Science.gov

Sample records for conserved folding mechanisms

  1. Redox cofactors insertion in prokaryotic molybdoenzymes occurs via a conserved folding mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Cartin, Rodrigo; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Frick, Klaudia; Blanc, Jean-Michel; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Walburger, Anne; Grimaldi, Stéphane; Friedrich, Thorsten; Receveur-Brechot, Véronique; Magalon, Axel

    2016-01-01

    A major gap of knowledge in metalloproteins is the identity of the prefolded state of the protein before cofactor insertion. This holds for molybdoenzymes serving multiple purposes for life, especially in energy harvesting. This large group of prokaryotic enzymes allows for coordination of molybdenum or tungsten cofactors (Mo/W-bisPGD) and Fe/S clusters. Here we report the structural data on a cofactor-less enzyme, the nitrate reductase respiratory complex and characterize the conformational changes accompanying Mo/W-bisPGD and Fe/S cofactors insertion. Identified conformational changes are shown to be essential for recognition of the dedicated chaperone involved in cofactors insertion. A solvent-exposed salt bridge is shown to play a key role in enzyme folding after cofactors insertion. Furthermore, this salt bridge is shown to be strictly conserved within this prokaryotic molybdoenzyme family as deduced from a phylogenetic analysis issued from 3D structure-guided multiple sequence alignment. A biochemical analysis with a distantly-related member of the family, respiratory complex I, confirmed the critical importance of the salt bridge for folding. Overall, our results point to a conserved cofactors insertion mechanism within the Mo/W-bisPGD family. PMID:27886223

  2. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  3. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  4. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  5. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  6. Protein Folding and Mechanisms of Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Villanueva, José Fernando; Díaz-Molina, Raúl; García-González, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Highly sophisticated mechanisms that modulate protein structure and function, which involve synthesis and degradation, have evolved to maintain cellular homeostasis. Perturbations in these mechanisms can lead to protein dysfunction as well as deleterious cell processes. Therefore in recent years the etiology of a great number of diseases has been attributed to failures in mechanisms that modulate protein structure. Interconnections among metabolic and cell signaling pathways are critical for homeostasis to converge on mechanisms associated with protein folding as well as for the preservation of the native structure of proteins. For instance, imbalances in secretory protein synthesis pathways lead to a condition known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which elicits the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR). Therefore, taking this into consideration, a key part of this paper is developed around the protein folding phenomenon, and cellular mechanisms which support this pivotal condition. We provide an overview of chaperone protein function, UPR via, spatial compartmentalization of protein folding, proteasome role, autophagy, as well as the intertwining between these processes. Several diseases are known to have a molecular etiology in the malfunction of mechanisms responsible for protein folding and in the shielding of native structure, phenomena which ultimately lead to misfolded protein accumulation. This review centers on our current knowledge about pathways that modulate protein folding, and cell responses involved in protein homeostasis. PMID:26225966

  7. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  8. Protein folding and misfolding: mechanism and principles.

    PubMed

    Englander, S Walter; Mayne, Leland; Krishna, Mallela M G

    2007-11-01

    Two fundamentally different views of how proteins fold are now being debated. Do proteins fold through multiple unpredictable routes directed only by the energetically downhill nature of the folding landscape or do they fold through specific intermediates in a defined pathway that systematically puts predetermined pieces of the target native protein into place? It has now become possible to determine the structure of protein folding intermediates, evaluate their equilibrium and kinetic parameters, and establish their pathway relationships. Results obtained for many proteins have serendipitously revealed a new dimension of protein structure. Cooperative structural units of the native protein, called foldons, unfold and refold repeatedly even under native conditions. Much evidence obtained by hydrogen exchange and other methods now indicates that cooperative foldon units and not individual amino acids account for the unit steps in protein folding pathways. The formation of foldons and their ordered pathway assembly systematically puts native-like foldon building blocks into place, guided by a sequential stabilization mechanism in which prior native-like structure templates the formation of incoming foldons with complementary structure. Thus the same propensities and interactions that specify the final native state, encoded in the amino-acid sequence of every protein, determine the pathway for getting there. Experimental observations that have been interpreted differently, in terms of multiple independent pathways, appear to be due to chance misfolding errors that cause different population fractions to block at different pathway points, populate different pathway intermediates, and fold at different rates. This paper summarizes the experimental basis for these three determining principles and their consequences. Cooperative native-like foldon units and the sequential stabilization process together generate predetermined stepwise pathways. Optional misfolding errors

  9. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    DOEpatents

    Markley, Finley W.

    1976-01-01

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  10. Modelling RNA folding under mechanical tension

    PubMed Central

    VIEREGG, JEFFREY R.; TINOCO, IGNACIO

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA unfolding and refolding under mechanical tension. The hierarchical nature of RNA structure and the existence of thermodynamic parameters for base pair formation based on nearest-neighbour interactions allows modelling of sequence-dependent folding dynamics for any secondary structure. We calculate experimental observables such as the transition force for unfolding, the end-to-end distribution function and its variance, as well as kinetic information, for a representative RNA sequence and for a sequence containing two homopolymer segments: A.U and G.C. PMID:16969426

  11. Evolutionarily conserved linkage between enzyme fold, flexibility, and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are intrinsically flexible molecules. The role of internal motions in a protein's designated function is widely debated. The role of protein structure in enzyme catalysis is well established, and conservation of structural features provides vital clues to their role in function. Recently, it has been proposed that the protein function may involve multiple conformations: the observed deviations are not random thermodynamic fluctuations; rather, flexibility may be closely linked to protein function, including enzyme catalysis. We hypothesize that the argument of conservation of important structural features can also be extended to identification of protein flexibility in interconnection with enzyme function. Three classes of enzymes (prolyl-peptidyl isomerase, oxidoreductase, and nuclease) that catalyze diverse chemical reactions have been examined using detailed computational modeling. For each class, the identification and characterization of the internal protein motions coupled to the chemical step in enzyme mechanisms in multiple species show identical enzyme conformational fluctuations. In addition to the active-site residues, motions of protein surface loop regions (>10 away) are observed to be identical across species, and networks of conserved interactions/residues connect these highly flexible surface regions to the active-site residues that make direct contact with substrates. More interestingly, examination of reaction-coupled motions in non-homologous enzyme systems (with no structural or sequence similarity) that catalyze the same biochemical reaction shows motions that induce remarkably similar changes in the enzyme substrate interactions during catalysis. The results indicate that the reaction-coupled flexibility is a conserved aspect of the enzyme molecular architecture. Protein motions in distal areas of homologous and non-homologous enzyme systems mediate similar changes in the active-site enzyme substrate interactions, thereby impacting

  12. Evolutionarily conserved linkage between enzyme fold, flexibility, and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2011-11-01

    Proteins are intrinsically flexible molecules. The role of internal motions in a protein's designated function is widely debated. The role of protein structure in enzyme catalysis is well established, and conservation of structural features provides vital clues to their role in function. Recently, it has been proposed that the protein function may involve multiple conformations: the observed deviations are not random thermodynamic fluctuations; rather, flexibility may be closely linked to protein function, including enzyme catalysis. We hypothesize that the argument of conservation of important structural features can also be extended to identification of protein flexibility in interconnection with enzyme function. Three classes of enzymes (prolyl-peptidyl isomerase, oxidoreductase, and nuclease) that catalyze diverse chemical reactions have been examined using detailed computational modeling. For each class, the identification and characterization of the internal protein motions coupled to the chemical step in enzyme mechanisms in multiple species show identical enzyme conformational fluctuations. In addition to the active-site residues, motions of protein surface loop regions (>10 Å away) are observed to be identical across species, and networks of conserved interactions/residues connect these highly flexible surface regions to the active-site residues that make direct contact with substrates. More interestingly, examination of reaction-coupled motions in non-homologous enzyme systems (with no structural or sequence similarity) that catalyze the same biochemical reaction shows motions that induce remarkably similar changes in the enzyme-substrate interactions during catalysis. The results indicate that the reaction-coupled flexibility is a conserved aspect of the enzyme molecular architecture. Protein motions in distal areas of homologous and non-homologous enzyme systems mediate similar changes in the active-site enzyme-substrate interactions, thereby impacting

  13. Thermal and mechanical multistate folding of ribonuclease H.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Terry J; Clark, Jonathan E; Knotts, Thomas A

    2009-12-21

    Two different classes of experimental techniques exist by which protein folding mechanisms are ascertained. The first class, of which circular dichroism is an example, probes thermally-induced folding. The second class, which includes atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers, measures mechanically-induced folding. In this article, we investigate if proteins fold/unfold via the same mechanisms both thermally and mechanically. We do so using Ribonuclease H, a protein that has been shown to fold through a three-state mechanism using both types of experimental techniques. A detailed, molecular-level description of the states involved in thermal and mechanical folding shows that mechanisms for both types are globally similar, but small difference exist in the most unfolded conformations. Comparison to previous work suggests a universal folding behavior for proteins with a core helical bundle.

  14. Thermal and mechanical multistate folding of ribonuclease H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Terry J.; Clark, Jonathan E.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2009-12-01

    Two different classes of experimental techniques exist by which protein folding mechanisms are ascertained. The first class, of which circular dichroism is an example, probes thermally-induced folding. The second class, which includes atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers, measures mechanically-induced folding. In this article, we investigate if proteins fold/unfold via the same mechanisms both thermally and mechanically. We do so using Ribonuclease H, a protein that has been shown to fold through a three-state mechanism using both types of experimental techniques. A detailed, molecular-level description of the states involved in thermal and mechanical folding shows that mechanisms for both types are globally similar, but small difference exist in the most unfolded conformations. Comparison to previous work suggests a universal folding behavior for proteins with a core helical bundle.

  15. Energy conservation in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentis, Jeffrey J.; Fedak, William A.

    2004-05-01

    In the classical mechanics of conservative systems, the position and momentum evolve deterministically such that the sum of the kinetic energy and potential energy remains constant in time. This canonical trademark of energy conservation is absent in the standard presentations of quantum mechanics based on the Schrödinger picture. We present a purely canonical proof of energy conservation that focuses exclusively on the time-dependent position x(t) and momentum p(t) operators. This treatment of energy conservation serves as an introduction to the Heisenberg picture and illuminates the classical-quantum connection. We derive a quantum-mechanical work-energy theorem and show explicitly how the time dependence of x and p and the noncommutivity of x and p conspire to bring about a perfect temporal balance between the evolving kinetic and potential parts of the total energy operator.

  16. Osmolyte-induced folding of an intrinsically disordered protein: folding mechanism in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chu; Oas, Terrence G

    2010-06-29

    Understanding the interconversion between thermodynamically distinguishable states present in a protein folding pathway provides not only the kinetics and energetics of protein folding but also insights into the functional roles of these states in biological systems. The protein component of the bacterial RNase P holoenzyme from Bacillus subtilis (P protein) was previously shown to be unfolded in the absence of its cognate RNA or other anionic ligands. P protein was used in this study as a model system to explore general features of intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) folding mechanisms. The use of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), an osmolyte that stabilizes the unliganded folded form of the protein, enabled us to study the folding process of P protein in the absence of ligand. Transient stopped-flow kinetic traces at various final TMAO concentrations exhibited multiphasic kinetics. Equilibrium "cotitration" experiments were performed using both TMAO and urea during the titration to produce a urea-TMAO titration surface of P protein. Both kinetic and equilibrium studies show evidence of a previously undetected intermediate state in the P protein folding process. The intermediate state is significantly populated, and the folding rate constants are relatively slow compared to those of intrinsically folded proteins similar in size and topology. The experiments and analysis described serve as a useful example for mechanistic folding studies of other IDPs.

  17. Mechanical development of folded chert beds in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, D.; Snyder, W.S.

    1988-03-01

    Small-scale folds in the upper siliceous facies of the Miocene Monterey Formation, at Lions Head, California (Santa Maria basin) are of tectonic origin. Folding is well developed in the chert-dominated zones and dies out rapidly in the adjacent siliceous mudstones. A tectonic origin is evidenced by the dominantly brittle deformation of the competent chert layers. Mechanically, the folds formed through a complex interrelationship between fracture and flexural slip. Opal-CT and quartz-chert layers display brittle fractures and rotated fracture blocks that responded to shortening. Thrusting of the chert layers is common in folds where fold propagation was impeded. Dilation breccia and void space occur in the hinges and reflect room problems during development of these disharmonic folds. Subsequent diagenesis has partially healed the fractures and slip surfaces, creating the erroneous appearance that ductile deformation was an important factor in the formation of the folds.

  18. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei; Forouhar, Farhad; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Tong, Liang; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.

  19. Mechanics of large folds in thin interfacial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, Vincent; Davidovitch, Benny; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2014-10-01

    A thin film confined to a liquid interface responds to uniaxial compression by wrinkling, and then by folding, that has been solved exactly before self-contact. Here, we address the mechanics of large folds, i.e., folds that absorb a length much larger than the wrinkle wavelength. With scaling arguments and numerical simulations, we show that the antisymmetric fold is energetically favorable and can absorb any excess length at zero pressure. Then, motivated by puzzles arising in the comparison of this simple model to experiments on lipid monolayers or capillary rafts, we discuss how to incorporate film weight, self-adhesion, or energy dissipation.

  20. $\\cN$-FOLD SUPERSYMMETRY IN QUANTUM MECHANICAL MATRIX MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

    We formulate Ņ-fold supersymmetry in quantum mechanical matrix models. As an example, we construct general two-by-two Hermitian matrix two-fold supersymmetric quantum mechanical systems. We find that there are two inequivalent such systems, both of which are characterized by two arbitrary scalar functions, and one of which does not reduce to the scalar system. The obtained systems are all weakly quasi-solvable.

  1. Fold of the conserved DTC domain in deltex proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Walker, John R.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2012-04-30

    Human Deltex 3-like (DTX3L) is a member of the Deltex family of proteins. Initially identified as a B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein, DTX3L is an E3 ligase that regulates subcellular localization of its partner protein, BAL, by a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic trafficking mechanism. Unlike other members of the Deltex family of proteins, DTX3L lacks the highly basic N-terminal motif and the central proline-rich motif present in other Deltex proteins, and instead contains other unique N-terminal domains. The C-terminal domains are, however, homologous with other members of the Deltex family of proteins; these include a RING domain and a previously unidentified C-terminal domain. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of this previously uncharacterized C-terminal domain of human DTX3L, which we term the Deltex C-terminal domain.

  2. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms, and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J

    2014-12-31

    RNA hairpins play a pivotal role in a diverse range of cellular functions, and are integral components of ribozymes, mRNA, and riboswitches. However, the mechanistic and kinetic details of RNA hairpin folding, which are key determinants of most of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic detail. Our results show that the potential energy landscapes have a distinct funnel-like bias toward the folded hairpin state, consistent with efficient structure-seeking properties. Mechanistic and kinetic information is analyzed in terms of kinetic transition networks. We find microsecond folding times, consistent with temperature jump experiments, for hairpin folding initiated from relatively compact unfolded states. This process is essentially driven by an initial collapse, followed by rapid zippering of the helix stem in the final phase. Much lower folding rates are predicted when the folding is initiated from extended chains, which undergo longer excursions on the energy landscape before nucleation events can occur. Our work therefore explains recent experiments and coarse-grained simulations, where the folding kinetics exhibit precisely this dependency on the initial conditions.

  3. The X-38 V-201 Fin Fold Actuation Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupo, Christian; Robertson, Brandan; Gafka, George

    2004-01-01

    The X-38 Vehicle 201 (V-201) is a space flight prototype lifting body vehicle that was designed to launch to orbit in the Space Shuttle orbiter payload bay. Although the project was cancelled in May 2003, many of the systems were nearly complete. This paper will describe the fin folding actuation mechanism flight subsystems and development units as well as lessons learned in the design, assembly, development testing, and qualification testing. The two vertical tail fins must be stowed (folded inboard) to allow the orbiter payload bay doors to close. The fin folding actuation mechanism is a remotely or extravehicular activity (EVA) actuated single fault tolerant system consisting of seven subsystems capable of repeatedly deploying or stowing the fins.

  4. Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein fold usage and evolutionary implications

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2006-03-15

    Background: Determining the complete repertoire of proteinstructures for all soluble, globular proteins in a single organism hasbeen one of the major goals of several structural genomics projects inrecent years. Results: We report that this goal has nearly been reachedfor several "minimal organisms"--parasites or symbionts with reducedgenomes--for which over 95 percent of the soluble, globular proteins maynow be assigned folds, overall 3-D backbone structures. We analyze thestructures of these proteins as they relate to cellular functions, andcompare conservation off old usage between functional categories. We alsocompare patterns in the conservation off olds among minimal organisms andthose observed between minimal organisms and other bacteria. Conclusion:We find that proteins performing essential cellular functions closelyrelated to transcription and translation exhibit a higher degree ofconservation in fold usage than proteins in other functional categories.Folds related to transcription and translation functional categories werealso over represented in minimal organisms compared to otherbacteria.

  5. Ring Separation Highlights the Protein-Folding Mechanism Used by the Phage EL-Encoded Chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Sudheer K; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Morgan, David Gene; Sherman, Michael B; He, Lilin; Georgopoulos, Costa; Sernova, Natalia V; Kurochkina, Lidia P; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2016-04-05

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous, ATP-dependent protein-folding molecular machines that are essential for all forms of life. Bacteriophage φEL encodes its own chaperonin to presumably fold exceedingly large viral proteins via profoundly different nucleotide-binding conformations. Our structural investigations indicate that ATP likely binds to both rings simultaneously and that a misfolded substrate acts as the trigger for ATP hydrolysis. More importantly, the φEL complex dissociates into two single rings resulting from an evolutionarily altered residue in the highly conserved ATP-binding pocket. Conformational changes also more than double the volume of the single-ring internal chamber such that larger viral proteins are accommodated. This is illustrated by the fact that φEL is capable of folding β-galactosidase, a 116-kDa protein. Collectively, the architecture and protein-folding mechanism of the φEL chaperonin are significantly different from those observed in group I and II chaperonins.

  6. Common folds and transport mechanisms of secondary active transporters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yigong

    2013-01-01

    Secondary active transporters exploit the electrochemical potential of solutes to shuttle specific substrate molecules across biological membranes, usually against their concentration gradient. Transporters of different functional families with little sequence similarity have repeatedly been found to exhibit similar folds, exemplified by the MFS, LeuT, and NhaA folds. Observations of multiple conformational states of the same transporter, represented by the LeuT superfamily members Mhp1, AdiC, vSGLT, and LeuT, led to proposals that structural changes are associated with substrate binding and transport. Despite recent biochemical and structural advances, our understanding of substrate recognition and energy coupling is rather preliminary. This review focuses on the common folds and shared transport mechanisms of secondary active transporters. Available structural information generally supports the alternating access model for substrate transport, with variations and extensions made by emerging structural, biochemical, and computational evidence.

  7. Statistical mechanics of simple models of protein folding and design.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, V S; Grosberg, A Y; Tanaka, T

    1997-01-01

    It is now believed that the primary equilibrium aspects of simple models of protein folding are understood theoretically. However, current theories often resort to rather heavy mathematics to overcome some technical difficulties inherent in the problem or start from a phenomenological model. To this end, we take a new approach in this pedagogical review of the statistical mechanics of protein folding. The benefit of our approach is a drastic mathematical simplification of the theory, without resort to any new approximations or phenomenological prescriptions. Indeed, the results we obtain agree precisely with previous calculations. Because of this simplification, we are able to present here a thorough and self contained treatment of the problem. Topics discussed include the statistical mechanics of the random energy model (REM), tests of the validity of REM as a model for heteropolymer freezing, freezing transition of random sequences, phase diagram of designed ("minimally frustrated") sequences, and the degree to which errors in the interactions employed in simulations of either folding and design can still lead to correct folding behavior. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:9414231

  8. The structure of a conserved piezo channel domain reveals a topologically distinct β sandwich fold.

    PubMed

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens T; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C

    2014-10-07

    Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2,000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a topologically distinct β sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be-identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

  9. Insights into Coupled Folding and Binding Mechanisms from Kinetic Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Michael D.; Dahal, Liza; Wicky, Basile I. M.; Clarke, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by a lack of persistent structure. Since their identification more than a decade ago, many questions regarding their functional relevance and interaction mechanisms remain unanswered. Although most experiments have taken equilibrium and structural perspectives, fewer studies have investigated the kinetics of their interactions. Here we review and highlight the type of information that can be gained from kinetic studies. In particular, we show how kinetic studies of coupled folding and binding reactions, an important class of signaling event, are needed to determine mechanisms. PMID:26851275

  10. The shape and mechanics of curved-fold origami structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-12-01

    We develop recursion equations to describe the three-dimensional shape of a sheet upon which a series of concentric curved folds have been inscribed. In the case of no stretching outside the fold, the three-dimensional shape of a single fold prescribes the shape of the entire origami structure. To better explore these structures, we derive continuum equations, valid in the limit of vanishing spacing between folds, to describe the smooth surface intersecting all the mountain folds. We find that this surface has negative Gaussian curvature with magnitude equal to the square of the fold's torsion. A series of open folds with constant fold angle generate a helicoid.

  11. The highly conserved nuclear lamin Ig-fold binds to PCNA: its role in DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Shumaker, Dale K.; Solimando, Liliana; Sengupta, Kaushik; Shimi, Takeshi; Adam, Stephen A.; Grunwald, Antje; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Aebi, Ueli; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Goldman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides insights into the role of nuclear lamins in DNA replication. Our data demonstrate that the Ig-fold motif located in the lamin C terminus binds directly to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor necessary for the chain elongation phase of DNA replication. We find that the introduction of a mutation in the Ig-fold, which alters its structure and causes human muscular dystrophy, inhibits PCNA binding. Studies of nuclear assembly and DNA replication show that lamins, PCNA, and chromatin are closely associated in situ. Exposure of replicating nuclei to an excess of the lamin domain containing the Ig-fold inhibits DNA replication in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibitory effect is significantly diminished in nuclei exposed to the same domain bearing the Ig-fold mutation. Using the crystal structures of the lamin Ig-fold and PCNA, molecular docking simulations suggest probable interaction sites. These findings also provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the numerous disease-causing mutations located within the lamin Ig-fold. PMID:18426975

  12. Role of mechanical factors in cortical folding development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Zhang, Tuo; Li, Xiao; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-01

    Deciphering mysteries of the structure-function relationship in cortical folding has emerged as the cynosure of recent research on brain. Understanding the mechanism of convolution patterns can provide useful insight into the normal and pathological brain function. However, despite decades of speculation and endeavors the underlying mechanism of the brain folding process remains poorly understood. This paper focuses on the three-dimensional morphological patterns of a developing brain under different tissue specification assumptions via theoretical analyses, computational modeling, and experiment verifications. The living human brain is modeled with a soft structure having outer cortex and inner core to investigate the brain development. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into the critical growth ratio for instability and crease formation of the developing brain followed by computational modeling as a way to offer clues for brain's postbuckling morphology. Especially, tissue geometry, growth ratio, and material properties of the cortex are explored as the most determinant parameters to control the morphogenesis of a growing brain model. As indicated in results, compressive residual stresses caused by the sufficient growth trigger instability and the brain forms highly convoluted patterns wherein its gyrification degree is specified with the cortex thickness. Morphological patterns of the developing brain predicted from the computational modeling are consistent with our neuroimaging observations, thereby clarifying, in part, the reason of some classical malformation in a developing brain.

  13. Conserved thioredoxin fold is present in Pisum sativum L. sieve element occlusion-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Umate, Pavan; Tuteja, Renu

    2010-06-01

    Homology-based three-dimensional model for Pisum sativum sieve element occlusion 1 (Ps.SEO1) (forisomes) protein was constructed. A stretch of amino acids (residues 320 to 456) which is well conserved in all known members of forisomes proteins was used to model the 3D structure of Ps.SEO1. The structural prediction was done using Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (PHYRE) web server. Based on studies of local sequence alignment, the thioredoxin-fold containing protein [Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) code d1o73a_], a member of the glutathione peroxidase family was selected as a template for modeling the spatial structure of Ps.SEO1. Selection was based on comparison of primary sequence, higher match quality and alignment accuracy. Motif 1 (EVF) is conserved in Ps.SEO1, Vicia faba (Vf.For1) and Medicago truncatula (Mt.SEO3); motif 2 (KKED) is well conserved across all forisomes proteins and motif 3 (IGYIGNP) is conserved in Ps.SEO1 and Vf.For1.

  14. Folding mechanism of a multiple independently-folding domain protein: double B domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Hammes, Gordon G; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-10-10

    The antibody binding properties of staphylococcal protein A (SpA) can be attributed to the presence of five highly homologous domains (E, D, A, B, and C). Although the folding of the B domain of protein A (BdpA) is well-characterized, the folding behavior of this domain in the context of full-length SpA in the cell remains unexplored. The sequence of the B domain is 89 and 91% identical to those of domains A and C, respectively. We have fused B domain sequences (BBdpA) as a close approximation of the A-B or B-C portion of SpA. Circular dichroism and fluorescence-detected denaturation curves of BBdpA are experimentally indistinguishable from those of BdpA. The rate constants for folding and unfolding from NMR line shape analysis for the single- and double-domain proteins are the same within experimental uncertainties (+/-20%). These results support the designation of SpA as a multiple independently-folding domain (MIFD) protein. We develop a mathematical model that describes the folding thermodynamics and kinetics of MIFD proteins. The model depicts MIFD protein folding and unfolding as a parallel network and explicitly calculates the flux through all parallel pathways. These fluxes are combined to give a complete description of the global thermodynamics and kinetics of the folding and unfolding of MIFD proteins. The global rates for complete folding and unfolding of a MIFD protein and those of the individual domains depend on the stability of the protein. We show that the global unfolding rate of a MIFD protein may be many orders of magnitude slower than that of the constituent domains.

  15. Electrostatic mechanism of nucleosomal array folding revealed by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Qing; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-06-01

    Although numerous experiments indicate that the chromatin fiber displays salt-dependent conformations, the associated molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we apply an irregular Discrete Surface Charge Optimization (DiSCO) model of the nucleosome with all histone tails incorporated to describe by Monte Carlo simulations salt-dependent rearrangements of a nucleosomal array with 12 nucleosomes. The ensemble of nucleosomal array conformations display salt-dependent condensation in good agreement with hydrodynamic measurements and suggest that the array adopts highly irregular 3D zig-zag conformations at high (physiological) salt concentrations and transitions into the extended "beads-on-a-string" conformation at low salt. Energy analyses indicate that the repulsion among linker DNA leads to this extended form, whereas internucleosome attraction drives the folding at high salt. The balance between these two contributions determines the salt-dependent condensation. Importantly, the internucleosome and linker DNA-nucleosome attractions require histone tails; we find that the H3 tails, in particular, are crucial for stabilizing the moderately folded fiber at physiological monovalent salt. chromatin modeling | irregular 3D zig-zag | Discrete Surface Charge Optimization model

  16. Electrostatic mechanism of nucleosomal array folding revealed by computer simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Qing; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Although numerous experiments indicate that the chromatin fiber displays salt-dependent conformations, the associated molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we apply an irregular Discrete Surface Charge Optimization (DiSCO) model of the nucleosome with all histone tails incorporated to describe by Monte Carlo simulations salt-dependent rearrangements of a nucleosomal array with 12 nucleosomes. The ensemble of nucleosomal array conformations display salt-dependent condensation in good agreement with hydrodynamic measurements and suggest that the array adopts highly irregular 3D zig-zag conformations at high (physiological) salt concentrations and transitions into the extended “beads-on-a-string” conformation at low salt. Energy analyses indicate that the repulsion among linker DNA leads to this extended form, whereas internucleosome attraction drives the folding at high salt. The balance between these two contributions determines the salt-dependent condensation. Importantly, the internucleosome and linker DNA–nucleosome attractions require histone tails; we find that the H3 tails, in particular, are crucial for stabilizing the moderately folded fiber at physiological monovalent salt. PMID:15919827

  17. Spin glasses and the statistical mechanics of protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Bryngelson, J D; Wolynes, P G

    1987-01-01

    The theory of spin glasses was used to study a simple model of protein folding. The phase diagram of the model was calculated, and the results of dynamics calculations are briefly reported. The relation of these results to folding experiments, the relation of these hypotheses to previous protein folding theories, and the implication of these hypotheses for protein folding prediction schemes are discussed. PMID:3478708

  18. Conservation of Fold and Topology of Functional Elements in Thiamin Pyrophosphate Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2005-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent enzymes are a highly divergent family of proteins binding both TPP and metal ions. They perform decarboxylation-hydroxyaldehydes. Prior -ketoacids and of a common - (O=)C-C(OH)- fragment of to knowledge of three-dimensional structures of these enzmes, the GDGY25-30NN sequence was used to identify these enzymes. Subsequently, a number of structural studies on those enzymes revealed multi-subunit organization and the features of the two duplicate cofactor binding sites. Analyzing the structures of 44 structurally known enzymes, we found that the common structure of these enzymes is reduced to 180-220 amino acid long fragments of two PP and two PYR domains that form the [PP:PYR]2 binding center of two cofactor molecules. The structures of PP and PYR are arranged in a similar fold-sheet with triplets of helices on both sides.Dconsisting of a six-stranded Residues surrounding the cofactors are not strictly conserved, but they provide the same interatomic contacts required for the catalytic functions that these enzymes perform while maintaining interactive structural integrity. These structural and functional amino acids are topological counterparts located in the same positions of the conserved fold of sets of PP and PYR domains. Additional parallels include short fragments of sequences that link these amino acids to the fold and function. This report on the structural commonalities amongst TPP dependent enzymes is thought to contribute new approaches to annotation that may assist in advancing the functional proteomics of TPP dependent enzymes, and trace their complexity within evolutionary context.

  19. Conserved prosegment residues stabilize a late-stage folding transition state of pepsin independently of ground states.

    PubMed

    Dee, Derek R; Horimoto, Yasumi; Yada, Rickey Y

    2014-01-01

    The native folding of certain zymogen-derived enzymes is completely dependent upon a prosegment domain to stabilize the folding transition state, thereby catalyzing the folding reaction. Generally little is known about how the prosegment accomplishes this task. It was previously shown that the prosegment catalyzes a late-stage folding transition between a stable misfolded state and the native state of pepsin. In this study, the contributions of specific prosegment residues to catalyzing pepsin folding were investigated by introducing individual Ala substitutions and measuring the effects on the bimolecular folding reaction between the prosegment peptide and pepsin. The effects of mutations on the free energies of the individual misfolded and native ground states and the transition state were compared using measurements of prosegment-pepsin binding and folding kinetics. Five out of the seven prosegment residues examined yielded relatively large kinetic effects and minimal ground state perturbations upon mutation, findings which indicate that these residues form strengthened and/or non-native contacts in the transition state. These five residues are semi- to strictly conserved, while only a non-conserved residue had no kinetic effect. One conserved residue was shown to form native structure in the transition state. These results indicated that the prosegment, which is only 44 residues long, has evolved a high density of contacts that preferentially stabilize the folding transition state over the ground states. It is postulated that the prosegment forms extensive non-native contacts during the process of catalyzing correct inter- and intra-domain contacts during the final stages of folding. These results have implications for understanding the folding of multi-domain proteins and for the evolution of prosegment-catalyzed folding.

  20. When fast is better: protein folding fundamentals and mechanisms from ultrafast approaches

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Victor; Cerminara, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Protein folding research stalled for decades because conventional experiments indicated that proteins fold slowly and in single strokes, whereas theory predicted a complex interplay between dynamics and energetics resulting in myriad microscopic pathways. Ultrafast kinetic methods turned the field upside down by providing the means to probe fundamental aspects of folding, test theoretical predictions and benchmark simulations. Accordingly, experimentalists could measure the timescales for all relevant folding motions, determine the folding speed limit and confirm that folding barriers are entropic bottlenecks. Moreover, a catalogue of proteins that fold extremely fast (microseconds) could be identified. Such fast-folding proteins cross shallow free energy barriers or fold downhill, and thus unfold with minimal co-operativity (gradually). A new generation of thermodynamic methods has exploited this property to map folding landscapes, interaction networks and mechanisms at nearly atomic resolution. In parallel, modern molecular dynamics simulations have finally reached the timescales required to watch fast-folding proteins fold and unfold in silico. All of these findings have buttressed the fundamentals of protein folding predicted by theory, and are now offering the first glimpses at the underlying mechanisms. Fast folding appears to also have functional implications as recent results connect downhill folding with intrinsically disordered proteins, their complex binding modes and ability to moonlight. These connections suggest that the coupling between downhill (un)folding and binding enables such protein domains to operate analogically as conformational rheostats. PMID:27574021

  1. When fast is better: protein folding fundamentals and mechanisms from ultrafast approaches.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Victor; Cerminara, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Protein folding research stalled for decades because conventional experiments indicated that proteins fold slowly and in single strokes, whereas theory predicted a complex interplay between dynamics and energetics resulting in myriad microscopic pathways. Ultrafast kinetic methods turned the field upside down by providing the means to probe fundamental aspects of folding, test theoretical predictions and benchmark simulations. Accordingly, experimentalists could measure the timescales for all relevant folding motions, determine the folding speed limit and confirm that folding barriers are entropic bottlenecks. Moreover, a catalogue of proteins that fold extremely fast (microseconds) could be identified. Such fast-folding proteins cross shallow free energy barriers or fold downhill, and thus unfold with minimal co-operativity (gradually). A new generation of thermodynamic methods has exploited this property to map folding landscapes, interaction networks and mechanisms at nearly atomic resolution. In parallel, modern molecular dynamics simulations have finally reached the timescales required to watch fast-folding proteins fold and unfold in silico All of these findings have buttressed the fundamentals of protein folding predicted by theory, and are now offering the first glimpses at the underlying mechanisms. Fast folding appears to also have functional implications as recent results connect downhill folding with intrinsically disordered proteins, their complex binding modes and ability to moonlight. These connections suggest that the coupling between downhill (un)folding and binding enables such protein domains to operate analogically as conformational rheostats.

  2. The Fast-Folding Mechanism of Villin Headpiece Subdomain Studied by Multiscale Distributed Computing.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuhei; Kitao, Akio

    2012-01-10

    The fast-folding mechanism of a 35-residue mini-protein, villin headpiece subdomain (HP35), was investigated using folding free energy landscape analysis with the multiscale free energy landscape calculation method (MSFEL). A major and a minor folding pathway were deduced from the folding free energy landscape. In the major folding pathway, the formation of helices II and III was the rate-limiting step in the transition to an intermediate state, triggered by the folding of the PLWK motif. HP35 then folds into the native structure through the formation of the hydrophobic core located at the center of the three-helix bundle. Mutations in the motif and hydrophobic core that suppressed folding into the native state drastically changed the folding free energy landscape compared to the wild type protein. In the minor folding pathway, nucleation of the hydrophobic core preceded formation of the motif.

  3. Statistical mechanics of RNA folding: Importance of alphabet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Emberly, Eldon; Tang, Chao; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2003-10-01

    We construct a base-stacking model of RNA secondary-structure formation and use it to study the mapping from sequence to structure. There are strong, qualitative differences between two-letter and four- or six-letter alphabets. With only two kinds of bases, most sequences have many alternative folding configurations and are consequently thermally unstable. Stable ground states are found only for a small set of structures of high designability, i.e., total number of associated sequences. In contrast, sequences made from four bases, as found in nature, or six bases have far fewer competing folding configurations, resulting in a much greater average stability of the ground state.

  4. Mechanism of development of inversion folding in the subsalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunev, B. V.; Lapkovsky, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The numerical modeling of the Archimedean upwelling of a salt bed predicts that, with mature diapirs (from the finger stage and later), an about 2-km-thick zone of inversion (mirror) folding, where the suprasalt diapirs correspond to the subsalt synclines while the suprasalt inter-diapir sags correspond to the anticlines in the subsalt, should be expected immediately below the bottom of the salt deposits. These deformations decay with depth. The development of the inversion folding is exceptionally due to the flow caused by the rising of the unstable layer.

  5. Mechanical Modeling and Computer Simulation of Protein Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Scott, Gregory E.; Denos, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, science education and modern technology are bridged to teach students at the high school and undergraduate levels about protein folding and to strengthen their model building skills. Students are guided from a textbook picture of a protein as a rigid crystal structure to a more realistic view: proteins are highly dynamic…

  6. Evolution of ribonuclease in relation to polypeptide folding mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, E. A.; Cohen, M. S.; Gold, M. H.; Kim, J.-K.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons of the N-terminal region of pancreatic RNAase in seven species are presented, taking into account cow, bison, deer, rat, pig, kangaroo, and turtle. The available limited evidence on hypervariable regions indicates that there is still an evolutionary constraint on them. It is proposed that there is a selection pressure acting on all regions of a protein sequence in evolution. Mutations that tend to obstruct the folding process can lead to various intensities of selection pressure.

  7. The energy landscape of modular repeat proteins: topology determines folding mechanism in the ankyrin family.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Cho, Samuel S; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2005-12-02

    Proteins consisting of repeating amino acid motifs are abundant in all kingdoms of life, especially in higher eukaryotes. Repeat-containing proteins self-organize into elongated non-globular structures. Do the same general underlying principles that dictate the folding of globular domains apply also to these extended topologies? Using a simplified structure-based model capturing a perfectly funneled energy landscape, we surveyed the predicted mechanism of folding for ankyrin repeat containing proteins. The ankyrin family is one of the most extensively studied classes of non-globular folds. The model based only on native contacts reproduces most of the experimental observations on the folding of these proteins, including a folding mechanism that is reminiscent of a nucleation propagation growth. The confluence of simulation and experimental results suggests that the folding of non-globular proteins is accurately described by a funneled energy landscape, in which topology plays a determinant role in the folding mechanism.

  8. Mechanism of folding chamber closure in a group II chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Baker, Matthew L; Schröder, Gunnar F; Douglas, Nicholai R; Reissmann, Stefanie; Jakana, Joanita; Dougherty, Matthew; Fu, Caroline J; Levitt, Michael; Ludtke, Steven J; Frydman, Judith; Chiu, Wah

    2010-01-21

    Group II chaperonins are essential mediators of cellular protein folding in eukaryotes and archaea. These oligomeric protein machines, approximately 1 megadalton, consist of two back-to-back rings encompassing a central cavity that accommodates polypeptide substrates. Chaperonin-mediated protein folding is critically dependent on the closure of a built-in lid, which is triggered by ATP hydrolysis. The structural rearrangements and molecular events leading to lid closure are still unknown. Here we report four single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of Mm-cpn, an archaeal group II chaperonin, in the nucleotide-free (open) and nucleotide-induced (closed) states. The 4.3 A resolution of the closed conformation allowed building of the first ever atomic model directly from the single particle cryo-EM density map, in which we were able to visualize the nucleotide and more than 70% of the side chains. The model of the open conformation was obtained by using the deformable elastic network modelling with the 8 A resolution open-state cryo-EM density restraints. Together, the open and closed structures show how local conformational changes triggered by ATP hydrolysis lead to an alteration of intersubunit contacts within and across the rings, ultimately causing a rocking motion that closes the ring. Our analyses show that there is an intricate and unforeseen set of interactions controlling allosteric communication and inter-ring signalling, driving the conformational cycle of group II chaperonins. Beyond this, we anticipate that our methodology of combining single particle cryo-EM and computational modelling will become a powerful tool in the determination of atomic details involved in the dynamic processes of macromolecular machines in solution.

  9. Conserved tertiary couplings stabilize elements in the PDZ fold, leading to characteristic patterns of domain conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ho, Bosco K; Agard, David A

    2010-03-01

    Single-domain allostery has been postulated to occur through intramolecular pathways of signaling within a protein structure. We had previously investigated these pathways by introducing a local thermal perturbation and analyzed the anisotropic propagation of structural changes throughout the protein. Here, we develop an improved approach, the Rotamerically Induced Perturbation (RIP), that identifies strong couplings between residues by analyzing the pathways of heat-flow resulting from thermal excitation of rotameric rotations at individual residues. To explore the nature of these couplings, we calculate the complete coupling maps of 5 different PDZ domains. Although the PDZ domain is a well conserved structural fold that serves as a scaffold in many protein-protein complexes, different PDZ domains display unique patterns of conformational flexibility in response to ligand binding: some show a significant shift in a set of alpha-helices, while others do not. Analysis of the coupling maps suggests a simple relationship between the computed couplings and observed conformational flexibility. In domains where the alpha-helices are rigid, we find couplings of the alpha-helices to the body of the protein, whereas in domains having ligand-responsive alpha-helices, no couplings are found. This leads to a model where the alpha-helices are intrinsically dynamic but can be damped if sidechains interact at key tertiary contacts. These tertiary contacts correlate to high covariation contacts as identified by the statistical coupling analysis method. As these dynamic modules are exploited by various allosteric mechanisms, these tertiary contacts have been conserved by evolution.

  10. Direct observation of an ensemble of stable collapsed states in the mechanical folding of ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Dougan, Lorna; Badilla, Carmen L.; Brujić, Jasna; Fernández, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical theories of protein folding have long predicted plausible mechanisms for reducing the vast conformational space through distinct ensembles of structures. However, these predictions have remained untested by bulk techniques, because the conformational diversity of folding molecules has been experimentally unapproachable. Owing to recent advances in single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy, we are now able to probe the structure and dynamics of the small protein ubiquitin by measuring its length and mechanical stability during each stage of folding. Here, we discover that upon hydrophobic collapse, the protein rapidly selects a subset of minimum energy structures that are mechanically weak and essential precursors of the native fold. From this much reduced ensemble, the native state is acquired through a barrier-limited transition. Our results support the validity of statistical mechanics models in describing the folding of a small protein on biological timescales. PMID:19541635

  11. Characterization of protein folding by a Φ-value calculation with a statistical-mechanical model

    PubMed Central

    Wako, Hiroshi; Abe, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    The Φ-value analysis approach provides information about transition-state structures along the folding pathway of a protein by measuring the effects of an amino acid mutation on folding kinetics. Here we compared the theoretically calculated Φ values of 27 proteins with their experimentally observed Φ values; the theoretical values were calculated using a simple statistical-mechanical model of protein folding. The theoretically calculated Φ values reflected the corresponding experimentally observed Φ values with reasonable accuracy for many of the proteins, but not for all. The correlation between the theoretically calculated and experimentally observed Φ values strongly depends on whether the protein-folding mechanism assumed in the model holds true in real proteins. In other words, the correlation coefficient can be expected to illuminate the folding mechanisms of proteins, providing the answer to the question of which model more accurately describes protein folding: the framework model or the nucleation-condensation model. In addition, we tried to characterize protein folding with respect to various properties of each protein apart from the size and fold class, such as the free-energy profile, contact-order profile, and sensitivity to the parameters used in the Φ-value calculation. The results showed that any one of these properties alone was not enough to explain protein folding, although each one played a significant role in it. We have confirmed the importance of characterizing protein folding from various perspectives. Our findings have also highlighted that protein folding is highly variable and unique across different proteins, and this should be considered while pursuing a unified theory of protein folding.

  12. Bend, buckle, and fold: mechanical engineering with nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Rogers, John A

    2009-03-24

    Research on nanomembranes and graphene sheets represents the "third wave" of work on nanomaterials, following earlier studies of nanoparticles/fullerenes and, somewhat later, nanowires/nanotubes. Inorganic semiconductor nanomembranes are particularly appealing due to their materials diversity, the ease with which they can be grown with high quality over large areas, and the ability to exploit them in unique, high-performance electronic and optoelectronic systems. The mechanics of such nanomembranes and the coupling of strain to their electronic properties are topics of considerable current interest. A new paper by the Lagally group in this issue combines single-crystalline silicon nanomembranes with chemical vapor deposition techniques to form "mechano-electronic" superlattices whose properties could lead to unusual classes of electronic devices.

  13. Swelling and folding as mechanisms of 3D shape formation in thin elastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.

    We work with two different mechanisms to generate geometric frustration on thin elastic sheets; isotropic differential growth and folding. We describe how controlled growth and prescribing folding patterns are useful tools for designing three-dimensional objects from information printed in two dimensions. The first mechanism is inspired by the possibility to control shapes by swelling polymer films, where we propose a solution for the problem of shape formation by asking the question, “what 2D metric should be prescribed to achieve a given 3D shape?”', namely the reverse problem. We choose two different types of initial configurations of sheets, disk-like with one boundary and annular with two boundaries. We demonstrate our technique by choosing four examples of 3D axisymmetric shapes and finding the respective swelling factors to achieve the desired shape. Second, we present a mechanical model for a single curved fold that explains both the buckled shape of a closed fold and its mechanical stiffness. The buckling arises from the geometrical frustration between the prescribed crease angle and the bending energy of the sheet away from the crease. This frustration increases as the sheet's area increases. Stiff folds result in creases with constant space curvature while softer folds inherit the broken symmetry of the buckled shape. We extend the application of our numerical model to show the potential to study multiple fold structures.

  14. Selective constraints in conserved folded RNAs of drosophilid and hominid genomes.

    PubMed

    Piskol, Robert; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    Small noncoding RNAs as well as folded RNA structures in genic regions are crucial for many cellular processes. They are involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation (microRNAs), RNA modification (small nucleolar RNAs), regulation of splicing, correct localization of proteins, and many other processes. In most cases, a distinct secondary structure of the molecule is necessary for its correct function. Hence, selection should act to retain the structure of the molecule, although the underlying sequence is allowed to vary. Here, we present the first genome-wide estimates of selective constraints in folded RNA molecules in the nuclear genomes of drosophilids and hominids. In comparison to putatively neutrally evolving sites, we observe substantially reduced rates of substitutions at paired and unpaired sites of folded molecules. We estimated evolutionary constraints to be in the ranges of (0.974,0.991) and (0.895,1.000) for paired nucleotides in drosophilids and hominids, respectively. These values are significantly higher than for constraints at nonsynonymous sites of protein-coding genes in both genera. Nonetheless, valleys of only moderately reduced fitness (s ≈ 10(-4)) are sufficient to generate the observed fraction of nucleotide changes that are removed by purifying selection. In addition, a comparison of selective coefficients between drosophilids and hominids revealed significantly higher constraints in drosophilids, which can be attributed to the difference in long-term effective population size between these two groups of species. This difference is particularly apparent at the independently evolving (unpaired) sites.

  15. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  16. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan region of Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW trending, 55.5 km long cross section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross section has been constructed from field as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross section is used in a numerical finite element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian versus power law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement, affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  17. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan Region of Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, M.; Reif, D.; Grasemann, B.

    2012-04-01

    Our study compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross-sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW-trending, 55.5 km long cross-section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross-section has been constructed from field, as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip-domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross-section is used in a numerical finite-element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian vs. power-law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  18. Mechanical Folding and Unfolding of Protein Barnase at the Single-Molecule Level

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, Anna; Rey-Serra, Blanca; Frutos, Silvia; Cecconi, Ciro; Ritort, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The unfolding and folding of protein barnase has been extensively investigated in bulk conditions under the effect of denaturant and temperature. These experiments provided information about structural and kinetic features of both the native and the unfolded states of the protein, and debates about the possible existence of an intermediate state in the folding pathway have arisen. Here, we investigate the folding/unfolding reaction of protein barnase under the action of mechanical force at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers. We measure unfolding and folding force-dependent kinetic rates from pulling and passive experiments, respectively, and using Kramers-based theories (e.g., Bell-Evans and Dudko-Hummer-Szabo models), we extract the position of the transition state and the height of the kinetic barrier mediating unfolding and folding transitions, finding good agreement with previous bulk measurements. Measurements of the force-dependent kinetic barrier using the continuous effective barrier analysis show that protein barnase verifies the Leffler-Hammond postulate under applied force and allow us to extract its free energy of folding, ΔG0. The estimated value of ΔG0 is in agreement with our predictions obtained using fluctuation relations and previous bulk studies. To address the possible existence of an intermediate state on the folding pathway, we measure the power spectrum of force fluctuations at high temporal resolution (50 kHz) when the protein is either folded or unfolded and, additionally, we study the folding transition-path time at different forces. The finite bandwidth of our experimental setup sets the lifetime of potential intermediate states upon barnase folding/unfolding in the submillisecond timescale. PMID:26745410

  19. Critical State Finite Element Models of Contractional Fault-Related Folding: Structural and Mechanical Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertz, M.; Lingrey, S.; Sanz, P. F.

    2011-12-01

    Geometric/kinematic models of the common fault-related fold types (fault-bend, fault-propagation, detachment folding) typically assume a simplified flexural-slip based bed-parallel simple shear mechanism. The magnitude of local strain is a function of layer dip change irrespective of material properties. Line-lengths parallel to and layer thicknesses orthogonal to the flexural-slip surface remain constant. This study reports on a range of more complicated kinematic and mechanical responses observed in fourteen idealized forward numerical models of contractional fault-related folding. The models test the effects of material properties, initial fault dip, and the presence of weak inter-layer detachment horizons. We employ a Lagrangian finite element method with adaptive remeshing and a constitutive model that is based on critical state mechanics. This approach allows for large, volumetric deformation and realistic evolution of the failure envelope during progressive deformation. We demonstrate that material properties affect the way faults propagate and thus exert a significant control on resultant fold layer geometry. In most cases, these geometries differ from the flexural-slip based kinematic idealizations. For instance, models of uniform sandstone properties exhibit efficient strain localization and clear patterns of fault tip propagation. Uniform shale properties tends to inhibit fault propagation due to distributed plastic deformation. Models with mixed inter-layered sandstone and shale deform in a disharmonic manner, resembling lobate-cuspate arrangements that are common to many outcrop-scale folds. Inter-layer detachments accommodate shortening by bed-parallel slip, resulting in fault-bend fold kinematics, imbrication of sand layers, and a general absence of fault propagation across layers. Constant area based plane strain restoration of the deformed models recovers the first-order contractional deformation (80-90% of true contractional strain). Constant line

  20. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm--within a few percent--that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have…

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: The nucleation mechanism of protein folding: a survey of computer simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faísca, Patrícia F. N.

    2009-09-01

    The nucleation mechanism of protein folding, originally proposed by Baldwin in the early 1970s, was firstly observed by Shakhnovich and co-workers two decades later in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of a simple lattice model. At about the same time the extensive use of phi-value analysis provided the first experimental evidence that the folding of Chymotrypsin-inhibitor 2, a small single-domain protein, which folds with two-state kinetics, is also driven by a nucleation mechanism. Since then, the nucleation mechanism is generally considered the most common form of folding mechanism amongst two-state proteins. However, recent experimental data has put forward the idea that this may not necessarily be so, since the accuracy of the experimentally determined phi values, which are used to identify the critical (i.e. nucleating) residues, is typically poor. Here, we provide a survey of in silico results on the nucleation mechanism, ranging from simple lattice Monte Carlo to more sophisticated off-lattice molecular dynamics simulations, and discuss them in light of experimental data.

  2. Cyt toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis: a protein fold conserved in several pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; López-Díaz, Jazmin A; Bravo, Alejandra

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria produce different insecticidal proteins known as Cry and Cyt toxins. Among them the Cyt toxins represent a special and interesting group of proteins. Cyt toxins are able to affect insect midgut cells but also are able to increase the insecticidal damage of certain Cry toxins. Furthermore, the Cyt toxins are able to overcome resistance to Cry toxins in mosquitoes. There is an increasing potential for the use of Cyt toxins in insect control. However, we still need to learn more about its mechanism of action in order to define it at the molecular level. In this review we summarize important aspects of Cyt toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, including current knowledge of their mechanism of action against mosquitoes and also we will present a primary sequence and structural comparison with related proteins found in other pathogenic bacteria and fungus that may indicate that Cyt toxins have been selected by several pathogenic organisms to exert their virulence phenotypes.

  3. A histone-fold complex and FANCM form a conserved DNA-remodeling complex to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhijiang; Delannoy, Mathieu; Ling, Chen; Daee, Danielle; Osman, Fekret; Muniandy, Parameswary A; Shen, Xi; Oostra, Anneke B; Du, Hansen; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Lin, Ti; Schuster, Beatrice; Décaillet, Chantal; Stasiak, Andrzej; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stone, Stacie; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Schindler, Detlev; Woodcock, Christopher L; Joenje, Hans; Sen, Ranjan; de Winter, Johan P; Li, Lei; Seidman, Michael M; Whitby, Matthew C; Myung, Kyungjae; Constantinou, Angelos; Wang, Weidong

    2010-03-26

    FANCM remodels branched DNA structures and plays essential roles in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Here, we show that FANCM forms a conserved DNA-remodeling complex with a histone-fold heterodimer, MHF. We find that MHF stimulates DNA binding and replication fork remodeling by FANCM. In the cell, FANCM and MHF are rapidly recruited to forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks, and both are required for cellular resistance to such lesions. In vertebrates, FANCM-MHF associates with the Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, promotes FANCD2 monoubiquitination in response to DNA damage, and suppresses sister-chromatid exchanges. Yeast orthologs of these proteins function together to resist MMS-induced DNA damage and promote gene conversion at blocked replication forks. Thus, FANCM-MHF is an essential DNA-remodeling complex that protects replication forks from yeast to human.

  4. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  5. Surface folding in metals: a mechanism for delamination wear in sliding

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Anirban; Guo, Yang; Sundaram, Narayan K.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution, in situ imaging of a hard, wedge-shaped model asperity sliding against a metal surface, we demonstrate a new mechanism for particle formation and delamination wear. Damage to the residual surface is caused by the occurrence of folds on the free surface of the prow-shaped region ahead of the wedge. This damage manifests itself as shallow crack-like features and surface tears, which are inclined at very acute angles to the surface. The transformation of folds into cracks, tears and particles is directly captured. Notably, a single sliding pass is sufficient to damage the surface, and subsequent passes result in the generation of platelet-like wear particles. Tracking the folding process at every stage from surface bumps to folds to cracks/tears/particles ensures that there is no ambiguity in capturing the mechanism of wear. Because fold formation and consequent delamination are quite general, our findings have broad applicability beyond wear itself, including implications for design of surface generation and conditioning processes. PMID:25197251

  6. Mechanical restoration of large-scale folded multilayers using the finite element method: Application to the Zagros Simply Folded Belt, N-Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    There are a large number of numerical finite element studies concerned with modeling the evolution of folded geological layers through time. This body of research includes many aspects of folding and many different approaches, such as two- and three-dimensional studies, single-layer folding, detachment folding, development of chevron folds, Newtonian, power-law viscous and more complex rheologies, influence of anisotropy, pure-shear, simple-shear and other boundary conditions and so forth. In recent years, studies of multilayer folding emerged, thanks to more advanced mesh generator software and increased computational power. Common to all of these studies is the fact that they consider a forward directed time evolution, as in nature. Very few studies use the finite element method for reverse-time simulations. In such studies, folded geological layers are taken as initial conditions for the numerical simulation. The folding process is reversed by changing the signs of the boundary conditions that supposedly drove the folding process. In such studies, the geometry of the geological layers before the folding process is searched and the amount of shortening necessary for the final folded geometry can be calculated. In contrast to a kinematic or geometric fold restoration procedure, the described approach takes the mechanical behavior of the geological layers into account, such as rheology and the relative strength of the individual layers. This approach is therefore called mechanical restoration of folds. In this study, the concept of mechanical restoration is applied to a two-dimensional 50km long NE-SW-cross-section through the Zagros Simply Folded Belt in Iraqi Kurdistan, NE from the city of Erbil. The Simply Folded Belt is dominated by gentle to open folding and faults are either absent or record only minor offset. Therefore, this region is ideal for testing the concept of mechanical restoration. The profile used is constructed from structural field measurements

  7. Single-Molecule Chemo-Mechanical Spectroscopy Provides Structural Identity of Folding Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Hesam N.; Toptygin, Dmitri; Kaiser, Christian M.; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the folding of biological macromolecules. Mechanical manipulation has revealed a wealth of mechanistic information on transient and intermediate states. To date, the majority of state assignment of intermediates has relied on empirical demarcation. However, performing such experiments in the presence of different osmolytes provides an alternative approach that reports on the structural properties of intermediates. Here, we analyze the folding and unfolding of T4 lysozyme with optical tweezers under a chemo-mechanical perturbation by adding osmolytes. We find that two unrelated protective osmolytes, sorbitol and trimethylamine-n-oxide, function by marginally decelerating unfolding rates and specifically modulating early events in the folding process, stabilizing formation of an on-pathway intermediate. The chemo-mechanical perturbation provides access to two independent metrics of the relevant states during folding trajectories, the contour length, and the solvent-accessible surface area. We demonstrate that the dependence of the population of the intermediate in different osmolytes, in conjunction with its measured contour length, provides the ability to discriminate between potential structural models of intermediate states. Our study represents a general strategy that may be employed in the structural modeling of equilibrium intermediate states observed in single-molecule experiments. PMID:27028638

  8. A conserved Glu-Arg salt bridge connects co-evolved motifs that define the eukaryote protein kinase fold

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Wu, Jian; Steichen, Jon M.; Kornev, Alexandr P.; Deal, Michael S.; Li, Sheng; Sankaran, Banumathi; Woods, Virgil L.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases (EPK)feature two co-evolved structural segments, the Activation segment which starts with the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) and ends with the Ala-Pro-Glu (APE) motifs, and the helical GHI-subdomain that comprises αG-αH-αI helices. Eukaryotic-like kinases have a much shorter Activation segment and lack the GHI-subdomain. They thus lack the conserved salt bridge interaction between the APE Glu and an Arg from the GHI-subdomain, a hallmark signature of EPKs. Although the conservation of this salt bridge in EPKs is well known and its implication in diseases has been illustrated by polymorphism analysis, its function has not been carefully studied. In this work, we use murine cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) as the model enzyme (Glu208 and Arg280) to examine the role of these two residues. We showed that Ala replacement of either residue caused a 40–120 fold decrease in catalytic efficiency of the enzyme due to an increase in Km(ATP) and a decrease in kcat. Crystal structures, as well as solution studies, also demonstratethat this ion pair contributes to the hydrophobic network and stability of the enzyme. We show that mutation of either Glu or Arg to Ala renders bothmutant proteins less effective substrates for upstream kinase phosphoinositide dependent kinase 1. We propose that the Glu208-Arg280 pair serves as a center hub of connectivity between these two structurally conserved elements in EPKs. Mutations of either residue disrupt communication not only between the two segments but also within the rest of the molecule leading to altered catalytic activity and enzyme regulation. PMID:22138346

  9. Multiple-probe analysis of folding and unfolding pathways of human serum albumin. Evidence for a framework mechanism of folding.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Banerjee, Abhijit; Krishnakumar, Shyam Sundar; Rahaman, Obaidur; Panda, Dulal

    2004-05-01

    The changes in the far-UV CD signal, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and bilirubin absorbance showed that the guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced unfolding of a multidomain protein, human serum albumin (HSA), followed a two-state process. However, using environment sensitive Nile red fluorescence, the unfolding and folding pathways of HSA were found to follow a three-state process and an intermediate was detected in the range 0.25-1.5 m GdnHCl. The intermediate state displayed 45% higher fluorescence intensity than that of the native state. The increase in the Nile red fluorescence was found to be due to an increase in the quantum yield of the HSA-bound Nile red. Low concentrations of GdnHCl neither altered the binding affinity of Nile red to HSA nor induced the aggregation of HSA. In addition, the secondary structure of HSA was not perturbed during the first unfolding transition (<1.5 m GdnHCl); however, the secondary structure was completely lost during the second transition. The data together showed that the half maximal loss of the tertiary structure occurred at a lower GdnHCl concentration than the loss of the secondary structure. Further kinetic studies of the refolding process of HSA using multiple spectroscopic techniques showed that the folding occurred in two phases, a burst phase followed by a slow phase. An intermediate with native-like secondary structure but only a partial tertiary structure was found to form in the burst phase of refolding. Then, the intermediate slowly folded into the native state. An analysis of the refolding data suggested that the folding of HSA could be best explained by the framework model.

