Science.gov

Sample records for conserved residue clusters

  1. Conservation of Flexible Residue Clusters among Structural and Functional Enzyme Homologues*

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Donald; Charest, Laurie-Anne; Morin, Sébastien; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Doucet, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Conformational flexibility between structural ensembles is an essential component of enzyme function. Although the broad dynamical landscape of proteins is known to promote a number of functional events on multiple time scales, it is yet unknown whether structural and functional enzyme homologues rely on the same concerted residue motions to perform their catalytic function. It is hypothesized that networks of contiguous and flexible residue motions occurring on the biologically relevant millisecond time scale evolved to promote and/or preserve optimal enzyme catalysis. In this study, we use a combination of NMR relaxation dispersion, model-free analysis, and ligand titration experiments to successfully capture and compare the role of conformational flexibility between two structural homologues of the pancreatic ribonuclease family: RNase A and eosinophil cationic protein (or RNase 3). In addition to conserving the same catalytic residues and structural fold, both homologues show similar yet functionally distinct clusters of millisecond dynamics, suggesting that conformational flexibility can be conserved among analogous protein folds displaying low sequence identity. Our work shows that the reduced conformational flexibility of eosinophil cationic protein can be dynamically and functionally reproduced in the RNase A scaffold upon creation of a chimeric hybrid between the two proteins. These results support the hypothesis that conformational flexibility is partly required for catalytic function in homologous enzyme folds, further highlighting the importance of dynamic residue sectors in the structural organization of proteins. PMID:23135272

  2. tRNase Z Catalysis and Conserved Residues on the Carboxy Side of the His Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Karkashon, Shay; Hopkinson, Angela; Levinger, Louis

    2008-01-01

    tRNAs are transcribed as precursors and processed in a series of required reactions leading to aminoacylation and translation. The 3′ end trailer can be removed by the pre-tRNA processing endonuclease tRNase Z, an ancient, conserved member of the β-lactamase superfamily of metal-dependent hydrolases. The signature sequence of this family, the His domain (HxHxDH, Motif II), and histidines in Motifs III and V and aspartate in Motif IV contribute seven side chains for coordination of two divalent metal ions. We previously investigated the effects on catalysis of substitutions in Motif II, and in the PxKxRN loop and Motif I on the amino side of Motif II. Herein we present the effects of substitutions on the carboxy side of Motif II within Motifs III, IV, the HEAT and HST loops and Motif V. Substitution of the Motif IV aspartate reduces catalytic efficiency more than 10,000-fold. Histidines in Motif III, V and the HST loop are also functionally important. Strikingly, replacement of Glu in the HEAT loop with Ala reducesefficiency by ~1000-fold. Proximity and orientation of this Glu side chain relative to His in the HST loop and the importance of both residues for catalysis suggest that they function as a duo in a proton transfer at the final stage of reaction, characteristic of the tRNase Z class of RNA endonucleases. PMID:17655328

  3. A Conserved Residue Cluster That Governs Kinetics of ATP-dependent Gating of Kir6.2 Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan D; Pless, Stephan A; Nunez, John-Jose; Kim, Robin Y; Li, Jenny B W; Yang, Runying; Ahern, Christopher A; Kurata, Harley T

    2015-06-19

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors. Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of ∼60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp-68 and Lys-170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp-68 or Lys-170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 and 700 ms for W68L and K170N, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using φ value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, which is potentially necessary to localize the ϵ-amine of Lys-170 in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Overall, our findings identify a discrete pair of highly conserved residues with an essential role for controlling gating kinetics of Kir channels.

  4. A Conserved Residue Cluster That Governs Kinetics of ATP-dependent Gating of Kir6.2 Potassium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Roger S.; Wright, Jordan D.; Pless, Stephan A.; Nunez, John-Jose; Kim, Robin Y.; Li, Jenny B. W.; Yang, Runying; Ahern, Christopher A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors. Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of ∼60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp-68 and Lys-170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp-68 or Lys-170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 and 700 ms for W68L and K170N, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using φ value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, which is potentially necessary to localize the ϵ-amine of Lys-170 in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Overall, our findings identify a discrete pair of highly conserved residues with an essential role for controlling gating kinetics of Kir channels. PMID:25934393

  5. Crucial role of conserved cysteine residues in the assembly of two iron-sulfur clusters on the CIA protein Nar1.

    PubMed

    Urzica, Eugen; Pierik, Antonio J; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland

    2009-06-09

    Iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein maturation in the eukaryotic cytosol and nucleus requires conserved components of the essential CIA machinery. The CIA protein Nar1 performs a specific function in transferring an Fe/S cluster that is assembled de novo on the Cfd1-Nbp35 scaffold to apoproteins. Here, we used systematic site-directed mutagenesis and a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies to show that Nar1 holds two Fe/S clusters at conserved N- and C-terminal cysteine motifs. A wealth of biochemical studies suggests that the assembly of these Fe/S clusters on Nar1 cannot be studied in Escherichia coli, as the recombinant protein does not contain the native Fe/S clusters. We therefore followed Fe/S cluster incorporation directly in yeast by a (55)Fe radiolabeling method in vivo, and we measured the functional consequences of Nar1 mutations in the assembly of cytosolic Fe/S proteins. We find that both Fe/S clusters are essential for Nar1 function and cell viability. Molecular modeling using a structurally but not functionally related bacterial iron-only hydrogenase as a template provided compelling structural explanations for our mutational data. The C-terminal Fe/S cluster is stably buried within Nar1, whereas the N-terminal one is exposed at the protein surface and hence may be more easily lost. Insertion of an Fe/S cluster into the C-terminal location depends on the N-terminal motif, suggesting the participation of the latter motif in the assembly process of the C-terminal cluster. The vicinity of the two Fe/S centers suggests a close functional cooperation during cytosolic Fe/S protein maturation.

  6. A Highly Conserved Residue of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Important for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Mediated by Anti-cluster A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Veillette, Maxime; Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Scharf, Louise; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ferrari, Guido; Robinson, James E.; Stürzel, Christina; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Lewis, George K.; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from HIV-1-infected individuals contain antibodies able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These antibodies preferentially recognize envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitopes induced upon CD4 binding. Here, we show that a highly conserved tryptophan at position 69 of the gp120 inner domain is important for ADCC mediated by anti-cluster A antibodies and sera from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26637462

  7. Conservation Level and Category Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, C. Rayfield; Kulhavy, Raymond W.

    1976-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that category recall is related to the quantity conservation of mass, weight, and volume. The predicted association between conservation level and category recall was observed. (JMB)

  8. Conservation Level and Category Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, C. Rayfield; Kulhavy, Raymond W.

    1976-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that category recall is related to the quantity conservation of mass, weight, and volume. The predicted association between conservation level and category recall was observed. (JMB)

  9. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    PubMed

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  10. 1. VIEW EAST, WEST FRONT OF SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CLUSTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW EAST, WEST FRONT OF SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CLUSTER (BUILDINGS 24, 25, 26) - U.S. Plant Introduction Station, Soil Conservation Service Cluster, 11601 Old Pond Road, Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, MD

  11. 3. VIEW NORTHEAST, SOUTH FRONT OF SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CLUSTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHEAST, SOUTH FRONT OF SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CLUSTER (BUILDING 25) - U.S. Plant Introduction Station, Soil Conservation Service Cluster, 11601 Old Pond Road, Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, MD

  12. Non-local residue-residue contacts in proteins are more conserved than local ones.

    PubMed

    Noivirt-Brik, Orly; Hazan, Gershon; Unger, Ron; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-02-01

    Non-covalent residue-residue contacts drive the folding of proteins and stabilize them. They may be local-i.e. involve residues that are close in sequence, or non-local. It has been suggested that, in most proteins, local contacts drive protein folding by providing crucial constraints of the conformational space, thus allowing proteins to fold. We compared residues that are involved in local contacts to residues that are involved in non-local contacts and found that, in most proteins, residues in non-local contacts are significantly more conserved evolutionarily than residues in local contacts. Moreover, non-local contacts are more structurally conserved: a contact between positions that are distant in sequence is more likely to exist in many structural homologues compared with a contact between positions that are close in sequence. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of protein folding and may allow for better prediction of critical intra-chain contacts.

  13. Identification of Structural and Catalytic Classes of Highly Conserved Amino Acid Residues in Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase †

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dawei; Frey, Perry A.; Lepore, Bryan W.; Ringe, Dagmar; Ruzicka, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    Lysine 2,3-aminomutase (LAM) from Clostridium subterminale SB4 catalyzes the interconversion of (S)-lysine and (S)-β-lysine by a radical mechanism involving coenzymatic actions of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a [4Fe-4S] cluster, and pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP). The enzyme contains a number of conserved acidic residues and a cysteine and arginine-rich motif, that binds iron and sulfide in the [4Fe–4S] cluster. The results of activity and iron, sulfide, and PLP analysis of variants resulting from site-specific mutations of the conserved acidic residues and the arginine residues in the iron-sulfide binding motif indicate two classes of conserved residues of each type. Mutation of the conserved residues Arg134, Asp293, and Asp330 abolish all enzymatic activity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure, these residues bind the ε-aminium and α-carboxylate groups of (S)-lysine. However, among these residues only Asp293 appears to be important for stabilizing the [4Fe–4S] cluster. Members of a second group of conserved residues appear to stabilize the structure of LAM. Mutations of arginine residues 130, 135, and 136 and acidic residues Glu86, Asp165, Glu236, and Asp172 dramatically decrease iron and sulfide contents in the purified variants. Mutation of Asp96 significantly decreases iron and sulfide content. Variants in Arg130 or Asp172 display no detectable activity, whereas variants in the other positions display low to very low activities. Structural roles are assigned to this latter class of conserved amino acids. In particular, a network of hydrogen bonded interactions of Arg130, Glu86, Arg135 and the main chain carbonyl groups of Cys132 and Leu55 appears to stabilize the [4Fe–4S] cluster. PMID:17042481

  14. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST, NORTH FRONT OF SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CLUSTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST, NORTH FRONT OF SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CLUSTER (BUILDINGS 24, 25, 26); NORTH FRONT OF QUARANTINE HEADHOUSE (BUILDING 27) - U.S. Plant Introduction Station, Soil Conservation Service Cluster, 11601 Old Pond Road, Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, MD

  15. Comparing Residue Clusters from Thermophilic and Mesophilic Enzymes Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E.; Yin, Hang; Crowley, Michael F.; Bomble, Yannick J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. Thus the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions. PMID:26741367

  16. Comparing residue clusters from thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes reveals adaptive mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E.; ...

    2016-01-07

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research.more » Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. As a result, the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.« less

  17. Comparing residue clusters from thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes reveals adaptive mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E.; Yin, Hang; Crowley, Michael F.; Bomble, Yannick J.

    2016-01-07

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. As a result, the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.

  18. Comparing Residue Clusters from Thermophilic and Mesophilic Enzymes Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sammond, Deanne W; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E; Yin, Hang; Crowley, Michael F; Bomble, Yannick J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. Thus the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.

  19. Clusters of Charged Residues at the C Terminus of MotA and N Terminus of MotB Are Important for Function of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Motor ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hosking, Edan R.; Manson, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    MotA contains a conserved C-terminal cluster of negatively charged residues, and MotB contains a conserved N-terminal cluster of positively charged residues. Charge-altering mutations affecting these residues impair motility but do not diminish Mot protein levels. The motility defects are reversed by second-site mutations targeting the same or partner protein. PMID:18469110

  20. Enforcing conservation laws in nonequilibrium cluster perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramsch, Christian; Potthoff, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Using the recently introduced time-local formulation of the nonequilibrium cluster perturbation theory (CPT), we construct a generalization of the approach such that macroscopic conservation laws are respected. This is achieved by exploiting the freedom for the choice of the starting point of the all-order perturbation theory in the intercluster hopping. The proposed conserving CPT is a self-consistent propagation scheme which respects the conservation of energy, particle number, and spin, which treats short-range correlations exactly up to the linear scale of the cluster, and which represents a mean-field-like approach on length scales beyond the cluster size. Using Green's functions, conservation laws are formulated as local constraints on the local spin-dependent particle and the doublon density. We consider them as conditional equations to self-consistently fix the time-dependent intracluster one-particle parameters. Thanks to the intrinsic causality of the CPT, this can be set up as a step-by-step time propagation scheme with a computational effort scaling linearly with the maximum propagation time and exponentially in the cluster size. As a proof of concept, we consider the dynamics of the two-dimensional, particle-hole-symmetric Hubbard model following a weak interaction quench by simply employing two-site clusters only. Conservation laws are satisfied by construction. We demonstrate that enforcing them has strong impact on the dynamics. While the doublon density is strongly oscillating within plain CPT, a monotonic relaxation is observed within the conserving CPT.

  1. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate Hox gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L; Meyer, Axel

    2003-06-01

    Comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly related genomes permit identification of conserved functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are highly conserved in vertebrates, occur in clusters, and are uninterrupted by other genes. We aligned (PipMaker) the nucleotide sequences of the HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human, and mouse, which are separated by approximately 500 million years of evolution. In support of our approach, several identified putative regulatory elements known to regulate the expression of Hox genes were recovered. The majority of the newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac database). The regulatory intergenic regions located between the genes that are expressed most anteriorly in the embryo are longer and apparently more evolutionarily conserved than those at the other end of Hox clusters. Different presumed regulatory sequences are retained in either the Aalpha or Abeta duplicated Hox clusters in the fish lineages. This suggests that the conserved elements are involved in different gene regulatory networks and supports the duplication-deletion-complementation model of functional divergence of duplicated genes.

  2. Evolutionary Conservation of Regulatory Elements in Vertebrate Hox Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly related genomes permit identification of conserved functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are highly conserved in vertebrates, occur in clusters, and are uninterrupted by other genes. We aligned (PipMaker) the nucleotide sequences of the HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human, and mouse, which are separated by approximately 500 million years of evolution. In support of our approach, several identified putative regulatory elements known to regulate the expression of Hox genes were recovered. The majority of the newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac database). The regulatory intergenic regions located between the genes that are expressed most anteriorly in the embryo are longer and apparently more evolutionarily conserved than those at the other end of Hox clusters. Different presumed regulatory sequences are retained in either the Aα or Aβ duplicated Hox clusters in the fish lineages. This suggests that the conserved elements are involved in different gene regulatory networks and supports the duplication-deletion-complementation model of functional divergence of duplicated genes. PMID:12799348

  3. Clustering and conservation patterns of human microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Altuvia, Yael; Landgraf, Pablo; Lithwick, Gila; Elefant, Naama; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Aravin, Alexei; Brownstein, Michael J.; Tuschl, Thomas; Margalit, Hanah

    2005-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ∼22 nt-long non-coding RNA molecules, believed to play important roles in gene regulation. We present a comprehensive analysis of the conservation and clustering patterns of known miRNAs in human. We show that human miRNA gene clustering is significantly higher than expected at random. A total of 37% of the known human miRNA genes analyzed in this study appear in clusters of two or more with pairwise chromosomal distances of at most 3000 nt. Comparison of the miRNA sequences with their homologs in four other organisms reveals a typical conservation pattern, persistent throughout the clusters. Furthermore, we show enrichment in the typical conservation patterns and other miRNA-like properties in the vicinity of known miRNA genes, compared with random genomic regions. This may imply that additional, yet unknown, miRNAs reside in these regions, consistent with the current recognition that there are overlooked miRNAs. Indeed, by comparing our predictions with cloning results and with identified miRNA genes in other mammals, we corroborate the predictions of 18 additional human miRNA genes in the vicinity of the previously known ones. Our study raises the proportion of clustered human miRNAs that are <3000 nt apart to 42%. This suggests that the clustering of miRNA genes is higher than currently acknowledged, alluding to its evolutionary and functional implications. PMID:15891114

  4. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  5. Residual Distribution Schemes for Conservation Laws Via Adaptive Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy; Abgrall, Remi; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper considers a family of nonconservative numerical discretizations for conservation laws which retains the correct weak solution behavior in the limit of mesh refinement whenever sufficient order numerical quadrature is used. Our analysis of 2-D discretizations in nonconservative form follows the 1-D analysis of Hou and Le Floch. For a specific family of nonconservative discretizations, it is shown under mild assumptions that the error arising from non-conservation is strictly smaller than the discretization error in the scheme. In the limit of mesh refinement under the same assumptions, solutions are shown to satisfy an entropy inequality. Using results from this analysis, a variant of the "N" (Narrow) residual distribution scheme of van der Weide and Deconinck is developed for first-order systems of conservation laws. The modified form of the N-scheme supplants the usual exact single-state mean-value linearization of flux divergence, typically used for the Euler equations of gasdynamics, by an equivalent integral form on simplex interiors. This integral form is then numerically approximated using an adaptive quadrature procedure. This renders the scheme nonconservative in the sense described earlier so that correct weak solutions are still obtained in the limit of mesh refinement. Consequently, we then show that the modified form of the N-scheme can be easily applied to general (non-simplicial) element shapes and general systems of first-order conservation laws equipped with an entropy inequality where exact mean-value linearization of the flux divergence is not readily obtained, e.g. magnetohydrodynamics, the Euler equations with certain forms of chemistry, etc. Numerical examples of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows containing discontinuities together with multi-level mesh refinement are provided to verify the analysis.

  6. Three conserved histidine residues contribute to mitochondrial iron transport through mitoferrins.

    PubMed

    Brazzolotto, Xavier; Pierrel, Fabien; Pelosi, Ludovic

    2014-05-15

    Iron is an essential element for almost all organisms. In eukaryotes, it is mainly used in mitochondria for the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and haem group maturation. Iron is delivered into the mitochondrion by mitoferrins, members of the MCF (mitochondrial carrier family), through an unknown mechanism. In the present study, the yeast homologues of these proteins, Mrs3p (mitochondrial RNA splicing 3) and Mrs4p, were studied by inserting them into liposomes. In this context, they could transport Fe2+ across the proteoliposome membrane, as shown using the iron chelator bathophenanthroline. A series of amino acid-modifying reagents were screened for their effects on Mrs3p-mediated iron transport. The results of the present study suggest that carboxy and imidazole groups are essential for iron transport. This was confirmed by in vivo complementation assays, which demonstrated that three highly conserved histidine residues are important for Mrs3p function. These histidine residues are not conserved in other MCF members and thus they are likely to play a specific role in iron transport. A model describing how these residues help iron to transit smoothly across the carrier cavity is proposed and compared with the structural and biochemical data available for other carriers in this family.

  7. Valinomycin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces: conservation, ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Matter, Andrea M; Hoot, Sara B; Anderson, Patrick D; Neves, Susana S; Cheng, Yi-Qiang

    2009-09-29

    Many Streptomyces strains are known to produce valinomycin (VLM) antibiotic and the VLM biosynthetic gene cluster (vlm) has been characterized in two independent isolates. Here we report the phylogenetic relationships of these strains using both parsimony and likelihood methods, and discuss whether the vlm gene cluster shows evidence of horizontal transmission common in natural product biosynthetic genes. Eight Streptomyces strains from around the world were obtained and sequenced for three regions of the two large nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes (vlm1 and vlm2) involved in VLM biosynthesis. The DNA sequences representing the vlm gene cluster are highly conserved among all eight environmental strains. The geographic distribution pattern of these strains and the strict congruence between the trees of the two vlm genes and the housekeeping genes, 16S rDNA and trpB, suggest vertical transmission of the vlm gene cluster in Streptomyces with no evidence of horizontal gene transfer. We also explored the relationship of the sequence of vlm genes to that of the cereulide biosynthetic genes (ces) found in Bacillus cereus and found them highly divergent from each other at DNA level (genetic distance values >or= 95.6%). It is possible that the vlm gene cluster and the ces gene cluster may share a relatively distant common ancestor but these two gene clusters have since evolved independently.

  8. Residual water in ionic liquids: clustered or dissociated?

    PubMed

    Reid, Joshua E S J; Walker, Adam J; Shimizu, Seishi

    2015-06-14

    How do residual water molecules in ionic liquids (ILs) interact with themselves, as well as with the ions? This question is crucial in understanding why the physical properties of ILs--and chemical reactions performed in them--are strongly affected by the residual water content. There have been three conflicting hypotheses regarding the structure and behaviour of the residual water: (i) water molecules are separated from one another, while interacting strongly with the ions, and dispersed throughout the medium; (ii) water molecules self-associate or form clusters in the ILs; (iii) residual water weakens ion-ion interactions. A satisfactory resolution of these conflicting suggestions has been hindered by the complexity and long range of the interactions in the water-IL mixture and by the often profound differences in physical structure between various different ILs. Here we present a route to resolve this question through a combination of a statistical thermodynamic theory (Kirkwood-Buff theory) with density and osmotic data from the literature. The structure of water-IL mixtures is shown to be water content dependent; at the lowest measured water concentration, strong water-IL interaction and water-water separation are observed in accordance to (i), whereas water in a more hydrophobic IL environment seems to self-associate at moderately low water concentrations, in accordance with (ii).

  9. Alanine mutagenesis of the primary antigenic escape residue cluster, c1, of apical membrane antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sheetij; Dlugosz, Lisa S; Clayton, Joshua W; Pool, Christopher D; Haynes, J David; Gasser, Robert A; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2010-02-01

    Antibodies against apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) inhibit invasion of Plasmodium merozoites into red cells, and a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms on AMA1 allow the parasite to escape inhibitory antibodies. The availability of a crystal structure makes it possible to test protein engineering strategies to develop a monovalent broadly reactive vaccine. Previously, we showed that a linear stretch of polymorphic residues (amino acids 187 to 207), localized within the C1 cluster on domain 1, conferred the highest level of escape from inhibitory antibodies, and these were termed antigenic escape residues (AER). Here we test the hypothesis that immunodampening the C1 AER will divert the immune system toward more conserved regions. We substituted seven C1 AER of the FVO strain Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 with alanine residues (ALA). The resulting ALA protein was less immunogenic than the native protein in rabbits. Anti-ALA antibodies contained a higher proportion of cross-reactive domain 2 and domain 3 antibodies and had higher avidity than anti-FVO. No overall enhancement of cross-reactive inhibitory activity was observed when anti-FVO and anti-ALA sera were compared for their ability to inhibit invasion. Alanine mutations at the C1 AER had shifted the immune response toward cross-strain-reactive epitopes that were noninhibitory, refuting the hypothesis but confirming the importance of the C1 cluster as an inhibitory epitope. We further demonstrate that naturally occurring polymorphisms that fall within the C1 cluster can predict escape from cross-strain invasion inhibition, reinforcing the importance of the C1 cluster genotype for antigenic categorization and allelic shift analyses in future phase 2b trials.

  10. Residue Management: A Computer Program About Conservation Tillage Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thien, Steve J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a computer program, Residue Management, which is designed to supplement discussions on the Universal Soil Loss Equation and the impact of tillage on soil properties for introductory soil courses. The program advances the user through three stages of residue management. Information on obtaining the program is also included. (ML)

  11. Herbicide and cover crop residue integration in conservation tillage tomato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increased adoption of conservation tillage in vegetable production requires more information on the role of various cover crops in weed control, tomato quality, and yield. Three conservation-tillage systems utilizing crimson clover, turnip, and cereal rye as winter cover crops were compared to a...

  12. Functional identification of conserved residues involved in Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG sortase specificity and pilus biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Douillard, François P; Rasinkangas, Pia; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-05-30

    In Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili mediate the adhesion of bacteria to host epithelial cells and play a pivotal role in colonization, host signaling, and biofilm formation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG, a well known probiotic bacterium, also displays on its cell surface mucus-binding pilus structures, along with other LPXTG surface proteins, which are processed by sortases upon specific recognition of a highly conserved LPXTG motif. Bioinformatic analysis of all predicted LPXTG proteins encoded by the L. rhamnosus GG genome revealed a remarkable conservation of glycine residues juxtaposed to the canonical LPXTG motif. Here, we investigated and defined the role of this so-called triple glycine (TG) motif in determining sortase specificity during the pilus assembly and anchoring. Mutagenesis of the TG motif resulted in a lack or an alteration of the L. rhamnosus GG pilus structures, indicating that the TG motif is critical in pilus assembly and that they govern the pilin-specific and housekeeping sortase specificity. This allowed us to propose a regulatory model of the L. rhamnosus GG pilus biogenesis. Remarkably, the TG motif was identified in multiple pilus gene clusters of other Gram-positive bacteria, suggesting that similar signaling mechanisms occur in other, mainly pathogenic, species. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. A Highly Conserved gp120 Inner Domain Residue Modulates Env Conformation and Trimer Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Tolbert, William D.; Prévost, Jérémie; Pacheco, Beatriz; Coutu, Mathieu; Debbeche, Olfa; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that highly conserved residues in the inner domain of gp120 are required for HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) transitions to the CD4-bound conformation (A. Finzi, S. H. Xiang, B. Pacheco, L. Wang, J. Haight, et al., Mol Cell 37:656–667, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2010.02.012; A. Desormeaux, M. Coutu, H. Medjahed, B. Pacheco, A. Herschhorn, et al., J Virol 87:2549–2562, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.03104-12). Moreover, W69, a highly conserved residue located at the interface between layer 1 and layer 2 of the inner domain, was recently shown to be important for efficient Env recognition by CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies capable of potent antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (W. D. Tolbert, N. Gohain, M. Veillette, J. P. Chapleau, C. Orlandi, et al., 2016, Structure 24:697–709, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.str.2016.03.005; S. Ding, M. Veillette, M. Coutu, J. Prevost, L. Scharf, et al., 2016, J Virol 90:2127–2134, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02779-15). We evaluated the contribution of the hydrophobicity of W69 to conformational changes of Env by replacing it with a series of residues with aliphatic or aromatic side chains of decreasing chain length. We have found that the hydrophobicity of residue 69 is important for Env processing, CD4 binding, and its transition to the CD4-bound conformation. The most deleterious effect was observed when W69 was replaced with alanine or glycine residues. However, the functions lost due to W69 mutations could be progressively restored with amino acids of increasing aliphatic chain length and fully recovered with residues bearing an aromatic ring. Interestingly, poor CD4 binding of W69A could be fully restored by introducing a compensatory mutation within layer 2 (S115W). Structural studies of HIV-1 gp120 coree W69A/S115W mutant bound to the CD4 peptide mimetic M48U1 and Fab of anti-cluster A antibody N60-i3 revealed no perturbations to the overall structure of the

  14. Structural consequences of chromophore formation and exploration of conserved lid residues amongst naturally occurring fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Matthew H.; Li, Binsen; Shahid, Ramza; Peshkepija, Paola; Zimmer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Computational methods were used to generate the lowest energy conformations of the immature precyclized forms of the 28 naturally occurring GFP-like proteins deposited in the pdb. In all 28 GFP-like proteins, the beta-barrel contracts upon chromophore formation and becomes more rigid. Our prior analysis of over 260 distinct naturally occurring GFP-like proteins revealed that most of the conserved residues are located in the top and bottom of the barrel in the turns between the β-sheets (Ong et al. 2011) [1]. Structural analyses, molecular dynamics simulations and the Anisotropic Network Model were used to explore the role of these conserved lid residues as possible folding nuclei. Our results are internally consistent and show that the conserved residues in the top and bottom lids undergo relatively less translational movement than other lid residues, and a number of these residues may play an important role as hinges or folding nuclei in the fluorescent proteins.

  15. The highly conserved aspartic acid residue between hypervariable regions 1 and 2 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 is important for early stages of virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W K; Essex, M; Lee, T H

    1995-01-01

    Between hypervariable regions V1 and V2 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 lies a cluster of relatively conserved residues. The contribution of nine charged residues in this region to virus infectivity was evaluated by single-amino-acid substitutions in an infectious provirus clone. Three of the HIV-1 mutants studied had slower growth kinetics than the wild-type virus. The delay was most pronounced in a mutant with an alanine substituted for an aspartic acid residue at position 180. This aspartic acid is conserved by all HIV-1 isolates with known nucleotide sequences. Substitutions with three other residues at this position, including a negatively charged glutamic acid, all affected virus infectivity. The defect identified in these mutants suggests that this aspartic acid residue is involved in the early stages of HIV-1 replication. PMID:7983752

  16. MCMC Sampling for a Multilevel Model with Nonindependent Residuals within and between Cluster Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, William; Goldstein, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the effect of removing the independence assumptions between the residuals in two-level random effect models. We first consider removing the independence between the Level 2 residuals and instead assume that the vector of all residuals at the cluster level follows a general multivariate normal distribution. We…

  17. MCMC Sampling for a Multilevel Model with Nonindependent Residuals within and between Cluster Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, William; Goldstein, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the effect of removing the independence assumptions between the residuals in two-level random effect models. We first consider removing the independence between the Level 2 residuals and instead assume that the vector of all residuals at the cluster level follows a general multivariate normal distribution. We…

  18. Evolutionary diversification of aminopeptidase N in Lepidoptera by conserved clade-specific amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L

    2014-07-01

    Members of the aminopepidase N (APN) gene family of the insect order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) bind the naturally insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of seven lepidopteran APN classes provided strong support for the hypothesis that lepidopteran APN2 class arose by gene duplication prior to the most recent common ancestor of Lepidoptera and Diptera. The Cry toxin-binding region (BR) of lepidopteran and dipteran APNs was subject to stronger purifying selection within APN classes than was the remainder of the molecule, reflecting conservation of catalytic site and adjoining residues within the BR. Of lepidopteran APN classes, APN2, APN6, and APN8 showed the strongest evidence of functional specialization, both in expression patterns and in the occurrence of conserved derived amino acid residues. The latter three APN classes also shared a convergently evolved conserved residue close to the catalytic site. APN8 showed a particularly strong tendency towards class-specific conserved residues, including one of the catalytic site residues in the BR and ten others in close vicinity to the catalytic site residues. The occurrence of class-specific sequences along with the conservation of enzymatic function is consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of Cry toxins in the environment has been a factor shaping the evolution of this multi-gene family.

  19. Conservation of cysteine residues in fungal histidine acid phytases.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, Edward J; Ullah, Abul H J

    2005-03-11

    Amino acid sequence analysis of fungal histidine acid phosphatases displaying phytase activity has revealed a conserved eight-cysteine motif. These conserved amino acids are not directly associated with catalytic function; rather they appear to be essential in the formation of disulfide bridges. Their role is seen as being similar to another eight-cysteine motif recently reported in the amino acid sequence of nearly 500 plant polypeptides. An additional disulfide bridge formed by two cysteines at the N-terminus of all the filamentous ascomycete phytases was also observed. Disulfide bridges are known to increase both stability and heat tolerance in proteins. It is therefore plausible that this extra disulfide bridge contributes to the higher stability found in phytase from some Aspergillus species. To engineer an enhanced phytase for the feed industry, it is imperative that the role of disulfide bridges be taken into cognizance and possibly be increased in number to further elevate stability in this enzyme.

  20. Predicting RNA-binding residues from evolutionary information and sequence conservation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in post-transcriptional control of RNA. RBPs are designed to efficiently recognize specific RNA sequences after it is derived from the DNA sequence. To satisfy diverse functional requirements, RNA binding proteins are composed of multiple blocks of RNA-binding domains (RBDs) presented in various structural arrangements to provide versatile functions. The ability to computationally predict RNA-binding residues in a RNA-binding protein can help biologists reveal important site-directed mutagenesis in wet-lab experiments. Results The proposed prediction framework named “ProteRNA” combines a SVM-based classifier with conserved residue discovery by WildSpan to identify the residues that interact with RNA in a RNA-binding protein. Although these conserved residues can be either functionally conserved residues or structurally conserved residues, they provide clues on the important residues in a protein sequence. In the independent testing dataset, ProteRNA has been able to deliver overall accuracy of 89.78%, MCC of 0.2628, F-score of 0.3075, and F0.5-score of 0.3546. Conclusions This article presents the design of a sequence-based predictor aiming to identify the RNA-binding residues in a RNA-binding protein by combining machine learning and pattern mining approaches. RNA-binding proteins have diverse functions while interacting with different categories of RNAs because these proteins are composed of multiple copies of RNA-binding domains presented in various structural arrangements to expand the functional repertoire of RNA-binding proteins. Furthermore, predicting RNA-binding residues in a RNA-binding protein can help biologists reveal important site-directed mutagenesis in wet-lab experiments. PMID:21143803

  1. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  2. Herbicide and cover crop residue integration for amaranth control in conservation agriculture cotton and implications for resistance management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation agriculture practices are threatened by glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth. Integrated practices including PRE herbicides and high-residue conservation agriculture systems may decrease Amaranth emergence. Field experiments were conducted from autumn 2006 through cash crop harvest in...

  3. Structure-function studies of nerve growth factor: functional importance of highly conserved amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, C F; Hallböök, F; Ebendal, T; Persson, H

    1990-01-01

    Selected amino acid residues in chicken nerve growth factor (NGF) were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutated NGF sequences were transiently expressed in COS cells and the yield of NGF protein in conditioned medium was quantified by Western blotting. Binding of each mutant to NGF receptors on PC12 cells was evaluated in a competition assay. The biological activity was determined by measuring stimulation of neurite outgrowth from chick sympathetic ganglia. The residues homologous to the proposed receptor binding site of insulin (Ser18, Met19, Val21, Asp23) were substituted by Ala. Replacement of Ser18, Met19 and Asp23 did not affect NGF activity. Modification of Val21 notably reduced both receptor binding and biological activity, suggesting that this residue is important to retain a fully active NGF. The highly conserved Tyr51 and Arg99 were converted into Phe and Lys respectively, without changing the biological properties of the molecule. However, binding and biological activity were greatly impaired after the simultaneous replacement of both Arg99 and Arg102 by Gly. The three conserved Trp residues at positions 20, 75 and 98 were substituted by Phe. The Trp mutated proteins retained 15-60% of receptor binding and 40-80% of biological activity, indicating that the Trp residues are not essential for NGF activity. However, replacement of Trp20 significantly reduced the amount of NGF in the medium, suggesting that this residue may be important for protein stability. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2328722

  4. Developments of entropy-stable residual distribution methods for conservation laws I: Scalar problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Farzad; Chizari, Hossain

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary developments of entropy-stable residual distribution methods for scalar problems. Controlling entropy generation is achieved by formulating an entropy conserved signals distribution coupled with an entropy-stable signals distribution. Numerical results of the entropy-stable residual distribution methods are accurate and comparable with the classic residual distribution methods for steady-state problems. High order accurate extensions for the new method on steady-state problems are also demonstrated. Moreover, the new method preserves second order accuracy on unsteady problems using an explicit time integration scheme. The idea of the multi-dimensional entropy-stable residual distribution method is generic enough to be extended to the system of hyperbolic equations, which will be presented in the sequel of this paper.

  5. Significance of conservative asparagine residues in the thermal hysteresis activity of carrot antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dang-Quan; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dong-Ru; He, Yan-Ming; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2004-01-01

    The approximately 24-amino-acid leucine-rich tandem repeat motif (PXXXXXLXXLXXLXLSXNXLXGXI) of carrot antifreeze protein comprises most of the processed protein and should contribute at least partly to the ice-binding site. Structural predictions using publicly available online sources indicated that the theoretical three-dimensional model of this plant protein includes a 10-loop beta-helix containing the approximately 24-amino-acid tandem repeat. This theoretical model indicated that conservative asparagine residues create putative ice-binding sites with surface complementarity to the 1010 prism plane of ice. We used site-specific mutagenesis to test the importance of these residues, and observed a distinct loss of thermal hysteresis activity when conservative asparagines were replaced with valine or glutamine, whereas a large increase in thermal hysteresis was observed when phenylalanine or threonine residues were replaced with asparagine, putatively resulting in the formation of an ice-binding site. These results confirmed that the ice-binding site of carrot antifreeze protein consists of conservative asparagine residues in each beta-loop. We also found that its thermal hysteresis activity is directly correlated with the length of its asparagine-rich binding site, and hence with the size of its ice-binding face. PMID:14531728

  6. Multiple Roles of a Conserved GAF Domain Tyrosine Residue in Cyanobacterial and Plant Phytochromes†

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Amanda J.; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Jang, Abigail Y.; Ernst, Lauren A.; Waggoner, Alan S.; Duan, Yong; Lei, Hongxing; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2005-01-01

    The phytochrome family of red/far-red photoreceptors has been optimized to support photochemical isomerization of a bound bilin chromophore, a process that triggers a conformational change and modulates biochemical output from the surrounding protein scaffold. Recent studies have established that the efficiency of this photochemical process is profoundly altered by mutation of a conserved tyrosine residue (Tyr176) within the bilin-binding GAF domain of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 [Fischer, A. J., and Lagarias, J. C. (2004) Harnessing phytochrome’s glowing potential, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 17334–17339]. Here, we show that the equivalent mutation in plant phytochromes behaves similarly, indicating that the function of this tyrosine in the primary photochemical mechanism is conserved. Saturation mutagenesis of Tyr176 in Cph1 establishes that no other residue can support comparably efficient photoisomerization. The spectroscopic consequences of Tyr176 mutations also reveal that Tyr176 regulates the conversion of the porphyrin-like conformation of the bilin precursor to a more extended conformation. The porphyrin-binding ability of the Tyr176Arg mutant protein indicates that Tyr176 also regulates the ligand-binding specificity of apophytochrome. On the basis of the hydrogen-bonding ability of Tyr176 substitutions that support the nonphotochemical C15-Z,syn to C15-Z,anti interconversion, we propose that Tyr176 orients the carboxyl side chain of a conserved acidic residue to stabilize protonation of the bilin chromophore. A homology model of the GAF domain of Cph1 predicts a C5-Z,syn, C10-Z,syn, C15-Z,anti configuration for the chromophore and implicates Glu189 as the proposed acidic residue stabilizing the extended conformation, an interpretation consistent with site-directed mutagenesis of this conserved acidic residue. PMID:16285723

  7. Conserved residues of the human mitochondrial holocytochrome c synthase mediate interactions with heme.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Shalon E; San Francisco, Brian; Bretsnyder, Eric C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-08-19

    C-type cytochromes are distinguished by the covalent attachment of a heme cofactor, a modification that is typically required for its subsequent folding, stability, and function. Heme attachment takes place in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and, in most eukaryotes, is mediated by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS). HCCS is the primary component of the eukaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathway, known as System III. The catalytic function of HCCS depends on its ability to coordinate interactions between its substrates: heme and cytochrome c. Recent advancements in the recombinant expression and purification of HCCS have facilitated comprehensive analyses of the roles of conserved residues in HCCS, as demonstrated in this study. Previously, we proposed a four-step model describing HCCS-mediated cytochrome c assembly, identifying a conserved histidine residue (His154) as an axial ligand to the heme iron. In this study, we performed a systematic mutational analysis of 17 conserved residues in HCCS, and we provide evidence that the enzyme contains two heme-binding domains. Our data indicate that heme contacts mediated by residues within these domains modulate the dynamics of heme binding and contribute to the stability of the HCCS-heme-cytochrome c steady state ternary complex. While some residues are essential for initial heme binding (step 1), others impact the subsequent release of the holocytochrome c product (step 4). Certain HCCS mutants that were defective in heme binding were corrected for function by exogenous aminolevulinic acid (ALA, the precursor to heme). This chemical "correction" supports the proposed role of heme binding for the corresponding residues.

  8. Conserved Residues of the Human Mitochondrial Holocytochrome c Synthase Mediate Interactions with Heme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    C-type cytochromes are distinguished by the covalent attachment of a heme cofactor, a modification that is typically required for its subsequent folding, stability, and function. Heme attachment takes place in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and, in most eukaryotes, is mediated by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS). HCCS is the primary component of the eukaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathway, known as System III. The catalytic function of HCCS depends on its ability to coordinate interactions between its substrates: heme and cytochrome c. Recent advancements in the recombinant expression and purification of HCCS have facilitated comprehensive analyses of the roles of conserved residues in HCCS, as demonstrated in this study. Previously, we proposed a four-step model describing HCCS-mediated cytochrome c assembly, identifying a conserved histidine residue (His154) as an axial ligand to the heme iron. In this study, we performed a systematic mutational analysis of 17 conserved residues in HCCS, and we provide evidence that the enzyme contains two heme-binding domains. Our data indicate that heme contacts mediated by residues within these domains modulate the dynamics of heme binding and contribute to the stability of the HCCS–heme–cytochrome c steady state ternary complex. While some residues are essential for initial heme binding (step 1), others impact the subsequent release of the holocytochrome c product (step 4). Certain HCCS mutants that were defective in heme binding were corrected for function by exogenous aminolevulinic acid (ALA, the precursor to heme). This chemical “correction” supports the proposed role of heme binding for the corresponding residues. PMID:25054239

  9. Structural implications of conserved aspartate residues located in tropomyosin’s coiled-coil core

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Li, Xiaochuan; Nirody, Jasmine; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2011-01-01

    Polar residues lying between adjacent α-helical chains of coiled-coils often contribute to coiled-coil curvature and flexibility, while more typical core hydrophobic residues anneal the chains together. In tropomyosins, ranging from smooth and skeletal muscle to cytoplasmic isoforms, a highly conserved Asp at residue 137 places negative charges within the tropomyosin coiled-coil core in a position which may affect the conformation needed for tropomyosin binding and regulatory movements on actin. Proteolytic susceptibility suggested that substituting a canonical Leu for the naturally occurring Asp at residue 137 increases inter-chain rigidity by stabilizing the tropomyosin coiled-coil. Using molecular dynamics, we now directly assess changes in coiled-coil curvature and flexibility caused by such mutants. Although the coiled-coil flexibility is modestly diminished near the residue 137 mutation site, as expected, a delocalized increase in flexibility along the overall coiled-coil is observed. Even though the average shape of the D137L tropomyosin is straighter than that of wild-type tropomyosin, it is still capable of binding actin due to this increase in flexibility. We conclude that the conserved, non-canonical Asp-137 destabilizes the local structure resulting in a local flexible region in the middle of tropomyosin that normally is important for tropomyosin steady-state equilibrium position on actin. PMID:22754618

  10. Critical role of conserved hydrophobic residues within the major homology region in mature retroviral capsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Purdy, John G; Flanagan, John M; Ropson, Ira J; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E; Craven, Rebecca C

    2008-06-01

    During retroviral maturation, the CA protein undergoes dramatic structural changes and establishes unique intermolecular interfaces in the mature capsid shell that are different from those that existed in the immature precursor. The most conserved region of CA, the major homology region (MHR), has been implicated in both immature and mature assembly, although the precise contribution of the MHR residues to each event has been largely undefined. To test the roles of specific MHR residues in mature capsid assembly, an in vitro system was developed that allowed for the first-time formation of Rous sarcoma virus CA into structures resembling authentic capsids. The ability of CA to assemble organized structures was destroyed by substitutions of two conserved hydrophobic MHR residues and restored by second-site suppressors, demonstrating that these MHR residues are required for the proper assembly of mature capsids in addition to any role that these amino acids may play in immature particle assembly. The defect caused by the MHR mutations was identified as an early step in the capsid assembly process. The results provide strong evidence for a model in which the hydrophobic residues of the MHR control a conformational reorganization of CA that is needed to initiate capsid assembly and suggest that the formation of an interdomain interaction occurs early during maturation.

  11. Nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 utilize similar glutamine-containing clusters of hydrophobic residues to activate transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Gugneja, S; Virbasius, C M; Scarpulla, R C

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) are ubiquitous transcription factors that have been implicated in the control of nuclear genes required for respiration, heme biosynthesis, and mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. Recently, both factors have been found to be major transcriptional determinants for a subset of these genes that define a class of simple promoters involved in respiratory chain expression. Here, functional domains required for transactivation by NRF-1 have been defined. An atypical nuclear localization signal resides in a conserved amino-terminal region adjacent to the DNA binding domain and consists of functionally redundant clusters of basic residues. A second domain in the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule is necessary for transcriptional activation. The activation domains of both NRF-1 and NRF-2 were extensively characterized by both deletion and alanine substitution mutagenesis. The results show that these domains do not fall into known classes defined by a preponderance of amino acid residues, including glutamines, prolines, or isoleucines, as found in other eukaryotic activators. Rather, in both factors, a series of tandemly arranged clusters of hydrophobic amino acids were required for activation. Although all of the functional clusters contain glutamines, the glutamines differ from the hydrophobic residues in that they are inconsequential for activation. Unlike the NRF-2 domain, which contains its essential hydrophobic motifs within 40 residues, the NRF-1 domain spans about 40% of the molecule and appears to have a bipartite structure. The findings indicate that NRF-1 and NRF-2 utilize similar hydrophobic structural motifs for activating transcription. PMID:8816484

  12. Mutational analysis of highly conserved aspartate residues essential to the catalytic core of the piggyBac transposase

    PubMed Central

    Keith, James H; Schaeper, Cheryl A; Fraser, Tresa S; Fraser, Malcolm J

    2008-01-01

    Background The piggyBac mobile element is quickly gaining popularity as a tool for the transgenesis of many eukaryotic organisms. By studying the transposase which catalyzes the movement of piggyBac, we may be able to modify this vector system to make it a more effective transgenesis tool. In a previous publication, Sarkar A, Sim C, Hong YS, Hogan JR, Fraser MJ, Robertson HM, and Collins FH have proposed the presence of the widespread 'DDE/DDD' motif for piggyBac at amino acid positions D268, D346, and D447. Results This study utilizes directed mutagenesis and plasmid-based mobility assays to assess the importance of these residues as the catalytic core of the piggyBac transposase. We have functionally analyzed individual point-mutations with respect to charge and physical size in all three proposed residues of the 'DDD' motif as well as another nearby, highly conserved aspartate at D450. All of our mutations had a significant effect on excision frequency in S2 cell cultures. We have also aligned the piggyBac transposase to other close family members, both functional and non-functional, in an attempt to identify the most highly conserved regions and position a number of interesting features. Conclusion We found all the designated DDD aspartates reside in clusters of amino acids that conserved among piggyBac family transposase members. Our results indicate that all four aspartates are necessary, to one degree or another, for excision to occur in a cellular environment, but D450 seems to have a tolerance for a glutamate substitution. All mutants tested significantly decreased excision frequency in cell cultures when compared with the wild-type transposase. PMID:18694512

  13. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-10-12

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC.

  14. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC. PMID:26456755

  15. Search for conserved amino acid residues of the α-crystallin proteins of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shiliaev, Nikita G; Selivanova, Olga M; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-04-01

    [Formula: see text]-crystallin is the major eye lens protein and a member of the small heat-shock protein (sHsp) family. [Formula: see text]-crystallins have been shown to support lens clarity by preventing the aggregation of lens proteins. We performed the bioinformatics analysis of [Formula: see text]-crystallin sequences from vertebrates to find conserved amino acid residues as the three-dimensional (3D) structure of [Formula: see text]-crystallin is not identified yet. We are the first who demonstrated that the N-terminal region is conservative along with the central domain for vertebrate organisms. We have found that there is correlation between the conserved and structured regions. Moreover, amyloidogenic regions also correspond to the structured regions. We analyzed the amino acid composition of [Formula: see text]-crystallin A and B chains. Analyzing the occurrence of each individual amino acid residue, we have found that such amino acid residues as leucine, serine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, histidine, isoleucine, glutamic acid, and valine change their content simultaneously in A and B chains in different classes of vertebrates. Aromatic amino acids occur more often in [Formula: see text]-crystallins from vertebrates than on the average in proteins among 17 animal proteomes. We obtained that the identity between A and B chains in the mammalian group is 0.35, which is lower than the published 0.60.

  16. How Similar Are Protein Folding and Protein Binding Nuclei? Examination of Vibrational Motions of Energy Hot Spots and Conserved Residues

    PubMed Central

    Haliloglu, Turkan; Keskin, Ozlem; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    The underlying physico-chemical principles of the interactions between domains in protein folding are similar to those between protein molecules in binding. Here we show that conserved residues and experimental hot spots at intermolecular binding interfaces overlap residues that vibrate with high frequencies. Similarly, conserved residues and hot spots are found in protein cores and are also observed to vibrate with high frequencies. In both cases, these residues contribute significantly to the stability. Hence, these observations validate the proposition that binding and folding are similar processes. In both packing plays a critical role, rationalizing the residue conservation and the experimental alanine scanning hot spots. We further show that high-frequency vibrating residues distinguish between protein binding sites and the remainder of the protein surface. PMID:15596504

  17. Sequence-based prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins with conservation and correlation information.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Liu, Hong-De; Xie, Jian-Ming; Sun, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    The recognition of DNA-binding residues in proteins is critical to our understanding of the mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions, gene expression, and for guiding drug design. Therefore, a prediction method DNABR (DNA Binding Residues) is proposed for predicting DNA-binding residues in protein sequences using the random forest (RF) classifier with sequence-based features. Two types of novel sequence features are proposed in this study, which reflect the information about the conservation of physicochemical properties of the amino acids, and the correlation of amino acids between different sequence positions in terms of physicochemical properties. The first type of feature uses the evolutionary information combined with the conservation of physicochemical properties of the amino acids while the second reflects the dependency effect of amino acids with regards to polarity charge and hydrophobic properties in the protein sequences. Those two features and an orthogonal binary vector which reflect the characteristics of 20 types of amino acids are used to build the DNABR, a model to predict DNA-binding residues in proteins. The DNABR model achieves a value of 0.6586 for Matthew’s correlation coefficient (MCC) and 93.04 percent overall accuracy (ACC) with a68.47 percent sensitivity (SE) and 98.16 percent specificity (SP), respectively. The comparisons with each feature demonstrate that these two novel features contribute most to the improvement in predictive ability. Furthermore, performance comparisons with other approaches clearly show that DNABR has an excellent prediction performance for detecting binding residues in putative DNA-binding protein. The DNABR web-server system is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/DNABR/.

  18. Computational analysis of conserved coil functional residues in the mitochondrial genomic sequences of dermatophytes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bulbul; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2016-01-01

    Dermatophyte is a group of closely related fungi that have the capacity to invade keratinized tissue of humans and other animals. The infection known as dermatophytosis, caused by members of the genera Microsporum, Trichophyton, and Epidermophyton includes infection to the groin (tinea cruris), beard (tinea barbae), scalp (tinea capitis), feet (tinea pedis), glabrous skin (tinea corporis), nail (tinea unguium), and hand (tinea manuum). The identification of evolutionary relationship between these three genera of dermatophyte is epidemiologically important to understand their pathogenicity. Mitochondrial DNA evolves more rapidly than a nuclear DNA due to higher rate of mutation but is very less affected by genetic recombination, making it an important tool for phylogenetic studies. Thus, here we present a novel scheme to identify the conserved coil functional residues of Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Epidermophyton floccosum and Microsporum canis. Protein coding sequences of the mitochondrial genome were aligned for their similar sequences and homology modelling was performed for structure and pocket identification. The results obtained from comparative analysis of the protein sequences revealed the presence of functionally active sites in all the species of the genera Trichophyton and Microsporum. However in Epidermophyton floccosum it was observed in three protein sequences of the five studied. The absence of these conserved coil functional residues in E. floccusum may be correlated with lesser infectivity of this organism. The functional residues identified in the present study could be responsible for the disease and thus can act as putative target sites for drug designing. PMID:28149055

  19. The bacterial ribonuclease P holoenzyme requires specific, conserved residues for efficient catalysis and substrate positioning.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Nicholas J; Osterman, Amy K; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2012-11-01

    RNase P is an RNA-based enzyme primarily responsible for 5'-end pre-tRNA processing. A structure of the bacterial RNase P holoenzyme in complex with tRNAPhe revealed the structural basis for substrate recognition, identified the active site location, and showed how the protein component increases functionality. The active site includes at least two metal ions, a universal uridine (U52), and P RNA backbone moieties, but it is unclear whether an adjacent, bacterially conserved protein loop (residues 52-57) participates in catalysis. Here, mutagenesis combined with single-turnover reaction kinetics demonstrate that point mutations in this loop have either no or modest effects on catalytic efficiency. Similarly, amino acid changes in the 'RNR' region, which represent the most conserved region of bacterial RNase P proteins, exhibit negligible changes in catalytic efficiency. However, U52 and two bacterially conserved protein residues (F17 and R89) are essential for efficient Thermotoga maritima RNase P activity. The U52 nucleotide binds a metal ion at the active site, whereas F17 and R89 are positioned >20 Å from the cleavage site, probably making contacts with N(-4) and N(-5) nucleotides of the pre-tRNA 5'-leader. This suggests a synergistic coupling between transition state formation and substrate positioning via interactions with the leader.

  20. Cardiolipin binds selectively but transiently to conserved lysine residues in the rotor of metazoan ATP synthases

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Anna L.

    2016-01-01

    The anionic lipid cardiolipin is an essential component of active ATP synthases. In metazoans, their rotors contain a ring of eight c-subunits consisting of inner and outer circles of N- and C-terminal α-helices, respectively. The beginning of the C-terminal α-helix contains a strictly conserved and fully trimethylated lysine residue in the lipid head-group region of the membrane. Larger rings of known structure, from c9-c15 in eubacteria and chloroplasts, conserve either a lysine or an arginine residue in the equivalent position. In computer simulations of hydrated membranes containing trimethylated or unmethylated bovine c8-rings and bacterial c10- or c11-rings, the head-groups of cardiolipin molecules became associated selectively with these modified and unmodified lysine residues and with adjacent polar amino acids and with a second conserved lysine on the opposite side of the membrane, whereas phosphatidyl lipids were attracted little to these sites. However, the residence times of cardiolipin molecules with the ring were brief and sufficient for the rotor to turn only a fraction of a degree in the active enzyme. With the demethylated c8-ring and with c10- and c11-rings, the density of bound cardiolipin molecules at this site increased, but residence times were not changed greatly. These highly specific but brief interactions with the rotating c-ring are consistent with functional roles for cardiolipin in stabilizing and lubricating the rotor, and, by interacting with the enzyme at the inlet and exit of the transmembrane proton channel, in participation in proton translocation through the membrane domain of the enzyme. PMID:27382158

  1. A conserved amino acid residue critical for product and substrate specificity in plant triterpene synthases

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Melissa; Thimmappa, Ramesha B.; Minto, Robert E.; Melton, Rachel E.; O’Maille, Paul E.; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Triterpenes are structurally complex plant natural products with numerous medicinal applications. They are synthesized through an origami-like process that involves cyclization of the linear 30 carbon precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene into different triterpene scaffolds. Here, through a forward genetic screen in planta, we identify a conserved amino acid residue that determines product specificity in triterpene synthases from diverse plant species. Mutation of this residue results in a major change in triterpene cyclization, with production of tetracyclic rather than pentacyclic products. The mutated enzymes also use the more highly oxygenated substrate dioxidosqualene in preference to 2,3-oxidosqualene when expressed in yeast. Our discoveries provide new insights into triterpene cyclization, revealing hidden functional diversity within triterpene synthases. They further open up opportunities to engineer novel oxygenated triterpene scaffolds by manipulating the precursor supply. PMID:27412861

  2. Significance of highly conserved aromatic residues in Micrococcus luteus B-P 26 undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Kharel, Yugesh; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Miki, Kunio; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Khare, Yugesh

    2003-12-01

    Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase catalyzes the sequential condensation of eight molecules of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) in the cis-configuration into farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) to produce undecaprenyl diphosphate (UPP), which is indispensable for the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall. This cis-type prenyltransferase exhibits a quite different mode of binding of homoallylic substrate IPP from that of trans-type prenyltransferase [Kharel Y. et al. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 28459-28464]. In order to know the IPP binding mode in more detail, we selected six highly conserved residues in Regions III, IV, and V among nine conserved aromatic residues in Micrococcus luteus B-P 26 UPP synthase for substitution by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes were expressed and purified to homogeneity, and then their effects on substrate binding and the catalytic function were examined. All of the mutant enzymes showed moderately similar far-UV CD spectra to that of the wild-type, indicating that none of the replacement of conserved aromatic residues affected the secondary structure of the enzyme. Kinetic analysis showed that the replacement of Tyr-71 with Ser in Region III, Tyr-148 with Phe in Region IV, and Trp-210 with Ala in Region V brought about 10-1,600-fold decreases in the kcat/Km values compared to that of the wild-type but the Km values for both substrates IPP and FPP resulted in only moderate changes. Substitution of Phe-207 with Ser in Region V resulted in a 13-fold increase in the Km value for IPP and a 1,000-2,000-fold lower kcat/Km value than those of the wild-type, although the Km values for FPP showed about no significant changes. In addition, the W224A mutant as to Region V showed 6-fold and 14-fold increased Km values for IPP and FPP, respectively, and 100-250-fold decreased kcat/Km values as compared to those of the wild-type. These results suggested that these conserved aromatic residues play important roles in the binding with both substrates

  3. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding.

    PubMed

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael; Pihl, Heidi; Larsen, Olav; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Johnsen, Anders H; Frimurer, Thomas M; Karlshøj, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-07-29

    Chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune system and are linked to several human diseases. The initial contact of chemokines with their receptors depends on highly specified extracellular receptor features. Here we investigate the importance of conserved extracellular disulfide bridges and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action in CCR8. We find that the seven-transmembrane (TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix III (TMIII) and ECL-2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only for chemokines. Furthermore, we find that two distinct aromatic residues in ECL-2, Tyr(184) (Cys + 1) and Tyr(187) (Cys + 4), are crucial for binding of the CC chemokines CCL1 (agonist) and MC148 (antagonist), respectively, but not for small molecule binding. Finally, using in silico modeling, we predict an aromatic cluster of interaction partners for Tyr(187) in TMIV (Phe(171)) and TMV (Trp(194)). We show in vitro that these residues are crucial for the binding and action of MC148, thus supporting their participation in an aromatic cluster with Tyr(187) This aromatic cluster appears to be present in a large number of CC chemokine receptors and thereby could play a more general role to be exploited in future drug development targeting these receptors. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C.; Lückmann, Michael; Pihl, Heidi; Larsen, Olav; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Johnsen, Anders H.; Frimurer, Thomas M.; Karlshøj, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune system and are linked to several human diseases. The initial contact of chemokines with their receptors depends on highly specified extracellular receptor features. Here we investigate the importance of conserved extracellular disulfide bridges and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action in CCR8. We find that the seven-transmembrane (TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix III (TMIII) and ECL-2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only for chemokines. Furthermore, we find that two distinct aromatic residues in ECL-2, Tyr184 (Cys + 1) and Tyr187 (Cys + 4), are crucial for binding of the CC chemokines CCL1 (agonist) and MC148 (antagonist), respectively, but not for small molecule binding. Finally, using in silico modeling, we predict an aromatic cluster of interaction partners for Tyr187 in TMIV (Phe171) and TMV (Trp194). We show in vitro that these residues are crucial for the binding and action of MC148, thus supporting their participation in an aromatic cluster with Tyr187. This aromatic cluster appears to be present in a large number of CC chemokine receptors and thereby could play a more general role to be exploited in future drug development targeting these receptors. PMID:27226537

  5. Cob component of corn residue can be used as a biofuel feedstock with little impact on soil and water conservation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Use of corn residue as a biofuel feedstock raises a number of concerns related to soil and water conservation. Soil compaction, increased susceptibility for wind and water erosion, increased nutrient removal, and loss of soil organic matter are potential negative affects associated with residue remo...

  6. Exploring proteome-wide occurrence of clusters of charged residues in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Belmabrouk, Sabrine; Kharrat, Najla; Benmarzoug, Riadh; Rebai, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    Clusters of charged residues are one of the key features of protein primary structure since they have been associated to important functions of proteins. Here, we present a proteome wide scan for the occurrence of Charge Clusters in Protein sequences using a new search tool (FCCP) based on a score-based methodology. The FCCP was run to search charge clusters in seven eukaryotic proteomes: Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Danio rerio, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that negative charge clusters (NCCs) are three to four times more frequent than positive charge clusters (PCCs). The Drosophila proteome is on average the most charged, whereas the human proteome is the least charged. Only 3 to 8% of the studied protein sequences have negative charge clusters, while 1.6 to 3% having PCCs and only 0.07 to 0.6% have both types of clusters. NCCs are localized predominantly in the N-terminal and C-terminal domains, while PCCs tend to be localized within the functional domains of the protein sequences. Furthermore, the gene ontology classification revealed that the protein sequences with negative and PCCs are mainly binding proteins.

  7. Role of Conserved Cysteine Residues in Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein E2 Folding and Function

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Kathleen; Boo, Irene; Tewierek, Kevin; Edmunds, Mark L.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus glycoprotein E2 contains 18 conserved cysteines predicted to form nine disulfide pairs. In this study, a comprehensive cysteine-alanine mutagenesis scan of all 18 cysteine residues was performed in E1E2-pseudotyped retroviruses (HCVpp) and recombinant E2 receptor-binding domain (E2 residues 384 to 661 [E2661]). All 18 cysteine residues were absolutely required for HCVpp entry competence. The phenotypes of individual cysteines and pairwise mutation of disulfides were largely the same for retrovirion-incorporated E2 and E2661, suggesting their disulfide arrangements are similar. However, the contributions of each cysteine residue and the nine disulfides to E2 structure and function varied. Individual Cys-to-Ala mutations revealed discordant effects, where removal of one Cys within a pair had minimal effect on H53 recognition and CD81 binding (C486 and C569) while mutation of its partner abolished these functions (C494 and C564). Removal of disulfides at C581-C585 and C452-C459 significantly reduced the amount of E1 coprecipitated with E2, while all other disulfides were absolutely required for E1E2 heterodimerization. Remarkably, E2661 tolerates the presence of four free cysteines, as simultaneous mutation of C452A, C486A, C569A, C581A, C585A, C597A, and C652A (M+C597A) retained wild-type CD81 binding. Thus, only one disulfide from each of the three predicted domains, C429-C552 (DI), C503-C508 (DII), and C607-C644 (DIII), is essential for the assembly of the E2661 CD81-binding site. Furthermore, the yield of total monomeric E2 increased to 70% in M+C597A. These studies reveal the contribution of each cysteine residue and the nine disulfide pairs to E2 structure and function. PMID:22278231

  8. Mutagenesis of conserved amino acids of Helicobacter pylori fur reveals residues important for function.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Beth M; Gancz, Hanan; Benoit, Stéphane L; Evans, Sarah; Olsen, Cara H; Michel, Sarah L J; Maier, Robert J; Merrell, D Scott

    2010-10-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) of the medically important pathogen Helicobacter pylori is unique in that it has been shown to function as a repressor both in the presence of an Fe2+ cofactor and in its apo (non-Fe2+-bound) form. However, virtually nothing is known concerning the amino acid residues that are important for Fur functioning. Therefore, mutations in six conserved amino acid residues of H. pylori Fur were constructed and analyzed for their impact on both iron-bound and apo repression. In addition, accumulation of the mutant proteins, protein secondary structure, DNA binding ability, iron binding capacity, and the ability to form higher-order structures were also examined for each mutant protein. While none of the mutated residues completely abrogated the function of Fur, we were able to identify residues that were critical for both iron-bound and apo-Fur repression. One mutation, V64A, did not alter regulation of any target genes. However, each of the five remaining mutations showed an effect on either iron-bound or apo regulation. Of these, H96A, E110A, and E117A mutations altered iron-bound Fur regulation and were all shown to influence iron binding to different extents. Additionally, the H96A mutation was shown to alter Fur oligomerization, and the E110A mutation was shown to impact oligomerization and DNA binding. Conversely, the H134A mutant exhibited changes in apo-Fur regulation that were the result of alterations in DNA binding. Although the E90A mutant exhibited alterations in apo-Fur regulation, this mutation did not affect any of the assessed protein functions. This study is the first for H. pylori to analyze the roles of specific amino acid residues of Fur in function and continues to highlight the complexity of Fur regulation in this organism.

  9. A cross-species bi-clustering approach to identifying conserved co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangwen; Jiang, Zongliang; Tian, Xiuchun; Bi, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A growing number of studies have explored the process of pre-implantation embryonic development of multiple mammalian species. However, the conservation and variation among different species in their developmental programming are poorly defined due to the lack of effective computational methods for detecting co-regularized genes that are conserved across species. The most sophisticated method to date for identifying conserved co-regulated genes is a two-step approach. This approach first identifies gene clusters for each species by a cluster analysis of gene expression data, and subsequently computes the overlaps of clusters identified from different species to reveal common subgroups. This approach is ineffective to deal with the noise in the expression data introduced by the complicated procedures in quantifying gene expression. Furthermore, due to the sequential nature of the approach, the gene clusters identified in the first step may have little overlap among different species in the second step, thus difficult to detect conserved co-regulated genes. Results: We propose a cross-species bi-clustering approach which first denoises the gene expression data of each species into a data matrix. The rows of the data matrices of different species represent the same set of genes that are characterized by their expression patterns over the developmental stages of each species as columns. A novel bi-clustering method is then developed to cluster genes into subgroups by a joint sparse rank-one factorization of all the data matrices. This method decomposes a data matrix into a product of a column vector and a row vector where the column vector is a consistent indicator across the matrices (species) to identify the same gene cluster and the row vector specifies for each species the developmental stages that the clustered genes co-regulate. Efficient optimization algorithm has been developed with convergence analysis. This approach was first validated on

  10. Contributions of Conserved Residues at the Gating Interface of Glycine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Pless, Stephan A.; Leung, Ada W. Y.; Galpin, Jason D.; Ahern, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are chloride channels that mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) family. The interface between the ligand binding domain and the transmembrane domain of pLGICs has been proposed to be crucial for channel gating and is lined by a number of charged and aromatic side chains that are highly conserved among different pLGICs. However, little is known about specific interactions between these residues that are likely to be important for gating in α1 GlyRs. Here we use the introduction of cysteine pairs and the in vivo nonsense suppression method to incorporate unnatural amino acids to probe the electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions of five highly conserved side chains near the interface, Glu-53, Phe-145, Asp-148, Phe-187, and Arg-218. Our results suggest a salt bridge between Asp-148 in loop 7 and Arg-218 in the pre-M1 domain that is crucial for channel gating. We further propose that Phe-145 and Phe-187 play important roles in stabilizing this interaction by providing a hydrophobic environment. In contrast to the equivalent residues in loop 2 of other pLGICs, the negative charge at Glu-53 α1 GlyRs is not crucial for normal channel function. These findings help decipher the GlyR gating pathway and show that distinct residue interaction patterns exist in different pLGICs. Furthermore, a salt bridge between Asp-148 and Arg-218 would provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the pathophysiologically relevant hyperekplexia, or startle disease, mutant Arg-218 → Gln. PMID:21835920

  11. Identification of Two Conserved Residues Involved in Copper Release from Chloroplast PIB-1-ATPases.

    PubMed

    Sautron, Emeline; Giustini, Cécile; Dang, ThuyVan; Moyet, Lucas; Salvi, Daniel; Crouzy, Serge; Rolland, Norbert; Catty, Patrice; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2016-09-16

    Copper is an essential transition metal for living organisms. In the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana, half of the copper content is localized in the chloroplast, and as a cofactor of plastocyanin, copper is essential for photosynthesis. Within the chloroplast, copper delivery to plastocyanin involves two transporters of the PIB-1-ATPases subfamily: HMA6 at the chloroplast envelope and HMA8 in the thylakoid membranes. Both proteins are high affinity copper transporters but share distinct enzymatic properties. In the present work, the comparison of 140 sequences of PIB-1-ATPases revealed a conserved region unusually rich in histidine and cysteine residues in the TMA-L1 region of eukaryotic chloroplast copper ATPases. To evaluate the role of these residues, we mutated them in HMA6 and HMA8. Mutants of interest were selected from phenotypic tests in yeast and produced in Lactococcus lactis for further biochemical characterizations using phosphorylation assays from ATP and Pi Combining functional and structural data, we highlight the importance of the cysteine and the first histidine of the CX3HX2H motif in the process of copper release from HMA6 and HMA8 and propose a copper pathway through the membrane domain of these transporters. Finally, our work suggests a more general role of the histidine residue in the transport of copper by PIB-1-ATPases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Two Conserved Cysteine Residues Are Required for the Masculinizing Activity of the Silkworm Masc Protein.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Susumu; Sugano, Yudai; Kiuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Toru

    2015-10-23

    We have recently discovered that the Masculinizer (Masc) gene encodes a CCCH tandem zinc finger protein, which controls both masculinization and dosage compensation in the silkworm Bombyx mori. In this study, we attempted to identify functional regions or residues that are required for the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein. We constructed a series of plasmids that expressed the Masc derivatives and transfected them into a B. mori ovary-derived cell line, BmN-4. To assess the masculinizing activity of the Masc derivatives, we investigated the splicing patterns of B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) and the expression levels of B. mori IGF-II mRNA-binding protein, a splicing regulator of Bmdsx, in Masc cDNA-transfected BmN-4 cells. We found that two zinc finger domains are not required for the masculinizing activity. We also identified that the C-terminal 288 amino acid residues are sufficient for the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein. Further detailed analyses revealed that two cysteine residues, Cys-301 and Cys-304, in the highly conserved region among lepidopteran Masc proteins are essential for the masculinizing activity in BmN-4 cells. Finally, we showed that Masc is a nuclear protein, but its nuclear localization is not tightly associated with the masculinizing activity.

  13. DID THE INFANT R136 AND NGC 3603 CLUSTERS UNDERGO RESIDUAL GAS EXPULSION?

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-02-10

    Based on kinematic data observed for very young, massive clusters that appear to be in dynamical equilibrium, it has recently been argued that such young systems are examples of where the early residual gas expulsion did not happen or had no dynamical effect. The intriguing scenario of a star cluster forming through a single starburst has thereby been challenged. Choosing the case of the R136 cluster of the Large Magellanic Cloud, the most cited one in this context, we perform direct N-body computations that mimic the early evolution of this cluster including the gas-removal phase (on a thermal timescale). Our calculations show that under plausible initial conditions which are consistent with observational data, a large fraction (>60%) of a gas-expelled, expanding R136-like cluster is bound to regain dynamical equilibrium by its current age. Therefore, the recent measurements of velocity dispersion in the inner regions of R136, which indicate that the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium, are consistent with an earlier substantial gas expulsion of R136 followed by a rapid re-virialization (in Almost-Equal-To 1 Myr). Additionally, we find that the less massive Galactic NGC 3603 Young Cluster (NYC), with a substantially longer re-virialization time, is likely to be found to have deviated from dynamical equilibrium at its present age ( Almost-Equal-To 1 Myr). The recently obtained stellar proper motions in the central part of the NYC indeed suggest this and are consistent with the computed models. This work significantly extends previous models of the Orion Nebula Cluster which already demonstrated that the re-virialization time of young post-gas-expulsion clusters decreases with increasing pre-expulsion density.

  14. Residue-specific immobilization of protein molecules by size-selected clusters

    PubMed Central

    Prisco, Umberto; Leung, Carl; Xirouchaki, Chrisa; Jones, Celine H; Heath, John K; Palmer, Richard E

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), operating in contact mode, has been employed in buffer solution to study two proteins; (i) green fluorescent protein (GFP), from the hydromedusan jellyfish Aequorea victoria; and (ii) human oncostatin M (OSM), in the presence of size-selected gold nanoclusters pinned on to a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate. The AFM images have revealed immobilization of single molecules of OSM, which are strongly bound to the gold nanoclusters. Conversely, no strong immobilization has been observed for the GFP, as these molecules were easily displaced by the scanning tip. The contrasting behaviour of the two proteins can be explained by the exposed molecular surface area of their cysteine residues as modelled on the basis of their respective X-ray crystallographic data structures. GFP contains two cysteine residues, but neither is readily available to chemisorb on the gold clusters, because the cysteines are largely inaccessible from the surface of the protein. In contrast, OSM has a total of five cysteine residues, with different degrees of accessibility, which make the protein amenable to anchoring on the nanoclusters. Statistical analysis of the height of the OSM molecules bound to the nanoclusters is in accordance with crystallographic data, and suggests various configurations of the proteins on the clusters, associated with the presence of different cysteine anchoring sites. These results suggest that the three-dimensional conformation of protein molecules is preserved when they are chemisorbed to size-selected gold clusters, thus opening a new route towards oriented immobilization of individual protein molecules. PMID:16849177

  15. A Highly Conserved Residue in HIV-1 Nef Alpha Helix 2 Modulates Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Aaron L.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Coutu, Mathieu; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; Arts, Eric J.; Finzi, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extensive genetic diversity is a defining characteristic of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and poses a significant barrier to the development of an effective vaccine. To better understand the impact of this genetic diversity on the HIV-1 pathogenic factor Nef, we compiled a panel of reference strains from the NIH Los Alamos HIV Database. Initial sequence analysis identified point mutations at Nef residues 13, 84, and 92 in subtype C reference strain C.BR92025 from Brazil. Functional analysis revealed impaired major histocompatibility complex class I and CD4 downregulation of strain C.BR92025 Nef, which corresponded to decreased protein expression. Metabolic labeling demonstrated that strain C.BR92025 Nef has a greater rate of protein turnover than subtype B reference strain B.JRFL that, on the basis of mutational analysis, is related to Nef residue A84. An alanine-to-valine substitution at position 84, located in alpha helix 2 of Nef, was sufficient to alter the rate of turnover of an otherwise highly expressed Nef protein. In conclusion, these findings highlight HIV-1 Nef residue A84 as a major determinant of protein expression that may offer an additional avenue to disrupt or mediate the effects of this key HIV-1 pathogenic factor. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Nef protein has been established as a key pathogenic determinant of HIV/AIDS, but there is little knowledge of how the extensive genetic diversity of HIV-1 affects Nef function. Upon compiling a set of subtype-specific reference strains, we identified a subtype C reference strain, C.BR92025, that contained natural polymorphisms at otherwise highly conserved residues 13, 84, and 92. Interestingly, strain C.BR92025 Nef displayed impaired Nef function and had decreased protein expression. We have demonstrated that strain C.BR92025 Nef has a higher rate of protein turnover than highly expressed Nef proteins and that this higher rate of protein turnover is due to an alanine-to-valine substitution

  16. Understanding the roles of strictly conserved tryptophan residues in O2 producing chlorite dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Beatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorite dismutases (Clds) degrade ClO2− to O2 and Cl− in perchlorate respiring bacteria, and they serve still poorly defined cellular roles in other diverse microbes. These proteins share 3 highly conserved Trp residues, W155, W156, and W227, on the proximal side of the heme. The Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) has been shown to form protein-based radicals in its reactions with ClO2− and peracetic acid. The roles of the conserved Trp residues in radical generation and in enzymatic function were assessed via spectroscopic and kinetic analysis of their Phe mutants. The W155F mutant was the most dramatically affected, appearing to lose the characteristic pentameric oligomerization state, secondary structure, and heme binding properties of the WT protein. The W156F mutant initially retains many features of the WT protein but over time acquires many of the features of W155F. Conversion to an inactive, heme-free form is accelerated by dilution, suggesting loss of the protein’s pentameric state. Hence, both W155 and W156 are important for heme binding and maintenance of the protein’s reactive pentameric structure. W227F by contrast retains many properties of the WT protein. Important differences are noted in the transient kinetic reactions with peracetic acid (PAA), where W227F appears to form an [Fe(IV)=O]-containing intermediate, which subsequently converts to an uncoupled [Fe(IV)=O + AA+.] system in a [PAA]-dependent manner. This is in contrast to the peroxidase-like formation of [Fe(IV)=O] coupled to a porphyrin π-cation radical in the WT protein, which decays in a [PAA]-independent manner. These observations and the lack of redox protection for the heme in any of the Trp mutants suggests a tendency for protein radical formation in DaCld that is independent of any of these conserved active site residues. PMID:23241559

  17. Identification and analysis of a highly conserved chemotaxis gene cluster in Shewanella species.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Ward, M.

    2007-08-01

    A conserved cluster of chemotaxis genes was identified from the genome sequences of fifteen Shewanella species. An in-frame deletion of the cheA-3 gene, which is located in this cluster, was created in S. oneidensis MR-1 and the gene shown to be essential for chemotactic responses to anaerobic electron acceptors. The CheA-3 protein showed strong similarity to Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 and P. aeruginosa CheA-1, two proteins that are also essential for chemotaxis. The genes encoding these proteins were shown to be located in chemotaxis gene clusters closely related to the cheA-3-containing cluster in Shewanella species. The results of this study suggest that a combination of gene neighborhood and homology analyses may be used to predict which cheA genes are essential for chemotaxis in groups of closely related microorganisms.

  18. Bridge helix bending promotes RNA polymerase II backtracking through a critical and conserved threonine residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da, Lin-Tai; Pardo-Avila, Fátima; Xu, Liang; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Lu; Gao, Xin; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) backtracking process is poorly understood. We built a Markov State Model from extensive molecular dynamics simulations to identify metastable intermediate states and the dynamics of backtracking at atomistic detail. Our results reveal that Pol II backtracking occurs in a stepwise mode where two intermediate states are involved. We find that the continuous bending motion of the Bridge helix (BH) serves as a critical checkpoint, using the highly conserved BH residue T831 as a sensing probe for the 3'-terminal base paring of RNA:DNA hybrid. If the base pair is mismatched, BH bending can promote the RNA 3'-end nucleotide into a frayed state that further leads to the backtracked state. These computational observations are validated by site-directed mutagenesis and transcript cleavage assays, and provide insights into the key factors that regulate the preferences of the backward translocation.

  19. Bridge helix bending promotes RNA polymerase II backtracking through a critical and conserved threonine residue

    PubMed Central

    Da, Lin-Tai; Pardo-Avila, Fátima; Xu, Liang; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Lu; Gao, Xin; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) backtracking process is poorly understood. We built a Markov State Model from extensive molecular dynamics simulations to identify metastable intermediate states and the dynamics of backtracking at atomistic detail. Our results reveal that Pol II backtracking occurs in a stepwise mode where two intermediate states are involved. We find that the continuous bending motion of the Bridge helix (BH) serves as a critical checkpoint, using the highly conserved BH residue T831 as a sensing probe for the 3′-terminal base paring of RNA:DNA hybrid. If the base pair is mismatched, BH bending can promote the RNA 3′-end nucleotide into a frayed state that further leads to the backtracked state. These computational observations are validated by site-directed mutagenesis and transcript cleavage assays, and provide insights into the key factors that regulate the preferences of the backward translocation. PMID:27091704

  20. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family*

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Miller, Darcie J.; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  1. Ganglioside glycosyltransferases are S-acylated at conserved cysteine residues involved in homodimerisation.

    PubMed

    Chumpen Ramirez, Sabrina; Ruggiero, Fernando M; Daniotti, Jose Luis; Valdez Taubas, Javier

    2017-08-07

    Ganglioside glycosyltransferases (GGTs) are type II membrane proteins bearing a short N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a transmembrane domain (TMD), and a lumenal catalytic domain. The expression and activity of these enzymes largely determine the quality of the glycolipids that decorate mammalian cell membranes. Many glycosyltransferases (GTs) are themselves glycosylated, and this is important for their proper localisation, but few if any other post-translational modifications of these proteins have been reported. Here, we show that the GGTs, ST3Gal-V, ST8Sia-I, and β4GalNAcT-I are S-acylated at conserved cysteine residues located close to the cytoplasmic border of their TMDs. ST3Gal-II, a GT that sialylates glycolipids and glycoproteins, is also S-acylated at a conserved cysteine located in the N-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Many other GTs also possess cysteine residues in their cytoplasmic regions, suggesting that this modification occurs also on these GTs. S-acylation, commonly known as palmitoylation, is catalysed by a family of palmitoyltransferases (PATs) that are mostly localised at the Golgi complex but also at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane. Using GT ER retention mutants, we found that S-acylation of β4GalNAcT-I and ST3Gal-II takes place at different compartments, suggesting that these enzymes are not substrates of the same PAT. Finally, we found that cysteines that are the target of S-acylation on β4GalNAcT-I and ST3Gal-II are involved in the formation of homodimers through disulphide bonds. We observed an increase in ST3Gal-II dimers in the presence of the PAT inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate, suggesting that GT homodimerisation may be regulating S-acylation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Collapse of Conductance Is Prevented by a Glutamate Residue Conserved in Voltage-Dependent K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; Pardal, Ricardo; Castellano, Antonio; López-Barneo, José

    2000-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ channel gating is influenced by the permeating ions. Extracellular K+ determines the occupation of sites in the channels where the cation interferes with the motion of the gates. When external [K+] decreases, some K+ channels open too briefly to allow the conduction of measurable current. Given that extracellular K+ is normally low, we have studied if negatively charged amino acids in the extracellular loops of Shaker K+ channels contribute to increase the local [K+]. Surprisingly, neutralization of the charge of most acidic residues has minor effects on gating. However, a glutamate residue (E418) located at the external end of the membrane spanning segment S5 is absolutely required for keeping channels active at the normal external [K+]. E418 is conserved in all families of voltage-dependent K+ channels. Although the channel mutant E418Q has kinetic properties resembling those produced by removal of K+ from the pore, it seems that E418 is not simply concentrating cations near the channel mouth, but has a direct and critical role in gating. Our data suggest that E418 contributes to stabilize the S4 voltage sensor in the depolarized position, thus permitting maintenance of the channel open conformation. PMID:10919865

  3. Interfacial Partitioning of a Loop Hinge Residue Contributes to Diacylglycerol Affinity of Conserved Region 1 Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela D.; Cole, Taylor R.; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional and novel isoenzymes of PKC are activated by the membrane-embedded second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) through its interactions with the C1 regulatory domain. The affinity of C1 domains to DAG varies considerably among PKCs. To gain insight into the origin of differential DAG affinities, we conducted high-resolution NMR studies of C1B domain from PKCδ (C1Bδ) and its W252Y variant. The W252Y mutation was previously shown to render C1Bδ less responsive to DAG (Dries, D. R., Gallegos, L. L., and Newton, A. C. (2007) A single residue in the C1 domain sensitizes novel protein kinase C isoforms to cellular diacylglycerol production. J. Biol. Chem. 282, 826–830) and thereby emulate the behavior of C1B domains from conventional PKCs that have a conserved Tyr at the equivalent position. Our data revealed that W252Y mutation did not perturb the conformation of C1Bδ in solution but significantly reduced its propensity to partition into a membrane-mimicking environment in the absence of DAG. Using detergent micelles doped with a paramagnetic lipid, we determined that both the residue identity at position 252 and complexation with diacylglycerol influence the geometry of C1Bδ-micelle interactions. In addition, we identified the C-terminal helix α1 of C1Bδ as an interaction site with the head groups of phosphatidylserine, a known activator of PKCδ. Taken together, our studies (i) reveal the identities of C1Bδ residues involved in interactions with membrane-mimicking environment, DAG, and phosphatidylserine, as well as the affinities associated with each event and (ii) suggest that the initial ligand-independent membrane recruitment of C1B domains, which is greatly facilitated by the interfacial partitioning of Trp-252, is responsible, at least in part, for the differential DAG affinities. PMID:25124034

  4. Manipulating Conserved Heme Cavity Residues of Chlorite Dismutase: Effect on Structure, Redox Chemistry, and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b containing oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. In order to elucidate the role of conserved heme cavity residues in the catalysis of this reaction comprehensive mutational and biochemical analyses of Cld from “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) were performed. Particularly, point mutations of the cavity-forming residues R173, K141, W145, W146, and E210 were performed. The effect of manipulation in 12 single and double mutants was probed by UV–vis spectroscopy, spectroelectrochemistry, pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetics, and X-ray crystallography. Resulting biochemical data are discussed with respect to the known crystal structure of wild-type NdCld and the variants R173A and R173K as well as the structures of R173E, W145V, W145F, and the R173Q/W146Y solved in this work. The findings allow a critical analysis of the role of these heme cavity residues in the reaction mechanism of chlorite degradation that is proposed to involve hypohalous acid as transient intermediate and formation of an O=O bond. The distal R173 is shown to be important (but not fully essential) for the reaction with chlorite, and, upon addition of cyanide, it acts as a proton acceptor in the formation of the resulting low-spin complex. The proximal H-bonding network including K141-E210-H160 keeps the enzyme in its ferric (E°′ = −113 mV) and mainly five-coordinated high-spin state and is very susceptible to perturbation. PMID:24364531

  5. Conserved Cysteine Residues Provide a Protein-Protein Interaction Surface in Dual Oxidase (DUOX) Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Meitzler, Jennifer L.; Hinde, Sara; Bánfi, Botond; Nauseef, William M.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Intramolecular disulfide bond formation is promoted in oxidizing extracellular and endoplasmic reticulum compartments and often contributes to protein stability and function. DUOX1 and DUOX2 are distinguished from other members of the NOX protein family by the presence of a unique extracellular N-terminal region. These peroxidase-like domains lack the conserved cysteines that confer structural stability to mammalian peroxidases. Sequence-based structure predictions suggest that the thiol groups present are solvent-exposed on a single protein surface and are too distant to support intramolecular disulfide bond formation. To investigate the role of these thiol residues, we introduced four individual cysteine to glycine mutations in the peroxidase-like domains of both human DUOXs and purified the recombinant proteins. The mutations caused little change in the stabilities of the monomeric proteins, supporting the hypothesis that the thiol residues are solvent-exposed and not involved in disulfide bonds that are critical for structural integrity. However, the ability of the isolated hDUOX1 peroxidase-like domain to dimerize was altered, suggesting a role for these cysteines in protein-protein interactions that could facilitate homodimerization of the peroxidase-like domain or, in the full-length protein, heterodimeric interactions with a maturation protein. When full-length hDUOX1 was expressed in HEK293 cells, the mutations resulted in decreased H2O2 production that correlated with a decreased amount of the enzyme localized to the membrane surface rather than with a loss of activity or with a failure to synthesize the mutant proteins. These results support a role for the cysteine residues in intermolecular disulfide bond formation with the DUOX maturation factor DUOXA1. PMID:23362256

  6. A catalytic function for the structurally conserved residue Phe 100 of ribonuclease T1.

    PubMed Central

    Doumen, J.; Gonciarz, M.; Zegers, I.; Loris, R.; Wyns, L.; Steyaert, J.

    1996-01-01

    The function of the conserved Phe 100 residue of RNase T1 (EC 3.1.27.3) has been investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and X-ray crystallography. Replacement of Phe 100 by alanine results in a mutant enzyme with kcat reduced 75-fold and a small increase in Km for the dinucleoside phosphate substrate GpC. The Phe 100 Ala substitution has similar effects on the turnover rates of GpC and its minimal analogue GpOMe, in which the leaving cytidine is replaced by methanol. The contribution to catalysis is independent of the nature of the leaving group, indicating that Phe 100 belongs to the primary site. The contribution of Phe 100 to catalysis may result from a direct van der Waals contact between its aromatic ring and the phosphate moiety of the substrate. Phe 100 may also contribute to the positioning of the pentacovalent phosphorus of the transition state, relative to other catalytic residues. If compared to the corresponding wild-type data, the structural implications of the mutation in the present crystal structure of Phe 100 Ala RNase T1 complexed with the specific inhibitor 2'-GMP are restricted to the active site. Repositioning of 2'-GMP, caused by the Phe 100 Ala mutation, generates new or improved contacts of the phosphate moiety with Arg 77 and His 92. In contrast, interactions with the Glu 58 carboxylate appear to be weakened. The effects of the His 92 Gln and Phe 100 Ala mutations on GpC turnover are additive in the corresponding double mutant, indicating that the contribution of Phe 100 to catalysis is independent of the catalytic acid His 92. The present results lead to the conclusion that apolar residues may contribute considerably to catalyze conversions of charged molecules to charged products, involving even more polar transition states. PMID:8844843

  7. The conserved protein Dre2 uses essential [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters for its function in cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Netz, Daili J A; Genau, Heide M; Weiler, Benjamin D; Bill, Eckhard; Pierik, Antonio J; Lill, Roland

    2016-07-15

    The cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly (CIA) machinery comprises 11 essential components and matures Fe-S proteins involved in translation and genome maintenance. Maturation is initiated by the electron transfer chain NADPH-diflavin reductase Tah18-Fe-S protein Dre2 that facilitates the de novo assembly of a [4Fe-4S] cluster on the scaffold complex Cfd1-Nbp35. Tah18-Dre2 also play a critical role in the assembly of the diferric tyrosyl radical cofactor of ribonucleotide reductase. Dre2 contains eight conserved cysteine residues as potential co-ordinating ligands for Fe-S clusters but their functional importance and the type of bound clusters is unclear. In the present study, we use a combination of mutagenesis, cell biological and biochemical as well as UV-visible, EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches to show that the yeast Dre2 cysteine residues Cys(252), Cys(263), Cys(266) and Cys(268) (motif I) bind a [2Fe-2S] cluster, whereas cysteine residues Cys(311), Cys(314), Cys(322) and Cys(325) (motif II) co-ordinate a [4Fe-4S] cluster. All of these residues with the exception of Cys(252) are essential for cell viability, cytosolic Fe-S protein activity and in vivo (55)Fe-S cluster incorporation. The N-terminal methyltransferase-like domain of Dre2 is important for proper Fe-S cluster assembly at motifs I and II, which occurs in an interdependent fashion. Our findings further resolve why recombinant Dre2 from Arabidopsis, Trypanosoma or humans has previously been isolated with a single [2Fe-2S] instead of native [2Fe-2S] plus [4Fe-4S] clusters. In the presence of oxygen, the motif I-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster is labile and the motif II-bound [4Fe-4S] cluster is readily converted into a [2Fe-2S] cluster. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Mutagenesis of conserved active site residues of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase enhances the accumulation of α-ketoglutarate in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (α-KG) is an important intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and has broad applications. The mitochondrial ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH) complex catalyzes the oxidation of α-KG to succinyl-CoA. Disruption of KGDH, which may enhance the accumulation of α-KG theoretically, was found to be lethal to obligate aerobic cells. In this study, individual overexpression of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST), which serves as the inner core of KGDH, decreased overall activity of the enzyme complex. Furthermore, two conserved active site residues of DLST, His419, and Asp423 were identified. In order to determine whether these residues are engaged in enzyme reaction or not, these two conserved residues were individually mutated. Analysis of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme variants provided evidence that the catalytic reaction of DLST depended on residues His419 and Asp423. Overexpression of mutated DLST not only impaired balanced assembly of KGDH, but also disrupted the catalytic integrity of the enzyme complex. Replacement of the Asp423 residue by glutamate increased extracellular α-KG by 40 % to 50 g L(-1) in mutant strain. These observations uncovered catalytic roles of two conserved active site residues of DLST and provided clues for effective metabolic strategies for rational carbon flux control for the enhanced production of α-KG and related bioproducts.

  9. Mechanism of silver staining of histones: evidence for involvement of clustered lysine residues.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, T; Tsutsui, K; Tsutsui, K; Aoyama, K; Oda, T

    1984-09-17

    Pretreatment of histones with formaldehyde markedly enhances the formation of metalic silver from ammoniacal silver ion. The rate of silver reduction was determined with different histones by spectrophotometric measurement of colloidal silver stabilized in solution, and the apparent reactivity thus determined was found to be in the decreasing order of H1 greater than H2B greater than H2A greater than H3 greater than H4. Involvement of lysine residues was suggested since this order coincides with that of lysine content of these histones. However, the exceptionally high reactivity of histone H1 can be explained only when greater contribution of clustered lysine residues is assumed. Amino group modification and tryptic digestion studies of H1 corroborated this assumption.

  10. Conservation of a vitellogenin gene cluster in oviparous vertebrates and identification of its traces in the platypus genome.

    PubMed

    Babin, Patrick J

    2008-04-30

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) derivatives are the main egg-yolk proteins in most oviparous animal species, and are, therefore, key players in reproduction and embryo development. Conserved synteny and phylogeny were used to identify a Vtg gene cluster (VGC) that had been evolutionarily conserved in most oviparous vertebrates, encompassing the three linked Vtgs on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome 8. Tandem arranged homologs to chicken VtgII and VtgIII were retrieved in similar locations in Xenopus (Xenopus tropicalis) and homologous transcribed inverted genes were found in medaka (Oryzias latipes), stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes), and Tetrahodon (Tetraodon nigroviridis), while zebrafish (Danio rerio) Vtg3 may represent a residual trace of VGC in this genome. Vtgs were not conserved in the paralogous chromosomal segment attributed to a whole-genome duplication event in the ancestor of teleosts, while tandem duplicated forms have survived the recent African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) tetraploidization. Orthologs to chicken VtgI were found in similar locations in teleost fish, as well as in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). Additional Vtg fragments found suggested that VGC had been conserved in this egg-laying mammal. A low ratio of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution values and the paucity of pseudogene features suggest functional platypus Vtg products. Genomic identification of Vtgs, Apob, and Mtp in this genome, together with maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses, support the existence of these three large lipid transfer protein superfamily members at the base of the mammalian lineage. In conclusion, the establishment of a VGC in the vertebrate lineage predates the divergence of ray-finned fish and tetrapods and the shift in reproductive and developmental strategy observed between prototherians and therians may be associated with its loss, as shown by its absence from the genomic resources currently

  11. Temporal and topological clustering of diverged residues among enterobacterial dihydrofolate reductases.

    PubMed

    Garvin, L D; Hardies, S C

    1991-09-01

    The complete nucleotide and encoded amino acid sequences were determined for the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from the bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes and Citrobacter freundii. These were compared with the closely related Escherichia coli DHFR sequence. The ancestral DHFR sequence common to these three species was reconstructed. Since that ancestor there have been seven, nine, and one amino acid replacements in E. coli, E. aerogenes, and C. freundii, respectively. In E. coli, five of its seven replacements were located in the beta-sheet portion of the protein, and all seven were located in a single restricted region of the protein. In E. aerogenes, all nine of its replacements were located within surface residues, with five clustered in a region topologically distinct from the E. coli cluster. The replaced side chains are sometimes in direct contact but more often are separated by an intervening side chain. It is argued that the temporal clustering of replacements is typical for the evolution of most proteins and that the associated topological clustering gives a picture of how evolutionary change is accommodated by protein structure.

  12. Demonstration of the functional role of conserved Glu-Arg residues in the Staphylococcus aureus ferrichrome transporter.

    PubMed

    Vinés, Enrique D; Speziali, Craig D; Heinrichs, David E

    2014-02-01

    The features that govern the interaction of ligand binding proteins with membrane permeases of cognate ABC transporters are largely unknown. Using sequence alignments and structural modeling based on the structure of the Escherichia coli BtuCD vitamin B12 transporter, we identified six conserved basic residues in the permease, comprised of FhuB and FhuG proteins, in the ferrichrome transporter of Staphylococcus aureus. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we demonstrate that two of these residues, FhuB Arg-71 and FhuG Arg-61, play a more dominant role in transporter function than FhuB Arg-74 and Arg-311, and FhuG Arg-64 and Lys-306. Moreover, we show that at positions 71 and 61 in FhuB and FhuG, respectively, arginine cannot be substituted for lysine without loss of transporter function. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated the importance of conserved acidic residues in the ferrichrome binding protein, FhuD2. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Glu-Arg salt bridges are critical for the interaction of the ligand binding protein with the transmembrane domains FhuB and FhuG. This hypothesis was further studied by "charge swapping" experiments whereby we constructed a S. aureus strain expressing FhuD2 with conserved residues Glu-97 and Glu-231 replaced by Arg and FhuB and FhuG with conserved basic residues Arg-71 and Arg-61, respectively, replaced by Glu. A strain containing this combination of substitutions restored partial function to the ferrichrome transporter. The results provide a direct demonstration of the functional importance of conserved basic residues on the extracellular surface of the ferrichrome permease in the Gram-positive bacterium S. aureus.

  13. Potential of high residue conservation tillage to enhance water conservation and water use efficiency in corn production in the Southeast

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Following the adoption of its first Comprehensive State-wide Water Management Plan in early February 2008, Georgia is on course to drafting regionally-based water development and conservation plans. Conservation tillage-based crop production can be one of the management tools available for achieving...

  14. Conserved residues in Ycf54 are required for protochlorophyllide formation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hollingshead, Sarah; Bliss, Sophie; Baker, Patrick J.

    2017-01-01

    Chlorophylls (Chls) are modified tetrapyrrole molecules, essential for photosynthesis. These pigments possess an isocyclic E ring formed by the Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethylester cyclase (MgPME–cyclase). We assessed the in vivo effects of altering seven highly conserved residues within Ycf54, which is required for MgPME–cyclase activity in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. Synechocystis strains harbouring the Ycf54 alterations D39A, F40A and R82A were blocked to varying degrees at the MgPME–cyclase step, whereas the A9G mutation reduced Ycf54 levels by ∼75%. Wild-type (WT) levels of the cyclase subunit CycI are present in strains with D39A and F40A, but these strains have lowered cellular Chl and photosystem accumulation. CycI is reduced by ∼50% in A9G and R82A, but A9G has no perturbations in Chl or photosystem accumulation, whilst R82A contains very little Chl and few photosystems. When FLAG tagged and used as bait in pulldown experiments, the three mutants D39A, F40A and R82A were unable to interact with the MgPME–cyclase component CycI, whereas A9G pulled down a similar level of CycI as WT Ycf54. These observations suggest that a stable interaction between CycI and Ycf54 is required for unimpeded Pchlide biosynthesis. Crystal structures of the WT, A9G and R82A Ycf54 proteins were solved and analysed to investigate the structural effects of these mutations. A loss of the local hydrogen bonding network and a reversal in the surface charge surrounding residue R82 are probably responsible for the functional differences observed in the R82A mutation. We conclude that the Ycf54 protein must form a stable interaction with CycI to promote optimal Pchlide biosynthesis. PMID:28008132

  15. Protein engineering of selected residues from conserved sequence regions of a novel Anoxybacillus α-amylase

    PubMed Central

    Ranjani, Velayudhan; Janeček, Štefan; Chai, Kian Piaw; Shahir, Shafinaz; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Kian Mau

    2014-01-01

    The α-amylases from Anoxybacillus species (ASKA and ADTA), Bacillus aquimaris (BaqA) and Geobacillus thermoleovorans (GTA, Pizzo and GtamyII) were proposed as a novel group of the α-amylase family GH13. An ASKA yielding a high percentage of maltose upon its reaction on starch was chosen as a model to study the residues responsible for the biochemical properties. Four residues from conserved sequence regions (CSRs) were thus selected, and the mutants F113V (CSR-I), Y187F and L189I (CSR-II) and A161D (CSR-V) were characterised. Few changes in the optimum reaction temperature and pH were observed for all mutants. Whereas the Y187F (t1/2 43 h) and L189I (t1/2 36 h) mutants had a lower thermostability at 65°C than the native ASKA (t1/2 48 h), the mutants F113V and A161D exhibited an improved t1/2 of 51 h and 53 h, respectively. Among the mutants, only the A161D had a specific activity, kcat and kcat/Km higher (1.23-, 1.17- and 2.88-times, respectively) than the values determined for the ASKA. The replacement of the Ala-161 in the CSR-V with an aspartic acid also caused a significant reduction in the ratio of maltose formed. This finding suggests the Ala-161 may contribute to the high maltose production of the ASKA. PMID:25069018

  16. Residues in Conserved Loops of Intramembrane Metalloprotease SpoIVFB Interact with Residues near the Cleavage Site in Pro-σK

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Luethy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Intramembrane metalloproteases (IMMPs) control critical biological processes by cleaving membrane-associated proteins within a transmembrane segment or at a site near the membrane surface. Phylogenetic analysis divides IMMPs into four groups. SpoIVFB is a group III IMMP that regulates Bacillus subtilis endospore formation by cleaving Pro-σK and releasing the active sigma factor from a membrane. To elucidate the enzyme-substrate interaction, single-cysteine versions of catalytically inactive SpoIVFB and C-terminally truncated Pro-σK(1-126) (which can be cleaved by active SpoIVFB) were coexpressed in Escherichia coli, and proximity was tested by disulfide cross-linking in vivo. As expected, the results provided evidence that catalytic residue Glu-44 of SpoIVFB is near the cleavage site in the substrate. Also near the cleavage site were two residues of SpoIVFB in predicted conserved loops; Pro-135 in a short loop and Val-70 in a longer loop. Pro-135 corresponds to Pro-399 of RseP, a group I IMMP, and Pro-399 was reported previously to interact with substrate near the cleavage site, suggesting a conserved interaction across IMMP subfamilies. Val-70 follows a newly recognized conserved motif, PXGG (X is a large hydrophobic residue), which is in a hydrophobic region predicted to be a membrane reentrant loop. Following the hydrophobic region is a negatively charged region that is conserved in IMMPs of groups I and III. At least two residues with a negatively charged side chain are required in this region for activity of SpoIVFB. The region exhibits other features in IMMPs of groups II and IV. Its possible roles, as well as that of the short loop, are discussed. New insights into IMMP-substrate interaction build toward understanding how IMMPs function and may facilitate manipulation of their activity. PMID:23995631

  17. Cover crop management influences residue biomass and subsequent weed suppression in a conservation agriculture corn and cotton rotation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Use of winter cover crops is an integral component of conservation systems in corn and cotton. However, data concerning cover management and subsequent residue and weed biomass is needed. Field experiments were conducted from autumn of 2003 through cash crop harvest in 2006 at the Alabama Agricultur...

  18. The role of a conserved tyrosine residue in high-potential iron sulfur proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Iwagami, S. G.; Creagh, A. L.; Haynes, C. A.; Borsari, M.; Felli, I. C.; Piccioli, M.; Eltis, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    Conserved tyrosine-12 of Ectothiorhodospira halophila high-potential iron sulphur protein (HiPIP) iso-I was substituted with phenylalanine (Y12F), histidine (Y12H), tryptophan (Y12W), isoleucine (Y12I), and alanine (Y12A). Variants Y12A and Y12I were expressed to reasonable levels in cells grown at lower temperatures, but decomposed during purification. Variants Y12F, Y12H, and Y12W were substantially destabilized with respect to the recombinant wild-type HiPIP (rcWT) as determined by differential scanning calorimetry over a pH range of 7.0-11.0. Characterization of the Y12F variant by NMR indicates that the principal structural differences between this variant and the rcWT HiPIP result from the loss of the two hydrogen bonds of the Tyr-12 hydroxyl group with Asn-14 O delta 1 and Lys-59 NH, respectively. The effect of the loss of the latter interaction is propagated through the Lys-59/Val-58 peptide bond, thereby perturbing Gly-46. The delta delta GDapp of Y12F of 2.3 kcal/mol with respect to rcWT HiPIP (25 degrees C, pH 7.0) is entirely consistent with the contribution of these two hydrogen bonds to the stability of the latter. CD measurements show that Tyr-12 influences several electronic transitions within the cluster. The midpoint reduction potentials of variants Y12F, Y12H, and Y12W were 17, 19, and 22 mV (20 mM MOPS, 0.2 M sodium chloride, pH 6.98, 25 degrees C), respectively, higher than that of rcWT HiPIP. The current results indicate that, although conserved Tyr-12 modulates the properties of the cluster, its principle function is to stabilize the HiPIP through hydrogen bonds involving its hydroxyl group and electrostatic interactions involving its aromatic ring. PMID:8580847

  19. Role of Conserved Proline Residues in Human Apolipoprotein A-IV Structure and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaodi; Walker, Ryan G.; Morris, Jamie; Davidson, W. Sean; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo)A-IV is a lipid emulsifying protein linked to a range of protective roles in obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. It exists in several states in plasma including lipid-bound in HDL and chylomicrons and as monomeric and dimeric lipid-free/poor forms. Our recent x-ray crystal structure of the central domain of apoA-IV shows that it adopts an elongated helical structure that dimerizes via two long reciprocating helices. A striking feature is the alignment of conserved proline residues across the dimer interface. We speculated that this plays important roles in the structure of the lipid-free protein and its ability to bind lipid. Here we show that the systematic conversion of these prolines to alanine increased the thermodynamic stability of apoA-IV and its propensity to oligomerize. Despite the structural stabilization, we noted an increase in the ability to bind and reorganize lipids and to promote cholesterol efflux from cells. The novel properties of these mutants allowed us to isolate the first trimeric form of an exchangeable apolipoprotein and characterize it by small-angle x-ray scattering and chemical cross-linking. The results suggest that the reciprocating helix interaction is a common feature of all apoA-IV oligomers. We propose a model of how self-association of apoA-IV can result in spherical lipoprotein particles, a model that may have broader applications to other exchangeable apolipoprotein family members. PMID:25733664

  20. Conserved residues in the HAMP domain define a new family of proposed bipartite energy taxis receptors.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Kathryn T; Zhulin, Igor B; Stuckey, Jeanne A; DiRita, Victor J

    2009-01-01

    HAMP domains, found in many bacterial signal transduction proteins, generally transmit an intramolecular signal between an extracellular sensory domain and an intracellular signaling domain. Studies of HAMP domains in proteins where both the input and output signals occur intracellularly are limited to those of the Aer energy taxis receptor of Escherichia coli, which has both a HAMP domain and a sensory PAS domain. Campylobacter jejuni has an energy taxis system consisting of the domains of Aer divided between two proteins, CetA (HAMP domain containing) and CetB (PAS domain containing). In this study, we found that the CetA HAMP domain differs significantly from that of Aer in the predicted secondary structure. Using similarity searches, we identified 55 pairs of HAMP/PAS proteins encoded by adjacent genes in a diverse group of microorganisms. We propose that these HAMP/PAS pairs form a new family of bipartite energy taxis receptors. Within these proteins, we identified nine residues in the HAMP domain and proximal signaling domain that are highly conserved, at least three of which are required for CetA function. Additionally, we demonstrated that CetA contributes to the invasion of human epithelial cells by C. jejuni, while CetB does not. This finding supports the hypothesis that members of HAMP/PAS pairs possess the capacity to act independently of each other in cellular traits other than energy taxis.