  10. Protein Folding Mechanism of the Dimeric AmphiphysinII/Bin1 N-BAR Domain.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Tobias; Balbach, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The human AmphyphisinII/Bin1 N-BAR domain belongs to the BAR domain superfamily, whose members sense and generate membrane curvatures. The N-BAR domain is a 57 kDa homodimeric protein comprising a six helix bundle. Here we report the protein folding mechanism of this protein as a representative of this protein superfamily. The concentration dependent thermodynamic stability was studied by urea equilibrium transition curves followed by fluorescence and far-UV CD spectroscopy. Kinetic unfolding and refolding experiments, including rapid double and triple mixing techniques, allowed to unravel the complex folding behavior of N-BAR. The equilibrium unfolding transition curve can be described by a two-state process, while the folding kinetics show four refolding phases, an additional burst reaction and two unfolding phases. All fast refolding phases show a rollover in the chevron plot but only one of these phases depends on the protein concentration reporting the dimerization step. Secondary structure formation occurs during the three fast refolding phases. The slowest phase can be assigned to a proline isomerization. All kinetic experiments were also followed by fluorescence anisotropy detection to verify the assignment of the dimerization step to the respective folding phase. Based on these experiments we propose for N-BAR two parallel folding pathways towards the homodimeric native state depending on the proline conformation in the unfolded state.

  11. Conservation of Mechanical Energy Using Dry Ice Slider-Projectiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Jenna; Baker, Blane

    2008-01-01

    Energy concepts are fundamentally important for describing and analyzing systems ranging from subatomic particles to spiral galaxies. In general, students first encounter such concepts in introductory courses that typically focus on forms of energy, energy transfer, and conservation laws. Within these courses, conservation of mechanical energy is…

  12. A Conserved Mechanism for Sulfonucleotide Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kate S; Gao, Hong; Chen, Huiyi; Stout, C. David; Leary, Julie A

    2005-01-01

    Sulfonucleotide reductases are a diverse family of enzymes that catalyze the first committed step of reductive sulfur assimilation. In this reaction, activated sulfate in the context of adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (APS) or 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) is converted to sulfite with reducing equivalents from thioredoxin. The sulfite generated in this reaction is utilized in bacteria and plants for the eventual production of essential biomolecules such as cysteine and coenzyme A. Humans do not possess a homologous metabolic pathway, and thus, these enzymes represent attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we studied the mechanism of sulfonucleotide reduction by APS reductase from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, using a combination of mass spectrometry and biochemical approaches. The results support the hypothesis of a two-step mechanism in which the sulfonucleotide first undergoes rapid nucleophilic attack to form an enzyme-thiosulfonate (E-Cys-S-SO3 −) intermediate. Sulfite is then released in a thioredoxin-dependent manner. Other sulfonucleotide reductases from structurally divergent subclasses appear to use the same mechanism, suggesting that this family of enzymes has evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:16008502

  13. Mechanism of Coupled Folding and Binding in the siRNA-PAZ Complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Feng

    2008-08-01

    The PAZ domain plays a key role in gene silencing pathway. The PAZ domain binds with siRNAs to form the multimeric RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC identifies mRNAs homologous to the siRNAs and promotes their degradation. It was found that binding with siRNA significantly enhances apo-PAZ folding. However, the mechanism by which folding is coupled to binding is poorly understood. Thus, the coupling relationship between binding and folding is very important for understanding the function of gene silencing. We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) of both bound and apo-PAZ to study the coupling mechanism between binding and folding in the siRNA-PAZ complex. Room-temperature MD simulations suggest that both PAZ and siRNA become more rigid and stable upon siRNA binding. Kinetic analysis of high-temperature MD simulations shows that both bound and apo-PAZ unfold via a two-state process. The unfolding pathways are different between bound and apo-PAZ: the order of helix III and helices I & II unfolding is switched. Furthermore, transition probability was used to determine the transition state ensemble for both bound and apo-PAZ. It was found that the transition state of bound PAZ is more compact than that of apo-PAZ. The predicted Φ-values suggest that the Φ-values of helix III and sheets of β3-β7 for bound PAZ are more native-like than those of apo-PAZ upon the binding of siRNA. The results can help us to understand the mechanism of gene silencing.

  14. Fractal features of a crumpling network in randomly folded thin matter and mechanics of sheet crushing.

    PubMed

    Balankin, Alexander S; Horta Rangel, Antonio; García Pérez, Gregorio; Gayosso Martinez, Felipe; Sanchez Chavez, Hugo; Martínez-González, Claudia L

    2013-05-01

    We study the static and dynamic properties of networks of crumpled creases formed in hand crushed sheets of paper. The fractal dimensionalities of crumpling networks in the unfolded (flat) and folded configurations are determined. Some other noteworthy features of crumpling networks are established. The physical implications of these findings are discussed. Specifically, we state that self-avoiding interactions introduce a characteristic length scale of sheet crumpling. A framework to model the crumpling phenomena is suggested. Mechanics of sheet crushing under external confinement is developed. The effect of compaction geometry on the crushing mechanics is revealed.

  15. Fractal features of a crumpling network in randomly folded thin matter and mechanics of sheet crushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Horta Rangel, Antonio; García Pérez, Gregorio; Gayosso Martinez, Felipe; Sanchez Chavez, Hugo; Martínez-González, Claudia L.

    2013-05-01

    We study the static and dynamic properties of networks of crumpled creases formed in hand crushed sheets of paper. The fractal dimensionalities of crumpling networks in the unfolded (flat) and folded configurations are determined. Some other noteworthy features of crumpling networks are established. The physical implications of these findings are discussed. Specifically, we state that self-avoiding interactions introduce a characteristic length scale of sheet crumpling. A framework to model the crumpling phenomena is suggested. Mechanics of sheet crushing under external confinement is developed. The effect of compaction geometry on the crushing mechanics is revealed.

  16. Applied origami. Using origami design principles to fold reprogrammable mechanical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jesse L; Evans, Arthur A; McLeod, Lauren; Hayward, Ryan C; Hull, Thomas; Santangelo, Christian D; Cohen, Itai

    2014-08-08

    Although broadly admired for its aesthetic qualities, the art of origami is now being recognized also as a framework for mechanical metamaterial design. Working with the Miura-ori tessellation, we find that each unit cell of this crease pattern is mechanically bistable, and by switching between states, the compressive modulus of the overall structure can be rationally and reversibly tuned. By virtue of their interactions, these mechanically stable lattice defects also lead to emergent crystallographic structures such as vacancies, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Each of these structures comes from an arrangement of reversible folds, highlighting a connection between mechanical metamaterials and programmable matter. Given origami's scale-free geometric character, this framework for metamaterial design can be directly transferred to milli-, micro-, and nanometer-size systems.

  17. A β-Mannanase with a Lysozyme-like Fold and a Novel Molecular Catalytic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Petricevic, Marija; John, Alan; Raich, Lluís; Jenkins, Huw; Portela De Souza, Leticia; Cuskin, Fiona; Gilbert, Harry J; Rovira, Carme; Goddard-Borger, Ethan D; Williams, Spencer J; Davies, Gideon J

    2016-12-28

    The enzymatic cleavage of β-1,4-mannans is achieved by endo-β-1,4-mannanases, enzymes involved in germination of seeds and microbial hemicellulose degradation, and which have increasing industrial and consumer product applications. β-Mannanases occur in a range of families of the CAZy sequence-based glycoside hydrolase (GH) classification scheme including families 5, 26, and 113. In this work we reveal that β-mannanases of the newly described GH family 134 differ from other mannanase families in both their mechanism and tertiary structure. A representative GH family 134 endo-β-1,4-mannanase from a Streptomyces sp. displays a fold closely related to that of hen egg white lysozyme but acts with inversion of stereochemistry. A Michaelis complex with mannopentaose, and a product complex with mannotriose, reveal ligands with pyranose rings distorted in an unusual inverted chair conformation. Ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics quantified the energetically accessible ring conformations and provided evidence in support of a (1)C4 → (3)H4(‡) → (3)S1 conformational itinerary along the reaction coordinate. This work, in concert with that on GH family 124 cellulases, reveals how the lysozyme fold can be co-opted to catalyze the hydrolysis of different polysaccharides in a mechanistically distinct manner.

  18. A β-Mannanase with a Lysozyme-like Fold and a Novel Molecular Catalytic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic cleavage of β-1,4-mannans is achieved by endo-β-1,4-mannanases, enzymes involved in germination of seeds and microbial hemicellulose degradation, and which have increasing industrial and consumer product applications. β-Mannanases occur in a range of families of the CAZy sequence-based glycoside hydrolase (GH) classification scheme including families 5, 26, and 113. In this work we reveal that β-mannanases of the newly described GH family 134 differ from other mannanase families in both their mechanism and tertiary structure. A representative GH family 134 endo-β-1,4-mannanase from a Streptomyces sp. displays a fold closely related to that of hen egg white lysozyme but acts with inversion of stereochemistry. A Michaelis complex with mannopentaose, and a product complex with mannotriose, reveal ligands with pyranose rings distorted in an unusual inverted chair conformation. Ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics quantified the energetically accessible ring conformations and provided evidence in support of a 1C4 → 3H4‡ → 3S1 conformational itinerary along the reaction coordinate. This work, in concert with that on GH family 124 cellulases, reveals how the lysozyme fold can be co-opted to catalyze the hydrolysis of different polysaccharides in a mechanistically distinct manner. PMID:28058278

  19. Conservation laws in the quantum mechanics of closed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartle, J.B. ||; Laflamme, R. |; Marolf, D.

    1995-06-15

    We investigate conservation laws in the quantum mechanics of closed systems and begin by reviewing an argument that exact decoherence implies the exact conservation of quantities that commute with the Hamiltonian. However, we also show that decoherence limits the alternatives that can be included in sets of histories that assess the conservation of these quantities. In the case of charge and energy, these limitations would be severe were these quantities not coupled to a gauge field. However, for the realistic cases of electric charge coupled to the electromagnetic field and mass coupled to spacetime curvature, we show that when alternative values of charge and mass decohere they always decohere exactly and are exactly conserved. Further, while decohering histories that describe possible changes in time of the total charge and mass are also subject to the limitations mentioned above, we show that these do not, in fact, restrict {ital physical} alternatives and are therefore not really limitations at all.

  20. A three-dimensional statistical mechanical model of folding double-stranded chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2001-05-01

    Based on a graphical representation of intrachain contacts, we have developed a new three-dimensional model for the statistical mechanics of double-stranded chain molecules. The theory has been tested and validated for the cubic lattice chain conformations. The statistical mechanical model can be applied to the equilibrium folding thermodynamics of a large class of chain molecules, including protein β-hairpin conformations and RNA secondary structures. The application of a previously developed two-dimensional model to RNA secondary structure folding thermodynamics generally overestimates the breadth of the melting curves [S-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 646 (2000)], suggesting an underestimation for the sharpness of the conformational transitions. In this work, we show that the new three-dimensional model gives much sharper melting curves than the two-dimensional model. We believe that the new three-dimensional model may give much improved predictions for the thermodynamic properties of RNA conformational changes than the previous two-dimensional model.

  1. Origami mechanical metamaterials based on the Miura-derivative fold patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Zang, Shixi; You, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two new types of origami-inspired mechanical metamaterials based on the Miura-derivative fold patterns that consist of non-identical parallelogram facets. The analytical models to predict dimension changes and deformation kinematics of the proposed metamaterials are developed. Furthermore, by modelling the creases as revolute hinges with certain rotational spring constants, we derived analytical models for stretching and bulk moduli. The analytical models are validated through finite-element simulation results. Numerical examples reveal that the proposed metamaterials possess some intriguing properties, including negative Poisson's ratios and bulk modulus. The work presented in this paper can provide a highly flexible framework for the design of versatile tunable mechanical metamaterials.

  2. Origami mechanical metamaterials based on the Miura-derivative fold patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Zang, Shixi; You, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two new types of origami-inspired mechanical metamaterials based on the Miura-derivative fold patterns that consist of non-identical parallelogram facets. The analytical models to predict dimension changes and deformation kinematics of the proposed metamaterials are developed. Furthermore, by modelling the creases as revolute hinges with certain rotational spring constants, we derived analytical models for stretching and bulk moduli. The analytical models are validated through finite-element simulation results. Numerical examples reveal that the proposed metamaterials possess some intriguing properties, including negative Poisson's ratios and bulk modulus. The work presented in this paper can provide a highly flexible framework for the design of versatile tunable mechanical metamaterials.

  3. Conservation of Mechanical and Electric Energy: Simple Experimental Verification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponikvar, D.; Planinsic, G.

    2009-01-01

    Two similar experiments on conservation of energy and transformation of mechanical into electrical energy are presented. Both can be used in classes, as they offer numerous possibilities for discussion with students and are simple to perform. Results are presented and are precise within 20% for the version of the experiment where measured values…

  4. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering. PMID:27624892

  5. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C Q

    2016-09-14

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson's ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  6. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  7. Gauge conservation laws and the momentum equation in nonholonomic mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassoò, Francesco; Giacobbe, Andrea; Sansonetto, Nicola

    2008-12-01

    The gauge mechanism is a generalization of the momentum map which links conservation laws to symmetry groups of nonholonomic systems. This method has been so far employed to interpret conserved quantities as momenta of vector fields which are sections of the constraint distribution. In order to obtain the largest class of conserved quantities of this type, we extend this method to an over-distribution of the constraint distribution, the so-called reaction-annihilator distribution, which encodes the effects that the nonholonomic reaction force has on the conservation laws. We provide examples showing the effectiveness of this generalization. Furthermore, we discuss the Noetherian properties of these conserved quantities, that is, whether and to which extent they depend only on the group, and not on the system. In this context, we introduce a notion of 'weak Noetherianity'. Finally, we point out that the gauge mechanism is equivalent to the momentum equation (at least for locally free actions), we generalize the momentum equation to the reaction-annihilator distribution, and we introduce a 'gauge momentum map' which embodies both methods. For simplicity, we treat only the case of linear constraints, natural Lagrangians, and lifted actions.

  8. Conservation of Salmonella infection mechanisms in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Schikora, Adam; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Bueso, Eduardo; Garcia, Ana V; Nilau, Theodora; Charrier, Amélie; Pelletier, Sandra; Menanteau, Pierrette; Baccarini, Manuela; Velge, Philippe; Hirt, Heribert

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella virulence in animals depends on effectors injected by Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs). In this report we demonstrate that Salmonella mutants that are unable to deliver effectors are also compromised in infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Transcriptome analysis revealed that in contrast to wild type bacteria, T3SS mutants of Salmonella are compromised in suppressing highly conserved Arabidopsis genes that play a prominent role during Salmonella infection of animals. We also found that Salmonella originating from infected plants are equally virulent for human cells and mice. These results indicate a high degree of conservation in the defense and infection mechanism of animal and plant hosts during Salmonella infection.

  9. The E. coli thioredoxin folding mechanism: the key role of the C-terminal helix.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego S; Sánchez, Ignacio E; Garrote, Ana; Sica, Mauricio P; Santos, Javier

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the unfolding mechanism of oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (EcTRX) was investigated experimentally and computationally. We characterized seven point mutants distributed along the C-terminal α-helix (CTH) and the preceding loop. The mutations destabilized the protein against global unfolding while leaving the native structure unchanged. Global analysis of the unfolding kinetics of all variants revealed a linear unfolding route with a high-energy on-pathway intermediate state flanked by two transition state ensembles TSE1 and TSE2. The experiments show that CTH is mainly unfolded in TSE1 and the intermediate and becomes structured in TSE2. Structure-based molecular dynamics are in agreement with these experiments and provide protein-wide structural information on transient states. In our model, EcTRX folding starts with structure formation in the β-sheet, while the protein helices coalesce later. As a whole, our results indicate that the CTH is a critical module in the folding process, restraining a heterogeneous intermediate ensemble into a biologically active native state and providing the native protein with thermodynamic and kinetic stability.

  10. Direct Observation of Folding Energy Landscape of RNA Hairpin at Mechanical Loading Rates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huizhong; Plaut, Benjamin; Zhu, Xiran; Chen, Maverick; Mavinkurve, Udit; Maiti, Anindita; Song, Guangtao; Murari, Krishna; Mandal, Maumita

    2017-03-16

    By applying a controlled mechanical load using optical tweezers, we measured the diffusive barrier crossing in a 49 nt long P5ab RNA hairpin. We find that in the free-energy landscape the barrier height (G(‡)) and transition distance (x(‡)) are dependent on the loading rate (r) along the pulling direction, x, as predicted by Bell. The barrier shifted toward the initial state, whereas ΔG(‡) reduced significantly from 50 to 5 kT, as r increased from 0 to 32 pN/s. However, the equilibrium work (ΔG) during strand separation, as estimated by Crook's fluctuation theorem, remained unchanged at different rates. Previously, helix formation and denaturation have been described as two-state (F ↔ U) transitions for P5ab. Herein, we report three intermediate states I1, I, and I2 located at 4, 11, and 16 nm respectively, from the folded conformation. The intermediates were observed only when the hairpin was subjected to an optimal r, 7.6 pN/s. The results indicate that the complementary strands in P5ab can zip and unzip through complex routes, whereby mismatches act as checkpoints and often impose barriers. The study highlights the significance of loading rates in force-spectroscopy experiments that are increasingly being used to measure the folding properties of biomolecules.

  11. Role of five-fold twin boundary on the enhanced mechanical properties of fcc Fe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Y; Nagao, S; He, J Y; Zhang, Z L

    2011-12-14

    The role of 5-fold twin boundary on the structural and mechanical properties of fcc Fe nanowire under tension is explored by classical molecular dynamics. Twin-stabilized fcc nanowire with various diameters (6-24 nm) are examined by tension tests at several temperatures ranging from 0.01 to 1100 K. Significant increase in the Young's modulus of the smaller nanowires is revealed to originate from the central area of quinquefoliolate-like stress-distribution over the 5-fold twin, rather than from the surface tension that is often considered as the main source of such size-effects found in nanostructures. Because of the excess compressive stress caused by crossing twin-boundaries, the atoms in the center behave stiffer than those in bulk and even expand laterally under axial tension, providing locally negative Poisson's ratio. The yield strength of nanowire is also enhanced by the twin boundary that suppresses dislocation nucleation within a fcc twin-domain; therefore, the plasticity of nanowire is initiated by strain-induced fcc→bcc phase transformation that destroys the twin structure. After the yield, the nucleated bcc phase immediately spreads to the entire area, and forms a multigrain structure to realize ductile deformation followed by necking. As temperature elevated close to the critical temperature between bcc and fcc phases, the increased stability of fcc phase competes with the phase transformation under tension, and hence dislocation nucleations in fcc phase are observed exclusively at the highest temperature in our study.

  12. Flux continuity and probability conservation in complexified Bohmian mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Bill

    2008-02-15

    Recent years have seen increased interest in complexified Bohmian mechanical trajectory calculations for quantum systems as both a pedagogical and computational tool. In the latter context, it is essential that trajectories satisfy probability conservation to ensure they are always guided to where they are most needed. We consider probability conservation for complexified Bohmian trajectories. The analysis relies on time-reversal symmetry considerations, leading to a generalized expression for the conjugation of wave functions of complexified variables. This in turn enables meaningful discussion of complexified flux continuity, which turns out not to be satisfied in general, though a related property is found to be true. The main conclusion, though, is that even under a weak interpretation, probability is not conserved along complex Bohmian trajectories.

  13. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  14. Alternating access mechanisms of LeuT-fold transporters: trailblazing towards the promised energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Kazmier, Kelli; Claxton, Derek P; Mchaourab, Hassane S

    2016-12-29

    Secondary active transporters couple the uphill translocation of substrates to electrochemical ion gradients. Transporter conformational motion, generically referred to as alternating access, enables a central ligand binding site to change its orientation relative to the membrane. Here we review themes of alternating access and the transduction of ion gradient energy to power this process in the LeuT-fold class of transporters where crystallographic, computational and spectroscopic approaches have converged to yield detailed models of transport cycles. Specifically, we compare findings for the Na(+)-coupled amino acid transporter LeuT and the Na(+)-coupled hydantoin transporter Mhp1. Although these studies have illuminated multiple aspects of transporter structures and dynamics, a number of questions remain unresolved that so far hinder understanding transport mechanisms in an energy landscape perspective.

  15. Predicting Folding Sequences Based on the Maximum Rock Strength and Mechanical Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubas, N.; Souloumiac, P.; Maillot, B.; Leroy, Y. M.

    2007-12-01

    The objective is to propose and validate simple procedures, compared to the finite-element method, to select and optimize the dominant mode of folding in fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges, and to determine its stress distribution. Mechanical equilibrium as well as the constraints due to the limited rock strength of the bulk material and of major discontinuities, such as décollements, are accounted for. The first part of the proposed procedure, which is at the core of the external approach of classical limit analysis, consists in estimating the least upper bound on the tectonic force by minimisation of the internal dissipation and part of the external work. The new twist to the method is that the optimization is also done with respect to the geometry of the evolving fold. If several folding events are possible, the dominant mode is the one leading to the least upper bound. The second part of the procedure is based on the Equilibrium Element Method, which is an application of the internal approach of limit analysis. The optimum stress field, obtained by spatial discretisation of the fold, provides the best lower bound on the tectonic force. The difference between the two bounds defines an error estimate of the exact unknown tectonic force. To show the merits of the proposed procedure, its first part is applied to predict the life span of a thrust within an accretionary prism, from its onset, its development with a relief build up and its arrest because of the onset of a more favorable new thrust (Cubas et al., 2007). This life span is sensitive to the friction angles over the ramp and the décollement. It is shown how the normal sequence of thrusting in a supercritical wedge is ended with the first out-of sequence event. The second part of the procedure provides the stress state over each thrust showing that the active back thrust is a narrow fan which dip is sensitive to the friction angle over the ramp and the amount of relief build up (Souloumiac et

  16. Folded Spring and Mechanically Switching SSHI for High Performance Miniature Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Okubo, H.; Komatsuzaki, T.; Iwata, Y.

    2016-11-01

    To downsize the clamp area and increase the output power of the harvester, we developed a miniature piezoelectric vibration energy harvester with combining a Z-shaped folded spring and a mechanically-switching SSHI (synchronized switch harvesting on inductor). The overall harvester size is 4×2×3 cm3. The FEM analysis revealed that the output power increases and the value of the 1st and 2nd resonance frequencies move closer as the angle of the Z-shaped spring decreases, therefore, the smaller angle would be more promising. The experimental results showed that the maximum output power of our harvester for the 1st (20.2 Hz) and 2nd (53.0 Hz) resonance frequencies at the applied acceleration of 4.9 m/s2 are 088 and 0.98 mW, respectively. The reason for a marked enhancement of the output power for the 2nd resonance frequency is attributed to the vertical movement of the 2nd vibrational mode which applies larger mechanical stress to the piezo ceramic and achieves better electrical contact between the tip of the Z-shaped spring and the spring plunger.

  17. A new mechanism for producing cleavage in preexisting folds: The translation mechanism. An example in the Burela section (Variscan belt, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobillo-Ares, Nilo C.; Bastida, Fernando; Aller, Jesús; Lisle, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    An outcrop on the Cantabrian coast (Burela section) shows a long train of tight meter-scale folds developed in Cambrian siliciclastic rocks. These folds have been shortened in the axial trace direction on the fold profile, developing a cleavage in the incompetent layers which obliterates the primary cleavage and crosscuts the folds. Several mechanisms have been analyzed to explain the development and attitude of this cleavage, some of them being the same as those that have previously been proposed to form folds but operating in a reverse sense. They are: anti-flexural flow, anti-reverse tangential longitudinal strain and homogeneous strain. The sole operation of these mechanisms cannot explain this cleavage and a new one has been defined with this aim. This mechanism consists of deformation of the incompetent layers by translation of the competent ones (translation mechanism), and it involves an area decrease within the incompetent layers in the fold profile plane and, if there is no important volume decrease, a stretching in the hinge direction that must affect both competent and incompetent layers. The geometrical properties of this mechanism have been analyzed in detail and it is concluded that, combined with a small amount of homogeneous flattening, this mechanism can explain the distribution of the cleavage through the folds.

  18. Significance of first-order faults in folding mechanically isotropic layers: Evidence from the Sudbury Basin, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Martin D.; Riller, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    The Sudbury Basin is a non-cylindrical fold basin demarcated by the layered Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC), the eastern part of which is transected by prominent curved faults. Folding of the SIC and adjacent rock units occurred in the brittle field and is peculiar due to its petrographically distinct, but initially mechanically similar layers. Overall, the layers are characterized by low levels of solid-state strain raising the question how the layer contacts acquired their curvature. We addressed this question by developing a G.I.S.-based workflow to analyze the orientation and slip vectors of the faults. Slip vectors form clusters of normal and reverse slip along a given fault. The clustering is best interpreted in terms of successive slip events during folding of the SIC. As the faults formed most likely as planar reverse faults prior to folding of the SIC they subsequently served as mechanically anisotropic elements to fold the SIC. The results contribute to (1) better understand the folding mechanisms of thick melt sheets in the upper crust, (2) explain apparently incompatible principal strain axes during progressive deformation, and (3) efficiently analyze the orientation and kinematics of fault zones close to the Earth's surface.

  19. A new mechanism for energy conservation technology services

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Feng

    1996-12-31

    In the ninth-five year plan of China, the socialist market economy model will be developed. In the stage of transferring from planning economy to market economy, the energy conservation technology services industry in China has met new challenges. Over the past ten to fifteen years, there has developed a new mechanism for financing energy efficiency investments in market economies. The process is simple. After inspecting an enterprise or an entity for energy saving opportunities, an Energy Service Company (ESCO) which business aimed at making money will review the recommended energy conservation opportunities with the enterprise or the entity (user) and implement those measures acceptable to the user at no front end cost to the user. The ESCO then guarantees that the energy savings will cover the cost of the capital renovations using the Performance Contracting.

  20. Identical folds used for distinct mechanical functions of the bacterial flagellar rod and hook

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Takashi; Kato, Takayuki; Hiraoka, Koichi D.; Miyata, Tomoko; Minamino, Tohru; Chevance, Fabienne F. V.; Hughes, Kelly T.; Namba, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a motile organelle driven by a rotary motor, and its axial portions function as a drive shaft (rod), a universal joint (hook) and a helical propeller (filament). The rod and hook are directly connected to each other, with their subunit proteins FlgG and FlgE having 39% sequence identity, but show distinct mechanical properties; the rod is straight and rigid as a drive shaft whereas the hook is flexible in bending as a universal joint. Here we report the structure of the rod and comparison with that of the hook. While these two structures have the same helical symmetry and repeat distance and nearly identical folds of corresponding domains, the domain orientations differ by ∼7°, resulting in tight and loose axial subunit packing in the rod and hook, respectively, conferring the rigidity on the rod and flexibility on the hook. This provides a good example of versatile use of a protein structure in biological organisms. PMID:28120828

  1. Mechanisms and consequences of protein aggregation: the role of folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Sangita; Oberg, Keith A; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2009-10-01

    Protein aggregation, being one of the hottest topics of modern protein science, is recognized now as a serious biomedical and biotechnological problem. Protein aggregation is considered as a causative factor (or at least an associated symptom) of a wide spectrum of human pathologies. Furthermore, aggregation and precipitation are known to trammel recombinant protein production, as well as to affect the manufacture, storage and delivery of proteinaceous drugs. Therefore, this topic attracts the serious attention of many researchers, a conclusion that follows from the average daily publication of 7-8 scientific papers dedicated to the various aspects of protein aggregation. However, the situation was rather different 15-20 years ago when it was believed that the formation of protein aggregates causing the irreversibility of unfolding or denaturation of some proteins was nothing more than an annoying experimental artifact, hampering the detailed characterization of the unfolding/denaturation processes. At that time, only a few laboratories (including the laboratory of Prof. Anthony L. Fink) seriously worked on understanding the molecular mechanisms of this "artifact". In this review, we summarize some of the early work of Tony Fink on aggregation, of protein folding intermediates and on the analysis of the structural consequences of this process.

  2. Structural insights into a unique cellulase fold and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Brás, Joana L A; Cartmell, Alan; Carvalho, Ana Luísa M; Verzé, Genny; Bayer, Edward A; Vazana, Yael; Correia, Márcia A S; Prates, José A M; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Boraston, Alisdair B; Romão, Maria J; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Gilbert, Harry J

    2011-03-29

    Clostridium thermocellum is a well-characterized cellulose-degrading microorganism. The genome sequence of C. thermocellum encodes a number of proteins that contain type I dockerin domains, which implies that they are components of the cellulose-degrading apparatus, but display no significant sequence similarity to known plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. Here, we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of one of these proteins, designated CtCel124. The protein was shown to be an endo-acting cellulase that displays a single displacement mechanism and acts in synergy with Cel48S, the major cellulosomal exo-cellulase. The crystal structure of CtCel124 in complex with two cellotriose molecules, determined to 1.5 Å, displays a superhelical fold in which a constellation of α-helices encircle a central helix that houses the catalytic apparatus. The catalytic acid, Glu96, is located at the C-terminus of the central helix, but there is no candidate catalytic base. The substrate-binding cleft can be divided into two discrete topographical domains in which the bound cellotriose molecules display twisted and linear conformations, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme may target the interface between crystalline and disordered regions of cellulose.

  3. Structural insights into a unique cellulase fold and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Cartmell, Alan; Carvalho, Ana Luísa M.; Verzé, Genny; Bayer, Edward A.; Vazana, Yael; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Prates, José A. M.; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Boraston, Alisdair B.; Romão, Maria J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a well-characterized cellulose-degrading microorganism. The genome sequence of C. thermocellum encodes a number of proteins that contain type I dockerin domains, which implies that they are components of the cellulose-degrading apparatus, but display no significant sequence similarity to known plant cell wall–degrading enzymes. Here, we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of one of these proteins, designated CtCel124. The protein was shown to be an endo-acting cellulase that displays a single displacement mechanism and acts in synergy with Cel48S, the major cellulosomal exo-cellulase. The crystal structure of CtCel124 in complex with two cellotriose molecules, determined to 1.5 Å, displays a superhelical fold in which a constellation of α-helices encircle a central helix that houses the catalytic apparatus. The catalytic acid, Glu96, is located at the C-terminus of the central helix, but there is no candidate catalytic base. The substrate-binding cleft can be divided into two discrete topographical domains in which the bound cellotriose molecules display twisted and linear conformations, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme may target the interface between crystalline and disordered regions of cellulose. PMID:21393568

  4. Mechanism-based corrector combination restores ΔF508-CFTR folding and function

    PubMed Central

    Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Veit, Guido; Dekkers, Johanna F.; Bagdany, Miklos; Soya, Naoto; Xu, Haijin; Roldan, Ariel; Verkman, Alan S.; Kurth, Mark; Simon, Agnes; Hegedus, Tamas; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2013-01-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation, ΔF508 in the nucleotide binding domain-1 (NBD1), impairs CFTR coupled-domain folding, plasma membrane (PM) expression, function and stability. VX-809, a promising investigational corrector of ΔF508-CFTR misprocessing, has limited clinical benefit and incompletely understood mechanism, hampering drug development. Based on the effect of second site suppressor mutations, robust ΔF508-CFTR correction likely requires stabilization of NBD1 and the membrane spanning domains (MSDs)-NBD1 interface, both established primary conformational defects. Here, we elucidated the molecular targets of available correctors; class-I stabilizes the NBD1-MSD1/2 interface, class-II targets NBD2, and only chemical chaperones, surrogates of class-III correctors, stabilize the human ΔF508-NBD1. While VX-809 can correct missense mutations primarily destabilizing the NBD1-MSD1/2 interface, functional PM expression of ΔF508-CFTR also requires compounds that counteract the NBD1 and NBD2 stability defects in CF bronchial epithelial cells and intestinal organoids. Thus, structure-guided corrector combination represents an effective approach for CF therapy. PMID:23666117

  5. Demonstration of a folding after binding mechanism in the recognition between the measles virus NTAIL and X domains.

    PubMed

    Dosnon, Marion; Bonetti, Daniela; Morrone, Angela; Erales, Jenny; di Silvio, Eva; Longhi, Sonia; Gianni, Stefano

    2015-03-20

    In the past decade, a wealth of experimental data has demonstrated that a large fraction of proteins, while functional, are intrinsically disordered at physiological conditions. Many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) undergo a disorder-to-order transition upon binding to their biological targets, a phenomenon known as induced folding. Induced folding may occur through two extreme mechanisms, namely conformational selection and folding after binding. Although the pre-existence of ordered structures in IDPs is a prerequisite for conformational selection, it does not necessarily commit to this latter mechanism, and kinetic studies are needed to discriminate between the two possible scenarios. So far, relatively few studies have addressed this issue from an experimental perspective. Here, we analyze the interaction kinetics between the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) and the X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Data reveal that NTAIL recognizes XD by first forming a weak encounter complex in a disordered conformation, which is subsequently locked-in by a folding step; i.e., binding precedes folding. The implications of our kinetic results, in the context of previously reported equilibrium data, are discussed. These results contribute to enhancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which IDPs recognize their partners and represent a paradigmatic example of the need of kinetic methods to discriminate between reaction mechanisms.

  6. Modeling the effect of codon translation rates on co-translational protein folding mechanisms of arbitrary complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniparoli, Luca; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2015-04-01

    In a cell, the folding of a protein molecule into tertiary structure can begin while it is synthesized by the ribosome. The rate at which individual amino acids are incorporated into the elongating nascent chain has been shown to affect the likelihood that proteins will populate their folded state, indicating that co-translational protein folding is a far from equilibrium process. Developing a theoretical framework to accurately describe this process is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of how proteins acquire their functional conformation in living cells. Current state-of-the-art computational approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations, are very demanding in terms of the required computer resources, making the simulation of co-translational protein folding difficult. Here, we overcome this limitation by introducing an efficient approach that predicts the effects that variable codon translation rates have on co-translational folding pathways. Our approach is based on Markov chains. By using as an input a relatively small number of molecular dynamics simulations, it allows for the computation of the probability that a nascent protein is in any state as a function of the translation rate of individual codons along a mRNA's open reading frame. Due to its computational efficiency and favorable scalability with the complexity of the folding mechanism, this approach could enable proteome-wide computational studies of the influence of translation dynamics on co-translational folding.

  7. Mechanics of non-critical fold-thrust belts based on finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Guy

    2011-03-01

    The mechanics of fold-thrust belts and accretionary wedges is investigated using a two dimensional, plane strain, elastic-plastic (cohesive Mohr-Coulomb) mechanical model solved with the Finite Element Method. Results show that when a layer with an initially non-critical geometry is compressed from the rear, it does not form a wedge that is at failure throughout, as assumed in critical wedge theory. Rather, the wedge consists of narrow plastic shear zones that propagate sequentially outward with time, loading rocks ahead while unloading rocks behind. Not only are stress states within the wedge not everywhere at failure but principal stress orientations vary strongly in time and space, particularly across shear zones, near the basal detachment and in the hanging wall of active structures, where local surface extension may be observed. The reason the investigated wedges are not stressed to compressive failure throughout is related to strength reduction associated with strain localisation that enables material outside shear zones to unload and return to an elastic stress state. This mechanism is intrinsic to elastic-plastic materials and occurs regardless of any material degradation such as loss of cohesion. Even though the stress state of the investigated wedges is generally non-critical, the overall geometry may still be consistent with cohesionless critical wedge theory, since the local surface slope is created when a particular part of the wedge is at a limit state. Prowedge tapers display non self-similar growth through time but eventually evolve to the minimum critical taper. Retrowedges on the other hand, may get caught within this initial transient state and thus may have tapers anywhere between the minimum and maximum critical taper. However, if the basal detachment is such that lateral propagation is not kinematically inhibited, retrowedges are shown to also eventually evolve towards minimum critical tapers, resulting in a symmetrical doubly-vergent orogen

  8. [The modern approach to the conservative treatment of the patients presenting with postoperative bilateral vocal fold palsy].

    PubMed

    Karpova, O Yu; Svistushkin, V M

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the preset study was to further improve the diagnostics and treatment of unilateral palsies of the laryngeal recurrent nerves associated with transitory reflective spasm of the functionally competent vocal fold. The study included 49 patients (46 women and 3 men) at the age varying from 21 to 75 years presenting with unilateral palsies of the laryngeal recurrent nerves associated with transitory reflective spasm of the functionally competent vocal fold that developed after the surgical intervention on the thyroid gland. The electromyographic test for latent tetany was performed for diagnostics and objective evaluation of the results of the treatmen. In addition, the blood ionized calcium levels were measured and videolaryngostroboscopy was used. The treatment included respiratory gymnastics, reflexotherapy (novocaine blockade of the Zakhar'in - Head's zone for the larynx, auricolotherapy, and pharmacotherapy with the prescription of vitamin-calcium preparations, myorelaxants, sedatives, and phonopedia. A loud enough resounding voice was restored in all the 49 participants of the study with the normalization of respiration and the complete cessation (or reduction to a minimum) of the reflexive coughing spells and laryngeal reflex spasms. None of the patients required tracheotomy during the follow-up period.

  9. New hypotheses derived from the structure of a flaviviral Xrn1-resistant RNA: Conservation, folding, and host adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, Jeffrey S; Rabe, Jennifer L; Chapman, Erich G

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne flaviviruses (FVs) are a growing world-wide health threat whose incidence and range are increasing. The pathogenicity and cytopathicity of these single-stranded RNA viruses are influenced by viral subgenomic non-protein-coding RNAs (sfRNAs) that the viruses produce to high levels during infection. To generate sfRNAs the virus co-opts the action of the abundant cellular exonuclease Xrn1, which is part of the cell's normal RNA turnover machinery. This exploitation of the cellular machinery is enabled by discrete, highly structured, Xrn1-resistant RNA elements (xrRNAs) in the 3′UTR that interact with Xrn1 to halt processive 5′ to 3′ decay of the viral genomic RNA. We recently solved the crystal structure of a functional xrRNA, revealing a novel fold that provides a mechanistic model for Xrn1 resistance. Continued analysis and interpretation of the structure reveals that the tertiary contacts that knit the xrRNA fold together are shared by a wide variety of arthropod-borne FVs, conferring robust Xrn1 resistance in all tested. However, there is some variability in the structures that correlates with unexplained patterns in the viral 3′ UTRs. Finally, examination of these structures and their behavior in the context of viral infection leads to a new hypothesis linking RNA tertiary structure, overall 3′ UTR architecture, sfRNA production, and host adaptation. PMID:26399159

  10. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K.; Cheong, S. A.

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with α helix and β hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein

  11. Conserved mechanism for coordinating replication fork helicase assembly with phosphorylation of the helicase

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) phosphorylates minichromosome maintenance 2 (Mcm2) during S phase in yeast, and Sld3 recruits cell division cycle 45 (Cdc45) to minichromosome maintenance 2-7 (Mcm2-7). We show here DDK-phosphoryled Mcm2 preferentially interacts with Cdc45 in vivo, and that Sld3 stimulates DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2 by 11-fold. We identified a mutation of the replication initiation factor Sld3, Sld3-m16, that is specifically defective in stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. Wild-type expression levels of sld3-m16 result in severe growth and DNA replication defects. Cells expressing sld3-m16 exhibit no detectable Mcm2 phosphorylation in vivo, reduced replication protein A-ChIP signal at an origin, and diminished Go, Ichi, Ni, and San association with Mcm2-7. Treslin, the human homolog of Sld3, stimulates human DDK phosphorylation of human Mcm2 by 15-fold. DDK phosphorylation of human Mcm2 decreases the affinity of Mcm5 for Mcm2, suggesting a potential mechanism for helicase ring opening. These data suggest a conserved mechanism for replication initiation: Sld3/Treslin coordinates Cdc45 recruitment to Mcm2-7 with DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2 during S phase. PMID:26305950

  12. Secondary Structure Propensities in Peptide Folding Simulations: A Systematic Comparison of Molecular Mechanics Interaction Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Dirk; de Groot, Bert L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We present a systematic study directed toward the secondary structure propensity and sampling behavior in peptide folding simulations with eight different molecular dynamics force-field variants in explicit solvent. We report on the combinational result of force field, water model, and electrostatic interaction schemes and compare to available experimental characterization of five studied model peptides in terms of reproduced structure and dynamics. The total simulation time exceeded 18 μs and included simulations that started from both folded and extended conformations. Despite remaining sampling issues, a number of distinct trends in the folding behavior of the peptides emerged. Pronounced differences in the propensity of finding prominent secondary structure motifs in the different applied force fields suggest that problems point in particular to the balance of the relative stabilities of helical and extended conformations. PMID:19619475

  13. Deciphering the mechanisms of binding induced folding at nearly atomic resolution: The Φ value analysis applied to IDPs

    PubMed Central

    Gianni, Stefano; Dogan, Jakob; Jemth, Per

    2014-01-01

    The Φ value analysis is a method to analyze the structure of metastable states in reaction pathways. Such a methodology is based on the quantitative analysis of the effect of point mutations on the kinetics and thermodynamics of the probed reaction. The Φ value analysis is routinely used in protein folding studies and is potentially an extremely powerful tool to analyze the mechanism of binding induced folding of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this review we recapitulate the key equations and experimental advices to perform the Φ value analysis in the perspective of the possible caveats arising in intrinsically disordered systems. Finally, we briefly discuss some few examples already available in the literature.

  14. Conservation of extrusion as an exit mechanism for Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Zuck, Meghan; Sherrid, Ashley; Suchland, Robert; Ellis, Tisha; Hybiske, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Chlamydiae exit via membrane-encased extrusion or through lysis of the host cell. Extrusions are novel, pathogen-containing structures that confer infectious advantages to Chlamydia, and are hypothesized to promote cell-to-cell spread, dissemination to distant tissues and facilitate immune evasion. The extrusion phenomenon has been characterized for several Chlamydia trachomatis serovars, but a thorough investigation of extrusion for additional clinically relevant C. trachomatis strains and Chlamydia species has yet to be performed. The key parameters investigated in this study were: (i) the conservation of extrusion across the Chlamydia genus, (ii) the functional requirement for candidate Chlamydia genes in extrusion formation i.e. IncA and CT228 and (iii) extrusion-mediated uptake, and consequent survival of Chlamydia inside macrophages. Inclusion morphology was characterized by live fluorescence microscopy, using an inverted GFP strategy, at early and mid-stages of infection. Enriched extrusions were used to infect bone marrow-derived macrophages, and bacterial viability was measured following macrophage engulfment. Our results demonstrate that extrusion is highly conserved across chlamydiae, including ocular, STD and LGV biovars and divergent Chlamydia species. Consequently, this exit mechanism for Chlamydia may fulfill common advantages important for pathogenesis.

  15. From the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane: mechanisms of CFTR folding and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Farinha, Carlos M; Canato, Sara

    2017-01-01

    CFTR biogenesis starts with its co-translational insertion into the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum and folding of the cytosolic domains, towards the acquisition of a fully folded compact native structure. Efficiency of this process is assessed by the ER quality control system that allows the exit of folded proteins but targets unfolded/misfolded CFTR to degradation. If allowed to leave the ER, CFTR is modified at the Golgi and reaches the post-Golgi compartments to be delivered to the plasma membrane where it functions as a cAMP- and phosphorylation-regulated chloride/bicarbonate channel. CFTR residence at the membrane is a balance of membrane delivery, endocytosis, and recycling. Several adaptors, motor, and scaffold proteins contribute to the regulation of CFTR stability and are involved in continuously assessing its structure through peripheral quality control systems. Regulation of CFTR biogenesis and traffic (and its dysregulation by mutations, such as the most common F508del) determine its overall activity and thus contribute to the fine modulation of chloride secretion and hydration of epithelial surfaces. This review covers old and recent knowledge on CFTR folding and trafficking from its synthesis to the regulation of its stability at the plasma membrane and highlights how several of these steps can be modulated to promote the rescue of mutant CFTR.

  16. Architecture and Folding Mechanism of the Azoarcus Group I Pre-tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan,P.; Masquida, B.; Westhof, E.; Woodson, S.

    2004-01-01

    Self-splicing RNAs must evolve to function in their specific exon context. The conformation of a group I pre-tRNA{sup ile} from the bacterium Azoarcus was probed by ribonuclease T1 and hydroxyl radical cleavage, and by native gel electrophoresis. Biochemical data and three-dimensional models of the pre-tRNA showed that the tRNA is folded, and that the tRNA and intron sequences form separate tertiary domains. Models of the active site before steps 1 and 2 of the splicing reaction predict that exchange of the external G-cofactor and the 3{prime}-terminal G is accomplished by a slight conformational change in P9.0 of the Azoarcus group I intron. Kinetic assays showed that the pre-tRNA folds in minutes, much more slowly than the intron alone. The dependence of the folding kinetics on Mg{sup 2+} and the concentration of urea, and RNase T1 experiments showed that formation of native pre-tRNA is delayed by misfolding of P3-P9, including mispairing between residues in P9 and the tRNA. Thus, although the intron and tRNA sequences form separate domains in the native pre-tRNA, their folding is coupled via metastable non-native base-pairs. This could help prevent premature processing of the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of unspliced pre-tRNA.

  17. Molecular mechanism of energy conservation in polysulfide respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Jormakka, Mika; Yokoyama, Ken; Yano, Takahiro; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Akimoto, Satoru; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Curmi, Paul; Iwata, So

    2008-09-03

    Bacterial polysulfide reductase (PsrABC) is an integral membrane protein complex responsible for quinone-coupled reduction of polysulfide, a process important in extreme environments such as deep-sea vents and hot springs. We determined the structure of polysulfide reductase from Thermus thermophilus at 2.4-{angstrom} resolution, revealing how the PsrA subunit recognizes and reduces its unique polyanionic substrate. The integral membrane subunit PsrC was characterized using the natural substrate menaquinone-7 and inhibitors, providing a comprehensive representation of a quinone binding site and revealing the presence of a water-filled cavity connecting the quinone binding site on the periplasmic side to the cytoplasm. These results suggest that polysulfide reductase could be a key energy-conserving enzyme of the T. thermophilus respiratory chain, using polysulfide as the terminal electron acceptor and pumping protons across the membrane via a previously unknown mechanism.

  18. Gauge transformations and conserved quantities in classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berche, Bertrand; Malterre, Daniel; Medina, Ernesto

    2016-08-01

    We are taught that gauge transformations in classical and quantum mechanics do not change the physics of the problem. Nevertheless, here we discuss three broad scenarios where under gauge transformations: (i) conservation laws are not preserved in the usual manner; (ii) non-gauge-invariant quantities can be associated with physical observables; and (iii) there are changes in the physical boundary conditions of the wave function that render it non-single-valued. We give worked examples that illustrate these points, in contrast to general opinions from classic texts. We also give a historical perspective on the development of Abelian gauge theory in relation to our particular points. Our aim is to provide a discussion of these issues at the graduate level.

  19. Structural heterogeneity of 6 M GdmCl-denatured proteins: implications for the mechanism of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2009-10-13

    An in vitro experiment with protein folding is typically initiated with 6 M GdmCl-denatured proteins, which are generally considered fully unfolded. However, studies conducted by various laboratories have shown that many 6 M GdmCl-denatured proteins are structurally heterogeneous and still retain nativelike residual structures. The extent of conformational heterogeneity of the 6 M GdmCl-denatured protein has significant implications for the folding landscape as well as the interpretation of the observed early stage folding mechanism. Using the method of disulfide scrambling, we are able to gain rough insight into the diverse structural properties of 6 M GdmCl-denatured proteins. It demonstrates that most 6 M GdmCl-denatured proteins are approximately fully denatured, but partially unfolded. Most of them comprise diverse conformational isomers. We review here the cumulative evidence obtained from various laboratories and also provide experimental data obtained in our laboratory.

  20. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  1. Modelling "reality" in tectonics: Simulation of the mechanical evolution of the Jura Mountains-Molasse Basin system, and routes to forward-inverse modelling of fold thrust belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindle, David; Kley, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate validation of any numerical model of any geological process comes when it can accurately forward model a case study from the geological record. However, as the example of the Jura-Molasse fold thrust belt demonstrates, geological information on even the most basic aspects of the present day state of such systems is highly incomplete and usually known only with large uncertainties. Fold thrust-belts are studied and understood by geologists in an iterative process of constructing their subsurface geometries and structures (folds, faults, bedding etc) based on limited subsurface information from boreholes, tunnels or seismic data where available, and surface information on outcrops of different layers and their dips. This data is usually processed through geometric models which involve conservation of line length of different beds over the length of an entire cross section. Constructing such sections is the art of cross section balancing. A balanced cross section can be easily restored to its pre-deformation state, assuming (usually) originally horizontal bedding to remove the effects of folding and faulting. Such a pre-deformation state can then form an initial condition for a forward mechanical model of the section. A mechanical model introduces new parameters into the system such as rock elasticity, cohesion, and frictional properties. However, a forward mechanical model can also potentially show the continuous evolution of a fold thrust belt, including dynamic quantities like stress. Moreover, a forward mechanical model, if correct in most aspects, should match in its final state, the present day geological cross section it is simulating. However, when attempting to achieve a match between geometric and mechanical models, it becomes clear that many more aspects of the geodynamic history of a fold thrust belt have to be taken into account. Erosion of the uppermost layers of an evolving thrust belt is the most obvious one of these. This can potentially

  2. Development of natural product-derived receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors based on conservation of protein domain fold.

    PubMed

    Kissau, Lars; Stahl, Petra; Mazitschek, Ralph; Giannis, Athannasios; Waldmann, Herbert

    2003-07-03

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as Tie-2, IGF1R, Her-2/Neu, EGFR, and VEGFR1-3 play crucial roles in the control of cell growth and differentiation. Inhibition of such RTKs has become a major focus of current anticancer drug development, and therefore the discovery of new classes of inhibitors for these signal-transducing proteins is of prime importance. We have recently proposed a novel concept for improving the hit-finding process by employing natural products as biologically validated starting points in structural space for compound library development. In this concept, natural products are regarded as evolutionary chosen ligands for protein domains which are structurally conserved yet genetically mobile. Here we report on the discovery of novel and highly selective VEGFR-2 and -3, Tie-2, and IGF1R inhibitors derived from the naturally occurring Her-2/Neu kinase inhibitor nakijiquinone C and developed on the basis of this concept. Based on the structure of the natural product, a small library (74 members) was synthesized and investigated for inhibition of kinases with highly similar ATP-binding domains. The library yielded inhibitors with IC(50)s in the low micromolar range with high frequency (7 out of 74). In particular, four inhibitors of Tie-2 were found, a kinase critically involved in the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones (angiogenesis) and believed to be a new promising target in antitumor therapy. These results support the "domain concept". To advance the development of improved inhibitors, extensive molecular modeling studies were undertaken, including the construction of new homology models for VEGFR-2 and Tie-2. These studies revealed residues in the kinase structure which are crucial to the development of tailor-made receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  3. Mechanism of Folding and Activation of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P).

    PubMed

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Cendron, Laura; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2016-01-29

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site-1 protease (S1P) is implicated in lipid homeostasis, the unfolded protein response, and lysosome biogenesis. The protease is further hijacked by highly pathogenic emerging viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P requires removal of an N-terminal prodomain, by a multistep process, generating the mature enzyme. Here, we uncover a modular structure of the human SKI-1/S1P prodomain and define its function in folding and activation. We provide evidence that the N-terminal AB fragment of the prodomain represents an autonomous structural and functional unit that is necessary and sufficient for folding and partial activation. In contrast, the C-terminal BC fragment lacks a defined structure but is crucial for autoprocessing and full catalytic activity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sequence of the AB domain is highly conserved, whereas the BC fragment shows considerable variation and seems even absent in some species. Notably, SKI-1/S1P of arthropods, like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, contains a shorter prodomain comprised of full-length AB and truncated BC regions. Swapping the prodomain fragments between fly and human resulted in a fully mature and active SKI-1/S1P chimera. Our study suggests that primordial SKI-1/S1P likely contained a simpler prodomain consisting of the highly conserved AB fragment that represents an independent folding unit. The BC region appears as a later evolutionary acquisition, possibly allowing more subtle fine-tuning of the maturation process.

  4. Mechanism of Folding and Activation of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P)*

    PubMed Central

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Cendron, Laura; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site-1 protease (S1P) is implicated in lipid homeostasis, the unfolded protein response, and lysosome biogenesis. The protease is further hijacked by highly pathogenic emerging viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P requires removal of an N-terminal prodomain, by a multistep process, generating the mature enzyme. Here, we uncover a modular structure of the human SKI-1/S1P prodomain and define its function in folding and activation. We provide evidence that the N-terminal AB fragment of the prodomain represents an autonomous structural and functional unit that is necessary and sufficient for folding and partial activation. In contrast, the C-terminal BC fragment lacks a defined structure but is crucial for autoprocessing and full catalytic activity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sequence of the AB domain is highly conserved, whereas the BC fragment shows considerable variation and seems even absent in some species. Notably, SKI-1/S1P of arthropods, like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, contains a shorter prodomain comprised of full-length AB and truncated BC regions. Swapping the prodomain fragments between fly and human resulted in a fully mature and active SKI-1/S1P chimera. Our study suggests that primordial SKI-1/S1P likely contained a simpler prodomain consisting of the highly conserved AB fragment that represents an independent folding unit. The BC region appears as a later evolutionary acquisition, possibly allowing more subtle fine-tuning of the maturation process. PMID:26645686

  5. Conservation of mechanism in three chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    He, Ze; Stigers Lavoie, Kimberly D; Bartlett, Paul A; Toney, Michael D

    2004-03-03

    Chorismate is the end-product of the shikimate pathway for biosynthesis of carbocyclic aromatic compounds in plants, bacteria, fungi, and some parasites. Anthranilate synthase (AS), 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase (ADCS), and isochorismate synthase (IS) are homologous enzymes that carry out the initial transformations on chorismate in the biosynthesis of tryptophan, p-aminobenzoate, and enterobactin, respectively, and are expected to share a common mechanism. Poor binding to ADCS of two potential transition state analogues for addition of a nucleophile to C6 of chorismate implies that it, like AS and IS, initiates reaction by addition of a nucleophile to C2. Molecular modeling based on the X-ray structures of AS and ADCS suggests that the active site residue K274 is the nucleophile employed by ADCS to initiate the reaction, forming a covalent intermediate. The K274A and K274R mutants were shown to have 265- and 640-fold reduced k(cat) values when PabA (the cognate amidotransferase) + glutamine are used as the nitrogen source. Under conditions of saturating chorismate and NH(4)(+), ADCS and the K274A mutant have identical k(cat) values, suggesting the participation of NH(4)(+) as a rescue agent. Such participation was confirmed by the buildup of 2-amino-2-deoxyisochorismate in the reactions of the K274A mutant but not ADCS, when either NH(4)(+) or PabA + glutamine is used as the nitrogen source. Additionally, the inclusion of ethylamine in the reactions of K274A yields the N-ethyl derivative of 2-amino-2-deoxyisochorismate. A unifying mechanism for AS, ADCS, and IS entailing nucleophile addition to C2 of chorismate in an S(N)2' ' process is proposed.