  1. The scaling exponent of residual nonwetting phase cluster size distributions in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglauer, Stefan; Wülling, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    During an imbibition process in two-phase subsurface flow the imbibing phase can displace the nonwetting phase up to an endpoint at which a residual saturation is reached (which cannot be reduced further by additional wetting phase flow due to the complex pore network of the rock and associated strong capillary forces which trap the nonwetting phase). The residual nonwetting phase is split into many disconnected clusters of different sizes. This size distribution is of key importance, for instance, in the context of hydrocarbon recovery, contaminant transport, or CO2 geostorage; and it is well established that this size distribution follows a power law. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with the exact value of the distribution exponent τ, which mathematically describes the size distribution. To reduce this uncertainty and to better constrain τ, we analyzed a representative experimental data set with mathematically rigorous methods, and we demonstrate that τ is substantially smaller (≈1.1) than previously suggested. This raises increasing doubt that simple percolation models can accurately predict subsurface fluid flow behavior; and this has serious consequences for subsurface flow processes: hydrocarbon recovery is easier than predicted, but CO2 geostorage dissolution trapping capacities are significantly reduced and potential remobilization of residual CO2 is more likely than previously believed.

  2. Conserved prosegment residues stabilize a late-stage folding transition state of pepsin independently of ground states.

    PubMed

    Dee, Derek R; Horimoto, Yasumi; Yada, Rickey Y

    2014-01-01

    The native folding of certain zymogen-derived enzymes is completely dependent upon a prosegment domain to stabilize the folding transition state, thereby catalyzing the folding reaction. Generally little is known about how the prosegment accomplishes this task. It was previously shown that the prosegment catalyzes a late-stage folding transition between a stable misfolded state and the native state of pepsin. In this study, the contributions of specific prosegment residues to catalyzing pepsin folding were investigated by introducing individual Ala substitutions and measuring the effects on the bimolecular folding reaction between the prosegment peptide and pepsin. The effects of mutations on the free energies of the individual misfolded and native ground states and the transition state were compared using measurements of prosegment-pepsin binding and folding kinetics. Five out of the seven prosegment residues examined yielded relatively large kinetic effects and minimal ground state perturbations upon mutation, findings which indicate that these residues form strengthened and/or non-native contacts in the transition state. These five residues are semi- to strictly conserved, while only a non-conserved residue had no kinetic effect. One conserved residue was shown to form native structure in the transition state. These results indicated that the prosegment, which is only 44 residues long, has evolved a high density of contacts that preferentially stabilize the folding transition state over the ground states. It is postulated that the prosegment forms extensive non-native contacts during the process of catalyzing correct inter- and intra-domain contacts during the final stages of folding. These results have implications for understanding the folding of multi-domain proteins and for the evolution of prosegment-catalyzed folding.

  3. Conserved Prosegment Residues Stabilize a Late-Stage Folding Transition State of Pepsin Independently of Ground States

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Derek R.; Horimoto, Yasumi; Yada, Rickey Y.

    2014-01-01

    The native folding of certain zymogen-derived enzymes is completely dependent upon a prosegment domain to stabilize the folding transition state, thereby catalyzing the folding reaction. Generally little is known about how the prosegment accomplishes this task. It was previously shown that the prosegment catalyzes a late-stage folding transition between a stable misfolded state and the native state of pepsin. In this study, the contributions of specific prosegment residues to catalyzing pepsin folding were investigated by introducing individual Ala substitutions and measuring the effects on the bimolecular folding reaction between the prosegment peptide and pepsin. The effects of mutations on the free energies of the individual misfolded and native ground states and the transition state were compared using measurements of prosegment-pepsin binding and folding kinetics. Five out of the seven prosegment residues examined yielded relatively large kinetic effects and minimal ground state perturbations upon mutation, findings which indicate that these residues form strengthened and/or non-native contacts in the transition state. These five residues are semi- to strictly conserved, while only a non-conserved residue had no kinetic effect. One conserved residue was shown to form native structure in the transition state. These results indicated that the prosegment, which is only 44 residues long, has evolved a high density of contacts that preferentially stabilize the folding transition state over the ground states. It is postulated that the prosegment forms extensive non-native contacts during the process of catalyzing correct inter- and intra-domain contacts during the final stages of folding. These results have implications for understanding the folding of multi-domain proteins and for the evolution of prosegment-catalyzed folding. PMID:24983988

  4. Sequence-related human proteins cluster by degree of evolutionary conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrowka, Ralf; Patzak, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Holste, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Gene duplication followed by adaptive evolution is thought to be a central mechanism for the emergence of novel genes. To illuminate the contribution of duplicated protein-coding sequences to the complexity of the human genome, we study the connectivity of pairwise sequence-related human proteins and construct a network (N) of linked protein sequences with shared similarities. We find that (i) the connectivity distribution P(k) for k sequence-related proteins decays as a power law P(k)˜k-γ with γ≈1.2 , (ii) the top rank of N consists of a single large cluster of proteins (≈70%) , while bottom ranks consist of multiple isolated clusters, and (iii) structural characteristics of N show both a high degree of clustering and an intermediate connectivity (“small-world” features). We gain further insight into structural properties of N by studying the relationship between the connectivity distribution and the phylogenetic conservation of proteins in bacteria, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. We find that (iv) the proportion of sequence-related proteins increases with increasing extent of evolutionary conservation. Our results support that small-world network properties constitute a footprint of an evolutionary mechanism and extend the traditional interpretation of protein families.

  5. Cluster analysis of Pinus taiwanensis for its ex situ conservation in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Shi, L; Wu, Z

    2015-06-01

    Pinus taiwanensis Hayata is one of the most famous sights in the Huangshan Scenic Resort, China, because of its strong adaptability and ability to survive; however, this endemic species is currently under threat in China. Relationships between different P. taiwanensis populations have been well-documented; however, few studies have been conducted on how to protect this rare pine. In the present study, we propose the ex situ conservation of this species using geographical information system (GIS) cluster and genetic diversity analyses. The GIS cluster method was conducted as a preliminary analysis for establishing a sampling site category based on climatic factors. Genetic diversity was analyzed using morphological and genetic traits. By combining geographical information with genetic data, we demonstrate that growing conditions, morphological traits, and the genetic make-up of the population in the Huangshan Scenic Resort were most similar to conditions on Tianmu Mountain. Therefore, we suggest that Tianmu Mountain is the best choice for the ex situ conservation of P. taiwanensis. Our results provide a molecular basis for the sustainable management, utilization, and conservation of this species in Huangshan Scenic Resort.

  6. Conserved Active Site Residues Limit Inhibition of a Copper-Containing Nitrite By Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tocheva, E.I.; Eltis, L.D.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-05-26

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  7. Conserved active site residues limit inhibition of a copper-containing nitrite reductase by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Tocheva, Elitza I; Eltis, Lindsay D; Murphy, Michael E P

    2008-04-15

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  8. Conserved residues in RF-NH₂ receptor models identify predicted contact sites in ligand-receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Bass, C; Katanski, C; Maynard, B; Zurro, I; Mariane, E; Matta, M; Loi, M; Melis, V; Capponi, V; Muroni, P; Setzu, M; Nichols, R

    2014-03-01

    Peptides in the RF-NH2 family are grouped together based on an amidated dipeptide C terminus and signal through G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to influence diverse physiological functions. By determining the mechanisms underlying RF-NH2 signaling targets can be identified to modulate physiological activity; yet, how RF-NH2 peptides interact with GPCRs is relatively unexplored. We predicted conserved residues played a role in Drosophila melanogaster RF-NH2 ligand-receptor interactions. In this study D. melanogaster rhodopsin-like family A peptide GPCRs alignments identified eight conserved residues unique to RF-NH2 receptors. Three of these residues were in extra-cellular loops of modeled RF-NH2 receptors and four in transmembrane helices oriented into a ligand binding pocket to allow contact with a peptide. The eighth residue was unavailable for interaction; yet its conservation suggested it played another role. A novel hydrophobic region representative of RF-NH2 receptors was also discovered. The presence of rhodopsin-like family A GPCR structural motifs including a toggle switch indicated RF-NH2s signal classically; however, some features of the DMS receptors were distinct from other RF-NH2 GPCRs. Additionally, differences in RF-NH2 receptor structures which bind the same peptide explained ligand specificity. Our novel results predicted conserved residues as RF-NH2 ligand-receptor contact sites and identified unique and classic structural features. These discoveries will aid antagonist design to modulate RF-NH2 signaling.

  9. Conservation of the pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic gene cluster among six pyrrolnitrin-producing strains.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P E; Burd, W; Hill, D S; Ligon, J M; van Pée, K

    1999-11-01

    The prnABCD gene cluster from Pseudomonas fluorescens encodes the biosynthetic pathway for pyrrolnitrin, a secondary metabolite derived from tryptophan which has strong anti-fungal activity. We used the prn genes from P. fluorescens strain BL915 as a probe to clone and sequence homologous genes from three other Pseudomonas strains, Burkholderia cepacia and Myxococcus fulvus. With the exception of the prnA gene from M. fulvus59% similar among the strains, indicating that the biochemical pathway for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis is highly conserved. The prnA gene from M. fulvus is about 45% similar to prnA from the other strains and contains regions which are highly conserved among all six strains.

  10. Measurement of cluster ions and residue nanoparticles from water samples with an electrospray/differential mobility analyzer.

    PubMed

    Han, Bangwoo; Lenggoro, I Wuled; Choi, Mansoo; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2003-06-01

    Cluster ions and residue nanoparticles with sizes below 30 nm were generated by electrospraying (ES) and drying droplets of pure water, tap water, and aqueous solutions of salts. The mobility spectra of the cluster ions between 9.1 and 9.3 x 10(-5) m2/(V s) were measured using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) operated at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. A modified Faraday cup and a condensation nucleus counter were used for detection. The concentrations of total residue/contaminants in the water were determined as a function of sizes of measured aerosol particles and of the initial droplets. Method detection limits were at sub-ppb level for pure water and sub-ppm level for tap water. ES/DMA is capable of simultaneously measuring the mobility distribution of cluster ions and concentration of total residue present in water samples.

  11. Critical Role of Conserved Hydrophobic Residues within the Major Homology Region in Mature Retroviral Capsid Assembly ▿

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, John G.; Flanagan, John M.; Ropson, Ira J.; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Craven, Rebecca C.

    2008-01-01

    During retroviral maturation, the CA protein undergoes dramatic structural changes and establishes unique intermolecular interfaces in the mature capsid shell that are different from those that existed in the immature precursor. The most conserved region of CA, the major homology region (MHR), has been implicated in both immature and mature assembly, although the precise contribution of the MHR residues to each event has been largely undefined. To test the roles of specific MHR residues in mature capsid assembly, an in vitro system was developed that allowed for the first-time formation of Rous sarcoma virus CA into structures resembling authentic capsids. The ability of CA to assemble organized structures was destroyed by substitutions of two conserved hydrophobic MHR residues and restored by second-site suppressors, demonstrating that these MHR residues are required for the proper assembly of mature capsids in addition to any role that these amino acids may play in immature particle assembly. The defect caused by the MHR mutations was identified as an early step in the capsid assembly process. The results provide strong evidence for a model in which the hydrophobic residues of the MHR control a conformational reorganization of CA that is needed to initiate capsid assembly and suggest that the formation of an interdomain interaction occurs early during maturation. PMID:18400856

  12. Drug repositioning for orphan genetic diseases through Conserved Anticoexpressed Gene Clusters (CAGCs)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of new therapies for orphan genetic diseases represents an extremely important medical and social challenge. Drug repositioning, i.e. finding new indications for approved drugs, could be one of the most cost- and time-effective strategies to cope with this problem, at least in a subset of cases. Therefore, many computational approaches based on the analysis of high throughput gene expression data have so far been proposed to reposition available drugs. However, most of these methods require gene expression profiles directly relevant to the pathologic conditions under study, such as those obtained from patient cells and/or from suitable experimental models. In this work we have developed a new approach for drug repositioning, based on identifying known drug targets showing conserved anti-correlated expression profiles with human disease genes, which is completely independent from the availability of ‘ad hoc’ gene expression data-sets. Results By analyzing available data, we provide evidence that the genes displaying conserved anti-correlation with drug targets are antagonistically modulated in their expression by treatment with the relevant drugs. We then identified clusters of genes associated to similar phenotypes and showing conserved anticorrelation with drug targets. On this basis, we generated a list of potential candidate drug-disease associations. Importantly, we show that some of the proposed associations are already supported by independent experimental evidence. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that the identification of gene clusters showing conserved anticorrelation with drug targets can be an effective method for drug repositioning and provide a wide list of new potential drug-disease associations for experimental validation. PMID:24088245

  13. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  14. Residue network in protein native structure belongs to the universality class of a three-dimensional critical percolation cluster.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2009-02-01

    Single protein molecules are regarded as contact networks of amino-acid residues. Relationships between the shortest path lengths and the numbers of residues within single molecules in the native structures are examined for various sized proteins. A universal scaling among proteins is obtained, which shows that the residue networks are fractal networks. This universal fractal network is characterized with three kinds of dimensions: the network topological dimension D{c} approximately 1.9 , the fractal dimension D{f} approximately 2.5 , and the spectral dimension D{s} approximately 1.3 . These values are in surprisingly good coincidence with those of the three-dimensional critical percolation cluster. Hence the residue contact networks in the protein native structures belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional percolation cluster. The criticality is relevant to the ambivalence in the protein native structures, the coexistence of stability and instability, both of which are necessary for protein functions.

  15. Residue network in protein native structure belongs to the universality class of a three-dimensional critical percolation cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2009-02-01

    Single protein molecules are regarded as contact networks of amino-acid residues. Relationships between the shortest path lengths and the numbers of residues within single molecules in the native structures are examined for various sized proteins. A universal scaling among proteins is obtained, which shows that the residue networks are fractal networks. This universal fractal network is characterized with three kinds of dimensions: the network topological dimension Dc≈1.9 , the fractal dimension Df≈2.5 , and the spectral dimension Ds≈1.3 . These values are in surprisingly good coincidence with those of the three-dimensional critical percolation cluster. Hence the residue contact networks in the protein native structures belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional percolation cluster. The criticality is relevant to the ambivalence in the protein native structures, the coexistence of stability and instability, both of which are necessary for protein functions.

  16. Combinatorial clustering of residue position subsets predicts inhibitor affinity across the human kinome.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Drew H; Moll, Mark; Finn, Paul W; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinases are a large family of enzymes that play fundamental roles in propagating signals within the cell. Because of the high degree of binding site similarity shared among protein kinases, designing drug compounds with high specificity among the kinases has proven difficult. However, computational approaches to comparing the 3-dimensional geometry and physicochemical properties of key binding site residue positions have been shown to be informative of inhibitor selectivity. The Combinatorial Clustering Of Residue Position Subsets (ccorps) method, introduced here, provides a semi-supervised learning approach for identifying structural features that are correlated with a given set of annotation labels. Here, ccorps is applied to the problem of identifying structural features of the kinase atp binding site that are informative of inhibitor binding. ccorps is demonstrated to make perfect or near-perfect predictions for the binding affinity profile of 8 of the 38 kinase inhibitors studied, while only having overall poor predictive ability for 1 of the 38 compounds. Additionally, ccorps is shown to identify shared structural features across phylogenetically diverse groups of kinases that are correlated with binding affinity for particular inhibitors; such instances of structural similarity among phylogenetically diverse kinases are also shown to not be rare among kinases. Finally, these function-specific structural features may serve as potential starting points for the development of highly specific kinase inhibitors.

  17. Combinatorial Clustering of Residue Position Subsets Predicts Inhibitor Affinity across the Human Kinome

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Drew H.; Moll, Mark; Finn, Paul W.; Kavraki, Lydia E.

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinases are a large family of enzymes that play fundamental roles in propagating signals within the cell. Because of the high degree of binding site similarity shared among protein kinases, designing drug compounds with high specificity among the kinases has proven difficult. However, computational approaches to comparing the 3-dimensional geometry and physicochemical properties of key binding site residue positions have been shown to be informative of inhibitor selectivity. The Combinatorial Clustering Of Residue Position Subsets (ccorps) method, introduced here, provides a semi-supervised learning approach for identifying structural features that are correlated with a given set of annotation labels. Here, ccorps is applied to the problem of identifying structural features of the kinase atp binding site that are informative of inhibitor binding. ccorps is demonstrated to make perfect or near-perfect predictions for the binding affinity profile of 8 of the 38 kinase inhibitors studied, while only having overall poor predictive ability for 1 of the 38 compounds. Additionally, ccorps is shown to identify shared structural features across phylogenetically diverse groups of kinases that are correlated with binding affinity for particular inhibitors; such instances of structural similarity among phylogenetically diverse kinases are also shown to not be rare among kinases. Finally, these function-specific structural features may serve as potential starting points for the development of highly specific kinase inhibitors. PMID:23754939

  18. The synthesis of oligoribonucleotides containing O6-methylguanosine: the role of conserved guanosine residues in hammerhead ribozyme cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Grasby, J A; Jonathan, P; Butler, G; Gait, M J

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis is described of oligoribonucleotides containing the modified nucleoside O6-methylguanosine. Solid-phase oligoribonucleotide assembly was carried out by use of 2'-silyl-protected nucleoside phosphoramidites, a new O6-methylguanosine-containing synthon and a mild deprotection method. The O6-methylguanosine-modified oligonucleotides were used in the study of the role of conserved residues G5, G8 and G12 in hammerhead ribozyme cleavage. Hammerheads thus substituted at any of these positions showed an approximately 75-fold reduction in kcat whereas Km was unaffected. Hammerheads with modifications at G5 or G8 showed a significant reduction in magnesium binding affinity whereas modification at G12 had no effect. The results show that the three conserved G residues play crucial but different role sin hammerhead cleavage. PMID:8233777

  19. Conserved gene clusters in bacterial genomes provide further support for the primacy of RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefert, J. L.; Martin, K. A.; Abdi, F.; Widger, W. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Five complete bacterial genome sequences have been released to the scientific community. These include four (eu)Bacteria, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, M. pneumoniae, and Synechocystis PCC 6803, as well as one Archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii. Features of organization shared by these genomes are likely to have arisen very early in the history of the bacteria and thus can be expected to provide further insight into the nature of early ancestors. Results of a genome comparison of these five organisms confirm earlier observations that gene order is remarkably unpreserved. There are, nevertheless, at least 16 clusters of two or more genes whose order remains the same among the four (eu)Bacteria and these are presumed to reflect conserved elements of coordinated gene expression that require gene proximity. Eight of these gene orders are essentially conserved in the Archaea as well. Many of these clusters are known to be regulated by RNA-level mechanisms in Escherichia coli, which supports the earlier suggestion that this type of regulation of gene expression may have arisen very early. We conclude that although the last common ancestor may have had a DNA genome, it likely was preceded by progenotes with an RNA genome.

  20. Minimal promoter systems reveal the importance of conserved residues in the B-finger of human transcription factor IIB.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Nancy E; Glaser, Bryan T; Foley, Katherine M; Burton, Zachary F; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-09-11

    The "B-finger" of transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) is highly conserved and believed to play a role in the initiation process. We performed alanine substitutions across the B-finger of human TFIIB, made change-of-charge mutations in selected residues, and substituted the B-finger sequence from other organisms. Mutant proteins were examined in two minimal promoter systems (containing only RNA polymerase II, TATA-binding protein, and TFIIB) and in a complex system, using TFIIB-immunodepleted HeLa cell nuclear extract (NE). Mutations in conserved residues located on the sides of the B-finger had the greatest effect on activity in both minimal promoter systems, with mutations in residues Glu-51 and Arg-66 eliminating activity. The double change-of-charge mutant (E51R:R66E) did not show activity in either minimal promoter system. Mutations in the nonconserved residues at the tip of the B-finger did not significantly affect activity. However, all of the mutations in the B-finger showed at least 25% activity in the HeLa cell NE. Chimeric proteins, containing B-finger sequences from species with conserved residues on the side of the B-finger, showed wild-type activity in a minimal promoter system and in the HeLa cell NE. However, chimeric proteins whose sequence showed divergence on the sides of the B-finger had reduced activity. Transcription factor IIF (TFIIF) partially restored activity of the inactive mutants in the minimal promoter system, suggesting that TFIIF in HeLa cell NE helps to rescue the inactive mutations by interacting with either the B-finger or another component of the initiation complex that is influenced by the B-finger.

  1. The Conserved Arginine Cluster in the Insert of the Third Cytoplasmic Loop of the Long Form of the D₂ Dopamine Receptor (D2L-R) Acts as an Intracellular Retention Signal.

    PubMed

    Kubale, Valentina; Blagotinšek, Kaja; Nøhr, Jane; Eidne, Karin A; Vrecl, Milka

    2016-07-19

    This study examined whether the conserved arginine cluster present within the 29-amino acid insert of the long form of the D₂ dopamine receptor (D2L-R) confers its predominant intracellular localization. We hypothesized that the conserved arginine cluster (RRR) located within the insert could act as an RXR-type endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Arginine residues (R) within the cluster at positions 267, 268, and 269 were charge-reserved to glutamic acids (E), either individually or in clusters, thus generating single, double, and triple D2L-R mutants. Through analyses of cellular localization by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioligand binding assay, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET²) β-arrestin 2 (βarr2) recruitment assay, and cAMP signaling, it was revealed that charge reversal of the R residues at all three positions within the motif impaired their colocalization with ER marker calnexin and led to significantly improved cell surface expression. Additionally, these data demonstrate that an R to glutamic acid (E) substitution at position 2 within the RXR motif is not functionally permissible. Furthermore, all generated D2L-R mutants preserved their functional integrity regarding ligand binding, agonist-induced βarr2 recruitment and Gαi-mediated signaling. In summary, our results show that the conserved arginine cluster within the 29-amino acid insert of third cytoplasmic loop (IC3) of the D2L-R appears to be the ER retention signal.

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis of photoprotein mnemiopsin: implication of some conserved residues in bioluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Sajedi, Reza H; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Taghdir, Majid; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2013-03-01

    Mnemiopsin is a Ca(2+)-binding photoprotein from Mnemiopsis leidyi that emits a flash of blue light upon reacting with coelenterazine and Ca(2+). The light emission is a result of an intramolecular oxidation reaction. Similar to the other Ca(2+)-binding photoproteins, mnemiopsin is composed of apophotoprotein (206 amino acid residues), the imidazopyrazine chromophore, coelenterazine, and molecular oxygen. The biochemical properties of this photoprotein have been recently characterized but so far there has been no individual study on the role of critical residues. In this study, we introduced some mutations in the mnemiopsin structure for investigation of the roles of some critical residues in the substrate binding cavity, and neighboring residues in the mechanism of the reaction and the bioluminescence properties of the photoprotein. Mutants of mnemiopsin were produced by substitution of residues M77, W101 and M151. Three mutants (W101F, W101Y and M151Y mutants) had significantly reduced luminescence activity and altered bioluminescent properties (such as decay rate, Ca(2+) sensitivity, etc.), whereas the fourth (M77H mutant) lost its luminescence activity completely. Our experimental and theoretical studies suggest that residue M77 probably has structural importance and participates in stabilization of active site residues, whereas residue M151 is one of the critical mechanistic residues in ctenophore photoproteins.

  3. Conserved residues in Lassa fever virus Z protein modulate viral infectivity at the level of the ribonucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles.

  4. Evolutionary conservation and in vitro reconstitution of microsporidian iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Freibert, Sven-A; Goldberg, Alina V; Hacker, Christian; Molik, Sabine; Dean, Paul; Williams, Tom A; Nakjang, Sirintra; Long, Shaojun; Sendra, Kacper; Bill, Eckhard; Heinz, Eva; Hirt, Robert P; Lucocq, John M; Embley, T Martin; Lill, Roland

    2017-01-04

    Microsporidians are obligate intracellular parasites that have minimized their genome content and sub-cellular structures by reductive evolution. Here, we demonstrate that cristae-deficient mitochondria (mitosomes) of Trachipleistophora hominis are the functional site of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) assembly, which we suggest is the essential task of these organelles. Cell fractionation, fluorescence imaging and immunoelectron microscopy demonstrate that mitosomes contain a complete pathway for [2Fe-2S] cluster biosynthesis that we biochemically reconstituted using purified mitosomal ISC proteins. The T. hominis cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly (CIA) pathway includes the essential Cfd1-Nbp35 scaffold complex that assembles a [4Fe-4S] cluster as shown by spectroscopic methods in vitro. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the ISC and CIA pathways are predominantly bacterial, but their cytosolic and nuclear target Fe/S proteins are mainly archaeal. This mixed evolutionary history of Fe/S-related proteins and pathways, and their strong conservation among highly reduced parasites, provides compelling evidence for the ancient chimeric ancestry of eukaryotes.

  5. Evolutionary conservation and in vitro reconstitution of microsporidian iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Freibert, Sven-A.; Goldberg, Alina V.; Hacker, Christian; Molik, Sabine; Dean, Paul; Williams, Tom A.; Nakjang, Sirintra; Long, Shaojun; Sendra, Kacper; Bill, Eckhard; Heinz, Eva; Hirt, Robert P.; Lucocq, John M; Embley, T. Martin; Lill, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Microsporidians are obligate intracellular parasites that have minimized their genome content and sub-cellular structures by reductive evolution. Here, we demonstrate that cristae-deficient mitochondria (mitosomes) of Trachipleistophora hominis are the functional site of iron–sulfur cluster (ISC) assembly, which we suggest is the essential task of these organelles. Cell fractionation, fluorescence imaging and immunoelectron microscopy demonstrate that mitosomes contain a complete pathway for [2Fe–2S] cluster biosynthesis that we biochemically reconstituted using purified mitosomal ISC proteins. The T. hominis cytosolic iron–sulfur protein assembly (CIA) pathway includes the essential Cfd1–Nbp35 scaffold complex that assembles a [4Fe–4S] cluster as shown by spectroscopic methods in vitro. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the ISC and CIA pathways are predominantly bacterial, but their cytosolic and nuclear target Fe/S proteins are mainly archaeal. This mixed evolutionary history of Fe/S-related proteins and pathways, and their strong conservation among highly reduced parasites, provides compelling evidence for the ancient chimeric ancestry of eukaryotes. PMID:28051091

  6. Peanut residue carbon and nitrogen mineralization under simulated conventional and conservation tillage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Residue management is an important aspect of crop production systems. Availability of plant residue nitrogen (N) to succeeding crops is dependent on N mineralization rates during decomposition. Cooperative Extension currently recommends 22-67 kg N ha-1 credit to subsequent crops following peanut (Ar...

  7. Nitrogen and carbon mineralization from peanut residues under conservation and conventional tillage at two locations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Residue management is an important aspect of crop production systems. Availability of plant residue nitrogen (N) to succeeding crops is dependent on N mineralization rates and therefore on rates of N release during decomposition. Much of the information available on N release rates from peanut (Ar...

  8. Large-scale analysis of conserved rare codon clusters suggests an involvement in co-translational molecular recognition events.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Matthieu; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2012-06-01

    An increasing amount of evidence from experimental and computational analysis suggests that rare codon clusters are functionally important for protein activity. Most of the studies on rare codon clusters were performed on a limited number of proteins or protein families. In the present study, we present the Sherlocc program and how it can be used for large scale protein family analysis of evolutionarily conserved rare codon clusters and their relation to protein function and structure. This large-scale analysis was performed using the whole Pfam database covering over 70% of the known protein sequence universe. Our program Sherlocc, detects statistically relevant conserved rare codon clusters and produces a user-friendly HTML output. Statistically significant rare codon clusters were detected in a multitude of Pfam protein families. The most statistically significant rare codon clusters were predominantly identified in N-terminal Pfam families. Many of the longest rare codon clusters are found in membrane-related proteins which are required to interact with other proteins as part of their function, for example in targeting or insertion. We identified some cases where rare codon clusters can play a regulating role in the folding of catalytically important domains. Our results support the existence of a widespread functional role for rare codon clusters across species. Finally, we developed an online filter-based search interface that provides access to Sherlocc results for all Pfam families. The Sherlocc program and search interface are open access and are available at http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca

  9. A highly Conserved Aspartic Acid Residue of the Chitosanase from Bacillus Sp. TS Is Involved in the Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanping; Zhao, Shuangzhi; Liu, Yang; Chang, Zhengying; Ma, Yanhe; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning

    2016-11-01

    The chitosanase from Bacillus sp. TS (CsnTS) is an enzyme belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 8. The sequence of CsnTS shares 98 % identity with the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17. Crystallography analysis and site-direct mutagenesis of the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17 identified the important residues involved in the catalytic interaction and substrate binding. However, despite progress in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the chitosanase from the family GH8, the functional roles of some residues that are highly conserved throughout this family have not been fully elucidated. This study focused on one of these residues, i.e., the aspartic acid residue at position 318. We found that apart from asparagine, mutation of Asp318 resulted in significant loss of enzyme activity. In-depth investigations showed that mutation of this residue not only impaired enzymatic activity but also affected substrate binding. Taken together, our results showed that Asp318 plays an important role in CsnTS activity.

  10. Conservation and relative importance of residues across protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Guharoy, Mainak; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2005-10-25

    A core region surrounded by a rim characterizes biological interfaces. We ascertain the importance of the core by showing the sequence entropies of the residues comprising the core to be smaller than those in the rim. Such a distinction is not seen in the 2-fold-related, nonphysiological interfaces formed in crystal lattices of monomeric proteins, thereby providing a procedure for characterizing the oligomeric state from crystal structures of protein molecules. This method is better than those that rely on the comparison of the sequence entropies in the interface and the rest of the protein surface, especially in cases where the surface harbors additional binding sites. To a good approximation there is a correlation between the accessible surface area lost because of complexation and DeltaDeltaG values obtained through alanine-scanning mutagenesis (26-38 cal per A(2) of the surface buried) for residues located in the core, a relationship that is not discernable for rim residues. If, however, a residue participates in hydrogen bonding across the interface, the extent of stabilization is 52 cal/mol per 1 A(2) of the nonpolar surface area buried by the residue. As opposed to an amino acid classification used earlier, an environment-based grouping of residues yields a better discrimination in the sequence entropy between the core and the rim.

  11. Residues cluster-based segmentation and outlier-detection method for large-scale phase unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hanwen; Li, Zhenfang; Bao, Zheng

    2011-10-01

    2-D phase unwrapping is an important technique in many applications. However, with the growth of image scale, how to tile and splice the image effectively has become a new challenge. In this paper, the phase unwrapping problem is abstracted as solving a large-scale system of inconsistent linear equations. With the difficulties of large-scale phase unwrapping analyzed, L(0)-norm criterion is found to have potentials in efficient image tiling and splicing. Making use of the clustering characteristic of residue distribution, a tiling strategy is proposed for L(0)-norm criterion. Unfortunately, L(0)-norm is an NP-hard problem, which is very difficult to find an exact solution in a polynomial time. In order to effectively solve this problem, equations corresponding to branch cuts of L(0)-norm in the inconsistent equation system mentioned earlier are considered as outliers, and then an outlier-detection-based phase unwrapping method is proposed. Through this method, a highly accurate approximate solution to this NP-hard problem is achieved. A set of experimental results shows that the proposed approach can avoid the inconsistency between local and global phase unwrapping solutions caused by image tiling.

  12. Function of conserved acidic residues in the PSST homologue of complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) from Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, P M; Zwicker, K; Kerscher, S; Brandt, U

    2000-08-04

    Proton-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest and least understood enzyme of the respiratory chain. Complex I from bovine mitochondria consists of more than forty different polypeptides. Subunit PSST has been suggested to carry iron-sulfur center N-2 and has more recently been shown to be involved in inhibitor binding. Due to its pH-dependent midpoint potential, N-2 has been proposed to play a central role both in ubiquinone reduction and proton pumping. To obtain more insight into the functional role of PSST, we have analyzed site-directed mutants of conserved acidic residues in the PSST homologous subunit of the obligate aerobic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Mutations D136N and E140Q provided functional evidence that conserved acidic residues in PSST play a central role in the proton translocating mechanism of complex I and also in the interaction with the substrate ubiquinone. When Glu(89), the residue that has been suggested to be the fourth ligand of iron-sulfur center N-2 was changed to glutamine, alanine, or cysteine, the EPR spectrum revealed an unchanged amount of this redox center but was shifted and broadened in the g(z) region. This indicates that Glu(89) is not a ligand of N-2. The results are discussedin the light of structural similarities to the homologous [NiFe] hydrogenases.

  13. Mutations in a Conserved Domain of E. coli MscS to the Most Conserved Superfamily Residue Leads to Kinetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Hannah R.; Blount, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli (E. coli) the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, MscS, gates in response to membrane tension created from acute external hypoosmotic shock, thus rescuing the bacterium from cell lysis. E. coli MscS is the most well studied member of the MscS superfamily of channels, whose members are found throughout the bacterial and plant kingdoms. Homology to the pore lining helix and upper vestibule domain of E. coli MscS is required for inclusion into the superfamily. Although highly conserved, in the second half of the pore lining helix (TM3B), E. coli MscS has five residues significantly different from other members of the superfamily. In superfamilies such as this, it remains unclear why variations within such a homologous region occur: is it tolerance of alternate residues, or does it define functional variance within the superfamily? Point mutations (S114I/T, L118F, A120S, L123F, F127E/K/T) and patch clamp electrophysiology were used to study the effect of changing these residues in E. coli MscS on sensitivity and gating. The data indicate that variation at these locations do not consistently lead to wildtype channel phenotypes, nor do they define large changes in mechanosensation, but often appear to effect changes in the E. coli MscS channel gating kinetics. PMID:26340270

  14. Mutations in a Conserved Domain of E. coli MscS to the Most Conserved Superfamily Residue Leads to Kinetic Changes.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Hannah R; Blount, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli (E. coli) the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, MscS, gates in response to membrane tension created from acute external hypoosmotic shock, thus rescuing the bacterium from cell lysis. E. coli MscS is the most well studied member of the MscS superfamily of channels, whose members are found throughout the bacterial and plant kingdoms. Homology to the pore lining helix and upper vestibule domain of E. coli MscS is required for inclusion into the superfamily. Although highly conserved, in the second half of the pore lining helix (TM3B), E. coli MscS has five residues significantly different from other members of the superfamily. In superfamilies such as this, it remains unclear why variations within such a homologous region occur: is it tolerance of alternate residues, or does it define functional variance within the superfamily? Point mutations (S114I/T, L118F, A120S, L123F, F127E/K/T) and patch clamp electrophysiology were used to study the effect of changing these residues in E. coli MscS on sensitivity and gating. The data indicate that variation at these locations do not consistently lead to wildtype channel phenotypes, nor do they define large changes in mechanosensation, but often appear to effect changes in the E. coli MscS channel gating kinetics.

  15. Conservation of Angular Momentum Confirmed: Rotational Deceleration in an Intermediate-Age Star Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Wu, Xiaohan; Li, Chengyuan; Deng, Licai

    2017-01-01

    The subgiant branch (SGB) of the extended main-sequence turn-off (eMSTO) Small Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 419 is significantly broader at bluer than at redder colors. If we would assume that the widths of the features in color--magnitude space were entirely owing to a range in stellar ages, the star-formation histories of the eMSTO stars and the blue SGB region would be significantly more prolonged than that of the red part of the SGB. This cannot be explained by assuming an internal age spread, a popular scenario to explain eMSTOs at intermediate ages (1--2 Gyr). We show that rotational deceleration of a population of rapidly rotating stars naturally explains the observed trend along the SGB. Our analysis shows that a "converging" SGB could be produced if the cluster is mostly composed of rapidly rotating stars that slow down over time owing to the conservation of angular momentum during their evolutionary expansion from main-sequence turn-off stars to red giants.

  16. An entropy-residual shock detector for solving conservation laws using high-order discontinuous Galerkin methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yu; See, Yee Chee; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    This manuscript is concerned with the detection of shock discontinuities in the solution of conservation laws for high-order discontinuous Galerkin methods. A shock detector based on the entropy residual is proposed to distinguish smooth and non-smooth parts of the solution. The numerical analysis shows that the proposed entropy residual converges if the true solution is smooth and sufficiently regularized in space and time. To precisely localize discontinuities of different natures, an approach is developed that dynamically sets the threshold on the detection function, such that the detection criterion retains its sensitivity to the characteristics of the local solution. The implementation is conducted in an entropy-bounded discontinuous Galerkin framework, and numerical tests confirm the convergence property of the entropy-residual formulation and the effectiveness of the thresholding procedure. This shock detector is combined with an artificial viscosity scheme for shock stabilization. Comparison with other detectors is performed to demonstrate the excellent performance of the entropy-residual based shock detector for a wide range of problems on regular and triangular grids.

  17. Conditional mutations occur predominantly in highly conserved residues of RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Scafe, C; Martin, C; Nonet, M; Podos, S; Okamura, S; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    Conditional mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II large subunit, RPB1, were obtained by introducing a mutagenized RPB1 plasmid into yeast cells, selecting for loss of the wild-type RPB1 gene, and screening the cells for heat or cold sensitivity. Sequence analysis of 10 conditional RPB1 mutations and 10 conditional RPB2 mutations revealed that the amino acid residues altered by these distinct mutations are nearly always invariant among eucaryotic RPB1 and RPB2 homologs. These results suggest that RNA polymerase mutants might be obtained in other eucaryotic organisms by alteration of these invariant residues. Images PMID:2406567

  18. Comparison of residual oil cluster size distribution, morphology and saturation in oil-wet and water-wet sandstone.

    PubMed

    Iglauer, S; Fernø, M A; Shearing, P; Blunt, M J

    2012-06-01

    We imaged an oil-wet sandstone at residual oil saturation (S(or)) conditions using X-ray micro-tomography with a nominal voxel size of (9 μm)(3) and monochromatic light from a synchrotron source. The sandstone was rendered oil-wet by ageing with a North Sea crude oil to represent a typical wettability encountered in hydrocarbon reservoirs. We measured a significantly lower S(or) for the oil-wet core (18.8%) than for an analogue water-wet core (35%). We analysed the residual oil cluster size distribution and find consistency with percolation theory that predicts a power-law cluster size distribution. We measure a power-law exponent τ=2.12 for the oil-wet core which is higher than τ for the water-wet system (τ=2.05), indicating fewer large clusters in the oil-wet case. The clusters are rough and sheet-like consistent with connectivity established through layers in the pore space and occupancy of the smaller pores; in contrast the clusters for water-wet media occupy the centres of the larger pores. These results imply less trapping of oil, but with a greater surface area for dissolution. In carbon storage applications, this suggests that in CO(2)-wet systems, capillary trapping is less significant, but that there is a large surface area for dissolution and reaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nearby clusters of hemagglutinin residues sustain SLAM-dependent canine distemper virus entry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    von Messling, Veronika; Oezguen, Numan; Zheng, Qi; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Braun, Werner; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-05-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM, CD150) is the universal morbillivirus receptor. Based on the identification of measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) amino acids supporting human SLAM-dependent cell entry, we mutated canine distemper virus (CDV) H and identified residues necessary for efficient canine SLAM-dependent membrane fusion. These residues are located in two nearby clusters in a new CDV H structural model. To completely abolish SLAM-dependent fusion, combinations of mutations were necessary. We rescued a SLAM-blind recombinant CDV with six mutations that did not infect ferret peripheral blood mononuclear cells while retaining full infectivity in epithelial cells.

  20. Identification of critical amino acid residues and functional conservation of the Neurospora crassa and Rattus norvegicus orthologues of neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Dibakar; Deka, Rekha; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2016-12-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) is a member of neuronal calcium sensor family of proteins consisting of an amino terminal myristoylation domain and four conserved calcium (Ca(2+)) binding EF-hand domains. We performed site-directed mutational analysis of three key amino acid residues that are glycine in the conserved site for the N-terminal myristoylation, a conserved glutamic acid residue responsible for Ca(2+) binding in the third EF-hand (EF3), and an unusual non-conserved amino acid arginine at position 175 in the Neurospora crassa NCS-1. The N. crassa strains possessing the ncs-1 mutant allele of these three amino acid residues showed impairment in functions ranging from growth, Ca(2+) stress tolerance, and ultraviolet survival. In addition, heterologous expression of the NCS-1 from Rattus norvegicus in N. crassa confirmed its interspecies functional conservation. Moreover, functions of glutamic acid at position 120, the first Ca(2+) binding residue among all the EF-hands of the R. norvegicus NCS-1 was found conserved. Thus, we identified three critical amino acid residues of N. crassa NCS-1, and demonstrated its functional conservation across species using the orthologue from R. norvegicus.

  1. pH-induced conformational change of IscU at low pH correlates with protonation/deprotonation of two conserved histidine residues.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ziqi; Kim, Jin Hae; Tonelli, Marco; Ali, Ibrahim K; Markley, John L

    2014-08-19

    IscU, the scaffold protein for the major iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis pathway in microorganisms and mitochondria (ISC pathway), plays important roles in the formation of [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters and their delivery to acceptor apo-proteins. Our laboratory has shown that IscU populates two distinct, functionally relevant conformational states, a more structured state (S) and a more dynamic state (D), that differ by cis/trans isomerizations about two peptidyl-prolyl peptide bonds [Kim, J. H., Tonelli, M., and Markley, J. L. (2012) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 109, 454-459. Dai Z., Tonelli, M., and Markley, J. L. (2012) Biochemistry, 51, 9595-9602. Cai, K., Frederick, R. O., Kim, J. H., Reinen, N. M., Tonelli, M., and Markley, J. L. (2013) J. Biol. Chem., 288, 28755-28770]. Here, we report our findings on the pH dependence of the D ⇄ S equilibrium for Escherichia coli IscU in which the D-state is stabilized at low and high pH values. We show that the lower limb of the pH dependence curve results from differences in the pKa values of two conserved histidine residues (His10 and His105) in the two states. The net proton affinity of His10 is about 50 times higher and that of His105 is 13 times higher in the D-state than in the S-state. The origin of the high limb of the D ⇄ S pH dependence remains to be determined. These results show that changes in proton inventory need to be taken into account in the steps in iron-sulfur cluster assembly and transfer that involve transitions of IscU between its S- and D-states.

  2. Residue management increases fallow water conservation and yield deficit irrigated crops grown in rotation with wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    No-tillage (NT) residue management provides cover to increase precipitation capture compared with disk tillage (DT) or in the absence of a cover crop. Therefore, NT has the potential to reduce irrigation withdrawals from the declining Ogallala Aquifer. In a 4-year study, we quantified DT and NT effe...

  3. Crop residue is key for sustaining maximum food production and for conservation of our biosphere

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residue is key in our efforts to move towards agricultural sustainability. This paper provides a quick overview of some selected references and looks at some of the newest advances related to cover crops. Several authors have described in detail the benefits derived from improving soil quality ...

  4. Carbon and nitrogen mineralization and persistence of organic residues under conservation and conventional tillage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A combination of high biomass cover crops with organic mulches may be an option for no-till vegetable production, but mineralization rates from these residues is lacking. The objective of this study was to assess nutrient release rates and persistence from mimosa, lespedeza, oat straw, and soybean r...

  5. Integrating herbicides in a high-residue cover crop conservation agriculture setting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation agriculture systems provide a means to ensure long-term agricultural productivity, protect environmental quality, and reduce inputs into farming systems. Weed control in these systems rely on multiple tactics to achieve effective weed management while limiting chemical inputs. Practic...

  6. ApoE: the role of conserved residues in defining function.

    PubMed

    Frieden, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of apolipoprotein E (apoE) from 63 different mammalian species have been downloaded from the protein database. The sequences were compared to human apoE4 to determine conserved and non-conserved sequences of amino acids. ApoE4 is the major risk factor for the development of late onset Alzheimer's disease while apoE3, which differs from apoE4 by a single amino acid change at position 112, poses little or no risk for the development of this disease. Thus, the two proteins appear to be structurally and functionally different. Seven highly conserved regions, representing approximately 47 amino acids (of 299) have been found. These regions are distributed throughout the protein and reflect ligand binding sites as well as regions proposed to be involved in the propagation of the cysteine-arginine change at position 112 to distant regions of the protein in the N- and C-terminal domains. Highly non-conserved regions are at the N- and C-terminal ends of the apoE protein. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  7. Fall conservation deep tillage stabilizes maize residues into soil organic matter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Efforts for increasing soil organic matter (SOM) content under agricultural systems have primarily focused on management practices that reduce exposure of SOM to decomposition via minimum tillage. We assess an alternative approach, termed ‘fall conservation deep tillage’ (FCDT), to SOM stabilization...

  8. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  9. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  10. Mutations of Conserved Residues in the Major Homology Region Arrest Assembling HIV-1 Gag as a Membrane-Targeted Intermediate Containing Genomic RNA and Cellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Motoko; Robinson, Bridget A.; Chutiraka, Kasana; Geary, Clair D.; Reed, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major homology region (MHR) is a highly conserved motif that is found within the Gag protein of all orthoretroviruses and some retrotransposons. While it is widely accepted that the MHR is critical for assembly of HIV-1 and other retroviruses, how the MHR functions and why it is so highly conserved are not understood. Moreover, consensus is lacking on when HIV-1 MHR residues function during assembly. Here, we first addressed previous conflicting reports by confirming that MHR deletion, like conserved MHR residue substitution, leads to a dramatic reduction in particle production in human and nonhuman primate cells expressing HIV-1 proviruses. Next, we used biochemical analyses and immunoelectron microscopy to demonstrate that conserved residues in the MHR are required after assembling Gag has associated with genomic RNA, recruited critical host factors involved in assembly, and targeted to the plasma membrane. The exact point of inhibition at the plasma membrane differed depending on the specific mutation, with one MHR mutant arrested as a membrane-associated intermediate that is stable upon high-salt treatment and other MHR mutants arrested as labile, membrane-associated intermediates. Finally, we observed the same assembly-defective phenotypes when the MHR deletion or conserved MHR residue substitutions were engineered into Gag from a subtype B, lab-adapted provirus or Gag from a subtype C primary isolate that was codon optimized. Together, our data support a model in which MHR residues act just after membrane targeting, with some MHR residues promoting stability and another promoting multimerization of the membrane-targeted assembling Gag oligomer. IMPORTANCE The retroviral Gag protein exhibits extensive amino acid sequence variation overall; however, one region of Gag, termed the major homology region, is conserved among all retroviruses and even some yeast retrotransposons, although the reason for this conservation remains poorly understood. Highly

  11. Mutations of Conserved Residues in the Major Homology Region Arrest Assembling HIV-1 Gag as a Membrane-Targeted Intermediate Containing Genomic RNA and Cellular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motoko; Robinson, Bridget A; Chutiraka, Kasana; Geary, Clair D; Reed, Jonathan C; Lingappa, Jaisri R

    2015-12-09

    The major homology region (MHR) is a highly conserved motif that is found within the Gag protein of all orthoretroviruses and some retrotransposons. While it is widely accepted that the MHR is critical for assembly of HIV-1 and other retroviruses, how the MHR functions and why it is so highly conserved are not understood. Moreover, consensus is lacking on when HIV-1 MHR residues function during assembly. Here, we first addressed previous conflicting reports by confirming that MHR deletion, like conserved MHR residue substitution, leads to a dramatic reduction in particle production in human and nonhuman primate cells expressing HIV-1 proviruses. Next, we used biochemical analyses and immunoelectron microscopy to demonstrate that conserved residues in the MHR are required after assembling Gag has associated with genomic RNA, recruited critical host factors involved in assembly, and targeted to the plasma membrane. The exact point of inhibition at the plasma membrane differed depending on the specific mutation, with one MHR mutant arrested as a membrane-associated intermediate that is stable upon high-salt treatment and other MHR mutants arrested as labile, membrane-associated intermediates. Finally, we observed the same assembly-defective phenotypes when the MHR deletion or conserved MHR residue substitutions were engineered into Gag from a subtype B, lab-adapted provirus or Gag from a subtype C primary isolate that was codon optimized. Together, our data support a model in which MHR residues act just after membrane targeting, with some MHR residues promoting stability and another promoting multimerization of the membrane-targeted assembling Gag oligomer. The retroviral Gag protein exhibits extensive amino acid sequence variation overall; however, one region of Gag, termed the major homology region, is conserved among all retroviruses and even some yeast retrotransposons, although the reason for this conservation remains poorly understood. Highly conserved residues

  12. Identification of two conserved aspartic acid residues required for DNA digestion by a novel thermophilic Exonuclease VII in Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Larrea, Andres A.; Pedroso, Ilene M.; Malhotra, Arun; Myers, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Exonuclease VII was first identified in 1974 as a DNA exonuclease that did not require any divalent cations for activity. Indeed, Escherichia coli ExoVII was identified in partially purified extracts in the presence of EDTA. ExoVII is comprised of two subunits (XseA and XseB) that are highly conserved and present in most sequenced prokaryotic genomes, but are not seen in eukaryotes. To better understand this exonuclease family, we have characterized an ExoVII homolog from Thermotoga maritima. Thermotoga maritima XseA/B homologs TM1768 and TM1769 were co-expressed and purified, and show robust nuclease activity at 80°C. This activity is magnesium dependent and is inhibited by phosphate ions, which distinguish it from E. coli ExoVII. Nevertheless, both E. coli and T. maritima ExoVII share a similar putative active site motif with two conserved aspartate residues in the large (XseA/TM1768) subunit. We show that these residues, Asp235 and Asp240, are essential for the nuclease activity of T. maritima ExoVII. We hypothesize that the ExoVII family of nucleases can be sub-divided into two sub-families based on EDTA resistance and that T. maritima ExoVII is the first member of the branch that is characterized by EDTA sensitivity and inhibition by phosphate. PMID:18812402

  13. Identification of conserved polar residues important for salt tolerance by the Na+/H+ exchanger of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Fliegel, Larry

    2005-01-01

    The Na+/H+ exchanger is a ubiquitous protein that transports Na+ and H+ in opposite directions across cell membranes. In fission yeast, the Na+/H+ exchanger sod2 plays a major role in the removal of excess detrimental intracellular sodium. The effect of mutagenesis of conserved polar amino acids of sod2 was examined by expressing 10 different mutant forms of sod2 in sod2 deficient S. pombe and characterizing salt tolerance. Asp145, 266, 267, and Glu173 were critical for proper function of sod2. Asp241 had an intermediate effect on sod2 function while mutation of Asp178 did not impair sod2 function. Simultaneous mutation of the Asp266, 267 pair impaired sod2 function. Mutation of each individual residue demonstrated that both were critical for sod2 function. Conservative mutations (Asp to Glu) of Asp266 and 267 failed to restore sod2 function. The results suggest that acidic residues associated with transmembrane segments are important in function, possibly being important in binding and coordinating cations.