  6. Navigating ligand protein binding free energy landscapes: universality and diversity of protein folding and molecular recognition mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhivker, Gennady M.; Rejto, Paul A.; Bouzida, Djamal; Arthurs, Sandra; Colson, Anthony B.; Freer, Stephan T.; Gehlhaar, Daniel K.; Larson, Veda; Luty, Brock A.; Marrone, Tami; Rose, Peter W.

    2001-03-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of ligand-protein binding are studied for the methotrexate-dihydrofolate reductase system from the binding free energy profile constructed as a function of the order parameter. Thermodynamic stability of the native complex and a cooperative transition to the unique native structure suggest the nucleation kinetic mechanism at the equilibrium transition temperature. Structural properties of the transition state ensemble and the ensemble of nucleation conformations are determined by kinetic simulations of the transmission coefficient and ligand-protein association pathways. Structural analysis of the transition states and the nucleation conformations reconciles different views on the nucleation mechanism in protein folding.

  7. Influences of heterogeneous native contact energy and many-body interactions on the prediction of protein folding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuqing; Ouyang, Yanhua; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-16

    Since single-point mutant perturbation has been used to probe protein folding mechanisms in experiments, the ϕ-value has become a critical parameter to infer the transition state (TS) for two-state proteins. Experimentally, large scale analysis has shown a nearly single uniform ϕ-value with normally distributed error from 24 different proteins; moreover, in zero stability conditions, the intrinsic variable ϕ(0) is around 0.36. To explore how and to what extent theoretical models can capture experimental phenomena, we here use structure-based explicit chain coarse-grained models to investigate the influence of single-point mutant perturbation on protein folding for single domain two-state proteins. Our results indicate that uniform, additive contact energetic interactions cannot predict experimental Brønsted plots well. Those points deviate largely from the main data sets in Brønsted plots, are mostly hydrophobic, and are located in N- and C-terminal contacting regions. Heterogenous contact energy, which is dependent on sequence separation, can narrow the point dispersion in a Brønsted plot. Moreover, we demonstrate that combining many-body interactions with heterogeneous native contact energy can present mean ϕ-values consistent with experimental findings, with a comparable distributed error. This indicates that for more accurate elucidation of protein folding mechanisms by residue-level structure-based models, these elements should be considered.

  8. Role of folded anisotropic fabric in the failure mode of gneiss: new insights from mechanical, microseismic and microstructural laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Dobbs, Marcus R.; Zanchetta, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Fabric anisotropy is a key control of the mechanical behaviour of rocks in a variety of geological settings and on different timescales. However, the effects of inherited, tectonically folded anisotropic fabrics on the brittle strength and failure mode of foliated metamorphic rocks is yet to be fully understood. Data from laboratory uniaxial compression tests on folded gneiss (Agliardi et al., 2014, Tectonophysics) recently showed that the brittle failure mode of this rock type depends on the arrangement of two distinct anisotropies (i.e. foliation and fold axial plane anisotropy), and that rock strength correlates with failure mode. Here we investigate the effects of confining pressure on this behaviour by performing triaxial compression experiments with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and analyse resulting fracture mechanisms and their microfabric controls using high resolution microanalysis techniques. We tested the Monte Canale Gneiss (Austroalpine Bernina nappe, Central Italian Alps), characterized by low phyllosilicate content, compositional layering folded at the cm-scale, and absence of a well-developed axial plane foliation. We used a servo-controlled hydraulic loading system to test 19 air-dry cylindrical specimens (diameter: 54 mm) that were characterized both in terms of fold geometry and orientation of foliation and fold axial planes to the axial load direction. We instrumented the specimens with direct contact axial and circumferential strain gauges. We performed tests at confining pressures of 40 MPa and constant axial strain rates of 5*10-6 s-1, measuring acoustic emissions and P- and S-wave velocities by three wideband (350-1000 kHz) piezoelectric transceivers with 40 dB preamps, mounted in the compression platens. We carried out post-failure microscale observation of fracture mechanisms, microcrack patterns and related fabric controls on resin-impregnated samples, using X-ray MicroCT (resolution: 9 μm), optical microscopy and SEM. Samples

  9. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  10. Self-oscillating Vocal Fold Model Mechanics: Healthy, Diseased, and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiubler, Elizabeth P.; Pollok, Lucas F. E.; Apostoli, Adam G.; Hancock, Adrienne B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Voice disorders have been estimated to have a substantial economic impact of 2.5 billion annually. Approximately 30% of people will suffer from a voice disorder at some point in their lives. Life-sized, self-oscillating, synthetic vocal fold (VF) models are fabricated to exhibit material properties representative of human VFs. These models are created both with and without a polyp-like structure, a pathology that has been shown to produce rich viscous flow structures not normally observed for healthy VFs during normal phonation. Pressure measurements are acquired upstream of the VFs and high-speed images are captured at varying flow rates during VF oscillation to facilitate an understanding of the characteristics of healthy and diseased VFs. The images are analyzed using a videokymography line-scan technique. Clinically-relevant parameters calculated from the volume-velocity output of a circumferentially-vented mask (Rothenberg mask) are compared to human data collected from two groups of males aged 18-30 and 60-80. This study extends the use of synthetic VF models by assessing their ability to replicate behaviors observed in human subject data to advance a means of investigating changes associated with normal, pathological, and the aging voice. Supported by the GWU Institute for Biomedical Engineering (GWIBE) and GWU Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  11. Mechanical design of the folded waveguide for PBX-M and TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelman, C.H.; Bigelow, T.S.; Yugo, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    The folded waveguide (FWG) antenna is an advanced Cyclotron Range of Frequencies launcher being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The FWG offers a drastic increase in radio frequency (RF) power density over typical loop antennas. It also results in internal electric fields of much lower magnitude near the plasma. It is scheduled for installation on either the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) or the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modified (PBX-M) tokamak in January 1996. The design objective is to provide an FWG that can withstand the thermal loads and disruption scenarios and meet the space constants of both machines. The design is also intended to be prototypical for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The FWG is fully retractable, and maintenance operations can be performed while the vessel remains under vacuum. The FWG can operate in fast-wave mode, or it can be retracted, rotated 90{degrees}, and reengaged for the ion-Bernstein wave launch. The polarizing plate completely covers the front of the antenna, except for slots cut at every other gap between with plates of other configurations such as a 0-{pi} dipole plate.

  12. Determination of the elastic properties of short ssDNA molecules by mechanically folding and unfolding DNA hairpins.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Anna; Ritort, Felix

    2014-12-01

    The characterization of elastic properties of biopolymers is crucial to understand many molecular reactions determined by conformational bending fluctuations of the polymer. Direct measurement of such elastic properties using single-molecule methods is usually hindered by the intrinsic tendency of such biopolymers to form high-order molecular structures. For example, single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acids (ssDNA) tend to form secondary structures such as local double helices that prevent the direct measurement of the ideal elastic response of the ssDNA. In this work, we show how to extract the ideal elastic response in the entropic regime of short ssDNA molecules by mechanically pulling two-state DNA hairpins of different contour lengths. This is achieved by measuring the force dependence of the molecular extension and stiffness on mechanically folding and unfolding the DNA hairpin. Both quantities are fit to the worm-like chain elastic model giving values for the persistence length and the interphosphate distance. This method can be used to unravel the elastic properties of short ssDNA and RNA sequences and, more generally, any biopolymer that can exhibit a cooperative two-state transition between mechanically folded and unfolded states (such as proteins).

  13. Mechanical benefits of conservative restoration for dental fissure caries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zheng, Keke; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    The principle of minimal intervention dentistry (MID) is to limit removal of carious tooth tissue while maximizing its repair and survival potential. The objective of this study is to explore the fracture resistance of a permanent molar tooth with a fissure carious lesion along with three clinical restoration procedures, namely one traditional and two conservative approaches, based upon MID. The traditional restoration employs extensive surgical removal of enamel and dentine about the cavity to eliminate potential risk of further caries development, while conservative method #1 removes significantly less enamel and infected dentine, and conservative method #2 only restores the overhanging enamel above the cavity and leaves the infected and affected dentine as it was. An extended finite element method (XFEM) is adopted here to analyze the fracture behaviors of both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of these four different scenarios. It was found that the two conservative methods exhibited better fracture resistance than the traditional restorative method. Although conservative method #2 has less fracture resistance than method #1, it had significantly superior fracture resistance compared to other restorations. More important, after cavity sealing it may potentially enhance the opportunity for remineralization and improved loading bearing capacity and fracture resistance.

  14. Cation-dependent folding of 3' cap-independent translation elements facilitates interaction of a 17-nucleotide conserved sequence with eIF4G.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Jelena J; Treder, Krzysztof; Peterson, Mariko S; Miller, W Allen

    2013-03-01

    The 3'-untranslated regions of many plant viral RNAs contain cap-independent translation elements (CITEs) that drive translation initiation at the 5'-end of the mRNA. The barley yellow dwarf virus-like CITE (BTE) stimulates translation by binding the eIF4G subunit of translation initiation factor eIF4F with high affinity. To understand this interaction, we characterized the dynamic structural properties of the BTE, mapped the eIF4G-binding sites on the BTE and identified a region of eIF4G that is crucial for BTE binding. BTE folding involves cooperative uptake of magnesium ions and is driven primarily by charge neutralization. Footprinting experiments revealed that functional eIF4G fragments protect the highly conserved stem-loop I and a downstream bulge. The BTE forms a functional structure in the absence of protein, and the loop that base pairs the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) remains solvent-accessible at high eIF4G concentrations. The region in eIF4G between the eIF4E-binding site and the MIF4G region is required for BTE binding and translation. The data support the model in which the eIF4F complex binds directly to the BTE which base pairs simultaneously to the 5'-UTR, allowing eIF4F to recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit to the 5'-end.

  15. Intramolecular Charge Transfer Dynamics of 4-(DIMETHYLAMINO)BENZONITRILE: Ultrafast Branching Followed by a Two-Fold Decay Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coto, Pedro B.; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Gustavsson, Thomas; Fujiwara, Takashige; Lim, Edward C.

    2010-06-01

    4-(Dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) is a paradigm molecule system that exhibits dual fluorescence and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in polar solvents. Although numbers of different experimental and theoretical methods have been carried out to date for elucidating the basic mechanism of its energy relaxation, there are still some crucial problems that remain unanswered. The time-resolved transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence upconversion will be presented, as combined with ab initio CASPT2//CASSCF calculations, which indicate that a more complex mechanism may be suggested in the ICT reaction in a polar environment. A scheme of ultrafast branching relaxation followed by two-fold decay is proposed in which, whereas the fully twisted ICT (TICT) state is responsible for the transient absorption, a distinct partially twisted ICT (pTICT) structure is for the fluorescent ICT state, both displaying clearly different decay rates.

  16. Folding Beauties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Leah Wrenn

    2006-01-01

    This article has its genesis in an MAA mini-course on origami, where a way to get a parabola by folding paper was presented. This article discusses the methods and mathematics of other curves obtained by paper-folding.

  17. Mechanics of neurulation: From classical to current perspectives on the physical mechanics that shape, fold, and form the neural tube.

    PubMed

    Vijayraghavan, Deepthi S; Davidson, Lance A

    2016-09-13

    Neural tube defects arise from mechanical failures in the process of neurulation. At the most fundamental level, formation of the neural tube relies on coordinated, complex tissue movements that mechanically transform the flat neural epithelium into a lumenized epithelial tube (Davidson, 2012). The nature of this mechanical transformation has mystified embryologists, geneticists, and clinicians for more than 100 years. Early embryologists pondered the physical mechanisms that guide this transformation. Detailed observations of cell and tissue movements as well as experimental embryological manipulations allowed researchers to generate and test elementary hypotheses of the intrinsic and extrinsic forces acting on the neural tissue. Current research has turned toward understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying neurulation. Genetic and molecular perturbation have identified a multitude of subcellular components that correlate with cell behaviors and tissue movements during neural tube formation. In this review, we focus on methods and conceptual frameworks that have been applied to the study of amphibian neurulation that can be used to determine how molecular and physical mechanisms are integrated and responsible for neurulation. We will describe how qualitative descriptions and quantitative measurements of strain, force generation, and tissue material properties as well as simulations can be used to understand how embryos use morphogenetic programs to drive neurulation. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A conserved fold for fimbrial components revealed by the crystal structure of a putative fimbrial assembly protein (BT1062) from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron at 2.2 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    BT1062 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a homolog of Mfa2 (PGN0288 or PG0179), which is a component of the minor fimbriae in Porphyromonas gingivalis. The crystal structure of BT1062 revealed a conserved fold that is widely adopted by fimbrial components. PMID:20944223

  19. Extreme Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaine, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Our understanding of the mathematics and algorithms behind paper folding, and geometric folding in general, has increased dramatically over the past several years. These developments have found a surprisingly broad range of applications. In the art of origami, it has helped spur the technical origami revolution. In engineering and science, it has helped solve problems in areas such as manufacturing, robotics, graphics, and protein folding. On the recreational side, it has led to new kinds of folding puzzles and magic. I will give an overview of the mathematics and algorithms of folding, with a focus on new mathematics and sculpture.

  20. Transformation of the mechanism of triple-helix peptide folding in the absence of a C-terminal nucleation domain and its implications for mutations in collagen disorders.

    PubMed

    Buevich, Alexei V; Silva, Teresita; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean

    2004-11-05

    Folding abnormalities of the triple helix have been demonstrated in collagen diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta in which the mutation leads to the substitution of a single Gly in the (Gly-X-Y)n sequence pattern by a larger residue. Model peptides can be used to clarify the details of normal collagen folding and the consequences of the interruption of that folding by a Gly substitution. NMR and CD studies show that placement of a (GPO)4 nucleation domain at the N terminus rather than the C terminus of a native collagen sequence allows the formation of a stable triple helix but alters the folding mechanism. Although C- to N-terminal directional folding occurs when the nucleation domain is at the C terminus, there is no preferential folding direction when the nucleation domain is at the N terminus. The lack of zipper-like directional folding does not interfere with triple-helix formation, and when a Gly residue is replaced by Ser to model an osteogenesis imperfecta mutation, the peptide with the N-terminal (GPO)4 domain can still form a good triple helix N-terminal to the mutation site. These peptide studies raise the possibility that mutant collagen could fold in a C to N direction in a zipper-like manner up to the mutation site and that completion of the triple helix N-terminal to the mutation would involve an alternative mechanism.

  1. Mechanics of the Salt Range-Potwar Plateau, Pakistan: A fold-and-thrust belt underlain by evaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumé, Steven C.; Lillie, Robert J.

    1988-02-01

    The Salt Range and Potwar Plateau are part of the active foreland fold-and-thrust belt of the Himalaya in northern Pakistan. In this region the distance from the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) to the front of the fold-and-thrust belt is very wide (100-150 km) because a thick evaporite sequence forms the zone of décollement. Recent studies have combined seismic reflection profiles, petroleum exploration wells, Bouguer gravity anomalies, and surface geology to construct cross sections in the eastern, central, and western Salt Range-Potwar Plateau areas. In this study the sections are compared with a model that considers the mechanics of a fold-and-thrust belt to be analogous to that of a wedge of snow or soil pushed in front of a bulldozer (Chapple, 1978; Davis et al., 1983; Dahlen et al., 1984; Dahlen, 1984). Models which include the effects of evaporites at the base (Chapple, 1978; Davis and Engelder, 1985) suggest that these thrust belts will have (1) narrow (< 1°) cross-sectional tapers, (2) larger widths than areas not underlain by evaporites, (3) symmetrical structures, and (4) changes in deformational style at the edge of the evaporite basin. The section across the eastern Potwar Plateau most closely resembles this latter model, having (1) a taper of 0.8° ± 0.1°, (2) a width of 100-150 km, (3) thrust faults that verge both to the north and south, and (4) structures rotated 30° counterclockwise with respect to the Salt Range. From the observed taper and pore fluid pressures of the eastern Potwar Plateau, estimates of the values for the yield strength of the evaporites (τo) and the coefficient of internal friction of the overlying wedge (μ) are calculated as τo = 1.33-1.50 MPa and μ = 0.95-1.04, which are then applied to the other cross sections. In the central and western sections a basement uplift, the Sargodha High, interferes with the front of the fold-and-thrust belt. This feature causes the ramping of the Salt Range Thrust and produces a relatively

  2. Conservative Diffusions: a Constructive Approach to Nelson's Stochastic Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlen, Eric Anders

    In Nelson's stochastic mechanics, quantum phenomena are described in terms of diffusions instead of wave functions; this thesis is a study of that description. We emphasize that we are concerned here with the possibility of describing, as opposed to explaining, quantum phenomena in terms of diffusions. In this direction, the following questions arise: "Do the diffusions of stochastic mechanics--which are formally given by stochastic differential equations with extremely singular coefficients--really exist?" Given that they exist, one can ask, "Do these diffusions have physically reasonable sample path behavior, and can we use information about sample paths to study the behavior of physical systems?" These are the questions we treat in this thesis. In Chapter I we review stochastic mechanics and diffusion theory, using the Guerra-Morato variational principle to establish the connection with the Schroedinger equation. This chapter is largely expository; however, there are some novel features and proofs. In Chapter II we settle the first of the questions raised above. Using PDE methods, we construct the diffusions of stochastic mechanics. Our result is sufficiently general to be of independent mathematical interest. In Chapter III we treat potential scattering in stochastic mechanics and discuss direct probabilistic methods of studying quantum scattering problems. Our results provide a solid "Yes" in answer to the second question raised above.

  3. Conserved two-step regulatory mechanism of human epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rane, Jayant K; Droop, Alastair P; Pellacani, Davide; Polson, Euan S; Simms, Matthew S; Collins, Anne T; Caves, Leo S D; Maitland, Norman J

    2014-02-11

    Human epithelia are organized in a hierarchical structure, where stem cells generate terminally differentiated cells via intermediate progenitors. This two-step differentiation process is conserved in all tissues, but it is not known whether a common gene set contributes to its regulation. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA) regulates early human prostate epithelial differentiation by activating a tightly coexpressed set of 80 genes (e.g., TMPRSS2). Response kinetics suggested that some of these genes could be direct RA targets, whereas others are probably responding indirectly to RA stimulation. Comparative bioinformatic analyses of published tissue-specific microarrays and a large-scale transcriptomic data set revealed that these 80 genes are not only RA responsive but also significantly coexpressed in many human cell systems. The same gene set preferentially responds to androgens during terminal prostate epithelial differentiation, implying a cell-type-dependent interplay between RA and tissue-specific transcription factor-mediated signaling in regulating the two steps of epithelial differentiation.

  4. Topological selection mechanism for conservation laws in incompressible stratified Euler fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortenzi, Giovanni; Chen, Shengqian; Camassa, Roberto; Falqui, Gregorio; Pedroni, Marco

    2014-11-01

    With his Kaffeeloeffel thought (``gedanken'') experiment, in 1910 Klein suggested that a topological change of an ideal fluid's domain can provide a mechanism for breaking the conservation of circulation enforced by Kelvin's Theorem. In our study, we extend this idea to more general conservation laws and explore the role of topological properties in the dynamics of an incompressible Euler fluid with stratification. In particular, we show that topologically non-trivial configurations of stratified fluid domains generate selection mechanisms for conserved quantities other than vorticity. In the talk we concentrate on the simple example of an air-water system in a channel, which encapsulates all the main points of these selection mechanisms. Among other examples, we show that the connection properties of the air domain affect total horizontal momentum conservation, despite the translational invariance of the system and its consequences by Noether's Theorem.

  5. Independent recruitment of a conserved developmental mechanism during leaf evolution.

    PubMed

    Harrison, C Jill; Corley, Susie B; Moylan, Elizabeth C; Alexander, Debbie L; Scotland, Robert W; Langdale, Jane A

    2005-03-24

    Vascular plants evolved in the Middle to Late Silurian period, about 420 million years ago. The fossil record indicates that these primitive plants had branched stems with sporangia but no leaves. Leaf-like lateral outgrowths subsequently evolved on at least two independent occasions. In extant plants, these events are represented by microphyllous leaves in lycophytes (clubmosses, spikemosses and quillworts) and megaphyllous leaves in euphyllophytes (ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms). Our current understanding of how leaves develop is restricted to processes that operate during megaphyll formation. Because microphylls and megaphylls evolved independently, different mechanisms might be required for leaf formation. Here we show that this is not so. Gene expression data from a microphyllous lycophyte, phylogenetic analyses, and a cross-species complementation experiment all show that a common developmental mechanism can underpin both microphyll and megaphyll formation. We propose that this mechanism might have operated originally in the context of primitive plant apices to facilitate bifurcation. Recruitment of this pathway to form leaves occurred independently and in parallel in different plant lineages.

  6. Folding mechanisms of individual beta-hairpins in a Go model of Pin1 WW domain by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhonglin; Ding, Jiandong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2008-06-14

    This paper examines the folding mechanism of an individual beta-hairpin in the presence of other hairpins by using an off-lattice model of a small triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet protein, Pin1 WW domain. The turn zipper model and the hydrophobic collapse model originally developed for a single beta-hairpin in literature is confirmed to be useful in describing beta-hairpins in model Pin1 WW domain. We find that the mechanism for folding a specific hairpin is independent of whether it folds first or second, but the formation process are significantly dependent on temperature. More specifically, beta1-beta2 hairpin folds via the turn zipper model at a low temperature and the hydrophobic collapse model at a high temperature, while the folding of beta2-beta3 hairpin follows the turn zipper model at both temperatures. The change in folding mechanisms is interpreted by the interplay between contact stability (enthalpy) and loop lengths (entropy), the effect of which is temperature dependent.

  7. Eccentric contraction: unraveling mechanisms of force enhancement and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Kiisa

    2016-01-01

    During the past century, physiologists have made steady progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of muscle contraction. However, this progress has so far failed to definitively explain the high force and low energy cost of eccentric muscle contraction. Hypotheses that have been proposed to explain increased muscle force during active stretch include cross-bridge mechanisms, sarcomere and half-sarcomere length non-uniformity, and engagement of a structural element upon muscle activation. The available evidence suggests that force enhancement results from an interaction between an elastic element in muscle sarcomeres, which is engaged upon activation, and the cross-bridges, which interact with the elastic elements to regulate their length and stiffness. Similarities between titin-based residual force enhancement in vertebrate muscle and twitchin-based 'catch' in invertebrate muscle suggest evolutionary homology. The winding filament hypothesis suggests plausible molecular mechanisms for effects of both Ca(2+) influx and cross-bridge cycling on titin in active muscle. This hypothesis proposes that the N2A region of titin binds to actin upon Ca(2+) influx, and that the PEVK region of titin winds on the thin filaments during force development because the cross-bridges not only translate but also rotate the thin filaments. Simulations demonstrate that a muscle model based on the winding filament hypothesis can predict residual force enhancement on the descending limb of the length-tension curve in muscles during eccentric contraction. A kinematic model of titin winding based on sarcomere geometry makes testable predictions about titin isoforms in different muscles. Ongoing research is aimed at testing these predictions and elucidating the biochemistry of the underlying protein interactions.

  8. Interplay among tertiary contacts, secondary structure formation and side-chain packing in the protein folding mechanism: all-atom representation study of protein L.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Cecilia; García, Angel E; Onuchic, José N

    2003-02-21

    Experimental and theoretical results suggest that, since proteins are energetically minimally frustrated, the native fold, or topology, plays a primary role in determining the structure of the transition state ensemble and on-pathway intermediate states in protein folding. Although the central role of native state topology in determining the folding mechanism is thought to be a quite general result-at least for small two-state folding proteins-there are remarkable exceptions. Recent experimental findings have shown that topology alone cannot always determine the folding mechanism, and demonstrated that the balance between topology and energetics is very delicate. This balance seems to be particularly critical in proteins with a highly symmetrical native structure, such as proteins L and G, which have similar native structure topology but fold by different mechanisms. Simplified, C(alpha)-atom only protein models have shown not be sufficient to differentiate these mechanisms. An all-atom Gō model provides a valuable intermediate model between structurally simplified protein representations and all-atom protein simulations with explicit/implicit solvent descriptions. We present here a detailed study of an all-atom Gō-like representation of protein L, in close comparison with the experimental results and with the results obtained from a simple C(alpha)-atom representation of the same protein. We also perform simulations for protein G, where we obtain a folding mechanism in which the protein symmetry is broken exactly in the opposite way to protein L as has been observed experimentally. A detailed analysis for protein L also shows that the role of specific residues is correctly and quantitatively reproduced by the all-atom Gō model over almost the entire protein.

  9. Microstructures, deformation mechanisms and strain patterns in a vertical profile, inner appalachian fold-thrust belt, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Schuman

    1993-02-01

    A core from the American Anniston No. 1 well, drilled in the Pell City thrust sheet, Calhoun County, Alabama, provides an excellent scientific opportunity to study in a vertical profile the deformation mechanisms and strain patterns associated with large-scale structures. The core contains stratigraphic units from Cambrian to Mississippian in age and two major thrust faults. A detailed structural analysis revealed two deformation episodes, a pre-orogenic deformation and Alleghanian orogenic deformation. In the pre-orogenic deformation, synsedimentary folds and growth faults are the characteristic early structures, and normal faults formed in lithifield rocks later. During Alleghanian deformation, earlier fractures are overprinted by later S1 penetrative structures. In limestone, shale and siltstone within thrust sheets, S1 is solution cleavage. Dolomites in the thrust sheets were deformed by fracturing, and no penetrative cleavages formed. In major fault zones, S1 mylonitic foliation formed in limestone, shale and siltstone. Fault-related dolomites were deformed cataclastically and no S surfaces formed. Strain magnitude increases towards major thrust faults in both the hanging walls and footwalls. For the typical fault configuration in the core with limestone-dolomite in the hanging wall and shale-siltstone in the footwall, strain is mainly caused by pressure solution and cataclasis in the hanging wall and by plastic deformation in the footwall.

  10. Effects of cohesion on the structural and mechanical evolution of fold and thrust belts and contractional wedges: Discrete element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Julia K.

    2015-05-01

    Particle-based numerical simulations of cohesive contractional wedges can yield important perspectives on the formation and evolution of fold and thrust belts, offering particular insights into the mechanical evolution of the systems. Results of several discrete element method simulations are presented here, demonstrating the stress and strain evolution of systems with different initial cohesive strengths. Particle assemblages consolidated under gravity, and bonded to impart cohesion, are pushed from the left at a constant velocity above a weak, unbonded décollement surface. Internal thrusting causes horizontal shortening and vertical thickening, forming wedge geometries. The mean wedge taper is similar for all simulations, consistent with their similar residual and basal sliding friction values. In all examples presented here, both forethrusts and back thrusts occur, but forethrusts accommodate most of the shortening. Fault spacing and offset increase with increasing cohesion. Significant tectonic volume strain also occurs, with the greatest incremental volume strain occurring just outboard of the deformation front. This diffuse shortening serves to strengthen the unfaulted domain in front of the deformed wedge, preconditioning these materials for brittle (dilative) failure. The reach of this volumetric strain and extent of décollement slip increase with cohesive strength, defining the extent of stress transmission. Stress paths for elements tracked through the simulations demonstrate systematic variations in shear stress in response to episodes of both décollement slip and thrust fault activity, providing a direct explanation for stress fluctuations during convergence.

  11. FERM-dependent E3 ligase recognition is a conserved mechanism for targeted degradation of lipoprotein receptors

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Hong, Cynthia; Schwabe, John W. R.; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDL receptor) regulates LDL receptor (LDLR)-dependent cholesterol uptake, but its mechanism of action, including the molecular basis for its stringent specificity, is poorly understood. Here we show that IDOL uses a singular strategy among E3 ligases for target recognition. The IDOL FERM domain binds directly to a recognition sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of lipoprotein receptors. This physical interaction is independent of IDOL's really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase activity and its capacity for autoubiquitination. Furthermore, IDOL controls its own stability through autoubiquitination of a unique FERM subdomain fold not present in other FERM proteins. Key residues defining the IDOL–LDLR interaction and IDOL autoubiquitination are functionally conserved in their insect homologs. Finally, we demonstrate that target recognition by IDOL involves a tripartite interaction between the FERM domain, membrane phospholipids, and the lipoprotein receptor tail. Our data identify the IDOL–LDLR interaction as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the regulation of lipid uptake and suggest that this interaction could potentially be exploited for the pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:22109552

  12. FERM-dependent E3 ligase recognition is a conserved mechanism for targeted degradation of lipoprotein receptors.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Goult, Benjamin T; Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Hong, Cynthia; Schwabe, John W R; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-12-13

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDL receptor) regulates LDL receptor (LDLR)-dependent cholesterol uptake, but its mechanism of action, including the molecular basis for its stringent specificity, is poorly understood. Here we show that IDOL uses a singular strategy among E3 ligases for target recognition. The IDOL FERM domain binds directly to a recognition sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of lipoprotein receptors. This physical interaction is independent of IDOL's really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase activity and its capacity for autoubiquitination. Furthermore, IDOL controls its own stability through autoubiquitination of a unique FERM subdomain fold not present in other FERM proteins. Key residues defining the IDOL-LDLR interaction and IDOL autoubiquitination are functionally conserved in their insect homologs. Finally, we demonstrate that target recognition by IDOL involves a tripartite interaction between the FERM domain, membrane phospholipids, and the lipoprotein receptor tail. Our data identify the IDOL-LDLR interaction as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the regulation of lipid uptake and suggest that this interaction could potentially be exploited for the pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism.

  13. Hierarchical folding mechanism of apomyoglobin revealed by ultra-fast H/D exchange coupled with 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Takanori; Nishimura, Chiaki; Akiyama, Shuji; Ishimori, Koichiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2008-09-16

    The earliest steps in the folding of proteins are complete on an extremely rapid time scale that is difficult to access experimentally. We have used rapid-mixing quench-flow methods to extend the time resolution of folding studies on apomyoglobin and elucidate the structural and dynamic features of members of the ensemble of intermediate states that are populated on a submillisecond time scale during this process. The picture that emerges is of a continuum of rapidly interconverting states. Even after only 0.4 ms of refolding time a compact state is formed that contains major parts of the A, G, and H helices, which are sufficiently well folded to protect amides from exchange. The B, C, and E helix regions fold more slowly and fluctuate rapidly between open and closed states as they search docking sites on this core; the secondary structure in these regions becomes stabilized as the refolding time is increased from 0.4 to 6 ms. No further stabilization occurs in the A, G, H core at 6 ms of folding time. These studies begin to time-resolve a progression of compact states between the fully unfolded and native folded states and confirm the presence an ensemble of intermediates that interconvert in a hierarchical sequence as the protein searches conformational space on its folding trajectory.

  14. Insights into function, catalytic mechanism, and fold evolution of selenoprotein methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 through structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Aachmann, Finn L; Sal, Lena S; Kim, Hwa-Young; Marino, Stefano M; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Dikiy, Alexander

    2010-10-22

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases protect cells by repairing oxidatively damaged methionine residues in proteins. Here, we report the first three-dimensional structure of the mammalian selenoprotein methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1), determined by high resolution NMR spectroscopy. Heteronuclear multidimensional spectra yielded NMR spectral assignments for the reduced form of MsrB1 in which catalytic selenocysteine (Sec) was replaced with cysteine (Cys). MsrB1 consists of a central structured core of two β-sheets and a highly flexible, disordered N-terminal region. Analysis of pH dependence of NMR signals of catalytically relevant residues, comparison with the data for bacterial MsrBs, and NMR-based structural analysis of methionine sulfoxide (substrate) and methionine sulfone (inhibitor) binding to MsrB1 at the atomic level reveal a mechanism involving catalytic Sec(95) and resolving Cys(4) residues in catalysis. The MsrB1 structure differs from the structures of Cys-containing MsrBs in the use of distal selenenylsulfide, residues needed for catalysis, and the mode in which the active form of the enzyme is regenerated. In addition, this is the first structure of a eukaryotic zinc-containing MsrB, which highlights the structural role of this metal ion bound to four conserved Cys. We integrated this information into a structural model of evolution of MsrB superfamily.

  15. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  16. Evolving Stress State and Deformation Mechanism in the Himalayan Foreland Fold-and-Thrust Belt, Northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, I.; Dasti, N.

    2010-12-01

    Crustal deformation along with shortening due to northward under-thrusting of the Indian plate beneath the Eurasian plate continues to create active tectonic features on the northern fringes of the Indian craton since major collision began in the Eocene. Here the study provides insights on the evolving stress state and deformation mechanism of the Salt Range and Potwar area of Northern Pakistan. This part of Himalayan foreland fold-and-thrust-belt has severe history of deformation during 5.1 Ma and 2 Ma. This foreland area lies between Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) in the north, Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) in the south and Jhelum fault of sinistral nature in the east & Kalabagh fault of dextral nature in the west. An integrated data from seismic reflection profiles and drilling logs reveal that the subsurface deformation encompasses pop-ups, imbricates, duplexes with in-sequence and out-of-sequence thrusting. It also depicts that intensity of deformation increases from the northern margin of Soan geosyncline towards north due to lacking of evaporites while in the south it decreases due to gradual increase in salt thickness. Surface geologic mapping glimpses a series of thrust sheets and anticlines trending ENE-SWS in the eastern and central part of the study area; whereas in the western part, the trend is almost E-W. This variation in the trend of structures is the result of counter clock rotational behaviour (~10°deviation from north to the west) of north-western part of the Indian lithospheric plate. Current outcrop-scale natural fracture data collected from selected anticlinal structures of the study area is presented to manifest the stress evolution and deformation styles under the established tectonic framework. Collected data is analysed for the evaluation of tectonic stress direction and deformation mechanism. The genetic arrangement and types of fractures observed in the study area indicate that the whole area is under compression. The data also testify

  17. Statistical mechanical foundation of the peridynamic nonlocal continuum theory: energy and momentum conservation laws.

    PubMed

    Lehoucq, R B; Sears, Mark P

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive the energy and momentum conservation laws of the peridynamic nonlocal continuum theory using the principles of classical statistical mechanics. The peridynamic laws allow the consideration of discontinuous motion, or deformation, by relying on integral operators. These operators sum forces and power expenditures separated by a finite distance and so represent nonlocal interaction. The integral operators replace the differential divergence operators conventionally used, thereby obviating special treatment at points of discontinuity. The derivation presented employs a general multibody interatomic potential, avoiding the standard assumption of a pairwise decomposition. The integral operators are also expressed in terms of a stress tensor and heat flux vector under the assumption that these fields are differentiable, demonstrating that the classical continuum energy and momentum conservation laws are consequences of the more general peridynamic laws. An important conclusion is that nonlocal interaction is intrinsic to continuum conservation laws when derived using the principles of statistical mechanics.

  18. Crystal structure of a member of a novel family of dioxygenases (PF10014) reveals a conserved cupin fold and active site

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Grant, Joanna; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Lesley, Scott A.; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    PF10014 is a novel family of 2-oxyglutarate-Fe2+-dependent dioxygenases that are involved in biosynthesis of antibiotics and regulation of biofilm formation, likely by catalyzing hydroxylation of free amino acids or other related ligands. The crystal structure of a PF10014 member from Methylibium petroleiphilum at 1.9 Å resolution shows strong structural similarity to cupin dioxygenases in overall fold and active site, despite very remote homology. However, one of the β-strands of the cupin catalytic core is replaced by a loop that displays conformational isomerism that likely regulates the active site. PMID:23852666

  19. Crystal structure of a member of a novel family of dioxygenases (PF10014) reveals a conserved cupin fold and active site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingping; Grant, Joanna; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Lesley, Scott A; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    PF10014 is a novel family of 2-oxyglutarate-Fe(2+) -dependent dioxygenases that are involved in biosynthesis of antibiotics and regulation of biofilm formation, likely by catalyzing hydroxylation of free amino acids or other related ligands. The crystal structure of a PF10014 member from Methylibium petroleiphilum at 1.9 Å resolution shows strong structural similarity to cupin dioxygenases in overall fold and active site, despite very remote homology. However, one of the β-strands of the cupin catalytic core is replaced by a loop that displays conformational isomerism that likely regulates the active site.

  20. Rv0216, a Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Myocbacterium Tuberculosis that is Essential for Bacterial Survival During Infection, has a Double Hotdog Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Castell,A.; Johansson, P.; Unge, T.; Jones, T.; Backbro, K.

    2005-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome contains about 4000 genes, of which approximately a third code for proteins of unknown function or are classified as conserved hypothetical proteins. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of one of these, the rv0216 gene product, which has been shown to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth in vivo. The structure exhibits the greatest similarity to bacterial and eukaryotic hydratases that catalyse the R-specific hydration of 2-enoyl coenzyme A. However, only part of the catalytic machinery is conserved in Rv0216 and it showed no activity for the substrate crotonyl-CoA. The structure of Rv0216 allows us to assign new functional annotations to a family of seven other M. tuberculosis proteins, a number if which are essential for bacterial survival during infection and growth.

  1. The interplay of fold mechanisms and basement weaknesses at the transition between Laramide basement-involved arches, north-central Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Thomas G.; Erslev, Eric A.

    2009-09-01

    Horizontally-shortened, basement-involved foreland orogens commonly exhibit anastomosing networks of bifurcating basement highs (here called arches) whose structural culminations are linked by complex transition zones of diversely-oriented faults and folds. The 3D geometry and kinematics of the southern Beartooth arch transition zone of north-central Wyoming were studied to understand the fold mechanisms and control on basement-involved arches. Data from 1581 slickensided minor faults are consistent with a single regional shortening direction of 065°. Evidence for oblique-slip, vertical axis rotations and stress refraction at anomalously-oriented folds suggests formation over reactivated pre-existing weaknesses. Restorable cross-sections and 3D surfaces, constrained by surface, well, and seismic data, document blind, ENE-directed basement thrusting and associated thin-skinned backthrusting and folding along the Beartooth and Oregon Basin fault systems. Between these systems, the basement-cored Rattlesnake Mountain backthrust followed basement weaknesses and rotated a basement chip toward the basin before the ENE-directed Line Creek fault system broke through and connected the Beartooth and Oregon Basin fault systems. Slip was transferred at the terminations of the Rattlesnake Mountain fault block by pivoting to the north and tear faulting to the south. In summary, unidirectional Laramide compression and pre-existing basement weaknesses combined with fault-propagation and rotational fault-bend folding to create an irregular yet continuous basement arch transition.

  2. Single-Molecule Folding Mechanisms of the apo- and Mg2+-Bound States of Human Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Mohsin M.; Heidarsson, Pétur O.; Otazo, Mariela R.; Mossa, Alessandro; Kragelund, Birthe B.; Cecconi, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) is the primordial member of a family of proteins responsible primarily for sensing changes in neuronal Ca2+ concentration. NCS-1 is a multispecific protein interacting with a number of binding partners in both calcium-dependent and independent manners, and acting in a variety of cellular processes in which it has been linked to a number of disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Despite extensive studies on the Ca2+-activated state of NCS proteins, little is known about the conformational dynamics of the Mg2+-bound and apo states, both of which are populated, at least transiently, at resting Ca2+ conditions. Here, we used optical tweezers to study the folding behavior of individual NCS-1 molecules in the presence of Mg2+ and in the absence of divalent ions. Under tension, the Mg2+-bound state of NCS-1 unfolds and refolds in a three-state process by populating one intermediate state consisting of a folded C-domain and an unfolded N-domain. The interconversion at equilibrium between the different molecular states populated by NCS-1 was monitored in real time through constant-force measurements and the energy landscapes underlying the observed transitions were reconstructed through hidden Markov model analysis. Unlike what has been observed with the Ca2+-bound state, the presence of Mg2+ allows both the N- and C-domain to fold through all-or-none transitions with similar refolding rates. In the absence of divalent ions, NCS-1 unfolds and refolds reversibly in a two-state reaction involving only the C-domain, whereas the N-domain has no detectable transitions. Overall, the results allowed us to trace the progression of NCS-1 folding along its energy landscapes and provided a solid platform for understanding the conformational dynamics of similar EF-hand proteins. PMID:26153708

  3. Smooth-particle applied mechanics: Conservation of angular momentum with tensile stability and velocity averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Merritt, Elizabeth C.

    2004-01-01

    Smooth-particle applied mechanics (SPAM) provides several approaches to approximate solutions of the continuum equations for both fluids and solids. Though many of the usual formulations conserve mass, (linear) momentum, and energy, the angular momentum is typically not conserved by SPAM. A second difficulty with the usual formulations is that tensile stress states often exhibit an exponentially fast high-frequency short-wavelength instability, “tensile instability.” We discuss these twin defects of SPAM and illustrate them for a rotating elastic body. We formulate ways to conserve angular momentum while at the same time delaying the symptoms of tensile instability for many sound-traversal times. These ideas should prove useful in more general situations.

  4. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant--while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  5. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  6. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  7. Information from folds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudleston, Peter J.; Treagus, Susan H.

    2010-12-01

    Folds are spectacular geological structures that are seen in layered rock on many different scales. To mark 30 years of the Journal of Structural Geology, we review the information that can be gained from studies of folds in theory, experiment and nature. We first review theoretical considerations and modeling, from classical approaches to current developments. The subject is dominated by single-layer fold theory, with the assumption of perfect layer-parallel shortening, but we also review multilayer fold theory and modeling, and folding of layers that are oblique to principal stresses and strains. This work demonstrates that viscosity ratio, degree of non-linearity of the flow law, anisotropy, and the thickness and spacing distribution of layers of different competence are all important in determining the nature and strength of the folding instability. Theory and modeling provide the basis for obtaining rheological information from natural folds, through analysis of wavelength/thickness ratios of single layer folds, and fold shapes. They also provide a basis for estimating the bulk strain from folded layers. Information about folding mechanisms can be obtained by analysis of cleavage and fabric patterns in folded rocks, and the history of deformation can be revealed by understanding how asymmetry can develop in folds, by how folds develop in shear zones, and how folds develop in more complex three-dimensional deformations.

  8. A method to determine mechanical energy conservation and efficiency in equine gait: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Preedy, D F; Colborne, G R

    2001-04-01

    Metabolic and mechanical energy costs of locomotion can be combined to calculate locomotor efficiency, which is the quotient of the mechanical energy and metabolic costs. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the mechanical and metabolic energy costs of locomotion at a range of 7 trotting speeds (2.5 to 6.2 m/s) on a level treadmill. A single, sound Thoroughbred horse was modelled as a system of 15 linked segments incorporating all 4 limbs, head, neck and trunk. The horse performed a continuous incremental exercise test at increasing trotting speeds while VO2 was recorded using a breath-by-breath gas analysis system. Positional data were recorded concurrently at 100 Hz using a 2-camera infrared kinematic system. Mechanical energy cost was calculated for 3-6 strides per speed increment, and metabolic data were obtained during the last 15 s of each speed step. Mechanical energy cost increased linearly from 3.3 J/kg/m at 2.5 m/s to a value of 5.31 J/kg/m at 6.2 m/s, and the within-subject variability was low at each of the speed steps. This analysis accounted for the important energy-conserving mechanisms of energy exchange within and between segments of the link segment model. Within-segment energy conservation remained approximately constant as speed increased, whereas between-segment conservation increased from 1040 to 4502 J/stride. The combination of both metabolic and mechanical costs of locomotion yielded an inverted bell-shaped curve of 'apparent' efficiency across the speed increments, with the maximum value occurring when metabolic cost was lowest at 3.8 m/s.

  9. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-03-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape.

  10. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape. PMID:26976044

  11. Conservative Management of Uncomplicated Mechanical Neck Pain in a Military Aviator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    manual therapy , aviation, exercise therapy, manipulation, spinal. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for...that describe the use of manual therapy , spinal manipulation, or spinal mobilization and therapeutic ex- ercise for managing mechanical neck pain in...conservative interdisciplinary management using manual therapy and therapeutic exercise. Case report A 38-year-old male active duty US Marine Corps F/A-18

  12. The structure of mouse cytomegalovirus m04 protein obtained from sparse NMR data reveals a conserved fold of the m02-m06 viral immune modulator family.

    PubMed

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Natarajan, Kannan; Ying, Jinfa; Vogeli, Beat; Boyd, Lisa F; Margulies, David H; Bax, Ad

    2014-09-02

    Immunoevasins are key proteins used by viruses to subvert host immune responses. Determining their high-resolution structures is key to understanding virus-host interactions toward the design of vaccines and other antiviral therapies. Mouse cytomegalovirus encodes a unique set of immunoevasins, the m02-m06 family, that modulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells. Notwithstanding the large number of genetic and functional studies, the structural biology of immunoevasins remains incompletely understood, largely because of crystallization bottlenecks. Here we implement a technology using sparse nuclear magnetic resonance data and integrative Rosetta modeling to determine the structure of the m04/gp34 immunoevasin extracellular domain. The structure reveals a β fold that is representative of the m02-m06 family of viral proteins, several of which are known to bind MHC-I molecules and interfere with antigen presentation, suggesting its role as a diversified immune regulation module.

  13. Stress, deformation, conservation, and rheology: a survey of key concepts in continuum mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief survey of key concepts in continuum mechanics. It focuses on the fundamental physical concepts that underlie derivations of the mathematical formulations of stress, strain, hydraulic head, pore-fluid pressure, and conservation equations. It then shows how stresses are linked to strain and rates of distortion through some special cases of idealized material behaviors. The goal is to equip the reader with a physical understanding of key mathematical formulations that anchor continuum mechanics in order to better understand theoretical studies published in geomorphology.

  14. Divergent mechanisms regulate conserved cardiopharyngeal development and gene expression in distantly related ascidians

    PubMed Central

    Stolfi, Alberto; Lowe, Elijah K; Racioppi, Claudia; Ristoratore, Filomena; Brown, C Titus; Swalla, Billie J; Christiaen, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Ascidians present a striking dichotomy between conserved phenotypes and divergent genomes: embryonic cell lineages and gene expression patterns are conserved between distantly related species. Much research has focused on Ciona or Halocynthia spp. but development in other ascidians remains poorly characterized. In this study, we surveyed the multipotent myogenic B7.5 lineage in Molgula spp. Comparisons to the homologous lineage in Ciona revealed identical cell division and fate specification events that result in segregation of larval, cardiac, and pharyngeal muscle progenitors. Moreover, the expression patterns of key regulators are conserved, but cross-species transgenic assays uncovered incompatibility, or ‘unintelligibility’, of orthologous cis-regulatory sequences between Molgula and Ciona. These sequences drive identical expression patterns that are not recapitulated in cross-species assays. We show that this unintelligibility is likely due to changes in both cis- and trans-acting elements, hinting at widespread and frequent turnover of regulatory mechanisms underlying otherwise conserved aspects of ascidian embryogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03728.001 PMID:25209999

  15. Efficient molecular mechanics simulations of the folding, orientation, and assembly of peptides in lipid bilayers using an implicit atomic solvation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordner, Andrew J.; Zorman, Barry; Abagyan, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins comprise a significant fraction of the proteomes of sequenced organisms and are the targets of approximately half of marketed drugs. However, in spite of their prevalence and biomedical importance, relatively few experimental structures are available due to technical challenges. Computational simulations can potentially address this deficit by providing structural models of membrane proteins. Solvation within the spatially heterogeneous membrane/solvent environment provides a major component of the energetics driving protein folding and association within the membrane. We have developed an implicit solvation model for membranes that is both computationally efficient and accurate enough to enable molecular mechanics predictions for the folding and association of peptides within the membrane. We derived the new atomic solvation model parameters using an unbiased fitting procedure to experimental data and have applied it to diverse problems in order to test its accuracy and to gain insight into membrane protein folding. First, we predicted the positions and orientations of peptides and complexes within the lipid bilayer and compared the simulation results with solid-state NMR structures. Additionally, we performed folding simulations for a series of host-guest peptides with varying propensities to form alpha helices in a hydrophobic environment and compared the structures with experimental measurements. We were also able to successfully predict the structures of amphipathic peptides as well as the structures for dimeric complexes of short hexapeptides that have experimentally characterized propensities to form beta sheets within the membrane. Finally, we compared calculated relative transfer energies with data from experiments measuring the effects of mutations on the free energies of translocon-mediated insertion of proteins into lipid bilayers and of combined folding and membrane insertion of a beta barrel protein.

  16. Gene expression suggests conserved mechanisms patterning the heads of insects and myriapods.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E; Damen, Wim G M

    2011-09-01

    Segmentation, i.e. the subdivision of the body into serially homologous units, is one of the hallmarks of the arthropods. Arthropod segmentation is best understood in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. But different from the situation in most arthropods in this species all segments are formed from the early blastoderm (so called long-germ developmental mode). In most other arthropods only the anterior segments are formed in a similar way (so called short-germ developmental mode). Posterior segments are added one at a time or in pairs of two from a posterior segment addition zone. The segmentation mechanisms are not universally conserved among arthropods and only little is known about the genetic patterning of the anterior segments. Here we present the expression patterns of the insect head patterning gene orthologs hunchback (hb), orthodenticle (otd), buttonhead-like (btdl), collier (col), cap-n-collar (cnc) and crocodile (croc), and the trunk gap gene Krüppel (Kr) in the myriapod Glomeris marginata. Conserved expression of these genes in insects and a myriapod suggests that the anterior segmentation system may be conserved in at least these two classes of arthropods. This finding implies that the anterior patterning mechanism already existed in the last common ancestor of insects and myriapods.

  17. Ligand Binding Mechanism in Steroid Receptors: From Conserved Plasticity to Differential Evolutionary Constraints.

    PubMed

    Edman, Karl; Hosseini, Ali; Bjursell, Magnus K; Aagaard, Anna; Wissler, Lisa; Gunnarsson, Anders; Kaminski, Tim; Köhler, Christian; Bäckström, Stefan; Jensen, Tina J; Cavallin, Anders; Karlsson, Ulla; Nilsson, Ewa; Lecina, Daniel; Takahashi, Ryoji; Grebner, Christoph; Geschwindner, Stefan; Lepistö, Matti; Hogner, Anders C; Guallar, Victor

    2015-12-01

    Steroid receptor drugs have been available for more than half a century, but details of the ligand binding mechanism have remained elusive. We solved X-ray structures of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors to identify a conserved plasticity at the helix 6-7 region that extends the ligand binding pocket toward the receptor surface. Since none of the endogenous ligands exploit this region, we hypothesized that it constitutes an integral part of the binding event. Extensive all-atom unbiased ligand exit and entrance simulations corroborate a ligand binding pathway that gives the observed structural plasticity a key functional role. Kinetic measurements reveal that the receptor residence time correlates with structural rearrangements observed in both structures and simulations. Ultimately, our findings reveal why nature has conserved the capacity to open up this region, and highlight how differences in the details of the ligand entry process result in differential evolutionary constraints across the steroid receptors.

  18. Changes in the folding landscape of the WW domain provide a molecular mechanism for an inherited genetic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; D’Amelio, Nicola; Lelli, Moreno; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Sudol, Marius; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    WW domains are small domains present in many human proteins with a wide array of functions and acting through the recognition of proline-rich sequences. The WW domain belonging to polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is of particular interest due to its direct involvement in several X chromosome-linked intellectual disabilities, including Golabi-Ito-Hall (GIH) syndrome, where a single point mutation (Y65C) correlates with the development of the disease. The mutant cannot bind to its natural ligand WBP11, which regulates mRNA processing. In this work we use high-field high-resolution NMR and enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the molecular causes the disease. We find that the wild type protein is partially unfolded exchanging among multiple beta-strand-like conformations in solution. The Y65C mutation further destabilizes the residual fold and primes the protein for the formation of a disulphide bridge, which could be at the origin of the loss of function. PMID:27456546

  19. The Crystal Structure of Dehi Reveals a New A-Haloacid Dehalogenase Fold And Active Site Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidberger, J.W.; Wilce, J.A.; Weightman, A.J.; Whisstock, J.C.; Wilce, M.C.J.

    2009-05-27

    Haloacid dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from organic haloacids and are of interest for bioremediation and for their potential use in the synthesis of industrial chemicals. We present the crystal structure of the homodimer DehI from Pseudomonas putida strain PP3, the first structure of a group I {alpha}-haloacid dehalogenase that can process both L- and D-substrates. The structure shows that the DehI monomer consists of two domains of {approx}130 amino acids that have {approx}16% sequence identity yet adopt virtually identical and unique folds that form a pseudo-dimer. Analysis of the active site reveals the likely binding mode of both L- and D-substrates with respect to key catalytic residues. Asp189 is predicted to activate a water molecule for nucleophilic attack of the substrate chiral centre resulting in an inversion of configuration of either L- or D-substrates in contrast to D-only enzymes. These details will assist with future bioengineering of dehalogenases.

  20. Changes in the folding landscape of the WW domain provide a molecular mechanism for an inherited genetic syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; D’Amelio, Nicola; Lelli, Moreno; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Sudol, Marius; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-07-01

    WW domains are small domains present in many human proteins with a wide array of functions and acting through the recognition of proline-rich sequences. The WW domain belonging to polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is of particular interest due to its direct involvement in several X chromosome-linked intellectual disabilities, including Golabi-Ito-Hall (GIH) syndrome, where a single point mutation (Y65C) correlates with the development of the disease. The mutant cannot bind to its natural ligand WBP11, which regulates mRNA processing. In this work we use high-field high-resolution NMR and enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the molecular causes the disease. We find that the wild type protein is partially unfolded exchanging among multiple beta-strand-like conformations in solution. The Y65C mutation further destabilizes the residual fold and primes the protein for the formation of a disulphide bridge, which could be at the origin of the loss of function.

  1. High-speed PIV measurements of the flow downstream of a dynamic mechanical model of the human vocal folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triep, M.; Brücker, Ch.; Schröder, W.

    2005-08-01

    The objective of the present study is the detailed analysis of the unsteady vortex dynamics downstream of the human glottis during phonation at typical fundamental frequencies of the male voice of about 120 Hz. A hydraulic respiratory mock circuit has been built, including a factor of three up-scaled realistic dynamic model of the vocal folds. Time-resolving flow measurements were carried out downstream of the glottis by means of high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV). The function of the human glottis is reproduced by two counter-rotating cams, each of which is covered with a stretched silicone membrane. The three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the cams is designed such that the rotation leads to a realistic time-varying motion and profile of the glottis and waveform of the glottal cycle. Using high-speed PIV, the velocity field is captured with high spatial and temporal resolution to investigate the unsteady vortex dynamics of the cyclic jet-like flow in the vocal tract. The results help us to understand the vorticity interaction within the pulsating jet and, consequently, the generated sound in a human voice. In addition, changing the 3-D contours of the cams enables us to investigate basic pathological differences of the glottis function and the resulting alterations of the velocity and vorticity field in the vocal tract. The results are presented for typical physiological flow conditions in the human glottis. The frequencies of periodic vortex structures generated downstream of the glottis are fivefold higher than the fundamental frequency of the vocal folds’ oscillation. The highest vorticity fluctuations have a phase shift of 35% relative to the opening of the glottis. Finally, the flow field in the vocal tract is identified to be highly three-dimensional.

  2. Asymmetric cell division of T cells upon antigen presentation uses multiple conserved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Oliaro, Jane; Van Ham, Vanessa; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Pasam, Anupama; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Pham, Kim; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Waterhouse, Nigel J; Bots, Michael; Hawkins, Edwin D; Watt, Sally V; Cluse, Leonie A; Clarke, Chris J P; Izon, David J; Chang, John T; Thompson, Natalie; Gu, Min; Johnstone, Ricky W; Smyth, Mark J; Humbert, Patrick O; Reiner, Steven L; Russell, Sarah M

    2010-07-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a potential means by which cell fate choices during an immune response are orchestrated. Defining the molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric division of T cells is paramount for determining the role of this process in the generation of effector and memory T cell subsets. In other cell types, asymmetric cell division is regulated by conserved polarity protein complexes that control the localization of cell fate determinants and spindle orientation during division. We have developed a tractable, in vitro model of naive CD8(+) T cells undergoing initial division while attached to dendritic cells during Ag presentation to investigate whether similar mechanisms might regulate asymmetric division of T cells. Using this system, we show that direct interactions with APCs provide the cue for polarization of T cells. Interestingly, the immunological synapse disseminates before division even though the T cells retain contact with the APC. The cue from the APC is translated into polarization of cell fate determinants via the polarity network of the Par3 and Scribble complexes, and orientation of the mitotic spindle during division is orchestrated by the partner of inscuteable/G protein complex. These findings suggest that T cells have selectively adapted a number of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to generate diversity through asymmetric cell division.

  3. A Novel Kleefstra Syndrome-associated Variant That Affects the Conserved TPLX Motif within the Ankyrin Repeat of EHMT1 Leads to Abnormal Protein Folding*

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Patrick R.; Tischer, Alexander; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Kemppainen, Jennifer L.; Sastry, Sujatha; Knight Johnson, Amy E.; Cousin, Margot A.; Boczek, Nicole J.; Oliver, Gavin; Misra, Vinod K.; Gavrilova, Ralitza H.; Lomberk, Gwen; Auton, Matthew; Urrutia, Raul; Klee, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    Kleefstra syndrome (KS) (Mendelian Inheritance in Man (MIM) no. 610253), also known as 9q34 deletion syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by haploinsufficiency of euchromatic histone methyltransferase-1 (EHMT1). The clinical phenotype of KS includes moderate to severe intellectual disability with absent speech, hypotonia, brachycephaly, congenital heart defects, and dysmorphic facial features with hypertelorism, synophrys, macroglossia, protruding tongue, and prognathism. Only a few cases of de novo missense mutations in EHMT1 giving rise to KS have been described. However, some EHMT1 variants have been described in individuals presenting with autism spectrum disorder or mild intellectual disability, suggesting that the phenotypic spectrum resulting from EHMT1 alterations may be quite broad. In this report, we describe two unrelated patients with complex medical histories consistent with KS in whom next generation sequencing identified the same novel c.2426C>T (p.P809L) missense variant in EHMT1. To examine the functional significance of this novel variant, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type and p.P809L variant, which predicted that the latter would have a propensity to misfold, leading to abnormal histone mark binding. Recombinant EHMT1 p.P809L was also studied using far UV circular dichroism spectroscopy and intrinsic protein fluorescence. These functional studies confirmed the model-based hypotheses and provided evidence for protein misfolding and aberrant target recognition as the underlying pathogenic mechanism for this novel KS-associated variant. This is the first report to suggest that missense variants in EHMT1 that lead to protein misfolding and disrupted histone mark binding can lead to KS. PMID:28057753

  4. A Genome-Scale Model of Shewanella piezotolerans Simulates Mechanisms of Metabolic Diversity and Energy Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Dufault-Thompson, Keith; Jian, Huahua; Cheng, Ruixue; Li, Jiefu; Wang, Fengping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella piezotolerans strain WP3 belongs to the group 1 branch of the Shewanella genus and is a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant species isolated from the deep sea. In this study, a genome-scale model was constructed for WP3 using a combination of genome annotation, ortholog mapping, and physiological verification. The metabolic reconstruction contained 806 genes, 653 metabolites, and 922 reactions, including central metabolic functions that represented nonhomologous replacements between the group 1 and group 2 Shewanella species. Metabolic simulations with the WP3 model demonstrated consistency with existing knowledge about the physiology of the organism. A comparison of model simulations with experimental measurements verified the predicted growth profiles under increasing concentrations of carbon sources. The WP3 model was applied to study mechanisms of anaerobic respiration through investigating energy conservation, redox balancing, and the generation of proton motive force. Despite being an obligate respiratory organism, WP3 was predicted to use substrate-level phosphorylation as the primary source of energy conservation under anaerobic conditions, a trait previously identified in other Shewanella species. Further investigation of the ATP synthase activity revealed a positive correlation between the availability of reducing equivalents in the cell and the directionality of the ATP synthase reaction flux. Comparison of the WP3 model with an existing model of a group 2 species, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, revealed that the WP3 model demonstrated greater flexibility in ATP production under the anaerobic conditions. Such flexibility could be advantageous to WP3 for its adaptation to fluctuating availability of organic carbon sources in the deep sea. IMPORTANCE The well-studied nature of the metabolic diversity of Shewanella bacteria makes species from this genus a promising platform for investigating the evolution of carbon metabolism and energy

  5. A Genome-Scale Model of Shewanella piezotolerans Simulates Mechanisms of Metabolic Diversity and Energy Conservation.

    PubMed

    Dufault-Thompson, Keith; Jian, Huahua; Cheng, Ruixue; Li, Jiefu; Wang, Fengping; Zhang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Shewanella piezotolerans strain WP3 belongs to the group 1 branch of the Shewanella genus and is a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant species isolated from the deep sea. In this study, a genome-scale model was constructed for WP3 using a combination of genome annotation, ortholog mapping, and physiological verification. The metabolic reconstruction contained 806 genes, 653 metabolites, and 922 reactions, including central metabolic functions that represented nonhomologous replacements between the group 1 and group 2 Shewanella species. Metabolic simulations with the WP3 model demonstrated consistency with existing knowledge about the physiology of the organism. A comparison of model simulations with experimental measurements verified the predicted growth profiles under increasing concentrations of carbon sources. The WP3 model was applied to study mechanisms of anaerobic respiration through investigating energy conservation, redox balancing, and the generation of proton motive force. Despite being an obligate respiratory organism, WP3 was predicted to use substrate-level phosphorylation as the primary source of energy conservation under anaerobic conditions, a trait previously identified in other Shewanella species. Further investigation of the ATP synthase activity revealed a positive correlation between the availability of reducing equivalents in the cell and the directionality of the ATP synthase reaction flux. Comparison of the WP3 model with an existing model of a group 2 species, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, revealed that the WP3 model demonstrated greater flexibility in ATP production under the anaerobic conditions. Such flexibility could be advantageous to WP3 for its adaptation to fluctuating availability of organic carbon sources in the deep sea. IMPORTANCE The well-studied nature of the metabolic diversity of Shewanella bacteria makes species from this genus a promising platform for investigating the evolution of carbon metabolism and energy conservation

  6. Predictive Computational Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Pierro, Miichele; Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter J.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    In vivo, the human genome folds into well-determined and conserved three-dimensional structures. The mechanism driving the folding process remains unknown. We report a theoretical model (MiChroM) for chromatin derived by using the maximum entropy principle. The proposed model allows Molecular Dynamics simulations of the genome using as input the classification of loci into chromatin types and the presence of binding sites of loop forming protein CTCF. The model was trained to reproduce the Hi-C map of chromosome 10 of human lymphoblastoid cells. With no additional tuning the model was able to predict accurately the Hi-C maps of chromosomes 1-22 for the same cell line. Simulations show unknotted chromosomes, phase separation of chromatin types and a preference of chromatin of type A to sit at the periphery of the chromosomes.

  7. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  8. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Catarina S. H.; Almeida, Zaida L.; Vaz, Daniela C.; Faria, Tiago Q.; Brito, Rui M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo. PMID:27589730

  9. Mechanical stability model of progradational carbonate platform margins under tectonic loads: Deformation of Cretaceous carbonate platforms in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Juan; Suter, Max

    2015-02-01

    Shortening in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico) is localized along the margins of Cretaceous carbonate platforms and controlled by mechanical stratigraphy. The platform margins are deformed by imbricate series of thrust ramps, whereas the coeval basins and platform interiors are deformed by map-scale detachment folds. Here we present a finite element model to evaluate the influence of the boundary geometry and boundary conditions on the style of deformation observed at these basinward progradational platform margins. We calculate the stress distribution in a linearly elastic platform-basin transition zone under the action of horizontal tectonic stress, taking into account changes of rock mechanical properties across the platform margin, as well as their dependence on direction, and infer the resulting fracture patterns based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. Stress concentrations are predicted at the contacts between the massive rocks of the platform margin and the well-layered rocks of both, the platform interior and the adjacent basin. Brittle failure of the platform border can be mostly attributed to three effects: mechanical coupling between the carbonate platform and a substratum of moderate to low viscosity, variations in layering and texture that governed the mechanical properties of the involved carbonates as well as their dependence on direction, and the development of sharp domain boundary corners associated with progradational facies changes. In contrast, the dip of the basement and a possible taper of the overlying Upper Cretaceous shale toward the basin appear to have little influence on the mechanical failure of the platform margin.

  10. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Brantley D.; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S.; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T.; Koelle, Michael R.; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA–G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  11. Nuclear autophagy: An evolutionarily conserved mechanism of nuclear degradation in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Luo, Majing; Zhao, Xueya; Song, Ying; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2016-11-01

    Macroautophagy/autophagy is a catabolic process that is essential for cellular homeostasis. Studies on autophagic degradation of cytoplasmic components have generated interest in nuclear autophagy. Although its mechanisms and roles have remained elusive, tremendous progress has been made toward understanding nuclear autophagy. Nuclear autophagy is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes that may target various nuclear components through a series of processes, including nuclear sensing, nuclear export, autophagic substrate encapsulation and autophagic degradation in the cytoplasm. However, the molecular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in nuclear autophagy remain largely unknown. Numerous studies have highlighted the importance of nuclear autophagy in physiological and pathological processes such as cancer. This review focuses on current advances in nuclear autophagy and provides a summary of its research history and landmark discoveries to offer new perspectives.

  12. Conservative management of uncomplicated mechanical neck pain in a military aviator.

    PubMed

    Green, Bart N; Dunn, Andrew S; Pearce, Solomon M; Johnson, Claire D

    2010-06-01

    Non-radicular neck pain arising from local musculoskeletal structures, known as mechanical neck pain or somatic dysfunction, is highly prevalent in the fighter jet aviator population. The management of this problem includes both therapeutic and aeromedical decisions. In addition to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, waiver guides recommend therapeutic exercise and manipulative therapy as treatments for somatic spine pain in aviators, and such treatments are employed in many military locations. However, there are currently no published studies that describe the use of manipulative therapy for fighter jet aviators. We report the case of an F/A-18 instructor pilot who experienced long-term relief of uncomplicated mechanical neck pain following interdisciplinary management that included manipulation and a home exercise program. Diagnostic considerations, conservative treatment options, and aeromedical concerns are discussed.

  13. Conservation Laws for Coupled Hydro-mechanical Processes in Unsaturated Porous Media: Theory and Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Borja, R I; White, J A

    2010-02-19

    We develop conservation laws for coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media using three-phase continuum mixture theory. From the first law of thermodynamics, we identify energy-conjugate variables for constitutive modeling at macroscopic scale. Energy conjugate expressions identified relate a certain measure of effective stress to the deformation of the solid matrix, the degree of saturation to the matrix suction, the pressure in each constituent phase to the corresponding intrinsic volume change of this phase, and the seepage forces to the corresponding pressure gradients. We then develop strong and weak forms of boundary-value problems relevant for 3D finite element modeling of coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media. The paper highlights a 3D numerical example illustrating the advances in the solution of large-scale coupled finite element systems, as well as the challenges in developing more predictive tools satisfying the basic conservation laws and the observed constitutive responses for unsaturated porous materials.

  14. Protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Mary-Jane; Sambrook, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    In the cell, as in vitro, the final conformation of a protein is determined by its amino-acid sequence. But whereas some isolated proteins can be denatured and refolded in vitro in the absence of other macromolecular cellular components, folding and assembly of polypeptides in vivo involves other proteins, many of which belong to families that have been highly conserved during evolution.

  15. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-10-15

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098.

  16. Mechanical study of the Chartreuse Fold-and-Thrust Belt: relationships between fluids overpressure and decollement within the Toarcian source-rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelon, Josselin; Sassi, William; Burov, Evgueni

    2016-04-01

    Many source-rocks are shale and constitute potential detachment levels in Fold-and-Thrust Belts (FTB): the toarcian Schistes-Cartons in the French Chartreuse FTB for example. Their mechanical properties can change during their burial and thermal maturation, as for example when large amount of hydrocarbon fluids are generated. A structural reconstruction of the Chartreuse FTB geo-history places the Toarcian Formation as the major decollement horizon. In this work, a mechanical analysis integrating the fluids overpressuring development is proposed to discuss on the validity of the structural interpretation. At first, an analogue of the Chartreuse Toarcian Fm, the albanian Posidonia Schist, is documented as it can provide insights on its initial properties and composition of its kerogen content. Laboratory characterisation documents the vertical evolution of the mineralogical, geochemical and mechanical parameters of this potential decollement layer. These physical parameters (i.e. Total Organic Carbon (TOC), porosity/permeability relationship, friction coefficient) are used to address overpressure buildup in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB with TEMISFlow Arctem Basin modelling approach (Faille et al, 2014) and the structural emplacement of the Chartreuse thrust units using the FLAMAR thermo-mechanical model (Burov et al, 2014). The hydro-mechanical modeling results highlight the calendar, distribution and magnitude of the overpressure that developed within the source-rock in the footwall of a simple fault-bend fold structure localized in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB. Several key geological conditions are required to create an overpressure able to fracture the shale-rocks and induce a significant change in the rheological behaviour: high TOC, low permeability, favourable structural evolution. These models highlight the importance of modeling the impact of a diffuse natural hydraulic fracturing to explain fluids propagation toward the foreland within

  17. Sandbox modelling of sequential thrusting in a mechanically two-layered system and its implications in fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Puspendu; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-10-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts display multi-storied thrust sequences, characterizing a composite architecture of the thrust wedges. Despite dramatic progress in sandbox modelling over the last three decades, our understanding of such composite thrust-wedge mechanics is limited and demands a re-visit to the problem of sequential thrusting in mechanically layered systems. This study offers a new approach to sandbox modelling, designed with a two-layered sandpack simulating a mechanically weak Coulomb layer, resting coherently upon a stronger Coulomb layer. Our experimental models reproduce strikingly similar styles of the multi-storied frontal thrust sequences observed in natural fold-and- thrust belts. The upper weak horizon undergoes sequential thrusting at a high spatial frequency, forming numerous, closely spaced frontal thrusts, whereas the lower strong horizon produces widely spaced thrusts with progressive horizontal shortening. This contrasting thrust progression behaviour gives rise to composite thrust architecture in the layered sandpack. We show the evolution of such composite thrust sequences as a function of frictional strength (μb) at the basal detachment and thickness ratio (Tr) between the weak and strong layers. For any given values of Tr and μb, the two thrust sequences progress at different rates; the closely-spaced, upper thrust sequence advances forelandward at a faster rate than the widely-spaced, lower thrust sequence. Basal friction (μb) has little effects on the vergence of thrusts in the upper weak layer; they verge always towards foreland, irrespective of Tr values. But, the lower strong layer develops back-vergent thrusts when μb is low (∼0.36). In our experiments, closely spaced thrusts in the upper sequence experience intense reactivation due to their interaction with widely spaced thrusts in the lower sequence. The interaction eventually affects the wedge topography, leading to two distinct parts: inner and outer wedges

  18. Conserved mechanisms of vocalization coding in mammalian and songbird auditory midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Portfors, Christine V.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquity of social vocalization among animals provides the opportunity to identify conserved mechanisms of auditory processing that subserve vocal communication. Identifying auditory coding properties that are shared across vocal communicators will provide insight into how human auditory processing leads to speech perception. Here, we compare auditory response properties and neural coding of social vocalizations in auditory midbrain neurons of mammalian and avian vocal communicators. The auditory midbrain is a nexus of auditory processing because it receives and integrates information from multiple parallel pathways and provides the ascending auditory input to the thalamus. The auditory midbrain is also the first region in the ascending auditory system where neurons show complex tuning properties that are correlated with the acoustics of social vocalizations. Single unit studies in mice, bats and zebra finches reveal shared principles of auditory coding including tonotopy, excitatory and inhibitory interactions that shape responses to vocal signals, nonlinear response properties that are important for auditory coding of social vocalizations and modulation tuning. Additionally, single neuron responses in the mouse and songbird midbrain are reliable, selective for specific syllables, and rely on spike timing for neural discrimination of distinct vocalizations. We propose that future research on auditory coding of vocalizations in mouse and songbird midbrain neurons adopt similar experimental and analytical approaches so that conserved principles of vocalization coding may be distinguished from those that are specialized for each species. PMID:23726970

  19. Conserved mechanisms of vocalization coding in mammalian and songbird auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Sarah M N; Portfors, Christine V

    2013-11-01

    The ubiquity of social vocalizations among animals provides the opportunity to identify conserved mechanisms of auditory processing that subserve communication. Identifying auditory coding properties that are shared across vocal communicators will provide insight into how human auditory processing leads to speech perception. Here, we compare auditory response properties and neural coding of social vocalizations in auditory midbrain neurons of mammalian and avian vocal communicators. The auditory midbrain is a nexus of auditory processing because it receives and integrates information from multiple parallel pathways and provides the ascending auditory input to the thalamus. The auditory midbrain is also the first region in the ascending auditory system where neurons show complex tuning properties that are correlated with the acoustics of social vocalizations. Single unit studies in mice, bats and zebra finches reveal shared principles of auditory coding including tonotopy, excitatory and inhibitory interactions that shape responses to vocal signals, nonlinear response properties that are important for auditory coding of social vocalizations and modulation tuning. Additionally, single neuron responses in the mouse and songbird midbrain are reliable, selective for specific syllables, and rely on spike timing for neural discrimination of distinct vocalizations. We propose that future research on auditory coding of vocalizations in mouse and songbird midbrain neurons adopt similar experimental and analytical approaches so that conserved principles of vocalization coding may be distinguished from those that are specialized for each species. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Communication Sounds and the Brain: New Directions and Perspectives".

  20. Statistical Mechanics of Colloidal Particles in Non-Conservative Force Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakil Moyses, Henrique

    Systems that are in mechanical equilibrium but are driven away from thermodynamic equilibrium present directed motion when in a thermal bath. This thesis explores this motion when systems are out of thermodynamic equilibrium due to the presence of non-conservative force fields. The first system we explored are Brownian vortexes. These are stochastic machines that use static non-conservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. In this thesis we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak non-conservative driving. We show that the first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers. Another system we explore are colloidal Janus particles composed of an optically absorbing and transparent faces. When illuminated by a defocused optical tweezer these particles swim vigorously, without requiring any chemical fuel. Most surprisingly, these optically activated colloidal swimmers circulate back and forth through the beam of light, tracing out regular sinuous patterns. In this thesis we propose a model for this class of light-activated swimmers in which a combination of radiation

  1. Conserved transport mechanisms but distinct auxin responses govern shoot patterning in Selaginella kraussiana.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Heather L; Langdale, Jane A

    2013-04-01

    To provide a comparative framework to understand the evolution of auxin regulation in vascular plants, the effect of perturbed auxin homeostasis was examined in the lycophyte Selaginella kraussiana. Polar auxin transport was measured by tracing tritiated IAA in excised shoots. Shoots were cultured in the presence of auxin efflux inhibitors and exogenous auxin, and developmental abnormalities were documented. Auxin transport in Selaginella shoots is exclusively basipetal, as in angiosperms. Perturbed auxin transport results in the loss of meristem maintenance and abnormal shoot architecture. Dichotomous root branching in Selaginella appears to be regulated by an antagonistic relationship between auxin and cytokinin. The results suggest that basipetal polar auxin transport occurred in the common ancestor of lycophytes and euphyllophytes. Although the mechanisms of auxin transport appear to be conserved across all vascular plants, distinct auxin responses govern shoot growth and development in lycophytes and euphyllophytes.

  2. Statistics of conserved quantities in mechanically stable packings of frictionless disks above jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yegang; Teitel, S.

    2015-02-01

    We numerically simulate mechanically stable packings of soft-core, frictionless, bidisperse disks in two dimensions, above the jamming packing fraction ϕJ. For configurations with a fixed isotropic global stress tensor, we compute the averages, variances, and correlations of conserved quantities (stress ΓC, force-tile area AC, Voronoi volume VC, number of particles NC, and number of small particles Ns C) on compact subclusters of particles C , as a function of the cluster size and the global system stress. We find several significant differences depending on whether the cluster C is defined by a fixed radius R or a fixed number of particles M . We comment on the implications of our findings for maximum entropy models of jammed packings.

  3. How do chaperonins fold protein?

    PubMed Central

    Motojima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein folding is a biological process that is essential for the proper functioning of proteins in all living organisms. In cells, many proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their folding. Chaperonins belong to a class of molecular chaperones that have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism by which a chaperonin mediates the folding of proteins is still controversial. Denatured proteins are folded in the closed chaperonin cage, leading to the assumption that denatured proteins are completely encapsulated inside the chaperonin cage. In contrast to the assumption, we recently found that denatured protein interacts with hydrophobic residues at the subunit interfaces of the chaperonin, and partially protrude out of the cage. In this review, we will explain our recent results and introduce our model for the mechanism by which chaperonins accelerate protein folding, in view of recent findings. PMID:27493521

  4. Evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for the selection and maintenance of behavioural activity

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Vincenzo G.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Strausfeld, Nicholas J.; Hirth, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Survival and reproduction entail the selection of adaptive behavioural repertoires. This selection manifests as phylogenetically acquired activities that depend on evolved nervous system circuitries. Lorenz and Tinbergen already postulated that heritable behaviours and their reliable performance are specified by genetically determined programs. Here we compare the functional anatomy of the insect central complex and vertebrate basal ganglia to illustrate their role in mediating selection and maintenance of adaptive behaviours. Comparative analyses reveal that central complex and basal ganglia circuitries share comparable lineage relationships within clusters of functionally integrated neurons. These clusters are specified by genetic mechanisms that link birth time and order to their neuronal identities and functions. Their subsequent connections and associated functions are characterized by similar mechanisms that implement dimensionality reduction and transition through attractor states, whereby spatially organized parallel-projecting loops integrate and convey sensorimotor representations that select and maintain behavioural activity. In both taxa, these neural systems are modulated by dopamine signalling that also mediates memory-like processes. The multiplicity of similarities between central complex and basal ganglia suggests evolutionarily conserved computational mechanisms for action selection. We speculate that these may have originated from ancestral ground pattern circuitries present in the brain of the last common ancestor of insects and vertebrates. PMID:26554043

  5. Conservative management of mechanical neck pain: systematic overview and meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Aker, P. D.; Gross, A. R.; Goldsmith, C. H.; Peloso, P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the efficacy of conservative management of mechanical neck disorders. METHODS: Published and unpublished reports were identified through computerised and manual searches of bibliographical databases, reference lists from primary articles, and letters to authors, agencies, foundations, and content experts. Selection criteria were applied to blinded articles, and selected articles were scored for methodological quality. Effect sizes were calculated from raw pain scores and combined by using meta-analytic techniques when appropriate. RESULTS: Twenty four randomised clinical trials met the selection criteria and were categorised by type of intervention: nine used manual treatments; 12 physical medicine methods; four drug treatment; and three education of patients (four trials investigated more than one form of intervention). The intervention strategies were summarised separately. Pooling of studies was considered only within each category. Five of the nine trials that used manual treatment in combination with other treatments were combined. One to four weeks after treatment the pooled effect size was -0.6 (95% confidence interval -0.9 to -0.4), equivalent to an improvement of 16 (6.9 to 23.1) points on a 100 point scale. Sensitivity analyses on study quality, chronicity, and data imputation did not alter this estimate. For other interventions, studies could not be combined to arrive at pooled estimates of effect. CONCLUSIONS: There is little information available from clinical trials to support many of the treatments for mechanical neck pain. In general, conservative interventions have not been studied in enough detail to assess efficacy or effectiveness adequately. PMID:8942688

  6. Analysis of 12C+12C Elastic and Inelastic Scatterings in the Framework of the Cluster Double Folding Model and Coupled-Channels Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanain, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    A double folding cluster (DFC) model is proposed for the analysis of (12) C+(12) C elastic and inelastic scatterings. The DFC procedure is performed using the alpha-clusters structure of (12) C nucleus. Angular distributions of the (12) C+(12) C elastic and inelastic scatterings in the energy range 70.7-126 MeV were analyzed using the derived DFC potentials in the framework of the coupled-channels (CC) mechanism. Successful descriptions of the data are obtained over the full measured angular range without the need to normalize the DFC potentials. Furthermore, the deduced deformation length and the quadrupole deformation parameter are quite consistent with the corresponding electromagnetic measurements.

  7. Anomalous Fourier's Law and Long Range Correlations in a 1D Non-momentum Conserving Mechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerschenfeld, A.; Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    We study by means of numerical simulations the velocity reversal model, a one-dimensional mechanical model of heat transport introduced in 1985 by Ianiro and Lebowitz. Our numerical results indicate that this model, which does not conserve momentum, exhibits nevertheless an anomalous Fourier's law similar to the ones previously observed in momentum-conserving models. This disagrees with what can be expected by solving the Boltzmann equation (BE) for this system. The pair correlation velocity field also looks very different from the correlations usually seen in diffusive systems, and shares some similarity with those of momentum-conserving heat transport models.

  8. Colocalization of WT1 and cell proliferation reveals conserved mechanisms in temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Schmahl, Jennifer; Yao, Humphrey H; Pierucci-Alves, Fernando; Capel, Blanche

    2003-04-01

    During vertebrate development the gonad has two possible fates, the testis or the ovary. The choice between these fates is made by a variety of sex-determining mechanisms, from the sex-determining gene on the Y chromosome (Sry) in mammals, to nongenetic temperature-dependent systems in many reptiles. Despite the differences in the mechanisms at the top of the sex-determining cascade, the resulting morphology and many genes involved in early testis and ovarian development are common to most vertebrates, leading to the hypothesis that the underlying processes of sex determination are conserved. In this study, we examined the early steps of gonad development in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta), a species that uses the temperature of egg incubation to determine sex. A dramatic increase in cell proliferation was observed in the male gonad during the earliest stages of sex determination. Using the localization of Wilms' Tumor suppressor 1 (WT1), we determined that this proliferation increase occurred in a population that contained pre-Sertoli cells. The proliferation of pre-Sertoli cells has been documented during sex determination in both mice and alligators, suggesting that proliferation of this cell type has an important role in vertebrate testis organogenesis and the determination of male fate.

  9. Enhancing conservation, ecosystem services, and local livelihoods through a wildlife premium mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dinerstein, Eric; Varma, Keshav; Wikramanayake, Eric; Powell, George; Lumpkin, Susan; Naidoo, Robin; Korchinsky, Mike; Del Valle, Christian; Lohani, Shubash; Seidensticker, John; Joldersma, Dirk; Lovejoy, Thomas; Kushlin, Andrey

    2013-02-01

    We propose the wildlife premium mechanism as an innovation to conserve endangered large vertebrates. The performance-based payment scheme would allow stakeholders in lower-income countries to generate revenue by recovering and maintaining threatened fauna that can also serve as umbrella species (i.e., species whose protection benefits other species with which they co-occur). There are 3 possible options for applying the premium: option 1, embed premiums in a carbon payment; option 2, link premiums to a related carbon payment, but as independent and legally separate transactions; option 3, link premiums to noncarbon payments for conserving ecosystem services (PES). Each option presents advantages, such as incentive payments to improve livelihoods of rural poor who reside in or near areas harboring umbrella species, and challenges, such as the establishment of a subnational carbon credit scheme. In Kenya, Peru, and Nepal pilot premium projects are now underway or being finalized that largely follow option 1. The Kasigau (Kenya) project is the first voluntary carbon credit project to win approval from the 2 leading groups sanctioning such protocols and has already sold carbon credits totaling over $1.2 million since June 2011. A portion of the earnings is divided among community landowners and projects that support community members and has added over 350 jobs to the local economy. All 3 projects involve extensive community management because they occur on lands where locals hold the title or have a long-term lease from the government. The monitoring, reporting, and verification required to make premium payments credible to investors include transparent methods for collecting data on key indices by trained community members and verification of their reporting by a biologist. A wildlife premium readiness fund would enable expansion of pilot programs needed to test options beyond those presented here.

  10. A conserved splicing mechanism of the LMNA gene controls premature aging.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C; Vautrot, Valentin; De Toledo, Marion; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Navarro, Claire L; Osorio, Fernando G; Freije, José M P; Stévenin, James; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Lévy, Nicolas; Branlant, Christiane; Tazi, Jamal

    2011-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder phenotypically characterized by many features of premature aging. Most cases of HGPS are due to a heterozygous silent mutation (c.1824C>T; p.Gly608Gly) that enhances the use of an internal 5' splice site (5'SS) in exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA and leads to the production of a truncated protein (progerin) with a dominant negative effect. Here we show that HGPS mutation changes the accessibility of the 5'SS of LMNA exon 11 which is sequestered in a conserved RNA structure. Our results also reveal a regulatory role of a subset of serine-arginine (SR)-rich proteins, including serine-arginine rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) and SRSF6, on utilization of the 5'SS leading to lamin A or progerin production and a modulation of this regulation in the presence of the c.1824C>T mutation is shown directly on HGPS patient cells. Mutant mice carrying the equivalent mutation in the LMNA gene (c.1827C>T) also accumulate progerin and phenocopy the main cellular alterations and clinical defects of HGPS patients. RNAi-induced depletion of SRSF1 in the HGPS-like mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) allowed progerin reduction and dysmorphic nuclei phenotype correction, whereas SRSF6 depletion aggravated the HGPS-like MEF's phenotype. We demonstrate that changes in the splicing ratio between lamin A and progerin are key factors for lifespan since heterozygous mice harboring the mutation lived longer than homozygous littermates but less than the wild-type. Genetic and biochemical data together favor the view that physiological progerin production is under tight control of a conserved splicing mechanism to avoid precocious aging.

  11. The protein folding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Francesco; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2004-03-01

    Networks are everywhere. The conformation space of a 20-residue antiparallel beta-sheet peptide [1], sampled by molecular dynamics simulations, is mapped to a network. Conformations are nodes of the network, and the transitions between them are links. As previously found for the World-Wide Web as well as for social and biological networks , the conformation space contains highly connected hubs like the native state which is the most populated free energy basin. Furthermore, the network shows a hierarchical modularity [2] which is consistent with the funnel mechanism of folding [3] and is not observed for a random heteropolymer lacking a native state. Here we show that the conformation space network describes the free energy landscape without requiring projections into arbitrarily chosen reaction coordinates. The network analysis provides a basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the folding transition state and the existence of multiple pathways. [1] P. Ferrara and A. Caflisch, Folding simulations of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet peptide, PNAS 97, 10780-10785 (2000). [2] Ravasz, E. and Barabási, A. L. Hierarchical organization in complex networks. Phys. Rev. E 67, 026112 (2003). [3] Dill, K. and Chan, H From Levinthal to pathways to funnels. Nature Struct. Biol. 4, 10-19 (1997)

  12. The effect of foreland palaeo-uplift on deformation mechanism in the Wupoer fold-and-thrust belt, NE Pamir: Constraints from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyang; Cheng, Xiaogan; Chen, Hanlin; Ding, Weiwei; Lin, Xiubin; Wu, Lei; Li, Kang; Shi, Jun; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Palaeo-uplifts often exist in fold-and-thrust belts. However, their effects on the deformational process have not yet been well understood. To evaluate such effects, six analogue models were systematically run based on geological features of the Wupoer fold-and-thrust belt (FTB), NE Pamir, where the Wulagen palaeo-uplift with overlying gypsum bed has been clearly identified. Our analogue results demonstrated that the palaeo-uplift (its location and inhomogenous distribution), accompanied with overlying gypsum bed that serves as ductile décollement, plays a critical role in localizing the front thrust fault and shaping it into arc form. The results indicate that the front thrust fault slides along the ductile décollement (gypsum bed), and breaks through onto the surface at the region where the palaeo-uplift develops, forming a piggy-back basin in the hanging wall. It suggests that the palaeo-uplift with consequent topographic variation of the overlying ductile décollement localizes the breakthrough point of the front thrust fault. In addition, the results indicate that the front thrust fault (Pamir Front Thrust, PFT) initially broke through in the location where it develops the Wulagen palaeo-uplift and propagated aside. This resulted in the distance between the PFT and the basement-involved fault (Main Pamir Thrust, MPT) to decrease from the region with palaeo-uplift to the areas aside without palaeo-uplift, thereby forming the arc-shaped PFT in map view. The results of this study also provide a revised geological model, which emphasizes the effect of décollement layer on absorbing the slip along the PFT. Our results provide a new mechanical interpretation of the deformation of Wupoer FTB, NE Pamir.

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of Calcium Hydroxide Conversion into Calcium Alkoxides: Implications in Heritage Conservation Using Nanolimes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Vettori, Irene; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion

    2016-05-24

    Nanolimes are alcohol dispersions of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles used in the conservation of cultural heritage. Although it was believed that Ca(OH)2 particles were inert when dispersed in short-chain alcohols, it has been recently shown that they can undergo transformation into calcium alkoxides. Little is known, however, about the mechanism and kinetics of such a phase transformation as well as its effect on the performance of nanolimes. Here we show that Ca(OH)2 particles formed after lime slaking react with ethanol and isopropanol and partially transform (fractional conversion, α up to 0.08) into calcium ethoxide and isopropoxide, respectively. The transformation shows Arrhenius behavior, with apparent activation energy Ea of 29 ± 4 and 37 ± 6 kJ mol(-1) for Ca-ethoxide and Ca-isopropoxide conversion, respectively. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses of reactant and product phases show that the alkoxides replace the crystalline structure of Ca(OH)2 along specific [hkl] directions, preserving the external hexagonal (platelike) morphology of the parent phase. Textural and kinetic results reveal that this pseudomorphic replacement involves a 3D diffusion-controlled deceleratory advancement of the reaction front. The results are consistent with an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation replacement mechanism. Analysis of the carbonation of Ca(OH)2 particles with different degree of conversion into Ca-ethoxide (α up to 0.08) and Ca-isopropoxide (α up to 0.04) exposed to air (20 °C, 80% relative humidity) reveals that Ca-alkoxides significantly reduce the rate of transformation into cementing CaCO3 and induce the formation of metastable vaterite, as opposed to stable calcite which forms in untransformed Ca(OH)2 samples. Similar effects are obtained when a commercial nanolime partially transformed into Ca-ethoxide is subjected to carbonation. Such effects may hamper/delay the strengthening or consolidation effects of nanolimes, thus having

  14. Is topsoil water repellency a mechanism for improving water conservation in depth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Elena; Jiménez-Pinilla, Patricia; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Vicky; Mataix-Beneyto, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) is widespread in forest soils under different climatic conditions, soil types and vegetation covers (Doerr et al., 2000). It is normally characterized by a high spatial variability in persistence, showing wettable and water repellent patches. This phenomenon has a special interest in semiarid areas, such as the Mediterranean ecosystems, where water resources are limited. For that reason, it is thought to be a possible mechanism for improving water conservation in soil profile, which would minimize evaporation losses from the soil surface (Doerr et al., 2000; Robinson et al. 2010). The ecological function of having a patchy hydrophobic surface might be the means of transporting water deeper into the soil profile and away from surface evaporation. In addition, it may also inhibit the growth of other vegetal species. This could increase the resistance of plants to drought by increasing water availability through reducing losses to surface evaporation or other plants. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that soil WR improves the water conservation within the soil. We have compared the temporal evolution of soil moisture between samples with repellent and wettable layers. Repellent and wettable soil samples were collected from an agricultural area in Biar (Alicante, Spain). Samples were put in 100ml plastic pots (n=30). Each one had two layers (WR and wettable or both wettable) with depth around 2.5cm for superficial and 3.5cm for deeper wettable horizon. We measured the evolution under different initial conditions of soil water content (around 20% and 9%) and soil superficial WR persistence (wettable, slight, strong and severe soil (n=5 per treatment)). Pots were kept under laboratory conditions (between 30-50% of relative air humidity and ? 20°C). Soil water content was controlled daily by weight measurement. Our results showed a clear significant difference in evaporation rates, which were higher in samples with a wettable superficial layer

  15. Evaluation of management techniques to conserve water in a mechanical head wash blood removal system.

    PubMed

    Galloway, H O; Deotte, R E; Lawrence, T E

    2013-11-01

    This research objectively evaluated methods to conserve water in a mechanical beef head wash system. Digital images of pre-wash and post-wash beef heads were analyzed to quantify the percentage change in red saturation of the image, which was used as an objective measure of cleanliness. Three types of nozzles (fan, three-hole, venturi) and three water pressures (344, 516, 689kPa) were evaluated in a two-way treatment structure. An interaction (P=0.07) was observed between water pressure and nozzle type; the change in red saturation increased as pressure decreased for fan and three-hole nozzles which contrasted with venturi nozzles. The fan nozzle×516kPa pressure treatment used 25L of water per head washed and was used to evaluate the effect of three water temperatures (15, 38, 57°C). Water temperature did not impact (P=0.21) change in red saturation. Reducing water wastage and minimizing the use of heated water could have positive economic benefits to the beef processor.

  16. Statistics and Correlations of Conserved Quantities in Mechanically Stable Packings of Frictionless Disks Above Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitel, Stephen; Wu, Yegang

    2015-03-01

    We consider mechanically stable packings of soft-core, frictionless, bidisperse disks in two dimensions above the jamming transition. Using an algorithm that generates packings with an isotropic global stress tensor, we compute the distribution of various conserved quantities on compact subclusters of particles, as a function of the total system stress and the cluster size. We consider the stress on the cluster, the Maxwell-Cremona force-tile area, the Voronoi volume, and the numbers of small and big particles in the cluster, and we compute the averages, variances and correlations among these different quantities. We compare two different ensembles of clusters: (i) clusters defined by a fixed radius, and (ii) clusters defined by a fixed number of particles. We find several significant differences between these two ensembles and we comment on the implications of our findings for maximum entropy models of jammed packings. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1205800. Computations were carried out at the Center for Integrated Research Computing at the University of Rochester.

  17. From tetrapods to primates: conserved developmental mechanisms in diverging ecological adaptations.

    PubMed

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Montiel, Juan F

    2012-01-01

    Primates are endowed with a brain about twice the size that of a mammal with the same body size, and humans have the largest brain relative to body size of all animals. This increase in brain size may be related to the acquisition of higher cognitive skills that permitted more complex social interactions, the evolution of culture, and the eventual ability to manipulate the environment. Nevertheless, in its internal structure, the primate brain shares a very conserved design with other mammals, being covered by a six-layered neocortex that, although expands disproportionately to other brain components, it does so following relatively well-defined allometric trends. Thus, the most fundamental events generating the basic design of the primate and human brain took place before the appearance of the first primate-like animal. Presumably, the earliest mammals already displayed a brain morphology radically different from that of their ancestors and that of their sister group, the reptiles, being characterized by the presence of an incipient neocortex that underwent an explosive growth in subsequent mammal evolution. In this chapter, we propose an integrative hypothesis for the origin of the mammalian neocortex, by considering the developmental modifications, functional networks, and ecological adaptations involved in the generation of this structure during the cretaceous period. Subsequently, the expansion of the primate brain is proposed to have relied on the amplification of the same, or very similar, developmental mechanisms as those involved in its primary origins, even in different ecological settings.

  18. Conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of signal transduction among mammalian Notch family members

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tomohiko; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Aoki, Tomokazu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Honjo, Tasuku

    2001-01-01

    Mouse Notch1, which plays an important role in cell fate determination in development, is proteolytically processed within its transmembrane domain by unidentified γ-secretase-like activity that depends on presenilin. To study this proteolytic event, we established a cell-free Notch cleavage assay system using the membrane fraction of fibroblast transfectants of various Notch constructs with deletion of the extracellular portion (Notch ΔE). The cytoplasmic portion of Notch1 ΔE was released from the membrane upon incubation at 37°C, which was inhibited by the specific γ-secretase inhibitor, MW167, or by overexpression of dominant negative presenilin1. Likewise, other members of mouse Notch family were proteolytically cleaved in a presenilin-dependent, MW167-sensitive manner in vivo as well as in the cell-free Notch ΔE cleavage assay system. All four members of the mouse Notch family migrated to the nucleus and activated the transcription from the promoter carrying the RBP-J consensus sequences after they were released from the membrane. These results demonstrate the conserved biochemical mechanism of signal transduction among mammalian Notch family members. PMID:11459941

  19. A conserved genetic mechanism specifies deutocerebral appendage identity in insects and arachnids

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prashant P.; Tarazona, Oscar A.; Lopez, Davys H.; Schwager, Evelyn E.; Cohn, Martin J.; Wheeler, Ward C.; Extavour, Cassandra G.

    2015-01-01

    The segmental architecture of the arthropod head is one of the most controversial topics in the evolutionary developmental biology of arthropods. The deutocerebral (second) segment of the head is putatively homologous across Arthropoda, as inferred from the segmental distribution of the tripartite brain and the absence of Hox gene expression of this anterior-most, appendage-bearing segment. While this homology statement implies a putative common mechanism for differentiation of deutocerebral appendages across arthropods, experimental data for deutocerebral appendage fate specification are limited to winged insects. Mandibulates (hexapods, crustaceans and myriapods) bear a characteristic pair of antennae on the deutocerebral segment, whereas chelicerates (e.g. spiders, scorpions, harvestmen) bear the eponymous chelicerae. In such hexapods as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, cephalic appendages are differentiated from the thoracic appendages (legs) by the activity of the appendage patterning gene homothorax (hth). Here we show that embryonic RNA interference against hth in the harvestman Phalangium opilio results in homeonotic chelicera-to-leg transformations, and also in some cases pedipalp-to-leg transformations. In more strongly affected embryos, adjacent appendages undergo fusion and/or truncation, and legs display proximal defects, suggesting conservation of additional functions of hth in patterning the antero-posterior and proximo-distal appendage axes. Expression signal of anterior Hox genes labial, proboscipedia and Deformed is diminished, but not absent, in hth RNAi embryos, consistent with results previously obtained with the insect G. bimaculatus. Our results substantiate a deep homology across arthropods of the mechanism whereby cephalic appendages are differentiated from locomotory appendages. PMID:25948691

  20. A conserved genetic mechanism specifies deutocerebral appendage identity in insects and arachnids.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant P; Tarazona, Oscar A; Lopez, Davys H; Schwager, Evelyn E; Cohn, Martin J; Wheeler, Ward C; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2015-06-07

    The segmental architecture of the arthropod head is one of the most controversial topics in the evolutionary developmental biology of arthropods. The deutocerebral (second) segment of the head is putatively homologous across Arthropoda, as inferred from the segmental distribution of the tripartite brain and the absence of Hox gene expression of this anterior-most, appendage-bearing segment. While this homology statement implies a putative common mechanism for differentiation of deutocerebral appendages across arthropods, experimental data for deutocerebral appendage fate specification are limited to winged insects. Mandibulates (hexapods, crustaceans and myriapods) bear a characteristic pair of antennae on the deutocerebral segment, whereas chelicerates (e.g. spiders, scorpions, harvestmen) bear the eponymous chelicerae. In such hexapods as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, cephalic appendages are differentiated from the thoracic appendages (legs) by the activity of the appendage patterning gene homothorax (hth). Here we show that embryonic RNA interference against hth in the harvestman Phalangium opilio results in homeonotic chelicera-to-leg transformations, and also in some cases pedipalp-to-leg transformations. In more strongly affected embryos, adjacent appendages undergo fusion and/or truncation, and legs display proximal defects, suggesting conservation of additional functions of hth in patterning the antero-posterior and proximo-distal appendage axes. Expression signal of anterior Hox genes labial, proboscipedia and Deformed is diminished, but not absent, in hth RNAi embryos, consistent with results previously obtained with the insect G. bimaculatus. Our results substantiate a deep homology across arthropods of the mechanism whereby cephalic appendages are differentiated from locomotory appendages.

  1. How Does Your Protein Fold? Elucidating the Apomyoglobin Folding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2017-01-17

    Although each type of protein fold and in some cases individual proteins within a fold classification can have very different mechanisms of folding, the underlying biophysical and biochemical principles that operate to cause a linear polypeptide chain to fold into a globular structure must be the same. In an aqueous solution, the protein takes up the thermodynamically most stable structure, but the pathway along which the polypeptide proceeds in order to reach that structure is a function of the amino acid sequence, which must be the final determining factor, not only in shaping the final folded structure, but in dictating the folding pathway. A number of groups have focused on a single protein or group of proteins, to determine in detail the factors that influence the rate and mechanism of folding in a defined system, with the hope that hypothesis-driven experiments can elucidate the underlying principles governing the folding process. Our research group has focused on the folding of the globin family of proteins, and in particular on the monomeric protein apomyoglobin. Apomyoglobin (apoMb) folds relatively slowly (∼2 s) via an ensemble of obligatory intermediates that form rapidly after the initiation of folding. The folding pathway can be dissected using rapid-mixing techniques, which can probe processes in the millisecond time range. Stopped-flow measurements detected by circular dichroism (CD) or fluorescence spectroscopy give information on the rates of folding events. Quench-flow experiments utilize the differential rates of hydrogen-deuterium exchange of amide protons protected in parts of the structure that are folded early; protection of amides can be detected by mass spectrometry or proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). In addition, apoMb forms an intermediate at equilibrium at pH ∼ 4, which is sufficiently stable for it to be structurally characterized by solution methods such as CD, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopies, and the

  2. The origami of thioredoxin-like folds

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jonathan L.; Bardwell, James C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Origami is the Japanese art of folding a piece of paper into complex shapes and forms. Much like origami of paper, Nature has used conserved protein folds to engineer proteins for a particular task. An example of a protein family, which has been used by Nature numerous times, is the thioredoxin superfamily. Proteins in the thioredoxin superfamily are all structured with a β-sheet core surrounded with α-helices, and most contain a canonical CXXC motif. The remarkable feature of these proteins is that the link between them is the fold; however, their reactivity is different for each member due to small variations in this general fold as well as their active site. This review attempts to unravel the minute differences within this protein family, and it also demonstrates the ingenuity of Nature to use a conserved fold to generate a diverse collection of proteins to perform a number of different biochemical tasks. PMID:17008712

  3. Extracting Information from Folds in Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudleston, Peter John

    1986-01-01

    Describes the three processes of folding in rocks: buckling, bending, and passive folding. Discusses how geometrical properties and strain distributions help to identify which processes produce natural folds, and also provides information about the mechanical properties of rocks, and the sense of shear in shear zones. (TW)

  4. Three-state kinetic folding mechanism of the H2A/H2B histone heterodimer: the N-terminal tails affect the transition state between a dimeric intermediate and the native dimer.

    PubMed

    Placek, Brandon J; Gloss, Lisa M

    2005-01-28

    The H2A/H2B heterodimer is a component of the nucleosome core particle, the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin in all eukaryotic cells. The kinetic folding mechanism for the H2A/H2B dimer has been determined from unfolding and refolding kinetics as a function of urea using stopped-flow, circular dichroism and fluorescence methods. The kinetic data are consistent with a three-state mechanism: two unfolded monomers associate to form a dimeric intermediate in the dead-time of the SF instrument (approximately 5 ms); this intermediate is then converted to the native dimer by a slower, first-order reaction. Analysis of the burst-phase amplitudes as a function of denaturant indicates that the dimeric kinetic intermediate possesses approximately 50% of the secondary structure and approximately 60% of the surface area burial of the native dimer. The stability of the dimeric intermediate is approximately 30% of that of the native dimer at the monomer concentrations employed in the SF experiments. Folding-to-unfolding double-jump experiments were performed to monitor the formation of the native dimer as a function of folding delay times. The double-jump data demonstrate that the dimeric intermediate is on-pathway and obligatory. Formation of a transient dimeric burst-phase intermediate has been observed in the kinetic mechanism of other intertwined, segment-swapped, alpha-helical, DNA-binding dimers, such as the H3-H4 histone dimer, Escherichia coli factor for inversion stimulation and E.coli Trp repressor. The common feature of a dimeric intermediate in these folding mechanisms suggests that this intermediate may accelerate protein folding, when compared to the folding of archael histones, which do not populate a transient dimeric species and fold more slowly.

  5. Mechanisms regulating GLUT4 transcription in skeletal muscle cells are highly conserved across vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Marín-Juez, Rubén; Diaz, Mónica; Morata, Jordi; Planas, Josep V

    2013-01-01

    The glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) plays a key role in glucose uptake in insulin target tissues. This transporter has been extensively studied in many species in terms of its function, expression and cellular traffic and complex mechanisms are involved in its regulation at many different levels. However, studies investigating the transcription of the GLUT4 gene and its regulation are scarce. In this study, we have identified the GLUT4 gene in a teleost fish, the Fugu (Takifugu rubripes), and have cloned and characterized a functional promoter of this gene for the first time in a non-mammalian vertebrate. In silico analysis of the Fugu GLUT4 promoter identified potential binding sites for transcription factors such as SP1, C/EBP, MEF2, KLF, SREBP-1c and GC-boxes, as well as a CpG island, but failed to identify a TATA box. In vitro analysis revealed three transcription start sites, with the main residing 307 bp upstream of the ATG codon. Deletion analysis determined that the core promoter was located between nucleotides -132/+94. By transfecting a variety of 5´deletion constructs into L6 muscle cells we have determined that Fugu GLUT4 promoter transcription is regulated by insulin, PG-J2, a PPARγ agonist, and electrical pulse stimulation. Furthermore, our results suggest the implication of motifs such as PPARγ/RXR and HIF-1α in the regulation of Fugu GLUT4 promoter activity by PPARγ and contractile activity, respectively. These data suggest that the characteristics and regulation of the GLUT4 promoter have been remarkably conserved during the evolution from fish to mammals, further evidencing the important role of GLUT4 in metabolic regulation in vertebrates.

  6. A Note on the Conservation of Mechanical Energy and the Galilean Principle of Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, F. C.; Soares, V.; Tort, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    A reexamination of simple examples that we usually teach to our students in introductory courses is the starting point for a discussion about the principle of conservation of energy and Galilean invariance. (Contains 5 figures.)

  7. Understanding Conservation of Laws in Mechanics: Students' Conceptual Change in Learning about Collisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimellini-Tomasini, N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews research on student learning about collisions in physics instruction. Focus is placed on the main differences between the spontaneous perspective in describing/interpreting collisions and the disciplinary perspective based upon the energy and linear momentum conservation laws. (PR)

  8. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  9. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Proteopedia: Rossmann Fold: A Beta-Alpha-Beta Fold at Dinucleotide Binding Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanukoglu, Israel

    2015-01-01

    The Rossmann fold is one of the most common and widely distributed super-secondary structures. It is composed of a series of alternating beta strand (ß) and alpha helical (a) segments wherein the ß-strands are hydrogen bonded forming a ß-sheet. The initial beta-alpha-beta (ßaß) fold is the most conserved segment of Rossmann folds. As this segment…

  11. Studying citizen science through adaptive management and learning feedbacks as mechanisms for improving conservation.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rebecca; Gray, Steven; Sorensen, Amanda; Newman, Greg; Mellor, David; Newman, Greg; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy; LaDeau, Shannon; Biehler, Dawn; Crall, Alycia

    2016-06-01

    Citizen science has generated a growing interest among scientists and community groups, and citizen science programs have been created specifically for conservation. We examined collaborative science, a highly interactive form of citizen science, which we developed within a theoretically informed framework. In this essay, we focused on 2 aspects of our framework: social learning and adaptive management. Social learning, in contrast to individual-based learning, stresses collaborative and generative insight making and is well-suited for adaptive management. Adaptive-management integrates feedback loops that are informed by what is learned and is guided by iterative decision making. Participants engaged in citizen science are able to add to what they are learning through primary data collection, which can result in the real-time information that is often necessary for conservation. Our work is particularly timely because research publications consistently report a lack of established frameworks and evaluation plans to address the extent of conservation outcomes in citizen science. To illustrate how our framework supports conservation through citizen science, we examined how 2 programs enacted our collaborative science framework. Further, we inspected preliminary conservation outcomes of our case-study programs. These programs, despite their recent implementation, are demonstrating promise with regard to positive conservation outcomes. To date, they are independently earning funds to support research, earning buy-in from local partners to engage in experimentation, and, in the absence of leading scientists, are collecting data to test ideas. We argue that this success is due to citizen scientists being organized around local issues and engaging in iterative, collaborative, and adaptive learning.

  12. Geometry of Miura-folded metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Mark; Guest, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes two folded metamaterials based on the Miura-ori fold pattern. The structural mechanics of these metamaterials are dominated by the kinematics of the folding, which only depends on the geometry and therefore is scale-independent. First, a folded shell structure is introduced, where the fold pattern provides a negative Poisson’s ratio for in-plane deformations and a positive Poisson’s ratio for out-of-plane bending. Second, a cellular metamaterial is described based on a stacking of individual folded layers, where the folding kinematics are compatible between layers. Additional freedom in the design of the metamaterial can be achieved by varying the fold pattern within each layer. PMID:23401549

  13. Distinguishing between sequential and nonsequentially folded proteins: implications for folding and misfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Maizel, J. V.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here an algorithm for distinguishing sequential from nonsequentially folding proteins. Several experiments have recently suggested that most of the proteins that are synthesized in the eukaryotic cell may fold sequentially. This proposed folding mechanism in vivo is particularly advantageous to the organism. In the absence of chaperones, the probability that a sequentially folding protein will misfold is reduced significantly. The problem we address here is devising a procedure that would differentiate between the two types of folding patterns. Footprints of sequential folding may be found in structures where consecutive fragments of the chain interact with each other. In such cases, the folding complexity may be viewed as being lower. On the other hand, higher folding complexity suggests that at least a portion of the polypeptide backbone folds back upon itself to form three-dimensional (3D) interactions with noncontiguous portion(s) of the chain. Hence, we look at the mechanism of folding of the molecule via analysis of its complexity, that is, through the 3D interactions formed by contiguous segments on the polypeptide chain. To computationally splice the structure into consecutively interacting fragments, we either cut it into compact hydrophobic folding units or into a set of hypothetical, transient, highly populated, contiguous fragments ("building blocks" of the structure). In sequential folding, successive building blocks interact with each other from the amino to the carboxy terminus of the polypeptide chain. Consequently, the results of the parsing differentiate between sequentially vs. nonsequentially folded chains. The automated assessment of the folding complexity provides insight into both the likelihood of misfolding and the kinetic folding rate of the given protein. In terms of the funnel free energy landscape theory, a protein that truly follows the mechanism of sequential folding, in principle, encounters smoother free energy barriers

  14. Investigating the Conservation of Mechanical Energy Using Video Analysis: Four Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive video analysis technology now enables students to make precise measurements of an object's position at incremental times during its motion. Such capability now allows users to "examine", rather than simply "assume", energy conservation in a variety of situations commonly discussed in introductory physics courses. This article describes…

  15. A Survey on Energy Conserving Mechanisms for the Internet of Things: Wireless Networking Aspects.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Zeeshan; Yoon, Wonyong

    2015-09-25

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is an emerging key technology for future industries and everyday lives of people, where a myriad of battery operated sensors, actuators, and smart objects are connected to the Internet to provide services such as mobile healthcare, intelligent transport system, environmental monitoring, etc. Since energy efficiency is of utmost importance to these battery constrained IoT devices, IoT-related standards and research works have focused on the device energy conserving issues. This paper presents a comprehensive survey on energy conserving issues and solutions in using diverse wireless radio access technologies for IoT connectivity, e.g., the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) machine type communications, IEEE 802.11ah, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE), and Z-Wave. We look into the literature in broad areas of standardization, academic research, and industry development, and structurally summarize the energy conserving solutions based on several technical criteria. We also propose future research directions regarding energy conserving issues in wireless networking-based IoT.

  16. A Survey on Energy Conserving Mechanisms for the Internet of Things: Wireless Networking Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zeeshan; Yoon, Wonyong

    2015-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is an emerging key technology for future industries and everyday lives of people, where a myriad of battery operated sensors, actuators, and smart objects are connected to the Internet to provide services such as mobile healthcare, intelligent transport system, environmental monitoring, etc. Since energy efficiency is of utmost importance to these battery constrained IoT devices, IoT-related standards and research works have focused on the device energy conserving issues. This paper presents a comprehensive survey on energy conserving issues and solutions in using diverse wireless radio access technologies for IoT connectivity, e.g., the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) machine type communications, IEEE 802.11ah, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE), and Z-Wave. We look into the literature in broad areas of standardization, academic research, and industry development, and structurally summarize the energy conserving solutions based on several technical criteria. We also propose future research directions regarding energy conserving issues in wireless networking-based IoT. PMID:26404275

  17. Winter Cereal Termination and Conservation Agriculture Cotton Yield Following Mechanical and Chemical Management Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An integral component of conservation-tillage systems in cotton is the use of a high-residue winter cover crop; however, managing such cover crops is a challenge. Black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb.), rye (Secale cereale L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) winter cover crops were established in ear...

  18. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Re-entrant-Groove-Assisted VLS Growth of Boron Carbide Five-Fold Twinned Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yu, Zhi-Yang; Steffan, Lea; Yuan, Jun

    2009-08-01

    We report a preferential growth of boron carbide nanowires with a five-fold twinned internal structure. The nanowires are found to grow catalytically via iron boron nanoparticles, but unusually the catalytic particle is in contact with the low-energy surfaces of boron carbide with V-shaped contact lines. We propose that this catalytical growth may be caused by preferential nucleation at the re-entrant grooves due to the twinning planes, followed by rapid spreading of atomic steps. This is consistent with the observed temperature dependence of the five-fold twinned nanowire growth.

  19. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis of a Novel Class of Shikimate Dehydrogenases: Evidence for a Conserved Catalytic Mechanism in the Shikimate Dehydrogenase Family

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, James; Lee, John; Hu, Shi; Senisterra, Guillermo; Christendat, Dinesh

    2011-10-27

    Shikimate dehydrogenase (SDH) catalyzes the reversible NADPH-dependent reduction of 3-dehydroshikimate to shikimate. This reaction represents the fourth step of the shikimate pathway, the essential route for the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, bacteria, and apicomplexan parasites. The absence of this pathway in animals makes it an attractive target for herbicides and antimicrobials. At least four functionally distinct enzyme classes, AroE, YdiB, SDH-like (SdhL), and AroE-like1 (Ael1), utilize shikimate as a substrate in vitro and form the SDH family. Crystal structures have been determined for AroE, YdiB, and SdhL. In this study, we have determined the first representative crystal structure of an Ael1 enzyme. We demonstrate that Ael1 shares a similar overall structure with the other members of the SDH family. This high level of structural conservation extends to the active sites of the enzymes. In particular, an ionizable active site lysine and aspartate are present in all SDH homologues. Two distinct biochemical roles have been reported for this Lys-Asp pair: as binding residues in YdiB and as a catalytic dyad in AroE and SdhL. Here, we establish that the residues function as a catalytic dyad in Ael1 and, interestingly, in at least one YdiB homologue. The conservation of three-dimensional fold, active site architecture, and catalytic mechanism among members of the SDH family will facilitate the design of drugs targeting the shikimate pathway.