  14. Studies on the fusion peptide of a paramyxovirus fusion glycoprotein: roles of conserved residues in cell fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, C M; Lamb, R A

    1992-01-01

    The role of residues in the conserved hydrophobic N-terminal fusion peptide of the paramyxovirus fusion (F) protein in causing cell-cell fusion was examined. Mutations were introduced into the cDNA encoding the simian virus 5 (SV5) F protein, the altered F proteins were expressed by using an eukaryotic vector, and their ability to mediate syncytium formation was determined. The mutant F proteins contained both single- and multiple-amino-acid substitutions, and they exhibited a variety of intracellular transport properties and fusion phenotypes. The data indicate that many substitutions in the conserved amino acids of the simian virus 5 F fusion peptide can be tolerated without loss of biological activity. Mutant F proteins which were not transported to the cell surface did not cause cell-cell fusion, but all of the mutants which were transported to the cell surface were fusion competent, exhibiting fusion properties similar to or better than those of the wild-type F protein. Mutant F proteins containing glycine-to-alanine substitutions had altered intracellular transport characteristics, yet they exhibited a great increase in fusion activity. The potential structural implications of this substitution and the possible importance of these glycine residues in maintaining appropriate levels of fusion activity are discussed. Images PMID:1548771

  15. Large-scale analysis of conserved rare codon clusters suggests an involvement in co-translational molecular recognition events

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Matthieu; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: An increasing amount of evidence from experimental and computational analysis suggests that rare codon clusters are functionally important for protein activity. Most of the studies on rare codon clusters were performed on a limited number of proteins or protein families. In the present study, we present the Sherlocc program and how it can be used for large scale protein family analysis of evolutionarily conserved rare codon clusters and their relation to protein function and structure. This large-scale analysis was performed using the whole Pfam database covering over 70% of the known protein sequence universe. Our program Sherlocc, detects statistically relevant conserved rare codon clusters and produces a user-friendly HTML output. Results: Statistically significant rare codon clusters were detected in a multitude of Pfam protein families. The most statistically significant rare codon clusters were predominantly identified in N-terminal Pfam families. Many of the longest rare codon clusters are found in membrane-related proteins which are required to interact with other proteins as part of their function, for example in targeting or insertion. We identified some cases where rare codon clusters can play a regulating role in the folding of catalytically important domains. Our results support the existence of a widespread functional role for rare codon clusters across species. Finally, we developed an online filter-based search interface that provides access to Sherlocc results for all Pfam families. Availability: The Sherlocc program and search interface are open access and are available at http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca Contact: rafael.najmanovich@usherbrooke.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22467916

  16. Comparative analysis of a conserved zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Shannon, M; Ashworth, L K; Mucenski, M L; Lamerdin, J E; Branscomb, E; Stubbs, L

    1996-04-01

    Several lines of evidence now suggest that many of the zinc-finger-containing (ZNF) genes in the human genome are arranged in clusters. However, little is known about the structure or function of the clusters or about their conservation throughout evolution. Here, we report the analysis of a conserved ZNF gene cluster located in human chromosome 19q13.2 and mouse chromosome 7. Our results indicate that the human cluster consists of at least 10 related Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing ZNF genes organized in tandem over a distance of 350-450 kb. Two cDNA clones representing genes in the murine cluster have been studied in detail. The KRAB A domains of these genes are nearly identical and are highly similar to human 19q13.2-derived KRAB sequences, but DNA-binding ZNF domains and other portions of the genes differ considerably. The two murine genes display distinct expression patterns, but are coexpressed in some adult tissues. These studies pave the way for a systematic analysis of the evolution of structure and function of genes within the numerous clustered ZNF families located on human chromosome 19 and elsewhere in the human and mouse genomes.

  17. Topologically Conserved Residues Direct Heme Transport in HRG-1-related Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Protchenko, Olga; Philpott, Caroline C.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans and human HRG-1-related proteins are conserved, membrane-bound permeases that bind and translocate heme in metazoan cells via a currently uncharacterized mechanism. Here, we show that cellular import of heme by HRG-1-related proteins from worms and humans requires strategically located amino acids that are topologically conserved across species. We exploit a heme synthesis-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant to model the heme auxotrophy of C. elegans and demonstrate that, under heme-deplete conditions, the endosomal CeHRG-1 requires both a specific histidine in the predicted second transmembrane domain (TMD2) and the FARKY motif in the C terminus tail for heme transport. By contrast, the plasma membrane CeHRG-4 transports heme by utilizing a histidine in the exoplasmic (E2) loop and the FARKY motif. Optimal activity under heme-limiting conditions, however, requires histidine in the E2 loop of CeHRG-1 and tyrosine in TMD2 of CeHRG-4. An analogous system exists in humans, because mutation of the synonymous histidine in TMD2 of hHRG-1 eliminates heme transport activity, implying an evolutionary conserved heme transport mechanism that predates vertebrate origins. Our results support a model in which heme is translocated across membranes facilitated by conserved amino acids positioned on the exoplasmic, cytoplasmic, and transmembrane regions of HRG-1-related proteins. These findings may provide a framework for understanding the structural basis of heme transport in eukaryotes and human parasites, which rely on host heme for survival. PMID:22174408

  18. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors.

  19. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors. PMID:28079168

  20. Analysis of Conserved Glutamate and Aspartate Residues in Drosophila Rhodopsin 1 and Their Influence on Spectral Tuning.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lijun; Farrell, David M; Fulton, Ruth M; Bagg, Eve E; Salcedo, Ernesto; Manino, Meridee; Britt, Steven G

    2015-09-04

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate invertebrate visual pigment absorption are poorly understood. Studies of amphioxus Go-opsin have demonstrated that Glu-181 functions as the counterion in this pigment. This finding has led to the proposal that Glu-181 may function as the counterion in other invertebrate visual pigments as well. Here we describe a series of mutagenesis experiments to test this hypothesis and to also test whether other conserved acidic amino acids in Drosophila Rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) may serve as the counterion of this visual pigment. Of the 5 Glu and Asp residues replaced by Gln or Asn in our experiments, none of the mutant pigments shift the absorption of Rh1 by more than 6 nm. In combination with prior studies, these results suggest that the counterion in Drosophila Rh1 may not be located at Glu-181 as in amphioxus, or at Glu-113 as in bovine rhodopsin. Conversely, the extremely low steady state levels of the E194Q mutant pigment (bovine opsin site Glu-181), and the rhabdomere degeneration observed in flies expressing this mutant demonstrate that a negatively charged residue at this position is essential for normal rhodopsin function in vivo. This work also raises the possibility that another residue or physiologic anion may compensate for the missing counterion in the E194Q mutant.

  1. Conserved Glycine 33 Residue in Flexible Domain I of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Is Critical for Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Allan G. N.; Loquet, Antoine; Stack, Séamus J.; Dalrymple, David; Gatherer, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus core protein forms the viral nucleocapsid and plays a critical role in the formation of infectious particles. In this study, we demonstrate that the highly conserved residue G33, located within domain 1 of the core protein, is important for the production of cell culture-infectious virus (HCVcc). Alanine substitution at this position in the JFH1 genome did not alter viral RNA replication but reduced infectivity by ∼2 logs. Virus production by this core mutant could be rescued by compensatory mutations located immediately upstream and downstream of the original G33A mutation. The examination of the helix-loop-helix motif observed in the core protein structure (residues 15 to 41; Protein Data Bank entry 1CWX) indicated that the residues G33 and F24 are in close contact with each other, and that the G33A mutation induces a steric clash with F24. Molecular simulations revealed that the compensatory mutations increase the helix-loop-helix flexibility, allowing rescue of the core active conformation required for efficient virus production. Taken together, these data highlight the plasticity of core domain 1 conformation and illustrate the relationship between its structural tolerance to mutations and virus infectivity. PMID:22072760

  2. The gsdf gene locus harbors evolutionary conserved and clustered genes preferentially expressed in fish previtellogenic oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Aude; Le Gac, Florence; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques

    2011-02-01

    The gonadal soma-derived factor (GSDF) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is conserved in teleostean fish species. Gsdf is specifically expressed in the gonads, and gene expression is restricted to the granulosa and Sertoli cells in trout and medaka. The gsdf gene expression is correlated to early testis differentiation in medaka and was shown to stimulate primordial germ cell and spermatogonia proliferation in trout. In the present study, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment conserved among vertebrates although no gsdf-related gene is detected on the corresponding genomic region in tetrapods. We demonstrate using quantitative RT-PCR that most of the genes localized in the synteny are specifically expressed in medaka gonads. Gsdf is the only gene of the synteny with a much higher expression in the testis compared to the ovary. In contrast, gene expression pattern analysis of the gsdf surrounding genes (nup54, aff1, klhl8, sdad1, and ptpn13) indicates that these genes are preferentially expressed in the female gonads. The tissue distribution of these genes is highly similar in medaka and zebrafish, two teleostean species that have diverged more than 110 million years ago. The cellular localization of these genes was determined in medaka gonads using the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique. We confirm that gsdf gene expression is restricted to Sertoli and granulosa cells in contact with the premeiotic and meiotic cells. The nup54 gene is expressed in spermatocytes and previtellogenic oocytes. Transcripts corresponding to the ovary-specific genes (aff1, klhl8, and sdad1) are detected only in previtellogenic oocytes. No expression was detected in the gonocytes in 10 dpf embryos. In conclusion, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment harboring evolutionary conserved genes in vertebrates. These genes are preferentially expressed in previtelloogenic oocytes, and thus, they

  3. Improving homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors through multiple-template derived conserved inter-residue interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Rajan; Heim, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Evidenced by the three-rounds of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) Dock competitions, improving homology modeling methods of helical transmembrane proteins including the GPCRs, based on templates of low sequence identity, remains an eminent challenge. Current approaches addressing this challenge adopt the philosophy of “modeling first, refinement next”. In the present work, we developed an alternative modeling approach through the novel application of available multiple templates. First, conserved inter-residue interactions are derived from each additional template through conservation analysis of each template-target pairwise alignment. Then, these interactions are converted into distance restraints and incorporated in the homology modeling process. This approach was applied to modeling of the human β2 adrenergic receptor using the bovin rhodopsin and the human protease-activated receptor 1 as templates and improved model quality was demonstrated compared to the homology model generated by standard single-template and multiple-template methods. This method of “refined restraints first, modeling next”, provides a fast and complementary way to the current modeling approaches. It allows rational identification and implementation of additional conserved distance restraints extracted from multiple templates and/or experimental data, and has the potential to be applicable to modeling of all helical transmembrane proteins. PMID:25503850

  4. Improving homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors through multiple-template derived conserved inter-residue interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Rajan; Heim, Andrew J.; Li, Zhijun

    2015-05-01

    Evidenced by the three-rounds of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) Dock competitions, improving homology modeling methods of helical transmembrane proteins including the GPCRs, based on templates of low sequence identity, remains an eminent challenge. Current approaches addressing this challenge adopt the philosophy of "modeling first, refinement next". In the present work, we developed an alternative modeling approach through the novel application of available multiple templates. First, conserved inter-residue interactions are derived from each additional template through conservation analysis of each template-target pairwise alignment. Then, these interactions are converted into distance restraints and incorporated in the homology modeling process. This approach was applied to modeling of the human β2 adrenergic receptor using the bovin rhodopsin and the human protease-activated receptor 1 as templates and improved model quality was demonstrated compared to the homology model generated by standard single-template and multiple-template methods. This method of "refined restraints first, modeling next", provides a fast and complementary way to the current modeling approaches. It allows rational identification and implementation of additional conserved distance restraints extracted from multiple templates and/or experimental data, and has the potential to be applicable to modeling of all helical transmembrane proteins.

  5. Improving homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors through multiple-template derived conserved inter-residue interactions.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Rajan; Heim, Andrew J; Li, Zhijun

    2015-05-01

    Evidenced by the three-rounds of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) Dock competitions, improving homology modeling methods of helical transmembrane proteins including the GPCRs, based on templates of low sequence identity, remains an eminent challenge. Current approaches addressing this challenge adopt the philosophy of "modeling first, refinement next". In the present work, we developed an alternative modeling approach through the novel application of available multiple templates. First, conserved inter-residue interactions are derived from each additional template through conservation analysis of each template-target pairwise alignment. Then, these interactions are converted into distance restraints and incorporated in the homology modeling process. This approach was applied to modeling of the human β2 adrenergic receptor using the bovin rhodopsin and the human protease-activated receptor 1 as templates and improved model quality was demonstrated compared to the homology model generated by standard single-template and multiple-template methods. This method of "refined restraints first, modeling next", provides a fast and complementary way to the current modeling approaches. It allows rational identification and implementation of additional conserved distance restraints extracted from multiple templates and/or experimental data, and has the potential to be applicable to modeling of all helical transmembrane proteins.

  6. Cloning and characterization of murine Aqp5: evidence for a conserved aquaporin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Krane, C M; Towne, J E; Menon, A G

    1999-05-01

    Aquaporin 5 (Aqp5), a member of the aquaporin family of membrane water channels, is thought to modulate the osmolality of fluids in the eye, lung, and salivary gland. Here, we report the cloning and genomic characterization of murine Aqp5 and its expression in relevant mouse tissues. This gene, comprised of four exons encoding 265 amino acids (121, 55, 28, and 61 amino acids respectively), is transcribed into an approximate 1.8-kb mRNA detected in lung, parotid, submandibular, sublingual, and lacrimal tissues. Aqp5 encodes a protein that is 98% identical to rat Aqp5. An Aqp5 antibody detects an approximately 27-kDa protein band in mouse lung, and an additional 29 kDa band in salivary gland. Cloning and physical mapping genomic fragments contiguous with Aqp5 revealed two other members of the aquaporin family: Aqp2 and Aqp6, arrayed head to tail in the order Aqp2-Aqp5-Aqp6, and provides evidence of a gene cluster conserved in order and orientation in both mice and humans.

  7. The phosphomimetic mutation of an evolutionarily conserved serine residue affects the signaling properties of Rho of plants (ROPs).

    PubMed

    Fodor-Dunai, Csilla; Fricke, Inka; Potocký, Martin; Dorjgotov, Dulguun; Domoki, Mónika; Jurca, Manuela E; Otvös, Krisztina; Zárský, Viktor; Berken, Antje; Fehér, Attila

    2011-05-01

    Plant ROP (Rho of plants) proteins form a unique subgroup within the family of Rho-type small G-proteins of eukaryotes. In this paper we demonstrate that the phosphomimetic mutation of a serine residue conserved in all Rho proteins affects the signaling properties of plant ROPs. We found that the S74E mutation in Medicago ROP6 and Arabidopsis ROP4 prevented the binding of these proteins to their plant-specific upstream activator the plant-specific ROP nucleotide exchanger (PRONE)-domain-containing RopGEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) protein and abolished the PRONE-mediated nucleotide exchange reaction in vitro. Structural modeling supported the hypothesis that potential phosphorylation of the S74 residue interferes with the binding of the PRONE-domain to the adjacent plant-specific R76 residue which plays an important role in functional ROP-PRONE interaction. Moreover, we show that while the binding of constitutively active MsROP6 to the effector protein RIC (ROP-interactive CRIB-motif-containing protein) was not affected by the S74E mutation, the capability of this mutated protein to bind and activate the RRK1 kinase in vitro was reduced. These observations are in agreement with the morphology of tobacco pollen tubes expressing mutant forms of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP):MsROP6. The S74E mutation in MsROP6 had no influence on pollen tube morphology and attenuated the phenotype of a constitutively active form of MsROP6. The presented Medicago and Arabidopsis data support the notion that the phosphorylation of the serine residue in ROPs corresponding to S74 in Medicago ROP6 could be a general principle for regulating ROP activation and signaling in plants. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. A conserved proline residue in Dothideomycete Avr4 effector proteins is required to trigger a Cf-4-dependent hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Mesarich, Carl H; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Beenen, Henriek G; Cordovez, Viviane; Guo, Yanan; Karimi Jashni, Mansoor; Bradshaw, Rosie E; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2016-01-01

    CfAvr4, a chitin-binding effector protein produced by the Dothideomycete tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum, protects the cell wall of this fungus against hydrolysis by secreted host chitinases during infection. However, in the presence of the Cf-4 immune receptor of tomato, CfAvr4 triggers a hypersensitive response (HR), which renders the pathogen avirulent. Recently, several orthologues of CfAvr4 have been identified from phylogenetically closely related species of Dothideomycete fungi. Of these, DsAvr4 from Dothistroma septosporum also triggers a Cf-4-dependent HR, but CaAvr4 and CbAvr4 from Cercospora apii and Cercospora beticola, respectively, do not. All, however, bind chitin. To identify the region(s) and specific amino acid residue(s) of CfAvr4 and DsAvr4 required to trigger a Cf-4-dependent HR, chimeric and mutant proteins, in which specific protein regions or single amino acid residues, respectively, were exchanged between CfAvr4 and CaAvr4 or DsAvr4 and CbAvr4, were tested for their ability to trigger an HR in Nicotiana benthamiana plants transgenic for the Cf-4 immune receptor gene. Based on this approach, a single region common to CfAvr4 and DsAvr4 was determined to carry a conserved proline residue necessary for the elicitation of this HR. In support of this result, a Cf-4-dependent HR was triggered by mutant CaAvr4 and CbAvr4 proteins carrying an arginine-to-proline substitution at this position. This study provides the first step in deciphering how Avr4 orthologues from different Dothideomycete fungi trigger a Cf-4-dependent HR.

  9. Phospho-N-Acetyl-Muramyl-Pentapeptide Translocase from Escherichia coli: Catalytic Role of Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Adrian J.; Brandish, Philip E.; Gilbey, Andrea M.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Phospho-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide translocase (translocase 1) catalyzes the first of a sequence of lipid-linked steps that ultimately assemble the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall. This essential enzyme is the target of several natural product antibiotics and has recently been the focus of antimicrobial drug discovery programs. The catalytic mechanism of translocase 1 is believed to proceed via a covalent intermediate formed between phospho-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide and a nucleophilic amino acid residue. Amino acid sequence alignments of the translocase 1 family and members of the related transmembrane phosphosugar transferase superfamily revealed only three conserved residues that possess nucleophilic side chains: the aspartic acid residues D115, D116, and D267. Here we report the expression and partial purification of Escherichia coli translocase 1 as a C-terminal hexahistidine (C-His6) fusion protein. Three enzymes with the site-directed mutations D115N, D116N, and D267N were constructed, expressed, and purified as C-His6 fusions. Enzymatic analysis established that all three mutations eliminated translocase 1 activity, and this finding verified the essential role of these residues. By analogy with the structural environment of the double aspartate motif found in prenyl transferases, we propose a model whereby D115 and D116 chelate a magnesium ion that coordinates with the pyrophosphate bridge of the UDP-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide substrate and in which D267 therefore fulfills the role of the translocase 1 active-site nucleophile. PMID:14996806

  10. A conserved cluster of three PRD-class homeobox genes (homeobrain, rx and orthopedia) in the Cnidaria and Protostomia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusion We report the first evidence for a PRD-class homeobox cluster that appears to have been conserved since the time of the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor, and possibly even earlier, given the presence of a partial cluster in the placozoan Trichoplax. Very similar clusters comprising these three genes exist in Nematostella and diverse protostomes. Interestingly, in chordates, one member of the ancestral cluster (homeobrain) has apparently been lost, and there is no linkage between rx and orthopedia in any of the vertebrates. In Nematostella, the spatial expression of these three genes along the body column is not colinear with their physical order in the cluster but the temporal expression is, therefore, using the terminology that has been applied to the Hox cluster genes, the HRO cluster would appear to exhibit temporal but not spatial colinearity. It remains to be seen whether the mechanisms responsible for the evolutionary conservation of the HRO cluster are the same mechanisms responsible for cohesion of the Hox cluster and other ANTP-class homeobox clusters that have been widely conserved throughout animal evolution. PMID:20849646

  11. A sub-clustering algorithm based on spatial data correlation for energy conservation in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Hui; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2014-11-18

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have emerged as a promising solution for various applications due to their low cost and easy deployment. Typically, their limited power capability, i.e., battery powered, make WSNs encounter the challenge of extension of network lifetime. Many hierarchical protocols show better ability of energy efficiency in the literature. Besides, data reduction based on the correlation of sensed readings can efficiently reduce the amount of required transmissions. Therefore, we use a sub-clustering procedure based on spatial data correlation to further separate the hierarchical (clustered) architecture of a WSN. The proposed algorithm (2TC-cor) is composed of two procedures: the prediction model construction procedure and the sub-clustering procedure. The energy conservation benefits by the reduced transmissions, which are dependent on the prediction model. Also, the energy can be further conserved because of the representative mechanism of sub-clustering. As presented by simulation results, it shows that 2TC-cor can effectively conserve energy and monitor accurately the environment within an acceptable level.

  12. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Miguel; Cabelli, Diane; Pinto, Ana F.; Romao, Celia V.; Pinto, Liliana C.; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Todorovic, Smilja

    2014-12-05

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the –EKHVP– motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue is substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (₋E₂₃T₂₄HVP₋), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.

  13. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue

    DOE PAGES

    Teixeira, Miguel; Cabelli, Diane; Pinto, Ana F.; ...

    2014-12-05

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the –EKHVP– motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue ismore » substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (₋E₂₃T₂₄HVP₋), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.« less

  14. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana F; Romão, Célia V; Pinto, Liliana C; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Lígia M; Todorovic, Smilja; Cabelli, Diane; Teixeira, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the -EKHVP- motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue is substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (-E23T24HVP-), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild-type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.

  15. A functional survey of the enhancer activity of conserved non-coding sequences from vertebrate Iroquois cluster gene deserts

    PubMed Central

    de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Feijóo, Cármen Gloria; Manzanares, Miguel; Tena, Juan J.; Rodríguez-Seguel, Elisa; Letizia, Annalisa; Allende, Miguel L.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies of the genome architecture of vertebrates have uncovered two unforeseen aspects of its organization. First, large regions of the genome, called gene deserts, are devoid of protein-coding sequences and have no obvious biological role. Second, comparative genomics has highlighted the existence of an array of highly conserved non-coding regions (HCNRs) in all vertebrates. Most surprisingly, these structural features are strongly associated with genes that have essential functions during development. Among these, the vertebrate Iroquois (Irx) genes stand out on both fronts. Mammalian Irx genes are organized in two clusters (IrxA and IrxB) that span >1 Mb each with no other genes interspersed. Additionally, a large number of HCNRs exist within Irx clusters. We have systematically examined the enhancer activity of HCNRs from the IrxB cluster using transgenic Xenopus and zebrafish embryos. Most of these HCNRs are active in subdomains of endogenous Irx expression, and some are candidates to contain shared enhancers of neighboring genes, which could explain the evolutionary conservation of Irx clusters. Furthermore, HCNRs present in tetrapod IrxB but not in fish may be responsible for novel Irx expression domains that appeared after their divergence. Finally, we have performed a more detailed analysis on two IrxB ultraconserved non-coding regions (UCRs) duplicated in IrxA clusters in similar relative positions. These four regions share a core region highly conserved among all of them and drive expression in similar domains. However, inter-species conserved sequences surrounding the core, specific for each of these UCRs, are able to modulate their expression. PMID:16024824

  16. Residue cluster additivity of thermodynamic stability in the hydrophobic core of mesophile vs. hyperthermophile rubredoxins.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Hernández, Griselda

    2007-02-01

    The branched sidechain residues 24 and 33 in the hydrophobic core of rubredoxin differ between the Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp) and Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf) sequences. Their X-ray structures indicate that these two sidechains are in van der Waals contact with each other, while neither appears to significantly interact with the other nonconserved residues. The simultaneous interchange of residues 24 and 33 between the Cp and Pf rubredoxin sequences yield a complementary pair of hybrid proteins for which the sum of their thermodynamic stabilities equals that of the parental rubredoxins. The 1.2 kcal/mol change arising from this two residues interchange accounts for 21% of the differential thermodynamic stability between the mesophile and hyperthermophile proteins. The additional interchange of the sole nonconserved aromatic residue in the hydrophobic core yields a 0.78 kcal/mol deviation from thermodynamic additivity.

  17. Charged extracellular residues, conserved throughout a G-protein-coupled receptor family, are required for ligand binding, receptor activation, and cell-surface expression.

    PubMed

    Hawtin, Stuart R; Simms, John; Conner, Matthew; Lawson, Zoe; Parslow, Rosemary A; Trim, Julie; Sheppard, Andrew; Wheatley, Mark

    2006-12-15

    For G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in general, the roles of extracellular residues are not well defined compared with residues in transmembrane helices (TMs). Nevertheless, extracellular residues are important for various functions in both peptide-GPCRs and amine-GPCRs. In this study, the V(1a) vasopressin receptor was used to systematically investigate the role of extracellular charged residues that are highly conserved throughout a subfamily of peptide-GPCRs, using a combination of mutagenesis and molecular modeling. Of the 13 conserved charged residues identified in the extracellular loops (ECLs), Arg(116) (ECL1), Arg(125) (top of TMIII), and Asp(204) (ECL2) are important for agonist binding and/or receptor activation. Molecular modeling revealed that Arg(125) (and Lys(125)) stabilizes TMIII by interacting with lipid head groups. Charge reversal (Asp(125)) caused re-ordering of the lipids, altered helical packing, and increased solvent penetration of the TM bundle. Interestingly, a negative charge is excluded at this locus in peptide-GPCRs, whereas a positive charge is excluded in amine-GPCRs. This contrasting conserved charge may reflect differences in GPCR binding modes between peptides and amines, with amines needing to access a binding site crevice within the receptor TM bundle, whereas the binding site of peptide-GPCRs includes more extracellular domains. A conserved negative charge at residue 204 (ECL2), juxtaposed to the highly conserved disulfide bond, was essential for agonist binding and signaling. Asp(204) (and Glu(204)) establishes TMIII contacts required for maintaining the beta-hairpin fold of ECL2, which if broken (Ala(204) or Arg(204)) resulted in ECL2 unfolding and receptor dysfunction. This study provides mechanistic insight into the roles of conserved extracellular residues.

  18. The conserved Lysine69 residue plays a catalytic role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The shikimate pathway is an attractive target for the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, but absent in humans. M. tuberculosis aroE-encoded shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the forth reaction in the shikimate pathway. Structural and functional studies indicate that Lysine69 may be involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding in M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Investigation of the kinetic properties of mutant enzymes can bring important insights about the role of amino acid residues for M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Findings We have performed site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding measurements and molecular modeling for both the wild-type M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase and the K69A mutant enzymes. The apparent steady-state kinetic parameters for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase were determined; the catalytic constant value for the wild-type enzyme (50 s-1) is 68-fold larger than that for the mutant K69A (0.73 s-1). There was a modest increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for DHS (K69A = 76 μM; wild-type = 29 μM) and NADPH (K69A = 30 μM; wild-type = 11 μM). The equilibrium dissociation constants for wild-type and K69A mutant enzymes are 32 (± 4) μM and 134 (± 21), respectively. Conclusion Our results show that the residue Lysine69 plays a catalytic role and is not involved in substrate binding for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. These efforts on M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase catalytic mechanism determination should help the rational design of specific inhibitors, aiming at the development of antitubercular drugs. PMID:19917104

  19. Role of the conserved arginine 274 and histidine 224 and 228 residues in the NuoCD subunit of complex I from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Belevich, Galina; Euro, Liliya; Wikström, Mårten; Verkhovskaya, Marina

    2007-01-16

    The conserved arginine 274 and histidine 224 and 228 residues in subunit NuoCD of complex I from Escherichia coli were substituted for alanine. The wild-type and mutated NuoCD subunit was expressed on a plasmid in an E. coli strain bearing a nuoCD deletion. Complex I was fully expressed in the H224A and H228A mutants, whereas the R274A mutation yielded approximately 50% expression. Ubiquinone reductase activity of complex I was studied in membranes and with purified enzyme and was 50% and 30% of the wild-type activity in the H224A and H228A mutants, respectively. The activity of R274A was less than 5% of the wild type in membranes but 20% in purified complex I. Rolliniastatin inhibited quinone reductase activity in the mutants with similar affinity as in the wild type, indicating that the quinone-binding site was not significantly altered by the mutations. Ubiquinone-dependent superoxide production by complex I was similar to the wild type in the R274A mutant but slightly higher in the H224A and H228A mutants. The EPR spectra of purified complex I from the H224A and H228A mutants did not differ from the wild type. In contrast, the signals of the N2 cluster and another fast-relaxing [4Fe-4S] cluster, tentatively assigned as N6b, were drastically decreased in the NADH-reduced R274A mutant enzyme but reappeared on further reduction with dithionite. These findings show that the redox potential of the N2 and N6b centers is shifted to more negative values by the R274A mutation. Purified complex I was reconstituted into liposomes, and electric potential was generated across the membrane upon NADH addition in all three mutant enzymes, suggesting that none of the mutations directly affect the proton-pumping machinery.

  20. Water pressure head and temperature impact on isoxaflutole degradation in crop residues and loamy surface soil under conventional and conservation tillage management.

    PubMed

    Alletto, Lionel; Coquet, Yves; Bergheaud, Valérie; Benoit, Pierre

    2012-08-01

    Laboratory incubations were performed in order to evaluate the dissipation of the proherbicide isoxaflutole in seedbed layer soil samples from conventional and conservation tillage systems and in maize and oat residues left at the soil surface under conservation tillage. The effects of temperature and water pressure head on radiolabelled isoxaflutole degradation were studied for each sample for 21d. Mineralisation of isoxaflutole was low for all samples and ranged from 0.0% to 0.9% of applied (14)C in soil samples and from 0.0% to 2.4% of applied (14)C in residue samples. In soil samples, degradation half-life of isoxaflutole ranged from 9 to 26h, with significantly higher values under conservation tillage. In residue samples, degradation half-life ranged from 3 to 31h, with significantly higher values in maize residues, despite a higher mineralisation and bound residue formation than in oat residues. Whatever the sample, most of the applied (14)C remained extractable during the experiment and, after 21d, less than 15% of applied (14)C were unextractable. This extractable fraction was composed of diketonitrile, benzoic acid derivative and several unidentified metabolites, with one of them accounting for more than 17% of applied (14)C. This study showed that tillage system design, including crop residues management, could help reducing the environmental impacts of isoxaflutole. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Conserved Arginine Cluster in the Insert of the Third Cytoplasmic Loop of the Long Form of the D2 Dopamine Receptor (D2L-R) Acts as an Intracellular Retention Signal

    PubMed Central

    Kubale, Valentina; Blagotinšek, Kaja; Nøhr, Jane; Eidne, Karin A.; Vrecl, Milka

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the conserved arginine cluster present within the 29-amino acid insert of the long form of the D2 dopamine receptor (D2L-R) confers its predominant intracellular localization. We hypothesized that the conserved arginine cluster (RRR) located within the insert could act as an RXR-type endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Arginine residues (R) within the cluster at positions 267, 268, and 269 were charge-reserved to glutamic acids (E), either individually or in clusters, thus generating single, double, and triple D2L-R mutants. Through analyses of cellular localization by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioligand binding assay, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET2) β-arrestin 2 (βarr2) recruitment assay, and cAMP signaling, it was revealed that charge reversal of the R residues at all three positions within the motif impaired their colocalization with ER marker calnexin and led to significantly improved cell surface expression. Additionally, these data demonstrate that an R to glutamic acid (E) substitution at position 2 within the RXR motif is not functionally permissible. Furthermore, all generated D2L-R mutants preserved their functional integrity regarding ligand binding, agonist-induced βarr2 recruitment and Gαi-mediated signaling. In summary, our results show that the conserved arginine cluster within the 29-amino acid insert of third cytoplasmic loop (IC3) of the D2L-R appears to be the ER retention signal. PMID:27447620

  2. Dissimilar roles of the four conserved acidic residues in the thermal stability of poly(A)-specific ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    He, Guang-Jun; Liu, Wei-Feng; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Divalent metal ions are essential for the efficient catalysis and structural stability of many nucleotidyl-transfer enzymes. Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) belongs to the DEDD superfamily of 3'-exonucleases, and the active site of PARN contains four conserved acidic amino acid residues that coordinate two Mg(2+) ions. In this research, we studied the roles of these four acidic residues in PARN thermal stability by mutational analysis. It was found that Mg(2+) significantly decreased the rate but increased the aggregate size of the 54 kDa wild-type PARN in a concentration-dependent manner. All of the four mutants decreased PARN thermal aggregation, while the aggregation kinetics of the mutants exhibited dissimilar Mg(2+)-dependent behavior. A comparison of the kinetic parameters indicated that Asp28 was the most crucial one to the binding of the two Mg(2+) ions, while metal B might be more important in PARN structural stability. The spectroscopic and aggregation results also suggested that the alterations in the active site structure by metal binding or mutations might lead to a global conformational change of the PARN molecule.

  3. A Conserved Glycine Residue of Trimeric Autotransporter Domains Plays a Key Role in Yersinia Adhesin A Autotransport▿

    PubMed Central

    Grosskinsky, Ulrike; Schütz, Monika; Fritz, Michaela; Schmid, Yvonne; Lamparter, Marina C.; Szczesny, Pawel; Lupas, Andrei N.; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Linke, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    The Yersinia adhesin A (YadA) is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of enteric yersiniae. It consists of three major domains: a head mediating adherence to host cells, a stalk involved in serum resistance, and an anchor that forms a membrane pore and is responsible for the autotransport function. The anchor contains a glycine residue, nearly invariant throughout trimeric autotransporter adhesins, that faces the pore lumen. To address the role of this glycine, we replaced it with polar amino acids of increasing side chain size and expressed wild-type and mutant YadA in Escherichia coli. The mutations did not impair the YadA-mediated adhesion to collagen and to host cells or the host cell cytokine production, but they decreased the expression levels and stability of YadA trimers with increasing side chain size. Likewise, autoagglutination and resistance to serum were decreased in these mutants. We found that the periplasmic protease DegP is involved in the degradation of YadA and that in an E. coli degP deletion strain, mutant versions of YadA were expressed almost to wild-type levels. We conclude that the conserved glycine residue affects both the export and the stability of YadA and consequently some of its putative functions in pathogenesis. PMID:17921300

  4. Conserved tyrosine 182 residue in hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1 plays a critical role in stabilizing the active site.

    PubMed

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Chung, Hye-Shin; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-03-01

    An aromatic amino acid, Tyr or Trp, located in the esterase active site wall, is highly conserved, with hyperthermophilic esterases showing preference for Tyr and lower temperature esterases showing preference for Trp. In this study, we investigated the role of Tyr(182) in the active site wall of hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1. Mutation of Tyr to Phe or Ala had a moderate effect on EstE1 thermal stability. However, a small-to-large mutation such as Tyr to His or Trp had a devastating effect on thermal stability. All mutant EstE1 enzymes showed reduced catalytic rates and enhanced substrate affinities as compared with wild-type EstE1. Hydrogen bond formation involving Tyr(182) was unimportant for maintaining EstE1 thermal stability, as the EstE1 structure is already adapted to high temperatures via increased intramolecular interactions. However, removal of hydrogen bond from Tyr(182) significantly decreased EstE1 catalytic activity, suggesting its role in stabilization of the active site. These results suggest that Tyr is preferred over a similarly sized Phe residue or bulky His or Trp residue in the active site walls of hyperthermophilic esterases for stabilizing the active site and regulating catalytic activity at high temperatures.

  5. Three conserved C-terminal residues of influenza fusion peptide alter its behavior at the membrane interface.

    PubMed

    Worch, Remigiusz; Krupa, Joanna; Filipek, Alicja; Szymaniec, Anna; Setny, Piotr

    2017-02-01

    The N-terminal fragment of the viral hemagglutinin HA2 subunit is termed a fusion peptide (HAfp). The 23-amino acid peptide (HAfp1-23) contains three C-terminal W21-Y22-G23 residues which are highly conserved among serotypes of influenza A and has been shown to form a tight helical hairpin very distinct from the boomerang structure of HAfp1-20. We studied the effect of peptide length on fusion properties, structural dynamics, and binding to the membrane interface. We developed a novel fusion visualization assay based on FLIM microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV). By means of molecular dynamics simulations and spectroscopic measurements, we show that the presence of the three C-terminal W21-Y22-G23 residues promotes the hairpin formation, which orients perpendicularly to the membrane plane and induces more disorder in the surrounding lipids than the less structured HAfp1-20. Moreover, we report cholesterol-enriched domain formation induced exclusively by the longer fusion peptide.

  6. Extracellular acidification exerts opposite actions on TREK1 and TREK2 potassium channels via a single conserved histidine residue.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Douguet, Dominique; Chatelain, Franck; Lazdunski, Michel; Lesage, Florian

    2009-08-25

    Mechanosensitive K(+) channels TREK1 and TREK2 form a subclass of two P-domain K(+) channels. They are potently activated by polyunsaturated fatty acids and are involved in neuroprotection, anesthesia, and pain perception. Here, we show that acidification of the extracellular medium strongly inhibits TREK1 with an apparent pK near to 7.4 corresponding to the physiological pH. The all-or-none effect of pH variation is steep and is observed within one pH unit. TREK2 is not inhibited but activated by acidification within the same range of pH, despite its close homology with TREK1. A single conserved residue, H126 in TREK1 and H151 in TREK2, is involved in proton sensing. This histidine is located in the M1P1 extracellular loop preceding the first P domain. The differential effect of acidification, that is, activation for TREK2 and inhibition for TREK1, involves other residues located in the P2M4 loop, linking the second P domain and the fourth membrane-spanning segment. Structural modeling of TREK1 and TREK2 and site-directed mutagenesis strongly suggest that attraction or repulsion between the protonated side chain of histidine and closely located negatively or positively charged residues in P2M4 control outer gating of these channels. The differential sensitivity of TREK1 and TREK2 to external pH variations discriminates between these two K(+) channels that otherwise share the same regulations by physical and chemical stimuli, and by hormones and neurotransmitters.

  7. The Effect of Conservation Tillage and Cover Crop Residue on Beneficial Arthropods and Weed Seed Predation in Acorn Squash.

    PubMed

    Quinn, N F; Brainard, D C; Szendrei, Z

    2016-10-15

    Conservation tillage combined with cover crops or mulching may enhance natural enemy activity in agroecosystems by reducing soil disturbance and increasing habitat structural complexity. In particular, weed seed predation can increase with vegetation cover and reduced tillage, indicating that mulches may improve the quality of the habitat for weed seed foraging. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of tillage and mulching for conservation biological control in cucurbit fields. The effects of mulch and reduced tillage on arthropods and rates of weed seed loss from arenas were examined in field trials on sandy soils in 2014 and 2015. Experimental factors included tillage and cover crop, each with two levels: strip-tillage or full-tillage, and cover crop mulch (rye residue) or no cover crop mulch (unmulched). Arthropod abundance on the crop foliage was not affected by tillage or cover crops. Contrary to expectations, epigeal natural enemies of insects and rates of weed seed removal either did not respond to treatments or were greater in full-tilled plots and plots without mulch. Our study demonstrates the potential importance of weed seed predators in reducing weed seedbanks in vegetable agroecosystems, and suggests that early-season tillage may not be detrimental to epigeal predator assemblages.

  8. Conserved leucine residue in the head region of morbillivirus fusion protein regulates the large conformational change during fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Plattet, Philippe; Langedijk, Johannes P M; Zipperle, Ljerka; Vandevelde, Marc; Orvell, Claes; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2009-09-29

    Paramyxovirus cell entry is controlled by the concerted action of two viral envelope glycoproteins, the fusion (F) and the receptor-binding (H) proteins, which together with a cell surface receptor mediate plasma membrane fusion activity. The paramyxovirus F protein belongs to class I viral fusion proteins which typically contain two heptad repeat regions (HR). Particular to paramyxovirus F proteins is a long intervening sequence (IS) located between both HR domains. To investigate the role of the IS domain in regulating fusogenicity, we mutated in the canine distemper virus (CDV) F protein IS domain a highly conserved leucine residue (L372) previously reported to cause a hyperfusogenic phenotype. Beside one F mutant, which elicited significant defects in processing, transport competence, and fusogenicity, all remaining mutants were characterized by enhanced fusion activity despite normal or slightly impaired processing and cell surface targeting. Using anti-CDV-F monoclonal antibodies, modified conformational F states were detected in F mutants compared to the parental protein. Despite these structural differences, coimmunoprecipitation assays did not reveal any drastic modulation in F/H avidity of interaction. However, we found that F mutants had significantly enhanced fusogenicity at low temperature only, suggesting that they folded into conformations requiring less energy to activate fusion. Together, these data provide strong biochemical and functional evidence that the conserved leucine 372 at the base of the HRA coiled-coil of F(wt) controls the stabilization of the prefusogenic state, restraining the conformational switch and thereby preventing extensive cell-cell fusion activity.

  9. The Effect of Conservation Tillage and Cover Crop Residue on Beneficial Arthropods and Weed Seed Predation in Acorn Squash.

    PubMed

    Quinn, N F; Brainard, D C; Szendrei, Z

    2016-12-01

    Conservation tillage combined with cover crops or mulching may enhance natural enemy activity in agroecosystems by reducing soil disturbance and increasing habitat structural complexity. In particular, weed seed predation can increase with vegetation cover and reduced tillage, indicating that mulches may improve the quality of the habitat for weed seed foraging. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of tillage and mulching for conservation biological control in cucurbit fields. The effects of mulch and reduced tillage on arthropods and rates of weed seed loss from arenas were examined in field trials on sandy soils in 2014 and 2015. Experimental factors included tillage and cover crop, each with two levels: strip-tillage or full-tillage, and cover crop mulch (rye residue) or no cover crop mulch (unmulched). Arthropod abundance on the crop foliage was not affected by tillage or cover crops. Contrary to expectations, epigeal natural enemies of insects and rates of weed seed removal either did not respond to treatments or were greater in full-tilled plots and plots without mulch. Our study demonstrates the potential importance of weed seed predators in reducing weed seedbanks in vegetable agroecosystems, and suggests that early-season tillage may not be detrimental to epigeal predator assemblages. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Control of activity through oxidative modification at the conserved residue Cys66 of aryl sulfotransferase IV.

    PubMed

    Marshall, A D; Darbyshire, J F; Hunter, A P; McPhie, P; Jakoby, W B

    1997-04-04

    Oxidation at Cys66 of rat liver aryl suflotransferase IV alters the enzyme's catalytic activity, pH optima and substrate specificity. Although this is a cytosolic detoxification enzyme, the pH optimum for the standard assay substrate 4-nitrophenol is at pH 5.5; upon oxidation, the optimum changes to the physiological pH range. The principal effect of the change in pH optimum is activation, which is manifest by an increase in K'cat without any major influence on substrate binding. In contrast, with tyrosine methyl ester as a substrate, the enzyme's optimum activity occurs at pH 8.0; upon oxidation, it ceases to be a substrate at any pH. The presence of Cys66 was essential for activation to occur, thereby providing a putative reason underlying the conserved nature of this cysteine throughout the phenol sulfotransferase family. Mapping of disulfides by mass spectrometry showed the critical event to be the oxidation of Cys66 to form a disulfide with either Cys232 or glutathione, either one is effective. These results point to a mechanism for regulating the activity of a key enzyme in xenobiotic detoxication during cellular oxidative stress.

  11. The structure of an unconventional HD-GYP protein from Bdellovibrio reveals the roles of conserved residues in this class of cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Andrew L; Capeness, Michael J; Lambert, Carey; Hobley, Laura; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP is a near-ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that is important in localized signal transmission during the control of various processes, including virulence and switching between planktonic and biofilm-based lifestyles. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by GGDEF diguanylate cyclases and hydrolyzed by EAL or HD-GYP phosphodiesterases, with each functional domain often appended to distinct sensory modules. HD-GYP domain proteins have resisted structural analysis, but here we present the first structural representative of this family (1.28 Å), obtained using the unusual Bd1817 HD-GYP protein from the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus. Bd1817 lacks the active-site tyrosine present in most HD-GYP family members yet remains an excellent model of their features, sharing 48% sequence similarity with the archetype RpfG. The protein structure is highly modular and thus provides a basis for delineating domain boundaries in other stimulus-dependent homologues. Conserved residues in the HD-GYP family cluster around a binuclear metal center, which is observed complexed to a molecule of phosphate, providing information on the mode of hydroxide ion attack on substrate. The fold and active site of the HD-GYP domain are different from those of EAL proteins, and restricted access to the active-site cleft is indicative of a different mode of activity regulation. The region encompassing the GYP motif has a novel conformation and is surface exposed and available for complexation with binding partners, including GGDEF proteins. It is becoming apparent that many bacteria use the signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP to regulate a variety of processes, most notably, transitions between motility and sessility. Importantly, this regulation is central to several traits implicated in chronic disease (adhesion, biofilm formation, and virulence gene expression). The mechanisms of cyclic-di-GMP synthesis via GGDEF enzymes and hydrolysis via EAL enzymes have been suggested by

  12. Hierarchical cluster analysis of matrix effects on 110 pesticide residues in 28 tea matrixes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Pang, Guo-Fang; Fan, Chun-Lin; Chen, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Matrix effects on 110 pesticides in 28 tea matrixes of different varieties and origins by LC/MS/MS were studied, and most of the pesticides exhibited soft and medium signal suppression. To better understand the influence of the tea varieties and the physicochemical characteristics of pesticides on the matrix effects, the multivariate analysis tool called hierarchical cluster analysis was applied. Tea matrixes were grouped into three clusters: unfermented, fermented, and post-fermented teas. Any type of tea can be chosen from each cluster as a corresponding representative matrix within that cluster to make matrix-matched solutions, which could simplify analysis while guaranteeing its accuracy. Matrix effects on most pesticides were similar despite the physicochemical diversities of the pesticides.

  13. Application of conservative residual distribution schemes to the solution of the shallow water equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchiuto, M.; Abgrall, R.; Deconinck, H.

    2007-03-01

    We consider the numerical solution of the shallow water equations on unstructured grids. We focus on flows over wet areas. The extension to the case of dry bed will be reported elsewhere. The shallow water equations fall into the category of systems of conservation laws which can be symmetrized thanks to the existence of a mathematical entropy coinciding, in this case, with the total energy. Our aim is to show the application of a particular class of conservative residual distribution (RD) schemes to the discretization of the shallow water equations and to analyze their discrete accuracy and stability properties. We give a review of conservative RD schemes showing relations between different approaches previously published, and recall L∞ stability and accuracy criteria characterizing the schemes. In particular, the accuracy of the RD method in presence of source terms is analyzed, and conditions to construct rth order discretizations on irregular triangular grids are proved. It is shown that the RD approach gives a natural way of obtaining high order discretizations which, moreover, preserves exactly the steady lake at rest solution independently on mesh topology, nature of the variation of the bottom and polynomial order of interpolation used for the unknowns. We also consider more general analytical solutions which are less investigated from the numerical view point. On irregular grids, linearity preserving RD schemes yield a truly second order approximation. We also sketch a strategy to achieve discretizations which preserve exactly some of these solutions. Numerical results on steady and time-dependent problems involving smooth and non-smooth variations of the bottom topology show very promising features of the approach.

  14. Conserved residues in yeast initiator tRNA calibrate initiation accuracy by regulating preinitiation complex stability at the start codon.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinsheng; Munoz, Antonio; Kolitz, Sarah E; Saini, Adesh K; Chiu, Wen-ling; Rahman, Hafsa; Lorsch, Jon R; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic initiator tRNA (tRNAi) contains several highly conserved unique sequence features, but their importance in accurate start codon selection was unknown. Here we show that conserved bases throughout tRNAi, from the anticodon stem to acceptor stem, play key roles in ensuring the fidelity of start codon recognition in yeast cells. Substituting the conserved G31:C39 base pair in the anticodon stem with different pairs reduces accuracy (the Sui(-) [suppressor of initiation codon] phenotype), whereas eliminating base pairing increases accuracy (the Ssu(-) [suppressor of Sui(-)] phenotype). The latter defect is fully suppressed by a Sui(-) substitution of T-loop residue A54. These genetic data are paralleled by opposing effects of Sui(-) and Ssu(-) substitutions on the stability of methionylated tRNAi (Met-tRNA(i)) binding (in the ternary complex [TC] with eIF2-GTP) to reconstituted preinitiation complexes (PICs). Disrupting the C3:G70 base pair in the acceptor stem produces a Sui(-) phenotype and also reduces the rate of TC binding to 40S subunits in vitro and in vivo. Both defects are suppressed by an Ssu(-) substitution in eIF1A that stabilizes the open/P(OUT) conformation of the PIC that exists prior to start codon recognition. Our data indicate that these signature sequences of tRNA(i) regulate accuracy by distinct mechanisms, promoting the open/P(OUT) conformation of the PIC (for C3:G70) or destabilizing the closed/P(IN) state (for G31:C39 and A54) that is critical for start codon recognition.

  15. The gp63 Gene Cluster Is Highly Polymorphic in Natural Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Populations, but Functional Sites Are Conserved

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Lilian S.; Souza, Bruno Araújo; Queiroz, Adriano; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Lima Machado, Paulo Roberto; M Carvalho, Edgar; Wilson, Mary Edythe; Schriefer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    GP63 or leishmanolysin is the major surface protease of Leishmania spp. involved in parasite virulence and host cell interaction. As such, GP63 is a potential target of eventual vaccines against these protozoa. In the current study we evaluate the polymorphism of gp63 in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis isolated from two sets of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) cases from Corte de Pedra, Brazil, including 35 cases diagnosed between 1994 and 2001 and 6 cases diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Parasites were obtained from lesions by needle aspiration and cultivation. Genomic DNA was extracted, and 405 bp fragments, including sequences encoding the putative macrophage interacting sites, were amplified from gp63 genes of all isolates. DNA amplicons were cloned into plasmid vectors and ten clones per L. (V.) braziliensis isolate were sequenced. Alignment of cloned sequences showed extensive polymorphism among gp63 genes within, and between parasite isolates. Overall, 45 different polymorphic alleles were detected in all samples, which could be segregated into two clusters. Cluster one included 25, and cluster two included 20 such genotypes. The predicted peptides showed overall conservation below 50%. In marked contrast, the conservation at segments with putative functional domains approached 90% (Fisher’s exact test p<0.0001). These findings show that gp63 is very polymorphic even among parasites from a same endemic focus, but the functional domains interacting with the mammalian host environment are conserved. PMID:27648939

  16. Evolutionary trace of G protein-coupled receptors reveals clusters of residues that determine global and class-specific functions.

    PubMed

    Madabushi, Srinivasan; Gross, Alecia K; Philippi, Anne; Meng, Elaine C; Wensel, Theodore G; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2004-02-27

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation mediated by ligand-induced structural reorganization of its helices is poorly understood. To determine the universal elements of this conformational switch, we used evolutionary tracing (ET) to identify residue positions commonly important in diverse GPCRs. When mapped onto the rhodopsin structure, these trace residues cluster into a network of contacts from the retinal binding site to the G protein-coupling loops. Their roles in a generic transduction mechanism were verified by 211 of 239 published mutations that caused functional defects. When grouped according to the nature of the defects, these residues sub-divided into three striking sub-clusters: a trigger region, where mutations mostly affect ligand binding, a coupling region near the cytoplasmic interface to the G protein, where mutations affect G protein activation, and a linking core in between where mutations cause constitutive activity and other defects. Differential ET analysis of the opsin family revealed an additional set of opsin-specific residues, several of which form part of the retinal binding pocket, and are known to cause functional defects upon mutation. To test the predictive power of ET, we introduced novel mutations in bovine rhodopsin at a globally important position, Leu-79, and at an opsin-specific position, Trp-175. Both were functionally critical, causing constitutive G protein activation of the mutants and rapid loss of regeneration after photobleaching. These results define in GPCRs a canonical signal transduction mechanism where ligand binding induces conformational changes propagated through adjacent trigger, linking core, and coupling regions.

  17. The Role of Conserved Tyrosine Residues in NiSOD Catalysis: A Case of Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Robert W.; Guce, Abigail; Bryngelson, Peter A.; Higgins, Khadine A.; Ryan, Kelly C.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Garman, Scott C.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases rely on protein structural elements to adjust the redox potential of the metallocenter to an optimum value near 300 mV (vs. NHE), to provide a source of protons for catalysis, and to control the access of anions to the active site. These aspects of the catalytic mechanism are examined herein for recombinant preparations of the nickel-dependent SOD (NiSOD) from Streptomyces coelicolor, and for a series of mutants that affect a key tyrosine residue, Tyr9 (Y9F-, Y62F-, Y9FY62F- and D3A-NiSOD). Structural aspects of the nickel sites are examined by a combination of EPR and x-ray absorption spectroscopies, and by single crystal x-ray diffraction at ~ 1.9 Å resolution in the case of Y9F- and D3A-NiSODs. The functional effects of the mutations are examined by kinetic studies employing pulse radiolytic generation of O2− and by redox titrations. These studies reveal that although the structure of the nickel center in NiSOD is unique, the ligand environment is designed to optimize the redox potential at 290 mV and results in the oxidation of 50% of the nickel centers in the oxidized hexamer. Kinetic investigations show that all of the mutant proteins have considerable activity. In the case of Y9F-NiSOD, the enzyme shows saturation behavior that is not observed in WT-NiSOD and suggests that release of peroxide is inhibited. The crystal structure of Y9F-NiSOD reveals an anion binding site that is occupied by either Cl− or Br− and is located close to, but not within bonding distance of the nickel center. The structure of D3A-NiSOD reveals that in addition to affecting the interaction between subunits, this mutation repositions Y9 and leads to altered chemistry with peroxide. Comparisons with Mn(SOD) and Fe(SOD) reveal that although different strategies are employed to adjust the redox potential and supply of protons, NiSOD has evolved a similar strategy to control the access of anions to the active site. PMID:19183068

  18. Density functional theory calculations on the active site of biotin synthase: mechanism of S transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster and the role of 1st and 2nd sphere residues.