  20. Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Density MR with arrows The clinical differential diagnosis of plica syndrome includes lateral epicondylitis (aka tennis elbow ), loose bodies... Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Radiology Corner Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Guarantor: CPT Amit Sanghi, USA, MC FS Contributors: CPT Amit...the case of a 17 year old female with elbow synovial fold syndrome (aka plica synovialis). The etiology is thought to be related to repetitive

  1. The Alternative complex III: properties and possible mechanisms for electron transfer and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Refojo, Patrícia N; Teixeira, Miguel; Pereira, Manuela M

    2012-10-01

    Alternative complexes III (ACIII) are recently identified membrane-bound enzymes that replace functionally the cytochrome bc(1/)b(6)f complexes. In general, ACIII are composed of four transmembrane proteins and three peripheral subunits that contain iron-sulfur centers and C-type hemes. ACIII are built by a combination of modules present in different enzyme families, namely the complex iron-sulfur molybdenum containing enzymes. In this article a historical perspective on the investigation of ACIII is presented, followed by an overview of the present knowledge on these enzymes. Electron transfer pathways within the protein are discussed taking into account possible different locations (cytoplasmatic or periplasmatic) of the iron-sulfur containing protein and their contribution to energy conservation. In this way several hypotheses for energy conservation modes are raised including linear and bifurcating electron transfer pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012).

  2. Methylation of ribosomal RNA by NSUN5 is a conserved mechanism modulating organismal lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Schosserer, Markus; Minois, Nadege; Angerer, Tina B.; Amring, Manuela; Dellago, Hanna; Harreither, Eva; Calle-Perez, Alfonso; Pircher, Andreas; Gerstl, Matthias Peter; Pfeifenberger, Sigrid; Brandl, Clemens; Sonntagbauer, Markus; Kriegner, Albert; Linder, Angela; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Mohr, Thomas; Steiger, Matthias; Mattanovich, Diethard; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Karl, Thomas; Sharma, Sunny; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Kos, Martin; Breitenbach, Michael; Wilson, Iain B.H.; Polacek, Norbert; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore; Grillari, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Several pathways modulating longevity and stress resistance converge on translation by targeting ribosomal proteins or initiation factors, but whether this involves modifications of ribosomal RNA is unclear. Here, we show that reduced levels of the conserved RNA methyltransferase NSUN5 increase the lifespan and stress resistance in yeast, worms and flies. Rcm1, the yeast homologue of NSUN5, methylates C2278 within a conserved region of 25S rRNA. Loss of Rcm1 alters the structural conformation of the ribosome in close proximity to C2278, as well as translational fidelity, and favours recruitment of a distinct subset of oxidative stress-responsive mRNAs into polysomes. Thus, rather than merely being a static molecular machine executing translation, the ribosome exhibits functional diversity by modification of just a single rRNA nucleotide, resulting in an alteration of organismal physiological behaviour, and linking rRNA-mediated translational regulation to modulation of lifespan, and differential stress response. PMID:25635753

  3. A galaxy of folds

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains. PMID:19937658

  4. A galaxy of folds.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains.

  5. Conserved mechanisms of Mycobacterium marinum pathogenesis within the environmental amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, George M; Morisaki, J Hiroshi; Champion, Patricia A DiGiuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a waterborne mycobacterial pathogen. Due to their common niche, protozoa likely represent natural hosts for M. marinum. We demonstrate that the ESX-1 secretion system is required for M. marinum pathogenesis and that M. marinum utilizes actin-based motility in amoebae. Therefore, at least two virulence pathways used by M. marinum in macrophages are conserved during M. marinum infection of amoebae.

  6. Histone-dependent IgG conservation in octanoic acid precipitation and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Toh, Phyllicia; Sun, Yue; Latiff, Sarah Maria Abdul; Hoi, Aina; Xian, Mo; Zhang, Haibo; Nian, Rui; Zhang, Wei; Gagnon, Pete

    2016-12-01

    Octanoic acid (OA) precipitation has long been used in protein purification. Recently, we reported a new cell culture clarification method for immunoglobulin G (IgG) purification, employing an advance elimination of chromatin heteroaggregates with a hybrid OA-solid phase system. This treatment reduced DNA more than 3 logs, histone below the detection limit (LOD), and non-histone host cell proteins (nh-HCP) by 90 % while conserving more than 90 % of the IgG monomer. In this study, we further investigated the conservation of IgG monomer and antibody light chain (LC) to the addition of OA/OA-solid phase complex, with or without histone and DNA in different combinations. The results showed that highly basic histone protein was the prime target in OA/OA-solid phase precipitation system for IgG purification, and the selective conservation of IgG monomer in this system was histone dependent. Our findings partially support the idea that OA works by sticking to electropositive hydrophobic domains on proteins, reducing their solubility, and causing them to agglomerate into large particles that precipitate from solution. Our findings also provide a new perspective for IgG purification and emphasize the necessity to re-examine the roles of various host contaminants in IgG purification.

  7. Folded dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Salaris, Claudio; DeRossi, Danilo

    2007-04-01

    Polymer-based linear actuators with contractile ability are currently demanded for several types of applications. Within the class of dielectric elastomer actuators, two basic configurations are available today for such a purpose: the multi-layer stack and the helical structure. The first consists of several layers of elementary planar actuators stacked in series mechanically and parallel electrically. The second configuration relies on a couple of helical compliant electrodes alternated with a couple of helical dielectrics. The fabrication of both these configurations presents some specific drawbacks today, arising from the peculiarity of each structure. Accordingly, the availability of simpler solutions may boost the short-term use of contractile actuators in practical applications. For this purpose, a new configuration is here described. It consists of a monolithic structure made of an electroded sheet, which is folded up and compacted. The resulting device is functionally equivalent to a multi-layer stack with interdigitated electrodes. However, with respect to a stack the new configuration is advantageously not discontinuous and can be manufactured in one single phase, avoiding layer-by-layer multi-step procedures. The development and preliminary testing of prototype samples of this new actuator made of a silicone elastomer are presented here.

  8. Exocytosis mechanisms underlying insulin release and glucose uptake: conserved roles for Munc18c and syntaxin 4.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jenna L; Oh, Eunjin; Thurmond, Debbie C

    2010-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been coined "a two-hit disease," as it involves specific defects of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta cells in addition to defects in peripheral tissue insulin action required for glucose uptake. Both of these processes, insulin secretion and glucose uptake, are mediated by SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein core complexes composed of syntaxin, SNAP-23/25, and VAMP proteins. The SNARE core complex is regulated by the Sec1/Munc18 (SM) family of proteins, which selectively bind to their cognate syntaxin isoforms with high affinity. The process of insulin secretion uses multiple Munc18-syntaxin isoform pairs, whereas insulin action in the peripheral tissues appears to use only the Munc18c-syntaxin 4 pair. Importantly, recent reports have linked obesity and Type 2 diabetes in humans with changes in protein levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of Munc18 and syntaxin isoforms relevant to these exocytotic processes, although the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotypes remain incomplete (5, 104, 144). Given the conservation of these proteins in two seemingly disparate processes and the need to design and implement novel and more effective clinical interventions, it will be vitally important to delineate the mechanisms governing these conserved SNARE-mediated exocytosis events. Thus, we provide here an up-to-date historical review of advancements in defining the roles and molecular mechanisms of Munc18-syntaxin complexes in the pathophysiology of Type 2 diabetes.

  9. The viral transactivator HBx protein exhibits a high potential for regulation via phosphorylation through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) encodes an oncogenic factor, HBx, which is a multifunctional protein that can induce dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways, transcription, and cell cycle progression, among other processes, through interactions with target host factors. The subcellular localization of HBx is both cytoplasmic and nuclear. This dynamic distribution of HBx could be essential to the multiple roles of the protein at different stages during HBV infection. Transactivational functions of HBx may be exerted both in the nucleus, via interaction with host DNA-binding proteins, and in the cytoplasm, via signaling pathways. Although there have been many studies describing different pathways altered by HBx, and its innumerable binding partners, the molecular mechanism that regulates its different roles has been difficult to elucidate. Methods In the current study, we took a bioinformatics approach to investigate whether the viral protein HBx might be regulated via phosphorylation by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Results We found that the phylogenetically conserved residues Ser25 and Ser41 (both within the negative regulatory domain), and Thr81 (in the transactivation domain) are predicted to be phosphorylated. By molecular 3D modeling of HBx, we further show these residues are all predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein, making them easily accesible to these types of modifications. Furthermore, we have also identified Yin Yang sites that might have the potential to be phosphorylated and O-β-GlcNAc interplay at the same residues. Conclusions Thus, we propose that the different roles of HBx displayed in different subcellular locations might be regulated by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of posttranslational modification, via phosphorylation. PMID:23079056

  10. Conserved molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of small molecule xenobiotic chemotherapeutics on cells

    PubMed Central

    SARIN, HEMANT

    2016-01-01

    For proper determination of the apoptotic potential of chemoxenobiotics in synergism, it is important to understand the modes, levels and character of interactions of chemoxenobiotics with cells in the context of predicted conserved biophysical properties. Chemoxenobiotic structures are studied with respect to atom distribution over molecular space, the predicted overall octanol-to-water partition coefficient (Log OWPC; unitless) and molecular size viz a viz van der Waals diameter (vdWD). The Log OWPC-to-vdWD (nm−1) parameter is determined, and where applicable, hydrophilic interacting moiety/core-to-vdWD (nm−1) and lipophilic incorporating hydrophobic moiety/core-to-vdWD (nm−1) parameters of their part-structures are determined. The cellular and sub-cellular level interactions of the spectrum of xenobiotic chemotherapies have been characterized, for which a classification system has been developed based on predicted conserved biophysical properties with respect to the mode of chemotherapeutic effect. The findings of this study are applicable towards improving the effectiveness of existing combination chemotherapy regimens and the predictive accuracy of personalized cancer treatment algorithms as well as towards the selection of appropriate novel xenobiotics with the potential to be potent chemotherapeutics for dendrimer nanoparticle-based effective transvascular delivery. PMID:26998284

  11. A conservative approximation to compressible two-phase flow models in the stiff mechanical relaxation limit

    SciTech Connect

    Deledicque, Vincent; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.

    2008-11-10

    In this article, we present and analyze a conservative approximation to reduced one-pressure one-velocity models for compressible two-phase flows that contain non-conservative products. This approximation is valid when certain material properties of the two phases are considerably different from each other. Although it cannot be applied to arbitrary mixtures, it is applicable to many heterogeneous mixtures of technological interest. Herein, we derive the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and Riemann invariants for the homogeneous part of the proposed model and develop an exact Riemann solver for it. Further, we investigate the structure of the steady two-phase detonation waves, with inert or reactive solid particles, admitted by the proposed model. Comparisons with the corresponding gaseous detonations are also made. Moreover, we derive a lower limit for the propagation speed of steady two-phase detonations in the case of reactive particles. At the limiting case of very dilute mixtures, this minimum speed tends to the Chapman-Jouguet velocity of gaseous detonations. Finally, we report on numerical simulations of the transmission of a purely gaseous detonation to heterogeneous mixtures containing inert or reactive solid particles. The effect of the solid particles on the structure of the resulting two-phase detonation is discussed in detail.

  12. Phagocytosis by Thrombocytes is a Conserved Innate Immune Mechanism in Lower Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Takahiro; Nakayasu, Chihaya; Rieger, Aja M.; Barreda, Daniel R.; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytes, nucleated hemostatic blood cells of non-mammalian vertebrates, are regarded as the functional equivalent of anucleated mammalian platelets. Additional immune functions, including phagocytosis, have also been suggested for thrombocytes, but no conclusive molecular or cellular experimental evidence for their potential ingestion and clearance of infiltrating microbes has been provided till date. In the present study, we demonstrate the active phagocytic ability of thrombocytes in lower vertebrates using teleost fishes and amphibian models. Ex vivo, common carp thrombocytes were able to ingest live bacteria as well as latex beads (0.5–3 μm in diameter) and kill the bacteria. In vivo, we found that thrombocytes represented nearly half of the phagocyte population in the common carp total peripheral blood leukocyte pool. Phagocytosis efficiency was further enhanced by serum opsonization. Particle internalization led to phagolysosome fusion and killing of internalized bacteria, pointing to a robust ability for microbe elimination. We find that this potent phagocytic activity is shared across teleost (Paralichthys olivaceus) and amphibian (Xenopus laevis) models examined, implying its conservation throughout the lower vertebrate lineage. Our results provide novel insights into the dual nature of thrombocytes in the immune and homeostatic response and further provide a deeper understanding of the potential immune function of mammalian platelets based on the conserved and vestigial functions. PMID:25278940

  13. Stress and strain evolution of folding rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Weikusat, Ilka

    2015-04-01

    One of the main objectives of structural geology is to unravel rock deformation histories. Fold shapes can be used to estimate the orientation and amount of strain associated with folding. However, much more information on rheology and kinematics can potentially be extracted from fold geometries (Llorens et al., 2013a). We can study the development of folds, quantify the relationships between the different parameters that determine their geometries and estimate their mechanical evolution. This approach allows us to better understand and predict not only rock but also ice deformation. One of the main parameters in fold development is the viscosity contrast between the folding layer and the matrix in which it is embedded (m), since it determines the initial fold wavelength and the amplification rate of the developing folds. Moreover, non-linear viscous rheology influences fold geometry too (Llorens et al., 2013b). We present a series of 2-dimensional simulations of folding of viscous single layers in pure and simple shear. We vary different parameters in order to compare and determine their influence on the resulting fold patterns and the associated mechanical response of the material. To perform these simulations we use the software platform ELLE (www.elle.ws) with the non-linear viscous finite element code BASIL. The results show that layers thicken at the beginning of deformation in all simulations, and visible folds start earlier or later depending on the viscosity contrast. When folds start to nucleate the layer maximum shear strain decreases, moving away from the theoretical trend for homogeneous strain (no folding). This allows the accurate determination of the onset of folding. Maximum deviatoric stresses are higher in power-law than in linear-viscosity materials, and it is initially double in pure shear than in simple shear conditions. Therefore, folding a competent layer requires less work in simple than in pure shear. The maximum deviatoric stress

  14. Turbulent phenomena in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Kalgin, Igor V; Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding and hydrodynamic turbulence are two long-standing challenges, in molecular biophysics and fluid dynamics, respectively. The theories of these phenomena have been developed independently and used different formalisms. Here we show that the protein folding flows can be surprisingly similar to turbulent fluid flows. Studying a benchmark model protein (an SH3 domain), we have found that the flows for the slow folding trajectories of the protein, in which a partly formed N- and C-terminal β sheet hinders the RT loop from attaching to the protein core, have many properties of turbulent flows of a fluid. The flows are analyzed in a three-dimensional (3D) space of collective variables, which are the numbers of native contacts between the terminal β strands, between the RT loop and the protein core, and the rest of the native contacts. We have found that the flows have fractal nature and are filled with 3D eddies; the latter contain strange attractors, at which the tracer flow paths behave as saddle trajectories. Two regions of the space increment have been observed, in which the flux variations are self-similar with the scaling exponent h=1/3, in surprising agreement with the Kolmogorov inertial range theory of turbulence. In one region, the cascade of protein rearrangements is directed from larger to smaller scales (net folding), and in the other, it is oppositely directed (net unfolding). Folding flows for the fast trajectories are essentially "laminar" and do not have the property of self-similarity. Based on the results of our study, we infer, and support this inference by simulations, that the origin of the similarity between the protein folding and turbulent motion of a fluid is in a cascade mechanism of structural transformations in the systems that underlies these phenomena.

  15. Uniqueness of the mechanism of protein import into the peroxisome matrix: transport of folded, co-factor-bound and oligomeric proteins by shuttling receptors.

    PubMed

    Léon, Sébastien; Goodman, Joel M; Subramani, Suresh

    2006-12-01

    Based on earlier suggestions that peroxisomes may have arisen from endosymbionts that later lost their DNA, it was expected that protein transport into this organelle would have parallels to systems found in other organelles of endosymbiont origin, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts. This review highlights three features of peroxisomal matrix protein import that make it unique in comparison with these other subcellular compartments - the ability of this organelle to transport folded, co-factor-bound and oligomeric proteins, the dynamics of the import receptors during the matrix protein import cycle and the existence of a peroxisomal quality-control pathway, which insures that the peroxisome membrane is cleared of cargo-free receptors.

  16. Conglobation in the pill bug, Armadillidium vulgare, as a water conservation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Smigel, Jacob T; Gibbs, Allen G

    2008-01-01

    Water balance of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was investigated during conglobation (rolling-up behavior). Water loss and metabolic rates were measured at 18 +/- 1 degrees C in dry air using flow-through respirometry. Water-loss rates decreased 34.8% when specimens were in their conglobated form, while CO2 release decreased by 37.1%. Water loss was also measured gravimetrically at humidities ranging from 6 to 75 %RH. Conglobation was associated with a decrease in water-loss rates up to 53 %RH, but no significant differences were observed at higher humidities. Our findings suggest that conglobation behavior may help to conserve water, in addition to its demonstrated role in protection from predation.

  17. Conglobation in the Pill Bug, Armadillidium vulgare, as a Water Conservation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Smigel, Jacob T.; Gibbs, Allen G.

    2008-01-01

    Water balance of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was investigated during conglobation (rolling-up behavior). Water loss and metabolic rates were measured at 18 ± 1°C in dry air using flow-through respirometry. Water-loss rates decreased 34.8% when specimens were in their conglobated form, while CO2 release decreased by 37.1%. Water loss was also measured gravimetrically at humidities ranging from 6 to 75 %RH. Conglobation was associated with a decrease in water-loss rates up to 53 %RH, but no significant differences were observed at higher humidities. Our findings suggest that conglobation behavior may help to conserve water, in addition to its demonstrated role in protection from predation. PMID:20233103

  18. Structures of Xenopus Embryonic Epidermal Lectin Reveal a Conserved Mechanism of Microbial Glycan Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wangkanont, Kittikhun; Wesener, Darryl A; Vidani, Jack A; Kiessling, Laura L; Forest, Katrina T

    2016-03-11

    Intelectins (X-type lectins), broadly distributed throughout chordates, have been implicated in innate immunity. Xenopus laevis embryonic epidermal lectin (XEEL), an intelectin secreted into environmental water by the X. laevis embryo, is postulated to function as a defense against microbes. XEEL is homologous (64% identical) to human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1), which is also implicated in innate immune defense. We showed previously that hIntL-1 binds microbial glycans bearing exocyclic vicinal diol groups. It is unknown whether XEEL has the same ligand specificity. Also unclear is whether XEEL and hIntL-1 have similar quaternary structures, as XEEL lacks the corresponding cysteine residues in hIntL-1 that stabilize the disulfide-linked trimer. These observations prompted us to further characterize XEEL. We found that hIntL-1 and XEEL have similar structural features. Even without the corresponding intermolecular disulfide bonds present in hIntL-1, the carbohydrate recognition domain of XEEL (XEELCRD) forms a stable trimer in solution. The structure of XEELCRD in complex with d-glycerol-1-phosphate, a residue present in microbe-specific glycans, indicated that the exocyclic vicinal diol coordinates to a protein-bound calcium ion. This ligand-binding mode is conserved between XEEL and hIntL-1. The domain architecture of full-length XEEL is reminiscent of a barbell, with two sets of three glycan-binding sites oriented in opposite directions. This orientation is consistent with our observation that XEEL can promote the agglutination of specific serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae. These data support a role for XEEL in innate immunity, and they highlight structural and functional conservation of X-type lectins among chordates.

  19. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  20. Nomenclature proposal to describe vocal fold motion impairment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Clark A; Mau, Ted; Remacle, Marc; Hess, Markus; Eckel, Hans E; Young, VyVy N; Hantzakos, Anastasios; Yung, Katherine C; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2016-08-01

    The terms used to describe vocal fold motion impairment are confusing and not standardized. This results in a failure to communicate accurately and to major limitations of interpreting research studies involving vocal fold impairment. We propose standard nomenclature for reporting vocal fold impairment. Overarching terms of vocal fold immobility and hypomobility are rigorously defined. This includes assessment techniques and inclusion and exclusion criteria for determining vocal fold immobility and hypomobility. In addition, criteria for use of the following terms have been outlined in detail: vocal fold paralysis, vocal fold paresis, vocal fold immobility/hypomobility associated with mechanical impairment of the crico-arytenoid joint and vocal fold immobility/hypomobility related to laryngeal malignant disease. This represents the first rigorously defined vocal fold motion impairment nomenclature system. This provides detailed definitions to the terms vocal fold paralysis and vocal fold paresis.

  1. Congenital hypothyroidism mutations affect common folding and trafficking in the α/β-hydrolase fold proteins.

    PubMed

    De Jaco, Antonella; Dubi, Noga; Camp, Shelley; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-12-01

    The α/β-hydrolase fold superfamily of proteins is composed of structurally related members that, despite great diversity in their catalytic, recognition, adhesion and chaperone functions, share a common fold governed by homologous residues and conserved disulfide bridges. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms within the α/β-hydrolase fold domain in various family members have been found for congenital endocrine, metabolic and nervous system disorders. By examining the amino acid sequence from the various proteins, mutations were found to be prevalent in conserved residues within the α/β-hydrolase fold of the homologous proteins. This is the case for the thyroglobulin mutations linked to congenital hypothyroidism. To address whether correct folding of the common domain is required for protein export, we inserted the thyroglobulin mutations at homologous positions in two correlated but simpler α/β-hydrolase fold proteins known to be exported to the cell surface: neuroligin3 and acetylcholinesterase. Here we show that these mutations in the cholinesterase homologous region alter the folding properties of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain, which are reflected in defects in protein trafficking, folding and function, and ultimately result in retention of the partially processed proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accordingly, mutations at conserved residues may be transferred amongst homologous proteins to produce common processing defects despite disparate functions, protein complexity and tissue-specific expression of the homologous proteins. More importantly, a similar assembly of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain tertiary structure among homologous members of the superfamily is required for correct trafficking of the proteins to their final destination.

  2. Folding of polyglutamine chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Manan; Reddy, Allam S.; Abbott, N. L.; de Pablo, J. J.

    2008-10-01

    Long polyglutamine chains have been associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases. These include Huntington's disease, where expanded polyglutamine (PolyQ) sequences longer than 36 residues are correlated with the onset of symptoms. In this paper we study the folding pathway of a 54-residue PolyQ chain into a β-helical structure. Transition path sampling Monte Carlo simulations are used to generate unbiased reactive pathways between unfolded configurations and the folded β-helical structure of the polyglutamine chain. The folding process is examined in both explicit water and an implicit solvent. Both models reveal that the formation of a few critical contacts is necessary and sufficient for the molecule to fold. Once the primary contacts are formed, the fate of the protein is sealed and it is largely committed to fold. We find that, consistent with emerging hypotheses about PolyQ aggregation, a stable β-helical structure could serve as the nucleus for subsequent polymerization of amyloid fibrils. Our results indicate that PolyQ sequences shorter than 36 residues cannot form that nucleus, and it is also shown that specific mutations inferred from an analysis of the simulated folding pathway exacerbate its stability.

  3. Protein Folding and Self-Organized Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajracharya, Arun; Murray, Joelle

    Proteins are known to fold into tertiary structures that determine their functionality in living organisms. However, the complex dynamics of protein folding and the way they consistently fold into the same structures is not fully understood. Self-organized criticality (SOC) has provided a framework for understanding complex systems in various systems (earthquakes, forest fires, financial markets, and epidemics) through scale invariance and the associated power law behavior. In this research, we use a simple hydrophobic-polar lattice-bound computational model to investigate self-organized criticality as a possible mechanism for generating complexity in protein folding.

  4. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sarah A; Kim, Junhyong

    2014-11-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function-for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures.

  5. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function—for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures. PMID:25234928

  6. Energy conservation in ad hoc multimedia networks using traffic-shaping mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Surendar

    2003-12-01

    In this work, we explore network traffic shaping mechanisms that deliver packets at pre-determined intervals; allowing the network interface to transition to a lower power consuming sleep state. We focus our efforts on commodity devices, IEEE 802.11b ad hoc mode and popular streaming formats. We argue that factors such as the lack of scheduling clock phase synchronization among the participants and scheduling delays introduced by back ground tasks affect the potential energy savings. Increasing the periodic transmission delays to transmit data infrequently can offset some of these effects at the expense of flooding the wireless channel for longer periods of time; potentially increasing the time to acquire the channel for non-multimedia traffic. Buffering mechanisms built into media browsers can mitigate the effects of these added delays from being mis-interpreted as network congestion. We show that practical implementations of such traffic shaping mechanisms can offer significant energy savings.

  7. The presence of disulfide bonds reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism involved in mitochondrial protein translocase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lidia; Sokol, Anna M.; Chojnacka, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is crucial for the biogenesis and structure of many proteins that are localized in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. The importance of disulfide bond formation within mitochondrial proteins was extended beyond soluble intermembrane space proteins. Tim22, a membrane protein and core component of the mitochondrial translocase TIM22, forms an intramolecular disulfide bond in yeast. Tim22 belongs to the Tim17/Tim22/Tim23 family of protein translocases. Here, we present evidence of the high evolutionary conservation of disulfide bond formation in Tim17 and Tim22 among fungi and metazoa. Topological models are proposed that include the location of disulfide bonds relative to the predicted transmembrane regions. Yeast and human Tim22 variants that are not oxidized do not properly integrate into the membrane complex. Moreover, the lack of Tim17 oxidation disrupts the TIM23 translocase complex. This underlines the importance of disulfide bond formation for mature translocase assembly through membrane stabilization of weak transmembrane domains. PMID:27265872

  8. Membrane pyrophosphatases from Thermotoga maritima and Vigna radiata suggest a conserved coupling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun-Mou; Wilkinson, Craig; Kellosalo, Juho; Tsai, Jia-Yin; Kajander, Tommi; Jeuken, Lars J. C.; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Goldman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatases (M-PPases), which couple proton/sodium ion transport to pyrophosphate synthesis/hydrolysis, are important in abiotic stress resistance and in the infectivity of protozoan parasites. Here, three M-PPase structures in different catalytic states show that closure of the substrate-binding pocket by helices 5–6 affects helix 13 in the dimer interface and causes helix 12 to move down. This springs a ‘molecular mousetrap', repositioning a conserved aspartate and activating the nucleophilic water. Corkscrew motion at helices 6 and 16 rearranges the key ionic gate residues and leads to ion pumping. The pumped ion is above the ion gate in one of the ion-bound structures, but below it in the other. Electrometric measurements show a single-turnover event with a non-hydrolysable inhibitor, supporting our model that ion pumping precedes hydrolysis. We propose a complete catalytic cycle for both proton and sodium-pumping M-PPases, and one that also explains the basis for ion specificity. PMID:27922000

  9. Nuclear pore proteins regulate chromatin structure and transcriptional memory by a conserved mechanism.

    PubMed

    Light, William H; Brickner, Jason H

    2013-01-01

    Previous experience alters the rate of transcriptional induction of many genes in yeast and this phenomenon persists through several cell division cycles. This phenomenon is called epigenetic transcriptional memory. For the yeast gene INO1, transcriptional memory requires a physical interaction with the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and changes in the chromatin structure of the promoter. These changes lead to binding of a preinitiation form of RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) to the INO1 promoter, bypassing the need to recruit RNAPII to the promoter during reactivation. In our recent study, we found that in human cells, hundreds of interferon-γ responsive genes exhibit a mechanistically similar form of transcriptional memory. Transcriptional memory requires a homologous nuclear pore protein in yeast and humans, which interacts with the promoters of genes that exhibit transcriptional memory and promotes both alteration of chromatin structure and binding of RNAPII. Whereas the interaction of yeast genes with nuclear pore proteins occurs at the NPC, the interaction of human genes with nuclear pore proteins occurs in the nucleoplasm. Thus, the interaction of nuclear pore proteins with genes plays an important and conserved role in affecting long-term epigenetic changes in transcriptional regulation.

  10. Evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of male germline development in flowering plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia A; Navarro-Costa, Paulo; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo; Becker, Jörg D

    2014-04-01

    Sexual reproduction is the main reproductive strategy of the overwhelming majority of eukaryotes. This suggests that the last eukaryotic common ancestor was able to reproduce sexually. Sexual reproduction reflects the ability to perform meiosis, and ultimately generating gametes, which are cells that carry recombined half sets of the parental genome and are able to fertilize. These functions have been allocated to a highly specialized cell lineage: the germline. Given its significant evolutionary conservation, it is to be expected that the germline programme shares common molecular bases across extremely divergent eukaryotic species. In the present review, we aim to identify the unifying principles of male germline establishment and development by comparing two very disparate kingdoms: plants and animals. We argue that male meiosis defines two temporally regulated gene expression programmes: the first is required for meiotic commitment, and the second is required for the acquisition of fertilizing ability. Small RNA pathways are a further key communality, ultimately ensuring the epigenetic stability of the information conveyed by the male germline.

  11. Optical methods for measuring DNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Adam D.; Ukogu, Obinna A.; Devenica, Luka M.; White, Elizabeth D.; Carter, Ashley R.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important biological processes is the dynamic folding and unfolding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The folding process is crucial for DNA to fit within the boundaries of the cell, while the unfolding process is essential for DNA replication and transcription. To accommodate both processes, the cell employs a highly active folding mechanism that has been the subject of intense study over the last few decades. Still, many open questions remain. What are the pathways for folding or unfolding? How does the folding equilibrium shift? And, what is the energy landscape for a particular process? Here, we review these emerging questions and the in vitro, optical methods that have provided answers, introducing the topic for those physicists seeking to step into biology. Specifically, we discuss two iconic experiments for DNA folding, the tethered particle motion (TPM) experiment and the optical tweezers experiment.

  12. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-11-18

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right-left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use.

  13. Garnet-biotite diffusion mechanisms in complex high-grade orogenic belts: Understanding and constraining petrological cooling rates in granulites from Ribeira Fold Belt (SE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bento dos Santos, Telmo M.; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; Fonseca, Paulo E.

    2014-12-01

    Cooling rates based on the retrograde diffusion of Fe2+ and Mg between garnet and biotite inclusions commonly show two contrasting scenarios: a) narrow closure temperature range with apparent absence of retrograde diffusion; or b) high result dispersion due to compositional variations in garnet and biotite. Cooling rates from migmatites, felsic and mafic granulites from Ribeira Fold Belt (SE Brazil) also show these two scenarios. Although the former can be explained by very fast cooling, the latter is often the result of open-system behaviour caused by deformation. Retrogressive cooling during the exhumation of granulite-facies rocks is often processed by thrusting and shearing which may cause plastic deformation, fractures and cracks in the garnet megablasts, allowing chemical diffusion outside the garnet megablast - biotite inclusion system. However, a careful use of garnets and biotites with large Fe/Mg variation and software that reduces result dispersion provides a good correlation between closure temperatures and the size of biotite inclusions which are mostly due to diffusion and compositional readjustment to thermal evolution during retrogression. Results show that felsic and mafic granulites have low cooling rates (1-2 °C/Ma) at higher temperatures and high cooling rates (˜100 °C/Ma) at lower temperatures, suggesting a two-step cooling/exhumation process, whereas migmatites show a small decrease in cooling rates during cooling (from 2.0 to 0.5 °C/Ma). These results agree with previously obtained thermochronological data, which indicates that this method is a valid tool to obtain meaningful petrological cooling rates in complex high-grade orogenic belts, such as the Ribeira Fold Belt.

  14. The M1 family of vertebrate aminopeptidases: role of evolutionarily conserved tyrosines in the enzymatic mechanism of aminopeptidase B.

    PubMed

    Cadel, Sandrine; Darmon, Cécile; Pernier, Julien; Hervé, Guy; Foulon, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Aminopeptidase B (Ap-B), a member of the M1 family of Zn(2+)-aminopeptidases, removes basic residues at the NH2-terminus of peptides and is involved in the in vivo proteolytic processing of miniglucagon and cholecystokinin-8. M1 enzymes hydrolyze numerous different peptides and are implicated in many physiological functions. As these enzymes have similar catalytic mechanisms, their respective substrate specificity and/or catalytic efficiency must be based on subtle structural differences at or near the catalytic site. This leads to the hypothesis that each primary structure contains a consensus structural template, strictly necessary for aminopeptidase activity, and a specific amino acid environment localized in or outside the catalytic pocket that finely tunes the substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency of each enzyme. A multiple sequence alignment of M1 peptidases from vertebrates allowed to identify conserved tyrosine amino acids, which are members of this catalytic backbone. In the present work, site-directed mutagenesis and 3D molecular modeling of Ap-B were used to specify the role of four fully (Y281, Y229, Y414, and Y441) and one partially (Y409) conserved residues. Tyrosine to phenylalanine mutations allowed confirming the influence of the hydroxyl groups on the enzyme activity. These groups are implicated in the reaction mechanism (Y414), in substrate specificity and/or catalytic efficiency (Y409), in stabilization of essential amino acids of the active site (Y229, Y409) and potentially in the maintenance of its structural integrity (Y281, Y441). The importance of hydrogen bonds is verified by the Y229H substitution, which preserves the enzyme activity. These data provide new insights into the catalytic mechanism of Ap-B in the M1 family of aminopeptidases.

  15. Conservation of a packaging signal and the viral genome RNA packaging mechanism in alphavirus evolution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dal Young; Firth, Andrew E; Atasheva, Svetlana; Frolova, Elena I; Frolov, Ilya

    2011-08-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of small, enveloped viruses which are widely distributed on all continents. In infected cells, alphaviruses display remarkable specificity in RNA packaging by encapsidating only their genomic RNA while avoiding packaging of the more abundant viral subgenomic (SG), cellular messenger and transfer RNAs into released virions. In this work, we demonstrate that in spite of evolution in geographically isolated areas and accumulation of considerable diversity in the nonstructural and structural genes, many alphaviruses belonging to different serocomplexes harbor RNA packaging signals (PSs) which contain the same structural and functional elements. Their characteristic features are as follows. (i) Sindbis, eastern, western, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis and most likely many other alphaviruses, except those belonging to the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) clade, have PSs which can be recognized by the capsid proteins of heterologous alphaviruses. (ii) The PS consists of 4 to 6 stem-loop RNA structures bearing conserved GGG sequences located at the base of the loop. These short motifs are integral elements of the PS and can function even in the artificially designed PS. (iii) Mutagenesis of the entire PS or simply the GGG sequences has strong negative effects on viral genome packaging and leads to release of viral particles containing mostly SG RNAs. (iv) Packaging of RNA appears to be determined to some extent by the number of GGG-containing stem-loops, and more than one stem-loop is required for efficient RNA encapsidation. (v) Viruses of the SFV clade are the exception to the general rule. They contain PSs in the nsP2 gene, but their capsid protein retains the ability to use the nsP1-specific PS of other alphaviruses. These new discoveries regarding alphavirus PS structure and function provide an opportunity for the development of virus variants, which are irreversibly attenuated in terms of production of infectious virus but release high levels

  16. Mechanisms of aquatic species invasions across the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, Amy J.; Stith, Bradley M.; Engel, Victor C.

    2016-12-15

    Invasive species are a global issue, and the southeastern United States is not immune to the problems they present. Therefore, various analyses using modeling and exploratory statistics were performed on the U.S. Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Database with the primary objective of determining the most appropriate use of presence-only data as related to invasive species in the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) region. A hierarchical model approach showed that a relatively small amount of high-quality data from planned surveys can be used to leverage the information in presence-only observations, having a broad spatial coverage and high biases of observer detection and in site selection. Because a variety of sampling protocols can be used in planned surveys, this approach to the analysis of presence-only data is widely applicable. An important part of the management of natural landscapes is the preservation of designated protected areas. When the hydrologic connection was considered in this analysis, the number of potential invaders that could spread to each protected area within the SALCC region was greatly increased, with a mean exceeding 30 species and the maximum reaching 57 species. Nearly all protected areas are hydrologically connected to at least 20 nonindigenous aquatic species. To examine possible factors which may contribute to nonindigenous aquatic species richness in the SALCC region, a set of exploratory statistics was employed. The best statistical model that included a combination of three anthropogenic variables (densities of housing, roads, and reservoirs) and two environmental variables (elevation range and longitude) explained approximately 62 percent of the variation in introduced species richness. Highest nonindigenous aquatic species richness occurred in the more upland, mountainous regions, where elevation range favored reservoirs and attracted urban centers. Lastly, patterns seen in a diffusion

  17. Programmable matter by folding

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, E.; An, B.; Benbernou, N. M.; Tanaka, H.; Kim, S.; Demaine, E. D.; Rus, D.; Wood, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to meet the goal. This paper considers achieving programmable sheets that can form themselves in different shapes autonomously by folding. Past approaches to creating transforming machines have been limited by the small feature sizes, the large number of components, and the associated complexity of communication among the units. We seek to mitigate these difficulties through the unique concept of self-folding origami with universal crease patterns. This approach exploits a single sheet composed of interconnected triangular sections. The sheet is able to fold into a set of predetermined shapes using embedded actuation. To implement this self-folding origami concept, we have developed a scalable end-to-end planning and fabrication process. Given a set of desired objects, the system computes an optimized design for a single sheet and multiple controllers to achieve each of the desired objects. The material, called programmable matter by folding, is an example of a system capable of achieving multiple shapes for multiple functions. PMID:20616049

  18. Folding of apominimyoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, G; Ascoli, F; Brunori, M

    1994-01-01

    The acid unfolding pathway of apominimyoglobin (apo-mini-Mb), a 108-aa fragment (aa 32-139) of horse heart apomyoglobin has been studied by means of circular dichroism, in comparison with the native apoprotein. Similar to sperm whale apomyoglobin [Hughson, F. M., Wright, P. E. & Baldwin, R. L. (1990) Science 249, 1544-1548], a partly folded intermediate (alpha-helical content approximately 35%) is populated at pH 4.2 for horse heart apomyoglobin. For this intermediate, Hughson et al. proposed a structural model with a compact subdomain involving tertiary interactions between the folded A, G, and H helices, with the remainder of the protein essentially unfolded. As described in this paper, a folding intermediate with an alpha-helical content of approximately 33% is populated at pH 4.3-5.0 also in apo-mini-Mb. The acid unfolding pathway is similarly affected in both the native and the mini apoprotein by 15% trifluoroethanol, a helix-stabilizing compound. Thus, the folding of the apo-mini-Mb intermediate is similar to that observed for the native apoprotein, in spite of the absence in the miniprotein of the A helix and of a large part of the H helix, which are crucial for the stability of apo-Mb intermediate. Our results suggest that acquisition of a folded state in apo-mini-Mb occurs through an alternative pathway, which may or may not be shared also by apo-Mb. PMID:7972092

  19. Conservation of miRNA-mediated silencing mechanisms across 600 million years of animal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Marta; Kirchner, Marieluise; Aharoni, Reuven; Ciolli Mattioli, Camilla; van den Bruck, David; Gutkovitch, Nadya; Modepalli, Vengamanaidu; Selbach, Matthias; Moran, Yehu; Chekulaeva, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Our current knowledge about the mechanisms of miRNA silencing is restricted to few lineages such as vertebrates, arthropods, nematodes and land plants. miRNA-mediated silencing in bilaterian animals is dependent on the proteins of the GW182 family. Here, we dissect the function of GW182 protein in the cnidarian Nematostella, separated by 600 million years from other Metazoa. Using cultured human cells, we show that Nematostella GW182 recruits the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complexes via its tryptophan-containing motifs, thereby inhibiting translation and promoting mRNA decay. Further, similarly to bilaterians, GW182 in Nematostella is recruited to the miRNA repression complex via interaction with Argonaute proteins, and functions downstream to repress mRNA. Thus, our work suggests that this mechanism of miRNA-mediated silencing was already active in the last common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria. PMID:27604873

  20. Conservation of miRNA-mediated silencing mechanisms across 600 million years of animal evolution.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Marta; Kirchner, Marieluise; Aharoni, Reuven; Ciolli Mattioli, Camilla; van den Bruck, David; Gutkovitch, Nadya; Modepalli, Vengamanaidu; Selbach, Matthias; Moran, Yehu; Chekulaeva, Marina

    2017-01-25

    Our current knowledge about the mechanisms of miRNA silencing is restricted to few lineages such as vertebrates, arthropods, nematodes and land plants. miRNA-mediated silencing in bilaterian animals is dependent on the proteins of the GW182 family. Here, we dissect the function of GW182 protein in the cnidarian Nematostella, separated by 600 million years from other Metazoa. Using cultured human cells, we show that Nematostella GW182 recruits the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complexes via its tryptophan-containing motifs, thereby inhibiting translation and promoting mRNA decay. Further, similarly to bilaterians, GW182 in Nematostella is recruited to the miRNA repression complex via interaction with Argonaute proteins, and functions downstream to repress mRNA. Thus, our work suggests that this mechanism of miRNA-mediated silencing was already active in the last common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria.

  1. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  2. Quantitative Morphology of Epithelial Folds

    PubMed Central

    Štorgel, Nick; Krajnc, Matej; Mrak, Polona; Štrus, Jasna; Ziherl, Primož

    2016-01-01

    The shape of spatially modulated epithelial morphologies such as villi and crypts is usually associated with the epithelium-stroma area mismatch leading to buckling. We propose an alternative mechanical model based on intraepithelial stresses generated by differential tensions of apical, lateral, and basal sides of cells as well as on the elasticity of the basement membrane. We use it to theoretically study longitudinal folds in simple epithelia and we identify four types of corrugated morphologies: compact, invaginated, evaginated, and wavy. The obtained tissue contours and thickness profiles are compared to epithelial folds observed in invertebrates and vertebrates, and for most samples, the agreement is within the estimated experimental error. Our model establishes the groove-crest modulation of tissue thickness as a morphometric parameter that can, together with the curvature profile, be used to estimate the relative differential apicobasal tension in the epithelium. PMID:26745429

  3. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; ...

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. Asmore » a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.« less

  4. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; Pinner, David

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. As a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.

  5. Molecular modeling and computational analyses suggests that the Sinorhizobium meliloti periplasmic regulator protein ExoR adopts a superhelical fold and is controlled by a unique mechanism of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Wiech, Eliza M; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-03-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti periplasmic ExoR protein and the ExoS/ChvI two-component system form a regulatory mechanism that directly controls the transformation of free-living to host-invading cells. In the absence of crystal structures, understanding the molecular mechanism of interaction between ExoR and the ExoS sensor, which is believed to drive the key regulatory step in the invasion process, remains a major challenge. In this study, we present a theoretical structural model of the active form of ExoR protein, ExoRm , generated using computational methods. Our model suggests that ExoR possesses a super-helical fold comprising 12 α-helices forming six Sel1-like repeats, including two that were unidentified in previous studies. This fold is highly conducive to mediating protein-protein interactions and this is corroborated by the identification of putative protein binding sites on the surface of the ExoRm protein. Our studies reveal two novel insights: (a) an extended conformation of the third Sel1-like repeat that might be important for ExoR regulatory function and (b) a buried proteolytic site that implies a unique proteolytic mechanism. This study provides new and interesting insights into the structure of S. meliloti ExoR, lays the groundwork for elaborating the molecular mechanism of ExoRm cleavage, ExoRm -ExoS interactions, and studies of ExoR homologs in other bacterial host interactions.

  6. EARLY BUD-BREAK1 (EBB1) defines a conserved mechanism for control of bud-break in woody perennials

    PubMed Central

    Busov, Victor; Carneros, Elena; Yakovlev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Bud-break is an environmentally and economically important trait in trees, shrubs and vines from temperate latitudes. Poor synchronization of bud-break timing with local climates can lead to frost injuries, susceptibility to pests and pathogens and poor crop yields in fruit trees and vines. The rapid climate changes outpace the adaptive capacities of plants to respond through natural selection. This is particularly true for trees which have long generation cycle and thus the adaptive changes are significantly delayed. Therefore, to devise appropriate breeding and conservation strategies, it is imperative to understand the molecular underpinnings that govern dormancy mechanisms. We have recently identified and characterized the poplar EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1) gene. EBB1 is a positive regulator of bud-break and encodes a transcription factor from the AP2/ERF family. Here, using comparative and functional genomics approaches we show that EBB1 function in regulation of bud-break is likely conserved across wide range of woody perennial species with importance to forestry and agriculture. PMID:26317150

  7. EARLY BUD-BREAK1 (EBB1) defines a conserved mechanism for control of bud-break in woody perennials.

    PubMed

    Busov, Victor; Carneros, Elena; Yakovlev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Bud-break is an environmentally and economically important trait in trees, shrubs and vines from temperate latitudes. Poor synchronization of bud-break timing with local climates can lead to frost injuries, susceptibility to pests and pathogens and poor crop yields in fruit trees and vines. The rapid climate changes outpace the adaptive capacities of plants to respond through natural selection. This is particularly true for trees which have long generation cycle and thus the adaptive changes are significantly delayed. Therefore, to devise appropriate breeding and conservation strategies, it is imperative to understand the molecular underpinnings that govern dormancy mechanisms. We have recently identified and characterized the poplar EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1) gene. EBB1 is a positive regulator of bud-break and encodes a transcription factor from the AP2/ERF family. Here, using comparative and functional genomics approaches we show that EBB1 function in regulation of bud-break is likely conserved across wide range of woody perennial species with importance to forestry and agriculture.

  8. Empathy as a driver of prosocial behaviour: highly conserved neurobehavioural mechanisms across species

    PubMed Central

    Decety, Jean; Bartal, Inbal Ben-Ami; Uzefovsky, Florina; Knafo-Noam, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Empathy reflects the natural ability to perceive and be sensitive to the emotional states of others, coupled with a motivation to care for their well-being. It has evolved in the context of parental care for offspring, as well as within kinship bonds, to help facilitate group living. In this paper, we integrate the perspectives of evolution, animal behaviour, developmental psychology, and social and clinical neuroscience to elucidate our understanding of the proximate mechanisms underlying empathy. We focus, in particular, on processing of signals of distress and need, and their relation to prosocial behaviour. The ability to empathize, both in animals and humans, mediates prosocial behaviour when sensitivity to others' distress is paired with a drive towards their welfare. Disruption or atypical development of the neural circuits that process distress cues and integrate them with decision value leads to callous disregard for others, as is the case in psychopathy. The realization that basic forms of empathy exist in non-human animals is crucial for gaining new insights into the underlying neurobiological and genetic mechanisms of empathy, enabling translation towards therapeutic and pharmacological interventions. PMID:26644596

  9. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  10. Overland flow generation mechanisms affected by topsoil treatment: Application to soil conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, P.; Ruiz-Sinoga, J. D.; Martínez-Murillo, J. F.; Lavee, H.

    2015-01-01

    Hortonian overland-flow is responsible for significant amounts of soil loss in Mediterranean geomorphological systems. Restoring the native vegetation is the most effective way to control runoff and sediment yield. During the seeding and plant establishment, vegetation cover may be better sustained if soil is amended with an external source. Four amendments were applied in an experimental set of plots: straw mulching (SM); mulch with chipped branches of Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis L.) (PM); TerraCottem hydroabsorbent polymer (HP); and sewage sludge (RU). Plots were afforested following the same spatial pattern, and amendments were mixed with the soil at the rate 10 Mg ha- 1. This research demonstrates the role played by the treatments in overland flow generation mechanism. On one hand, the high macroporosity of SM and PM, together with the fact that soil moisture increased with depth, explains weak overland flow and thus low sediment yield due to saturation conditions. Therefore, regarding overland flow and sediment yield, RU behaves similarly to SM and PM. On the other hand, when HP was applied, overland flow developed quickly with relatively high amounts. This, together with the decrease downward in soil moisture along the soil profile, proved that mechanisms of overland flow are of the Hortonian type.

  11. Empathy as a driver of prosocial behaviour: highly conserved neurobehavioural mechanisms across species.

    PubMed

    Decety, Jean; Bartal, Inbal Ben-Ami; Uzefovsky, Florina; Knafo-Noam, Ariel

    2016-01-19

    Empathy reflects the natural ability to perceive and be sensitive to the emotional states of others, coupled with a motivation to care for their well-being. It has evolved in the context of parental care for offspring, as well as within kinship bonds, to help facilitate group living. In this paper, we integrate the perspectives of evolution, animal behaviour, developmental psychology, and social and clinical neuroscience to elucidate our understanding of the proximate mechanisms underlying empathy. We focus, in particular, on processing of signals of distress and need, and their relation to prosocial behaviour. The ability to empathize, both in animals and humans, mediates prosocial behaviour when sensitivity to others' distress is paired with a drive towards their welfare. Disruption or atypical development of the neural circuits that process distress cues and integrate them with decision value leads to callous disregard for others, as is the case in psychopathy. The realization that basic forms of empathy exist in non-human animals is crucial for gaining new insights into the underlying neurobiological and genetic mechanisms of empathy, enabling translation towards therapeutic and pharmacological interventions.

  12. Analytical mechanics and field theory: derivation of equations from energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, N. A.

    2014-06-01

    Equations of motion in mechanics and field equations in field theory are conventionally derived using the least action principle. This paper presents a nonvariational derivation of Hamilton's and Lagrange's equations. The derivation starts by specifying the system energy as a function of generalized coordinates and velocities and then introduces generalized momenta in such a way that the energy remains unchanged under variations of any degree of freedom. This immediately leads to Hamilton's equations with an as yet undefined Hamiltonian. The explicit dependence of generalized momenta on the coordinates and velocities is determined by first finding the Lagrangian from the known energy function. We discuss electrodynamics as an illustrative example. The proposed approach provides new insight into the nature of canonical momenta and offers a way to find the Lagrangian from the known energy of the system.

  13. A Computational Model of Cerebral Cortex Folding

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingxin; Guo, Lei; Li, Gang; Faraco, Carlos; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    The geometric complexity and variability of the human cerebral cortex has long intrigued the scientific community. As a result, quantitative description of cortical folding patterns and the understanding of underlying folding mechanisms have emerged as important research goals. This paper presents a computational 3-dimensional geometric model of cerebral cortex folding initialized by MRI data of a human fetal brain and deformed under the governance of a partial differential equation modeling cortical growth. By applying different simulation parameters, our model is able to generate folding convolutions and shape dynamics of the cerebral cortex. The simulations of this 3D geometric model provide computational experimental support to the following hypotheses: 1) Mechanical constraints of the skull regulate the cortical folding process. 2) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the global cell growth rate of the whole cortex. 3) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on relative rates of cell growth in different cortical areas. 4) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the initial geometry of the cortex. PMID:20167224

  14. Folds and Etudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "Folds" and "Etudes" which are images derived from anonymous typing exercises that he found in a used copy of "Touch Typing Made Simple". "Etudes" refers to the musical tradition of studies for a solo instrument, which is a typewriter. Typing exercises are repetitive attempts to type words and phrases…

  15. Conserved mechanisms across development and tumorigenesis revealed by a mouse development perspective of human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Alvin T.; Zhao, Qing; Cai, Zhaohui; Butte, Atul J.; Kim, John Y.H.; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Rowitch, David H.; Kohane, Isaac S.

    2004-01-01

    Identification of common mechanisms underlying organ development and primary tumor formation should yield new insights into tumor biology and facilitate the generation of relevant cancer models. We have developed a novel method to project the gene expression profiles of medulloblastomas (MBs)—human cerebellar tumors—onto a mouse cerebellar development sequence: postnatal days 1-60 (P1-P60). Genomically, human medulloblastomas were closest to mouse P1-P10 cerebella, and normal human cerebella were closest to mouse P30-P60 cerebella. Furthermore, metastatic MBs were highly associated with mouse P5 cerebella, suggesting that a clinically distinct subset of tumors is identifiable by molecular similarity to a precise developmental stage. Genewise, down- and up-regulated MB genes segregate to late and early stages of development, respectively. Comparable results for human lung cancer vis-a-vis the developing mouse lung suggest the generalizability of this multiscalar developmental perspective on tumor biology. Our findings indicate both a recapitulation of tissue-specific developmental programs in diverse solid tumors and the utility of tumor characterization on the developmental time axis for identifying novel aspects of clinical and biological behavior. PMID:15075291

  16. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  17. Strain concentration mechanism beneath the fold-and-thrust belt, Ishikari-teichi Toen Fault Zone, NE Japan, revealed by three-dimensional resistivity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaya, Y.; Mogi, T.; Honda, R.; Hase, H.; Suzuki, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Uyeshima, M.

    2013-12-01

    Ishikari-teichi-toen fault zone (ITFZ) is an active fault zone, located at the eastern edge of the Ishikari lowland between the central and southwestern part of Hokkaido Island, Japan. The Ishikari lowland is situated at the end of westing foreland fold-and-thrust belt from the Hidaka collision zone at which the NE Japan and Kuril arcs contact each other. This activity forms a tectonic zone in this region under E-W compression field. The recent studies regarding inland earthquakes have suggested that fluids in the mid-lower crust generate a weak zone and the compressive strain is accumulated there. Thus, the distribution of fluids in the crust might be one of the important factors in generating inland earthquakes. A magnetotelluric (MT) survey was performed in the Ishikari lowland region in order to clarify the distribution of fluids beneath the ITFZ. Four components of impedance tensor and two components of magnetic transfer function at 16 frequencies between 40 and 0.00012 Hz at 50 measurement stations were inverted to a 3-D resistivity structure with the aid of the WSINV3DMT code. The inverted structure showed that the conductive layer (<10 Ωm) corresponding to sediments beneath the lowland lies from the surface down to 7 km deep. The resistivity below 7 km shows a regional boundary between the western-northern and southwestern parts. A conductor along the ITFZ is found beneath this boundary in the middle crust. We interpreted this conductor to be a fluid rich zone, acting as a dynamically weakened zone. The conductive body is also found beneath the Shikotsu caldera, implying magmatic fluids ascending from the mantle or a region of partial melt. We propose possible factors to form the strain compression in this region as follows; (1) There is the regional boundary as a structural background. (2) The fluid rich zone beneath the boundary acts as a dynamically weak zone. (3) The heterogeneous structure in the shallower part causes a thrust fault there. These

  18. Modelling of lateral fold growth and fold linkage: Applications to fold-and-thrust belt tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We use a finite element model to investigate the three-dimensional fold growth and interference of two initially isolated fold segments. The most critical parameter, which controls the fold linkage mode, is the phase difference between the laterally growing fold hinge lines: 1) "Linear-linkage" yields a sub-cylindrical fold with a saddle at the location where the two initial folds linked. 2) "Oblique-linkage" produces a curved fold resembling a Type II refold structure. 3) "Oblique-no-linkage" results in two curved folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. 4) "Linear-no-linkage" yields a fold train of two separate sub-cylindrical folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. The transition from linkage to no-linkage occurs when the fold separation between the initially isolated folds is slightly larger than one half of the low-amplitude fold wavelength. The model results compare well with previously published plasticine analogue models and can be directly applied to the investigation of fold growth history in fold-and-thust belts. An excellent natural example of lateral fold linkage is described from the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The fold growth in this region is not controlled by major thrust faults but the shortening of the Paleozoic to Cenozoic passive margin sediments of the Arabian plate occurred mainly by detachment folding. The sub-cylindrical anticlines with hinge-parallel lengths of more than 50 km have not developed from single sub-cylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification and lateral fold growth. Linkage points are marked by geomorphological saddle points which are structurally the lowermost points of antiforms and points of principal curvatures with opposite sign. Linkage points can significantly influence the migration of mineral-rich fluids and hydrocarbons and are therefore of great economic importance.