    PubMed

    Rana, Atanu; Dey, Subal; Agrawal, Amita; Dey, Abhishek

    2015-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on the active site of biotin synthase (BS) to investigate the sulfur transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster to dethiobiotin (DTB). The active site is modeled to include both the 1st and 2nd sphere residues. Molecular orbital theory considerations and calculation on smaller models indicate that only an S atom (not S²⁻) transfer from an oxidized Fe(2)S(2) cluster leads to the formation of biotin from the DTB using two adenosyl radicals generated from S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The calculations on larger protein active site model indicate that a 9-monothiobiotin bound reduced cluster should be an intermediate during the S atom insertion from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster consistent with experimental data. The Arg260 bound to Fe1, being a weaker donor than cysteine bound to Fe(2), determines the geometry and the electronic structure of this intermediate. The formation of this intermediate containing the C9-S bond is estimated to have a ΔG(≠) of 17.1 kcal/mol while its decay by the formation of the 2nd C6-S bond is calculated to have a ΔG(≠) of 29.8 kcal/mol, i.e. the 2nd C-S bond formation is calculated to be the rate determining step in the cycle and it leads to the decay of the Fe(2)S(2) cluster. Significant configuration interaction (CI), present in these transition states, helps lower the barrier of these reactions by ~30-25 kcal/mol relative to a hypothetical outer-sphere reaction. The conserved Phe285 residue near the Fe(2)S(2) active site determines the stereo selectivity at the C6 center of this radical coupling reaction. Reaction mechanism of BS investigated using DFT calculations. Strong CI and the Phe285 residue control the kinetic rate and stereochemistry of the product.

  19. Structure and sequence conservation of hao cluster genes of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria: evidence for their evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, David J; Hooper, Alan B; Klotz, Martin G

    2005-09-01

    Comparison of the organization and sequence of the hao (hydroxylamine oxidoreductase) gene clusters from the gammaproteobacterial autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (aAOB) Nitrosococcus oceani and the betaproteobacterial aAOB Nitrosospira multiformis and Nitrosomonas europaea revealed a highly conserved gene cluster encoding the following proteins: hao, hydroxylamine oxidoreductase; orf2, a putative protein; cycA, cytochrome c(554); and cycB, cytochrome c(m)(552). The deduced protein sequences of HAO, c(554), and c(m)(552) were highly similar in all aAOB despite their differences in species evolution and codon usage. Phylogenetic inference revealed a broad family of multi-c-heme proteins, including HAO, the pentaheme nitrite reductase, and tetrathionate reductase. The c-hemes of this group also have a nearly identical geometry of heme orientation, which has remained conserved during divergent evolution of function. High sequence similarity is also seen within a protein family, including cytochromes c(m)(552), NrfH/B, and NapC/NirT. It is proposed that the hydroxylamine oxidation pathway evolved from a nitrite reduction pathway involved in anaerobic respiration (denitrification) during the radiation of the Proteobacteria. Conservation of the hydroxylamine oxidation module was maintained by functional pressure, and the module expanded into two separate narrow taxa after a lateral gene transfer event between gamma- and betaproteobacterial ancestors of extant aAOB. HAO-encoding genes were also found in six non-aAOB, either singly or tandemly arranged with an orf2 gene, whereas a c(554) gene was lacking. The conservation of the hao gene cluster in general and the uniqueness of the c(554) gene in particular make it a suitable target for the design of primers and probes useful for molecular ecology approaches to detect aAOB.

  20. Structure and Sequence Conservation of hao Cluster Genes of Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria: Evidence for Their Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, David J.; Hooper, Alan B.; Klotz, Martin G.

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of the organization and sequence of the hao (hydroxylamine oxidoreductase) gene clusters from the gammaproteobacterial autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (aAOB) Nitrosococcus oceani and the betaproteobacterial aAOB Nitrosospira multiformis and Nitrosomonas europaea revealed a highly conserved gene cluster encoding the following proteins: hao, hydroxylamine oxidoreductase; orf2, a putative protein; cycA, cytochrome c554; and cycB, cytochrome cm552. The deduced protein sequences of HAO, c554, and cm552 were highly similar in all aAOB despite their differences in species evolution and codon usage. Phylogenetic inference revealed a broad family of multi-c-heme proteins, including HAO, the pentaheme nitrite reductase, and tetrathionate reductase. The c-hemes of this group also have a nearly identical geometry of heme orientation, which has remained conserved during divergent evolution of function. High sequence similarity is also seen within a protein family, including cytochromes cm552, NrfH/B, and NapC/NirT. It is proposed that the hydroxylamine oxidation pathway evolved from a nitrite reduction pathway involved in anaerobic respiration (denitrification) during the radiation of the Proteobacteria. Conservation of the hydroxylamine oxidation module was maintained by functional pressure, and the module expanded into two separate narrow taxa after a lateral gene transfer event between gamma- and betaproteobacterial ancestors of extant aAOB. HAO-encoding genes were also found in six non-aAOB, either singly or tandemly arranged with an orf2 gene, whereas a c554 gene was lacking. The conservation of the hao gene cluster in general and the uniqueness of the c554 gene in particular make it a suitable target for the design of primers and probes useful for molecular ecology approaches to detect aAOB. PMID:16151127

  1. Conserved aromatic residues in the transmembrane region VI of the V1a vasopressin receptor differentiate agonist vs. antagonist ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Cotte, N; Balestre, M N; Aumelas, A; Mahé, E; Phalipou, S; Morin, D; Hibert, M; Manning, M; Durroux, T; Barberis, C; Mouillac, B

    2000-07-01

    Despite their opposite effects on signal transduction, the nonapeptide hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and its V1a receptor-selective cyclic peptide antagonist d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2]AVP display homologous primary structures, differing only at residues 1 and 2. These structural similarities led us to hypothesize that both ligands could interact with the same binding pocket in the V1a receptor. To determine receptor residues responsible for discriminating binding of agonist and antagonist ligands, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of conserved aromatic and hydrophilic residues as well as nonconserved residues, all located in the transmembrane binding pocket of the V1a receptor. Mutation of aromatic residues of transmembrane region VI (W304, F307, F308) reduced affinity for the d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2]AVP and markedly decreased affinity for the unrelated strongly hydrophobic V1a-selective nonpeptide antagonist SR 49059. Replacement of these aromatic residues had no effect on AVP binding, but increased AVP-induced coupling efficacy of the receptor for its G protein. Mutating hydrophilic residues Q108, K128 and Q185 in transmembrane regions II, III and IV, respectively, led to a decrease in affinity for both agonists and antagonists. Finally, the nonconserved residues T333 and A334 in transmembrane region VII, controlled the V1a/V2 binding selectivity for both nonpeptide and cyclic peptide antagonists. Thus, because conserved aromatic residues of the V1a receptor binding pocket seem essential for antagonists and do not contribute at all to the binding of agonists, we propose that these residues differentiate agonist vs. antagonist ligand binding.

  2. Highly conserved serine residue 40 in HIV-1 p6 regulates capsid processing and virus core assembly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of two late assembly (L-) domains. Although p6 is located within one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene, the 52 amino acid peptide binds at least to two cellular budding factors (Tsg101 and ALIX), is a substrate for phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, and mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into viral particles. As expected, known functional domains mostly overlap with several conserved residues in p6. In this study, we investigated the importance of the highly conserved serine residue at position 40, which until now has not been assigned to any known function of p6. Results Consistently with previous data, we found that mutation of Ser-40 has no effect on ALIX mediated rescue of HIV-1 L-domain mutants. However, the only feasible S40F mutation that preserves the overlapping pol open reading frame (ORF) reduces virus replication in T-cell lines and in human lymphocyte tissue cultivated ex vivo. Most intriguingly, L-domain mediated virus release is not dependent on the integrity of Ser-40. However, the S40F mutation significantly reduces the specific infectivity of released virions. Further, it was observed that mutation of Ser-40 selectively interferes with the cleavage between capsid (CA) and the spacer peptide SP1 in Gag, without affecting cleavage of other Gag products. This deficiency in processing of CA, in consequence, led to an irregular morphology of the virus core and the formation of an electron dense extra core structure. Moreover, the defects induced by the S40F mutation in p6 can be rescued by the A1V mutation in SP1 that generally enhances processing of the CA-SP1 cleavage site. Conclusions Overall, these data support a so far unrecognized function of p6 mediated by Ser-40 that occurs independently of the L-domain function, but selectively affects CA maturation and

  3. Adaptive nitrogen and integrated weed management in conservation agriculture: impacts on agronomic productivity, greenhouse gas emissions, and herbicide residues.

    PubMed

    Oyeogbe, Anthony Imoudu; Das, T K; Bhatia, Arti; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2017-04-01

    Increasing nitrogen (N) immobilization and weed interference in the early phase of implementation of conservation agriculture (CA) affects crop yields. Yet, higher fertilizer and herbicide use to improve productivity influences greenhouse gase emissions and herbicide residues. These tradeoffs precipitated a need for adaptive N and integrated weed management in CA-based maize (Zea mays L.)-wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.) emend Fiori & Paol] cropping system in the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) to optimize N availability and reduce weed proliferation. Adaptive N fertilization was based on soil test value and normalized difference vegetation index measurement (NDVM) by GreenSeeker™ technology, while integrated weed management included brown manuring (Sesbania aculeata L. co-culture, killed at 25 days after sowing), herbicide mixture, and weedy check (control, i.e., without weed management). Results indicated that the 'best-adaptive N rate' (i.e., 50% basal + 25% broadcast at 25 days after sowing + supplementary N guided by NDVM) increased maize and wheat grain yields by 20 and 14% (averaged for 2 years), respectively, compared with whole recommended N applied at sowing. Weed management by brown manuring (during maize) and herbicide mixture (during wheat) resulted in 10 and 21% higher grain yields (averaged for 2 years), respectively, over the weedy check. The NDVM in-season N fertilization and brown manuring affected N2O and CO2 emissions, but resulted in improved carbon storage efficiency, while herbicide residuals in soil were significantly lower in the maize season than in wheat cropping. This study concludes that adaptive N and integrated weed management enhance synergy between agronomic productivity, fertilizer and herbicide efficiency, and greenhouse gas mitigation.

  4. Conserved piRNA Expression from a Distinct Set of piRNA Cluster Loci in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Mei; Gerlach, Daniel; Yu, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Naramura, Mayumi; Kile, Benjamin T.; Lau, Nelson C.

    2015-01-01

    The Piwi pathway is deeply conserved amongst animals because one of its essential functions is to repress transposons. However, many Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) do not base-pair to transposons and remain mysterious in their targeting function. The sheer number of piRNA cluster (piC) loci in animal genomes and infrequent piRNA sequence conservation also present challenges in determining which piC loci are most important for development. To address this question, we determined the piRNA expression patterns of piC loci across a wide phylogenetic spectrum of animals, and reveal that most genic and intergenic piC loci evolve rapidly in their capacity to generate piRNAs, regardless of known transposon silencing function. Surprisingly, we also uncovered a distinct set of piC loci with piRNA expression conserved deeply in Eutherian mammals. We name these loci Eutherian-Conserved piRNA cluster (ECpiC) loci. Supporting the hypothesis that conservation of piRNA expression across ~100 million years of Eutherian evolution implies function, we determined that one ECpiC locus generates abundant piRNAs antisense to the STOX1 transcript, a gene clinically associated with preeclampsia. Furthermore, we confirmed reduced piRNAs in existing mouse mutations at ECpiC-Asb1 and -Cbl, which also display spermatogenic defects. The Asb1 mutant testes with strongly reduced Asb1 piRNAs also exhibit up-regulated gene expression profiles. These data indicate ECpiC loci may be specially adapted to support Eutherian reproduction. PMID:26588211

  5. Conserved piRNA Expression from a Distinct Set of piRNA Cluster Loci in Eutherian Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chirn, Gung-Wei; Rahman, Reazur; Sytnikova, Yuliya A; Matts, Jessica A; Zeng, Mei; Gerlach, Daniel; Yu, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Naramura, Mayumi; Kile, Benjamin T; Lau, Nelson C

    2015-11-01

    The Piwi pathway is deeply conserved amongst animals because one of its essential functions is to repress transposons. However, many Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) do not base-pair to transposons and remain mysterious in their targeting function. The sheer number of piRNA cluster (piC) loci in animal genomes and infrequent piRNA sequence conservation also present challenges in determining which piC loci are most important for development. To address this question, we determined the piRNA expression patterns of piC loci across a wide phylogenetic spectrum of animals, and reveal that most genic and intergenic piC loci evolve rapidly in their capacity to generate piRNAs, regardless of known transposon silencing function. Surprisingly, we also uncovered a distinct set of piC loci with piRNA expression conserved deeply in Eutherian mammals. We name these loci Eutherian-Conserved piRNA cluster (ECpiC) loci. Supporting the hypothesis that conservation of piRNA expression across ~100 million years of Eutherian evolution implies function, we determined that one ECpiC locus generates abundant piRNAs antisense to the STOX1 transcript, a gene clinically associated with preeclampsia. Furthermore, we confirmed reduced piRNAs in existing mouse mutations at ECpiC-Asb1 and -Cbl, which also display spermatogenic defects. The Asb1 mutant testes with strongly reduced Asb1 piRNAs also exhibit up-regulated gene expression profiles. These data indicate ECpiC loci may be specially adapted to support Eutherian reproduction.

  6. Crop residues of the contiguous United States: Balancing feedstock and soil needs with conservation tillage, cover crops, and biochar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residues are among the cellulosic feedstocks expected to provide renewable energy. The availability of crop species and residue availability varies across the United States. Estimates of harvestable residues must consider all the residues produced during the entire rotation. Inclusion of fallow...

  7. The Escherichia coli twin-arginine translocase: conserved residues of TatA and TatB family components involved in protein transport.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Matthew G; de Leeuw, Erik; Porcelli, Ida; Buchanan, Grant; Berks, Ben C; Palmer, Tracy

    2003-03-27

    The Escherichia coli Tat system serves to export folded proteins harbouring an N-terminal twin-arginine signal peptide across the cytoplasmic membrane. In this report we have studied the functions of conserved residues within the structurally related TatA and TatB proteins. Our results demonstrate that there are two regions within each protein of high sequence conservation that are critical for efficient Tat translocase function. The first region is the interdomain hinge between the transmembrane and the amphipathic alpha-helices of TatA and TatB proteins. The second region is within the amphipathic helices of TatA and TatB. In particular an invariant phenylalanine residue within TatA proteins is essential for activity, whereas a string of glutamic acid residues on the same face of the amphipathic helix of TatB is important for function.

  8. Identification of conserved amino acid residues critical for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase function in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Craigie, R

    1992-01-01

    We have probed the structural organization of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase protein by limited proteolysis and the functional organization by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acid residues. A central region of the protein was relatively resistant to proteolysis. Proteins with altered amino acids in this region, or in the N-terminal part of the protein that includes a putative zinc-binding motif, were purified and assayed for 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities in vitro. In general, these mutations had parallel effects on 3' processing and DNA strand transfer, suggesting that integrase may utilize a single active site for both reactions. The only proteins that were completely inactive in all three assays contained mutations at conserved amino acids in the central region, suggesting that this part of the protein may be involved in catalysis. In contrast, none of the mutations in the N-terminal region resulted in a protein that was inactive in all three assays, suggesting that this part of integrase may not be essential for catalysis. The disintegration reaction was particularly insensitive to these amino acid substitutions, indicating that some function that is important for 3' processing and DNA strand transfer may be dispensable for disintegration. Images PMID:1404595

  9. Biological and structural characterization of a Ras transforming mutation at the phenylalanine-156 residue, which is conserved in all members of the Ras superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Quilliam, L A; Zhong, S; Rabun, K M; Carpenter, J W; South, T L; Der, C J; Campbell-Burk, S

    1995-01-01

    Although Ras residue phenylalanine-156 (F156) is strictly conserved in all members of the Ras superfamily of proteins, it is located outside of the consensus GDP/GTP-binding pocket. Its location within the hydrophobic core of Ras suggests that its strict conservation reflects a crucial role in structural stability. However, mutation of the equivalent residue (F157L) in the Drosophila Ras-related protein Rap results in a gain-of-function phenotype, suggesting an alternative role for this residue. Therefore, we have introduced an F156L mutation into Ras to evaluate the role of this residue in Ras structure and function. Whereas introduction of this mutation activated the transforming potential of wild-type Ras, it did not impair that of oncogenic Ras. Further, Ras (156L) exhibited an extremely rapid off rate for bound GDP/GTP in vitro and showed increased levels of Ras.GTP in vivo. To determine the structural basis for these altered properties, we used high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The F156L mutation caused loss of contact with residues 6, 23, 55, and 79, resulting in disruption of secondary structure in alpha-helix 1 and in beta-sheets 1-5. These major structural changes contrast with the isolated alterations induced by oncogenic mutation (residues 12 or 61) that perturb GTPase activity, and instead, weaken Ras contacts with Mg2+ and its guanine nucleotide substrate and result in increased rates of GDP/GTP dissociation. Altogether, these observations demonstrate the essential role of this conserved residue in Ras structure and its function as a regulated GDP/GTP switch. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7877967

  10. Nucleotide sequence of a cluster of early and late genes in a conserved segment of the vaccinia virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Plucienniczak, A; Schroeder, E; Zettlmeissl, G; Streeck, R E

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 7.6 kb vaccinia DNA segment from a genomic region conserved among different orthopox virus has been determined. This segment contains a tight cluster of 12 partly overlapping open reading frames most of which can be correlated with previously identified early and late proteins and mRNAs. Regulatory signals used by vaccinia virus have been studied. Presumptive promoter regions are rich in A, T and carry the consensus sequences TATA and AATAA spaced at 20-24 base pairs. Tandem repeats of a CTATTC consensus sequence are proposed to be involved in the termination of early transcription. PMID:2987815

  11. Long-term memory: a natural mechanism for the clustering of extreme events and anomalous residual times in climate records.

    PubMed

    Bunde, Armin; Eichner, Jan F; Kantelhardt, Jan W; Havlin, Shlomo

    2005-02-04

    We study the statistics of the return intervals between extreme events above a certain threshold in long-term persistent records. We find that the long-term memory leads (i) to a stretched exponential distribution of the return intervals, (ii) to a pronounced clustering of extreme events, and (iii) to an anomalous behavior of the mean residual time to the next event that depends on the history and increases with the elapsed time in a counterintuitive way. We present an analytical scaling approach and demonstrate that all these features can be seen in long climate records. The phenomena should also occur in heartbeat records, Internet traffic, and stock market volatility and have to be taken into account for an efficient risk evaluation.

  12. Polar residues in a conserved motif spanning helices 1 and 2 are functionally important in the SulP transporter family.

    PubMed

    Leves, Fiona P; Tierney, M Louise; Howitt, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    The SulP family (including the SLC26 family) is a diverse family of anion transporters found in all domains of life, with different members transporting different anions. We used sequence and bioinformatics analysis of helices 1 and 2 of SulP family members to identify a conserved motif, extending the previously defined 'sulfate transporter motif'. The analysis showed that in addition to being highly conserved in both sequence and spacing, helices 1 and 2 contain a significant number of polar residues and are predicted to be buried within the protein interior, with at least some faces packed closely against other helices. This suggests a significant functional role for this region and we tested this by mutating polar residues in helices 1 and 2 in the sulfate transporter, SHST1. All mutations made, even those removing only a single hydroxyl group, had significant effects on transport. Many mutations abolished transport without affecting plasma membrane expression of the mutant protein, suggesting a functional role for these residues. Different helical faces appear to have different roles, with the most severe effects being localised to two interacting faces of helices 1 and 2. Our results confirm the predicted importance of conserved polar residues in helices 1 and 2 and suggest that transport of sulfate by SHST1 is dependent on a network of polar and aromatic interactions between these two helices.

  13. Highly conserved residues in the helical domain of dengue virus type 1 precursor membrane protein are involved in assembly, precursor membrane (prM) protein cleavage, and entry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Szu-Chia; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Zou, Gang; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Shi, Pei-Yong; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2014-11-28

    The envelope and precursor membrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) are present on the surface of immature virions. During maturation, prM protein is cleaved by furin protease into pr peptide and membrane (M) protein. Although previous studies mainly focusing on the pr region have identified several residues important for DENV replication, the functional role of M protein, particularly the α-helical domain (MH), which is predicted to undergo a large conformational change during maturation, remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nine highly conserved MH domain residues in the replication cycle of DENV by site-directed mutagenesis in a DENV1 prME expression construct and found that alanine substitutions introduced to four highly conserved residues at the C terminus and one at the N terminus of the MH domain greatly affect the production of both virus-like particles and replicon particles. Eight of the nine alanine mutants affected the entry of replicon particles, which correlated with the impairment in prM cleavage. Moreover, seven mutants were found to have reduced prM-E interaction at low pH, which may inhibit the formation of smooth immature particles and exposure of prM cleavage site during maturation, thus contributing to inefficient prM cleavage. Taken together, these results are the first report showing that highly conserved MH domain residues, located at 20-38 amino acids downstream from the prM cleavage site, can modulate the prM cleavage, maturation of particles, and virus entry. The highly conserved nature of these residues suggests potential targets of antiviral strategy.

  14. Importance of clustered 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) residues for the gene targeting activity of triple helix-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nitin; Majumdar, Alokes; Cuenoud, Bernard; Miller, Paul S; Seidman, Michael M

    2004-02-10

    We are developing triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as gene targeting reagents in living mammalian cells. We have described psoralen-linked TFOs with 2'-O-methyl and 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) (2'-AE) substitutions that are active in a gene knockout assay in cultured cells. The assay is based on mutagenesis by psoralen, a photoactive DNA cross-linker. Previous work showed that TFOs with three or four 2'-AE residues were disproportionately more active than those with one or two substitutions. Here we demonstrate that for optimal bioactivity the 2'-AE residues must be clustered rather than dispersed. We have further characterized bioactive and inactive TFOs in an effort to identify biochemical and biophysical correlates of biological activity. While thermal stability is a standard monitor of TFO biophysical activity, we find that T(m) values do not distinguish bioactive and inactive TFOs. In contrast, measurements of TFO association rates appear to correlate well with bioactivity, in that triplex formation occurs disproportionately faster with the TFOs containing three or four 2'-AE residues. We asked if extending the incubation time prior to photoactivation would enhance the bioactivity of a TFO with a slow on rate relative to the TFO with a faster association rate. However, there was no change in bioactivity differential. These results are compatible with a model in which TFO binding in vivo is followed by relatively rapid elution by cellular functions, similar to that described for transcription factors. Under these circumstances, TFOs with faster on rates would be favored because they would be more likely to be in triplexes at the time of photoactivation.

  15. The iron uptake repressor Fep1 in the fission yeast binds Fe-S cluster through conserved cysteines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kang-Lok; Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2016-09-09

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated since iron is an essential but toxic element in the cell. The GATA-type transcription factor Fep1 and its orthologs contribute to iron homeostasis in many fungi by repressing genes for iron uptake when intracellular iron is high. Even though the function and interaction partners of Fep1 have been elucidated extensively In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the mechanism behind iron-sensing by Fep1 remains elusive. It has been reported that Fep1 interacts with Fe-S-containing monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 and Grx4-Fra2 complex. In this study, we demonstrate that Fep1 also binds iron, in the form of Fe-S cluster. Spectroscopic and biochemical analyses of as isolated and reconstituted Fep1 suggest that the dimeric Fep1 binds Fe-S clusters. The mutation study revealed that the cluster-binding depended on the conserved cysteines located between the two zinc fingers in the DNA binding domain. EPR analyses revealed [Fe-S]-specific peaks indicative of mixed presence of [2Fe-2S], [3Fe-4S], or [4Fe-4S]. The finding that Fep1 is an Fe-S protein fits nicely with the model that the Fe-S-trafficking Grx4 senses intracellular iron environment and modulates the activity of Fep1. - Highlights: • Fep1, a prototype fungal iron uptake regulator, was isolated stably from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. • Fep1 exhibits UV–visible absorption spectrum, characteristic of [Fe-S] proteins. • The iron and sulfide contents in purified or reconstituted Fep1 also support [Fe-S]. • The conserved cysteines are critical for [Fe-S]-binding. • EPR spectra at 5 K and 123 K suggest a mixed population of [Fe-S].

  16. Evolutionary Conserved Motif Finder (ECMFinder) for genome-wide identification of clustered YY1- and CTCF-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keunsoo; Chung, Jae Hoon; Kim, Joomyeong

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new bioinformatics approach called ECMFinder (Evolutionary Conserved Motif Finder). This program searches for a given DNA motif within the entire genome of one species and uses the gene association information of a potential transcription factor-binding site (TFBS) to screen the homologous regions of a second and third species. If multiple species have this potential TFBS in homologous positions, this program recognizes the identified TFBS as an evolutionary conserved motif (ECM). This program outputs a list of ECMs, which can be uploaded as a Custom Track in the UCSC genome browser and can be visualized along with other available data. The feasibility of this approach was tested by searching the genomes of three mammals (human, mouse and cow) with the DNA-binding motifs of YY1 and CTCF. This program successfully identified many clustered YY1- and CTCF-binding sites that are conserved among these species but were previously undetected. In particular, this program identified CTCF-binding sites that are located close to the Dlk1, Magel2 and Cdkn1c imprinted genes. Individual ChIP experiments confirmed the in vivo binding of the YY1 and CTCF proteins to most of these newly discovered binding sites, demonstrating the feasibility and usefulness of ECMFinder. PMID:19208640

  17. Alanine substitution of conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail of herpes simplex virus gB can enhance or abolish cell fusion activity and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Ruel, Nancy . E-mail: n-ruel@northwestern.edu; Zago, Anna . E-mail: anna_zago@acgtinc.com; Spear, Patricia G. . E-mail: p-spear@northwestern.edu

    2006-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is one of the four viral glycoproteins required for viral entry and cell fusion and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. Mutants of HSV type 2 gB were generated by substituting conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail with alanine or by deleting 41 amino acids from the C-terminus. Some of the mutations abolished cell fusion activity and also prevented transport of gB to the cell surface, identifying residues in the gB cytoplasmic tail that are critical for intracellular transport of this glycoprotein. These mutations also prevented production of infectious virus, possibly because the mutant forms of gB were not transported to the site of envelopment. Other mutations, particularly the deletion, significantly enhanced cell fusion activity. These mutations, as well as others described previously, identify regions of the gB cytoplasmic domain that modulate cell fusion activity.

  18. Beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic genes have been conserved in clusters in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Burnham, M K; Bull, J H; Hodgson, J E; Ward, J M; Browne, P; Brown, J; Barton, B; Earl, A J; Turner, G

    1990-01-01

    A cosmid clone containing closely linked beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic genes was isolated from a gene library of Flavobacterium sp. SC 12,154. The location within the cluster of the DNA thought to contain the gene for delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS), the first step in the beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic pathway, was identified by a novel method. This DNA facilitated the isolation, by cross-hybridization, of the corresponding DNA from Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064, Penicillium chrysogenum Oli13 and Aspergillus nidulans R153. Evidence was obtained which confirmed that the cross-hybridizing sequences contained the ACVS gene. In each case the ACVS gene was found to be closely linked to other beta-lactam biosynthetic genes and constituted part of a gene cluster. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2107074

  19. Effect of translational and angular momentum conservation on energy equipartition in microcanonical equilibrium in small clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niiyama, Tomoaki; Shimizu, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Taizo R.; Okushima, Teruaki; Ikeda, Kensuke S.

    2009-05-01

    We investigate numerically and analytically the effects of conservation of total translational and angular momentum on the distribution of kinetic energy among particles in microcanonical particle systems with small number of degrees of freedom, specifically microclusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of microclusters with constant total energy and momenta, using Lennard-Jones, Morse, and Coulomb plus Born-Mayer-type potentials, show that the distribution of kinetic energy among particles can be inhomogeneous and depend on particle mass and position even in thermal equilibrium. Statistical analysis using a microcanonical measure taking into account of the additional conserved quantities gives theoretical expressions for kinetic energy as a function of the mass and position of a particle with only O(1/N2) deviation from the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. These expressions fit numerical results well. Finally, we propose an intuitive interpretation for the inhomogeneity of the kinetic energy distributions.

  20. Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Conserved Sequence Motifs between Helices E and H: Prediction of Critical Motifs and Residues in Enzyme Functions

    PubMed Central

    Oezguen, Numan; Kumar, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Rational approaches have been extensively used to investigate the role of active site residues in cytochrome P450 (CYP) functions. However, recent studies using random mutagenesis suggest an important role for non-active site residues in CYP functions. Meta-analysis of the random mutants showed that 75% of the functionally important non-active site residues are present in 20% of the entire protein between helices E and H (E-H) and conserved sequence motif (CSM) between 7 and 11. The CSM approach was developed recently to investigate the functional role of non-active site residues in CYP2B4. Furthermore, we identified and analyzed the CSM in multiple CYP families and subfamilies in the E-H region. Results from CSM analysis showed that CSM 7, 8, 10, and 11 are conserved in CYP1, CYP2, and CYP3 families, while CSM 9 is conserved only in CYP2 family. Analysis of different CYP2 subfamilies showed that CYP2B and CYP2C have similar characteristics in the CSM, while the characteristics of CYP2A and CYP2D subfamilies are different. Finally, we analyzed CSM 7, 8, 10, and 11, which are common in all the CYP families/subfamilies analyzed, in fifteen important drug-metabolizing CYPs. The results showed that while CSM 8 is most conserved among these CYPs, CSM 7, 9, and 10 have significant variations. We suggest that CSM8 has a common role in all the CYPs that have been analyzed, while CSM 7, 10, and 11 may have relatively specific role within the subfamily. We further suggest that these CSM play important role in opening and closing of the substrate access/egress channel by modulating the flexible/plastic region of the protein. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis of these CSM can be used to study structure-function and dynamic/plasticity-function relationships and to design CYP biocatalysts. PMID:25426333

  1. The conservation of phosphate-binding residues among PHT1 transporters suggests that distinct transport affinities are unlikely to result from differences in the phosphate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ceasar, S Antony; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P; Ignacimuthu, S; Baldwin, Stephen A

    2016-10-15

    The plant PHosphate Transporter 1 (PHT1) family of membrane proteins belongs to the major facilitator super family and plays a major role in the acquisition of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the soil and its transport within the plant. These transporters have been well characterized for expression patterns, localization, and in some cases affinity. Furthermore, the crystal structure of a high-affinity eukaryotic phosphate transporter from the fungus Piriformospora indica (PiPT) has revealed important information on the residues involved in Pi transport. Using multiple-sequence alignments and homology modelling, the phosphate-binding site residues were shown to be well conserved between all the plant PHT1 proteins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae PHO84 and PiPT. For example, Asp 324 in PiPT is conserved in the equivalent position in all plant PHT1 and yeast transporters analyzed, and this residue in ScPHO84 was shown by mutagenesis to be important for both the binding and transport of Pi. Moreover, Asp 45 and Asp 149, which are predicted to be involved in proton import, and Lys 459, which is putatively involved in Pi-binding, are all fully conserved in PHT1 and ScPHO84 transporters. The conserved nature of the residues that play a key role in Pi-binding and transport across the PHT1 family suggests that the differing Pi affinities of these transporters do not reside in differences in the Pi-binding site. Recent studies suggest that phosphate transporters could possess dual affinity and that post-translational modifications may be important in regulating affinity for phosphate. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Specific Residues of a Conserved Domain in the N Terminus of the Human Cytomegalovirus pUL50 Protein Determine Its Intranuclear Interaction with pUL53*

    PubMed Central

    Milbradt, Jens; Auerochs, Sabrina; Sevvana, Madhumati; Muller, Yves A.; Sticht, Heinrich; Marschall, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Herpesviral capsids are assembled in the host cell nucleus and are subsequently translocated to the cytoplasm. During this process it has been demonstrated that the human cytomegalovirus proteins pUL50 and pUL53 interact and form, together with other viral and cellular proteins, the nuclear egress complex at the nuclear envelope. In this study we provide evidence that specific residues of a conserved N-terminal region of pUL50 determine its intranuclear interaction with pUL53. In silico evaluation and biophysical analyses suggested that the conserved region forms a regular secondary structure adopting a globular fold. Importantly, site-directed replacement of individual amino acids by alanine indicated a strong functional influence of specific residues inside this globular domain. In particular, mutation of the widely conserved residues Glu-56 or Tyr-57 led to a loss of interaction with pUL53. Consistent with the loss of binding properties, mutants E56A and Y57A showed a defective function in the recruitment of pUL53 to the nuclear envelope in expression plasmid-transfected and human cytomegalovirus-infected cells. In addition, in silico analysis suggested that residues 3–20 form an amphipathic α-helix that appears to be conserved among Herpesviridae. Point mutants revealed a structural role of this N-terminal α-helix for pUL50 stability rather than a direct role in the binding of pUL53. In contrast, the central part of the globular domain including Glu-56 and Tyr-57 is directly responsible for the functional interaction with pUL53 and thus determines formation of the basic nuclear egress complex. PMID:22589554

  3. The penicillin gene cluster is amplified in tandem repeats linked by conserved hexanucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Fierro, F; Barredo, J L; Díez, B; Gutierrez, S; Fernández, F J; Martín, J F

    1995-01-01

    The penicillin biosynthetic genes (pcbAB, pcbC, penDE) of Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 were located in a 106.5-kb DNA region that is amplified in tandem repeats (five or six copies) linked by conserved TTTACA sequences. The wild-type strains P. chrysogenum NRRL 1951 and Penicillium notatum ATCC 9478 (Fleming's isolate) contain a single copy of the 106.5-kb region. This region was bordered by the same TTTACA hexanucleotide found between tandem repeats in strain AS-P-78. A penicillin overproducer strain, P. chrysogenum E1, contains a large number of copies in tandem of a 57.9-kb DNA fragment, linked by the same hexanucleotide or its reverse complementary TGTAAA sequence. The deletion mutant P. chrysogenum npe10 showed a deletion of 57.9 kb that corresponds exactly to the DNA fragment that is amplified in E1. The conserved hexanucleotide sequence was reconstituted at the deletion site. The amplification has occurred within a single chromosome (chromosome I). The tandem reiteration and deletion appear to arise by mutation-induced site-specific recombination at the conserved hexanucleotide sequences. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7597101

  4. The penicillin gene cluster is amplified in tandem repeats linked by conserved hexanucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Fierro, F; Barredo, J L; Díez, B; Gutierrez, S; Fernández, F J; Martín, J F

    1995-06-20

    The penicillin biosynthetic genes (pcbAB, pcbC, penDE) of Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 were located in a 106.5-kb DNA region that is amplified in tandem repeats (five or six copies) linked by conserved TTTACA sequences. The wild-type strains P. chrysogenum NRRL 1951 and Penicillium notatum ATCC 9478 (Fleming's isolate) contain a single copy of the 106.5-kb region. This region was bordered by the same TTTACA hexanucleotide found between tandem repeats in strain AS-P-78. A penicillin overproducer strain, P. chrysogenum E1, contains a large number of copies in tandem of a 57.9-kb DNA fragment, linked by the same hexanucleotide or its reverse complementary TGTAAA sequence. The deletion mutant P. chrysogenum npe10 showed a deletion of 57.9 kb that corresponds exactly to the DNA fragment that is amplified in E1. The conserved hexanucleotide sequence was reconstituted at the deletion site. The amplification has occurred within a single chromosome (chromosome I). The tandem reiteration and deletion appear to arise by mutation-induced site-specific recombination at the conserved hexanucleotide sequences.

  5. AF-2 activity and recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to the estrogen receptor depend on a lysine residue conserved in nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Henttu, P M; Kalkhoven, E; Parker, M G

    1997-01-01

    Hormone-dependent transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors depends on the presence of a conserved C-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix (helix 12) in the ligand-binding domain. Here we show that a lysine residue, which is conserved in most nuclear receptors in the predicted helix 3, is also required for estrogen-dependent transactivation. The replacement of lysine 366 with alanine appreciably reduced activation function 2 (AF-2) activity without affecting steroid- or DNA-binding activity in the mouse estrogen receptor. The mutation dramatically reduced the ability of the receptor to bind steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) but had no effect on receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP-140) binding, indicating that while their sites of interaction overlap, they are not entirely consistent and in keeping with the proposal that the recruitment of coactivators, such as SRC-1, is required for AF-2 activity. Although the function of RIP-140 remains to be established, RIP-140 appears to be capable of recruiting the basal transcription machinery, since overexpression of the protein markedly increased the transcriptional activity of the mutant receptor. Since the lysine residue is conserved, we propose that it is required, together with residues in helix 12, to form the surface by which members of the nuclear receptor family interact with coactivators. PMID:9121431

  6. Structural involvement in substrate recognition of an essential aspartate residue conserved in Mep/Amt and Rh-type ammonium transporters.

    PubMed

    Marini, Anna Maria; Boeckstaens, Mélanie; Benjelloun, Fatine; Chérif-Zahar, Baya; André, Bruno

    2006-06-01

    Ammonium transport proteins belonging to the Mep/Amt/Rh family are spread throughout all domains of life. A conserved aspartate residue plays a key role in the function of Escherichia coli AmtB. Here, we show that the analogous aspartate residue is critical for the transport function of eukaryotic family members as distant as the yeast transporter/sensor Mep2 and the human RhAG and RhCG proteins. In yeast Mep2, replacement of aspartate(186) with asparagine produced an inactive transporter localized at the cell surface, whilst replacement with alanine was accompanied by stacking of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Introduction of an acidic residue, glutamate, produced a partially active protein. A carboxyl group at position 186 of Mep2 therefore appears mandatory for function. Kinetic analysis shows the Mep2(D186E) variant to be particularly affected at the level of substrate affinity, suggesting an involvement of aspartate(186) in ammonium recognition. Our data also put forward that ammonium recognition and/or transport by Mep2 is required for the sensor role played in the development of pseudohyphal growth. Finally, replacement of the conserved aspartate with asparagine in human RhAG and RhCG proteins resulted in the loss of bi-directional transport function. Hence, this aspartate residue might play a preserved functional role in Mep/Amt/Rh proteins.

  7. Conserved histidine residues at the ferroxidase centre of the Campylobacter jejuni Dps protein are not strictly required for metal binding and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sanchuki, Heloisa B S; Valdameri, Glaucio; Moure, Vivian R; Rodriguez, Jorge A; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Korolik, Victoria; Ribeiro, Ronny Rocha; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for living organisms as it is involved in a broad variety of important biological processes. However, free iron inside the cell could be potentially toxic, generating hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reaction. Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells) belongs to a subfamily of ferritins and can store iron atoms inside the dodecamer. The presence of a ferroxidase centre, composed of highly conserved residues, is a signature of this protein family. In this study, we analysed the role of two conserved histidine residues (H25 and H37) located at the ferroxidase centre of the Campylobacter jejuni Dps protein by replacing them with glycine residues. The C. jejuni H25G/H37G substituted variant showed reduced iron binding and ferroxidase activities in comparison with wt Dps, while DNA-binding activity remained unaffected. We also found that both CjDps wt and CjDps H25G/H37G were able to bind manganese atoms. These results indicate that the H25 and H37 residues at the ferroxidase centre of C. jejuni Dps are not strictly required for metal binding and oxidation.

  8. Conserved hydrophobic residues in the CARP/β-sheet domain of cyclase-associated protein are involved in actin monomer regulation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2017-09-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a multidomain protein that promotes actin filament dynamics. The C-terminal region of CAP contains a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 protein (CARP) domain (or a β-sheet domain), which binds to actin monomer and is essential for enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. However, how the CARP domain binds to actin is not clearly understood. Here, we report that conserved hydrophobic residues in the CARP domain play important roles in the function of CAP to regulate actin dynamics. Single mutations of three conserved surface-exposed hydrophobic residues in the CARP domain of CAS-2, a Caenorhabditis elegans CAP, significantly reduce its binding to actin monomers and suppress its nucleotide exchange activity on actin. As a result, these mutants are weaker than wild-type to compete with ADF/cofilin to promote recycling of actin monomers for polymerization. A double mutation (V367A/I373A) eliminates these actin-regulatory functions of CAS-2. These hydrophobic residues and previously identified functional residues are scattered on a concave β-sheet of the CARP domain, suggesting that a wide area of the β-sheet is involved in binding to actin. These observations suggest that the CARP domain of CAP binds to actin in a distinct manner from other known actin-binding proteins. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Spatial clustering of binding motifs and charges reveals conserved functional features in disordered nucleoporin sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, David; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) gates the only channel through which cells exchange material between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Traffic is regulated by transport receptors bound to cargo which interact with numerous of disordered phenylalanine glycine (FG) repeat containing proteins (FG nups) that line this channel. The precise physical mechanism of transport regulation has remained elusive primarily due to the difficulty in understanding the structure and dynamics of such a large assembly of interacting disordered proteins. Here we have performed a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis, specifically tailored towards disordered proteins, on thousands of nuclear pore proteins from a variety of species revealing a set of highly conserved features in the sequence structure among FG nups. Contrary to the general perception that these proteins are functionally equivalent to homogeneous polymers, we show that biophysically important features within individual nups like the separation, spatial localization and ordering along the chain of FG and charge domains are highly conserved. Our current understanding of NPC structure and function should therefore be revised to account for these common features that are functionally relevant for the underlying physical mechanism of NPC gating.

  10. Cotton nitrogen management in a high-residue conservation system: nitrogen source, rate, application method and application timing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation tillage systems are promoted in many parts of the world to help achieve environmental sustainability in agriculture. In-service training programs are used to educate extension agents as means to diffuse conservation tillage practices. However, changing extension agents’ attitudes is a c...

  11. Roles of conserved residues within the pre-NH2-terminal domain of herpes simplex virus 1 DNA polymerase in replication and latency in mice.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Shariya L; Pesola, Jean M; Coen, Donald M

    2014-04-01

    The catalytic subunit of the herpes simplex virus 1 DNA polymerase (HSV-1 Pol) is essential for viral DNA synthesis and production of infectious virus in cell culture. While mutations that affect 5'-3' polymerase activity have been evaluated in animal models of HSV-1 infection, mutations that affect other functions of HSV-1 Pol have not. In a previous report, we utilized bacterial artificial chromosome technology to generate defined HSV-1 pol mutants with lesions in the previously uncharacterized pre-NH2-terminal domain. We found that the extreme N-terminal 42 residues (deletion mutant polΔN43) were dispensable for replication in cell culture, while residues 44-49 (alanine-substitution mutant polA6) were required for efficient viral DNA synthesis and production of infectious virus. In this study, we sought to address the importance of these conserved elements in viral replication in a mouse corneal infection model. Mutant virus polΔN43 exhibited no meaningful defect in acute or latent infection despite strong conservation of residues 1-42 with HSV-2 Pol. The polA6 mutation caused a modest defect in replication at the site of inoculation, and was severely impaired for ganglionic replication, even at high inocula that permitted efficient corneal replication. Additionally, the polA6 mutation resulted in reduced latency establishment and subsequent reactivation. Moreover, we found that the polA6 replication defect in cultured cells was exacerbated in resting cells as compared to dividing cells. These results reveal an important role for the conserved motif at residues 44-49 of HSV-1 Pol for ganglionic viral replication.

  12. Crystallographic and Mutational Studies of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis recA Mini-inteins Suggest a Pivotal Role for a Highly Conserved Aspartate Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Van Roey,P.; Pereira, B.; Li, Z.; Hiraga, K.; Belfort, M.; Derbyshire, V.

    2007-01-01

    The 440 amino acid Mtu recA intein consists of independent protein-splicing and endonuclease domains. Previously, removal of the central endonuclease domain of the intein, and selection for function, generated a 168 residue mini-intein, {Delta}I-SM, that had splicing activity similar to that of the full-length, wild-type protein. A D422G mutation ({Delta}I-CM) increased C-terminal cleavage activity. Using the {Delta}I-SM mini-intein structure (presented here) as a guide, we previously generated a highly active 139 residue mini-intein, {Delta}{Delta}I{sub hh}-SM, by replacing 36 amino acid residues in the residual endonuclease loop with a seven-residue {beta}-turn from the autoprocessing domain of Hedgehog protein. The three-dimensional structures of {Delta}I-SM, {Delta}{Delta}I{sub hh}-SM, and two variants, {Delta}{Delta}I{sub hh}-CM and {Delta}{Delta}I{sub hh}, have been determined to evaluate the effects of the minimization on intein integrity and to investigate the structural and functional consequences of the D422G mutation. These structural studies show that Asp422 is capable of interacting with both the N and C termini. These interactions are lacking in the CM variant, but are replaced by contacts with water molecules. Accordingly, additional mutagenesis of residue 422, combined with mutations that isolate N-terminal and C-terminal cleavage, showed that the side-chain of Asp422 plays a role in both N and C-terminal cleavage, thereby suggesting that this highly conserved residue regulates the balance between the two reactions.

  13. Conserved Amino Acid Residues of the NuoD Segment Important for Structure and Function of Escherichia coli NDH-1 (Complex I)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The NuoD segment (homologue of mitochondrial 49 kDa subunit) of the proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I/NDH-1) from Escherichia coli is in the hydrophilic domain and bears many highly conserved amino acid residues. The three-dimensional structural model of NDH-1 suggests that the NuoD segment, together with the neighboring subunits, constitutes a putative quinone binding cavity. We used the homologous DNA recombination technique to clarify the role of selected key amino acid residues of the NuoD segment. Among them, residues Tyr273 and His224 were considered candidates for having important interactions with the quinone headgroup. Mutant Y273F retained partial activity but lost sensitivity to capsaicin-40. Mutant H224R scarcely affected the activity, suggesting that this residue may not be essential. His224 is located in a loop near the N-terminus of the NuoD segment (Gly217–Phe227) which is considered to form part of the quinone binding cavity. In contrast to the His224 mutation, mutants G217V, P218A, and G225V almost completely lost the activity. One region of this loop is positioned close to a cytosolic loop of the NuoA subunit in the membrane domain, and together they seem to be important in keeping the quinone binding cavity intact. The structural role of the longest helix in the NuoD segment located behind the quinone binding cavity was also investigated. Possible roles of other highly conserved residues of the NuoD segment are discussed. PMID:25545070

  14. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL37 Protein Tyrosine Residues Conserved among All Alphaherpesviruses Are Required for Interactions with Glycoprotein K, Cytoplasmic Virion Envelopment, and Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Chouljenko, Dmitry V.; Jambunathan, Nithya; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Naderi, Misagh; Brylinski, Michal; Caskey, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL37 protein functions in virion envelopment at trans-Golgi membranes, as well as in retrograde and anterograde transport of virion capsids. Recently, we reported that UL37 interacts with glycoprotein K (gK) and its interacting partner protein UL20 (N. Jambunathan, D. Chouljenko, P. Desai, A. S. Charles, R. Subramanian, V. N. Chouljenko, and K. G. Kousoulas, J Virol 88:5927–5935, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00278-14), facilitating cytoplasmic virion envelopment. Alignment of UL37 homologs encoded by alphaherpesviruses revealed the presence of highly conserved residues in the central portion of the UL37 protein. A cadre of nine UL37 site-specific mutations were produced and tested for their ability to inhibit virion envelopment and infectious virus production. Complementation analysis revealed that replacement of tyrosines 474 and 480 with alanine failed to complement the UL37-null virus, while all other mutated UL37 genes complemented the virus efficiently. The recombinant virus DC474-480 constructed with tyrosines 474, 476, 477, and 480 mutated to alanine residues produced a gK-null-like phenotype characterized by the production of very small plaques and accumulation of capsids in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Recombinant viruses having either tyrosine 476 or 477 replaced with alanine produced a wild-type phenotype. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that replacement of all four tyrosines with alanines substantially reduced the ability of gK to interact with UL37. Alignment of HSV UL37 with the human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus UL37 homologs revealed that Y480 was conserved only for alphaherpesviruses. Collectively, these results suggest that the UL37 conserved tyrosine 480 residue plays a crucial role in interactions with gK to facilitate cytoplasmic virion envelopment and infectious virus production. IMPORTANCE The HSV-1 UL37 protein is conserved among all herpesviruses, functions in both

  15. A highly conserved NB-LRR encoding gene cluster effective against Setosphaeria turcica in sorghum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The fungal pathogen Setosphaeria turcica causes turcicum or northern leaf blight disease on maize, sorghum and related grasses. A prevalent foliar disease found worldwide where the two host crops, maize and sorghum are grown. The aim of the present study was to find genes controlling the host defense response to this devastating plant pathogen. A cDNA-AFLP approach was taken to identify candidate sequences, which functions were further validated via virus induced gene silencing (VIGS), and real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to address evolutionary events. Results cDNA-AFLP analysis was run on susceptible and resistant sorghum and maize genotypes to identify resistance-related sequences. One CC-NB-LRR encoding gene GRMZM2G005347 was found among the up-regulated maize transcripts after fungal challenge. The new plant resistance gene was designated as St referring to S. turcica. Genome sequence comparison revealed that the CC-NB-LRR encoding St genes are located on chromosome 2 in maize, and on chromosome 5 in sorghum. The six St sorghum genes reside in three pairs in one locus. When the sorghum St genes were silenced via VIGS, the resistance was clearly compromised, an observation that was supported by real-time PCR. Database searches and phylogenetic analysis suggest that the St genes have a common ancestor present before the grass subfamily split 50-70 million years ago. Today, 6 genes are present in sorghum, 9 in rice and foxtail millet, respectively, 3 in maize and 4 in Brachypodium distachyon. The St gene homologs have all highly conserved sequences, and commonly reside as gene pairs in the grass genomes. Conclusions Resistance genes to S. turcica, with a CC-NB-LRR protein domain architecture, have been found in maize and sorghum. VIGS analysis revealed their importance in the surveillance to S. turcica in sorghum. The St genes are highly conserved in sorghum, rice, foxtail millet, maize and Brachypodium, suggesting an

  16. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Kieffer, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA), a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and androgen receptor (AR). BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD), which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules. PMID:27583469

  17. Integrating Markov clustering and molecular phylogenetics to reconstruct the cyanobacterial species tree from conserved protein families.

    PubMed

    Swingley, Wesley D; Blankenship, Robert E; Raymond, Jason

    2008-04-01

    Attempts to classify living organisms by their physical characteristics are as old as biology itself. The advent of protein and DNA sequencing--most notably the use of 16S ribosomal RNA--defined a new level of classification that now forms our basic understanding of the history of life on earth. High-throughput sequencing currently provides DNA sequences at an unprecedented rate, not only providing a wealth of information but also posing considerable analytical challenges. Here we present comparative genomics-based methods useful for automating evolutionary analysis between any number of species. As a practical example, we applied our method to the well-studied cyanobacterial lineage. The 24 cyanobacterial genomes compared here occupy a wide variety of environmental niches and play major roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles. By integrating phylogenetic data inferred for upward of 1,000 protein-coding genes common to all or most cyanobacteria, we have reconstructed an evolutionary history of the phylum, establishing a framework for resolving key issues regarding the evolution of their metabolic and phenotypic diversity. Greater resolution on individual branches can be attained by telescoping inward to the larger set of conserved proteins between fewer taxa. The construction of all individual protein phylogenies allows for quantitative tree scoring, providing insight into the evolutionary history of each protein family as well as probing the limits of phylogenetic resolution. The tools incorporated here are fast, computationally tractable, and easily extendable to other phyla and provide a scaleable framework for contrasting and integrating the information present in thousands of protein-coding genes within related genomes.

  18. Differential modulation of prM cleavage, extracellular particle distribution, and virus infectivity by conserved residues at nonfurin consensus positions of the dengue virus pr-M junction.

    PubMed

    Junjhon, Jiraphan; Lausumpao, Matthawee; Supasa, Sunpetchuda; Noisakran, Sansanee; Songjaeng, Adisak; Saraithong, Prakaimuk; Chaichoun, Kridsada; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Keelapang, Poonsook; Kanjanahaluethai, Amornrat; Puttikhunt, Chunya; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Malasit, Prida; Sittisombut, Nopporn

    2008-11-01

    In the generation of flavivirus particles, an internal cleavage of the envelope glycoprotein prM by furin is required for the acquisition of infectivity. Unlike cleavage of the prM of other flaviviruses, cleavage of dengue virus prM is incomplete in many cell lines; the partial cleavage reflects the influence of residues at furin nonconsensus positions of the pr-M junction, as flaviviruses share basic residues at positions P1, P2, and P4, recognized by furin. In this study, viruses harboring the alanine-scanning and other multiple-point mutations of the pr-M junction were generated, employing a dengue virus background that exhibited 60 to 70% prM cleavage and a preponderance of virion-sized extracellular particles. Analysis of prM and its cleavage products in viable mutants revealed a cleavage-suppressive effect at the conserved P3 Glu residue, as well as the cleavage-augmenting effects at the P5 Arg and P6 His residues, indicating an interplay between opposing modulatory influences mediated by these residues on the cleavage of the pr-M junction. Changes in the prM cleavage level were associated with altered proportions of extracellular virions and subviral particles; mutants with reduced cleavage were enriched with subviral particles and prM-containing virions, whereas the mutant with enhanced cleavage was deprived of these particles. Alterations of virus multiplication were detected in mutants with reduced prM cleavage and were correlated with their low specific infectivities. These findings define the functional roles of charged residues located adjacent to the furin consensus sequence in the cleavage of dengue virus prM and provide plausible mechanisms by which the reduction in the pr-M junction cleavability may affect virus replication.