  19. Overland flow generation mechanisms affected by topsoil treatment: Application to soil conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Paloma, Hueso; Juan Francisco, Martinez-Murillo; Damian, Ruiz-Sinoga Jose; Hanoch, Lavee

    2015-04-01

    Hortonian overland-flow is responsible for significant amounts of soil loss in Mediterranean geomorphological systems. Restoring the native vegetation is the most effective way to control runoff and sediment yield. During the seeding and plant establishment, vegetation cover may be better sustained if soil is amended with an external source. Four amendments were applied in an experimental set of plots: straw mulching (SM); mulch with chipped branches of Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis L.) (PM); TerraCotten hydroabsobent polymers (HP); sewage sludge (RU); and control (C). Plots were afforested following the same spatial pattern, and amendments were mixed with the soil at the rate 10 Mg ha-1. This research demonstrates the role played by the treatments in overland flow generation mechanism (runoff, overland flow and soil moisture along the soil profile). The general overland flow characteristics showed that in the C plots the average overland flow was 8.0 ± 22.0 l per event, and the HP plots produced a similar mean value (8.1 ± 20.1 l). The average overland flow per event was significantly less for soil amended with SM, PM or RU (2.7 ± 8.3 l; 1.3 ± 3.5 l and 2.2 ± 5.9 l, respectively). There was a similar trend with respect to the maximum overland flow. The mean sediment yield per event was relatively high in the C and HP plots (8.6 ± 27.8 kg and 14.8 ± 43.4 kg, respectively), while significantly lower values were registered in the SM, PM and RU plots (0.4 ± 1.0 kg; 0.2 ± 0.3 kg and 0.2 ± 0.3 kg, respectively). Very similar trends were found for the maximum sediment yield. Regarding to the soil moisture values, there was a difference in the trends between the C and HP plots and the SM, PM and RU plots. In the C and HP plots the general trend was for a decrease in soil moisture downward through the soil profile, while in the SM, PM and RU plots the soil moisture remained relatively constant or increased, except for the RU treatment in which the soil moisture

  20. Disparate Regulatory Mechanisms Control Fat3 and P75NTR Protein Transport through a Conserved Kif5-Interaction Domain

    PubMed Central

    Birkness, Jacqueline E.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    Directed transport delivers proteins to specific cellular locations and is one mechanism by which cells establish and maintain polarized cellular architectures. The atypical cadherin Fat3 directs the polarized extension of dendrites in retinal amacrine cells by influencing the distribution of cytoskeletal regulators during retinal development, however the mechanisms regulating the distribution of Fat3 remain unclear. We report a novel Kinesin/Kif5 Interaction domain (Kif5-ID) in Fat3 that facilitates Kif5B binding, and determines the distribution of Fat3 cytosolic domain constructs in neurons and MDCK cells. The Kif5-ID sequence is conserved in the neurotrophin receptor P75NTR, which also binds Kif5B, and Kif5-ID mutations similarly result in P75NTR mislocalization. Despite these similarities, Kif5B-mediated protein transport is differentially regulated by these two cargos. For Fat3, the Kif5-ID is regulated by alternative splicing, and the timecourse of splicing suggests that the distribution of Fat3 may switch between early and later stages of retinal development. In contrast, P75NTR binding to Kif5B is enhanced by tyrosine phosphorylation and thus has the potential to be dynamically regulated on a more rapid time scale. PMID:27788242

  1. A conserved inter-domain communication mechanism regulates the ATPase activity of the AAA-protein Drg1.

    PubMed

    Prattes, Michael; Loibl, Mathias; Zisser, Gertrude; Luschnig, Daniel; Kappel, Lisa; Rössler, Ingrid; Grassegger, Manuela; Hromic, Altijana; Krieger, Elmar; Gruber, Karl; Pertschy, Brigitte; Bergler, Helmut

    2017-03-17

    AAA-ATPases fulfil essential roles in different cellular pathways and often act in form of hexameric complexes. Interaction with pathway-specific substrate and adaptor proteins recruits them to their targets and modulates their catalytic activity. This substrate dependent regulation of ATP hydrolysis in the AAA-domains is mediated by a non-catalytic N-terminal domain. The exact mechanisms that transmit the signal from the N-domain and coordinate the individual AAA-domains in the hexameric complex are still the topic of intensive research. Here, we present the characterization of a novel mutant variant of the eukaryotic AAA-ATPase Drg1 that shows dysregulation of ATPase activity and altered interaction with Rlp24, its substrate in ribosome biogenesis. This defective regulation is the consequence of amino acid exchanges at the interface between the regulatory N-domain and the adjacent D1 AAA-domain. The effects caused by these mutations strongly resemble those of pathological mutations of the AAA-ATPase p97 which cause the hereditary proteinopathy IBMPFD (inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia). Our results therefore suggest well conserved mechanisms of regulation between structurally, but not functionally related members of the AAA-family.

  2. Influence of photopolymerization parameters on the mechanical properties of polymer-ceramic composites applied in the conservative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pieniak, Daniel; Niewczas, Agata M; Walczak, Mariusz; Zamościńska, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the results of study of mechanical properties for four commercial polymer-ceramic composites applied in the conservative dentistry are presented, including one new silorane based composite and three standard composites based on methacrylate compounds. Influence of the type of light of diode and halogen polymerization lamps on the microhardness, flexural strength and elasticity were studied. Both exposed and unexposed specimens were taken into account. An exposure time was also differentiated (40 sec and 60 sec). Basic statistics of the analysed material parameters were determined. A post hoc test (Newman-Keuls) was performed in order to evaluate differences between microhardness of the materials studied, as well as Kruskal-Wallis test to evaluate differences in flexural strength and elasticity modulus of the material. It has been indicated that there is an impact of the type of lamp on the microhardness and flexural strength of composites with methacrylate matrix and lack of such impact in the case of composites containing siloranes. Additionally, it has been found that an increase of photopolymerization time has a significantly different impact on the mechanical properties depending on the type of irradiated material.

  3. A conserved inter-domain communication mechanism regulates the ATPase activity of the AAA-protein Drg1

    PubMed Central

    Prattes, Michael; Loibl, Mathias; Zisser, Gertrude; Luschnig, Daniel; Kappel, Lisa; Rössler, Ingrid; Grassegger, Manuela; Hromic, Altijana; Krieger, Elmar; Gruber, Karl; Pertschy, Brigitte; Bergler, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    AAA-ATPases fulfil essential roles in different cellular pathways and often act in form of hexameric complexes. Interaction with pathway-specific substrate and adaptor proteins recruits them to their targets and modulates their catalytic activity. This substrate dependent regulation of ATP hydrolysis in the AAA-domains is mediated by a non-catalytic N-terminal domain. The exact mechanisms that transmit the signal from the N-domain and coordinate the individual AAA-domains in the hexameric complex are still the topic of intensive research. Here, we present the characterization of a novel mutant variant of the eukaryotic AAA-ATPase Drg1 that shows dysregulation of ATPase activity and altered interaction with Rlp24, its substrate in ribosome biogenesis. This defective regulation is the consequence of amino acid exchanges at the interface between the regulatory N-domain and the adjacent D1 AAA-domain. The effects caused by these mutations strongly resemble those of pathological mutations of the AAA-ATPase p97 which cause the hereditary proteinopathy IBMPFD (inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget’s disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia). Our results therefore suggest well conserved mechanisms of regulation between structurally, but not functionally related members of the AAA-family. PMID:28303975

  4. Transcriptomic Analysis of Tail Regeneration in the Lizard Anolis carolinensis Reveals Activation of Conserved Vertebrate Developmental and Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D.; Markov, Glenn J.; Eckalbar, Walter L.; George, Rajani M.; King, Jesse M.; Tokuyama, Minami A.; Geiger, Lauren A.; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J.; Allen, April N.; Siniard, Ashley L.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F.; Rawls, J. Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies. PMID:25140675

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in the lizard Anolis carolinensis reveals activation of conserved vertebrate developmental and repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D; Markov, Glenn J; Eckalbar, Walter L; George, Rajani M; King, Jesse M; Tokuyama, Minami A; Geiger, Lauren A; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J; Allen, April N; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Fisher, Rebecca E; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F; Rawls, J Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies.

  6. First Insights into the Subterranean Crustacean Bathynellacea Transcriptome: Transcriptionally Reduced Opsin Repertoire and Evidence of Conserved Homeostasis Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Seunghyun; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Ahn, Inhye; Lee, Chi-Woo; Cho, Joo-Lae; Min, Gi-Sik; Park, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Bathynellacea (Crustacea, Syncarida, Parabathynellidae) are subterranean aquatic crustaceans that typically inhabit freshwater interstitial spaces (e.g., groundwater) and are occasionally found in caves and even hot springs. In this study, we sequenced the whole transcriptome of Allobathynella bangokensis using RNA-seq. De novo sequence assembly produced 74,866 contigs including 28,934 BLAST hits. Overall, the gene sequences were most similar to those of the waterflea Daphnia pulex. In the A. bangokensis transcriptome, no opsin or related sequences were identified, and no contig aligned to the crustacean visual opsins and non-visual opsins (i.e. arthropsins, peropsins, and melaopsins), suggesting potential regressive adaptation to the dark environment. However, A. bangokensis expressed conserved gene family sets, such as heat shock proteins and those related to key innate immunity pathways and antioxidant defense systems, at the transcriptional level, suggesting that this species has evolved adaptations involving molecular mechanisms of homeostasis. The transcriptomic information of A. bangokensis will be useful for investigating molecular adaptations and response mechanisms to subterranean environmental conditions. PMID:28107438

  7. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  8. Ab initio RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  9. Ab initio RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-17

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  10. Mammalian and malaria parasite cyclase-associated proteins catalyze nucleotide exchange on G-actin through a conserved mechanism.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Maarit; Bertling, Enni; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Baum, Jake; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-01-11

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are among the most highly conserved regulators of actin dynamics, being present in organisms from mammals to apicomplexan parasites. Yeast, plant, and mammalian CAPs are large multidomain proteins, which catalyze nucleotide exchange on actin monomers from ADP to ATP and recycle actin monomers from actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin for new rounds of filament assembly. However, the mechanism by which CAPs promote nucleotide exchange is not known. Furthermore, how apicomplexan CAPs, which lack many domains present in yeast and mammalian CAPs, contribute to actin dynamics is not understood. We show that, like yeast Srv2/CAP, mouse CAP1 interacts with ADF/cofilin and ADP-G-actin through its N-terminal α-helical and C-terminal β-strand domains, respectively. However, in the variation to yeast Srv2/CAP, mouse CAP1 has two adjacent profilin-binding sites, and it interacts with ATP-actin monomers with high affinity through its WH2 domain. Importantly, we revealed that the C-terminal β-sheet domain of mouse CAP1 is essential and sufficient for catalyzing nucleotide exchange on actin monomers, although the adjacent WH2 domain is not required for this function. Supporting these data, we show that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum CAP, which is entirely composed of the β-sheet domain, efficiently promotes nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. Collectively, this study provides evidence that catalyzing nucleotide exchange on actin monomers via the β-sheet domain is the most highly conserved function of CAPs from mammals to apicomplexan parasites. Other functions, including interactions with profilin and ADF/cofilin, evolved in more complex organisms to adjust the specific role of CAPs in actin dynamics.

  11. Microsecond subdomain folding in dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Iwakura, Masahiro; Matthews, C Robert; Bilsel, Osman

    2011-07-08

    The characterization of microsecond dynamics in the folding of multisubdomain proteins has been a major challenge in understanding their often complex folding mechanisms. Using a continuous-flow mixing device coupled with fluorescence lifetime detection, we report the microsecond folding dynamics of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a two-subdomain α/β/α sandwich protein known to begin folding in this time range. The global dimensions of early intermediates were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer, and the dynamic properties of the local Trp environments were monitored by fluorescence lifetime detection. We found that substantial collapse occurs in both the locally connected adenosine binding subdomain and the discontinuous loop subdomain within 35 μs of initiation of folding from the urea unfolded state. During the fastest observable ∼550 μs phase, the discontinuous loop subdomain further contracts, concomitant with the burial of Trp residue(s), as both subdomains achieve a similar degree of compactness. Taken together with previous studies in the millisecond time range, a hierarchical assembly of DHFR--in which each subdomain independently folds, subsequently docks, and then anneals into the native conformation after an initial heterogeneous global collapse--emerges. The progressive acquisition of structure, beginning with a continuously connected subdomain and spreading to distal regions, shows that chain entropy is a significant organizing principle in the folding of multisubdomain proteins and single-domain proteins. Subdomain folding also provides a rationale for the complex kinetics often observed.

  12. Local vs global motions in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Maisuradze, Gia G.; Liwo, Adam; Senet, Patrick; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2013-01-01

    It is of interest to know whether local fluctuations in a polypeptide chain play any role in the mechanism by which the chain folds to the native structure of a protein. This question is addressed by analyzing folding and non-folding trajectories of a protein; as an example, the analysis is applied to the 37-residue triple β-strand WW domain from the Formin binding protein 28 (FBP28) (PDB ID: 1E0L). Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories were generated with the coarse-grained united-residue force field, and one- and two-dimensional free-energy landscapes (FELs) along the backbone virtual-bond angle θ and backbone virtual-bond-dihedral angle γ of each residue, and principal components, respectively, were analyzed. The key residues involved in the folding of the FBP28 WW domain are elucidated by this analysis. The correlations between local and global motions are found. It is shown that most of the residues in the folding trajectories of the system studied here move in a concerted fashion, following the dynamics of the whole system. This demonstrates how the choice of a pathway has to involve concerted movements in order for this protein to fold. This finding also sheds light on the effectiveness of principal component analysis (PCA) for the description of the folding dynamics of the system studied. It is demonstrated that the FEL along the PCs, computed by considering only several critically-placed residues, can correctly describe the folding dynamics. PMID:23914144

  13. CRISPR-Cas9 cleavage efficiency correlates strongly with target-sgRNA folding stability: from physical mechanism to off-target assessment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Duan, Dongsheng; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2017-12-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 complex, a bacterial immune response system, has been widely adopted for RNA-guided genome editing and transcription regulation in applications such as targeted genome modification and site-directed mutagenesis. However, the physical basis for its target specificity is not fully understood. In this study, based on a statistical mechanical analysis for the whole ensemble of sgRNA-target complex conformations, we identify a strong correlation between Cas9 cleavage efficiency and the stability of the DNA-RNA (R-loop) complex structures, with a Pearson correlation coefficient ranging from 0.775 to 0.886 for the tested systems. The finding leads to quantitative insights into important experimental results, such as the greater Cas9 tolerance to single-base mismatches in PAM-distal region than to PAM-proximal region and the high specificity and efficiency for shorter protospacers. Moreover, the results from the genome-wide off-target assessments, compared with other off-target scoring tools, indicate that the statistical mechanics-based approach provides more reliable off-target analyses and sgRNA design. To facilitate the genome engineering applications, a new web-based tool for genome-wide off-target assessment is established.

  14. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.

  15. A New Use for a Familiar Fold: the X-Ray Crystal Structure of GTP-Bound GTP Cyclohydrolase III From Methanocaldococcus Jannaschii Reveals a Two Metal Ion Catalytic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, S.D.; Roberts, S.A.; Zegeer, A.M.; Montfort, W.R.; Bandarian, V.

    2009-05-26

    GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH) III from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, which catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 2-amino-5-formylamino-6-ribosylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5'-phosphate (FAPy), has been shown to require Mg{sup 2+} for catalytic activity and is activated by monovalent cations such as K{sup +} and ammonium [Graham, D. E., Xu, H., and White, R. H. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 15074-15084]. The reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by a GCH II ortholog (SCO 6655) from Streptomyces coelicolor; however, SCO 6655, like other GCH II proteins, is a zinc-containing protein. The structure of GCH III complexed with GTP solved at 2 {angstrom} resolution clearly shows that GCH III adopts a distinct fold that is closely related to the palm domains of phosphodiesterases, such as DNA polymerase I. GCH III is a tetramer of identical subunits; each monomer is composed of an N- and a C-terminal domain that adopt nearly superimposible structures, suggesting that the protein has arisen by gene duplication. Three metal ions were located in the active site, two of which occupy positions that are analogous to those occupied by divalent metal ions in the structures of a number of palm domain containing proteins, such as DNA polymerase I. Two conserved Asp residues that coordinate the metal ions, which are also found in palm domain containing proteins, are observed in GCH III. Site-directed variants (Asp{yields}Asn) of these residues in GCH III are less active than wild-type. The third metal ion, most likely a potassium ion, is involved in substrate recognition through coordination of O6 of GTP. The arrangement of the metal ions in the active site suggests that GCH III utilizes two metal ion catalysis. The structure of GCH III extends the repertoire of possible reactions with a palm fold to include cyclohydrolase chemistry.

  16. Chimeric Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Displaying Conserved Enterovirus 71 Epitopes Elicit Protective Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice through Divergent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaohua; Ku, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Shi, Jinping; Zhang, Yunfang; Kong, Liangliang; Cong, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, food, and mouth disease, which frequently occurs in young children. Since there are 11 subgenotypes (A, B1 to B5, and C1 to C5) within EV71, an EV71 vaccine capable of protecting against all of these subgenotypes is desirable. We report here the vaccine potential and protective mechanism of two chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) presenting conserved neutralizing epitopes of EV71. We show that fusions of hepatitis B core antigen (HBc) with the SP55 or SP70 epitope of EV71, designated HBcSP55 and HBcSP70, respectively, can be rapidly generated and self-assembled into VLPs with the epitopes displayed on the surface. Immunization with the chimeric VLPs induced carrier- and epitope-specific antibody responses in mice. Anti-HBcSP55 and anti-HBcSP70 sera, but not anti-HBc sera, were able to neutralize in vitro multiple genotypes and strains of EV71. Importantly, passive immunization with anti-HBcSP55 or anti-HBcSP70 sera protected neonatal mice against lethal EV71 infections. Interestingly, anti-HBcSP70 sera could inhibit EV71 attachment to susceptible cells, whereas anti-HBcSP55 sera could not. However, both antisera were able to neutralize EV71 infection in vitro at the postattachment stage. The divergent mechanism of neutralization and protection conferred by anti-SP70 and anti-SP55 sera is in part attributed to their respective ability to bind authentic viral particles. Collectively, our study not only demonstrates that chimeric VLPs displaying the SP55 and SP70 epitopes are promising candidates for a broad-spectrum EV71 vaccine but also reveals distinct mechanisms of neutralization by the SP55- and SP70-targeted antibodies. PMID:24131712

  17. A bidirectional shape memory alloy folding actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Jamie K.; Wood, Robert J.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a low-profile bidirectional folding actuator based on annealed shape memory alloy sheets applicable for meso- and microscale systems. Despite the advantages of shape memory alloys—high strain, silent operation, and mechanical simplicity—their application is often limited to unidirectional operation. We present a bidirectional folding actuator that produces two opposing 180° motions. A laser-patterned nickel alloy (Inconel 600) heater localizes actuation to the folding sections. The actuator has a thin ( < 1 mm) profile, making it appropriate for use in robotic origami. Various design parameters and fabrication variants are described and experimentally explored in the actuator prototype.

  18. Network measures for protein folding state discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Fariselli, Piero; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fold using a two-state or multi-state kinetic mechanisms, but up to now there is not a first-principle model to explain this different behavior. We exploit the network properties of protein structures by introducing novel observables to address the problem of classifying the different types of folding kinetics. These observables display a plain physical meaning, in terms of vibrational modes, possible configurations compatible with the native protein structure, and folding cooperativity. The relevance of these observables is supported by a classification performance up to 90%, even with simple classifiers such as discriminant analysis. PMID:27464796

  19. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Witkiewicz, Halina; Oh, Phil; Schnitzer, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  20. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  1. Four residues of propeptide are essential for precursor folding of nattokinase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Cao, Xinhua; Deng, Yu; Bao, Wei; Tang, Changyan; Ding, Hanjing; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2014-11-01

    Subtilisin propeptide functions as an intramolecular chaperone that guides precursor folding. Nattokinase, a member of subtilisin family, is synthesized as a precursor consisting of a signal peptide, a propeptide, and a subtilisin domain, and the mechanism of its folding remains to be understood. In this study, the essential residues of nattokinase propeptide which contribute to precursor folding were determined. Deletion analysis showed that the conserved regions in propeptide were important for precursor folding. Single-site and multi-site mutagenesis studies confirmed the role of Tyr10, Gly13, Gly34, and Gly35. During stage (i) and (ii) of precursor folding, Tyr10 and Gly13 would form the part of interface with subtilisin domain. While Gly34 and Gly35 connected with an α-helix that would stabilize the structure of propeptide. The quadruple Ala mutation, Y10A/G13A/G34A/G35A, resulted in a loss of the chaperone function for the propeptide. This work showed the essential residues of propeptide for precursor folding via secondary structure and kinetic parameter analyses.

  2. Cooperativity and modularity in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Sasai, Masaki; Chikenji, George; Terada, Tomoki P.

    2016-01-01

    A simple statistical mechanical model proposed by Wako and Saitô has explained the aspects of protein folding surprisingly well. This model was systematically applied to multiple proteins by Muñoz and Eaton and has since been referred to as the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton (WSME) model. The success of the WSME model in explaining the folding of many proteins has verified the hypothesis that the folding is dominated by native interactions, which makes the energy landscape globally biased toward native conformation. Using the WSME and other related models, Saitô emphasized the importance of the hierarchical pathway in protein folding; folding starts with the creation of contiguous segments having a native-like configuration and proceeds as growth and coalescence of these segments. The Φ-values calculated for barnase with the WSME model suggested that segments contributing to the folding nucleus are similar to the structural modules defined by the pattern of native atomic contacts. The WSME model was extended to explain folding of multi-domain proteins having a complex topology, which opened the way to comprehensively understanding the folding process of multi-domain proteins. The WSME model was also extended to describe allosteric transitions, indicating that the allosteric structural movement does not occur as a deterministic sequential change between two conformations but as a stochastic diffusive motion over the dynamically changing energy landscape. Statistical mechanical viewpoint on folding, as highlighted by the WSME model, has been renovated in the context of modern methods and ideas, and will continue to provide insights on equilibrium and dynamical features of proteins.

  3. Hippocampal–Dorsolateral Prefrontal Coupling as a Species-Conserved Cognitive Mechanism: A Human Translational Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Bähner, Florian; Demanuele, Charmaine; Schweiger, Janina; Gerchen, Martin F; Zamoscik, Vera; Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Hahn, Tim; Meyer, Patric; Flor, Herta; Durstewitz, Daniel; Tost, Heike; Kirsch, Peter; Plichta, Michael M; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal–prefrontal cortex (HC–PFC) interactions are implicated in working memory (WM) and altered in psychiatric conditions with cognitive impairment such as schizophrenia. While coupling between both structures is crucial for WM performance in rodents, evidence from human studies is conflicting and translation of findings is complicated by the use of differing paradigms across species. We therefore used functional magnetic resonance imaging together with a spatial WM paradigm adapted from rodent research to examine HC–PFC coupling in humans. A PFC–parietal network was functionally connected to hippocampus (HC) during task stages requiring high levels of executive control but not during a matched control condition. The magnitude of coupling in a network comprising HC, bilateral dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC), and right supramarginal gyrus explained one-fourth of the variability in an independent spatial WM task but was unrelated to visual WM performance. HC–DLPFC coupling may thus represent a systems-level mechanism specific to spatial WM that is conserved across species, suggesting its utility for modeling cognitive dysfunction in translational neuroscience. PMID:25578799

  4. Polymer films removed from solid surfaces by nanostructured fluids: microscopic mechanism and implications for the conservation of cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Raudino, Martina; Selvolini, Giulia; Montis, Costanza; Baglioni, Michele; Bonini, Massimo; Berti, Debora; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-03-25

    Complex fluids based on amphiphilic formulations are emerging, particularly in the field of conservation of works of art, as effective and safe liquid media for the removal of hydrophobic polymeric coatings. The comprehension of the cleaning mechanism is key to designing tailored fluids for this purpose. However, the interaction between nanostructured fluids and hydrophobic polymer films is still poorly understood. In this study, we show how the combination of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides interesting and complementary insight into this process. We focused on the interaction between an ethyl methacrylate/methyl acrylate 70:30 copolymer film deposited onto a glass surface and a water/nonionic surfactant/2-butanone (MEK) ternary system, with MEK being a good solvent and water being a nonsolvent for the polymer. Our results indicate a synergy between the organic solvent and the surfactant assemblies: MEK rapidly swells the outer layers of the polymer film allowing for the subsequent diffusion of solvent molecules, while the amphiphile decreases the interfacial energy between the polymeric coating and the liquid phase, favoring dewetting and dispersion of swollen polymer droplets in the aqueous phase. The chemical nature of the surfactant and the microstructure of the assemblies determine both the kinetics and the overall efficiency of polymer removal, as assessed by comparing the behavior of similar formulations containing an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS).

  5. Folding above faults, Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetric folds formed above basement faults can be observed throughout the Rocky Mountains. Several previous interpretations of the folding process made the implicit assumption that one or both fold hinges migrated or rolled'' through the steep forelimb of the fold as the structure evolved (rolling hinge model). Results of mapping in the Bighorn and Seminoe Mountains, WY, and Sangre de Cristo Range, CO, do not support this hypothesis. An alternative interpretation is presented in which fold hinges remained fixed in position during folding (fixed hinge model). Mapped folds share common characteristics: (1) axial traces of the folds intersect faults at or near the basement/cover interface, and diverge from faults upsection; (2) fold hinges are narrow and interlimb angles cluster around 80--100[degree] regardless of fold location; (3) fold shape is typically angular, despite published cross sections that show concentric folds; and, (4) beds within the folds show thickening and/or thinning, most commonly adjacent to fold hinges. The rolling hinge model requires that rocks in the fold forelimbs bend through narrow fold hinges as deformation progressed. Examination of massive, competent rock units such as the Ord. Bighorn Dolomite, Miss. Madison Limestone, and, Penn. Tensleep Sandstone reveals no evidence of the extensive internal deformation that would be expected if hinges rolled through rocks of the forelimb. The hinges of some folds (e.g. Golf Creek anticline, Bighorn Mountains) are offset by secondary faults, effectively preventing the passage of rocks from backlimb to forelimb. The fixed hinge model proposes that the fold hinges were defined early in fold evolution, and beds were progressively rotated and steepened as the structure grew.

  6. The Numba ductile deformation zone (northwest Cameroon): A geometric analysis of folds based on the Fold Profiler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njanko, T.; Chatué, C. Njiki; Kwékam, M.; Nké, B. E. Bella; Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Fozing, E. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Numba ductile deformation zone (NDDZ) is characterised by folds recorded during the three deformation phases that affected the banded amphibole gneiss. Fold-shape analyses using the program Fold Profiler with the aim to show the importance of folding events in the structural analysis of the NDDZ and its contribution to the Pan-African orogeny in central Africa have been made. Classical field method, conic sections method and Ramsay's fold classification method were applied to (i) have the general orientation of folds, (ii) analyze the fold shapes and (iii) classify the geometry of the folded bands. Fold axes in banded amphibole gneiss plunge moderately (<15°) towards the NNE or SSW. The morphology of F1, F2 and F3 folds in the study area clearly points to (i) Z-shape folds with SE vergence and (ii) a dextral sense of shear motion. Conic section method reveals two dominant families: F1 and F3 folds belong to parabolic shape folds, while F2 folds belong to parabolic shape and hyperbolic shape folds. Ramsay's scheme emphasizes class 1C (for F1, F2 and F3 folds) and class 3 (for F2 folds) as main fold classes. The co-existence of the various fold shapes can be explained by (i) the structuration of the banded gneiss, (ii) the folding mechanisms that associate shear with a non-least compressive or flattening component in a ductile shear zone and (iii) the change in rheological properties of the band during the period of fold formation. These data allow us to conclude that the Numba region underwent ductile dextral shear and can be integrated (i) in a correlation model with the Central Cameroon Shear Zone (CCSZ) and associated syn-kinematic intrusions and (ii) into the tectonic model of Pan-African belt of central Africa in Cameroon.

  7. Evolution of the arginase fold and functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Daniel P.; Costanzo, Luigi Di; Gennadios, Heather A.; Christianson, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The large number of protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank allows for the identification of novel structural superfamilies based on conservation of fold in addition to conservation of amino acid sequence. Since sequence diverges more rapidly than fold in protein evolution, proteins with little or no significant sequence identity are occasionally observed to adopt similar folds, thereby reflecting unanticipated evolutionary relationships. Here, we review the unique α/β fold first observed in the manganese metalloenzyme rat liver arginase, consisting of a parallel 8 stranded β-sheet surrounded by several helices, and its evolutionary relationship with the zinc-requiring and/or iron-requiring histone deacetylases and acetylpolyamine amidohydrolases. Structural comparisons reveal key features of the core α/β fold that contribute to the divergent metal ion specificity and stoichiometry required for the chemical and biological functions of these enzymes. PMID:18360740

  8. Single-molecule analysis of Mss116-mediated group II intron folding

    PubMed Central

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Solem, Amanda; Pyle, Anna Marie; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    DEAD-box helicases are conserved enzymes involved in nearly all aspects of RNA metabolism, but their mechanisms of action remain unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the DEAD-box protein Mss116 on its natural substrate, the group II intron ai5γ. Group II introns are structurally complex catalytic RNAs considered evolutionarily related to the eukaryotic spliceosome, and an interesting paradigm for large RNA folding. We used single-molecule fluorescence to monitor the effect of Mss116 on folding dynamics of a minimal active construct, ai5γ–D135. The data show that Mss116 stimulates dynamic sampling between states along the folding pathway, an effect previously observed only with high Mg2+ concentrations. Furthermore, the data indicate that Mss116 promotes folding through discrete ATP-independent and ATP-dependent steps. We propose that Mss116 stimulates group II intron folding through a multi-step process that involves electrostatic stabilization of early intermediates and ATP hydrolysis during the final stages of native state assembly. PMID:20944626

  9. GroEL-mediated protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, W. A.; Horwich, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    I. Architecture of GroEL and GroES and the reaction pathway A. Architecture of the chaperonins B. Reaction pathway of GroEL-GroES-mediated folding II. Polypeptide binding A. A parallel network of chaperones binding polypeptides in vivo B. Polypeptide binding in vitro 1. Role of hydrophobicity in recognition 2. Homologous proteins with differing recognition-differences in primary structure versus effects on folding pathway 3. Conformations recognized by GroEL a. Refolding studies b. Binding of metastable intermediates c. Conformations while stably bound at GroEL 4. Binding constants and rates of association 5. Conformational changes in the substrate protein associated with binding by GroEL a. Observations b. Kinetic versus thermodynamic action of GroEL in mediating unfolding c. Crossing the energy landscape in the presence of GroEL III. ATP binding and hydrolysis-driving the reaction cycle IV. GroEL-GroES-polypeptide ternary complexes-the folding-active cis complex A. Cis and trans ternary complexes B. Symmetric complexes C. The folding-active intermediate of a chaperonin reaction-cis ternary complex D. The role of the cis space in the folding reaction E. Folding governed by a "timer" mechanism F. Release of nonnative polypeptides during the GroEL-GroES reaction G. Release of both native and nonnative forms under physiologic conditions H. A role for ATP binding, as well as hydrolysis, in the folding cycle V. Concluding remarks. PMID:9098884

  10. Folds on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image, acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft on September 26, 1998, shows features on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa that a scientific report published today interprets as signs of compressive folding.

    The imaged area is in the Astypalaea Linea region of Europa's southern hemisphere, seen with low-angle sunshine coming from the upper right. North is toward the top.

    Astypalaea Linea is the smooth, gray area that stretches from north to south across the image mosaic. It is thought to have formed by a combination of pulling apart and sliding of the icy surface. The telltale fold features are within the smoother portions of the surface between the more dominant ridges, which are attributed to upwelling of material through surface ice. In the smooth areas, the surface has gentle swells and dips, which show most clearly in the version on the right, processed to accentuate broader-scale shapes. For example, a dip about 15 kilometers (about 10 miles) wide cuts diagonally across the northern half of the largest smooth area, and a rise runs parallel to that in the southern half of the smooth area. closeup detail

    Louise M. Prockter, at Johns Hopkins University, and Robert T. Pappalardo, at Brown University, report in the journal Science today that those rises, or anticlines, and dips, or synclines, appear to be the result of compression causing the crust to fold.

    Additional evidence comes from smaller features more visible in the version on the left, covering the same area. At the crest of the gentle rise in the largest smooth area are small fractures that could be caused by the stretching stress of bending the surface layer upwards. Similarly, at the bottom of the adjacent dip are small, wrinkle-like ridges that could be caused by stress from bending the surface layer downwards.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California

  11. The crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of vIRF-1 from the oncogenic KSHV reveals a conserved fold for DNA binding and reinforces its role as a transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Kelly; Venkatachalam, Rajakannan; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Lim, Bee Ting; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes four viral homologues to cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), where the most studied is vIRF-1. Even though vIRF-1 shows sequence homology to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD) of human IRFs, a specific role for this domain in vIRF-1’s function has remained uncertain. To provide insights into the function of the vIRF-1 DBD, we have determined the crystal structure of it in complex with DNA and in its apo-form. Using a thermal stability shift assay (TSSA), we show that the vIRF-1 DBD binds DNA, whereas full-length vIRF-1 does not, suggesting a cis-acting regulatory mechanism in similarity to human IRFs. The complex structure of vIRF-1 DBD reveals interactions with the DNA backbone and the positioning of two arginines for specific recognition in the major grove. A superimposition with human IRF-3 reveals a similar positioning of the two specificity-determining arginines, and additional TSSAs indicate binding of vIRF-1 to an IRF-3 operator consensus sequence. The results from this study, therefore, provide support that vIRF-1 has evolved to bind DNA and plays a role in DNA binding in the context of transcriptional regulation and might act on some of the many operator sequences controlled by human IRF-3. PMID:23435230

  12. Folding of non-Euclidean curved shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Nakul; Evans, Arthur; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis; Cohen, Itai; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Origami-based folding of 2D sheets has been of recent interest for a variety of applications ranging from deployable structures to self-folding robots. Though folding of planar sheets follows well-established principles, folding of curved shells involves an added level of complexity due to the inherent influence of curvature on mechanics. In this study, we use principles from differential geometry and thin shell mechanics to establish fundamental rules that govern folding of prototypical creased shells. In particular, we show how the normal curvature of a crease line controls whether the deformation is smooth or discontinuous, and investigate the influence of shell thickness and boundary conditions. We show that snap-folding of shells provides a route to rapid actuation on time-scales dictated by the speed of sound. The simple geometric design principles developed can be applied at any length-scale, offering potential for bio-inspired soft actuators for tunable optics, microfluidics, and robotics. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through EFRI ODISSEI-1240441 with additional support to S.I.-G. through the UMass MRSEC DMR-0820506 REU program.

  13. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  14. Protein photo-folding and quantum folding theory.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liaofu

    2012-06-01

    The rates of protein folding with photon absorption or emission and the cross section of photon -protein inelastic scattering are calculated from quantum folding theory by use of a field-theoretical method. All protein photo-folding processes are compared with common protein folding without the interaction of photons (non-radiative folding). It is demonstrated that there exists a common factor (thermo-averaged overlap integral of the vibration wave function, TAOI) for protein folding and protein photo-folding. Based on this finding it is predicted that (i) the stimulated photo-folding rates and the photon-protein resonance Raman scattering sections show the same temperature dependence as protein folding; (ii) the spectral line of the electronic transition is broadened to a band that includes an abundant vibration spectrum without and with conformational transitions, and the width of each vibration spectral line is largely reduced. The particular form of the folding rate-temperature relation and the abundant spectral structure imply the existence of quantum tunneling between protein conformations in folding and photo-folding that demonstrates the quantum nature of the motion of the conformational-electronic system.

  15. Self-folding miniature elastic electric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Meeker, Laura; Tolley, Michael T.; Wood, Robert J.; Rus, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Printing functional materials represents a considerable impact on the access to manufacturing technology. In this paper we present a methodology and validation of print-and-self-fold miniature electric devices. Polyvinyl chloride laminated sheets based on metalized polyester film show reliable self-folding processes under a heat application, and it configures 3D electric devices. We exemplify this technique by fabricating fundamental electric devices, namely a resistor, capacitor, and inductor. Namely, we show the development of a self-folded stretchable resistor, variable resistor, capacitive strain sensor, and an actuation mechanism consisting of a folded contractible solenoid coil. Because of their pre-defined kinematic design, these devices feature elasticity, making them suitable as sensors and actuators in flexible circuits. Finally, an RLC circuit obtained from the integration of developed devices is demonstrated, in which the coil based actuator is controlled by reading a capacitive strain sensor.

  16. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  17. Bioinformatical parsing of folding-on-binding proteins reveals their compositional and evolutionary sequence design.

    PubMed

    Narasumani, Mohanalakshmi; Harrison, Paul M

    2015-12-18

    Intrinsic disorder occurs when (part of) a protein remains unfolded during normal functioning. Intrinsically-disordered regions can contain segments that 'fold on binding' to another molecule. Here, we perform bioinformatical parsing of human 'folding-on-binding' (FB) proteins, into four subsets: Ordered regions, FB regions, Disordered regions that surround FB regions ('Disordered-around-FB'), and Other-Disordered regions. We examined the composition and evolutionary behaviour (across vertebrate orthologs) of these subsets. From a convergence of three separate analyses, we find that for hydrophobicity, Ordered regions segregate from the other subsets, but the Ordered and FB regions group together as highly conserved, and the Disordered-around-FB and Other-Disordered regions as less conserved (with a lesser significant difference between Ordered and FB regions). FB regions are highly-conserved with net positive charge, whereas Disordered-around-FB have net negative charge and are relatively less hydrophobic than FB regions. Indeed, these Disordered-around-FB regions are excessively hydrophilic compared to other disordered regions generally. We describe how our results point towards a possible compositionally-based steering mechanism of folding-on-binding.

  18. Factors that affect coseismic folds in an overburden layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shaogang; Cai, Yongen

    2016-12-01

    Coseismic folds induced by blind thrust faults have been observed in many earthquake zones, and they have received widespread attention from geologists and geophysicists. Numerous studies have been conducted regarding fold kinematics; however, few have studied fold dynamics quantitatively. In this paper, we establish a conceptual model with a thrust fault zone and tectonic stress load to study the factors that affect coseismic folds and their formation mechanisms using the finite element method. The numerical results show that the fault dip angle is a key factor that controls folding. The greater the dip angle is, the steeper the fold slope. The second most important factor is the overburden thickness. The thicker the overburden is, the more gradual the fold. In this case, folds are difficult to identify in field surveys. Therefore, if a fold can be easily identified with the naked eye, the overburden is likely shallow. The least important factors are the mechanical parameters of the overburden. The larger the Young's modulus of the overburden is, the smaller the displacement of the fold and the fold slope. Strong horizontal compression and vertical extension in the overburden near the fault zone are the main mechanisms that form coseismic folds.

  19. A conserved, lipid-mediated sorting mechanism of yeast Ist2 and mammalian STIM proteins to the peripheral ER.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Ebru; Momburg, Frank; Engel, Ulrike; Temmerman, Koen; Nickel, Walter; Seedorf, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Sorting of yeast Ist2 to the plasma membrane (PM) or the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) requires a cortical sorting signal (CSS(Ist2)) that interacts with lipids including phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) at the PM. Here, we show that the expression of Ist2 in mammalian cells resulted in a peripheral patch-like localization without any detection of Ist2 at the cell surface. Attached to C-termini of mammalian integral membrane proteins, the CSS(Ist2) targeted these proteins to PM-associated domains of the ER and abolished trafficking via the classical secretory pathway. The interaction of integral membrane proteins with PI(4,5)P(2) at the PM created ER-PM contacts. This process is similar to the regulated coupling of ER domains to the PM via stromal interaction molecule (STIM) proteins during store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). The CSS(Ist2) and the C-terminus of the ER-located Ca(2+) sensor STIM2 were sufficient to bind PI(4,5)P(2) and PI(3,4,5)P(3) at the PM, showing that an evolutionarily conserved mechanism is involved in the sorting of integral membrane proteins to PM-associated domains of the ER. Yeast Ist2 and STIM2 share a common basic and amphipathic signal at their extreme C-termini. STIM1 showed binding preference for liposomes containing PI(4,5)P(2), suggesting a specific contribution of lipids to the recruitment of ER domains to the PM during SOCE.

  20. How the genome folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  1. Non-cylindrical fold growth in the Zagros fold and thrust belt (Kurdistan, NE-Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Nikolaus; Bretis, Bernhard; Grasemann, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros mountains extends over 1800 km from Kurdistan in N-Iraq to the Strait of Hormuz in Iran and is one of the world most promising regions for the future hydrocarbon exploration. The Zagros Mountains started to form as a result of the collision between the Eurasian and Arabian Plates, whose convergence began in the Late Cretaceous as part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic system. Geodetic and seismological data document that both plates are still converging and that the fold and thrust belt of the Zagros is actively growing. Extensive hydrocarbon exploration mainly focuses on the antiforms of this fold and thrust belt and therefore the growth history of the folds is of great importance. This work investigates by means of structural field work and quantitative geomorphological techniques the progressive fold growth of the Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines located in the NE of the city of Erbil in the Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq. This part of the Zagros fold and thrust belt belongs to the so-called Simply Folded Belt, which is dominated by gentle to open folding. Faults or fault related folds have only minor importance. The mechanical anisotropy of the formations consisting of a succession of relatively competent (massive dolomite and limestone) and incompetent (claystone and siltstone) sediments essentially controls the deformation pattern with open to gentle parallel folding of the competent layers and flexural flow folding of the incompetent layers. The characteristic wavelength of the fold trains is around 10 km. Due to faster erosion of the softer rock layers in the folded sequence, the more competent lithologies form sharp ridges with steeply sloping sides along the eroded flanks of the anticlines. Using an ASTER digital elevation model in combination with geological field data we quantified 250 drainage basins along the different limbs of the subcylindrical Permam, Bana Bawi- and Safeen- Anticlines. Geomorphological indices of the drainage

  2. Cortical Folding Patterns and Predicting Cytoarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Niranjini; Busa, Evelina; Augustinack, Jean; Hinds, Oliver; Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The human cerebral cortex is made up of a mosaic of structural areas, frequently referred to as Brodmann areas (BAs). Despite the widespread use of cortical folding patterns to perform ad hoc estimations of the locations of the BAs, little is understood regarding 1) how variable the position of a given BA is with respect to the folds, 2) whether the location of some BAs is more variable than others, and 3) whether the variability is related to the level of a BA in a putative cortical hierarchy. We use whole-brain histology of 10 postmortem human brains and surface-based analysis to test how well the folds predict the locations of the BAs. We show that higher order cortical areas exhibit more variability than primary and secondary areas and that the folds are much better predictors of the BAs than had been previously thought. These results further highlight the significance of cortical folding patterns and suggest a common mechanism for the development of the folds and the cytoarchitectonic fields. PMID:18079129

  3. Mechanistic aspects of sodium-binding sites in LeuT-like fold symporters.

    PubMed

    Perez, Camilo; Ziegler, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Secondary active transporters are of paramount biological impact in all living cells, facilitating the movement of many different substrates across the membrane against a concentration gradient. The uphill transport of one substrate is coupled to the downhill transport of another and driven by the electrochemical gradient. In the last decade, an increasing number of atomic structures of secondary transporters have been reported, confirming a very fundamental mechanistic concept known as the alternating-access cycle. The wealth of structures of transporters sharing the so-called LeuT-like fold that is characterized by two five-transmembrane-helix repeats sharing a 2-fold inverted pseudo symmetry has raised big hopes to finally describe alternating access on a molecular level. Although comparing the individual transporter states of different LeuT-like fold transporters revealed striking similarities, the coupling process, which represents the heart of secondary transport, is far from being understood. Here, we review the structural, functional, and biophysical validation of sodium-binding sites in four different LeuT-like fold transporters. The conservation of sodium sites is discussed in light of their role as key elements connecting symmetry-related structural domains, which are involved in substrate translocation. Moreover, we highlight their crucial roles in conformational changes of LeuT-like fold transporters and their implication on a unifying mechanism in secondary transport.

  4. Molecular Recognition by Templated Folding of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toto, Angelo; Camilloni, Carlo; Giri, Rajanish; Brunori, Maurizio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Gianni, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins often become structured upon interacting with their partners. The mechanism of this ‘folding upon binding’ process, however, has not been fully characterised yet. Here we present a study of the folding of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of c-Myb (c-Myb) upon binding its partner KIX. By determining the structure of the folding transition state for the binding of wild-type and three mutational variants of KIX, we found a remarkable plasticity of the folding pathway of c-Myb. To explain this phenomenon, we show that the folding of c-Myb is templated by the structure of KIX. This adaptive folding behaviour, which occurs by heterogeneous nucleation, differs from the robust homogeneous nucleation typically observed for globular proteins. We suggest that this templated folding mechanism may enable intrinsically disordered proteins to achieve specific and reliable binding with multiple partners while avoiding aberrant interactions.

  5. Molecular Recognition by Templated Folding of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Toto, Angelo; Camilloni, Carlo; Giri, Rajanish; Brunori, Maurizio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Gianni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins often become structured upon interacting with their partners. The mechanism of this ‘folding upon binding’ process, however, has not been fully characterised yet. Here we present a study of the folding of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of c-Myb (c-Myb) upon binding its partner KIX. By determining the structure of the folding transition state for the binding of wild-type and three mutational variants of KIX, we found a remarkable plasticity of the folding pathway of c-Myb. To explain this phenomenon, we show that the folding of c-Myb is templated by the structure of KIX. This adaptive folding behaviour, which occurs by heterogeneous nucleation, differs from the robust homogeneous nucleation typically observed for globular proteins. We suggest that this templated folding mechanism may enable intrinsically disordered proteins to achieve specific and reliable binding with multiple partners while avoiding aberrant interactions. PMID:26912067

  6. Adaptive Origami for Efficiently Folded Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    4 3.2 Design of 2D-to- 3D Actuating Mechanisms...printing, lithography) to convert surface patterns on substrates into stable 3D objects. The design and fabrication of structures based on folding...Nafion, where prescribed 3D geometric information can be encoded as a spatially patterned composite of discrete shape-memory and locked-shape-memory

  7. A sweet code for glycoprotein folding.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Julio J; Parodi, Armando J

    2015-11-14

    Glycoprotein synthesis is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen upon transfer of a glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid derivative to Asn residues (N-glycosylation). N-Glycan-dependent quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER prevents exit to Golgi of folding intermediates, irreparably misfolded glycoproteins and incompletely assembled multimeric complexes. It also enhances folding efficiency by preventing aggregation and facilitating formation of proper disulfide bonds. The control mechanism essentially involves four components, resident lectin-chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin) that recognize monoglucosylated polymannose protein-linked glycans, lectin-associated oxidoreductase acting on monoglucosylated glycoproteins (ERp57), a glucosyltransferase that creates monoglucosylated epitopes in protein-linked glycans (UGGT) and a glucosidase (GII) that removes the glucose units added by UGGT. This last enzyme is the only mechanism component sensing glycoprotein conformations as it creates monoglucosylated glycans exclusively in not properly folded glycoproteins or in not completely assembled multimeric glycoprotein complexes. Glycoproteins that fail to properly fold are eventually driven to proteasomal degradation in the cytosol following the ER-associated degradation pathway, in which the extent of N-glycan demannosylation by ER mannosidases play a relevant role in the identification of irreparably misfolded glycoproteins.

  8. Predicting protein folds with fold-specific PSSM libraries.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yoojin; Chintapalli, Sree Vamsee; Ko, Kyung Dae; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Zhang, Zhenhai; van Rossum, Damian; Patterson, Randen L

    2011-01-01

    Accurately assigning folds for divergent protein sequences is a major obstacle to structural studies. Herein, we outline an effective method for fold recognition using sets of PSSMs, each of which is constructed for different protein folds. Our analyses demonstrate that FSL (Fold-specific Position Specific Scoring Matrix Libraries) can predict/relate structures given only their amino acid sequences of highly divergent proteins. This ability to detect distant relationships is dependent on low-identity sequence alignments obtained from FSL. Results from our experiments demonstrate that FSL perform well in recognizing folds from the "twilight-zone" SABmark dataset. Further, this method is capable of accurate fold prediction in newly determined structures. We suggest that by building complete PSSM libraries for all unique folds within the Protein Database (PDB), FSL can be used to rapidly and reliably annotate a large subset of protein folds at proteomic level. The related programs and fold-specific PSSMs for our FSL are publicly available at: http://ccp.psu.edu/download/FSLv1.0/.

  9. Evolutionary Optimization of Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Debès, Cédric; Wang, Minglei; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Nature has shaped the make up of proteins since their appearance, 3.8 billion years ago. However, the fundamental drivers of structural change responsible for the extraordinary diversity of proteins have yet to be elucidated. Here we explore if protein evolution affects folding speed. We estimated folding times for the present-day catalog of protein domains directly from their size-modified contact order. These values were mapped onto an evolutionary timeline of domain appearance derived from a phylogenomic analysis of protein domains in 989 fully-sequenced genomes. Our results show a clear overall increase of folding speed during evolution, with known ultra-fast downhill folders appearing rather late in the timeline. Remarkably, folding optimization depends on secondary structure. While alpha-folds showed a tendency to fold faster throughout evolution, beta-folds exhibited a trend of folding time increase during the last 1.5 billion years that began during the “big bang” of domain combinations. As a consequence, these domain structures are on average slow folders today. Our results suggest that fast and efficient folding of domains shaped the universe of protein structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that optimization of the kinetic and thermodynamic accessibility of the native fold reduces protein aggregation propensities that hamper cellular functions. PMID:23341762

  10. Non-local residue-residue contacts in proteins are more conserved than local ones.

    PubMed

    Noivirt-Brik, Orly; Hazan, Gershon; Unger, Ron; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-02-01

    Non-covalent residue-residue contacts drive the folding of proteins and stabilize them. They may be local-i.e. involve residues that are close in sequence, or non-local. It has been suggested that, in most proteins, local contacts drive protein folding by providing crucial constraints of the conformational space, thus allowing proteins to fold. We compared residues that are involved in local contacts to residues that are involved in non-local contacts and found that, in most proteins, residues in non-local contacts are significantly more conserved evolutionarily than residues in local contacts. Moreover, non-local contacts are more structurally conserved: a contact between positions that are distant in sequence is more likely to exist in many structural homologues compared with a contact between positions that are close in sequence. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of protein folding and may allow for better prediction of critical intra-chain contacts.

  11. Detachment folding, fold amplification, and diapirism in thrust wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco

    2003-12-01

    The relations between detachment folding, fold amplification, and salt diapirism in contractional settings have been investigated by means of scaled analogue models. The viscosity of the silicone layer simulating salt in nature and the shortening rates were combined in order to reproduce weak (type 1 models) and strong (type 2 models) décollements. Deformation patterns in the roof sequence exhibited two contrasting styles, (1) outward propagation of detachment folding along the décollement (OFP mode) and (2) passive roof duplex (PRD mode). In type 2 models, detachment folding propagated away from the most external thrust in the floor sequence, while in type 1 models, long-lived detachment folds almost invariably localized amplified above a floor thrust tip as a result of strain localization. A silicone wall intruded occasionally into the crestal graben of detachment folds in type 1 and OFP models. Best fitting of transition models data points indicates nonlinear relations with regression curves close to the equilateral hyperbola equation for both OFP-PRD and amplified detachment folds-box folds transitions. A quantitative comparison of model results with nature has been attempted by plotting salt-based fold-and-thrust belts data points on the scaled transition curves obtained from the modeling. Such a comparison relates shear stress products and ratios to the conditions favoring the amplification of detachment folds and the potential emplacement of ductile diapirs in their core. By reducing the roof sequence strength, pore fluid pressure λb is inferred to shift the equilibrium of fold-and-thrust belts toward the field of OFP and diapirism.

  12. Computational analysis of hydrogenated graphyne folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenear, Christopher; Becton, Matthew; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-02-01

    This letter employs molecular mechanics simulations to analyze the geometric changes of foreign-atom-doped graphyne. Simulation results show that higher the density of dopant and the greater area covered by the dopant correlates to a greater folding angle of the graphyne sheet. Compared to graphene, graphyne folding could prove to be more effective for various nanodevices based on its unique band gap, especially when doped, and its tunable interactions with and absorption of foreign molecules. Therefore, our findings may offer unique perspectives into the development of novel graphyne-based nanodevices and stimulate the community's research interest in graphene-related origami.

  13. Folding and faulting of an elastic continuum

    PubMed Central

    Gourgiotis, Panos A.

    2016-01-01

    Folding is a process in which bending is localized at sharp edges separated by almost undeformed elements. This process is rarely encountered in Nature, although some exceptions can be found in unusual layered rock formations (called ‘chevrons’) and seashell patterns (for instance Lopha cristagalli). In mechanics, the bending of a three-dimensional elastic solid is common (for example, in bulk wave propagation), but folding is usually not achieved. In this article, the route leading to folding is shown for an elastic solid obeying the couple-stress theory with an extreme anisotropy. This result is obtained with a perturbation technique, which involves the derivation of new two-dimensional Green's functions for applied concentrated force and moment. While the former perturbation reveals folding, the latter shows that a material in an extreme anisotropic state is also prone to a faulting instability, in which a displacement step of finite size emerges. Another failure mechanism, namely the formation of dilation/compaction bands, is also highlighted. Finally, a geophysical application to the mechanics of chevron formation shows how the proposed approach may explain the formation of natural structures. PMID:27118925

  14. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  15. Changes of protein stiffness during folding detect protein folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Małek, Katarzyna E; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule force-quench atomic force microscopy (FQ-AFM) is used to detect folding intermediates of a simple protein by detecting changes of molecular stiffness of the protein during its folding process. Those stiffness changes are obtained from shape and peaks of an autocorrelation of fluctuations in end-to-end length of the folding molecule. The results are supported by predictions of the equipartition theorem and agree with existing Langevin dynamics simulations of a simplified model of a protein folding. In the light of the Langevin simulations the experimental data probe an ensemble of random-coiled collapsed states of the protein, which are present both in the force-quench and thermal-quench folding pathways.

  16. Structural Bridges through Fold Space

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Hannah; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2015-01-01

    Several protein structure classification schemes exist that partition the protein universe into structural units called folds. Yet these schemes do not discuss how these units sit relative to each other in a global structure space. In this paper we construct networks that describe such global relationships between folds in the form of structural bridges. We generate these networks using four different structural alignment methods across multiple score thresholds. The networks constructed using the different methods remain a similar distance apart regardless of the probability threshold defining a structural bridge. This suggests that at least some structural bridges are method specific and that any attempt to build a picture of structural space should not be reliant on a single structural superposition method. Despite these differences all representations agree on an organisation of fold space into five principal community structures: all-α, all-β sandwiches, all-β barrels, α/β and α + β. We project estimated fold ages onto the networks and find that not only are the pairings of unconnected folds associated with higher age differences than bridged folds, but this difference increases with the number of networks displaying an edge. We also examine different centrality measures for folds within the networks and how these relate to fold age. While these measures interpret the central core of fold space in varied ways they all identify the disposition of ancestral folds to fall within this core and that of the more recently evolved structures to provide the peripheral landscape. These findings suggest that evolutionary information is encoded along these structural bridges. Finally, we identify four highly central pivotal folds representing dominant topological features which act as key attractors within our landscapes. PMID:26372166

  17. Pseudoknots in RNA folding landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kucharík, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The function of an RNA molecule is not only linked to its native structure, which is usually taken to be the ground state of its folding landscape, but also in many cases crucially depends on the details of the folding pathways such as stable folding intermediates or the timing of the folding process itself. To model and understand these processes, it is necessary to go beyond ground state structures. The study of rugged RNA folding landscapes holds the key to answer these questions. Efficient coarse-graining methods are required to reduce the intractably vast energy landscapes into condensed representations such as barrier trees or basin hopping graphs (BHG) that convey an approximate but comprehensive picture of the folding kinetics. So far, exact and heuristic coarse-graining methods have been mostly restricted to the pseudoknot-free secondary structures. Pseudoknots, which are common motifs and have been repeatedly hypothesized to play an important role in guiding folding trajectories, were usually excluded. Results: We generalize the BHG framework to include pseudoknotted RNA structures and systematically study the differences in predicted folding behavior depending on whether pseudoknotted structures are allowed to occur as folding intermediates or not. We observe that RNAs with pseudoknotted ground state structures tend to have more pseudoknotted folding intermediates than RNAs with pseudoknot-free ground state structures. The occurrence and influence of pseudoknotted intermediates on the folding pathway, however, appear to depend very strongly on the individual RNAs so that no general rule can be inferred. Availability and implementation: The algorithms described here are implemented in C++ as standalone programs. Its source code and Supplemental material can be freely downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/bhg.html. Contact: qin@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  18. Recoverable and Programmable Collapse from Folding Pressurized Origami Cellular Solids.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Fang, H; Wang, K W

    2016-09-09

    We report a unique collapse mechanism by exploiting the negative stiffness observed in the folding of an origami solid, which consists of pressurized cells made by stacking origami sheets. Such a collapse mechanism is recoverable, since it only involves rigid folding of the origami sheets and it is programmable by pressure control and the custom design of the crease pattern. The collapse mechanism features many attractive characteristics for applications such as energy absorption. The reported results also suggest a new branch of origami study focused on its nonlinear mechanics associated with folding.

  19. Recoverable and Programmable Collapse from Folding Pressurized Origami Cellular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Fang, H.; Wang, K. W.

    2016-09-01

    We report a unique collapse mechanism by exploiting the negative stiffness observed in the folding of an origami solid, which consists of pressurized cells made by stacking origami sheets. Such a collapse mechanism is recoverable, since it only involves rigid folding of the origami sheets and it is programmable by pressure control and the custom design of the crease pattern. The collapse mechanism features many attractive characteristics for applications such as energy absorption. The reported results also suggest a new branch of origami study focused on its nonlinear mechanics associated with folding.

  20. Problem Solving through Paper Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a couple of challenging mathematical problems that involve paper folding. These problem-solving tasks can be used to foster geometric and algebraic thinking among students. The context of paper folding makes some of the abstract mathematical ideas involved relatively concrete. When implemented…

  1. Diversified Structural Basis of a Conserved Molecular Mechanism for pH-Dependent Dimerization in Spider Silk N-Terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Otikovs, Martins; Chen, Gefei; Nordling, Kerstin; Landreh, Michael; Meng, Qing; Jörnvall, Hans; Kronqvist, Nina; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jaudzems, Kristaps

    2015-08-17

    Conversion of spider silk proteins from soluble dope to insoluble fibers involves pH-dependent dimerization of the N-terminal domain (NT). This conversion is tightly regulated to prevent premature precipitation and enable rapid silk formation at the end of the duct. Three glutamic acid residues that mediate this process in the NT from Euprosthenops australis major ampullate spidroin 1 are well conserved among spidroins. However, NTs of minor ampullate spidroins from several species, including Araneus ventricosus ((Av)MiSp NT), lack one of the glutamic acids. Here we investigate the pH-dependent structural changes of (Av)MiSp NT, revealing that it uses the same mechanism but involves a non-conserved glutamic acid residue instead. Homology modeling of the structures of other MiSp NTs suggests that these harbor different compensatory residues. This indicates that, despite sequence variations, the molecular mechanism underlying pH-dependent dimerization of NT is conserved among different silk types.

  2. The Conservation of Structure and Mechanism of Catalytic Action in a Family of Thiamin Pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent enzymes are a divergent family of TPP and metal ion binding proteins that perform a wide range of functions with the common decarboxylation steps of a -(O=)C-C(OH)- fragment of alpha-ketoacids and alpha- hydroxyaldehydes. To determine how structure and catalytic action are conserved in the context of large sequence differences existing within this family of enzymes, we have carried out an analysis of TPP-dependent enzymes of known structures. The common structure of TPP-dependent enzymes is formed at the interface of four alpha/beta domains from at least two subunits, which provide for two metal and TPP-binding sites. Residues around these catalytic sites are conserved for functional purpose, while those further away from TPP are conserved for structural reasons. Together they provide a network of contacts required for flip-flop catalytic action within TPP-dependent enzymes. Thus our analysis defines a TPP-action motif that is proposed for annotating TPP-dependent enzymes for advancing functional proteomics.

  3. DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 mediates a conserved coat-dormancy mechanism for the temperature- and gibberellin-dependent control of seed germination

    PubMed Central

    Graeber, Kai; Linkies, Ada; Steinbrecher, Tina; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Tarkowská, Danuše; Turečková, Veronika; Ignatz, Michael; Sperber, Katja; Voegele, Antje; de Jong, Hans; Urbanová, Terezie; Strnad, Miroslav; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Seed germination is an important life-cycle transition because it determines subsequent plant survival and reproductive success. To detect optimal spatiotemporal conditions for germination, seeds act as sophisticated environmental sensors integrating information such as ambient temperature. Here we show that the DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) gene, known for providing dormancy adaptation to distinct environments, determines the optimal temperature for seed germination. By reciprocal gene-swapping experiments between Brassicaceae species we show that the DOG1-mediated dormancy mechanism is conserved. Biomechanical analyses show that this mechanism regulates the material properties of the endosperm, a seed tissue layer acting as germination barrier to control coat dormancy. We found that DOG1 inhibits the expression of gibberellin (GA)-regulated genes encoding cell-wall remodeling proteins in a temperature-dependent manner. Furthermore we demonstrate that DOG1 causes temperature-dependent alterations in the seed GA metabolism. These alterations in hormone metabolism are brought about by the temperature-dependent differential expression of genes encoding key enzymes of the GA biosynthetic pathway. These effects of DOG1 lead to a temperature-dependent control of endosperm weakening and determine the optimal temperature for germination. The conserved DOG1-mediated coat-dormancy mechanism provides a highly adaptable temperature-sensing mechanism to control the timing of germination. PMID:25114251

  4. DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 mediates a conserved coat-dormancy mechanism for the temperature- and gibberellin-dependent control of seed germination.

    PubMed

    Graeber, Kai; Linkies, Ada; Steinbrecher, Tina; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Tarkowská, Danuše; Turečková, Veronika; Ignatz, Michael; Sperber, Katja; Voegele, Antje; de Jong, Hans; Urbanová, Terezie; Strnad, Miroslav; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2014-08-26

    Seed germination is an important life-cycle transition because it determines subsequent plant survival and reproductive success. To detect optimal spatiotemporal conditions for germination, seeds act as sophisticated environmental sensors integrating information such as ambient temperature. Here we show that the delay of germination 1 (DOG1) gene, known for providing dormancy adaptation to distinct environments, determines the optimal temperature for seed germination. By reciprocal gene-swapping experiments between Brassicaceae species we show that the DOG1-mediated dormancy mechanism is conserved. Biomechanical analyses show that this mechanism regulates the material properties of the endosperm, a seed tissue layer acting as germination barrier to control coat dormancy. We found that DOG1 inhibits the expression of gibberellin (GA)-regulated genes encoding cell-wall remodeling proteins in a temperature-dependent manner. Furthermore we demonstrate that DOG1 causes temperature-dependent alterations in the seed GA metabolism. These alterations in hormone metabolism are brought about by the temperature-dependent differential expression of genes encoding key enzymes of the GA biosynthetic pathway. These effects of DOG1 lead to a temperature-dependent control of endosperm weakening and determine the optimal temperature for germination. The conserved DOG1-mediated coat-dormancy mechanism provides a highly adaptable temperature-sensing mechanism to control the timing of germination.

  5. The folding of a family of three-helix bundle proteins: spectrin R15 has a robust folding nucleus, unlike its homologous neighbours.

    PubMed

    Kwa, Lee Gyan; Wensley, Beth G; Alexander, Crispin G; Browning, Stuart J; Lichman, Benjamin R; Clarke, Jane

    2014-04-03

    Three homologous spectrin domains have remarkably different folding characteristics. We have previously shown that the slow-folding R16 and R17 spectrin domains can be altered to resemble the fast folding R15, in terms of speed of folding (and unfolding), landscape roughness and folding mechanism, simply by substituting five residues in the core. Here we show that, by contrast, R15 cannot be engineered to resemble R16 and R17. It is possible to engineer a slow-folding version of R15, but our analysis shows that this protein neither has a rougher energy landscape nor does change its folding mechanism. Quite remarkably, R15 appears to be a rare example of a protein with a folding nucleus that does not change in position or in size when its folding nucleus is disrupted. Thus, while two members of this protein family are remarkably plastic, the third has apparently a restricted folding landscape.

  6. The Folding of a Family of Three-Helix Bundle Proteins: Spectrin R15 Has a Robust Folding Nucleus, Unlike Its Homologous Neighbours☆

    PubMed Central

    Kwa, Lee Gyan; Wensley, Beth G.; Alexander, Crispin G.; Browning, Stuart J.; Lichman, Benjamin R.; Clarke, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Three homologous spectrin domains have remarkably different folding characteristics. We have previously shown that the slow-folding R16 and R17 spectrin domains can be altered to resemble the fast folding R15, in terms of speed of folding (and unfolding), landscape roughness and folding mechanism, simply by substituting five residues in the core. Here we show that, by contrast, R15 cannot be engineered to resemble R16 and R17. It is possible to engineer a slow-folding version of R15, but our analysis shows that this protein neither has a rougher energy landscape nor does change its folding mechanism. Quite remarkably, R15 appears to be a rare example of a protein with a folding nucleus that does not change in position or in size when its folding nucleus is disrupted. Thus, while two members of this protein family are remarkably plastic, the third has apparently a restricted folding landscape. PMID:24373753

  7. 3D fold growth rates in transpressional tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    Geological folds are inherently three-dimensional (3D) structures; hence, they also grow in 3D. In this study, fold growth in all three dimensions is quantified numerically using a finite-element algorithm for simulating deformation of Newtonian media in 3D. The presented study is an extension and generalization of the work presented in Frehner (2014), which only considered unidirectional layer-parallel compression. In contrast, the full range from strike slip settings (i.e., simple shear) to unidirectional layer-parallel compression is considered here by varying the convergence angle of the boundary conditions; hence the results are applicable to general transpressional tectonic settings. Only upright symmetrical single-layer fold structures are considered. The horizontal higher-viscous layer exhibits an initial point-like perturbation. Due to the mixed pure- and simple shear boundary conditions a mechanical buckling instability grows from this perturbation in all three dimensions, described by: Fold amplification (vertical growth): Fold amplification describes the growth from a fold shape with low limb-dip angle to a shape with higher limb-dip angle. Fold elongation (growth parallel to fold axis): Fold elongation describes the growth from a dome-shaped (3D) structure to a more cylindrical fold (2D). Sequential fold growth (growth perpendicular to fold axial plane): Sequential fold growth describes the growth of secondary (and further) folds adjacent to the initial isolated fold. The term 'lateral fold growth' is used as an umbrella term for both fold elongation and sequential fold growth. In addition, the orientation of the fold axis is tracked as a function of the convergence angle. Even though the absolute values of all three growth rates are markedly reduced with increasing simple-shear component at the boundaries, the general pattern of the quantified fold growth under the studied general-shear boundary conditions is surprisingly similar to the end

  8. Inframammary fold: a histologic reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Muntan, C D; Sundine, M J; Rink, R D; Acland, R D

    2000-02-01

    The inframammary fold is a defining element in the shape and structure of the female breast. It should be preserved whenever possible in ablative procedures and recreated accurately when the breast is reconstructed after mastectomy. To date, no accurate anatomic description of this essential structure exists. Previous studies have suggested that the fold is produced by a supporting ligament running from the dermis in the fold region to a variety of locations on the rib cage. This clinic's experience with mastectomy, augmentation mammaplasty, and breast reconstruction does not support the existence of a ligamentous structure. To define the structure of the inframammary fold, 10 female and 2 male cadavers were studied. The anterior chest wall was removed en bloc and frozen in orthostatic position. Parasagittal sections were made of the inframammary fold with the chest wall intact. After decalcification of the ribs and routine histologic preparation, thin sections were stained with Gomori's trichrome. On light microscopic examination, no demonstrable ligamentous structure of dense regular connective tissue could be identified in the fold region in any of the 12 specimens. Superficial and deep fascial layers were uniformly observed anterior to the pectoralis major and serratus anterior muscles. The superficial fascia was connected to the dermis in the fold region in a variety of configurations. In some cases, the deep fascia fused with the superficial fascia and dermis at the fold level. In other cases, bundles of collagen fibers arising from the superficial fascial layer were found to insert into the dermis at the inframammary fold, slightly inferior to it, or both. These bundles were observed consistently in sections from the sternum to the middle axillary line. They were distinct from Cooper's suspensory ligaments, which are seen more superiorly in the glandular tissue.

  9. Acceleration of protein folding by four orders of magnitude through a single amino acid substitution

    PubMed Central

    Roderer, Daniel J. A.; Schärer, Martin A.; Rubini, Marina; Glockshuber, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    Cis prolyl peptide bonds are conserved structural elements in numerous protein families, although their formation is energetically unfavorable, intrinsically slow and often rate-limiting for folding. Here we investigate the reasons underlying the conservation of the cis proline that is diagnostic for the fold of thioredoxin-like thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases. We show that replacement of the conserved cis proline in thioredoxin by alanine can accelerate spontaneous folding to the native, thermodynamically most stable state by more than four orders of magnitude. However, the resulting trans alanine bond leads to small structural rearrangements around the active site that impair the function of thioredoxin as catalyst of electron transfer reactions by more than 100-fold. Our data provide evidence for the absence of a strong evolutionary pressure to achieve intrinsically fast folding rates, which is most likely a consequence of proline isomerases and molecular chaperones that guarantee high in vivo folding rates and yields. PMID:26121966

  10. The delicate balance between secreted protein folding and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation in human physiology.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Christopher J; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding "problem," as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates.

  11. THE DELICATE BALANCE BETWEEN SECRETED PROTEIN FOLDING AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM-ASSOCIATED DEGRADATION IN HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding “problem,” as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates. PMID:22535891

  12. Calnexin, calreticulin and the folding of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    Calnexin and calreticulin are molecular chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum (ERJ. They are lectins that interact with newly synthesized glycoproteins that have undergone partial trimming of their core N-linked oligosaccharides. Together with the enzymes responsible for glucose removal and a glucosyltransferase that re-glucosylates already-trimmed glycoproteins, they provide a novel mechanism for promoting folding, oligomeric assembly and quality control in the ER.

  13. A Computational Study of the Effect of False Vocal Folds on Glottal Flow and Vocal Fold Vibration During Phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xudong; Bielamowicz, Steve; Luo, Haoxiang; Mittal, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    The false vocal folds are believed to be components of the acoustic filter that is responsible for shaping the voice. However, the effects of false vocal folds on the vocal fold vibration and the glottal aerodynamic during phonation remain unclear. This effect has implications for computational modeling of phonation as well as for understanding laryngeal pathologies such as glottal incompetence resulting from unilateral vocal fold paralysis. In this study, a high fidelity, two-dimensional computational model, which combines an immersed boundary method for the airflow and a continuum, finite-element method for the vocal folds, is used to examine the effect of the false vocal folds on flow-induced vibration (FIV) of the true vocal folds and the dynamics of the glottal jet. The model is notionally based on a laryngeal CT scan and employs realistic flow conditions and tissue properties. Results show that the false vocal folds potentially have a significant impact on phonation. The false vocal folds reduce the glottal flow impedance and increase the amplitude as well as the mean glottal jet velocity. The false vocal folds also enhance the intensity of the monopole acoustic sources in the glottis. A mechanism for reduction in flow impedance due to the false vocal folds is proposed. PMID:19142730

  14. Protein folding by distributed computing and the denatured state ensemble.

    PubMed

    Marianayagam, Neelan J; Fawzi, Nicolas L; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2005-11-15

    The distributed computing (DC) paradigm in conjunction with the folding@home (FH) client server has been used to study the folding kinetics of small peptides and proteins, giving excellent agreement with experimentally measured folding rates, although pathways sampled in these simulations are not always consistent with the folding mechanism. In this study, we use a coarse-grain model of protein L, whose two-state kinetics have been characterized in detail by using long-time equilibrium simulations, to rigorously test a FH protocol using approximately 10,000 short-time, uncoupled folding simulations starting from an extended state of the protein. We show that the FH results give non-Poisson distributions and early folding events that are unphysical, whereas longer folding events experience a correct barrier to folding but are not representative of the equilibrium folding ensemble. Using short-time, uncoupled folding simulations started from an equilibrated denatured state ensemble (DSE), we also do not get agreement with the equilibrium two-state kinetics because of overrepresented folding events arising from higher energy subpopulations in the DSE. The DC approach using uncoupled short trajectories can make contact with traditionally measured experimental rates and folding mechanism when starting from an equilibrated DSE, when the simulation time is long enough to sample the lowest energy states of the unfolded basin and the simulated free-energy surface is correct. However, the DC paradigm, together with faster time-resolved and single-molecule experiments, can also reveal the breakdown in the two-state approximation due to observation of folding events from higher energy subpopulations in the DSE.

  15. Conserved Structural Regions Involved in the Catalytic Mechanism of Escherichia coli K-12 WaaO (RfaI)

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Keigo; Ohsuka, Shinji; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Ohta, Michio

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 WaaO (formerly known as RfaI) is a nonprocessive α-1,3 glucosyltransferase, involved in the synthesis of the R core of lipopolysaccharide. By comparing the amino acid sequence of WaaO with those of 11 homologous α-glycosyltransferases, four strictly conserved regions, I, II, III, and IV, were identified. Since functionally related transferases are predicted to have a similar architecture in the catalytic sites, it is assumed that these four regions are directly involved in the formation of α-glycosidic linkage from α-linked nucleotide diphospho-sugar donor. Hydrophobic cluster analysis revealed a conserved domain at the N termini of these α-glycosyltransferases. This domain was similar to that previously reported for β-glycosyltransferases. Thus, this domain is likely to be involved in the formation of β-glycosidic linkage between the donor sugar and the enzyme at the first step of the reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis of E. coli K-12 WaaO revealed four critical amino acid residues. PMID:9765561

  16. Conserved structural regions involved in the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli K-12 WaaO (RfaI).

    PubMed

    Shibayama, K; Ohsuka, S; Tanaka, T; Arakawa, Y; Ohta, M

    1998-10-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 WaaO (formerly known as RfaI) is a nonprocessive alpha-1,3 glucosyltransferase, involved in the synthesis of the R core of lipopolysaccharide. By comparing the amino acid sequence of WaaO with those of 11 homologous alpha-glycosyltransferases, four strictly conserved regions, I, II, III, and IV, were identified. Since functionally related transferases are predicted to have a similar architecture in the catalytic sites, it is assumed that these four regions are directly involved in the formation of alpha-glycosidic linkage from alpha-linked nucleotide diphospho-sugar donor. Hydrophobic cluster analysis revealed a conserved domain at the N termini of these alpha-glycosyltransferases. This domain was similar to that previously reported for beta-glycosyltransferases. Thus, this domain is likely to be involved in the formation of beta-glycosidic linkage between the donor sugar and the enzyme at the first step of the reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis of E. coli K-12 WaaO revealed four critical amino acid residues.

  17. Folding gravitational-wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. R.; Ballmer, Stefan W.

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of kilometer-scale terrestrial gravitational wave interferometers is limited by mirror coating thermal noise. Alternative interferometer topologies can mitigate the impact of thermal noise on interferometer noise curves. In this work, we explore the impact of introducing a single folding mirror into the arm cavities of dual-recycled Fabry–Perot interferometers. While simple folding alone does not reduce the mirror coating thermal noise, it makes the folding mirror the critical mirror, opening up a variety of design and upgrade options. Improvements to the folding mirror thermal noise through crystalline coatings or cryogenic cooling can increase interferometer range by as much as a factor of two over the Advanced LIGO reference design.

  18. Double universality of a quantum phase transition in spinor condensates: modification of the Kibble-Żurek mechanism by a conservation law.

    PubMed

    Świsłocki, Tomasz; Witkowska, Emilia; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Matuszewski, Michał

    2013-01-25

    We consider a phase transition from an antiferromagnetic to a phase separated ground state in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate of ultracold atoms. We demonstrate the occurrence of two scaling laws, for the number of spin domain seeds just after the phase transition, and for the number of spin domains in the final, stable configuration. Only the first scaling can be explained by the standard Kibble-Żurek mechanism. We explain the occurrence of two scaling laws by a model including postselection of spin domains due to the conservation of condensate magnetization.

  19. PREFACE Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    multi-scale dynamical problem when one considers the synergies between protein expression, spontaneous folding, chaperonin-assisted folding, protein targeting, the kinetics of post-translational modifications, protein degradation, and of course the drive to avoid aggregation. Further, there is growing recognition that cells not only tolerate but select for proteins that are intrinsically disordered. These proteins are essential for many crucial activities, and yet their inability to fold in isolation makes them prone to proteolytic processing and aggregation. In the series of papers that make up this special focus on protein folding in physical biology, leading researchers provide insights into diverse cross-sections of problems in protein folding. Barrick provides a concise review of what we have learned from the study of two-state folders and draws attention to how several unanswered questions are being approached using studies on large repeat proteins. Dissecting the contribution of hydration-mediated interactions to driving forces for protein folding and assembly has been extremely challenging. There is renewed interest in using hydrostatic pressure as a tool to access folding intermediates and decipher the role of partially hydrated states in folding, misfolding, and aggregation. Silva and Foguel review many of the nuances that have been uncovered by perturbing hydrostatic pressure as a thermodynamic parameter. As noted above, protein folding in vivo is expected to be considerably more complex than the folding of two-state proteins in dilute solutions. Lucent et al review the state-of-the-art in the development of quantitative theories to explain chaperonin-assisted folding in vivo. Additionally, they highlight unanswered questions pertaining to the processing of unfolded/misfolded proteins by the chaperone machinery. Zhuang et al present results that focus on the effects of surface tethering on transition state ensembles and folding mechanisms of a model two

  20. Protein folding by motion planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shawna; Song, Guang; Amato, Nancy M.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate a novel approach for studying protein folding that has evolved from robotics motion planning techniques called probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs). Our focus is to study issues related to the folding process, such as the formation of secondary and tertiary structures, assuming we know the native fold. A feature of our PRM-based framework is that the large sets of folding pathways in the roadmaps it produces, in just a few hours on a desktop PC, provide global information about the protein's energy landscape. This is an advantage over other simulation methods such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo methods which require more computation and produce only a single trajectory in each run. In our initial studies, we obtained encouraging results for several small proteins. In this paper, we investigate more sophisticated techniques for analyzing the folding pathways in our roadmaps. In addition to more formally revalidating our previous results, we present a case study showing that our technique captures known folding differences between the structurally similar proteins G and L. This research was supported in part by NSF CAREER Award CCR-9624315, NSF Grants ACI-9872126, EIA-9975018, EIA-0103742, EIA-9805823, ACR-0113971, CCR-0113974, EIA-9810937, EIA-0079874 and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board grant ATP-000512-0261-2001. ST was supported in part by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. GS was supported in part by an IBM PhD Fellowship.

  1. Minimizing Frustration by Folding in an Aqueous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Carla; Clark, A. Clay

    2010-01-01

    Although life as we know it evolved in an aqueous medium, the properties of water are not completely understood. In this review, we focus on the role of water in guiding protein folding and stability. Specifically, we discuss the mechanisms of protein folding in an aqueous environment, the effects of water on the folding energy landscape as well as the transition state ensemble, and interactions of water with the folded state. We show that water cannot be viewed as a passive solvent, but rather, plays a very active role in the life of a protein. PMID:17719000

  2. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Brandon L; Larue, Ross C; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P

    2016-02-23

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein-protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins.

  3. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Tao; Yoon, ChangKyu; Jin, Qianru; Li, Mingen; Liu, Zewen; Gracias, David H.

    2015-05-18

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  4. Molecular and biochemical analysis of rainbow trout LCK suggests a conserved mechanism for T-cell signaling in gnathostomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Dutton, S.; Hansen, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Two genes were identified in rainbow trout that display high sequence identity to vertebrate Lck. Both of the trout Lck transcripts are associated with lymphoid tissues and were found to be highly expressed in IgM-negative lymphocytes. In vitro analysis of trout lymphocytes indicates that trout Lck mRNA is up-regulated by T-cell mitogens, supporting an evolutionarily conserved function for Lck in the signaling pathways of T-lymphocytes. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a specific monoclonal antibody raised against the N-terminal domains of recombinant trout Lck that can recognize Lck protein(s) from trout thymocyte lysates that are similar in size (???57 kDa) to mammalian Lck. This antibody also reacted with permeabilized lymphocytes during FACS analysis, indicating its potential usage for cellular analyses of trout lymphocytes, thus representing an important tool for investigations of salmonid T-cell function.

  5. Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1987-10-31

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis.

  6. Influence of vein fabric on strain distribution and fold kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torremans, Koen; Muchez, Philippe; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Abundant pre-folding, bedding-parallel fibrous dolomite veins in shale are found associated with the Nkana-Mindola stratiform Cu-Co deposit in the Central African Copperbelt, Zambia. These monomineralic veins extend for several meters along strike, with a fibrous infill orthogonal to low-tortuosity vein walls. Growth morphologies vary from antitaxial with a pronounced median surface to asymmetric syntaxial, always with small but quantifiable growth competition. Subsequently, these veins were folded. In this study, we aim to constrain the kinematic fold mechanism by which strain is accommodated in these veins, estimate paleorheology at time of deformation and investigate the influence of vein fabric on deformation during folding. Finally, the influence of the deformation on known metallogenetic stages is assessed. Various deformation styles are observed, ultimately related to vein attitude across tight to close lower-order, hectometre-scale folds. In fold hinges, at low to average dips, veins are (poly-)harmonically to disharmonically folded as parasitic folds in single or multilayer systems. With increasing distance from the fold hinge, parasitic fold amplitude decreases and asymmetry increases. At high dips in the limbs, low-displacement duplication thrusts of veins at low angles to bedding are abundant. Slickenfibres and slickenlines are sub-perpendicular to fold hinges and shallow-dipping slickenfibre-step lineations are parallel to local fold hinge lines. A dip isogon analysis of reconstructed fold geometries prior to homogeneous shortening reveals type 1B parallel folds for the veins and type 1C for the matrix. Two main deformation mechanisms are identified in folded veins. Firstly, undulatory extinction, subgrains and fluid inclusions planes parallel the fibre long axis, with deformation intensity increasing away from the fold hinges, indicate intracrystalline strain accumulation. Secondly, intergranular deformation through bookshelf rotation of fibres, via

  7. An approach for generating trajectory-based dynamics which conserves the canonical distribution in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. II. Thermal correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jian; Miller, William H.

    2011-03-14

    We show the exact expression of the quantum mechanical time correlation function in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. The trajectory-based dynamics that conserves the quantum canonical distribution-equilibrium Liouville dynamics (ELD) proposed in Paper I is then used to approximately evaluate the exact expression. It gives exact thermal correlation functions (of even nonlinear operators, i.e., nonlinear functions of position or momentum operators) in the classical, high temperature, and harmonic limits. Various methods have been presented for the implementation of ELD. Numerical tests of the ELD approach in the Wigner or Husimi phase space have been made for a harmonic oscillator and two strongly anharmonic model problems, for each potential autocorrelation functions of both linear and nonlinear operators have been calculated. It suggests ELD can be a potentially useful approach for describing quantum effects for complex systems in condense phase.

  8. An approach for generating trajectory-based dynamics which conserves the canonical distribution in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. I. Theories.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Miller, William H

    2011-03-14

    We have reformulated and generalized our recent work [J. Liu and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 234110 (2007)] into an approach for generating a family of trajectory-based dynamics methods in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. The approach (equilibrium Liouville dynamics) is in the spirit of Liouville's theorem in classical mechanics. The trajectory-based dynamics is able to conserve the quantum canonical distribution for the thermal equilibrium system and approaches classical dynamics in the classical (ℏ → 0), high temperature (β → 0), and harmonic limits. Equilibrium Liouville dynamics provides the framework for the development of novel theoretical∕computational tools for studying quantum dynamical effects in large∕complex molecular systems.

  9. An approach for generating trajectory-based dynamics which conserves the canonical distribution in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. I. Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Miller, William H.

    2011-03-01

    We have reformulated and generalized our recent work [J. Liu and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 234110 (2007)] into an approach for generating a family of trajectory-based dynamics methods in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. The approach (equilibrium Liouville dynamics) is in the spirit of Liouville's theorem in classical mechanics. The trajectory-based dynamics is able to conserve the quantum canonical distribution for the thermal equilibrium system and approaches classical dynamics in the classical (ℏ → 0), high temperature (β → 0), and harmonic limits. Equilibrium Liouville dynamics provides the framework for the development of novel theoretical/computational tools for studying quantum dynamical effects in large/complex molecular systems.

  10. An approach for generating trajectory-based dynamics which conserves the canonical distribution in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. II. Thermal correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Miller, William H.

    2011-03-01

    We show the exact expression of the quantum mechanical time correlation function in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics. The trajectory-based dynamics that conserves the quantum canonical distribution-equilibrium Liouville dynamics (ELD) proposed in Paper I is then used to approximately evaluate the exact expression. It gives exact thermal correlation functions (of even nonlinear operators, i.e., nonlinear functions of position or momentum operators) in the classical, high temperature, and harmonic limits. Various methods have been presented for the implementation of ELD. Numerical tests of the ELD approach in the Wigner or Husimi phase space have been made for a harmonic oscillator and two strongly anharmonic model problems, for each potential autocorrelation functions of both linear and nonlinear operators have been calculated. It suggests ELD can be a potentially useful approach for describing quantum effects for complex systems in condense phase.

  11. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs.

  12. Collections Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, Robert

    Collections conservation is an approach to the preservation treatment of books and book-like materials that is conceptualized and organized in terms of large groups of materials. This guide is intended to enable a library to evaluate its current collections conservation activities. The introduction describes collections conservation and gives…

  13. Mechanisms of anti-inflammatory property of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor: inhibition of JNK signaling in lipopolysaccharide-induced microglia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Wen; Maharjan, Sailendra; Cui, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Xingli; Tang, Dongqi; Nie, Lin

    2014-02-01

    Microglia are important resident immune cells in the central nervous system (CNS) and involved in the neuroinflammation caused by CNS disorders, including brain trauma, ischemia, stroke, infections, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Our study explores the hypothesis that conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF), a secretory neurotrophic factor, may provide a novel therapy for associated with neuroinflammation related to the microglia. We observed that CDNF was upregulated in rat primary microglia treated with 1 μg/mL lipopolysaccharide, an inflammatory inducer, for 24 h. Thus, we hypothesize that CDNF may play a role, mediator or inhibitor, in regulating the inflammation in microglial cells induced by LPS. Finally, our data showed that CDNF significantly attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines (PGE2 and IL-1β) and remarkably alleviated the cytotoxicity (percentage of lactate dehydrogenase released) in the LPS-induced microglia by suppressing the phosphorylation of JNK, but not the P38 or ERK pathways. These results demonstrate the anti-inflammatory property of CDNF by inhibition of JNK signaling in LPS-induced microglia, suggesting that CDNF may be a potential novel agent for the treatment of neuroinflammation in the CNS disorders.

  14. Autophagy, a Conserved Mechanism for Protein Degradation, Responds to Heat, and Other Abiotic Stresses in Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yufei; Guo, Meng; Wang, Hu; Lu, Jinping; Liu, Jinhong; Zhang, Chong; Gong, Zhenhui; Lu, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses negatively affect plants growth and development by inducing protein denaturation, and autophagy degrades the damaged proteins to alleviate their toxicity, however, little is known about the involvement of autophagy in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) tolerances to abiotic stresses. In this study, we identified autophagy-related gene (ATG) members in the whole genome of pepper by HMM method and analyzed their expression profiles in response to heat and other abiotic stresses by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the CaATG contained 15 core ATG members including 29 ATG proteins with their respective conserved functional domains, involving the whole process of autophagy. Under normal environmental condition, the expression of CaATG genes showed tissue- and developmental stage-specific patterns, while under abiotic stresses of salt, drought, heat, cold and carbohydrate starvation, the accumulation of autophagosome punctate increased and the expression level of CaATG genes changed with stress type-dependent pattern, which indicates the linkage of autophagy in pepper response to abiotic stresses. After treated with heat stress, both the number of up-regulated CaATG genes and the increment of autophagosome punctate were higher in pepper thermotolerant line R9 than those in thermosensitive line B6, implying an association of autophagy with heat tolerance. In addition, CaATG6 was predicted to interact with CaHSP90 family members. Our study suggests that autophagy is connected to pepper tolerances to heat and other abiotic stresses. PMID:26904087

  15. The effect of surface tethering on the folding of the src-SH3 protein domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhuoyun; Jewett, Andrew I.; Soto, Patricia; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2009-03-01

    The effect of surface tethering on the folding mechanism of the src-SH3 protein domain was investigated using a coarse-grained Gō-type protein model. The protein was tethered at various locations along the protein chain and the thermodynamics and kinetics of folding were studied using replica exchange and constant temperature Langevin dynamics. Our simulations reveal that tethering in a structured part of the transition state can dramatically alter the folding mechanism, while tethering in an unstructured part leaves the folding mechanism unaltered as compared to bulk folding. Interestingly, there is only modest correlation between the tethering effect on the folding mechanism and its effect on thermodynamic stability and folding rates. We suggest locations on the protein at which tethering could be performed in single-molecule experiments so as to leave the folding mechanism unaltered from the bulk.

  16. Folded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Bill; Zhu, Chen; Song, Binhuang; Lowery, Arthur J

    2016-12-26

    We propose and demonstrate a new sub-carrier multiplexing scheme, utilizing orthogonal, periodic-sinc-shaped sub-carrier spectra. This 'folded' OFDM allows for multi-carrier bands to be generated with the precise, rectangular frequency definition of Nyquist WDM. We show that this scheme can be implemented with 10 GHz sub-bands, showing a 0.5-dB implementation penalty and successful transmission over 4160-km. We further investigate 40-GHz bands in an add/drop multiplexing scenario on a 50-GHz WDM grid, and show that folded OFDM can provided advantages over conventional OFDM in bandwidth-limited systems.

  17. Mesoscale Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar

    2009-03-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is the fundamental protein/nucleic acid unit that stores the genetic material. Understanding how chromatin fibers fold and unfold in physiological conditions is important for interpreting fundamental biological processes like DNA replication and transcription regulation. Using a mesoscopic model of oligonucleosome chains and tailored sampling protocols, we elucidate the energetics of oligonucleosome folding/unfolding and the role of each histone tail, linker histones, and divalent ions in regulating chromatin structure. The resulting compact topologies reconcile features of the zigzag model with straight linker DNAs with the solenoid model with bent linker DNAs for optimal fiber organization and reveal dynamic and energetic aspects involved.

  18. Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mohazab, Ali R.; Plotkin, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for calculating the extent to which chain non-crossing is important in the most efficient, optimal trajectories or pathways for a protein to fold. This involves recording all unphysical crossing events of a ghost chain, and calculating the minimal uncrossing cost that would have been required to avoid such events. A depth-first tree search algorithm is applied to find minimal transformations to fold , , , and knotted proteins. In all cases, the extra uncrossing/non-crossing distance is a small fraction of the total distance travelled by a ghost chain. Different structural classes may be distinguished by the amount of extra uncrossing distance, and the effectiveness of such discrimination is compared with other order parameters. It was seen that non-crossing distance over chain length provided the best discrimination between structural and kinetic classes. The scaling of non-crossing distance with chain length implies an inevitable crossover to entanglement-dominated folding mechanisms for sufficiently long chains. We further quantify the minimal folding pathways by collecting the sequence of uncrossing moves, which generally involve leg, loop, and elbow-like uncrossing moves, and rendering the collection of these moves over the unfolded ensemble as a multiple-transformation “alignment”. The consensus minimal pathway is constructed and shown schematically for representative cases of an , , and knotted protein. An overlap parameter is defined between pathways; we find that proteins have minimal overlap indicating diverse folding pathways, knotted proteins are highly constrained to follow a dominant pathway, and proteins are somewhere in between. Thus we have shown how topological chain constraints can induce dominant pathway mechanisms in protein folding. PMID:23365638

  19. Root proliferation in decaying roots and old root channels: A nutrient conservation mechanism in oligotrophic mangrove forests?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    1. In oligotrophic habitats, proliferation of roots in nutrient-rich microsites may contribute to overall nutrient conservation by plants. Peat-based soils on mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by the presence of decaying roots and numerous old root channels (0.1-3.5 cm diameter) that become filled with living and highly branched roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans. The objectives of this study were to quantify the proliferation of roots in these microsites and to determine what causes this response. 2. Channels formed by the refractory remains of mangrove roots accounted for only 1-2% of total soil volume, but the proportion of roots found within channels varied from 9 to 24% of total live mass. Successive generations of roots growing inside increasingly smaller root channels were also found. 3. When artificial channels constructed of PVC pipe were buried in the peat for 2 years, those filled with nutrient-rich organic matter had six times more roots than empty or sand-filled channels, indicating a response to greater nutrient availability rather than to greater space or less impedance to root growth. 4. Root proliferation inside decaying roots may improve recovery of nutrients released from decomposing tissues before they can be leached or immobilized in this intertidal environment. Greatest root proliferation in channels occurred in interior forest zones characterized by greater soil waterlogging, which suggests that this may be a strategy for nutrient capture that minimizes oxygen losses from the whole root system. 5. Improved efficiency of nutrient acquisition at the individual plant level has implications for nutrient economy at the ecosystem level and may explain, in part, how mangroves persist and grow in nutrient-poor environments.

  20. Evidence for Conservation of the Calcitonin Superfamily and Activity-regulating Mechanisms in the Basal Chordate Branchiostoma floridae

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Toshio; Kuwasako, Kenji; Ogasawara, Michio; Takahashi, Hiroki; Matsubara, Shin; Osugi, Tomohiro; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Sasayama, Yuichi; Suzuki, Nobuo; Satake, Honoo

    2016-01-01

    The calcitonin (CT)/CT gene-related peptide (CGRP) family is conserved in vertebrates. The activities of this peptide family are regulated by a combination of two receptors, namely the calcitonin receptor (CTR) and the CTR-like receptor (CLR), and three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Furthermore, RAMPs act as escort proteins by translocating CLR to the cell membrane. Recently, CT/CGRP family peptides have been identified or inferred in several invertebrates. However, the molecular characteristics and relevant functions of the CTR/CLR and RAMPs in invertebrates remain unclear. In this study, we identified three CT/CGRP family peptides (Bf-CTFPs), one CTR/CLR-like receptor (Bf-CTFP-R), and three RAMP-like proteins (Bf-RAMP-LPs) in the basal chordate amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae). The Bf-CTFPs were shown to possess an N-terminal circular region typical of the CT/CGRP family and a C-terminal Pro-NH2. The Bf-CTFP genes were expressed in the central nervous system and in endocrine cells of the midgut, indicating that Bf-CTFPs serve as brain and/or gut peptides. Cell surface expression of the Bf-CTFP-R was enhanced by co-expression with each Bf-RAMP-LP. Furthermore, Bf-CTFPs activated Bf-CTFP-R·Bf-RAMP-LP complexes, resulting in cAMP accumulation. These results confirmed that Bf-RAMP-LPs, like vertebrate RAMPs, are prerequisites for the function and translocation of the Bf-CTFP-R. The relative potencies of the three peptides at each receptor were similar. Bf-CTFP2 was a potent ligand at all receptors in cAMP assays. Bf-RAMP-LP effects on ligand potency order were distinct to vertebrate CGRP/adrenomedullin/amylin receptors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecular and functional characterization of an authentic invertebrate CT/CGRP family receptor and RAMPs. PMID:26644465

  1. Origin of the vertebrate body plan via mechanically biased conservation of regular geometrical patterns in the structure of the blastula.

    PubMed

    Edelman, David B; McMenamin, Mark; Sheesley, Peter; Pivar, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    We present a plausible account of the origin of the archetypal vertebrate bauplan. We offer a theoretical reconstruction of the geometrically regular structure of the blastula resulting from the sequential subdivision of the egg, followed by mechanical deformations of the blastula in subsequent stages of gastrulation. We suggest that the formation of the vertebrate bauplan during development, as well as fixation of its variants over the course of evolution, have been constrained and guided by global mechanical biases. Arguably, the role of such biases in directing morphology-though all but neglected in previous accounts of both development and macroevolution-is critical to any substantive explanation for the origin of the archetypal vertebrate bauplan. We surmise that the blastula inherently preserves the underlying geometry of the cuboidal array of eight cells produced by the first three cleavages that ultimately define the medial-lateral, dorsal-ventral, and anterior-posterior axes of the future body plan. Through graphical depictions, we demonstrate the formation of principal structures of the vertebrate body via mechanical deformation of predictable geometrical patterns during gastrulation. The descriptive rigor of our model is supported through comparisons with previous characterizations of the embryonic and adult vertebrate bauplane. Though speculative, the model addresses the poignant absence in the literature of any plausible account of the origin of vertebrate morphology. A robust solution to the problem of morphogenesis-currently an elusive goal-will only emerge from consideration of both top-down (e.g., the mechanical constraints and geometric properties considered here) and bottom-up (e.g., molecular and mechano-chemical) influences.

  2. Targeting Fold Stiffness to Design Enhanced Origami Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskohl, Philip; Bazzan, Giorgio; Abbott, Andrew; Durstock, Michael; Vaia, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Structures with adaptive geometry are increasingly of interest for actuation, sensing and packaging applications. Origami structures, by definition, can ``shape-shift'' between multiple geometric configurations that are predefined by a pattern of folds. Plastic deformation and local failure at the fold lines transform an originally homogenous material into a grid with locally tailored mechanical properties that bias the response of the overall structure to external loading. Typically, origami structures focus on uniformly stiff fold lines with rigid facets. In this study, we discuss how localized variations in stiffness can influence global properties, including energy budget to transition from flat to folded structure, the preferred path through configuration space, and the final mechanical response of the folded architecture. A simple, bi-stable origami fold pattern is laser machined into polypropylene sheets of different compliance and the critical load of the transition is measured. We model the structure as a truss with bar elongation, folding, and facet bending in order to predict ways to enhance or mitigate the critical load. Targeting local folding properties to modify global performance directly extends to the analysis of more complex architectures.

  3. Use of Protein Folding Reagents.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The reagents and methods for purification and use of the most commonly used denaturants, guanidine hydrochloride (guanidine-HCl) and urea, are described. Other protein denaturants and reagents used to fold proteins are briefly mentioned. Sulfhydryl reagents (reducing agents) and "oxido-shuffling" (or oxidative regeneration) systems are also described.

  4. Single molecule RNA folding studied with optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey Robert

    The RNA folding problem (predicting the equilibrium structure and folding pathway of an RNA molecule from its sequence) is one of the classic problems of biophysics. Recent discoveries of many new functions for RNA have increased its importance, and new instrumental techniques have provided new ways to characterize molecular behavior. In particular, optical trapping (optical tweezers) allows controlled mechanical force to be applied to single RNA molecules while their end-to-end extension is monitored in real time. This enables characterization of RNA folding dynamics at a level unreachable by traditional bulk methods. Furthermore, recent advances in statistical mechanics make it possible to recover equilibrium quantities such as free energy from reactions which occur away from equilibrium. This dissertation describes the application of optical trapping and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to quantitatively characterize folding of RNA secondary structures. By measuring the folding free energy of several specially designed hairpins in solutions containing various amounts of sodium and potassium, we were able to determine that RNA secondary structure thermodynamics depends not only on monovalent cation concentration but also surprisingly, on species. We also investigated the temperature dependence of hairpin folding thermodynamics and kinetics, which provided a direct measurement of enthalpy and entropy for RNA folding at physiological temperatures. We found that the folding pathway was quite sensitive to both salt and temperature, as measured by the folding success rate of a biologically important hairpin from the HIV-1 viral genome. Finally, I discuss modeling of force-induced RNA folding and unfolding, as well as a series of efforts which have dramatically improved the performance of our optical trapping instrument.

  5. A conserved RNA structural element within the hepatitis B virus post-transcriptional regulatory element enhance nuclear export of intronless transcripts and repress the splicing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Visootsat, Akasit; Payungporn, Sunchai; T-Thienprasert, Nattanan P

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a primary cause of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cirrhosis worldwide. To develop novel antiviral drugs, a better understanding of HBV gene expression regulation is vital. One important aspect is to understand how HBV hijacks the cellular machinery to export unspliced RNA from the nucleus. The HBV post-transcriptional regulatory element (HBV PRE) has been proposed to be the HBV RNA nuclear export element. However, the function remains controversial, and the core element is unclear. This study, therefore, aimed to identify functional regulatory elements within the HBV PRE and investigate their functions. Using bioinformatics programs based on sequence conservation and conserved RNA secondary structures, three regulatory elements were predicted, namely PRE 1151-1410, PRE 1520-1620 and PRE 1650-1684. PRE 1151-1410 significantly increased intronless and unspliced luciferase activity in both HepG2 and COS-7 cells. Likewise, PRE 1151-1410 significantly elevated intronless and unspliced HBV surface transcripts in liver cancer cells. Moreover, motif analysis predicted that PRE 1151-1410 contains several regulatory motifs. This study reported the roles of PRE 1151-1410 in intronless transcript nuclear export and the splicing mechanism. Additionally, these results provide knowledge in the field of HBV RNA regulation. Moreover, PRE 1151-1410 may be used to enhance the expression of other mRNAs in intronless reporter plasmids.

  6. Chaperones rescue luciferase folding by separating its domains.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2014-10-10

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process.

  7. Chaperones Rescue Luciferase Folding by Separating Its Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Zackary N.; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process. PMID:25160632

  8. Effects of tethering a multistate folding protein to a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2011-05-01

    Protein/surface interactions are important in a variety of fields and devices, yet fundamental understanding of the relevant phenomena remains fragmented due to resolution limitations of experimental techniques. Molecular simulation has provided useful answers, but such studies have focused on proteins that fold through a two-state process. This study uses simulation to show how surfaces can affect proteins which fold through a multistate process by investigating the folding mechanism of lysozyme (PDB ID: 7LZM). The results demonstrate that in the bulk 7LZM folds through a process with four stable states: the folded state, the unfolded state, and two stable intermediates. The folding mechanism remains the same when the protein is tethered to a surface at most residues; however, in one case the folding mechanism changes in such a way as to eliminate one of the intermediates. An analysis of the molecular configurations shows that tethering at this site is advantageous for protein arrays because the active site is both presented to the bulk phase and stabilized. Taken as a whole, the results offer hope that rational design of protein arrays is possible once the behavior of the protein on the surface is ascertained.

  9. Effects of tethering a multistate folding protein to a surface.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A

    2011-05-14

    Protein/surface interactions are important in a variety of fields and devices, yet fundamental understanding of the relevant phenomena remains fragmented due to resolution limitations of experimental techniques. Molecular simulation has provided useful answers, but such studies have focused on proteins that fold through a two-state process. This study uses simulation to show how surfaces can affect proteins which fold through a multistate process by investigating the folding mechanism of lysozyme (PDB ID: 7LZM). The results demonstrate that in the bulk 7LZM folds through a process with four stable states: the folded state, the unfolded state, and two stable intermediates. The folding mechanism remains the same when the protein is tethered to a surface at most residues; however, in one case the folding mechanism changes in such a way as to eliminate one of the intermediates. An analysis of the molecular configurations shows that tethering at this site is advantageous for protein arrays because the active site is both presented to the bulk phase and stabilized. Taken as a whole, the results offer hope that rational design of protein arrays is possible once the behavior of the protein on the surface is ascertained.

  10. Unraveling metamaterial properties in zigzag-base folded sheets

    PubMed Central

    Eidini, Maryam; Paulino, Glaucio H.

    2015-01-01

    Creating complex spatial objects from a flat sheet of material using origami folding techniques has attracted attention in science and engineering. In the present work, we use the geometric properties of partially folded zigzag strips to better describe the kinematics of known zigzag/herringbone-base folded sheet metamaterials such as Miura-ori. Inspired by the kinematics of a one–degree of freedom zigzag strip, we introduce a class of cellular folded mechanical metamaterials comprising different scales of zigzag strips. This class of patterns combines origami folding techniques with kirigami. Using analytical and numerical models, we study the key mechanical properties of the folded materials. We show that our class of patterns, by expanding on the design space of Miura-ori, is appropriate for a wide range of applications from mechanical metamaterials to deployable structures at small and large scales. We further show that, depending on the geometry, these materials exhibit either negative or positive in-plane Poisson’s ratios. By introducing a class of zigzag-base materials in the current study, we unify the concept of in-plane Poisson’s ratio for similar materials in the literature and extend it to the class of zigzag-base folded sheet materials. PMID:26601253

  11. Unraveling metamaterial properties in zigzag-base folded sheets.

    PubMed

    Eidini, Maryam; Paulino, Glaucio H

    2015-09-01

    Creating complex spatial objects from a flat sheet of material using origami folding techniques has attracted attention in science and engineering. In the present work, we use the geometric properties of partially folded zigzag strips to better describe the kinematics of known zigzag/herringbone-base folded sheet metamaterials such as Miura-ori. Inspired by the kinematics of a one-degree of freedom zigzag strip, we introduce a class of cellular folded mechanical metamaterials comprising different scales of zigzag strips. This class of patterns combines origami folding techniques with kirigami. Using analytical and numerical models, we study the key mechanical properties of the folded materials. We show that our class of patterns, by expanding on the design space of Miura-ori, is appropriate for a wide range of applications from mechanical metamaterials to deployable structures at small and large scales. We further show that, depending on the geometry, these materials exhibit either negative or positive in-plane Poisson's ratios. By introducing a class of zigzag-base materials in the current study, we unify the concept of in-plane Poisson's ratio for similar materials in the literature and extend it to the class of zigzag-base folded sheet materials.

  12. Numerical modeling of fold-and-thrust belts: Applications to Kuqa foreland fold belt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Morgan, J. K.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    We constructed discrete element models to simulate the evolution of fold-and-thrust belts. The impact of rock competence and decollement strength on the geometric pattern and deformation mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts has been investigated. The models reproduced some characteristic features of fold-and-thrust belts, such as faulted detachment folds, pop-ups, far-traveled thrust sheets, passive-roof duplexes, and back thrusts. In general, deformation propagates farther above a weak decollement than above a strong decollement. Our model results confirm that fold-and-thrust belts with strong frictional decollements develop relatively steep and narrow wedges formed by closely spaced imbricate thrust slices, whereas fold belts with weak decollements form wide low-taper wedges composed of faulted detachment folds, pop-ups, and back thrusts. Far-traveled thrust sheets and passive-roof duplexes are observed in the model with a strong lower decollement and a weak upper detachment. Model results also indicate that the thickness of the weak layer is critical. If it is thick enough, it acts as a ductile layer that is able to flow under differential stress, which helps to partition deformation above and below it. The discrete element modeling results were used to interpret the evolution of Kuqa Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt along northern Tarim basin, China. Seismic and well data show that the widely distributed Paleogene rock salt has a significant impact on the deformation in this area. Structures beneath salt are closely spaced imbricate thrust and passive-roof duplex systems. Deformation above salt propagates much farther than below the salt. Faults above salt are relatively wide spaced. A huge controversy over the Kuqa fold-and-thrust belt is whether it is thin-skinned or thick-skinned. With the insights from DEM results, we suggest that Kuqa structures are mostly thin-skinned with Paleogene salt as decollement, except for the rear part near the backstop, where the

  13. Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt, Bryce; Christensen, Steven M.

    In the case of the free particle, we interpreted various components of the energy-momentum-stress density as fluxes of energy and momentum. This interpretation can obviously be extended also to particle ensembles and gases. When we speak of fluxes we usually think of quantities that are conserved. In special relativity, energy and momentum are conserved. In general relativity, they are no longer generally conserved, at least if we do not include the energy and momentum of the gravitational field itself. Nevertheless, their densities and fluxes satisfy a covariant generalization of a true conservation law, which is quite easy to obtain.

  14. Two more approaches for generating trajectory-based dynamics which conserves the canonical distribution in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian

    2011-05-21

    We show two more approaches for generating trajectory-based dynamics in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics: "equilibrium continuity dynamics" (ECD) in the spirit of the phase space continuity equation in classical mechanics, and "equilibrium Hamiltonian dynamics" (EHD) in the spirit of the Hamilton equations of motion in classical mechanics. Both ECD and EHD can recover exact thermal correlation functions (of even nonlinear operators, i.e., nonlinear functions of position or momentum operators) in the classical, high temperature, and harmonic limits. Both ECD and EHD conserve the quasi-probability within the infinitesimal volume dx(t)dp(t) around the phase point (x(t), p(t)) along the trajectory. Numerical tests of both approaches in the Wigner phase space have been made for two strongly anharmonic model problems and a double well system, for each potential auto-correlation functions of both linear and nonlinear operators have been calculated. The results suggest EHD and ECD are two additional potential useful approaches for describing quantum effects for complex systems in condense phase.

  15. Conservative options in the management of spinal disorders, Part I. Bed rest, mechanical and energy-transfer therapies.

    PubMed

    Reitman, C; Esses, S I

    1995-02-01

    Current literature does not support the efficacy of solitary use of energy-transfer therapies, such as ice or heat treatments, or electrotherapy, for the treatment of idiopathic back pain. Bed rest does not alter the natural history of back pain, and in fact can be detrimental to optimal recovery. Mechanical therapies, such as traction and orthoses, have limited usefulness. Although orthoses do not appear to weaken the trunk, they also do not appear to alter posture out of the brace, do not consistently diminish back muscle action during activities, and do not immobilize the spine. There have been no conclusive studies to substantiate the solitary use of any of these forms of treatment, although some may be beneficial at times in an adjunctive role.

  16. An iterative Riemann solver for systems of hyperbolic conservation law s, with application to hyperelastic solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Gregory H.

    2003-08-06

    In this paper we present a general iterative method for the solution of the Riemann problem for hyperbolic systems of PDEs. The method is based on the multiple shooting method for free boundary value problems. We demonstrate the method by solving one-dimensional Riemann problems for hyperelastic solid mechanics. Even for conditions representative of routine laboratory conditions and military ballistics, dramatic differences are seen between the exact and approximate Riemann solution. The greatest discrepancy arises from misallocation of energy between compressional and thermal modes by the approximate solver, resulting in nonphysical entropy and temperature estimates. Several pathological conditions arise in common practice, and modifications to the method to handle these are discussed. These include points where genuine nonlinearity is lost, degeneracies, and eigenvector deficiencies that occur upon melting.

  17. Transcription factors that influence RNA polymerases I and II: To what extent is mechanism of action conserved?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Najmi, Saman M; Schneider, David A

    2017-02-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear RNA synthesis is accomplished by at least three unique, multisubunit RNA polymerases. The roles of these enzymes are generally partitioned into the synthesis of the three major classes of RNA: rRNA, mRNA, and tRNA for RNA polymerases I, II, and III respectively. Consistent with their unique cellular roles, each enzyme has a complement of specialized transcription factors and enzymatic properties. However, not all transcription factors have evolved to affect only one eukaryotic RNA polymerase. In fact, many factors have been shown to influence the activities of multiple nuclear RNA polymerases. This review focuses on a subset of these factors, specifically addressing the mechanisms by which these proteins influence RNA polymerases I and II.

  18. Avibactam and Class C β-Lactamases: Mechanism of Inhibition, Conservation of the Binding Pocket, and Implications for Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, M. R.; Ross, P. L.; McLaughlin, R. E.; Olivier, N. B.

    2014-01-01

    Avibactam is a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that inhibits a wide range of β-lactamases. These include class A, class C, and some class D enzymes, which erode the activity of β-lactam drugs in multidrug-resistant pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae spp. Avibactam is currently in clinical development in combination with the β-lactam antibiotics ceftazidime, ceftaroline fosamil, and aztreonam. Avibactam has the potential to be the first β-lactamase inhibitor that might provide activity against class C-mediated resistance, which represents a growing concern in both hospital- and community-acquired infections. Avibactam has an unusual mechanism of action: it is a covalent inhibitor that acts via ring opening, but in contrast to other currently used β-lactamase inhibitors, this reaction is reversible. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of avibactam bound to a class C β-lactamase, AmpC, from P. aeruginosa that provided insight into the mechanism of both acylation and recyclization in this enzyme class and highlighted the differences observed between class A and class C inhibition. Furthermore, variants resistant to avibactam that identified the residues important for inhibition were isolated. Finally, the structural information was used to predict effective inhibition by sequence analysis and functional studies of class C β-lactamases from a large and diverse set of contemporary clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa and several Enterobacteriaceae spp.) obtained from recent infections to understand any preexisting variability in the binding pocket that might affect inhibition by avibactam. PMID:25022578

  19. High-resolution protein folding with a transferable potential.

    PubMed

    Hubner, Isaac A; Deeds, Eric J; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2005-12-27

    A generalized computational method for folding proteins with a fully transferable potential and geometrically realistic all-atom model is presented and tested on seven helix bundle proteins. The protocol, which includes graph-theoretical analysis of the ensemble of resulting folded conformations, was systematically applied and consistently produced structure predictions of approximately 3 A without any knowledge of the native state. To measure and understand the significance of the results, extensive control simulations were conducted. Graph theoretic analysis provides a means for systematically identifying the native fold and provides physical insight, conceptually linking the results to modern theoretical views of protein folding. In addition to presenting a method for prediction of structure and folding mechanism, our model suggests that an accurate all-atom amino acid representation coupled with a physically reasonable atomic interaction potential and hydrogen bonding are essential features for a realistic protein model.

  20. Macular folds: an unusual association in topiramate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kesarwani, Siddharth; Rao, Aparna; Garnaik, Anshuman

    2012-07-01

    We report two uncommon cases of acute onset myopia with macular folds following use of topiramate. A 25-year-old woman, with no prior history of glasses, taking topiramate for recurrent headaches, presented with decreased vision. On examination, she was found to have a refractive error of -5.00 DS in both eyes and intraocular pressure of 10 mmHg and 6 mmHg in the right and left eyes, respectively. She had closed angles on gonioscopy, ciliary effusion on ultrasonic biomicroscopy with inner limiting membrane folds in the macula in both eyes. She was on anti-glaucoma medication when she presented to us. A 20-year-old woman presented with acute headache and decreased vision following use of topiramate for treatment of migraine. On examination, her intraocular pressure was 25 mmHg in both eyes with closed angles on gonioscopy, a refractive error of -4.50 DS and prominent macular folds with no fluid in both eyes. There was complete resolution of macular folds and angle-closure attack after discontinuation of topiramate and conservative treatment with topical steroids and cycloplegics in both eyes. Topiramate toxicity may present with macular folds associated with angle-closure glaucoma. Folds in the inner limiting membrane might give a clue to choroidal effusion as the cause for this presentation. The symptoms resolved on the discontinuation of topiramate.