  19. Computational analysis of perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV) in three countries, provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV, which has caused global panic to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the family Flaviviridae, the causal agent of the self-limiting Dengue fever and the potentially fatal hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, has been a scourge in tropical countries for many centuries. The recently solved structure of mature ZIKV (PDB ID:5IRE) has provided key insights into the structure of the envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins, the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes, and also enumerates residue pairs that undergo significant polarity reversal. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little

  20. A conserved proline residue in the leucine zipper region of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 in Arabidopsis thaliana interferes with the formation of homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Huaishun; Cao Kaiming; Wang Xiping

    2007-10-19

    Two putative Arabidopsis E group bZIP transcript factors, AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61, are nuclear-localized and their transcriptional activation domain is in their N-terminal region. By searching GenBank, we found other eight plant homologues of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61. All of them have a proline residue in the third heptad of zipper region. Yeast two-hybrid assay and EMSA showed that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could not form homodimer while their mutant forms, AtbZIP34m and AtbZIP61m, which the proline residue was replaced by an alanine residue in the zipper region, could form homodimer and bind G-box element. These results suggest that the conserved proline residue interferes with the homodimer formation. However, both AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could form heterodimers with members of I group and S group transcription factors in which some members involved in vascular development. So we speculate that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 may participate in plant development via interacting with other group bZIP transcription factors.

  1. Identification of Conserved Residues in Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E2 That Modulate Virus Dependence on CD81 and SRB1 Entry Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Muriel; Sarrazin, Stéphane; Montserret, Roland; Descamps, Véronique; Baumert, Thomas F.; Duverlie, Gilles; Séron, Karin; Penin, François

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In spite of the high variability of its sequence, hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 contains several conserved regions. In this study, we explored the structural and functional features of the highly conserved E2 segment from amino acid (aa) 502 to 520, which had been proposed as a fusion peptide and shown to strongly overlap a potential conserved neutralizing epitope. For this purpose, we used reverse genetics to introduce point mutations within this region, and we characterized the phenotypes of these mutants in the light of the recently published structure of E2. The functional analyses showed that their phenotypes are in agreement with the positions of the corresponding residues in the E2 crystal structure. In contrast, our data ruled out the involvement of this region in membrane fusion, and they indicate that alternative conformations would be necessary to expose the potential neutralizing epitope present in this segment. Of particular interest, we identified three specific mutations (Y507L, V514A, and V515A) located within this neutralizing epitope which only mildly reduced infectivity and showed no assembly defect. These mutations modulated HCV dependence on the viral receptor SRB1, and/or they also modulated virion sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies. Importantly, their characterization also showed that amino acids Y507, V514, and V515 contribute to E2 interaction with HCV receptor CD81. In conclusion, our data show that the highly conserved E2 segment from aa 502 to 520 plays a key role in cell entry by influencing the association of the viral particle with coreceptors and neutralizing antibodies. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 exhibit sequence variability. However, some segments of the envelope proteins are highly conserved, suggesting that these sequences play a key role at some steps of the HCV life cycle. In this work, we characterized the function and structure of a highly conserved E2 region

  2. Identification of conserved residues in hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein E2 that modulate virus dependence on CD81 and SRB1 entry factors.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Muriel; Sarrazin, Stéphane; Montserret, Roland; Descamps, Véronique; Baumert, Thomas F; Duverlie, Gilles; Séron, Karin; Penin, François; Dubuisson, Jean

    2014-09-01

    In spite of the high variability of its sequence, hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 contains several conserved regions. In this study, we explored the structural and functional features of the highly conserved E2 segment from amino acid (aa) 502 to 520, which had been proposed as a fusion peptide and shown to strongly overlap a potential conserved neutralizing epitope. For this purpose, we used reverse genetics to introduce point mutations within this region, and we characterized the phenotypes of these mutants in the light of the recently published structure of E2. The functional analyses showed that their phenotypes are in agreement with the positions of the corresponding residues in the E2 crystal structure. In contrast, our data ruled out the involvement of this region in membrane fusion, and they indicate that alternative conformations would be necessary to expose the potential neutralizing epitope present in this segment. Of particular interest, we identified three specific mutations (Y507L, V514A, and V515A) located within this neutralizing epitope which only mildly reduced infectivity and showed no assembly defect. These mutations modulated HCV dependence on the viral receptor SRB1, and/or they also modulated virion sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies. Importantly, their characterization also showed that amino acids Y507, V514, and V515 contribute to E2 interaction with HCV receptor CD81. In conclusion, our data show that the highly conserved E2 segment from aa 502 to 520 plays a key role in cell entry by influencing the association of the viral particle with coreceptors and neutralizing antibodies. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 exhibit sequence variability. However, some segments of the envelope proteins are highly conserved, suggesting that these sequences play a key role at some steps of the HCV life cycle. In this work, we characterized the function and structure of a highly conserved E2 region that is targeted by

  3. Importance of Conserved Residues of the Serine Protease Autotransporter β-Domain in Passenger Domain Processing and β-Barrel Assembly ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yihfen T.; Tsang, Casey; Cameron, Todd A.; Ankrah, Dennis O.; Rodou, Athina; Stathopoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Serine protease autotransporters of the family Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) comprise a family of virulence proteins secreted by enteric Gram-negative bacteria via the autotransporter secretion pathway. A SPATE polypeptide contains a C-terminal translocator domain that inserts into the bacterial outer membrane as a β-barrel structure and mediates secretion of the passenger domain to the extracellular environment. In the present study, we examined the role of conserved residues located in the SPATE β-barrel-forming region in passenger domain secretion. Thirty-nine fully conserved residues in Tsh were mutated by single-residue substitution, and defects in their secretion phenotypes were assessed by cell fractionation and immunochemistry. A total of 22 single mutants exhibited abnormal phenotypes in different cellular compartments. Most mutants affecting secretion are charged residues with side chains pointing into the β-barrel interior. Seven mutants showed notable abnormalities in processing (constructs with the E1231A, E1249A, and R1374A mutations) and β-barrel assembly or insertion into the outer membrane (constructs with the G1158Y, F1360A, Y1375A, and F1377A mutations). The phenotypes of the β-barrel assembly/insertion mutants and the presence of a processed Tsh passenger domain in the periplasm support the possibility that the translocator domain must undergo extensive folding prior to insertion into the outer membrane. Results from double-mutation experiments further demonstrate that F1360 and F1377 affect β-barrel insertion/assembly at different times. In light of these new data, a more refined model for the mechanism of SPATE secretion is presented. PMID:20515934

  4. The conserved cis-Pro39 residue plays a crucial role in the proper positioning of the catalytic base Asp38 in ketosteroid isomerase from Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Gyu Hyun; Cha, Sun-Shin; Yun, Young Sung; Oh, Yun Hee; Hong, Bee Hak; Lee, Heung-Soo; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2003-01-01

    KSI (ketosteroid isomerase) from Comamonas testosteroni is a homodimeric enzyme that catalyses the allylic isomerization of Delta5-3-ketosteroids to their conjugated Delta4-isomers at a reaction rate equivalent to the diffusion-controlled limit. Based on the structural analysis of KSI at a high resolution, the conserved cis-Pro39 residue was proposed to be involved in the proper positioning of Asp38, a critical catalytic residue, since the residue was found not only to be structurally associated with Asp38, but also to confer a structural rigidity on the local active-site geometry consisting of Asp38, Pro39, Val40, Gly41 and Ser42 at the flexible loop between b-strands B1 and B2. In order to investigate the structural role of the conserved cis-Pro39 residue near the active site of KSI, Pro39 was replaced with alanine or glycine. The free energy of activation for the P39A and P39G mutants increased by 10.5 and 16.7 kJ/mol (2.5 and 4.0 kcal/mol) respectively, while DG(U)H2O (the free-energy change for unfolding in the absence of urea at 25.00+/-0.02 degrees C) decreased by 31.0 and 35.6 kJ/mol (7.4 and 8.5 kcal/mol) respectively, compared with the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the P39A mutant in complex with d-equilenin [d-1,3,5(10),6,8-estrapentaen-3-ol-17-one], a reaction intermediate analogue, determined at 2.3 A (0.23 nm) resolution revealed that the P39A mutation significantly disrupted the proper orientations of both d-equilenin and Asp38, as well as the local active-site geometry near Asp38, which resulted in substantial decreases in the activity and stability of KSI. Upon binding 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid, the fluorescence intensities of the P39A and P39G mutants were increased drastically, with maximum wavelengths blue-shifted upon binding, indicating that the mutations might alter the hydrophobic active site of KSI. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the conserved cis-Pro39 residue plays a crucial role in the proper

  5. The role of a conserved proline residue in mediating conformational changes associated with voltage gating of Cx32 gap junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Ri, Y; Ballesteros, J A; Abrams, C K; Oh, S; Verselis, V K; Weinstein, H; Bargiello, T A

    1999-01-01

    We have explored the role of a proline residue located at position 87 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of gap junctions in the mechanism of voltage-dependent gating of connexin32 (Cx32). Substitution of this proline (denoted Cx32P87) with residues G, A, or V affects channel function in a progressive manner consistent with the expectation that a proline kink (PK) motif exists in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of this connexin. Mutations of the preceding threonine residue T86 to S, A, C, V, N, or L shift the conductance-voltage relation of wild-type Cx32, such that the mutated channels close at smaller transjunctional voltages. The observed shift in voltage dependence is consistent with a reduction in the open probability of the mutant hemichannels at a transjunctional voltage (Vj) of 0 mV. In both cases in which kinetics were examined, the time constants for reaching steady state were faster for T86N and T86A than for wild type at comparable voltages, suggesting that the T86 mutations cause the energetic destabilization of the open state relative to the other states of the channel protein. The structural underpinnings of the observed effects were explored with Monte Carlo simulations. The conformational space of TM2 helices was found to differ for the T86A, V, N, and L mutants, which produce a less bent helix ( approximately 20 degrees bend angle) compared to the wild type, which has a approximately 37 degrees bend angle. The greater bend angle of the wild-type helix reflects the propensity of the T86 residue to hydrogen bond with the backbone carbonyl of amino acid residue I82. The relative differences in propensity for hydrogen bonding of the mutants relative to the wild-type threonine residue in the constructs we studied (T86A, V, N, L, S, and C) correlate with the shift in the conductance-voltage relation observed for T86 mutations. The data are consistent with a structural model in which the open conformation of the Cx32 channel corresponds to

  6. Integrating high residue cover crops and weed control options for resistant weeds threatening conservation agriculture and water resources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation tillage reduces the physical movement of soil to the minimum required for crop establishment and production. When consistently practiced as a soil and crop management system, it greatly reduces soil erosion and is recognized for the potential to improve soil quality and plant water avai...

  7. Functional analysis of an inosine-guanosine transporter from Leishmania donovani. The role of conserved residues, aspartate 389 and arginine 393.

    PubMed

    Arastu-Kapur, Shirin; Ford, Ethan; Ullman, Buddy; Carter, Nicola S

    2003-08-29

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters encompass two conserved, charged residues that occur within predicted transmembrane domain 8. To assess the role of these "signature" residues in transporter function, the Asp389 and Arg393 residues within the LdNT2 nucleoside transporter from Leishmania donovani were mutated and the resultant phenotypes evaluated after transfection into Delta ldnt2 parasites. Whereas an R393K mutant retained transporter activity similar to that of wild type LdNT2, the R393L, D389E, and D389N mutations resulted in dramatic losses of transport capability. Tagging the wild type and mutant ldnt2 proteins with green fluorescent protein demonstrated that the D389N and D389E mutants targeted properly to the parasite cell surface and flagellum, whereas the expression of R393L at the cell surface was profoundly compromised. To test whether Asp389 and Arg393 interact, a series of mutants was generated, D389R/R393R, D389D/R393D, and D389R/R393D, within the green fluorescent protein-tagged LdNT2 construct. Although all of these ldnt2 mutants were transport-deficient, D389R/R393D localized properly to the plasma membrane, while neither D389R/R393R nor D389D/R393D could be detected. Moreover, a transport-incompetent D389N/R393N double ldnt2 mutant also localized to the parasite membrane, whereas a D389L/R393L ldnt2 mutant did not, suggesting that an interaction between residues 389 and 393 may be involved in LdNT2 membrane targeting. These studies establish genetically that Asp389 is critical for optimal transporter function and that a positively charged or polar residue at Arg393 is essential for proper expression of LdNT2 at the plasma membrane.

  8. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  9. Leucine residues in conserved region of 33K protein of bovine adenovirus - 3 are important for binding to major late promoter and activation of late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Vikas; Islam, Azharul; Ayalew, Lisanework E; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2015-09-01

    The L6 region of bovine adenovirus 3 (BAdV-3) encode 33K (spliced) and 22K (unspliced) proteins. Earlier, anti-33K serum detected five major and three minor proteins in BAdV-3 infected cells. Here, we demonstrate that anti-sera raised against L6-22K protein detected two proteins of 42 and 37 kDa in BAdV-3 infected cells and one protein of 42 kDa in transfected cells expressing splice-site variant 22K protein (pC.22K containing substituted splice acceptor/donor sequence). Unlike 22K, 33K stimulated the transcription from the major late promoter (MLP) by binding to the downstream sequence elements (DE). Analysis of the variant proteins demonstrated that amino acids 201-240 of the conserved C-terminus of 33K containing the potential leucine zipper and RS repeat are required for the activation of MLP. Furthermore, amino acid substitution analysis demonstrated that unlike arginine residues of RS repeat, the leucine residues (217, 224, 232 and 240) of the conserved leucine zipper appear required for the binding of 33K to the MLP.

  10. The C-terminal 18 Amino Acid Region of Dengue Virus NS5 Regulates its Subcellular Localization and Contains a Conserved Arginine Residue Essential for Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ivan H. W.; Chan, Kitti W. K.; Zhao, Yongqian; Ooi, Eng Eong; Lescar, Julien; Jans, David A.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus NS5 is the most highly conserved amongst the viral non-structural proteins and is responsible for capping, methylation and replication of the flavivirus RNA genome. Interactions of NS5 with host proteins also modulate host immune responses. Although replication occurs in the cytoplasm, an unusual characteristic of DENV2 NS5 is that it localizes to the nucleus during infection with no clear role in replication or pathogenesis. We examined NS5 of DENV1 and 2, which exhibit the most prominent difference in nuclear localization, employing a combination of functional and structural analyses. Extensive gene swapping between DENV1 and 2 NS5 identified that the C-terminal 18 residues (Cter18) alone was sufficient to direct the protein to the cytoplasm or nucleus, respectively. The low micromolar binding affinity between NS5 Cter18 and the nuclear import receptor importin-alpha (Impα), allowed their molecular complex to be purified, crystallised and visualized at 2.2 Å resolution using x-ray crystallography. Structure-guided mutational analysis of this region in GFP-NS5 clones of DENV1 or 2 and in a DENV2 infectious clone reveal residues important for NS5 subcellular localization. Notably, the trans conformation adopted by Pro-884 allows proper presentation for binding Impα and mutating this proline to Thr, as present in DENV1 NS5, results in mislocalizaion of NS5 to the cytoplasm without compromising virus fitness. In contrast, a single mutation to alanine at NS5 position R888, a residue conserved in all flaviviruses, resulted in a completely non-viable virus, and the R888K mutation led to a severely attenuated phentoype, even though NS5 was located in the nucleus. R888 forms a hydrogen bond with Y838 that is also conserved in all flaviviruses. Our data suggests an evolutionarily conserved function for NS5 Cter18, possibly in RNA interactions that are critical for replication, that is independent of its role in subcellular localization. PMID:27622521

  11. Structure-function relationship in the globular type III antifreeze protein: identification of a cluster of surface residues required for binding to ice.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, H.; Sönnichsen, F. D.; DeLuca, C. I.; Sykes, B. D.; Davies, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) depress the freezing point of aqueous solutions by binding to and inhibiting the growth of ice. Whereas the ice-binding surface of some fish AFPs is suggested by their linear, repetitive, hydrogen bonding motifs, the 66-amino-acid-long Type III AFP has a compact, globular fold without any obvious periodicity. In the structure, 9 beta-strands are paired to form 2 triple-stranded antiparallel sheets and 1 double-stranded antiparallel sheet, with the 2 triple sheets arranged as an orthogonal beta-sandwich (Sönnichsen FD, Sykes BD, Chao H, Davies PL, 1993, Science 259:1154-1157). Based on its structure and an alignment of Type III AFP isoform sequences, a cluster of conserved, polar, surface-accessible amino acids (N14, T18, Q44, and N46) was noted on and around the triple-stranded sheet near the C-terminus. At 3 of these sites, mutations that switched amide and hydroxyl groups caused a large decrease in antifreeze activity, but amide to carboxylic acid changes produced AFPs that were fully active at pH 3 and pH 6. This is consistent with the observation that Type III AFP is optimally active from pH 2 to pH 11. At a concentration of 1 mg/mL, Q44T, N14S, and T18N had 50%, 25%, and 10% of the activity of wild-type antifreeze, respectively. The effects of the mutations were cumulative, such that the double mutant N14S/Q44T had 10% of the wild-type activity and the triple mutant N14S/T18N/Q44T had no activity. All mutants with reduced activity were shown to be correctly folded by NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, a complete characterization of the triple mutant by 2-dimensional NMR spectroscopy indicated that the individual and combined mutations did not significantly alter the structure of these proteins. These results suggest that the C-terminal beta-sheet of Type III AFP is primarily responsible for antifreeze activity, and they identify N14, T18, and Q44 as key residues for the AFP-ice interaction. PMID:7849594

  12. The Conserved Dcw Gene Cluster of R. sphaeroides Is Preceded by an Uncommonly Extended 5’ Leader Featuring the sRNA UpsM

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Lennart; Thoelken, Clemens; Volk, Marcel; Remes, Bernhard; Lechner, Marcus; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Cell division and cell wall synthesis mechanisms are similarly conserved among bacteria. Consequently some bacterial species have comparable sets of genes organized in the dcw (division and cell wall) gene cluster. Dcw genes, their regulation and their relative order within the cluster are outstandingly conserved among rod shaped and gram negative bacteria to ensure an efficient coordination of growth and division. A well studied representative is the dcw gene cluster of E. coli. The first promoter of the gene cluster (mraZ1p) gives rise to polycistronic transcripts containing a 38 nt long 5’ UTR followed by the first gene mraZ. Despite reported conservation we present evidence for a much longer 5’ UTR in the gram negative and rod shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. This extended 268 nt long 5’ UTR comprises a Rho independent terminator, which in case of termination gives rise to a non-coding RNA (UpsM). This sRNA is conditionally cleaved by RNase E under stress conditions in an Hfq- and very likely target mRNA-dependent manner, implying its function in trans. These results raise the question for the regulatory function of this extended 5’ UTR. It might represent the rarely described case of a trans acting sRNA derived from a riboswitch with exclusive presence in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. PMID:27802301

  13. The Conserved Dcw Gene Cluster of R. sphaeroides Is Preceded by an Uncommonly Extended 5' Leader Featuring the sRNA UpsM.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lennart; Thoelken, Clemens; Volk, Marcel; Remes, Bernhard; Lechner, Marcus; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Cell division and cell wall synthesis mechanisms are similarly conserved among bacteria. Consequently some bacterial species have comparable sets of genes organized in the dcw (division and cell wall) gene cluster. Dcw genes, their regulation and their relative order within the cluster are outstandingly conserved among rod shaped and gram negative bacteria to ensure an efficient coordination of growth and division. A well studied representative is the dcw gene cluster of E. coli. The first promoter of the gene cluster (mraZ1p) gives rise to polycistronic transcripts containing a 38 nt long 5' UTR followed by the first gene mraZ. Despite reported conservation we present evidence for a much longer 5' UTR in the gram negative and rod shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. This extended 268 nt long 5' UTR comprises a Rho independent terminator, which in case of termination gives rise to a non-coding RNA (UpsM). This sRNA is conditionally cleaved by RNase E under stress conditions in an Hfq- and very likely target mRNA-dependent manner, implying its function in trans. These results raise the question for the regulatory function of this extended 5' UTR. It might represent the rarely described case of a trans acting sRNA derived from a riboswitch with exclusive presence in the family of Rhodobacteraceae.

  14. Contribution of conserved polar glutamine, asparagine and threonine residues and glycosylation to agonist action at human P2X1 receptors for ATP.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jonathan A; Evans, Richard J

    2006-02-01

    The role of conserved polar glutamine, asparagine and threonine residues in the large extracellular loop, and glycosylation, to agonist action at human P2X1 receptors was tested by generating alanine substitution mutants. For the majority of mutants (Q56A, Q95A, T104A, T109A, Q112A, Q114A, T146A, N153A, T158A, N184A, N191A, N242A, N300A) alanine substitution had no effect on ATP potency. The mutants Q95A, Q112A, Q114A and T158A showed changes in efficacy for the partial agonists BzATP and Ap5A, suggesting that these polar residues may contribute to the gating of the channel. The mutants T186A, N204A and N290A had six-, three- and 60-fold decreases in ATP potency, respectively. For T186A and N290A, the partial agonists BzATP and Ap5A were no longer agonists but still bind to the receptor as shown by the ability to modulate the response to co-applied ATP. N153, N184 and N242 are glycosylated in the endoplasmic reticulum and N300 acquires complex glycosylation in the golgi. These results aid in refining a model for ATP binding at the P2X1 receptor where the residues F185T186, and the conserved triplet N290F291R292, are likely to play a role in ATP action at the receptor.

  15. A Highly Conserved Residue in the C-Terminal Helix of HIV-1 Matrix Is Required for Envelope Incorporation into Virus Particles

    PubMed Central

    Brandano, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of viral envelope (Env) glycoproteins into nascent particles is an essential step in the production of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This process has been shown to require interactions between Env and the matrix (MA) domain of the Gag polyprotein. Previous studies indicate that several residues in the N-terminal region of MA are required for Env incorporation. However, the precise mechanism by which Env proteins are acquired during virus assembly has yet to be fully defined. Here, we examine whether a highly conserved glutamate at position 99 in the C-terminal helix is required for MA function and HIV-1 replication. We analyze a panel of mutant viruses that contain different amino acid substitutions at this position using viral infectivity studies, virus-cell fusion assays, and immunoblotting. We find that E99V mutant viruses are defective for fusion with cell membranes and thus are noninfectious. We show that E99V mutant particles of HIV-1 strains LAI and NL4.3 lack wild-type levels of Env proteins. We identify a compensatory substitution in MA residue 84 and show that it can reverse the E99V-associated defects. Taken together, these results indicate that the C-terminal hydrophobic pocket of MA, which encompasses both residues 84 and 99, has a previously unsuspected and key role in HIV-1 Env incorporation. PMID:22156517

  16. Mutation of a conserved residue enhances the sensitivity of analogue-sensitised kinases to generate a novel approach to the study of mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Tay, Ye-Dee; Patel, Avinash; Kaemena, Daniel F; Hagan, Iain M

    2013-11-01

    The chemical genetic strategy in which mutational enlargement of the ATP-binding site sensitises of a protein kinase to bulky ATP analogues has proved to be an elegant tool for the generation of conditional analogue-sensitive kinase alleles in a variety of model organisms. Here, we describe a novel substitution mutation in the kinase domain that can enhance the sensitivity of analogue-sensitive kinases. Substitution of a methionine residue to phenylalanine in the +2 position after HRDLKxxN motif of the subdomain VIb within the kinase domain markedly increased the sensitivities of the analogue-sensitive kinases to ATP analogues in three out of five S. pombe kinases (i.e. Plo1, Orb5 and Wee1) that harbor this conserved methionine residue. Kinome alignment established that a methionine residue is found at this site in 5-9% of kinases in key model organisms, suggesting that a broader application of this structural modification may enhance ATP analogue sensitivity of analogue-sensitive kinases in future studies. We also show that the enhanced sensitivity of the wee1.as8 allele in a cdc25.22 background can be exploited to generate highly synchronised mitotic and S phase progression at 36°C. Proof-of-principle experiments show how this novel synchronisation technique will prove of great use in the interrogation of the mitotic or S-phase functions through temperature sensitivity mutation of molecules of interest in fission yeast.

  17. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  18. The Replacement of 10 Non-Conserved Residues in the Core Protein of JFH-1 Hepatitis C Virus Improves Its Assembly and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Loïc; Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Boyer, Audrey; Desvignes, Virginie; Gaillard, Julien; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Roingeard, Philippe; Hourioux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly is still poorly understood. It is thought that trafficking of the HCV core protein to the lipid droplet (LD) surface is essential for its multimerization and association with newly synthesized HCV RNA to form the viral nucleocapsid. We carried out a mapping analysis of several complete HCV genomes of all genotypes, and found that the genotype 2 JFH-1 core protein contained 10 residues different from those of other genotypes. The replacement of these 10 residues of the JFH-1 strain sequence with the most conserved residues deduced from sequence alignments greatly increased virus production. Confocal microscopy of the modified JFH-1 strain in cell culture showed that the mutated JFH-1 core protein, C10M, was present mostly at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, but not at the surface of the LDs, even though its trafficking to these organelles was possible. The non-structural 5A protein of HCV was also redirected to ER membranes and colocalized with the C10M core protein. Using a Semliki forest virus vector to overproduce core protein, we demonstrated that the C10M core protein was able to form HCV-like particles, unlike the native JFH-1 core protein. Thus, the substitution of a few selected residues in the JFH-1 core protein modified the subcellular distribution and assembly properties of the protein. These findings suggest that the early steps of HCV assembly occur at the ER membrane rather than at the LD surface. The C10M-JFH-1 strain will be a valuable tool for further studies of HCV morphogenesis. PMID:26339783

  19. Binding of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) to phospholipid membranes: potential role of an unstructured cluster of basic residues.

    PubMed

    Nomikos, Michail; Mulgrew-Nesbitt, Anna; Pallavi, Payal; Mihalyne, Gyongyi; Zaitseva, Irina; Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony; Murray, Diana; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2007-06-01

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) is a sperm-specific enzyme that initiates the Ca2+ oscillations in mammalian eggs that activate embryo development. It shares considerable sequence homology with PLC-delta1, but lacks the PH domain that anchors PLC-delta1 to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, PIP2. Thus it is unclear how PLC-zeta interacts with membranes. The linker region between the X and Y catalytic domains of PLC-zeta, however, contains a cluster of basic residues not present in PLC-delta1. Application of electrostatic theory to a homology model of PLC-zeta suggests this basic cluster could interact with acidic lipids. We measured the binding of catalytically competent mouse PLC-zeta to phospholipid vesicles: for 2:1 phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS) vesicles, the molar partition coefficient, K, is too weak to be of physiological significance. Incorporating 1% PIP2 into the 2:1 PC/PS vesicles increases K about 10-fold, to 5x10(3) M-1, a biologically relevant value. Expressed fragments corresponding to the PLC-zeta X-Y linker region also bind with higher affinity to polyvalent than monovalent phosphoinositides on nitrocellulose filters. A peptide corresponding to the basic cluster (charge=+7) within the linker region, PLC-zeta-(374-385), binds to PC/PS vesicles with higher affinity than PLC-zeta, but its binding is less sensitive to incorporating PIP2. The acidic residues flanking this basic cluster in PLC-zeta may account for both these phenomena. FRET experiments suggest the basic cluster could not only anchor the protein to the membrane, but also enhance the local concentration of PIP2 adjacent to the catalytic domain.

  20. Quorum sensing-controlled Evr regulates a conserved cryptic pigment biosynthetic cluster and a novel phenomycin-like locus in the plant pathogen, Pectobacterium carotovorum.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Neil R; Commander, Paul M B; Salmond, George P C

    2010-07-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum SCRI193 is a phytopathogenic Gram-negative bacterium. In this study, we have identified a novel cryptic pigment biosynthetic locus in P. carotovorum SCRI193 which we have called the Pectobacterium orange pigment (pop) cluster. The pop cluster is flanked by two tRNA genes and contains genes that encode non-ribosomal peptide synthases and polyketide synthase and produces a negatively charged polar orange pigment. Orange pigment production is activated when an adjacent transcriptional activator sharing sequence similarity with the Erwinia virulence regulator (Evr) is overexpressed. Evr was shown to positively activate its own transcription and that of the pigment biosynthetic genes and an unlinked locus encoding a phenomycin homologue. In addition, the expression of Evr and orange pigment production was shown to be regulated by N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-HSL (OHHL) quorum sensing and have a virulence phenotype in potato. Finally, by comparative genomics and Southern blotting we demonstrate that this pigment biosynthetic cluster is present in multiple P. carotovorum spp., Pectobacterium brasiliensis 1692 and a truncated version of the cluster is present in Pectobacterium atrosepticum. The conserved nature of this cluster in P. carotovorum and P. brasiliensis suggests that the pop cluster has an important function in these broad-host-range soft rotting bacteria, which is no longer required in the narrow-host-range P. atrosepticum SCRI1043.

  1. A light-dependent complementation system for analysis of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase: Identification and mutagenesis of two conserved residues that are essential for enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, H.M.; Timko, M.P.

    1995-01-31

    Protochlorophyllide reductase (NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase; EC 1.6.99.1) catalyzes the light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide, a key regulatory step in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. We have developed an expression system in which the protochlorophyllide reductase from pea (Pisum sativum L.) is used to complement protochlorophyllide reduction mutants in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, allowing analysis of wild-type and mutant forms of the enzyme. By protein sequence comparisons, we have identified the plant protochlorophyllide reductases as belonging to the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. Based on our protein sequence alignments, we have identified and mutated two conserved residues (Tyr-275 and Lys-279) within the proposed active site of the enzyme and shown that they are critical for activity. A model of the enzyme reaction mechanism for light-dependent protochlorophyllide reduction is proposed. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Importance of the conserved lysine 83 residue of Zea mays cytochrome b(561) for ascorbate-specific transmembrane electron transfer as revealed by site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Nobuyuki; Rahman, Motiur Md; Sakamoto, Yoichi; Takigami, Tadakazu; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Hori, Hiroshi; Hase, Toshiharu; Park, Sam-Yong; Tsubaki, Motonari

    2009-11-10

    Cytochromes b(561), a novel class of transmembrane electron transport proteins residing in a large variety of eukaryotic cells, have a number of common structural features including six hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices and two heme ligation sites. We found that recombinant Zea mays cytochrome b(561) obtained by a heterologous expression system using yeast Pichia pastoris cells could utilize the ascorbate/mondehydroascorbate radical as a physiological electron donor/acceptor. We found further that a concerted proton/electron transfer mechanism might be operative in Z. mays cytochrome b(561) as well upon the electron acceptance from ascorbate to the cytosolic heme center. The well-conserved Lys(83) residue in a cytosolic loop was found to have a very important role(s) for the binding of ascorbate and the succeeding electron transfer via electrostatic interactions based on the analyses of three site-specific mutants, K83A, K83E, and K83D. Further, unusual behavior of the K83A mutant in pulse radiolysis experiments indicated that Lys(83) might also be responsible for the intramolecular electron transfer to the intravesicular heme. On the other hand, pulse radiolysis experiments on two site-specific mutants, S118A and W122A, for the well-conserved residues in the putative monodehydroascorbate radical binding site showed that their electron transfer activities to the monodehydroascorbate radical were very similar to those of the wild-type protein, indicating that Ser(118) and Trp(122) do not have major roles for the redox events on the intravesicular side.

  3. DHARMA - Discriminant hyperplane abstracting residuals minimization algorithm for separating clusters with fuzzy boundaries. [data points pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasarathy, B. V.

    1976-01-01

    Learning of discriminant hyperplanes in imperfectly supervised or unsupervised training sample sets with unreliably labeled samples along the fuzzy joint boundaries between sample clusters is discussed, with the discriminant hyperplane designed to be a least-squares fit to the unreliably labeled data points. (Samples along the fuzzy boundary jump back and forth from one cluster to the other in recursive cluster stabilization and are considered unreliably labeled.) Minimization of the distances of these unreliably labeled samples from the hyperplanes does not sacrifice the ability to discriminate between classes represented by reliably labeled subsets of samples. An equivalent unconstrained linear inequality problem is formulated and algorithms for its solution are indicated. Landsat earth sensing data were used in confirming the validity and computational feasibility of the approach, which should be useful in deriving discriminant hyperplanes separating clusters with fuzzy boundaries, given supervised training sample sets with unreliably labeled boundary samples.

  4. The Immunosuppressive Properties of the HIV Vpr Protein Are Linked to a Single Highly Conserved Residue, R90

    PubMed Central

    Tcherepanova, Irina; Starr, Aijing; Lackford, Brad; Adams, Melissa D.; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Boulassel, Mohamed Rachid; Calderhead, David; Healey, Don; Nicolette, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background A hallmark of AIDS progression is a switch of cytokines from Th1 to Th2 in the plasma of patients. IL-12, a critical Th1 cytokine secreted by antigen presenting cells (APCs) is suppressed by Vpr, implicating it as an important virulence factor. We hypothesize that Vpr protein packaged in the virion may be required for disabling APCs of the first infected mucosal tissues. Consistent with this idea are reports that defects in the C-terminus of Vpr are associated with long-term non-progression. Principal Findings Vpr RNA amplified from various sources was electroporated into monocyte-derived DC and IL-12 levels in supernatants were analyzed. The analysis of previously reported C-terminal Vpr mutations demonstrate that they do not alleviate the block of IL-12 secretion. However, a novel single conservative amino acid substitution, R90K, reverses the IL-12 suppression. Analysis of 1226 Vpr protein sequences demonstrated arginine (R) present at position 90 in 98.8%, with other substitutions at low frequency. Furthermore, none of sequences report lysine (K) in position 90. Vpr clones harboring the reported substitutions in position 90 were studied for their ability to suppress IL-12. Our data demonstrates that none of tested substitutions other than K relieve IL-12 suppression. This suggests a natural selection for sequences which suppress IL-12 secretion by DC and against mutations which relieve such suppression. Further analyses demonstrated that the R90K, as well as deletion of the C-terminus, directs the Vpr protein for rapid degradation. Conclusion This study supports Vpr as an HIV virulence factor during HIV infection and for the first time provides a link between evolutionary conservation of Vpr and its ability to suppress IL-12 secretion by DC. DC activated in the presence of Vpr would be defective in the production of IL-12, thus contributing to the prevailing Th2 cytokine profile associated with progressive HIV disease. These findings should be

  5. Using mutagenesis to explore conserved residues in the RNA-binding groove of influenza A virus nucleoprotein for antiviral drug development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Lin; Hung, Hui-Chen; Lo, Shou-Chen; Chiang, Ching-Hui; Chen, I.-Jung; Hsu, John T.-A.; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-02-01

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant type of RNA-binding viral protein in influenza A virus-infected cells and is necessary for viral RNA transcription and replication. Recent studies demonstrated that influenza NP is a valid target for antiviral drug development. The surface of the groove, covered with numerous conserved residues between the head and body domains of influenza A NP, plays a crucial role in RNA binding. To explore the mechanism by which NP binds RNA, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis in the RNA-binding groove, followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to characterize the interactions between RNA and NP. Furthermore, a role of Y148 in NP stability and NP-RNA binding was evaluated. The aromatic residue of Y148 was found to stack with a nucleotide base. By interrupting the stacking interaction between Y148 and an RNA base, we identified an influenza virus NP inhibitor, (E, E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) -1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione; this inhibitor reduced the NP’s RNA-binding affinity and hindered viral replication. Our findings will be useful for the development of new drugs that disrupt the interaction between RNA and viral NP in the influenza virus.

  6. A positively charged residue of φ29 DNA polymerase, highly conserved in DNA polymerases from families A and B, is involved in binding the incoming nucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Truniger, Verónica; Lázaro, José M.; Esteban, Francisco J.; Blanco, Luis; Salas, Margarita

    2002-01-01

    Alignment of the protein sequence of DNA-dependent DNA polymerases has allowed the definition of a new motif, lying adjacent to motif B in the direction of the N-terminus and therefore named pre-motif B. Both motifs are located in the fingers subdomain, shown to rotate towards the active site to form a dNTP-binding pocket in several DNA polymerases in which a closed ternary complex pol:DNA:dNTP has been solved. The functional significance of pre-motif B has been studied by site-directed mutagenesis of φ29 DNA polymerase. The affinity for nucleotides of φ29 DNA polymerase mutant residues Ile364 and Lys371 was strongly affected in DNA- and terminal protein-primed reactions. Additionally, mutations in Ile364 affected the DNA-binding capacity of φ29 DNA polymerase. The results suggest that Lys371 of φ29 DNA polymerase, highly conserved among families A and B, interacts with the phosphate groups of the incoming nucleotide. On the other hand, the role of residue Ile364 seems to be structural, being important for both DNA and dNTP binding. Pre-motif B must therefore play an important role in binding the incoming nucleotide. Interestingly, the roles of Lys371 and Ile364 were also shown to be important in reactions without template, suggesting that φ29 DNA polymerase can achieve the closed conformation in the absence of a DNA template. PMID:11917008

  7. Inactivation of influenza virus haemagglutinin by chlorine dioxide: oxidation of the conserved tryptophan 153 residue in the receptor-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2012-12-01

    Airborne influenza virus infection of mice can be prevented by gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). This study demonstrated that ClO(2) abolished the function of the haemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (H1N1) in a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent manner. The IC(50) during a 2 min reaction with ClO(2) at 25 °C was 13.7 µM, and the half-life time of HA with 100 µM ClO(2) at 25 °C was 19.5 s. Peptides generated from a tryptic digest of ClO(2)-treated virus were analysed by mass spectrometry. An HA fragment, (150)NLLWLTGK(157) was identified in which the tryptophan residue (W153) was 32 mass units greater than expected. The W153 residue of this peptide, which is derived from the central region of the receptor-binding site of HA, is highly conserved. It was shown that W153 was oxidized to N-formylkynurenine in ClO(2)-treated virus. It was concluded that the inactivation of influenza virus by ClO(2) is caused by oxidation of W153 in HA, thereby abolishing its receptor-binding ability.

  8. Substitutions of Conserved Residues in the C-terminal Region of DnaC Cause Thermolability in Helicase Loading*

    PubMed Central

    Felczak, Magdalena M.; Sage, Jay M.; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Aykul, Senem; Kaguni, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    The DnaB-DnaC complex binds to the unwound DNA within the Escherichia coli replication origin in the helicase loading process, but the biochemical events that lead to its stable binding are uncertain. This study characterizes the function of specific C-terminal residues of DnaC. Genetic and biochemical characterization of proteins bearing F231S and W233L substitutions of DnaC reveals that their activity is thermolabile. Because the mutants remain able to form a complex with DnaB at 30 and 37 °C, their thermolability is not explained by an impaired interaction with DnaB. Photo-cross-linking experiments and biosensor analysis show an altered affinity of these mutants compared with wild type DnaC for single-stranded DNA, suggesting that the substitutions affect DNA binding. Despite this difference, their activity in DNA binding is not thermolabile. The substitutions also drastically reduce the affinity of DnaC for ATP as measured by the binding of a fluorescent ATP analogue (MANT-ATP) and by UV cross-linking of radiolabeled ATP. Experiments show that an elevated temperature substantially inhibits both mutants in their ability to load the DnaB-DnaC complex at a DnaA box. Because a decreased ATP concentration exacerbates their thermolabile behavior, we suggest that the F231S and W233L substitutions are thermolabile in ATP binding, which correlates with defective helicase loading at an elevated temperature. PMID:26728455

  9. Understanding the molecular basis of stability in Kunitz (STI) family of inhibitors in terms of a conserved core tryptophan residue: A theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Datta Sharma, Ravi; Goswami, Nabajyoti; Ghosh, Debasree; Majumder, Sudip

    2017-08-01

    β-trefoil is one of the superfolds among proteins. Important classes of proteins like Interleukins (ILs), FibroblastGrowth Factors (FGFs), Kunitz (STI) family of inhibitors etc. belong to this fold. Kunitz (STI) family of inhibitors of proteins possess a highly conserved and structurally important Trytophan 91 (W91) residue, which stitches the top layer of the barrel with the lid. In this article we have investigated the molecular insights of the involvement of this W91 residue in the stability and folding pathway of Kunitz (STI) family. Winged bean Chymotrypsin inhibitor (WCI), a member of Kunitz (STI) family was chosen as a model system for carrying out the work. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were run with a set of total six proteins, including wild type WCI (WT) & five mutants namely W91F, W91M, W91A, W91H and W91I. Among all of them the coordinates of four proteins were taken from their crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), where as the coordinates for the rest two was generated using in-silico modelling. Our results suggest that truly this W91 residue plays a determining role in stability and folding pathway of Kunitz (STI) family. The mutants are less stable and more susceptible to quicker unfolding at higher temperatures compared to the wild type WCI. These effects are most pronounced for the smallest mutants namely W91H and W91A, indicating more is the cavity created by mutation at W91 position more the proteins becomes unstable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of four conserved aspartic acid residues of EF-loops in the metal ion binding and in the self-assembly of ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus centrin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Duan, Lian; Sun, Tijian; Yang, Binsheng

    2016-12-01

    Ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (EoCen) is an EF-hand calcium-binding protein closely related to the prototypical calcium sensor protein calmodulin. Four mutants (D37K, D73K, D110K and D146K) were created firstly to elucidate the importance of the first aspartic acid residues (Asp37, Asp73, Asp110 and Asp146) in the beginning of the four EF-loops of EoCen. Aromatic-sensitized Tb(3+) fluorescence indicates that the aspartic acid residues are very important for the metal-binding of EoCen, except for Asp73 (in EF-loop II). Resonance light scattering (RLS) measurements for different metal ions (Ca(2+) and Tb(3+)) binding proteins suggest that the order of four conserved aspartic acid residues for contributing to the self-assembly of EoCen is Asp37 > Asp146 > Asp110 > Asp73. Cross-linking experiment also exhibits that Asp37 and Asp146 play critical role in the self-assembly of EoCen. Asp37, in site I, which is located in the N-terminal domain, plays the most important role in the metal ion-dependent self-assembly of EoCen, and there is cooperativity between N-terminal and C-terminal domain (especially the site IV). In addition, the dependence of Tb(3+) induced self-assembly of EoCen and the mutants on various factors, including ionic strength and pH, were characterized using RLS. Finally, 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) binding, ionic strength and pH control experiments indicate that in the process of EoCen self-assembly, molecular interactions are mediated by both electrostatic and hydrophobic forces, and the hydrophobic interaction has the important status.

  11. Conserved glutamate residues are critically involved in Na+/nucleoside cotransport by human concentrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hCNT1).

    PubMed

    Yao, Sylvia Y M; Ng, Amy M L; Slugoski, Melissa D; Smith, Kyla M; Mulinta, Ras; Karpinski, Edward; Cass, Carol E; Baldwin, Stephen A; Young, James D

    2007-10-19

    Human concentrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hCNT1), the first discovered of three human members of the SLC28 (CNT) protein family, is a Na+/nucleoside cotransporter with 650 amino acids. The potential functional roles of 10 conserved aspartate and glutamate residues in hCNT1 were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. Initially, each of the 10 residues was replaced by the corresponding neutral amino acid (asparagine or glutamine). Five of the resulting mutants showed unchanged Na+-dependent uridine transport activity (D172N, E338Q, E389Q, E413Q, and D565N) and were not investigated further. Three were retained in intracellular membranes (D482N, E498Q, and E532Q) and thus could not be assessed functionally. The remaining two (E308Q and E322Q) were present in normal quantities at cell surfaces but exhibited low intrinsic transport activities. Charge replacement with the alternate acidic amino acid enabled correct processing of D482E and E498D, but not of E532D, to cell surfaces and also yielded partially functional E308D and E322D. Relative to wild-type hCNT1, only D482E exhibited normal transport kinetics, whereas E308D, E308Q, E322D, E322Q, and E498D displayed increased K50(Na+) and/or Km(uridine) values and diminished Vmax(Na+) and Vmax(uridine) values. E322Q additionally exhibited uridine-gated uncoupled Na+ transport. Together, these findings demonstrate roles for Glu-308, Glu-322, and Glu-498 in Na+/nucleoside cotransport and suggest locations within a common cation/nucleoside translocation pore. Glu-322, the residue having the greatest influence on hCNT1 transport function, exhibited uridine-protected inhibition by p-chloromercuriphenyl sulfonate and 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate when converted to cysteine.

  12. The interdomain linker of AAV-2 Rep68 is an integral part of its oligomerization domain: role of a conserved SF3 helicase residue in oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Bardelli, Martino; Burgner, John W; Villamil-Jarauta, Maria; Das, Kanni; Kekilli, Demet; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Linden, R Michael; Escalante, Carlos R

    2012-01-01

    The four Rep proteins of adeno-associated virus (AAV) orchestrate all aspects of its viral life cycle, including transcription regulation, DNA replication, virus assembly, and site-specific integration of the viral genome into the human chromosome 19. All Rep proteins share a central SF3 superfamily helicase domain. In other SF3 members this domain is sufficient to induce oligomerization. However, the helicase domain in AAV Rep proteins (i.e. Rep40/Rep52) as shown by its monomeric characteristic, is not able to mediate stable oligomerization. This observation led us to hypothesize the existence of an as yet undefined structural determinant that regulates Rep oligomerization. In this document, we described a detailed structural comparison between the helicase domains of AAV-2 Rep proteins and those of the other SF3 members. This analysis shows a major structural difference residing in the small oligomerization sub-domain (OD) of Rep helicase domain. In addition, secondary structure prediction of the linker connecting the helicase domain to the origin-binding domain (OBD) indicates the potential to form α-helices. We demonstrate that mutant Rep40 constructs containing different lengths of the linker are able to form dimers, and in the presence of ATP/ADP, larger oligomers. We further identified an aromatic linker residue (Y224) that is critical for oligomerization, establishing it as a conserved signature motif in SF3 helicases. Mutation of this residue critically affects oligomerization as well as completely abolishes the ability to produce infectious virus. Taken together, our data support a model where the linker residues preceding the helicase domain fold into an α-helix that becomes an integral part of the helicase domain and is critical for the oligomerization and function of Rep68/78 proteins through cooperative interaction with the OBD and helicase domains.

  13. Identification of catalytic bases in the active site of Escherichia coli methylglyoxal synthase: cloning, expression, and functional characterization of conserved aspartic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Saadat, D; Harrison, D H

    1998-07-14

    Methylglyoxal synthase provides bacteria with an alternative to triosephosphate isomerase for metabolizing dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). In the present studies, the methylglyoxal synthase gene in Escherichia coli has been cloned and sequenced. The identified open reading frame (ORF) codes for a polypeptide of 152 amino acids, consistent with the 17 kDa purified protein. The sequence of this protein is not similar to any other protein of known function, including the functionally similar protein triosephosphate isomerase. The methylglyoxal synthase gene was amplified by PCR, subcloned into the pET16B expression vector, and expressed in the host E. coli BL21(DE3). Sequence comparison of the methylglyoxal protein and related ORFs from four different bacterial species revealed that four aspartic acid and no glutamic acid residues are absolutely conserved. The function of the four aspartic acid residues was tested by mutating them to either asparagine or glutamic acid. Thermal denaturation, CD spectroscopy, and gel filtration experiments showed that the mutant enzymes had the same secondary and quaternary structure as the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic characterization of both Asp 71 and Asp 101 mutant proteins shows reduced kcat/Km by 10(3)- and 10(4)-fold respectively, suggesting that they are both intimately involved in catalysis. A time-dependent inhibition of both Asp 20 and Asp 91 asparagine mutants by DHAP suggests that these two residues are involved with protecting the enzyme from DHAP or reactive intermediates along the catalytic pathway. In combination with the results of 2-phosphoglycolate binding studies, a catalytic mechanism is proposed.

  14. Probing the location and function of the conserved histidine residue of phosphoglucose isomerase by using an active site directed inhibitor N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, M.; Chane, T. L.; Sun, Y. J.; Hsiao, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) catalyzes the interconversion of D-glucopyranose-6-phosphate and D-fructofuranose-6-phosphate by promoting an intrahydrogen transfer between C1 and C2. A conserved histidine exists throughout all phosphoglucose isomerases and was hypothesized to be the base catalyzing the isomerization reaction. In the present study, this conserved histidine, His311, of the enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus was subjected to mutational analysis, and the mutational effect on the inactivation kinetics by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was investigated. The substitution of His311 with alanine, asparagine, or glutamine resulted in the decrease of activity, in k(cat)/K(M), by a factor of 10(3), indicating the importance of this residue. N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate inactivated irreversibly the activity of wild-type phosphoglucose isomerase; however, His311 --> Ala became resistant to this inhibitor, indicating that His311 is located in the active site and is responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme by this active site-directed inhibitor. The pKa of His311 was estimated to be 6.31 according to the pH dependence of the inactivation. The proximity of this value with the pKa value of 6.35, determined from the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M), supports a role of His311 as a general base in the catalysis. PMID:10595547

  15. Perturbing the water cavity surrounding the manganese cluster by mutating the residue D1-valine 185 has a strong effect on the water oxidation mechanism of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Bao, Han; Neveu, Curtis L; Burnap, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    The active site of water oxidation in Photosystem II (PSII) is a Mn4CaO5 cluster that is located in a cavity between the D1 and CP43 protein subunits by which it is coordinated. The remainder of this cavity is filled with water molecules, which serve as a source of substrate and participate in poorly understood hydrogen bond networks that may modulate the function of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. These water molecules interact with the first and second sphere amino acid ligands to the Mn4CaO5 cluster and some water interacts directly with the Mn4CaO5 cluster. Here, the results of mutations to the amino acids that line the walls of several predicted cavities in the immediate vicinity of the Mn4CaO5 cluster were examined in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Of these, mutations of Val185 in the D1 subunit resulted in the most interesting functional alterations. The hydrophobic D1-Val185 occupies a location contacting water molecules that are positioned between the redox active tyrosine (YZ) and the putative proton gate residue, D1-Asp61, and at a position opposite the oxo bridge atom, O5, of the cluster. Mutations of the residue D1-Val185 were produced, with the intention that the substitute residue would extend into the water cavity that includes H2O molecules that interact with the Mn4CaO5 cluster, amino acid ligands of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, YZ and the chloride co-factor of PSII. Three of these mutants, D1-Val185Asn, D1-Val185Thr, and D1-Val185Phe, were able to accumulate significant levels of charge separating PSII and were characterized using polarographic and fluorescent techniques. Of the three substitutions, the phenylalanine substitution was the most severe with a complete inability to evolve oxygen, despite being able to accumulate PSII and to undergo stable charge separation. The threonine substitution had no apparent effect on oxygen evolution other than a 40% reduction in the steady state rate of O2 production compared to the case of wild-type Synechocystis , due to a

  16. On the role of a conserved, potentially helix-breaking residue in the tRNA-binding alpha-helix of archaeal CCA-adding enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyundae D; Sood, Vanita D; Baker, David; Weiner, Alan M

    2008-07-01

    Archaeal class I CCA-adding enzymes use a ribonucleoprotein template to build and repair the universally conserved 3'-terminal CCA sequence of the acceptor stem of all tRNAs. A wealth of structural and biochemical data indicate that the Archaeoglobus fulgidus CCA-adding enzyme binds primarily to the tRNA acceptor stem through a long, highly conserved alpha-helix that lies nearly parallel to the acceptor stem and makes many contacts with its sugar-phosphate backbone. Although the geometry of this alpha-helix is nearly ideal in all available cocrystal structures, the helix contains a highly conserved, potentially helix-breaking proline or glycine near the N terminus. We performed a mutational analysis to dissect the role of this residue in CCA-addition activity. We found that the phylogenetically permissible P295G mutant and the phylogenetically absent P295T had little effect on CCA addition, whereas P295A and P295S progressively interfered with CCA addition (C74>C75>A76 addition). We also examined the effects of these mutations on tRNA binding and the kinetics of CCA addition, and performed a computational analysis using Rosetta Design to better understand the role of P295 in nucleotide transfer. Our data indicate that CCA-adding activity does not correlate with the stability of the pre-addition cocrystal structures visualized by X-ray crystallography. Rather, the data are consistent with a transient conformational change involving P295 of the tRNA-binding alpha-helix during or between one or more steps in CCA addition.

  17. Polar N-terminal Residues Conserved in Type 2 Secretion Pseudopilins Determine Subunit Targeting and Membrane Extraction Steps during Fibre Assembly.

    PubMed

    Santos-Moreno, Javier; East, Alexandra; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nadeau, Nathalie; Bond, Peter J; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy; Francetic, Olivera

    2017-06-02

    Bacterial type 2 secretion systems (T2SS), type 4 pili, and archaeal flagella assemble fibres from initially membrane-embedded pseudopilin and pilin subunits. Fibre subunits are made as precursors with positively charged N-terminal anchors, whose cleavage via the prepilin peptidase, essential for pilin membrane extraction and assembly, is followed by N-methylation of the mature (pseudo)pilin N terminus. The conserved Glu residue at position 5 (E5) of mature (pseudo)pilins is essential for assembly. Unlike T4 pilins, where E5 residue substitutions also abolish N-methylation, the E5A variant of T2SS pseudopilin PulG remains N-methylated but is affected in interaction with the T2SS component PulM. Here, biochemical and functional analyses showed that the PulM interaction defect only partly accounts for the PulG(E5A) assembly defect. First, PulG(T2A) variant, equally defective in PulM interaction, remained partially functional. Furthermore, pseudopilus assembly defect of pulG(E5A) mutant was stronger than that of the pulM deletion mutant. To understand the dominant effect of E5A mutation, we used molecular dynamics simulations of PulG(E5A), methylated PulG(WT) (MePulG(WT)), and MePulG(E5A) variant in a model membrane. These simulations pointed to a key role for an intramolecular interaction between the pseudopilin N-terminal amine and E5 to limit polar interactions with membrane phospholipids. N-methylation of the N-terminal amine further limited its interactions with phospholipid head-groups to facilitate pseudopilin membrane escape. By binding to polar residues in the conserved N-terminal region of PulG, we propose that PulM acts as chaperone to promote pseudopilin recruitment and coordinate its membrane extraction with subsequent steps of the fibre assembly process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Conserved Active Site Tyrosine Residue of Proline Dehydrogenase Helps Enforce the Preference for Proline over Hydroxyproline as the Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrander, E.L.; Larson, J.D.; Schuermann, J.P.; Tanner, J.J.

    2009-03-02

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to {Delta}-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate. PRODHs exhibit a pronounced preference for proline over hydroxyproline (trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline) as the substrate, but the basis for specificity is unknown. The goal of this study, therefore, is to gain insight into the structural determinants of substrate specificity of this class of enzyme, with a focus on understanding how PRODHs discriminate between the two closely related molecules, proline and hydroxyproline. Two site-directed mutants of the PRODH domain of Escherichia coli PutA were created: Y540A and Y540S. Kinetics measurements were performed with both mutants. Crystal structures of Y540S complexed with hydroxyproline, proline, and the proline analogue L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid were determined at resolutions of 1.75, 1.90, and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. Mutation of Tyr540 increases the catalytic efficiency for hydroxyproline 3-fold and decreases the specificity for proline by factors of 20 (Y540S) and 50 (Y540A). The structures show that removal of the large phenol side chain increases the volume of the substrate-binding pocket, allowing sufficient room for the 4-hydroxyl of hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the introduced serine residue participates in recognition of hydroxyproline by forming a hydrogen bond with the 4-hydroxyl. This result has implications for understanding the substrate specificity of the related enzyme human hydroxyproline dehydrogenase, which has serine in place of tyrosine at this key active site position. The kinetic and structural results suggest that Tyr540 is an important determinant of specificity. Structurally, it serves as a negative filter for hydroxyproline by clashing with the 4-hydroxyl group of this potential substrate.

  19. A conserved active site tyrosine residue of proline dehydrogenase helps enforce the preference for proline over hydroxyproline as the substrate.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Elizabeth L; Larson, John D; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Tanner, John J

    2009-02-10

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) catalyzes the oxidation of l-proline to Delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate. PRODHs exhibit a pronounced preference for proline over hydroxyproline (trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline) as the substrate, but the basis for specificity is unknown. The goal of this study, therefore, is to gain insight into the structural determinants of substrate specificity of this class of enzyme, with a focus on understanding how PRODHs discriminate between the two closely related molecules, proline and hydroxyproline. Two site-directed mutants of the PRODH domain of Escherichia coli PutA were created: Y540A and Y540S. Kinetics measurements were performed with both mutants. Crystal structures of Y540S complexed with hydroxyproline, proline, and the proline analogue l-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid were determined at resolutions of 1.75, 1.90, and 1.85 A, respectively. Mutation of Tyr540 increases the catalytic efficiency for hydroxyproline 3-fold and decreases the specificity for proline by factors of 20 (Y540S) and 50 (Y540A). The structures show that removal of the large phenol side chain increases the volume of the substrate-binding pocket, allowing sufficient room for the 4-hydroxyl of hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the introduced serine residue participates in recognition of hydroxyproline by forming a hydrogen bond with the 4-hydroxyl. This result has implications for understanding the substrate specificity of the related enzyme human hydroxyproline dehydrogenase, which has serine in place of tyrosine at this key active site position. The kinetic and structural results suggest that Tyr540 is an important determinant of specificity. Structurally, it serves as a negative filter for hydroxyproline by clashing with the 4-hydroxyl group of this potential substrate.

  20. Conserved catalytic residues of the ALDH1L1 aldehyde dehydrogenase domain control binding and discharging of the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2011-07-01

    The C-terminal domain (C(t)-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several C(t)-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP(+), Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP(+) but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type C(t)-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP(+) with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication.

  1. Conserved Catalytic Residues of the ALDH1L1 Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Domain Control Binding and Discharging of the Coenzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A.

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (Ct-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP+-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several Ct-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP+, Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP+ but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type Ct-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP+ with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication. PMID:21540484

  2. Clustering and Residual Confounding in the Application of Marginal Structural Models: Dialysis Modality, Vascular Access, and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Kasza, Jessica; Polkinghorne, Kevan R; Marshall, Mark R; McDonald, Stephen P; Wolfe, Rory

    2015-09-15

    In the application of marginal structural models to compare time-varying treatments, it is rare that the hierarchical structure of a data set is accounted for or that the impact of unmeasured confounding on estimates is assessed. These issues often arise when analyzing data sets drawn from clinical registries, where patients may be clustered within health-care providers, and the amount of data collected from each patient may be limited by design (e.g., to reduce costs or encourage provider participation). We compared the survival of patients undergoing treatment with various dialysis types, where some patients switched dialysis modality during the course of their treatment, by estimating a marginal structural model using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, 2003-2011. The number of variables recorded by the registry is limited, and patients are clustered within the dialysis centers responsible for their treatment, so we assessed the impact of accounting for unmeasured confounding or clustering on estimated treatment effects. Accounting for clustering had limited impact, and only unreasonable levels of unmeasured confounding would have changed conclusions about treatment comparisons. Our analysis serves as a case study in assessing the impact of unmeasured confounding and clustering in the application of marginal structural models. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Roles of Copper and a Conserved Aspartic Acid in the Autocatalytic Hydroxylation of a Specific Tryptophan Residue during Cysteine Tryptophylquinone Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Heather R; Sehanobish, Esha; Shiller, Alan M; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Davidson, Victor L

    2017-02-21

    The first posttranslational modification step in the biosynthesis of the tryptophan-derived quinone cofactors is the autocatalytic hydroxylation of a specific Trp residue at position C-7 on the indole side chain. Subsequent modifications are catalyzed by modifying enzymes, but the mechanism by which this first step occurs is unknown. LodA possesses a cysteine tryptophylquinone (CTQ) cofactor. Metal analysis as well as spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the mature and precursor forms of a D512A LodA variant provides evidence that copper is required for the initial hydroxylation of the precursor protein and that if alternative metals are bound, the modification does not occur and the precursor is unstable. It is shown that the mature native LodA also contains loosely bound copper, which affects the visible absorbance spectrum and quenches the fluorescence spectrum that is attributed to the mature CTQ cofactor. When copper is removed, the fluorescence appears, and when it is added back to the protein, the fluorescence is quenched, indicating that copper reversibly binds in the proximity of CTQ. Removal of copper does not diminish the enzymatic activity of LodA. This distinguishes LodA from enzymes with protein-derived tyrosylquinone cofactors in which copper is present near the cofactor and is absolutely required for activity. Mechanisms are proposed for the role of copper in the hydroxylation of the unactivated Trp side chain. These results demonstrate that the reason that the highly conserved Asp512 is critical for LodA, and possibly all tryptophylquinone enzymes, is not because it is required for catalysis but because it is necessary for CTQ biosynthesis, more specifically to facilitate the initial copper-dependent hydroxylation of a specific Trp residue.

  4. The role of conserved Cys residues in Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase: Cys139 is crucial for the enzyme activity and Cys320 regulates enzyme stability.

    PubMed

    Smolko, Ana; Šupljika, Filip; Martinčić, Jelena; Jajčanin-Jozić, Nina; Grabar-Branilović, Marina; Tomić, Sanja; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Piantanida, Ivo; Salopek-Sondi, Branka

    2016-04-07

    Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase (BrILL2) participates in the homeostasis of the plant hormones auxins by hydrolyzing the amino acid conjugates of auxins, thereby releasing the free active form of hormones. Herein, the potential role of the two conserved Cys residues of BrILL2 (at sequence positions 139 and 320) has been investigated by using interdisciplinary approaches and methods of molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and molecular modelling. The obtained results show that both Cys residues participate in the regulation of enzyme activity. Cys320 located in the satellite domain of the enzyme is mainly responsible for protein stability and regulation of enzyme activity through polymer formation, as has been revealed by enzyme kinetics and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the BrILL2 wild type and mutants C320S and C139S. Cys139 positioned in the active site of the catalytic domain is involved in the coordination of one Mn(2+) ion of the bimetal center and is crucial for the enzymatic activity. Although the point mutation Cys139 to Ser causes the loss of enzyme activity, it does not affect the metal binding to the BrILL2 enzyme, as has been shown by isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and differential scanning calorimetry data. MD simulations (200 ns) revealed a different active site architecture of the BrILL2C139S mutant in comparison to the wild type enzyme. Additional possible reasons for the inactivity of the BrILL2C139S mutant have been discussed based on MD simulations and MM-PBSA free energy calculations of BrILL2 enzyme complexes (wt and C139S mutant) with IPA-Ala as a substrate.

  5. Probing the Catalytic Potential of the Hamster Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase 2 Catalytic Triad by Site-directed Mutagenesis of the Proximal Conserved Residue, Tyrosine 190

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Naixia; Liu, Li; Walters, Kylie J.; Hanna, Patrick E.; Wagner, Carston R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) play an important role in both detoxification of arylamine and hydrazine drugs and activation of arylamine carcinogens. Since the catalytic triad, Cys-His-Asp, of mammalian NATs has been shown to be essential for maintaining protein stability, rendering it impossible to assess alterations of the triad on catalysis, we explored the impact of the highly conserved proximal residue, Tyr-190, which forms a direct hydrogen bond interaction with one of the triad residues, Asp-122, as well as a potential pi-pi stacking interaction with the active site His-107. Replacement of Hamster NAT2 Tyr-190 by either phenylalanine, isoleucine, or alanine was well tolerated and did not result in significant alterations in the overall fold of the protein. Nevertheless, stopped-flow and steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that Tyr-190 was critical for maximizing the acetylation rate of NAT2 and the transacetylation rate of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) when compared to wild type. Tyr-190 was also shown to play an important role in determining the pKa of the active site cysteine during acetylation, as well as the pH versus rate profile for transacetylation. We hypothesized that the pH-dependence was associated with global changes in the active site structure, which was revealed by the superposition of [1H, 15N] HSQC spectra for wild type and Y190A. These results suggest that NAT2 catalytic efficiency is partially governed by the ability of Tyr-190 to mediate the collective impact of multiple side chains on the electrostatic potential and local conformation of active site. PMID:19860825

  6. A conserved glycine residue in the C-terminal region of human ATG9A is required for its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Catherine; Gilis, Florentine; Tevel, Virginie; Jadot, Michel; Boonen, Marielle

    2016-10-14

    ATG9A is the only polytopic protein of the mammalian autophagy-related protein family whose members regulate autophagosome formation during macroautophagy. At steady state, ATG9A localizes to several intracellular sites, including the Golgi apparatus, endosomes and the plasma membrane, and it redistributes towards autophagosomes upon autophagy induction. Interestingly, the transport of yeast Atg9 to the pre-autophagosomal structure depends on its self-association, which is mediated by a short amino acid motif located in the C-terminal region of the protein. Here, we investigated whether the residues that align with this motif in human ATG9A (V(515)-C(519)) are also required for its trafficking in mammalian cells. Interestingly, our findings support that human ATG9A self-interacts as well, and that this process promotes transport of ATG9A molecules through the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, our data reveal that the transport of ATG9A out of the ER is severely impacted after mutation of the conserved V(515)-C(519) motif. Nevertheless, the mutated ATG9A molecules could still interact with each other, indicating that the molecular mechanism of self-interaction differs in mammalian cells compared to yeast. Using sequential amino acid substitutions of glycine 516 and cysteine 519, we found that the stability of ATG9A relies on both of these residues, but that only the former is required for efficient transport of human ATG9A from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conserved aspartate and lysine residues of RcsB are required for amylovoran biosynthesis, virulence, and DNA binding in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Ancona, Veronica; Chatnaparat, Tiyakhon; Zhao, Youfu

    2015-08-01

    In Erwinia amylovora, the Rcs phosphorelay system is essential for amylovoran production and virulence. To further understand the role of conserved aspartate residue (D56) in the phosphor receiver (PR) domain and lysine (K180) residue in the function domain of RcsB, amino acid substitutions of RcsB mutant alleles were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and complementation of various rcs mutants were performed. A D56E substitution of RcsB, which mimics the phosphorylation state of RcsB, complemented the rcsB mutant, resulting in increased amylovoran production and gene expression, reduced swarming motility, and restored pathogenicity. In contrast, D56N and K180A or K180Q substitutions of RcsB did not complement the rcsB mutant. Electrophoresis mobility shift assays showed that D56E, but not D56N, K180Q and K180A substitutions of RcsB bound to promoters of amsG and flhD, indicating that both D56 and K180 are required for DNA binding. Interestingly, the RcsBD56E allele could also complement rcsAB, rcsBC and rcsABCD mutants with restored virulence and increased amylovoran production, indicating that RcsB phosphorylation is essential for virulence of E. amylovora. In addition, mutations of T904 and A905, but not phosphorylation mimic mutation of D876 in the PR domain of RcsC, constitutively activate the Rcs system, suggesting that phosphor transfer is required for activating the Rcs system and indicating both A905 and T904 are required for the phosphatase activity of RcsC. Our results demonstrated that RcsB phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, phosphor transfer from RcsC are essential for the function of the Rcs system, and also suggested that constitutive activation of the Rcs system could reduce the fitness of E. amylovora.

  8. A cluster randomized trial comparing deltamethrin and bendiocarb as insecticides for indoor residual spraying to control malaria on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bradley, John; Hergott, Dianna; Garcia, Guillermo; Lines, Jo; Cook, Jackie; Slotman, Michel A; Phiri, Wonder Philip; Schwabe, Christopher; Kleinschmidt, Immo

    2016-07-22

    Indoor residual spraying (IRS) has been used on Bioko for malaria control since 2004. In 2013 the insecticide was changed from bendiocarb to deltamethrin. Shortly after this change, there was a marked increase in malaria prevalence on the island. This trial was carried out to compare the effectiveness of bendiocarb and deltamethrin for use in IRS on Bioko. Twenty-four clusters of houses were randomized to receive IRS with either bendiocarb or deltamethrin. Approximately 3 months after the intervention, the prevalence of malaria and levels of haemoglobin were measured in children aged 2-14 years in each cluster. Prevalence of malaria in 2-14 year olds was lower in the bendiocarb arm (16.8, 95 % CI 11.1-24.7, N = 1374) than in the deltamethrin arm (23.2, 95 % CI 16.0-32.3, N = 1330) but this difference was not significant (p = 0.390), even after adjusting for covariates (p = 0.119). Mean haemoglobin in children was marginally higher in the bendiocarb clusters (11.6 g/dl, 95 % CI 11.5-11.8, N = 1326) than in the deltamethrin clusters (11.5 g/dl, 95 % CI 11.3-11.7, N = 1329). This difference was borderline significant after adjusting for covariates (p = 0.049). The results are suggestive of bendiocarb being more effective at preventing malaria on Bioko although evidence for this was weak. The results are likely due to the fact that local vectors remain fully susceptible to bendiocarb whereas subsequent tests have shown resistance to deltamethrin.

  9. Conserved-residue mutations in Wzy affect O-antigen polymerization and Wzz-mediated chain-length regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Salim T.; Huszczynski, Steven M.; Nugent, Timothy; Gold, Alexander C.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2013-12-01

    O antigen (O-Ag) in many bacteria is synthesized via the Wzx/Wzy-dependent pathway in which Wzy polymerizes lipid-linked O-Ag subunits to modal lengths regulated by Wzz. Characterization of 83 site-directed mutants of Wzy from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (WzyPa) in topologically-mapped periplasmic (PL) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) verified the functional importance of PL3 and PL5, with the former shown to require overall cationic properties. Essential Arg residues in the RX10G motifs of PL3 and PL5 were found to be conserved in putative homologues of WzyPa, as was the overall sequence homology between these two periplasmic loops in each protein. Amino acid substitutions in CL6 were found to alter Wzz-mediated O-antigen modality, with evidence suggesting that these changes may perturb the C-terminal WzyPa tertiary structure. Together, these data suggest that the catch-and-release mechanism of O-Ag polymerization is widespread among bacteria and that regulation of polymer length is affected by interaction of Wzz with Wzy.

  10. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:27367684

  11. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-06-29

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed.

  12. Sperm surface hyaluronan binding protein (HABP1) interacts with zona pellucida of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) through its clustered mannose residues.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ilora; Datta, Kasturi

    2003-02-01

    Sperm-oocyte interaction during fertilization is multiphasic, with multicomponent events, taking place between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and sperm surface receptor. d-mannosylated glycoproteins, the major constituents of ZP are considered to serve as ligands for sperm binding. The presence of hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1) on sperm surface of different mammals including cattle and its possible involvement in sperm function is already reported. Recently, we have demonstrated the specificity of clustered mannose as another ligand for HABP1 (Kumar et al., 2001: J Biosci 26:325-332). Here, we report that only N-linked mannosylated zona-glycoproteins bind to sperm surface HABP1. Labeled HABP1 interacts with ZP of intact oocyte of Bubalus bubalis, which can be competed with unlabeled HABP1 or excess d-mannosylated albumin (DMA). This data suggests the specific interaction of HABP1 with ZP, through clustered mannose residues. In order to examine the physiological significance of such an interaction, the capacity of sperm binding to oocytes under in vitro fertilization plates was examined either in presence of DMA alone or in combination with HABP1. The number of sperms, bound to oocytes was observed to reduce significantly in presence of DMA, which could be reversed by the addition of purified recombinant HABP1 (rHABP1) in the same plate. This suggests that sperm surface HABP1 may act as mannose binding sites for zona recognition. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. In Silico Analysis of Gene Expression Network Components Underlying Pigmentation Phenotypes in the Python Identified Evolutionarily Conserved Clusters of Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Color variation provides the opportunity to investigate the genetic basis of evolution and selection. Reptiles are less studied than mammals. Comparative genomics approaches allow for knowledge gained in one species to be leveraged for use in another species. We describe a comparative vertebrate analysis of conserved regulatory modules in pythons aimed at assessing bioinformatics evidence that transcription factors important in mammalian pigmentation phenotypes may also be important in python pigmentation phenotypes. We identified 23 python orthologs of mammalian genes associated with variation in coat color phenotypes for which we assessed the extent of pairwise protein sequence identity between pythons and mouse, dog, horse, cow, chicken, anole lizard, and garter snake. We next identified a set of melanocyte/pigment associated transcription factors (CREB, FOXD3, LEF-1, MITF, POU3F2, and USF-1) that exhibit relatively conserved sequence similarity within their DNA binding regions across species based on orthologous alignments across multiple species. Finally, we identified 27 evolutionarily conserved clusters of transcription factor binding sites within ~200-nucleotide intervals of the 1500-nucleotide upstream regions of AIM1, DCT, MC1R, MITF, MLANA, OA1, PMEL, RAB27A, and TYR from Python bivittatus. Our results provide insight into pigment phenotypes in pythons. PMID:27698666

  14. The valine and lysine residues in the conserved FxVTxK motif are important for the function of phylogenetically distant plant cellulose synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Slabaugh, Erin; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess; Chaves, Arielle; Wilson, Liza; Wilson, Carmen; Davis, Jonathan K.; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Anderson, Charles T.; Roberts, Alison W.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2015-12-08

    Cellulose synthases (CESAs) synthesize the β-1,4-glucan chains that coalesce to form cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls. In addition to a large cytosolic (catalytic) domain, CESAs have eight predicted transmembrane helices (TMHs). However, analogous to the structure of BcsA, a bacterial CESA, predicted TMH5 in CESA may instead be an interfacial helix. This would place the conserved FxVTxK motif in the plant cell cytosol where it could function as a substrate-gating loop as occurs in BcsA. To define the functional importance of the CESA region containing FxVTxK, we tested five parallel mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana CESA1 and Physcomitrella patens CESA5 in complementation assays of the relevant cesa mutants. In both organisms, the substitution of the valine or lysine residues in FxVTxK severely affected CESA function. In Arabidopsis roots, both changes were correlated with lower cellulose anisotropy, as revealed by Pontamine Fast Scarlet. Analysis of hypocotyl inner cell wall layers by atomic force microscopy showed that two altered versions of Atcesa1 could rescue cell wall phenotypes observed in the mutant background line. Overall, the data show that the FxVTxK motif is functionally important in two phylogenetically distant plant CESAs. The results show that Physcomitrella provides an efficient model for assessing the effects of engineered CESA mutations affecting primary cell wall synthesis and that diverse testing systems can lead to nuanced insights into CESA structure–function relationships. Although CESA membrane topology needs to be experimentally determined, the results support the possibility that the FxVTxK region functions similarly in CESA and BcsA.

  15. The valine and lysine residues in the conserved FxVTxK motif are important for the function of phylogenetically distant plant cellulose synthases.

    PubMed

    Slabaugh, Erin; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess; Chaves, Arielle; Wilson, Liza; Wilson, Carmen; Davis, Jonathan K; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Anderson, Charles T; Roberts, Alison W; Haigler, Candace H

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose synthases (CESAs) synthesize the β-1,4-glucan chains that coalesce to form cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls. In addition to a large cytosolic (catalytic) domain, CESAs have eight predicted transmembrane helices (TMHs). However, analogous to the structure of BcsA, a bacterial CESA, predicted TMH5 in CESA may instead be an interfacial helix. This would place the conserved FxVTxK motif in the plant cell cytosol where it could function as a substrate-gating loop as occurs in BcsA. To define the functional importance of the CESA region containing FxVTxK, we tested five parallel mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana CESA1 and Physcomitrella patens CESA5 in complementation assays of the relevant cesa mutants. In both organisms, the substitution of the valine or lysine residues in FxVTxK severely affected CESA function. In Arabidopsis roots, both changes were correlated with lower cellulose anisotropy, as revealed by Pontamine Fast Scarlet. Analysis of hypocotyl inner cell wall layers by atomic force microscopy showed that two altered versions of Atcesa1 could rescue cell wall phenotypes observed in the mutant background line. Overall, the data show that the FxVTxK motif is functionally important in two phylogenetically distant plant CESAs. The results show that Physcomitrella provides an efficient model for assessing the effects of engineered CESA mutations affecting primary cell wall synthesis and that diverse testing systems can lead to nuanced insights into CESA structure-function relationships. Although CESA membrane topology needs to be experimentally determined, the results support the possibility that the FxVTxK region functions similarly in CESA and BcsA.

  16. Combined pituitary hormone deficiency caused by a novel mutation of a highly conserved residue (F88S) in the homeodomain of PROP-1.

    PubMed

    Osorio, M G; Kopp, P; Marui, S; Latronico, A C; Mendonca, B B; Arnhold, I J

    2000-08-01

    Mutations in the pituitary-specific paired-like homeodomain transcription factor, PROP-1, result in combined pituitary hormone deficiency. We studied a Brazilian girl, offspring of first cousins, who presented with short stature and deficiencies of GH, TSH, PRL, LH, and FSH. Her cortisol response to hypoglycemia was determined at age 4.9, 10.7, and 14.1 yr and remained normal. Magnetic resonance imaging at the age of 9 yr revealed an anterior pituitary lobe of diminished height (3 mm; normal, 4.5 +/- 0.6), but radiography revealed a sella turcica volume above the normal mean. Direct sequencing of the PROP-1 gene revealed homozygosity for a novel 263T>C transition that results in the replacement of a highly conserved phenylalanine by serine at codon 88 (F88S). F88 constitutes the hydrophobic core of the first helix of the homeodomain of PROP-1, and the substitution by the polar residue serine is expected to alter the secondary structure and impair binding of the mutated PROP-1 to DNA target sequences. The F88S mutation (which corresponds to murine F85S) was introduced into the murine Prop-1 complementary DNA and its consequences on DNA binding and trans-activation were assessed in vitro. In contrast to wild-type Prop-1, the F88S mutant showed no significant DNA binding to a PRDQ9 Prop-1 response element in gel shift assays. Transcriptional activation of a luciferase reporter gene containing a PRDQ9 site upstream of a simian virus 40 promoter was reduced to approximately 34% compared with that of wild-type Prop-1 in transiently transfected TSA-201 human embryonic kidney cells. The F88S mutation further expands the repertoire of mutations in PROP-1.

  17. Effect of hole doping on the electronic structure and the Fermi surface in the Hubbard model within norm-conserving cluster pertubation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S. V. Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2012-01-15

    The concentration dependences of the band structure, spectral weight, density of states, and Fermi surface in the paramagnetic state are studied in the Hubbard model within cluster pertubation theory with 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 clusters. Representation of the Hubbard X operators makes it possible to control conservation of the spectral weight in constructing cluster perturbation theory. The calculated value of the ground-state energy is in good agreement with the results obtained using nonperturbative methods such as the quantum Monte Carlo method, exact diagonalization of a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 cluster, and the variational Monte Carlo method. It is shown that in the case of hole doping, the states in the band gap (in-gap states) lie near the top of the lower Hubbard band for large values of U and near the bottom of the upper band for small U. The concentration dependence of the Fermi surface strongly depends on hopping to second (t Prime ) and third (t Double-Prime ) neighbors. For parameter values typical of HTSC cuprates, the existence of three concentration regions with different Fermi surfaces is demonstrated. It is shown that broadening of the spectral electron density with an energy resolution typical of contemporary ARPES leads to a pattern of arcs with a length depending on the concentration. Only an order-of-magnitude decrease in the linewidth makes it possible to obtain the true Fermi surface from the spectral density. The kinks associated with strong electron correlations are detected in the dispersion relation below the Fermi level.

  18. LoaP is a broadly conserved antiterminator protein that regulates antibiotic gene clusters in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Jonathan R; Klupt, Steven; Zhang, Chengxi; Straight, Paul; Winkler, Wade C

    2017-02-13

    A valuable resource available in the search for new natural products is the diverse microbial life that spans the planet. A large subset of these microorganisms synthesize complex specialized metabolites exhibiting biomedically important activities. A limiting step to the characterization of these compounds is an elucidation of the genetic regulatory mechanisms that oversee their production. Although proteins that control transcription initiation of specialized metabolite gene clusters have been identified, those affecting transcription elongation have not been broadly investigated. In this study, we analysed the phylogenetic distribution of the large, widespread NusG family of transcription elongation proteins and found that it includes a cohesive outgroup of paralogues (herein coined LoaP), which are often positioned adjacent or within gene clusters for specialized metabolites. We established Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LoaP as a paradigm for this protein subgroup and showed that it regulated the transcriptional readthrough of termination sites located within two different antibiotic biosynthesis operons. Both of these antibiotics have been implicated in plant-protective activities, demonstrating that LoaP controls an important regulon of specialized metabolite genes for this microorganism. These data therefore reveal transcription elongation as a point of regulatory control for specialized metabolite pathways and introduce a subgroup of NusG proteins for this purpose.

  19. Product PCNPsurv or the "reduced" evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion for "hot" fusion reactions studied with the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Hemdeep, Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-04-01

    The product PCNPsurv of compound nucleus (CN) fusion probability PCN and survival probability Psurv is calculated to determine the reduced evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion , denoted σERreduced, with (total) fusion cross section σfusion given as a sum of CN-formation cross section σCN and non-CN cross section σnCN for each reaction, where σCN is the sum of evaporation residue cross section σER and fusion-fission cross section σff and σnCN, if not measured, is estimated empirically as the difference between measured and calculated σfusion. Our calculations of PCN and Psurv, based on the dynamical cluster-decay model, were successfully made for some 17 "hot" fusion reactions, forming different CN of mass numbers ACN˜100 -300 , with deformations of nuclei up to hexadecapole deformations and "compact" orientations for both coplanar (Φc=0∘ ) and noncoplanar (Φc≠0∘ ) configurations, using various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting variations of σERreduced with CN excitation energy E*, fissility parameter χ , CN mass ACN, and Coulomb parameter Z1Z2 show that, independent of entrance channel, different isotopes of CN, and nuclear interaction potentials used, the dominant quantity in the product is Psurv, which classifies all the studied CN into three groups of weakly fissioning, radioactive, and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei, with relative magnitudes of σERreduced˜1 , ˜10-6 , and ˜10-11 , which, like for PCN, get further grouped in two dependencies of (i) weakly fissioning and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei decreasing with increasing E* and (ii) radioactive nuclei increasing with increasing E*.

  20. LhcaR1 of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum encodes a polypeptide of the LHCI complex with seven potential chlorophyll a-binding residues that are conserved in most LHCs.

    PubMed

    Tan, S; Cunningham, F X; Gantt, E

    1997-01-01

    The accessory light-harvesting polypeptides associated with photosystem I (LHCI) in Porphyridium cruentum bind chlorophyll a, zeaxanthin and beta-carotene. A cDNA library of P. cruentum was screened with an antiserum specific to the LHCI polypeptides, and an 0.9 kb fragment was identified as coding for an LHCI polypeptide. This cDNA, which we named LhcaR1, has an open reading frame encoding 222 amino acid residues including a putative transit peptide of 28 amino acids. Hydropathy analysis suggests that there are three transmembrane helices in the mature polypeptide. Each of the amino acid residues that bind chlorophyll (six residues) and serve in stabilizing the helices in higher-plant LHCs are conserved in helices 1 and 3 of P. cruentum LhcaR1. The N-terminal flanking regions of these two helices also show high sequence conservation with other LHCs. Helix 2 contains a seventh putative chlorophyll-binding site, but resembles helix 2 of higher-plant LHCs to a lesser degree. A sequence motif of 11 residues found near the N-terminus and in each of the three helices suggests the possibility that the red algal LhcaR1 derives from a gene duplication. Polypeptides of the expected molecular weight in six other red algae (Achrochaetium, Bangia, Callithamnion, Cyanidium, Polysiphonia, Spermothamnion) were recognized by the antiserum to P. cruentum LHCI, indicating a wide distribution of LHCI in rhodophytes.

  1. Two Cytoplasmic Acylation Sites and an Adjacent Hydrophobic Residue, but No Other Conserved Amino Acids in the Cytoplasmic Tail of HA from Influenza A Virus Are Crucial for Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Siche, Stefanie; Brett, Katharina; Möller, Lars; Kordyukova, Larisa V.; Mintaev, Ramil R.; Alexeevski, Andrei V.; Veit, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recruitment of the matrix protein M1 to the assembly site of the influenza virus is thought to be mediated by interactions with the cytoplasmic tail of hemagglutinin (HA). Based on a comprehensive sequence comparison of all sequences present in the database, we analyzed the effect of mutating conserved residues in the cytosol-facing part of the transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail of HA (A/WSN/33 (H1N1) strain) on virus replication and morphology of virions. Removal of the two cytoplasmic acylation sites and substitution of a neighboring isoleucine by glutamine prevented rescue of infectious virions. In contrast, a conservative exchange of the same isoleucine, non-conservative exchanges of glycine and glutamine, deletion of the acylation site at the end of the transmembrane region and shifting it into the tail did not affect virus morphology and had only subtle effects on virus growth and on the incorporation of M1 and Ribo-Nucleoprotein Particles (RNPs). Thus, assuming that essential amino acids are conserved between HA subtypes we suggest that, besides the two cytoplasmic acylation sites (including adjacent hydrophobic residues), no other amino acids in the cytoplasmic tail of HA are indispensable for virus assembly and budding. PMID:26670246

  2. Effectiveness and Cost of Insecticide-Treated Bed Nets and Indoor Residual Spraying for the Control of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: A Cluster-Randomized Control Trial in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Faraj, Chafika; Yukich, Joshua; Adlaoui, El Bachir; Wahabi, Rachid; Mnzava, Abraham Peter; Kaddaf, Mustapha; El Idrissi, Abderrahmane Laamrani; Ameur, Btissam; Kleinschmidt, Immo

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) remains an important public health problem in Morocco. A cluster-randomized trial was conducted with the following three study arms: 1) long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) plus standard of care environmental management (SoC-EM), 2) indoor residual spraying (IRS) with α-cypermethrin plus SoC-EM, and 3) SoC-EM alone. Incidence of new CL cases by passive and active case detection, sandfly abundance, and cost and cost-effectiveness was compared between study arms over 5 years. Incidence of CL and sandfly abundance were significantly lower in the IRS arm compared with SoC-EM (CL incidence rate ratio = 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.15–0.69, P = 0.005 and sandfly abundance ratio = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.18–0.85, P = 0.022). Reductions in the LLIN arm of the study were not significant, possibly due to poor compliance. IRS was effective and more cost-effective for the prevention of CL in Morocco. PMID:26811431

  3. Effectiveness and Cost of Insecticide-Treated Bed Nets and Indoor Residual Spraying for the Control of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: A Cluster-Randomized Control Trial in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Chafika; Yukich, Joshua; Adlaoui, El Bachir; Wahabi, Rachid; Mnzava, Abraham Peter; Kaddaf, Mustapha; El Idrissi, Abderrahmane Laamrani; Ameur, Btissam; Kleinschmidt, Immo

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) remains an important public health problem in Morocco. A cluster-randomized trial was conducted with the following three study arms: 1) long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) plus standard of care environmental management (SoC-EM), 2) indoor residual spraying (IRS) with α-cypermethrin plus SoC-EM, and 3) SoC-EM alone. Incidence of new CL cases by passive and active case detection, sandfly abundance, and cost and cost-effectiveness was compared between study arms over 5 years. Incidence of CL and sandfly abundance were significantly lower in the IRS arm compared with SoC-EM (CL incidence rate ratio = 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.15-0.69, P = 0.005 and sandfly abundance ratio = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.18-0.85, P = 0.022). Reductions in the LLIN arm of the study were not significant, possibly due to poor compliance. IRS was effective and more cost-effective for the prevention of CL in Morocco. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. Organic weed conrol and cover crop residue integration impacts on weed control, quality, and yield and economics in conservation tillage tomato - A case study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increased use of conservation tillage in vegetable production requires more information be developed on the role of cover crops in weed control, tomato quality and yield. Three conservation-tillage systems utilizing crimson clover, brassica and cereal rye as winter cover crops were compared to ...

  5. Structure based alignment and clustering of proteins (STRALCP)

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T.; Zhou, Carol E.; Smith, Jason R.; Lam, Marisa W.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed are computational methods of clustering a set of protein structures based on local and pair-wise global similarity values. Pair-wise local and global similarity values are generated based on pair-wise structural alignments for each protein in the set of protein structures. Initially, the protein structures are clustered based on pair-wise local similarity values. The protein structures are then clustered based on pair-wise global similarity values. For each given cluster both a representative structure and spans of conserved residues are identified. The representative protein structure is used to assign newly-solved protein structures to a group. The spans are used to characterize conservation and assign a "structural footprint" to the cluster.

  6. Unique functional properties of conserved arginine residues in the lentivirus lytic peptide domains of the C-terminal tail of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Anne-Sophie; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Craigo, Jodi K; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2014-03-14

    A previous study from our laboratory reported a preferential conservation of arginine relative to lysine in the C-terminal tail (CTT) of HIV-1 envelope (Env). Despite substantial overall sequence variation in the CTT, specific arginines are highly conserved in the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP) motifs and are scarcely substituted by lysines, in contrast to gp120 and the ectodomain of gp41. However, to date, no explanation has been provided to explain the selective incorporation and conservation of arginines over lysines in these motifs. Herein, we address the functions in virus replication of the most conserved arginines by performing conservative mutations of arginine to lysine in the LLP1 and LLP2 motifs. The presence of lysine in place of arginine in the LLP1 motif resulted in significant impairment of Env expression and consequently virus replication kinetics, Env fusogenicity, and incorporation. By contrast, lysine exchanges in LLP2 only affected the level of Env incorporation and fusogenicity. Our findings demonstrate that the conservative lysine substitutions significantly affect Env functional properties indicating a unique functional role for the highly conserved arginines in the LLP motifs. These results provide for the first time a functional explanation to the preferred incorporation of arginine, relative to lysine, in the CTT of HIV-1 Env. We propose that these arginines may provide unique functions for Env interaction with viral or cellular cofactors that then influence overall Env functional properties.

  7. Dali server: conservation mapping in 3D.

    PubMed

    Holm, Liisa; Rosenström, Päivi

    2010-07-01

    Our web site (http://ekhidna.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali_server) runs the Dali program for protein structure comparison. The web site consists of three parts: (i) the Dali server compares newly solved structures against structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), (ii) the Dali database allows browsing precomputed structural neighbourhoods and (iii) the pairwise comparison generates suboptimal alignments for a pair of structures. Each part has its own query form and a common format for the results page. The inputs are either PDB identifiers or novel structures uploaded by the user. The results pages are hyperlinked to aid interactive analysis. The web interface is simple and easy to use. The key purpose of interactive analysis is to check whether conserved residues line up in multiple structural alignments and how conserved residues and ligands cluster together in multiple structure superimpositions. In favourable cases, protein structure comparison can lead to evolutionary discoveries not detected by sequence analysis.

  8. Indoor Residual Spraying in Combination with Insecticide-Treated Nets Compared to Insecticide-Treated Nets Alone for Protection against Malaria: A Cluster Randomised Trial in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    West, Philippa A.; Protopopoff, Natacha; Wright, Alexandra; Kivaju, Zuhura; Tigererwa, Robinson; Mosha, Franklin W.; Kisinza, William; Rowland, Mark; Kleinschmidt, Immo

    2014-01-01

    Background Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) of houses provide effective malaria transmission control. There is conflicting evidence about whether it is more beneficial to provide both interventions in combination. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted to investigate whether the combination provides added protection compared to ITNs alone. Methods and Findings In northwest Tanzania, 50 clusters (village areas) were randomly allocated to ITNs only or ITNs and IRS. Dwellings in the ITN+IRS arm were sprayed with two rounds of bendiocarb in 2012. Plasmodium falciparum prevalence rate (PfPR) in children 0.5–14 y old (primary outcome) and anaemia in children <5 y old (secondary outcome) were compared between study arms using three cross-sectional household surveys in 2012. Entomological inoculation rate (secondary outcome) was compared between study arms. IRS coverage was approximately 90%. ITN use ranged from 36% to 50%. In intention-to-treat analysis, mean PfPR was 13% in the ITN+IRS arm and 26% in the ITN only arm, odds ratio = 0.43 (95% CI 0.19–0.97, n = 13,146). The strongest effect was observed in the peak transmission season, 6 mo after the first IRS. Subgroup analysis showed that ITN users were additionally protected if their houses were sprayed. Mean monthly entomological inoculation rate was non-significantly lower in the ITN+IRS arm than in the ITN only arm, rate ratio = 0.17 (95% CI 0.03–1.08). Conclusions This is the first randomised trial to our knowledge that reports significant added protection from combining IRS and ITNs compared to ITNs alone. The effect is likely to be attributable to IRS providing added protection to ITN users as well as compensating for inadequate ITN use. Policy makers should consider deploying IRS in combination with ITNs to control transmission if local ITN strategies on their own are insufficiently effective. Given the uncertain generalisability of these findings

  9. Cloning and Characterization of the Tetrocarcin A Gene Cluster from Micromonospora chalcea NRRL 11289 Reveals a Highly Conserved Strategy for Tetronate Biosynthesis in Spirotetronate Antibiotics▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Zhang, Yiping; Huang, Lijuan; Jia, Xinying; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Xu; Tang, Gongli; Liu, Wen

    2008-01-01

    Tetrocarcin A (TCA), produced by Micromonospora chalcea NRRL 11289, is a spirotetronate antibiotic with potent antitumor activity and versatile modes of action. In this study, the biosynthetic gene cluster of TCA was cloned and localized to a 108-kb contiguous DNA region. In silico sequence analysis revealed 36 putative genes that constitute this cluster (including 11 for unusual sugar biosynthesis, 13 for aglycone formation, and 4 for glycosylations) and allowed us to propose the biosynthetic pathway of TCA. The formation of d-tetronitrose, l-amicetose, and l-digitoxose may begin with d-glucose-1-phosphate, share early enzymatic steps, and branch into different pathways by competitive actions of specific enzymes. Tetronolide biosynthesis involves the incorporation of a 3-C unit with a polyketide intermediate to form the characteristic spirotetronate moiety and trans-decalin system. Further substitution of tetronolide with five deoxysugars (one being a deoxynitrosugar) was likely due to the activities of four glycosyltransferases. In vitro characterization of the first enzymatic step by utilization of 1,3-biphosphoglycerate as the substrate and in vivo cross-complementation of the bifunctional fused gene tcaD3 (with the functions of chlD3 and chlD4) to ΔchlD3 and ΔchlD4 in chlorothricin biosynthesis supported the highly conserved tetronate biosynthetic strategy in the spirotetronate family. Deletion of a large DNA fragment encoding polyketide synthases resulted in a non-TCA-producing strain, providing a clear background for the identification of novel analogs. These findings provide insights into spirotetronate biosynthesis and demonstrate that combinatorial-biosynthesis methods can be applied to the TCA biosynthetic machinery to generate structural diversity. PMID:18586939

  10. A highly conserved interaction involving the middle residue of the SXN active-site motif is crucial for function of class B penicillin-binding proteins: mutational and computational analysis of PBP 2 from N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Tomberg, Joshua; Temple, Brenda; Fedarovich, Alena; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A

    2012-04-03

    Insertion of an aspartate residue at position 345a in penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2), which lowers the rate of penicillin acylation by ~6-fold, is commonly observed in penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Here, we show that insertions of other amino acids also lower the penicillin acylation rate of PBP 2, but none supported growth of N. gonorrhoeae, indicating loss of essential transpeptidase activity. The Asp345a mutation likely acts by altering the interaction between its adjacent residue, Asp346, in the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and Ser363, the middle residue of the SXN active site motif. Because the adjacent aspartate creates ambiguity in the position of the insertion, we also examined if insertions at position 346a could confer decreased susceptibility to penicillin. However, only aspartate insertions were identified, indicating that only an Asp-Asp couple can confer resistance and retain transpeptidase function. The importance of the Asp346-Ser363 interaction was assessed by mutation of each residue to Ala. Although both mutants lowered the acylation rate of penicillin G by 5-fold, neither could support growth of N. gonorrhoeae, again indicating loss of transpeptidase function. Interaction between a residue in the equivalent of the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and the middle residue of the SXN motif is observed in crystal structures of other Class B PBPs, and its importance is also supported by multisequence alignments. Overall, these results suggest that this conserved interaction can be manipulated (e.g., by insertion) to lower the acylation rate by β-lactam antibiotics and increase resistance, but only if essential transpeptidase activity is preserved.

  11. Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues Lining the Extracellular Loop I of Sodium-coupled Bile Acid Transporter ASBT Interact with Na+ and 7α-OH Moieties on the Ligand Cholestane Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Hussainzada, Naissan; Da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Zhang, Eric Y.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Functional contributions of residues Val-99—Ser-126 lining extracellular loop (EL) 1 of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter were determined via cysteine-scanning mutagenesis, thiol modification, and in silico interpretation. Despite membrane expression for all but three constructs (S112C, Y117C, S126C), most EL1 mutants (64%) were inactivated by cysteine mutation, suggesting a functional role during sodium/bile acid co-transport. A negative charge at conserved residues Asp-120 and Asp-122 is required for transport function, whereas neutralization of charge at Asp-124 yields a functionally active transporter. D124A exerts low affinity for common bile acids except deoxycholic acid, which uniquely lacks a 7α-hydroxyl (OH) group. Overall, we conclude that (i) Asp-122 functions as a Na+ sensor, binding one of two co-transported Na+ ions, (ii) Asp-124 interacts with 7α-OH groups of bile acids, and (iii) apolar EL1 residues map to hydrophobic ligand pharmacophore features. Based on these data, we propose a comprehensive mechanistic model involving dynamic salt bridge pairs and hydrogen bonding involving multiple residues to describe sodium-dependent bile acid transporter-mediated bile acid and cation translocation. PMID:18508772

  12. Substitution of conserved cysteine residues in Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Substitutions in the amino-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) HC-Pro were evaluated for effects on transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). Alanine substitution at cysteine residues 16, 46 and 49 abolished vector transmission. Although alanine substitution a...

  13. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  14. Mutation of a Conserved Active Site Residue Converts Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase l Into a DNA Topoisomerase l-Dependent Poison

    SciTech Connect

    He,X.; van Waardenburg, R.; Babaoglu, K.; Price, A.; Nitiss, K.; Nitiss, J.; Bjornsti, M.; White, S.

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (Tdp1) catalyzes the resolution of 3' and 5' phospho-DNA adducts. A defective mutant, associated with the recessive neurodegenerative disease SCAN1, accumulates Tdp1-DNA complexes in vitro. To assess the conservation of enzyme architecture, a 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of yeast Tdp1 was determined that is very similar to human Tdp1. Poorly conserved regions of primary structure are peripheral to an essentially identical catalytic core. Enzyme mechanism was also conserved, because the yeast SCAN1 mutant (H{sub 432}R) enhanced cell sensitivity to the DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) poison camptothecin. A more severe Top1-dependent lethality of Tdp1H{sub 432}N was drug-independent, coinciding with increased covalent Top1-DNA and Tdp1-DNA complex formation in vivo. However, both H432 mutants were recessive to wild-type Tdp1. Thus, yeast H{sub 432} acts in the general acid/base catalytic mechanism of Tdp1 to resolve 3' phosphotyrosyl and 3' phosphoamide linkages. However, the distinct pattern of mutant Tdp1 activity evident in yeast cells, suggests a more severe defect in Tdp1H{sub 432}N-catalyzed resolution of 3' phospho-adducts.

  15. Sequence-Based Screening for Rare Enzymes: New Insights into the World of AMDases Reveal a Conserved Motif and 58 Novel Enzymes Clustering in Eight Distinct Families

    PubMed Central

    Maimanakos, Janine; Chow, Jennifer; Gaßmeyer, Sarah K.; Güllert, Simon; Busch, Florian; Kourist, Robert; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Arylmalonate Decarboxylases (AMDases, EC 4.1.1.76) are very rare and mostly underexplored enzymes. Currently only four known and biochemically characterized representatives exist. However, their ability to decarboxylate α-disubstituted malonic acid derivatives to optically pure products without cofactors makes them attractive and promising candidates for the use as biocatalysts in industrial processes. Until now, AMDases could not be separated from other members of the aspartate/glutamate racemase superfamily based on their gene sequences. Within this work, a search algorithm was developed that enables a reliable prediction of AMDase activity for potential candidates. Based on specific sequence patterns and screening methods 58 novel AMDase candidate genes could be identified in this work. Thereby, AMDases with the conserved sequence pattern of Bordetella bronchiseptica’s prototype appeared to be limited to the classes of Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria. Amino acid homologies and comparison of gene surrounding sequences enabled the classification of eight enzyme clusters. Particularly striking is the accumulation of genes coding for different transporters of the tripartite tricarboxylate transporters family, TRAP transporters and ABC transporters as well as genes coding for mandelate racemases/muconate lactonizing enzymes that might be involved in substrate uptake or degradation of AMDase products. Further, three novel AMDases were characterized which showed a high enantiomeric excess (>99%) of the (R)-enantiomer of flurbiprofen. These are the recombinant AmdA and AmdV from Variovorax sp. strains HH01 and HH02, originated from soil, and AmdP from Polymorphum gilvum found by a data base search. Altogether our findings give new insights into the class of AMDases and reveal many previously unknown enzyme candidates with high potential for bioindustrial processes. PMID:27610105

  16. Structure/Function Analysis of Recurrent Mutations in SETD2 Protein Reveals a Critical and Conserved Role for a SET Domain Residue in Maintaining Protein Stability and Histone H3 Lys-36 Trimethylation.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Kathryn E; Fahey, Catherine C; Shinsky, Stephen A; Chiang, Yun-Chen J; DiFiore, Julia V; Jha, Deepak Kumar; Vo, Andy H; Shavit, Jordan A; Davis, Ian J; Strahl, Brian D; Rathmell, W Kimryn

    2016-09-30

    The yeast Set2 histone methyltransferase is a critical enzyme that plays a number of key roles in gene transcription and DNA repair. Recently, the human homologue, SETD2, was found to be recurrently mutated in a significant percentage of renal cell carcinomas, raising the possibility that the activity of SETD2 is tumor-suppressive. Using budding yeast and human cell line model systems, we examined the functional significance of two evolutionarily conserved residues in SETD2 that are recurrently mutated in human cancers. Whereas one of these mutations (R2510H), located in the Set2 Rpb1 interaction domain, did not result in an observable defect in SETD2 enzymatic function, a second mutation in the catalytic domain of this enzyme (R1625C) resulted in a complete loss of histone H3 Lys-36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). This mutant showed unchanged thermal stability as compared with the wild type protein but diminished binding to the histone H3 tail. Surprisingly, mutation of the conserved residue in Set2 (R195C) similarly resulted in a complete loss of H3K36me3 but did not affect dimethylated histone H3 Lys-36 (H3K36me2) or functions associated with H3K36me2 in yeast. Collectively, these data imply a critical role for Arg-1625 in maintaining the protein interaction with H3 and specific H3K36me3 function of this enzyme, which is conserved from yeast to humans. They also may provide a refined biochemical explanation for how H3K36me3 loss leads to genomic instability and cancer. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Mutations of the Same Conserved Glutamate Residue in NBD2 of the Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 Subunit of the KATP Channel Can Result in Either Hyperinsulinism or Neonatal Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Männikkö, Roope; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Sim, Xiuli; Segal, David; Hussain, Khalid; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Two novel mutations (E1506D, E1506G) in the nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2) of the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP channel) sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) subunit were detected heterozygously in patients with neonatal diabetes. A mutation at the same residue (E1506K) was previously shown to cause congenital hyperinsulinemia. We sought to understand why mutations at the same residue can cause either neonatal diabetes or hyperinsulinemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Neonatal diabetic patients were sequenced for mutations in ABCC8 (SUR1) and KCNJ11 (Kir6.2). Wild-type and mutant KATP channels were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied with electrophysiological methods. RESULTS Oocytes expressing neonatal diabetes mutant channels had larger resting whole-cell KATP currents than wild-type, consistent with the patients’ diabetes. Conversely, no E1506K currents were recorded at rest or after metabolic inhibition, as expected for a mutation causing hyperinsulinemia. KATP channels are activated by Mg-nucleotides (via SUR1) and blocked by ATP (via Kir6.2). All mutations decreased channel activation by MgADP but had little effect on MgATP activation, as assessed using an ATP-insensitive Kir6.2 subunit. Importantly, using wild-type Kir6.2, a 30-s preconditioning exposure to physiological MgATP concentrations (>300 µmol/L) caused a marked reduction in the ATP sensitivity of neonatal diabetic channels, a small decrease in that of wild-type channels, and no change for E1506K channels. This difference in MgATP inhibition may explain the difference in resting whole-cell currents found for the neonatal diabetes and hyperinsulinemia mutations. CONCLUSIONS Mutations in the same residue can cause either hyperinsulinemia or neonatal diabetes. Differentially altered nucleotide regulation by NBD2 of SUR1 can explain the respective clinical phenotypes. PMID:21617188

  18. Global alteration of the drug-binding pocket of human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) by substitution of fifteen conserved residues reveals a negative correlation between substrate size and transport efficiency.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Shahrooz; Chufan, Eduardo E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2017-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, is linked to the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. However, the drug-binding sites and translocation pathways of this transporter are not yet well-characterized. We recently demonstrated the important role of tyrosine residues in regulating P-gp ATP hydrolysis via hydrogen bond formations with high affinity modulators. Since tyrosine is both a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, and non-covalent interactions are key in drug transport, in this study we investigated the global effect of enrichment of tyrosine residues in the drug-binding pocket on the drug binding and transport function of P-gp. By employing computational analysis, 15 conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp that interact with substrates were identified and then substituted with tyrosine, including 11 phenylalanine (F72, F303, F314, F336, F732, F759, F770, F938, F942, F983, F994), two leucine (L339, L975), one isoleucine (I306), and one methionine (M949). Characterization of the tyrosine-rich P-gp mutant in HeLa cells demonstrated that this major alteration in the drug-binding pocket by introducing fifteen additional tyrosine residues is well tolerated and has no measurable effect on total or cell surface expression of this mutant. Although the tyrosine-enriched mutant P-gp could transport small to moderate size (<1000 Daltons) fluorescent substrates, its ability to transport large (>1000 Daltons) substrates such as NBD-cyclosporine A, Bodipy-paclitaxel and Bodipy-vinblastine was significantly decreased. This was further supported by the physico-chemical characterization of seventeen tested substrates, which revealed a negative correlation between drug transport and molecular size for the tyrosine-enriched P-gp mutant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Probing conserved surfaces on PapD.