  1. Dissecting Ubiquitin Folding Using the Self-Organized Polymer Model.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Govardhan; Thirumalai, D

    2015-08-27

    Folding of Ubiquitin (Ub), a functionally important protein found in eukaryotic organisms, is investigated at low and neutral pH at different temperatures using simulations of the coarse-grained self-organized-polymer model with side chains (SOP-SC). The melting temperatures (Tm's), identified with the peaks in the heat capacity curves, decrease as pH decreases, in qualitative agreement with experiments. The calculated radius of gyration, showing dramatic variations with pH, is in excellent agreement with scattering experiments. At Tm, Ub folds in a two-state manner at low and neutral pH. Clustering analysis of the conformations sampled in equilibrium folding trajectories at Tm, with multiple transitions between the folded and unfolded states, shows a network of metastable states connecting the native and unfolded states. At low and neutral pH, Ub folds with high probability through a preferred set of conformations resulting in a pH-dependent dominant folding pathway. Folding kinetics reveal that Ub assembly at low pH occurs by multiple pathways involving a combination of nucleation-collapse and diffusion collision mechanism. The mechanism by which Ub folds is dictated by the stability of the key secondary structural elements responsible for establishing long-range contacts and collapse of Ub. Nucleation collapse mechanism holds if the stability of these elements are marginal, as would be the case at elevated temperatures. If the lifetimes associated with these structured microdomains are on the order of hundreds of microseconds, then Ub folding follows the diffusion-collision mechanism with intermediates, many of which coincide with those found in equilibrium. Folding at neutral pH is a sequential process with a populated intermediate resembling that sampled at equilibrium. The transition state structures, obtained using a Pfold analysis, are homogeneous and globular with most of the secondary and tertiary structures being native-like. Many of our findings for

  2. Three-way RNA junctions with remote tertiary contacts: A recurrent and highly versatile fold

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Marcos; Dufour, David; Gallego, José

    2009-01-01

    Three-way junction RNAs adopt a recurrent Y shape when two of the helices form a coaxial stack and the third helix establishes one or more tertiary contacts several base pairs away from the junction. In this review, the structure, distribution, and functional relevance of these motifs are examined. Structurally, the folds exhibit conserved junction topologies, and the distal tertiary interactions play a crucial role in determining the final shape of the structures. The junctions and remote tertiary contacts behave as flexible hinge motifs that respond to changes in the other region, providing these folds with switching mechanisms that have been shown to be functionally useful in a variety of contexts. In addition, the juxtaposition of RNA domains at the junction and at the distal tertiary complexes enables the RNA helices to adopt unusual conformations that are frequently used by proteins, RNA molecules, and antibiotics as platforms for specific binding. As a consequence of these properties, Y-shaped junctions are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life, having been observed in small naked RNAs such as riboswitches and ribozymes or embedded in complex ribonucleoprotein systems like ribosomal RNAs, RNase P, or the signal recognition particle. In all cases, the folds were found to play an essential role for the functioning or assembly of the RNA or ribonucleoprotein systems that contain them. PMID:19741022

  3. The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii targets proteins to dense granules and the vacuolar space using both conserved and unusual mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Karsten, V; Qi, H; Beckers, C J; Reddy, A; Dubremetz, J F; Webster, P; Joiner, K A

    1998-06-15

    All known proteins that accumulate in the vacuolar space surrounding the obligate intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are derived from parasite dense granules. To determine if constitutive secretory vesicles could also mediate delivery to the vacuolar space, T. gondii was stably transfected with soluble Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase and E. coli beta-lactamase. Surprisingly, both foreign secretory reporters were delivered quantitatively into parasite dense granules and efficiently secreted into the vacuolar space. Addition of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchor rerouted alkaline phosphatase to the parasite surface. Alkaline phosphatase fused to the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail from the endogenous dense granule protein GRA4 localized to dense granules. The protein was secreted into a tuboreticular network in the vacuolar space, in a fashion dependent upon the cytoplasmic tail, but not upon a tyrosine-based motif within the tail. Alkaline phosphatase fused to the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail localized primarily to the Golgi, although staining of dense granules and the intravacuolar network was also detected; truncating the cytoplasmic tail decreased Golgi staining and increased delivery to dense granules but blocked delivery to the intravacuolar network. Targeting of secreted proteins to T. gondii dense granules and the plasma membrane uses general mechanisms identified in higher eukaryotic cells but is simplified and exaggerated in scope, while targeting of secreted proteins beyond the boundaries of the parasite involves unusual sorting events.

  4. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenen, Antje; Gillespie, Leah; Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der; Khromykh, Alexander; Mackenzie, Jason

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  5. Energy conservation in infants.

    PubMed

    Blass, Elliott

    2015-08-01

    Energy acquisition through suckling has been widely studied in rat and human infants. Processes mediating energy conservation, however, have not received the attention that they deserve. This essay, in honor of Professor Jerry Hogan, discusses parallel behaviors used by rat and human mothers to minimize energy loss in their offspring. Parallel mechanisms underlying energy preservation have been identified in rats and humans, suggesting phylogenetic conservation and possibly continuity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: In Honor of Jerry Hogan.

  6. Conservation Tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Maurice R.; Daniel, Tommy C.; Schweizer, Edward E.; Allmaras, Raymond R.

    1985-11-01

    Conservation production systems combine tillage and planting practices to reduce soil erosion and loss of water from farmland. Successful conservation tillage practices depend on the ability of farm managers to integrate sound crop production practices with effective pest management systems. More scientific information is needed to determine the relations between tillage practices and physical, chemical, and biological soil factors that affect plant and pest ecology. There is a need to devise improved pest management strategies for conservation tillage and to better understand the impact of conservation tillage on water quality, especially as it is related to use of agricultural chemicals. While savings in fuel, labor, and soil have induced many farmers to adopt conservation tillage, improved methods and equipment should increase adoption even more.

  7. The impact of intraglottal vortices on vocal fold dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron; Pirnia, Alireza; Peterson, Sean

    2016-11-01

    During voiced speech a critical pressure is produced in the lungs that separates the vocal folds and creates a passage (the glottis) for airflow. As air passes through the vocal folds the resulting aerodynamic loading, coupled with the tissue properties of the vocal folds, produces self-sustained oscillations. Throughout each cycle a complex flow field develops, characterized by a plethora of viscous flow phenomena. Air passing through the glottis creates a jet, with periodically-shed vortices developing due to flow separation and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer. These vortices have been hypothesized to be a crucial mechanism for producing vocal fold vibrations. In this study the effect of vortices on the vocal fold dynamics is investigated experimentally by passing a vortex ring over a flexible beam with the same non-dimensional mechanical properties as the vocal folds. Synchronized particle image velocimetry data are acquired in tandem with the beam dynamics. The resulting impact of the vortex ring loading on vocal fold dynamics is discussed in detail. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Grant CBET #1511761.

  8. From Helix–Coil Transitions to Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    An evolution of procedures to simulate protein structure and folding pathways is described. From an initial focus on the helix–coil transition and on hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions, our original attempts to determine protein structure and folding pathways were based on an experimental approach. Experiments on the oxidative folding of reduced bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) led to a mechanism by which the molecule folded to the native structure by a minimum of four different pathways. The experiments with RNase A were followed by development of a molecular mechanics approach, first, making use of global optimization procedures and then with molecular dynamics (MD), evolving from an all-atom to a united-residue model. This hierarchical MD approach facilitated probing of the folding trajectory to longer time scales than with all-atom MD, and hence led to the determination of complete folding trajectories, thus far for a protein containing as many as 75 amino acid residues. With increasing refinement of the computational procedures, the computed results are coming closer to experimental observations, providing an understanding as to how physics directs the folding process. PMID:18008324

  9. The crystal structure of a partial mouse Notch-1 ankyrin domain: Repeats 4 through 7 preserve an ankyrin fold

    SciTech Connect

    Lubman, Olga Y.; Kopan, Raphael; Waksman, Gabriel; Korolev, Sergey

    2010-07-20

    Folding and stability of proteins containing ankyrin repeats (ARs) is of great interest because they mediate numerous protein-protein interactions involved in a wide range of regulatory cellular processes. Notch, an ankyrin domain containing protein, signals by converting a transcriptional repression complex into an activation complex. The Notch ANK domain is essential for Notch function and contains seven ARs. Here, we present the 2.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of ARs 4-7 from mouse Notch 1 (m1ANK). These C-terminal repeats were resistant to degradation during crystallization, and their secondary and tertiary structures are maintained in the absence of repeats 1-3. The crystallized fragment adopts a typical ankyrin fold including the poorly conserved seventh AR, as seen in the Drosophila Notch ANK domain (dANK). The structural preservation and stability of the C-terminal repeats shed a new light onto the mechanism of hetero-oligomeric assembly during Notch-mediated transcriptional activation.

  10. Ventricular-Fold Dynamics in Human Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailly, Lucie; Bernardoni, Nathalie Henrich; Müller, Frank; Rohlfs, Anna-Katharina; Hess, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed (a) to provide a classification of the ventricular-fold dynamics during voicing, (b) to study the aerodynamic impact of these motions on vocal-fold vibrations, and (c) to assess whether ventricular-fold oscillations could be sustained by aerodynamic coupling with the vocal folds. Method: A 72-sample…

  11. A Conserved Role for the NAM/miR164 Developmental Module Reveals a Common Mechanism Underlying Carpel Margin Fusion in Monocarpous and Syncarpous Eurosids

    PubMed Central

    Vialette-Guiraud, Aurélie C. M.; Chauvet, Aurélie; Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Eschstruth, Alexis; Ratet, Pascal; Scutt, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of angiosperms are syncarpous- their gynoecium is composed of two or more fused carpels. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this fusion is regulated through the balance of expression between CUP SHAPED COTYLEDON (CUC) genes, which are orthologs of the Petunia hybrida transcription factor NO APICAL MERISTEM (NAM), and their post-transcriptional regulator miR164. Accordingly, the expression of a miR164-insensitive form of A. thaliana CUC2 causes a radical breakdown of carpel fusion. Here, we investigate the role of the NAM/miR164 genetic module in carpel closure in monocarpous plants. We show that the disruption of this module in monocarpous flowers of A. thaliana aux1-22 mutants causes a failure of carpel closure, similar to the failure of carpel fusion observed in the wild-type genetic background. This observation suggested that closely related mechanisms may bring about carpel closure and carpel fusion, at least in A. thaliana. We therefore tested whether these mechanisms were conserved in a eurosid species that is monocarpous in its wild-type form. We observed that expression of MtNAM, the NAM ortholog in the monocarpous eurosid Medicago truncatula, decreases during carpel margin fusion, suggesting a role for the NAM/miR164 module in this process. We transformed M. truncatula with a miR164-resistant form of MtNAM and observed, among other phenotypes, incomplete carpel closure in the resulting transformants. These data confirm the underlying mechanistic similarity between carpel closure and carpel fusion which we observed in A. thaliana. Our observations suggest that the role of the NAM/miR164 module in the fusion of carpel margins has been conserved at least since the most recent common ancestor of the eurosid clade, and open the possibility that a similar mechanism may have been responsible for carpel closure at much earlier stages of angiosperm evolution. We combine our results with studies of early diverging angiosperms to speculate on the role of the NAM

  12. A Conserved Role for the NAM/miR164 Developmental Module Reveals a Common Mechanism Underlying Carpel Margin Fusion in Monocarpous and Syncarpous Eurosids.

    PubMed

    Vialette-Guiraud, Aurélie C M; Chauvet, Aurélie; Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Eschstruth, Alexis; Ratet, Pascal; Scutt, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    The majority of angiosperms are syncarpous- their gynoecium is composed of two or more fused carpels. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this fusion is regulated through the balance of expression between CUP SHAPED COTYLEDON (CUC) genes, which are orthologs of the Petunia hybrida transcription factor NO APICAL MERISTEM (NAM), and their post-transcriptional regulator miR164. Accordingly, the expression of a miR164-insensitive form of A. thaliana CUC2 causes a radical breakdown of carpel fusion. Here, we investigate the role of the NAM/miR164 genetic module in carpel closure in monocarpous plants. We show that the disruption of this module in monocarpous flowers of A. thaliana aux1-22 mutants causes a failure of carpel closure, similar to the failure of carpel fusion observed in the wild-type genetic background. This observation suggested that closely related mechanisms may bring about carpel closure and carpel fusion, at least in A. thaliana. We therefore tested whether these mechanisms were conserved in a eurosid species that is monocarpous in its wild-type form. We observed that expression of MtNAM, the NAM ortholog in the monocarpous eurosid Medicago truncatula, decreases during carpel margin fusion, suggesting a role for the NAM/miR164 module in this process. We transformed M. truncatula with a miR164-resistant form of MtNAM and observed, among other phenotypes, incomplete carpel closure in the resulting transformants. These data confirm the underlying mechanistic similarity between carpel closure and carpel fusion which we observed in A. thaliana. Our observations suggest that the role of the NAM/miR164 module in the fusion of carpel margins has been conserved at least since the most recent common ancestor of the eurosid clade, and open the possibility that a similar mechanism may have been responsible for carpel closure at much earlier stages of angiosperm evolution. We combine our results with studies of early diverging angiosperms to speculate on the role of the NAM

  13. Two-ligand priming mechanism for potentiated phosphoinositide synthesis is an evolutionarily conserved feature of Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine exchange proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Ghosh, Ratna; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Lönnfors, Max; Somerharju, Pentti; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid signaling, particularly phosphoinositide signaling, plays a key role in regulating the extreme polarized membrane growth that drives root hair development in plants. The Arabidopsis AtSFH1 gene encodes a two-domain protein with an amino-terminal Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP) domain linked to a carboxy-terminal nodulin domain. AtSfh1 is critical for promoting the spatially highly organized phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate signaling program required for establishment and maintenance of polarized root hair growth. Here we demonstrate that, like the yeast Sec14, the AtSfh1 PITP domain requires both its phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)- and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho)-binding properties to stimulate PtdIns-4-phosphate [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis. Moreover, we show that both phospholipid-binding activities are essential for AtSfh1 activity in supporting polarized root hair growth. Finally, we report genetic and biochemical evidence that the two-ligand mechanism for potentiation of PtdIns 4-OH kinase activity is a broadly conserved feature of plant Sec14-nodulin proteins, and that this strategy appeared only late in plant evolution. Taken together, the data indicate that the PtdIns/PtdCho-exchange mechanism for stimulated PtdIns(4)P synthesis either arose independently during evolution in yeast and in higher plants, or a suitable genetic module was introduced to higher plants from a fungal source and subsequently exploited by them. PMID:27193303

  14. Deletions involving long-range conserved nongenic sequences upstream and downstream of FOXL2 as a novel disease-causing mechanism in blepharophimosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beysen, D; Raes, J; Leroy, B P; Lucassen, A; Yates, J R W; Clayton-Smith, J; Ilyina, H; Brooks, S Sklower; Christin-Maitre, S; Fellous, M; Fryns, J P; Kim, J R; Lapunzina, P; Lemyre, E; Meire, F; Messiaen, L M; Oley, C; Splitt, M; Thomson, J; Van de Peer, Y; Veitia, R A; De Paepe, A; De Baere, E

    2005-08-01

    The expression of a gene requires not only a normal coding sequence but also intact regulatory regions, which can be located at large distances from the target genes, as demonstrated for an increasing number of developmental genes. In previous mutation studies of the role of FOXL2 in blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES), we identified intragenic mutations in 70% of our patients. Three translocation breakpoints upstream of FOXL2 in patients with BPES suggested a position effect. Here, we identified novel microdeletions outside of FOXL2 in cases of sporadic and familial BPES. Specifically, four rearrangements, with an overlap of 126 kb, are located 230 kb upstream of FOXL2, telomeric to the reported translocation breakpoints. Moreover, the shortest region of deletion overlap (SRO) contains several conserved nongenic sequences (CNGs) harboring putative transcription-factor binding sites and representing potential long-range cis-regulatory elements. Interestingly, the human region orthologous to the 12-kb sequence deleted in the polled intersex syndrome in goat, which is an animal model for BPES, is contained in this SRO, providing evidence of human-goat conservation of FOXL2 expression and of the mutational mechanism. Surprisingly, in a fifth family with BPES, one rearrangement was found downstream of FOXL2. In addition, we report nine novel rearrangements encompassing FOXL2 that range from partial gene deletions to submicroscopic deletions. Overall, genomic rearrangements encompassing or outside of FOXL2 account for 16% of all molecular defects found in our families with BPES. In summary, this is the first report of extragenic deletions in BPES, providing further evidence of potential long-range cis-regulatory elements regulating FOXL2 expression. It contributes to the enlarging group of developmental diseases caused by defective distant regulation of gene expression. Finally, we demonstrate that CNGs are candidate regions for genomic rearrangements in developmental

  15. Deletions Involving Long-Range Conserved Nongenic Sequences Upstream and Downstream of FOXL2 as a Novel Disease-Causing Mechanism in Blepharophimosis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beysen, D.; Raes, J.; Leroy, B. P.; Lucassen, A.; Yates, J. R. W.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Ilyina, H.; Brooks, S. Sklower; Christin-Maitre, S.; Fellous, M.; Fryns, J. P.; Kim, J. R.; Lapunzina, P.; Lemyre, E.; Meire, F.; Messiaen, L. M.; Oley, C.; Splitt, M.; Thomson, J.; Peer, Y. Van de; Veitia, R. A.; De Paepe, A.; De Baere, E.

    2005-01-01

    The expression of a gene requires not only a normal coding sequence but also intact regulatory regions, which can be located at large distances from the target genes, as demonstrated for an increasing number of developmental genes. In previous mutation studies of the role of FOXL2 in blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES), we identified intragenic mutations in 70% of our patients. Three translocation breakpoints upstream of FOXL2 in patients with BPES suggested a position effect. Here, we identified novel microdeletions outside of FOXL2 in cases of sporadic and familial BPES. Specifically, four rearrangements, with an overlap of 126 kb, are located 230 kb upstream of FOXL2, telomeric to the reported translocation breakpoints. Moreover, the shortest region of deletion overlap (SRO) contains several conserved nongenic sequences (CNGs) harboring putative transcription-factor binding sites and representing potential long-range cis-regulatory elements. Interestingly, the human region orthologous to the 12-kb sequence deleted in the polled intersex syndrome in goat, which is an animal model for BPES, is contained in this SRO, providing evidence of human-goat conservation of FOXL2 expression and of the mutational mechanism. Surprisingly, in a fifth family with BPES, one rearrangement was found downstream of FOXL2. In addition, we report nine novel rearrangements encompassing FOXL2 that range from partial gene deletions to submicroscopic deletions. Overall, genomic rearrangements encompassing or outside of FOXL2 account for 16% of all molecular defects found in our families with BPES. In summary, this is the first report of extragenic deletions in BPES, providing further evidence of potential long-range cis-regulatory elements regulating FOXL2 expression. It contributes to the enlarging group of developmental diseases caused by defective distant regulation of gene expression. Finally, we demonstrate that CNGs are candidate regions for genomic rearrangements in developmental

  16. Folded MEMS approach to NMRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundeti, Venu Madhav

    Atomic gyroscopes have a potential for good performance advantages and several attempts are being made to miniaturize them. This thesis describes the efforts made in implementing a Folded MEMS based NMRG. The micro implementations of all the essential components for NMRG (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope) are described in detail in regards to their design, fabrication, and characterization. A set of micro-scale Helmholtz coils are described and the homogeneity of the generated magnetic field is analyzed for different designs of heaters. The dielectric mirrors and metallic mirrors are compared in terms of reflectivity and polarization change up on reflection. A pyramid shaped folded backbone structure is designed, fabricated, and assembled along with all the required components. A novel double-folded structure 1/4th the size of original version is fabricated and assembled. Design and modeling details of a 5 layered shield with shielding factor > 106 and total volume of around 90 cc are also presented. A table top setup for characterization of atomic vapor cell is described in detail. A micro vapor cell based Rb magnetometer with a sensitivity of 108 pT/√Hz is demonstrated. The challenges due to DC heating are addressed and mitigated using an AC heater. Several experiments related to measuring the relaxation time of Xe are provided along with results. For Xe131, relaxation times of T1 = 23.78 sec, T2 = 18.06 sec and for Xe129, T1 = 21.65 sec and T2 = 20.45 sec are reported.

  17. Valproic acid increases conservative homologous recombination frequency and reactive oxygen species formation: a potential mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Defoort, Ericka N; Kim, Perry M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-04-01

    Valproic acid, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, is associated with a 1 to 2% incidence of neural tube defects when taken during pregnancy; however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs has not been elucidated. Previous research suggests that valproic acid exposure leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). DNA damage due to ROS can result in DNA double-strand breaks, which can be repaired through homologous recombination (HR), a process that is not error-free and can result in detrimental genetic changes. Because the developing embryo requires tight regulation of gene expression to develop properly, we propose that the loss or dysfunction of genes involved in embryonic development through aberrant HR may ultimately cause neural tube defects. To determine whether valproic acid induces HR, Chinese hamster ovary 3-6 cells, containing a neomycin direct repeat recombination substrate, were exposed to valproic acid for 4 or 24 h. A significant increase in HR after exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) for 24 h was observed, which seems to occur through a conservative HR mechanism. We also demonstrated that exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) significantly increased intracellular ROS levels, which were attenuated by preincubation with polyethylene glycol-conjugated (PEG)-catalase. A significant change in the ratio of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/2'-de-oxyguanosine, a measure of DNA oxidation, was not observed after valproic acid exposure; however, preincubation with PEG-catalase significantly blocked the increase in HR. These data demonstrate that valproic acid increases HR frequency and provides a possible mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

  18. Energy Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelson, Philip H.

    1972-01-01

    Comments on The Potential for Energy Conservation,'' a study by the Office of Emergency Preparedness, emphasizing the coming dependence on foreign oil, and presses for government influence to encourage development of more efficient cars. (AL)

  19. Conservation Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students teach about the importance of recycling and conservation by presenting demonstrations. Includes demonstrations on water, plastic, and other recycling products such as steel. (YDS)

  20. Improving protein fold recognition by random forest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recognizing the correct structural fold among known template protein structures for a target protein (i.e. fold recognition) is essential for template-based protein structure modeling. Since the fold recognition problem can be defined as a binary classification problem of predicting whether or not the unknown fold of a target protein is similar to an already known template protein structure in a library, machine learning methods have been effectively applied to tackle this problem. In our work, we developed RF-Fold that uses random forest - one of the most powerful and scalable machine learning classification methods - to recognize protein folds. Results RF-Fold consists of hundreds of decision trees that can be trained efficiently on very large datasets to make accurate predictions on a highly imbalanced dataset. We evaluated RF-Fold on the standard Lindahl's benchmark dataset comprised of 976 × 975 target-template protein pairs through cross-validation. Compared with 17 different fold recognition methods, the performance of RF-Fold is generally comparable to the best performance in fold recognition of different difficulty ranging from the easiest family level, the medium-hard superfamily level, and to the hardest fold level. Based on the top-one template protein ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate is 84.5%, 63.4%, and 40.8% at family, superfamily, and fold levels, respectively. Based on the top-five template protein folds ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate increases to 91.5%, 79.3% and 58.3% at family, superfamily, and fold levels. Conclusions The good performance achieved by the RF-Fold demonstrates the random forest's effectiveness for protein fold recognition. PMID:25350499

  1. Functional analysis of propeptide as an intramolecular chaperone for in vivo folding of subtilisin nattokinase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Liu, Hui; Bao, Wei; Weng, Meizhi; Chen, Wei; Cai, Yongjun; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2010-12-01

    Here, we show that during in vivo folding of the precursor, the propeptide of subtilisin nattokinase functions as an intramolecular chaperone (IMC) that organises the in vivo folding of the subtilisin domain. Two residues belonging to β-strands formed by conserved regions of the IMC are crucial for the folding of the subtilisin domain through direct interactions. An identical protease can fold into different conformations in vivo due to the action of a mutated IMC, resulting in different kinetic parameters. Some interfacial changes involving conserved regions, even those induced by the subtilisin domain, blocked subtilisin folding and altered its conformation. Insight into the interaction between the subtilisin and IMC domains is provided by a three-dimensional structural model.

  2. The CATH Hierarchy Revisited—Structural Divergence in Domain Superfamilies and the Continuity of Fold Space

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Alison; Redfern, Oliver C.; Greene, Lesley; Sillitoe, Ian; Lewis, Tony; Dibley, Mark; Reid, Adam; Pearl, Frances; Dallman, Tim; Todd, Annabel; Garratt, Richard; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Summary This paper explores the structural continuum in CATH and the extent to which superfamilies adopt distinct folds. Although most superfamilies are structurally conserved, in some of the most highly populated superfamilies (4% of all superfamilies) there is considerable structural divergence. While relatives share a similar fold in the evolutionary conserved core, diverse elaborations to this core can result in significant differences in the global structures. Applying similar protocols to examine the extent to which structural overlaps occur between different fold groups, it appears this effect is confined to just a few architectures and is largely due to small, recurring super-secondary motifs (e.g., αβ-motifs, α-hairpins). Although 24% of superfamilies overlap with superfamilies having different folds, only 14% of nonredundant structures in CATH are involved in overlaps. Nevertheless, the existence of these overlaps suggests that, in some regions of structure space, the fold universe should be seen as more continuous. PMID:19679085

  3. A Hooke׳s law-based approach to protein folding rate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Prieto, Pablo J; Salgado, Jesús; García, Yamila; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M

    2015-01-07

    Kinetics is a key aspect of the renowned protein folding problem. Here, we propose a comprehensive approach to folding kinetics where a polypeptide chain is assumed to behave as an elastic material described by the Hooke׳s law. A novel parameter called elastic-folding constant results from our model and is suggested to distinguish between protein with two-state and multi-state folding pathways. A contact-free descriptor, named folding degree, is introduced as a suitable structural feature to study protein-folding kinetics. This approach generalizes the observed correlations between varieties of structural descriptors with the folding rate constant. Additionally several comparisons among structural classes and folding mechanisms were carried out showing the good performance of our model with proteins of different types. The present model constitutes a simple rationale for the structural and energetic factors involved in protein folding kinetics.

  4. Distinct folding pathways of two homologous disulfide proteins: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2011-01-01

    The folding pathways of disulfide proteins vary substantially (Arolas et al., Trends Biochem Sci 31: 292-301, 2006). The diversity is mainly manifested by (a) the extent of heterogeneity of folding intermediates, (b) the extent of presence of native-like intermediates, and (c) the variation of folding kinetics. Even among structurally similar proteins, the difference can be enormous. This is demonstrated in this concise review with two structurally homologous kunitz-type protease inhibitors, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide, as well as a group of cystine knot proteins. The diversity of their folding mechanisms is illustrated with two different folding techniques: (a) the conventional method of disulfide oxidation (oxidative folding), and (b) the novel method of disulfide scrambling (Chang, J Biol Chem 277: 120-126, 2002). This review also highlights the convergence of folding models concluded form the conventional conformational folding and those obtained by oxidative folding.

  5. Kinematics and thermodynamics of a folding heteropolymer.

    PubMed Central

    Fukugita, M; Lancaster, D; Mitchard, M G

    1993-01-01

    In order to elucidate the folding dynamics of protein, we have carried out numerical simulations of a heteropolymer model of self-interacting random chains. We find that folding propensity depends strongly on sequence and that both folding and nonfolding sequences exist. Furthermore we show that folding is a two-step process: the transition from coil state to unique folded state takes place through a globule phase. In addition to the continuous coil-globule transition, there exists an abrupt transition that separates the unique folded state from the globule state and ensures the stability of the native state. PMID:8327518

  6. SbnG, a citrate synthase in Staphylococcus aureus: a new fold on an old enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kobylarz, Marek J; Grigg, Jason C; Sheldon, Jessica R; Heinrichs, David E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2014-12-05

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. We present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic gene clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. A structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production.

  7. Open Fissure Folds record coseismic loading and postseismic stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüchter, Jens-Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Open Fissure Folds hosted by high pressure/low temperature metamorphic rocks of south Evia (Greece) are introduced, their structural and microstructural record is analysed, and a mechanical model is proposed. Open Fissure Folds are preserved as at least two parallel folded quartz-feldspar veins separated by narrow buckled rock columns. The veins originated as tensile cracks that propagated in the middle crust driven by high differential stress. Features diagnostic for Open Fissure Folds indicate that the rock columns represented the layers of high viscosity, and not the veins as consistently reported in many previous studies on folded veins. This record is taken to indicate that buckling of the rock columns initiated after arrest of the fractures and terminated prior to complete vein sealing. Accordingly, mechanical decoupling by open fissures allowed for buckling of the rock columns in response to episodic creep of the host rocks according to stress relaxation, as expected for postseismic deformation in the earthquake cycle. I propose that the parental fractures propagated in response to quasi-instantaneous coseismic loading of the middle crust. Buckling was attributed to transient postseismic creep and stress relaxation. Complete sealing of the veins occurred when stresses were largely relaxed. Each Open Fissure Fold records the stress and strain history of a single earthquake.

  8. Iodothyronine deiodinase gene analysis of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas reveals possible conservation of thyroid hormone feedback regulation mechanism in mollusks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-07-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinase catalyzes the initiation and termination of thyroid hormones (THs) effects, and plays a central role in the regulation of thyroid hormone level in vertebrates. In non-chordate invertebrates, only one deiodinase has been identified in the scallop Chlamys farreri. Here, two deiodinases were cloned in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas ( CgDx and CgDy). The characteristic in-frame TGA codons and selenocysteine insertion sequence elements in the oyster deiodinase cDNAs supported the activity of them. Furthermore, seven orthologs of deiodinases were found by a tblastn search in the mollusk Lottia gigantea and the annelid Capitella teleta. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the deiodinase gene originated from an common ancestor and a clade-specific gene duplication occurred independently during the differentiation of the mollusk, annelid, and vertebrate lineages. The distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns implied functional divergence of the two deiodinases. The expression of CgDx and CgDy was influenced by L-thyroxine T4, and putative thyroid hormone responsive elements were found in their promoters, which suggested that the oyster deiodinases were feedback regulated by TH. Epinephrine stimulated the expression level of CgDx and CgDy, suggesting an interaction effect between different hormones. This study provides the first evidence for the existence of a conserved TH feedback regulation mechanism in mollusks, providing insights into TH evolution.

  9. Variola and Monkeypox Viruses Utilize Conserved Mechanisms of Virion Motility and Release That Depend on Abl and Src Family Tyrosine Kinases▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Patrick M.; Smith, Scott K.; Olson, Victoria A.; Thorne, Steve H.; Bornmann, William; Damon, Inger K.; Kalman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VacV) enters mammalian cells, replicates extranuclearly, and produces virions that move to the cell surface along microtubules, fuse with the plasma membrane, and move from infected cells toward apposing cells on actin-filled membranous protrusions or actin tails. To form actin tails, cell-associated enveloped virions (CEV) require Abl and Src family tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, release of CEV from the cell requires Abl but not Src family tyrosine kinases and is blocked by imatinib mesylate (STI-571; Gleevec), an Abl family kinase inhibitor used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia in humans. Here we demonstrate that the Poxviridae family members monkeypox virus (MPX) and variola virus (VarV) use conserved mechanisms for actin motility and extracellular enveloped virion (EEV) release. Furthermore, we show that imatinib mesylate is effective in a mouse model of infection with VacV, whether delivered prophylactically or postinfection, and restricts spread of virions from the site of inoculation. While inhibitors of both Src and Abl family kinases, such as dasatinib (BMS-354825; Sprycel), are effective in limiting dissemination of VacV, VarV, and MPX in vitro, members of this class of drugs appear to have immunosuppressive effects in vivo that preclude their use as anti-infectives. Together, these data suggest a possible utility for imatinib mesylate in treating smallpox or MPX infections or complications associated with vaccination. PMID:20962097

  10. Drosophila Homologues of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) and the Formin Diaphanous Collaborate by a Conserved Mechanism to Stimulate Actin Filament Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Richa; Stepanik, Vince; Rankova, Aneliya; Molinar, Olivia; Goode, Bruce L.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a large multidomain protein that regulates the cytoskeleton. Recently, it was shown that vertebrate APC through its Basic domain directly collaborates with the formin mDia1 to stimulate actin filament assembly in the presence of nucleation barriers. However, it has been unclear whether these activities extend to homologues of APC and Dia in other organisms. Drosophila APC and Dia are each required to promote actin furrow formation in the syncytial embryo, suggesting a potential collaboration in actin assembly, but low sequence homology between the Basic domains of Drosophila and vertebrate APC has left their functional and mechanistic parallels uncertain. To address this question, we purified Drosophila APC1 and Dia and determined their individual and combined effects on actin assembly using both bulk fluorescence assays and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Our data show that APC1, similar to its vertebrate homologue, bound to actin monomers and nucleated and bundled filaments. Further, Drosophila Dia nucleated actin assembly and protected growing filament barbed ends from capping protein. Drosophila APC1 and Dia directly interacted and collaborated to promote actin assembly in the combined presence of profilin and capping protein. Thus, despite limited sequence homology, Drosophila and vertebrate APCs exhibit highly related activities and mechanisms and directly collaborate with formins. These results suggest that APC-Dia interactions in actin assembly are conserved and may underlie important in vivo functions in a broad range of animal phyla. PMID:23558679

  11. Gene expression and secretion of LH and FSH in relation to gene expression of GnRH receptors in the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) demonstrates highly conserved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Crawford, J L; Heath, D A; Haydon, L J; Thomson, B P; Eckery, D C

    2009-01-01

    In eutherian mammals, the gonadotrophins (LH and FSH) are synthesized and stored in gonadotroph cells under the regulation of multiple mechanisms including GnRH. Very little is known about the regulation of gonadotrophin secretion and storage in pituitary glands of marsupials. This study revealed, using quantitative PCR and heterologous RIA techniques, that LHB mRNA expression levels remained constant over the oestrous cycle, regardless of the presence of a preovulatory LH surge, which is characteristic of a hormone secreted under regulation. Our sampling regime was unable to detect pulses of LH during the follicular phase, although GNRHR mRNA levels had increased at this time. Pulses of LH were, however, detected in the luteal phase of cycling females, in anoestrus females and in males. There was a positive correlation between gene expression of FSHB and plasma levels of FSH at different stages of the oestrous cycle and no pulses of FSH were detected at any time; all characteristics of a hormone secreted via the constitutive pathway. Using in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry methods, we determined that mRNA expression of LHB and FSHB, and protein storage of gonadotrophins exhibited a similar pattern of localisation within the pituitary gland. Additionally, sexual dimorphism of gonadotroph populations was evident. In summary, these findings are similar to that reported in eutherians and considering that marsupial evolution diverged from eutherians over 100 million years ago suggests that the regulation of gonadotrophins is highly conserved indeed.

  12. Structure of the C. elegans ZYG-1 cryptic polo box suggests a conserved mechanism for centriolar docking of Plk4 kinases.

    PubMed

    Shimanovskaya, Ekaterina; Viscardi, Valeria; Lesigang, Johannes; Lettman, Molly M; Qiao, Renping; Svergun, Dmitri I; Round, Adam; Oegema, Karen; Dong, Gang

    2014-08-05

    Plk4 family kinases control centriole assembly. Plk4s target mother centrioles through an interaction between their cryptic polo box (CPB) and acidic regions in the centriolar receptors SPD-2/Cep192 and/or Asterless/Cep152. Here, we report a crystal structure for the CPB of C. elegans ZYG-1, which forms a Z-shaped dimer containing an intermolecular β sheet with an extended basic surface patch. Biochemical and in vivo analysis revealed that electrostatic interactions dock the ZYG-1 CPB basic patch onto the SPD-2-derived acidic region to promote ZYG-1 targeting and new centriole assembly. Analysis of a different crystal form of the Drosophila Plk4 (DmPlk4) CPB suggests that it also forms a Z-shaped dimer. Comparison of the ZYG-1 and DmPlk4 CPBs revealed structural changes in the ZYG-1 CPB that confer selectivity for binding SPD-2 over Asterless-derived acidic regions. Overall, our findings suggest a conserved mechanism for centriolar docking of Plk4 homologs that initiate daughter centriole assembly.

  13. Folding and self-assembly of a small protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzan, Adam K.; Liwo, Adam; Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.

    2012-01-01

    The synthetic homotetrameric ββα (BBAT1) protein possesses a stable quaternary structure with a ββα fold. Because of its small size (a total of 84 residues), the homotetramer is an excellent model system with which to study the self-assembly and protein-protein interactions. We find from replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations with the coarse-grain UNRES force field that the folding and association pathway consists of three well-separated steps, where that association to a tetramer precedes and facilitates folding of the four chains. At room temperature the tetramer exists in an ensemble of diverse structures. The crystal structure becomes energetically favored only when the molecule is put in a dense and crystal-like environment. The observed picture of folding promoted by association may mirror the mechanism according to which intrinsically unfolded proteins assume their functional structure. PMID:24039552

  14. THEORY OF PROTEIN FOLDING: The Energy Landscape Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Wolynes, Peter G.

    1997-10-01

    The energy landscape theory of protein folding is a statistical description of a protein's potential surface. It assumes that folding occurs through organizing an ensemble of structures rather than through only a few uniquely defined structural intermediates. It suggests that the most realistic model of a protein is a minimally frustrated heteropolymer with a rugged funnel-like landscape biased toward the native structure. This statistical description has been developed using tools from the statistical mechanics of disordered systems, polymers, and phase transitions of finite systems. We review here its analytical background and contrast the phenomena in homopolymers, random heteropolymers, and protein-like heteropolymers that are kinetically and thermodynamically capable of folding. The connection between these statistical concepts and the results of minimalist models used in computer simulations is discussed. The review concludes with a brief discussion of how the theory helps in the interpretation of results from fast folding experiments and in the practical task of protein structure prediction.

  15. Induction of Expansion and Folding in Human Cerebral Organoids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Muffat, Julien; Omer, Attya; Bosch, Irene; Lancaster, Madeline A; Sur, Mriganka; Gehrke, Lee; Knoblich, Juergen A; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2017-03-02

    An expansion of the cerebral neocortex is thought to be the foundation for the unique intellectual abilities of humans. It has been suggested that an increase in the proliferative potential of neural progenitors (NPs) underlies the expansion of the cortex and its convoluted appearance. Here we show that increasing NP proliferation induces expansion and folding in an in vitro model of human corticogenesis. Deletion of PTEN stimulates proliferation and generates significantly larger and substantially folded cerebral organoids. This genetic modification allows sustained cell cycle re-entry, expansion of the progenitor population, and delayed neuronal differentiation, all key features of the developing human cortex. In contrast, Pten deletion in mouse organoids does not lead to folding. Finally, we utilized the expanded cerebral organoids to show that infection with Zika virus impairs cortical growth and folding. Our study provides new insights into the mechanisms regulating the structure and organization of the human cortex.

  16. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna; Freire Soler, Victor M.; Brökers, Lara; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning; Schleberger, Marika

    2014-12-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS2 and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS2 does not.

  17. In situ protein folding and activation in bacterial inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Montalban, Nuria; Natalello, Antonino; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio; Doglia, Silvia Maria

    2008-07-01

    Recent observations indicate that bacterial inclusion bodies formed in absence of the main chaperone DnaK result largely enriched in functional, properly folded recombinant proteins. Unfortunately, the molecular basis of this intriguing fact, with obvious biotechnological interest, remains unsolved. We have explored here two non-excluding physiological mechanisms that could account for this observation, namely selective removal of inactive polypeptides from inclusion bodies or in situ functional activation of the embedded proteins. By combining structural and functional analysis, we have not observed any preferential selection of inactive and misfolded protein species by the dissagregating machinery during inclusion body disintegration. Instead, our data strongly support that folding intermediates aggregated as inclusion bodies could complete their natural folding process once deposited in protein clusters, which conduces to significant functional activation. In addition, in situ folding and protein activation in inclusion bodies is negatively regulated by the chaperone DnaK.

  18. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein folding in a chaperonin cage

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Hagen; Hillger, Frank; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Hoffmann, Armin; Streich, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Nettels, Daniel; Lipman, Everett A.; Schuler, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are known to be essential for avoiding protein aggregation in vivo, but it is still unclear how they affect protein folding mechanisms. We use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to follow the folding of a protein inside the GroEL/GroES chaperonin cavity over a time range from milliseconds to hours. Our results show that confinement in the chaperonin decelerates the folding of the C-terminal domain in the substrate protein rhodanese, but leaves the folding rate of the N-terminal domain unaffected. Microfluidic mixing experiments indicate that strong interactions of the substrate with the cavity walls impede the folding process, but the folding hierarchy is preserved. Our results imply that no universal chaperonin mechanism exists. Rather, a competition between intra- and intermolecular interactions determines the folding rates and mechanisms of a substrate inside the GroEL/GroES cage. PMID:20547872

  19. Programmed folding of DNA origami structures through single-molecule force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Wooli; Kim, Kipom; Min, Duyoung; Ryu, Je-Kyung; Hyeon, Changbong; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2014-12-01

    Despite the recent development in the design of DNA origami, its folding yet relies on thermal or chemical annealing methods. We here demonstrate mechanical folding of the DNA origami structure via a pathway that has not been accessible to thermal annealing. Using magnetic tweezers, we stretch a single scaffold DNA with mechanical tension to remove its secondary structures, followed by base pairing of the stretched DNA with staple strands. When the force is subsequently quenched, folding of the DNA nanostructure is completed through displacement between the bound staple strands. Each process in the mechanical folding is well defined and free from kinetic traps, enabling us to complete folding within 10 min. We also demonstrate parallel folding of DNA nanostructures through multiplexed manipulation of the scaffold DNAs. Our results suggest a path towards programmability of the folding pathway of DNA nanostructures.

  20. Folding tools for flat conductor cable harnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loggins, R.

    1971-01-01

    Vise grip pliers have detachable metal gripping plates which are changed to accommodate cables from 1 to 3 in. wide and to form any desired fold angle. A second tool squeezes cable along crease to complete the fold.

  1. Communication: Folding of glycosylated proteins under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shental-Bechor, Dalit; Levy, Yaakov

    2011-10-01

    Conjugating flexible polymers (such as oligosaccharides) to proteins or confining a protein in a restricted volume often increases protein thermal stability. In this communication, we investigate the interplay between conjugation and confinement which is not trivial as the magnitude and the mechanism of stabilization are different in each instance. Using coarse-grained computational approach the folding biophysics is studied when the protein is placed in a sphere of variable radius and is conjugated to 0-6 mono- or penta-saccharides. We observe a synergistic effect on thermal stability when short oligosaccharides are attached and the modified protein is confined in a small cage. However, when large oligosaccharides are added, a conflict between confinement and glycosylation arises as the stabilizing effect of the cage is dramatically reduced and it is almost impossible to further stabilize the protein beyond the mild stabilization induced by the sugars.

  2. Dynamics of Folds in the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krylov, Nikolai A.; Rogers, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    Take a strip of paper and fold a crease intersecting the long edges, creating two angles. Choose one edge and consider the angle with the crease. Fold the opposite edge along the crease, creating a new crease that bisects the angle. Fold again, this time using the newly created crease and the initial edge, creating a new angle along the chosen…

  3. Towards a geomechanics classification of folded layered rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Zanchi, Andrea; Bianchi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    Several schemes have been proposed in the last decades to account for the effects of structure and alteration of rock masses on their geo-mechanical properties. Among these, the Geological Strength Index (GSI) turned out as the most effective to account for complex geological conditions, including heavily fractured, heterogeneous (e.g. flysch-like) or tectonically disturbed rock masses. It is well known that folding has a direct impact on the type and degree of fracturing. Nevertheless, no classification scheme has been developed to introduce explicitly the effects of folding and associated fracturing on rock mass strength and deformability. In this perspective, we carried out an exploratory study aimed at establishing relationships between outcrop-scale folding and GSI in layered carbonate rock masses, exceptionally well exposed in a quarry near Bergamo (Lombardia, Southern Alps). A N-S trending, 350m long and 115m high benched rock face exposes a complete cross section of a sub-horizontal inclined fold involving Lower Jurassic cherty mudstones (Moltrasio Lms.) and marly limestones successions (Domaro Lms.). The main fold has an axial surface moderately dipping to the north and is characterised by polyharmonic folds at scales of metres to tens of metres. The site was documented by producing a digital outcrop through a high-resolution terrestrial photogrammetric survey from distances ranging from 70 to 130 m (18 camera stations, 395 pictures), using RTK GNSS measurements for camera station geo-referencing. Data processing by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) techniques resulted in detailed point clouds covering the entire slope with a cm-scale accuracy. In order to establish relationships between lithology, folding styles, and geomechanical properties of folded rock masses we performed a detailed structural analysis at 25 survey stations spread over all the different fold sectors. These surveys include: lithology, bedding attitude and thickness, brittle structures (e

  4. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  5. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  6. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  7. Marketing Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, William B.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986, Northeast Utilities began helping shool administrators combat school building energy wastage through a program called Energy Alliance. The typical school can reduce its energy bill by 30 percent by adopting a wide range of conservation measures, including cogeneration, relamping, and energy audits. (MLH)

  8. Lighting Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Frank D.

    1975-01-01

    With the energy crisis has come an awareness of wasteful consumption practices. One area where research is being done is in lighting conservation. Information in this article is concerned with finding more effective and efficient lighting designs which include daylight utilization, task-oriented lighting, and lighting controls. (MA)

  9. Colorful Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Some people only think about conservation on Earth Day. Being in the "art business" however, this author is always conscious of the many products she thinks get wasted when they could be reused, recycled, and restored--especially in a school building and art room. In this article, she describes an art lesson that allows students to paint…

  10. Work Done by Titin Protein Folding Assists Muscle Contraction.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Eckels, Edward C; Popa, Ionel; Kosuri, Pallav; Linke, Wolfgang A; Fernández, Julio M

    2016-02-16

    Current theories of muscle contraction propose that the power stroke of a myosin motor is the sole source of mechanical energy driving the sliding filaments of a contracting muscle. These models exclude titin, the largest protein in the human body, which determines the passive elasticity of muscles. Here, we show that stepwise unfolding/folding of titin immunoglobulin (Ig) domains occurs in the elastic I band region of intact myofibrils at physiological sarcomere lengths and forces of 6-8 pN. We use single-molecule techniques to demonstrate that unfolded titin Ig domains undergo a spontaneous stepwise folding contraction at forces below 10 pN, delivering up to 105 zJ of additional contractile energy, which is larger than the mechanical energy delivered by the power stroke of a myosin motor. Thus, it appears inescapable that folding of titin Ig domains is an important, but as yet unrecognized, contributor to the force generated by a contracting muscle.

  11. Work done by titin protein folding assists muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Ionel; Kosuri, Pallav; Linke, Wolfgang A.; Fernández, Julio M.

    2016-01-01

    Current theories of muscle contraction propose that the power stroke of a myosin motor is the sole source of mechanical energy driving the sliding filaments of a contracting muscle. These models exclude titin, the largest protein in the human body, which determines the passive elasticity of muscles. Here, we show that stepwise unfolding/folding of titin Ig domains occurs in the elastic I band region of intact myofibrils at physiological sarcomere lengths and forces of 6-8 pN. We use single molecule techniques to demonstrate that unfolded titin Ig domains undergo a spontaneous stepwise folding contraction at forces below 10 pN, delivering up to 105 zJ of additional contractile energy, which is larger than the mechanical energy delivered by the power stroke of a myosin motor. Thus, it appears inescapable that folding of titin Ig domains is an important, but so far unrecognized contributor to the force generated by a contracting muscle. PMID:26854230

  12. 3D fold growth in transpression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel

    2016-12-01

    Geological folds in transpression are inherently 3D structures; hence their growth and rotation behavior is studied using 3D numerical finite-element simulations. Upright single-layer buckle folds in Newtonian materials are considered, which grow from an initial point-like perturbation due to a combination of in-plane shortening and shearing (i.e., transpression). The resulting fold growth exhibits three components: (1) fold amplification (vertical), (2) fold elongation (parallel to fold axis), and (3) sequential fold growth (perpendicular to axial plane) of new anti- and synforms adjacent to the initial fold. Generally, the fold growth rates are smaller for shearing-dominated than for shortening-dominated transpression. In spite of the growth rate, the folding behavior is very similar for the different convergence angles. The two lateral directions always exhibit similar growth rates implying that the bulk fold structure occupies an increasing roughly circular area. Fold axes are always parallel to the major horizontal principal strain axis (λ→max, i.e., long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse), which is initially also parallel to the major horizontal instantaneous stretching axis (ISA→max). After initiation, the fold axes rotate together with λ→max. Sequential folds appearing later do not initiate parallel to ISA→max, but parallel to λ→max, i.e. parallel to the already existing folds, and also rotate with λ→max. Therefore, fold axes do not correspond to passive material lines and hinge migration takes place as a consequence. The fold axis orientation parallel to λ→max is independent of convergence angle and viscosity ratio. Therefore, a triangular relationship between convergence angle, amount of shortening, and fold axis orientation exists. If two of these values are known, the third can be determined. This relationship is applied to the Zagros fold-and-thrust-belt to estimate the degree of strain partitioning between the Simply

  13. Folding of viscous sheets and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatiy, M.; Mahadevan, L.

    2000-12-01

    We consider the nonlinear folding behavior of a viscous filament or a sheet under the influence of an external force such as gravity. Everyday examples of this phenomenon are provided by the periodic folding of a sheet of honey as it impinges on toast, or the folding of a stream of shampoo as it falls on one's hand. To understand the evolution of a fold, we formulate and solve a free-boundary problem for the phenomenon, give scaling laws for the size of the folds and the frequency with which they are laid out, and verify these experimentally.

  14. Anatomy and Histology of an Epicanthal Fold.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Woo; Hwang, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to elucidate the precise anatomical and histological detail of the epicanthal fold.Thirty-two hemifaces of 16 Korean adult cadavers were used in this study (30 hemifaces with an epicanthal fold, 2 without an epicanthal fold). In 2 patients who had an epicanthoplasty, the epicanthal folds were sampled.In a dissection, the periorbital skin and subcutaneous tissues were removed and the epicanthal fold was observed in relation to each part of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Specimens including the epicanthal fold were embeddedin in paraffin, sectioned at 10 um, and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin. The horizontal section in the level of the paplebral fissure was made and the prepared slides were observed under a light microscope.In the specimens without an epicanthal fold, no connection between the upper preseptal muscle and the lower preseptal muscle was found. In the specimens with an epicanthal fold, a connection of the upper preseptal muscle to the lower preseptal muscle was observed. It was present in all 15 hemifaces (100%). There was no connection between the pretarsal muscles. In a horizontal section, the epicanthal fold was composed of 3 compartments: an outer skin lining, a core structure, and an innerskin lining. The core structure was mainly composed of muscular fibers and fibrotic tissue and they were intermingled.Surgeons should be aware of the anatomical details of an epicanthal fold. In removing or reconstructing an epicanthal fold, the fibromuscular core band should also be removed or reconstructed.

  15. Theory of RNA Folding: From Hairpins to Ribozymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, D.; Hyeon, Changbong

    The rugged nature of the RNA folding landscape is determined by a number of conflicting interactions like repulsive electrostatic potential between the charges on the phosphate groups, constraints due to loop entropy, base stacking, and hydrogen bonding that operate on various length scales. As a result the kinetics of self-assembly of RNA is complex, but can be easily modulated by varying the concentrations, sizes, and shapes of the counterions. Here, we provide a theoretical description of RNA folding that is rooted in the energy landscape perspective and polyelectrolyte theory. A consequence of the rugged folding landscape is that, self-assembly of RNA into compact three-dimensional structures occurs by parallel routes, and is best described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism (KPM). According to KPM one fraction of molecules (Φ) folds rapidly while the remaining gets trapped in one of several competing basins of attraction. The partition factor Φ can be altered by point mutations as well as by changing the initial conditions such as ion concentration, size and valence of ions. We show that even hairpin formation, either by temperature or force quench, captures much of the features of folding of large RNA molecules. Despite the complexity of the folding process, we show that the KPM concepts from polyelectrolyte theory, and charge density of ions can be used to explain the stability, pathways and their diversity, and the plastiCity of the transition State ensemble of RNA self-assembly.

  16. Spontaneous access to DNA target sites in folded chromatin fibers.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Michael G; Bussiek, Malte; Langowski, Jörg; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-06-13

    DNA wrapped in nucleosomes is sterically occluded from many protein complexes that must act on it; how such complexes gain access to nucleosomal DNA is not known. In vitro studies on isolated nucleosomes show that they undergo spontaneous partial unwrapping conformational transitions, which make the wrapped nucleosomal DNA transiently accessible. Thus, site exposure might provide a general mechanism allowing access of protein complexes to nucleosomal DNA. However, existing quantitative analyses of site exposure focused on single nucleosomes, while the presence of neighbor nucleosomes and concomitant chromatin folding might significantly influence site exposure. In this work, we carried out quantitative studies on the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in homogeneous nucleosome arrays. Two striking findings emerged. Organization into chromatin fibers changes the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA only modestly, from approximately 3-fold decreases to approximately 8-fold increases in accessibility. This means that nucleosome arrays are intrinsically dynamic and accessible even when they are visibly condensed. In contrast, chromatin folding decreases the accessibility of linker DNA by as much as approximately 50-fold. Thus, nucleosome positioning dramatically influences the accessibility of target sites located inside nucleosomes, while chromatin folding dramatically regulates access to target sites in linker DNA.

  17. Origination of the Protein Fold Repertoire from Oily Pluripotent Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    2014-01-01

    While the repertoire of protein folds that exists today underlies most of life’s capabilities, our mechanistic picture of protein fold origination is incomplete. This paper discusses a hypothetical mechanism for the emergence of the protein fold repertoire from highly dynamic and collapsed peptides, exemplified by peptides with high oil content or hydrophobicity. These peptides are called pluripotent to emphasize their capacity to evolve into numerous folds transiently available to them. As evidence, the paper will discuss previous simulation work on the superior fold evolvability of oily peptides, trace (“fossil”) evidence within proteomes seen today, and a general relationship between protein dynamism and evolvability. Aside from implications on the origination of protein folds, the hypothesis implies that the vanishing utility of a random peptide in protein origination may be relatively exaggerated, as some random peptides with a certain composition (e.g., oily) may fare better than others. In later sections, the hypothesis is discussed in the context of existing discussions regarding the spontaneous origination of biomolecules. PMID:28250375

  18. The role of hydration in vocal fold physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Leydon, Ciara

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Increased vocal fold hydration is a popular target in the prevention and management of voice disorders. Current intervention strategies focus on enhancing both systemic (internal) and superficial (surface) hydration. This paper will review relevant bench and human subject research on the role of hydration in vocal fold physiology. Recent findings Bench and human subject studies provide converging evidence that systemic and superficial dehydration are detrimental to vocal fold physiology. Dehydration challenges increase the viscous properties of excised vocal fold tissue. Systemic, superficial, and combined drying challenges increase aerodynamic and acoustic measures of voice production in speakers. Emerging theoretical and clinical evidence suggest that increasing both systemic and superficial hydration levels may benefit voice production, however, robust evidence for positive outcomes of hydration treatments is lacking. Summary Increased systemic and superficial vocal fold hydration as a component of vocal hygiene may improve overall health and efficiency of the vocal apparatus. However, continued exploration of biological mechanisms regulating vocal fold hydration is needed to optimize clinical hydration interventions. Specifically, the development of hydration treatments that maximize positive phonatory outcomes will necessitate understanding of the signaling pathways linking systemic and superficial hydration. PMID:20386449

  19. Controlled Folding of Single Crystal Graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Ming; Kim, Na Yeon; Cunning, Benjamin V; Huang, Yuan; Qu, Deshun; Chen, Xianjue; Jin, Sunghwan; Biswal, Mandakini; Zhang, Xu; Lee, Sun Hwa; Lim, Hyunseob; Yoo, Won Jong; Lee, Zonghoon; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2017-03-08

    Folded graphene in which two layers are stacked with a twist angle between them has been predicted to exhibit unique electronic, thermal, and magnetic properties. We report the folding of a single crystal monolayer graphene film grown on a Cu(111) substrate by using a tailored substrate having a hydrophobic region and a hydrophilic region. Controlled film delamination from the hydrophilic region was used to prepare macroscopic folded graphene with good uniformity on the millimeter scale. This process was used to create many folded sheets each with a defined twist angle between the two sheets. By identifying the original lattice orientation of the monolayer graphene on Cu foil, or establishing the relation between the fold angle and twist angle, this folding technique allows for the preparation of twisted bilayer graphene films with defined stacking orientations and may also be extended to create folded structures of other two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  20. Principles and engineering of antibody folding and assembly.

    PubMed

    Feige, Matthias J; Buchner, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    Antibodies are uniquely suited to serve essential roles in the human immune defense as they combine several specific functions in one hetero-oligomeric protein. Their constant regions activate effector functions and their variable domains provide a stable framework that allows incorporation of highly diverse loop sequences. The combination of non-germline DNA recombination and mutation together with heavy and light chain assembly allows developing variable regions that specifically recognize essentially any antigen they may encounter. However, this diversity also requires tailor-made mechanisms to guarantee that folding and association of antibodies is carefully this diversity also requires tailor-made mechanisms to guarantee that folding and association of antibodies is carefully controlled before the protein is secreted from a plasma cell. Accordingly, the generic immunoglobulin fold β-barrel structure of antibody domains has been fine-tuned during evolution to fit the different requirements. Work over the past decades has identified important aspects of the folding and assembly of antibody domains and chains revealing domain specific variations of a general scheme. The most striking is the folding of an intrinsically disordered antibody domain in the context of its partner domain as the basis for antibody assembly and its control on the molecular level in the cell. These insights have not only allowed a better understanding of the antibody folding process but also provide a wealth of opportunities for rational optimization of antibody molecules. In this review, we summarize current concepts of antibody folding and assembly and discuss how they can be utilized to engineer antibodies with improved performance for different applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in the molecular engineering of antibodies.