    PubMed

    Hung, D L; Knight, S D; Hultgren, S J

    1999-02-01

    PapD is the periplasmic chaperone required for the assembly of P pili in pyelonephritic strains of Escherichia coli. It consists of two immunoglobulin-like domains bisected by a subunit binding cleft. PapD is the prototype member of a super family of immunoglobulin-like chaperones that work in concert with their respective ushers to assemble a plethora of adhesive organelles including pilus- and non-pilus-associated adhesins. Three highly conserved residue clusters have been shown to play critical roles in the structure and function of PapD, as determined by site-directed mutagenesis. The in vivo stability of the chaperone depended on the formation of a buried salt bridge within the cleft. Residues along the G1 beta strand were required for efficient binding of subunits consistent with the crystal structure of PapD-peptide complexes. Finally, Thr-53, a residue that is part of a conserved band of residues located on the amino-terminal domain surface opposite the subunit binding cleft, was also found to be critical for pilus assembly, but mutations at Thr-53 did not interfere with chaperone-subunit complex formation.

  20. The Characteristics of Rare Codon Clusters in the Genome and Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus; a Bioinformatics Look

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Mohammadreza; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Mortazavi, Mojtaba; Safarpour, Alireza; Naseri, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies suggest that rare codon clusters are functionally important for protein activity. METHODS Here, for the first time we analyzed and reported rare codon clusters in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) genome and then identified the location of these rare codon clusters in the structure of HCV protein. This analysis was performed using the Sherlocc program that detects statistically relevant conserved rare codon clusters. RESULTS By this program, we identified the rare codon cluster in three regions of HCV genome; NS2, NS3, and NS5A coding sequence of HCV genome. For further understanding of the role of these rare codon clusters, we studied the location of these rare codon clusters and critical residues in the structure of NS2, NS3 and NS5A proteins. We identified some critical residues near or within rare codon clusters. It should be mentioned that characteristics of these critical residues such as location and situation of side chains are important in assurance of the HCV life cycle. CONCLUSION The characteristics of these residues and their relative status showed that these rare codon clusters play an important role in proper folding of these proteins. Thus, it is likely that these rare codon clusters may have an important role in the function of HCV proteins. This information is helpful in development of new avenues for vaccine and treatment protocols. PMID:25349685

  1. X-ray crystal structures of manganese(II)-reconstituted and native toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase reveal rotamer shifts in conserved residues and an enhanced view of the protein interior.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael S; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Condon, Karen L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2006-11-29

    We report the X-ray crystal structures of native and manganese(II)-reconstituted toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase (ToMOH) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 to 1.85 and 2.20 A resolution, respectively. The structures reveal that reduction of the dimetallic active site is accompanied by a carboxylate shift and alteration of the coordination environment for dioxygen binding and activation. A rotamer shift in a strategically placed asparagine 202 accompanies dimetallic center reduction and is proposed to influence protein component interactions. This rotamer shift is conserved between ToMOH and the corresponding residue in methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH). Previously unidentified hydrophobic pockets similar to those present in MMOH are assigned.

  2. The conserved glycine/alanine residue of the active-site loop containing the putative acetylCoA-binding motif is essential for the overall structural integrity of Mesorhizobium loti arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Atmane, Noureddine; Dairou, Julien; Flatters, Delphine; Martins, Marta; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Derreumaux, Philippe; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2007-09-14

    The arylamine N-acetyltransferases are important xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze an acetyl group transfer from acetylCoA to arylamine substrates. NAT enzymes possess an active-site loop (the active-site P-loop) involved in substrate binding and selectivity. The Gly/Ala residue present at the start of the active-site P-loop, although conserved in all NAT enzymes, is not involved in the catalytic mechanism or substrate binding. Here we show that a small amino acid (such as Gly or Ala) at this position is important not only for maintaining the functions of the active-site P-loop but, more surprisingly, also important for maintaining the overall structural integrity of NAT enzymes. Our data thus suggest that in addition to its role in substrate binding and selectivity, the active-site P-loop could play a wider structural role in NAT enzymes.

  3. The Origin Of The Gaussian Initial Mass Function of Old Globular Cluster Systems: Impact Of The Residual Star Forming Gas Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, G. A.; Gilmore, G. F.

    2006-08-01

    Evidence favouring a Gaussian cluster initial mass function (IMF) similar to that today for systems of old globular clusters (GC) has accumulated over recent years. We show that a bell-shaped cluster mass function may be the imprint of expulsion from the protocluster of the leftover star forming gas due to supernova activity. Owing to the corresponding weakening of its gravitational potential, the protocluster retains a fraction only of its newly formed stars. The mass fraction of bound stars extends from zero to unity depending on the star formation efficiency (SFE) achieved by the protoglobular cloud. We investigate how such wide variations affect the mapping of the protoglobular cloud mass function to the GC IMF. We assume that the protoglobular cloud mass spectrum obeys a power-law with spectral index between -2.5 and -1.5, as is observed for giant molecular clouds in the Local Group. Following convolution with an SFE probability distribution, we account for gas removal and derive the cluster initial mass (function) by combining each SFE value to the corresponding fraction of stars remaining bound to the protocluster. Although our simulations were started with power-law cloud mass distributions, the newly formed gas-free bound star clusters show bell-shaped mass functions, that is, little memory of the cloud mass distribution is retained. If the GC IMF is actually a bell-shape/Gaussian similar to that today, then the origin of the universal cluster mass at the present-day turnover is locked into the cluster formation process. We show that the turnover universality would originate mostly from a common value among galaxies for the lower mass limit of the protoglobular clouds, possibly with second-order variations driven by differences in the slope of the cloud mass spectrum, that of the SFE distribution, as well as by differences in the gas removal time-scale.

  4. DDT residue contamination in sediments from Lake Sibaya in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: implications for conservation in a World Heritage Site.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Marc S

    2013-11-01

    Maputaland in northern KwaZulu-Natal is a biodiversity hotspot and host to a number of ecologically important systems, including Lake Sibaya, southern Africa's largest natural freshwater lake. The region is malaria endemic and this study reports the presence of DDT and its metabolites in the sediments of Lake Sibaya that have resulted from the widespread and continued use of DDT in the region. DDT residues (p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD, and p,p'-DDE) were detected at all 11 sites sampled, with total concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 123 ng g(-1). Total DDT concentrations at Lake Sibaya represent some of the highest levels reported in South Africa, with most samples exceeding sediment quality guideline values. The findings from this study raise concerns and indicate that urgent further work is needed to investigate the potential for bioaccumulation, which could adversely affect breeding fish, bird, and crocodile populations in the region. While this study represents the first report on DDT contamination in Lake Sibaya, results have important implications for a number of other aquatic ecosystems within the Maputaland ecoregion, as well as the many local people who depend on them.

  5. Functional importance of two conserved residues in intracellular loop 1 and transmembrane region 2 of Family A GPCRs: insights from ligand binding and signal transduction responses of D1 and D5 dopaminergic receptor mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boyang; Yang, Xiaodi; Tiberi, Mario

    2015-10-01

    For many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the role of the first intracellular loop (IL1) and its connections with adjacent transmembrane (TM) regions have not been investigated. Notably, these regions harbor several polar residues such as Ser and Thr. To begin uncovering how these polar residues may contribute to the structural basis for GPCR functionality, we have designed human D1-class receptor mutants (hD1-ST1 and hD5-ST1) whereby all Ser and Thr of IL1 and IL1/TM2 juncture have been replaced by Ala and Val, respectively. Both ST1 mutants exhibited a loss of dopamine affinity but similar binding properties for inverse agonists compared to their parent receptors. As well, these mutations diminished receptor activation for both subtypes, as indicated by an ablated constitutive activity and a pronounced decrease in dopamine potency. Interestingly, both mutants exhibited enhanced dopamine-mediated maximal stimulation (Emax) of adenylyl cyclase that was at least two-fold higher than wild-type. Point mutations for hD1R revealed that the loss in dopamine affinity and potency was attributed to Thr59, while the enhanced Emax of adenylyl cyclase was directly influenced by Ser65. These two residues are conserved among many Family A GPCRs and have recurring molecular interactions among crystallized structures. As such, their functional roles for IL1 and its transition into TM2 reported herein may also be applicable to other GPCRs. Our work thus potentially highlights a structural role of Thr59 and Ser65 in the formation of critical intramolecular interactions for ligand binding and signal transduction of D1-class dopaminergic receptors. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Conservation analysis of residues in the S4-S5 linker and the terminal part of the S5-P-S6 pore modulus in Kv and HCN channels: flexible determinants for the electromechanical coupling.

    PubMed

    Balleza, Daniel; Carrillo, Elisa; Gómez-Lagunas, Froylán

    2015-10-01

    Protein mobility is important to achieve protein function. Intrinsic flexibility associated with motion underlies this important issue and the analysis of side chain flexibility gives insights to understand it. In this work, the S5-P-S6 pore modulus (PM) of members of Kv and HCN channels was examined by a combination of sequence alignment, residue composition analysis, and intrinsic side chain flexibility. The PM sequences were organized as a database that was used to reveal and correlate the functional diversity of each analyzed family. Specifically, we focused our attention on the crucial role of the S4-S5 linker and its well-described interaction with the S6 T during the electromechanical coupling. Our analysis suggests the presence of a Gly-hinge in the middle of the S4-S5 linkers. This apparent Gly-hinge links a flexible N-terminal segment with a rigid C-terminal one, although in Kv7 channels, the latter segment is even more flexible. Instead, HCN channels exhibit a putative Thr-hinge and is rich in aromatic residues, in consequence, their linker is more rigid. Concerning S6, we confirm the presence of the two flexible kinks previously described and we provide the complete segmental flexibility profiles for the different families. Our results are discussed in terms of the relation between residue composition, conservation, and local conformational flexibility. This provides important insights to understand and differentiate the characteristic gating properties of these channels as well as their implications in cell physiology.

  7. Mutational and Structural Analysis of Conserved Residues in Ribose-5-Phosphate Isomerase B from Leishmania donovani: Role in Substrate Recognition and Conformational Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Preet Kamal; Tripathi, Neha; Desale, Jayesh; Neelagiri, Soumya; Yadav, Shailendra; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Singh, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B from Leishmania donovani (LdRpiB) is one of the potential drug targets against visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study, we have targeted several conserved amino acids for mutational analysis (i.e. Cys69, His11, His102, His138, Asp45, Tyr46, Pro47 and Glu149) to gain crucial insights into their role in substrate binding, catalysis and conformational stability of the enzyme. All the eight LdRpiB variants were cloned, sequenced, expressed and purified. C69S, H102N, D45N and E149A mutants exhibited complete loss of enzyme activity indicating that they are indispensable for the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters were altered in case of H138N, H11N and P47A variants; however Y46F exhibited similar kinetic behaviour as wild type. All the mutants except H138N exhibited altered protein structure as determined by CD and fluorescence spectral analysis. This data was supported by the atomic level details of the conformational changes and substrate binding using molecular dynamic simulations. LdRpiB also exhibited activity with D-form of various aldose substrates in the order of D-ribose > D-talose > D-allose > D-arabinose. Our study provides insights for better understanding of substrate enzyme interactions which can rationalize the process of drug design against parasite RpiB. PMID:26953696

  8. Functional importance of a pair of conserved glutamic acid residues and of Ca(2+) binding in the cbb(3)-type oxygen reductases from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Hanlin; Han, Huazhi; Roh, Jung H; Hemp, James; Hosler, Jonathan P; Gennis, Robert B

    2012-09-18

    The cbb(3)-type cytochrome c oxidases are members of the family of heme-copper proton pumping respiratory oxygen reductases. The structure of the cbb(3)-type oxidase from Pseudomonas stutzeri reveals that, in addition to the six redox-active metal centers (two b-type hemes, three c-type hemes, and Cu(B)), the enzyme also contains at least one Ca(2+). The calcium bridges two propionate carboxyls at the interface between the low-spin heme b and the active-site heme b(3) and, in addition, is ligated to a serine in subunit CcoO and by a glutamate in subunit CcoN. The glutamate that is ligated to Ca(2+) is one of a pair of glutamic acid residues that has previously been suggested to be part of a proton exit pathway for pumped protons. In this work, mutations of these glutamates are investigated in the cbb(3)-type oxidases from Vibrio cholerae and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Metal analysis shows that each of these wild-type enzymes contains Ca(2+). Mutations of the glutamate expected to ligate the Ca(2+) in each of these enzymes (E126 in V. cholerae and E180 in R. sphaeroides) result in a loss of activity as well as a loss of Ca(2+). Mutations of the nearby glutamate (E129 in V. cholerae and E183 in R. sphaeroides) also resulted in a loss of oxidase activity and a loss of Ca(2+). It is concluded that the Ca(2+) is essential for assembly of the fully functional enzyme and that neither of the glutamates is likely to be part of a pathway for pumped protons within the cbb(3)-type oxygen reductases. A more likely role for these glutamates is the maintenance of the structural integrity of the active conformation of the enzyme.

  9. The molecular basis for species-specific activation of human TRPA1 protein by protons involves poorly conserved residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    de la Roche, Jeanne; Eberhardt, Mirjam J; Klinger, Alexandra B; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Wegner, Florian; Koppert, Wolfgang; Reeh, Peter W; Lampert, Angelika; Fischer, Michael J M; Leffler, Andreas

    2013-07-12

    The surveillance of acid-base homeostasis is concerted by diverse mechanisms, including an activation of sensory afferents. Proton-evoked activation of rodent sensory neurons is mainly mediated by the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels. In this study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidosis activates and sensitizes the human irritant receptor TRPA1 (hTRPA1). Proton-evoked membrane currents and calcium influx through hTRPA1 occurred at physiological acidic pH values, were concentration-dependent, and were blocked by the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC030031. Both rodent and rhesus monkey TRPA1 failed to respond to extracellular acidosis, and protons even inhibited rodent TRPA1. Accordingly, mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking TRPV1 only responded to protons when hTRPA1 was expressed heterologously. This species-specific activation of hTRPA1 by protons was reversed in both mouse and rhesus monkey TRPA1 by exchange of distinct residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Furthermore, protons seem to interact with an extracellular interaction site to gate TRPA1 and not via a modification of intracellular N-terminal cysteines known as important interaction sites for electrophilic TRPA1 agonists. Our data suggest that hTRPA1 acts as a sensor for extracellular acidosis in human sensory neurons and should thus be taken into account as a yet unrecognized transduction molecule for proton-evoked pain and inflammation. The species specificity of this property is unique among known endogenous TRPA1 agonists, possibly indicating that evolutionary pressure enforced TRPA1 to inherit the role as an acid sensor in human sensory neurons.

  10. A highly conserved Tyrosine residue of family B DNA polymerases contributes to dictate translesion synthesis past 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine

    PubMed Central

    de Vega, Miguel; Salas, Margarita

    2007-01-01

    The harmfulness of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8oxodG) damage resides on its dual coding potential, as it can pair with the correct dCMP (dC) or the incorrect dAMP (dA). Here, we investigate the translesional synthesis ability of family B ϕ29 DNA polymerase on 8oxodG-containing templates. We show that this polymerase preferentially inserts dC opposite 8oxodG, its 3′–5′ exonuclease activity acting indistinctly on both dA or dC primer terminus. In addition, ϕ29 DNA polymerase shows a favoured extension of the 8oxodG/dA pair, but with an efficiency much lower than that of the canonical dG/dC pair. Additionally, we have analysed the role of the invariant tyrosine from motif B of family B DNA polymerases in translesional synthesis past 8oxodG, replacing the corresponding ϕ29 DNA polymerase Tyr390 by Phe or Ser. The lack of the aromatic portion in mutant Y390S led to a lost of discrimination against dA insertion opposite 8oxodG. On the contrary, the absence of the hydroxyl group in the Y390F mutant precluded the favoured extension of 8oxodG:dA base pair with respect to 8oxodG:dC. Based on the results obtained, we propose that this Tyr residue contributes to dictate nucleotide insertion and extension preferences during translesion synthesis past 8oxodG by family B replicases. PMID:17652324

  11. The Molecular Basis for Species-specific Activation of Human TRPA1 Protein by Protons Involves Poorly Conserved Residues within Transmembrane Domains 5 and 6*

    PubMed Central

    de la Roche, Jeanne; Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Wegner, Florian; Koppert, Wolfgang; Reeh, Peter W.; Lampert, Angelika; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Leffler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of acid-base homeostasis is concerted by diverse mechanisms, including an activation of sensory afferents. Proton-evoked activation of rodent sensory neurons is mainly mediated by the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels. In this study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidosis activates and sensitizes the human irritant receptor TRPA1 (hTRPA1). Proton-evoked membrane currents and calcium influx through hTRPA1 occurred at physiological acidic pH values, were concentration-dependent, and were blocked by the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC030031. Both rodent and rhesus monkey TRPA1 failed to respond to extracellular acidosis, and protons even inhibited rodent TRPA1. Accordingly, mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking TRPV1 only responded to protons when hTRPA1 was expressed heterologously. This species-specific activation of hTRPA1 by protons was reversed in both mouse and rhesus monkey TRPA1 by exchange of distinct residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Furthermore, protons seem to interact with an extracellular interaction site to gate TRPA1 and not via a modification of intracellular N-terminal cysteines known as important interaction sites for electrophilic TRPA1 agonists. Our data suggest that hTRPA1 acts as a sensor for extracellular acidosis in human sensory neurons and should thus be taken into account as a yet unrecognized transduction molecule for proton-evoked pain and inflammation. The species specificity of this property is unique among known endogenous TRPA1 agonists, possibly indicating that evolutionary pressure enforced TRPA1 to inherit the role as an acid sensor in human sensory neurons. PMID:23709225

  12. NMR Characterization of the Near Native and Unfolded States of the PTB Domain of Dok1: Alternate Conformations and Residual Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sebanti; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    Background Phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains are critically involved in cellular signaling and diseases. PTB domains are categorized into three distinct structural classes namely IRS-like, Shc-like and Dab-like. All PTB domains consist of a core pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with additional structural elements in Shc and Dab groups. The core PH fold of the PTB domain contains a seven stranded β-sheet and a long C-terminal helix. Principal Findings In this work, the PTB domain of Dok1 protein has been characterized, by use of NMR spectroscopy, in solutions containing sub-denaturing and denaturing concentrations of urea. We find that the Dok1 PTB domain displays, at sub-denaturing concentrations of urea, alternate conformational states for residues located in the C-terminal helix and in the β5 strand of the β-sheet region. The β5 strand of PTB domain has been found to be experiencing significant chemical shift perturbations in the presence of urea. Notably, many of these residues in the helix and in the β5 strand are also involved in ligand binding. Structural and dynamical analyses at 7 M urea showed that the PTB domain is unfolded with islands of motionally restricted regions in the polypeptide chain. Further, the C-terminal helix appears to be persisted in the unfolded state of the PTB domain. By contrast, residues encompassing β-sheets, loops, and the short N-terminal helix lack any preferred secondary structures. Moreover, these residues demonstrated an intimate contact with the denaturant. Significance This study implicates existence of alternate conformational states around the ligand binding pocket of the PTB domain either in the native or in the near native conditions. Further, the current study demonstrates that the C-terminal helical region of PTB domain may be considered as a potential site for the initiation of folding. PMID:24587391

  13. Multiple ligand-binding properties of the lipocalin member chicken alpha1-acid glycoprotein studied by circular dichroism and electronic absorption spectroscopy: the essential role of the conserved tryptophan residue.

    PubMed

    Zsila, Ferenc; Matsunaga, Hisami; Bikádi, Zsolt; Haginaka, Jun

    2006-08-01

    Multiple ligand-binding properties of the 30-kDa chicken alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (cAGP), a member of the lipocalin protein family, were investigated for the first time by using circular dichroism (CD) and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy methods. By measuring induced CD (ICD) spectra, high-affinity binding (K(a) approximately 10(5)-10(6) M(-1)) of several drugs, dyes and natural compounds to cAGP was demonstrated including antimalarial agents (quinacrine, primaquine), phenotiazines (chlorpromazine, methylene blue), propranolol, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (ketoprofen, diclofenac), tamoxifen, diazepam, tacrine, dicoumarol, cationic dyes (auramine O, thioflavine T, ethidium bromide), benzo[a]pyrene, L-thyroxine, bile pigments (bilirubin, biliverdin), alkaloids (piperine, aristolochic acid), saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Analysis of the extrinsic CD spectra with the study of the covalently modified protein and CD displacement experiments revealed that a single Trp26 residue of cAGP conserved in the whole lipocalin family is part of the binding site, and it is essentially involved in the ligand-binding process via pi-pi stacking interaction resulting in the appearance of strong induced CD bands due to the non-degenerate intermolecular exciton coupling between the pi-pi* transitions of the stacked indole ring-ligand chromophore. The finding that cAGP is able to accommodate a broad spectrum of ligands belonging to different chemical classes suggests that its core beta-barrel cavity is unusually wide containing overlapping sub-sites. Significance of these new data in understanding of the ligand-binding properties of other lipocalins, especially that of human AGP, and potential practical applications are briefly discussed. Overall, cAGP serves as a simple, ultimate model to extend our knowledge on ligand-binding properties of lipocalins and to study the role of tryptophan residues in molecular recognition processes.

  14. The Hydroxyl Side Chain of a Highly Conserved Serine Residue Is Required for Cation Selectivity and Substrate Transport in the Glial Glutamate Transporter GLT-1/SLC1A2*

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Alexandre; Montalbetti, Nicolas; Gyimesi, Gergely; Pujol-Giménez, Jonai; Hediger, Matthias A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate transporters maintain synaptic concentration of the excitatory neurotransmitter below neurotoxic levels. Their transport cycle consists of cotransport of glutamate with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of potassium. Structural studies proposed that a highly conserved serine located in the binding pocket of the homologous GltPh coordinates l-aspartate as well as the sodium ion Na1. To experimentally validate these findings, we generated and characterized several mutants of the corresponding serine residue, Ser-364, of human glutamate transporter SLC1A2 (solute carrier family 1 member 2), also known as glutamate transporter GLT-1 and excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT2. S364T, S364A, S364C, S364N, and S364D were expressed in HEK cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes to measure radioactive substrate transport and transport currents, respectively. All mutants exhibited similar plasma membrane expression when compared with WT SLC1A2, but substitutions of serine by aspartate or asparagine completely abolished substrate transport. On the other hand, the threonine mutant, which is a more conservative mutation, exhibited similar substrate selectivity, substrate and sodium affinities as WT but a lower selectivity for Na+ over Li+. S364A and S364C exhibited drastically reduced affinities for each substrate and enhanced selectivity for l-aspartate over d-aspartate and l-glutamate, and lost their selectivity for Na+ over Li+. Furthermore, we extended the analysis of our experimental observations using molecular dynamics simulations. Altogether, our findings confirm a pivotal role of the serine 364, and more precisely its hydroxyl group, in coupling sodium and substrate fluxes. PMID:26483543

  15. Mutants blocked in penicillin biosynthesis show a deletion of the entire penicillin gene cluster at a specific site within a conserved hexanucleotide sequence.

    PubMed

    Fierro, F; Montenegro, E; Gutiérrez, S; Martín, J F

    1996-01-01

    The organization of the genes of the penicillin cluster has been studied in three different mutants of P. chrysogenum impaired in penicillin biosynthesis. The three blocked mutants (derived from the parental strain P. chrysogenum Bb-1) lacked the genes pcbAB, pcbC and penDE of the penicillin biosynthetic pathway and were unable to form isopenicillin N synthase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase. All strains were identified as P. chrysogenum derivatives by fingerprinting analysis with (GTG)n as a probe. The borders of the deleted region were cloned and sequenced, showing the same junction point in the three mutants. The deleted DNA region was found to be identical to that described in P. chrysogenum npe10. The frequent deletion of the pen gene cluster at this point may indicate that this cluster is located in an unstable genetic region, flanked by hot spots of recombination, that is easily lost by mutagen-induced recombination.

  16. Evolution of C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Flaveria, a conserved serine residue in the carboxyl-terminal part of the enzyme is a major determinant for C4-specific characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, O E; Westhoff, P; Svensson, P

    2000-09-08

    C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases have evolved from ancestral C3 isoforms during the evolution of angiosperms and gained distinct kinetic and regulatory properties compared with the C3 isozymes. To identify amino acid residues and/or domains responsible for these C4-specific properties the C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase of Flaveria trinervia (C4) was compared with its orthologue in the closely related C3 plant Flaveria pringlei. Reciprocal enzyme chimera were constructed and the kinetic constants, K(0.5) and k(cat), as well as the Hill coefficient, h, were determined for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate both in the presence and absence of the activator glucose 6-phosphate. By this approach two regions were identified which determined most of the kinetic differences of the C4 and C3 ppcA phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases with respect to the substrate PEP. In addition, the experiments suggest that the two regions do not act additively but interact with each other. The region between amino acids 296 and 437 is essential for activation by glucose 6-phosphate. The carboxyl-terminal segment between amino acids 645 and 966 contains a C4 conserved serine or a C3 invariant alanine at position 774 in the respective enzyme isoform. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that this position is a key determinant for the kinetic properties of the two isozymes.

  17. Project CHOICE: #26. A Career Education Unit for Junior High School. Careers in Conservation of the Environment and Natural Resources. (Agriculture and Ecological Studies Cluster; Science and Engineering Occupations Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This junior high teaching unit on careers in conservation of the environment and natural resources is one in a series of career guidebooks developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking classroom experiences with the world of work. The unit…

  18. A cluster of aspartic residues in the extracellular loop II of PAR 4 is important for thrombin interaction and activation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Centellas, Daniel; Gudlur, Sushanth; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Ramström, Sofia; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2017-06-01

    Thrombin activates platelets via proteolytic cleavage of protease-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. The two PARs have distinct but complementary roles. The mechanisms responsible for PAR1 activation by thrombin have been extensively studied. However, much less is known regarding thrombin activation of PAR4, especially the potential involvement of regions of PAR4 other than the N-terminal, which is bound to the catalytic site of thrombin. We have studied PAR4 in S. cerevisiae strain MMY12, an expression system in which the GPCR receptors are connected to a Lac Z reporter gene resulting in increased β-galactosidase activity. This approach was used to assess PAR4 mutants to evaluate the contribution of different aspartic residues in facilitating PAR4 activation. Furthermore, peptides mimicking parts of the PAR4 N-terminal and the second extracellular loop (ECLII) were tested for their ability to inhibit platelet activation by thrombin. Binding of these peptides to γ-thrombin was studied by monitoring the decrease in tryptophan fluorescence intensity of thrombin. We conclude that not only the N-terminal but also the electronegative aspartic residues D224, D230 and D235 (located in ECLII) are be important for PAR4 binding to thrombin. We further suggest that they play a role for the tethered ligand binding to the receptor, as mutations also affected activation in response to a PAR4-activating peptide mimicking the new N-terminal formed after cleavage. This agrees with previous results on PAR1 and thrombin binding. We suggest that the ECLII of PAR4 could be a potential target for antithrombotic drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Annotating Protein Functional Residues by Coupling High-Throughput Fitness Profile and Homologous-Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yushen; Wu, Nicholas C.; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Tianhao; Gong, Danyang; Shu, Sara; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identification and annotation of functional residues are fundamental questions in protein sequence analysis. Sequence and structure conservation provides valuable information to tackle these questions. It is, however, limited by the incomplete sampling of sequence space in natural evolution. Moreover, proteins often have multiple functions, with overlapping sequences that present challenges to accurate annotation of the exact functions of individual residues by conservation-based methods. Using the influenza A virus PB1 protein as an example, we developed a method to systematically identify and annotate functional residues. We used saturation mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing to measure the replication capacity of single nucleotide mutations across the entire PB1 protein. After predicting protein stability upon mutations, we identified functional PB1 residues that are essential for viral replication. To further annotate the functional residues important to the canonical or noncanonical functions of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (vRdRp), we performed a homologous-structure analysis with 16 different vRdRp structures. We achieved high sensitivity in annotating the known canonical polymerase functional residues. Moreover, we identified a cluster of noncanonical functional residues located in the loop region of the PB1 β-ribbon. We further demonstrated that these residues were important for PB1 protein nuclear import through the interaction with Ran-binding protein 5. In summary, we developed a systematic and sensitive method to identify and annotate functional residues that are not restrained by sequence conservation. Importantly, this method is generally applicable to other proteins about which homologous-structure information is available. PMID:27803181

  20. Two-dimensional magnetization exchange spectroscopy of Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin. Nuclear Overhauser effect and electron self-exchange cross peaks from amino acid residues surrounding the Fe-2S* cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Skjeldal, L.; Westler, W.M.; Oh, Byungha; Krezel, A.M.; Markley, J.L.; Holden, H.M.; Jacobson, B.L.; Rayment, I. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison )

    1991-07-30

    Hyperfine {sup 1}H NMR signals of the 2 Fe-2S* vegetative ferredoxin from Anabaena 7,120 have been studied by two-dimensional (2D) magnetization exchange spectroscopy. The rapid longitudinal relaxation rates of these signals required the use of very short nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) mixing times (0.5-20 ms). The resulting pattern of NOE cross-relaxation peaks when combined with previous 1D NOE results led to elucidation of the carbon-bound proton spin systems from each of the four cysteines ligated to the 2Fe-2S* cluster in the reduced ferredoxin. Additional NOE cross peaks were observed that provide information about other amino acid residues that interact with the iron-sulfur cluster. NOE cross peaks were assigned tentatively to Leu{sup 27}, Arg{sup 42}, and Ala{sup 43} on the basis of the X-ray coordinates of oxidized Anabaena 7,120 ferredoxin. Three chemical exchange cross peaks were detected in magnetization exchange spectra of half-reduced ferredoxin and assigned to the {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} protons of Cys{sup 49} and Cys{sup 79} (both of whose sulfur atoms are ligated to Fe(III)) and Arg{sup 42} (whose amide nitrogen is hydrogen-bonded to one of the inorganic sulfurs of the 2Fe-2S* cluster). The chemical exchange cross peaks provide a means of extending assignments in the spectrum of reduced ferredoxin to assignments in the spectrum of the oxidized protein. The results suggest that 2D magnetization exchange spectroscopy employing short mixing times will be useful for the assignment and characterization of hyperfine {sup 1}H peaks in a variety of paramagnetic proteins.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ISU1 and ISU2: members of a well-conserved gene family for iron-sulfur cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Garland, S A; Hoff, K; Vickery, L E; Culotta, V C

    1999-12-10

    Recent studies in bacteria and eukaryotes have led to the identification of several new genes implicated in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster-containing proteins. This report focuses on two genes of bakers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ISU1 and ISU2, which encode homologues to bacterial IscU and NifU, potential iron-binding or cluster-assembly proteins. As with other yeast genes implicated in Fe/S protein assembly, deletion of either ISU1 or ISU2 results in increased accumulation of iron within the mitochondria, loss of activity of the [4Fe-4S] aconitase enzyme, and suppression of oxidative damage in cells lacking cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase. Both genes are induced in strains expressing an activated allele of Aft1p, the iron-sensing transcription factor, suggesting that they are regulated by the iron status of the cell. Immunoblotting studies using an antibody directed against Escherichia coli IscU reveal that both Isu1p and Isu2p are localized primarily in the mitochondria and that Isu1p is the predominant form expressed under all growth conditions tested. The possible role of the Isu proteins in the assembly and/or repair of Fe/S clusters is discussed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of human and Indian muntjac karyotypes (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis) reveals satellite DNA clusters at the margins of conserved syntenic segments.

    PubMed

    Frönicke, L; Scherthan, H

    1997-06-01

    Zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with human whole chromosome-specific paint probes revealed extensive homoeologies between Indian muntjac (2n=6, 7 female, male) and human karyotypes (2n=46). Forty-two conserved syntenic segments, corresponding to all human chromosomes except the Y chromosome, produced a near-complete coverage of the muntjac complement and revealed margins of interspecific segmental homoeology. To test the hypothesis that interstitial satellite DNA loci, illuminated by a Chinese muntjac C5-satellite probe in Indian muntjac chromosome arms, mark ancestral fusion points (Lin CC, Sasi R, Fan YS, Chen Z-Q (1991) New evidence for tandem chromosome fusions in the karyotypic evolution of the Asian muntjacs. Chromosoma 101: 19-24), we combined Zoo-FISH with C5 satellite mapping. Twenty-six interstitial satellite DNA loci were detected in the haploid Indian muntjac genome and were found to co-localize with the margins of conserved human/Indian muntjac syntenic segments. These results were confirmed by two-colour FISH and are in accordance with the tandem fusion hypothesis for Indian muntjac chromosomes. Furthermore, conserved syntenic segment combinations detected in pig, cattle and Indian muntjac Zoo-FISH maps reveal ancestral artiodactyl chromosomes.

  3. An essential tyrosine residue of Aspergillus polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Stratilová, E; Dzúrová, M; Markovic, O; Jörnvall, H

    1996-03-11

    Based on strict conservation of a tyrosine residue in 24 polygalacturonases, tyrosine modification was assessed in two different forms of the Aspergillus enzyme. The second subform was unknown in structure but submitted to sequence analysis and was found also to have the conserved tyrosine residue. Results of chemical modifications are consistent in showing inactivation of the proteins with all tyrosine-reactive agents tested, acetic anhydride, N-acetyl imidazole, and tetranitromethane. Furthermore, after acetylation, regeneration of enzyme activity was possible with hydroxylamine. Spectrophotometric pH titration showed that one accessible tyrosine residue is ionized at pH 9.3-9.5, whereas the remaining, masked residues are all ionized at pH 10.5. It is concluded that one tyrosine residue is catalytically important, in agreement with the inactivation and reactivation data, that this residue is accessible, and that it is likely to correspond to the strictly conserved residue observed in all forms.

  4. Functional Differentiation of Antiporter-Like Polypeptides in Complex I; a Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study of Residues Conserved in MrpA and NuoL but Not in MrpD, NuoM, and NuoN

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Eva; Górecki, Kamil; Drakenberg, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that the three largest subunits in the membrane domain (NuoL, NuoM and NuoN) of complex I are homologous to each other, as well as to two subunits (MrpA and MrpD) from a Na+/H+ antiporter, Mrp. MrpA and NuoL are more similar to each other and the same is true for MrpD and NuoN. This suggests a functional differentiation which was proven experimentally in a deletion strain model system, where NuoL could restore the loss of MrpA, but not that of MrpD and vice versa. The simplest explanation for these observations was that the MrpA and MrpD proteins are not antiporters, but rather single subunit ion channels that together form an antiporter. In this work our focus was on a set of amino acid residues in helix VIII, which are only conserved in NuoL and MrpA (but not in any of the other antiporter-like subunits.) and to compare their effect on the function of these two proteins. By combining complementation studies in B. subtilis and 23Na-NMR, response of mutants to high sodium levels were tested. All of the mutants were able to cope with high salt levels; however, all but one mutation (M258I/M225I) showed differences in the efficiency of cell growth and sodium efflux. Our findings showed that, although very similar in sequence, NuoL and MrpA seem to differ on the functional level. Nonetheless the studied mutations gave rise to interesting phenotypes which are of interest in complex I research. PMID:27391676

  5. Single-channel analysis of a point mutation of a conserved serine residue in the S2 ligand-binding domain of the NR2A NMDA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Wyllie, David J A; Johnston, Alexander R; Lipscombe, Diane; Chen, Philip E

    2006-07-15

    We have examined the function of a conserved serine residue (Ser670) in the S2 ligand-binding region of the NR2A N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit, using recombinant NR1/NR2A receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Mutation of Ser670 to glycine (S670G) in NR2A reduced the potency of glutamate by 124-fold. Single-channel conductance and the duration of apparent open periods of NR2A(S670G) receptor mutants were, however, indistinguishable from wild-type NMDA receptors. NR1/NR2A(S670G) shut-time distributions were best described by a mixture of six exponential components, and the four shortest shut intervals of each distribution were considered to occur within a channel activation (burst). Bursts of single-channel openings were fitted with a mixture of four exponential components. The longest two components carried the majority of the charge transfer and had mean durations of 9.6 +/- 0.5 and 29.6 +/- 1.5 ms. The overall channel open probability during a burst was high (mean, 0.83 +/- 0.06). Consistent with a shortening of NMDA receptor-channel burst lengths was the observation of an increased deactivation rate of macroscopic currents evoked by brief applications of glutamate to outside-out membrane patches. Correlations between shut times and adjacent open times were observed in all data records. Noticeably, shorter than average openings tended to occur next to long closed periods, whereas longer than average openings tended to occur next to short closings. Our single-channel data, together with modelling using a kinetic scheme to describe channel activations, support our hypothesis that the S670G point mutation reduces the dwell time of glutamate in its binding site.

  6. The sua8 suppressors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode replacements of conserved residues within the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and affect transcription start site selection similarly to sua7 (TFIIB) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Berroteran, R W; Ware, D E; Hampsey, M

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sua8 gene were found to be suppressors of an aberrant ATG translation initiation codon in the leader region of the cyc1 gene. Analysis of cyc1 transcripts from sua8 mutants revealed that suppression is a consequence of diminished transcription initiation at the normal start sites in favor of initiation at downstream sites, including a site between the aberrant and normal ATG start codons. This effect is not cyc1 gene specific since initiation at other genes, including ADH1, CYC7, and HIS4, was similarly affected, although initiation at HIS3 and SPT15 was unaffected. The SUA8 gene was cloned and partially sequenced, revealing identity to RPB1, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The sua8 suppressors are the result of single amino acid replacements of highly conserved residues. Three replacements were found either within or immediately preceding homology block D, and a fourth was found adjacent to homology block H, indicating that these regions play a role in defining start sites in vivo. Nearly identical effects on start site selection were observed for sua7 suppressors, which encode altered forms of TFIIB. Synthetic lethality was associated with double sua7 sua8 suppressor mutations, and recessive sua7 mutants failed to fully complement recessive sua8 mutants in heterozygous diploids (nonallelic noncomplementation). These data indicate that the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB are important determinants of transcription start site selection in S. cerevisiae and suggest that this function might be conferred by interaction between these two proteins. Images PMID:8264591

  7. Conserved arginine residues in the carboxyl terminus of the equine arteritis virus E protein may play a role in heparin binding but may not affect viral infectivity in equine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengchun; Sarkar, Sanjay; Zhang, Jianqiang; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-04-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis, has relatively broad cell tropism in vitro. In horses, EAV primarily replicates in macrophages and endothelial cells of small blood vessels. Until now, neither the cellular receptor(s) nor the mechanism(s) of virus attachment and entry have been determined for this virus. In this study, we investigated the effect of heparin on EAV infection in equine endothelial cells (EECs). Heparin, but not other glycosaminoglycans, could reduce EAV infection up to 93 %. Sequence analysis of the EAV E minor envelope protein revealed a conserved amino acid sequence (52 RSLVARCSRGARYR 65) at the carboxy terminus of the E protein, which was predicted to be the heparin-binding domain. The basic arginine (R) amino acid residues were subsequently mutated to glycine by site-directed mutagenesis of ORF2a in an E protein expression vector and an infectious cDNA clone of EAV. Two single mutations in E (R52G and R57G) did not affect the heparin-binding capability, whereas the E double mutation (R52,60G) completely eliminated the interaction between the E protein and heparin. Although the mutant R52,60G EAV did not bind heparin, the mutations did not completely abolish infectivity, indicating that heparin is not the only critical factor for EAV infection. This also suggested that other viral envelope protein(s) might be involved in attachment through heparin or other cell-surface molecules, and this warrants further investigation.

  8. 3640 unique EST clusters from the medaka testis and their potential use for identifying conserved testicular gene expression in fish and mammals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Lijan; Zhang, Zhenhai; Hong, Ni; Peng, Jinrong; Hong, Yunhan

    2008-01-01

    The fish medaka is the first vertebrate capable of full spermatogenesis in vitro from self-renewing spermatogonial stem cells to motile test-tube sperm. Precise staging and molecular dissection of this process has been hampered by the lack of suitable molecular markers. We have generated a normalized medaka testis cDNA library and obtained 7040 high quality sequences representing 3641 unique gene clusters. Among these, 1197 unique clusters are homologous to known genes, and 2444 appear to be novel genes. Ontology analysis shows that the 1197 gene products are implicated in diverse molecular and cellular processes. These genes include markers for all major types of testicular somatic and germ cells. Furthermore, markers were identified for major spermatogenic stages ranging from spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal to meiosis entry, progression and completion. Intriguingly, the medaka testis expresses at least 13 homologs of the 33 mouse X-chromosomal genes that are enriched in the testis. More importantly, we show that key components of several signaling pathways known to be important for testicular function in mammals are well represented in the medaka testicular EST collection. Medaka exhibits a considerable similarity in testicular gene expression to mammals. The medaka testicular EST collection we obtained has wide range coverage and will not only consolidate our knowledge on the comparative analysis of known genes' functions in the testis but also provide a rich resource to dissect molecular events and mechanism of spermatogenesis in vivo and in vitro in medaka as an excellent vertebrate model.

  9. Conservation of Domain Structure in a Fast-Evolving Heterochromatic SUUR Protein in Drosophilids

    PubMed Central

    Yurlova, Anna A.; Makunin, Igor V.; Kolesnikova, Tatyana D.; Posukh, Olga V.; Belyaeva, Elena S.; Zhimulev, Igor F.

    2009-01-01

    Different genomic regions replicate at a distinct time during S-phase. The SuUR mutation alters replication timing and the polytenization level of intercalary and pericentric heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland polytene chromosomes. We analyzed SuUR in different insects, identified conserved regions in the protein, substituted conserved amino acid residues, and studied effects of the mutations on SUUR function. SuUR orthologs were identified in all sequenced drosophilids, and a highly divergent ortholog was found in the mosquito genome. We demonstrated that SUUR evolves at very high rate comparable with that of Transformer. Remarkably, upstream ORF within 5′ UTR of the gene is more conserved than SUUR in drosophilids, but it is absent in the mosquito. The domain structure and charge of SUUR are maintained in drosophilids despite the high divergence of the proteins. The N-terminal part of SUUR with similarity to the SNF2/SWI2 proteins displays the highest level of conservation. Mutation of two conserved amino acid residues in this region impairs binding of SUUR to polytene chromosomes and reduces the ability of the protein to cause DNA underreplication. The least conserved middle part of SUUR interacting with HP1 retains positively and negatively charged clusters and nuclear localization signals. The C terminus contains interlacing conserved and variable motifs. Our results suggest that SUUR domains evolve with different rates and patterns but maintain their features. PMID:19596903

  10. Fusion-evaporation residues and α-decay chains of the superheavy element Z=115 formed in the 243Am + 48Ca reaction using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Raj; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2013-05-01

    The decay of the Z=115 superheavy nuclear system, formed in the 243Am+48Ca reaction, is studied by using the dynamical cluster-decay model. The calculated excitation functions of 2n-, 3n-, and 4n-evaporation channels, for the excitation energy range ECN*=31-47 MeV, are compared with the recent experimental data. The deformation effects are included up to β2, within the hot optimum orientation approach, and a comparative analysis of spherical versus static and dynamic deformations is investigated explicitly for the 2n-evaporation residue, as only 2n decay responds to spherical fragments. The 3n and 4n decay cross sections could be fitted only after the inclusion of deformation effects. The variation of preformation probability, barrier penetrability, and barrier modification is investigated in order to extract a better picture of the dynamics involved in the reaction under consideration. It is observed that, for the 3n-evaporation channel, the barrier modification at ECN*=36.15 MeV is the smallest and hence supports the experimental observation of maximum cross section (8.5 pb) at this energy. The role of isospin (N/Z ratio) is also investigated for the decay of various isotopes of Z=115 formed in 48Ca+241,243,245Am reactions. Furthermore, the evaporation cross sections of 2n, 3n, and 4n channels are also estimated at the Bass barrier by interpolating the neck-length parameters fixed in reference to available data at above-barrier energies. Finally, the α-decay chains are analyzed by using the preformed cluster model. It is shown that the present data of α-decay half-lives support “hot” optimum orientations of nuclei, rather than the usual “cold” ones, within a constant empirical factor in penetrability.

  11. Conservation among HSP60 sequences in relation to structure, function, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Brocchieri, L.; Karlin, S.

    2000-01-01

    The chaperonin HSP60 (GroEL) proteins are essential in eubacterial genomes and in eukaryotic organelles. Functional regions inferred from mutation studies and the Escherichia coli GroEL 3D crystal complexes are evaluated in a multiple alignment across 43 diverse HSP60 sequences, centering on ATP/ADP and Mg2+ binding sites, on residues interacting with substrate, on GroES contact positions, on interface regions between monomers and domains, and on residues important in allosteric conformational changes. The most evolutionary conserved residues relate to the ATP/ADP and Mg2+ binding sites. Hydrophobic residues that contribute in substrate binding are also significantly conserved. A large number of charged residues line the central cavity of the GroEL-GroES complex in the substrate-releasing conformation. These span statistically significant intra- and inter-monomer three-dimensional (3D) charge clusters that are highly conserved among sequences and presumably play an important role interacting with the substrate. Unaligned short segments between blocks of alignment are generally exposed at the outside wall of the Anfinsen cage complex. The multiple alignment reveals regions of divergence common to specific evolutionary groups. For example, rickettsial sequences diverge in the ATP/ADP binding domain and gram-positive sequences diverge in the allosteric transition domain. The evolutionary information of the multiple alignment proffers attractive sites for mutational studies. PMID:10752609

  12. High Sequence Conservation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase under Drug Pressure despite the Continuous Appearance of Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Gago, Federico; Santoro, Maria; Gori, Caterina; Svicher, Valentina; Rodríguez-Barrios, Fátima; d'Arrigo, Roberta; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Bertoli, Ada; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Balzarini, Jan; Antinori, Andrea; Perno, Carlo-Federico

    2005-01-01

    To define the extent of sequence conservation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) in vivo, the first 320 amino acids of RT obtained from 2,236 plasma-derived samples from a well-defined cohort of 1,704 HIV-1-infected individuals (457 drug naïve and 1,247 drug treated) were analyzed and examined in structural terms. In naïve patients, 233 out of these 320 residues (73%) were conserved (<1% variability). The majority of invariant amino acids clustered into defined regions comprising between 5 and 29 consecutive residues. Of the nine longest invariant regions identified, some contained residues and domains critical for enzyme stability and function. In patients treated with RT inhibitors, despite profound drug pressure and the appearance of mutations primarily associated with resistance, 202 amino acids (63%) remained highly conserved and appeared mostly distributed in regions of variable length. This finding suggests that participation of consecutive residues in structural domains is strictly required for cooperative functions and sustainability of HIV-1 RT activity. Besides confirming the conservation of amino acids that are already known to be important for catalytic activity, stability of the heterodimer interface, and/or primer/template binding, the other 62 new invariable residues are now identified and mapped onto the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme. This new knowledge could be of help in the structure-based design of novel resistance-evading drugs. PMID:16051864

  13. Residual Cap

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-10

    This MOC image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions

  14. The evolutionary conservation of rps3 introns and rps19-rps3-rpl16 gene cluster in Adiantum capillus-veneris mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bonavita, Savino; Regina, Teresa Maria Rosaria

    2016-02-01

    Ferns are a large and evolutionarily critical group of vascular land plants for which quite limited mitochondrial gene content and genome organization data are, currently, available. This study reports that the gene for the ribosomal protein S3 (rps3) is preserved and physically clustered to an upstream rps19 and a downstream overlapping rpl16 locus in the mitochondrial DNA of the true fern Adiantum capillus-veneris L. Sequence analysis also revealed that the rps3 gene is interrupted by two cis-splicing group II introns, like the counterpart in lycopod and gymnosperm representatives. A preliminary polymerase chain reaction (PCR) survey confirmed a scattered distribution pattern of both the rps3 introns also in other fern lineages. Northern blot and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses demonstrated that the three ribosomal protein genes are co-transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA and modified by RNA editing. Particularly, the U-to-C type editing amends numerous genomic stop codons in the A. capillus-veneris rps19, rps3 and rpl16 sequences, thus, assuring the synthesis of complete and functional polypeptides. Collectively, the findings from this study further expand our knowledge of the mitochondrial rps3 architecture and evolution, also, bridging the significant molecular data gaps across the so far underrepresented ferns and all land plants.

  15. Binding of the Chaperone Jac1 Protein and Cysteine Desulfurase Nfs1 to the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Scaffold Isu Protein Is Mutually Exclusive*

    PubMed Central

    Majewska, Julia; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Schilke, Brenda; Kominek, Jacek; Blenska, Anna; Delewski, Wojciech; Song, Ji-Yoon; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A.; Dutkiewicz, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster proteins requires the interaction of multiple proteins with the highly conserved 14-kDa scaffold protein Isu, on which clusters are built prior to their transfer to recipient proteins. For example, the assembly process requires the cysteine desulfurase Nfs1, which serves as the sulfur donor for cluster assembly. The transfer process requires Jac1, a J-protein Hsp70 cochaperone. We recently identified three residues on the surface of Jac1 that form a hydrophobic patch critical for interaction with Isu. The results of molecular modeling of the Isu1-Jac1 interaction, which was guided by these experimental data and structural/biophysical information available for bacterial homologs, predicted the importance of three hydrophobic residues forming a patch on the surface of Isu1 for interaction with Jac1. Using Isu variants having alterations in residues that form the hydrophobic patch on the surface of Isu, this prediction was experimentally validated by in vitro binding assays. In addition, Nfs1 was found to require the same hydrophobic residues of Isu for binding, as does Jac1, suggesting that Jac1 and Nfs1 binding is mutually exclusive. In support of this conclusion, Jac1 and Nfs1 compete for binding to Isu. Evolutionary analysis revealed that residues involved in these interactions are conserved and that they are critical residues for the biogenesis of Fe/S cluster protein in vivo. We propose that competition between Jac1 and Nfs1 for Isu binding plays an important role in transitioning the Fe/S cluster biogenesis machinery from the cluster assembly step to the Hsp70-mediated transfer of the Fe/S cluster to recipient proteins. PMID:23946486

  16. Binding of the chaperone Jac1 protein and cysteine desulfurase Nfs1 to the iron-sulfur cluster scaffold Isu protein is mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Julia; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schilke, Brenda; Kominek, Jacek; Blenska, Anna; Delewski, Wojciech; Song, Ji-Yoon; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A; Dutkiewicz, Rafal

    2013-10-04

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster proteins requires the interaction of multiple proteins with the highly conserved 14-kDa scaffold protein Isu, on which clusters are built prior to their transfer to recipient proteins. For example, the assembly process requires the cysteine desulfurase Nfs1, which serves as the sulfur donor for cluster assembly. The transfer process requires Jac1, a J-protein Hsp70 cochaperone. We recently identified three residues on the surface of Jac1 that form a hydrophobic patch critical for interaction with Isu. The results of molecular modeling of the Isu1-Jac1 interaction, which was guided by these experimental data and structural/biophysical information available for bacterial homologs, predicted the importance of three hydrophobic residues forming a patch on the surface of Isu1 for interaction with Jac1. Using Isu variants having alterations in residues that form the hydrophobic patch on the surface of Isu, this prediction was experimentally validated by in vitro binding assays. In addition, Nfs1 was found to require the same hydrophobic residues of Isu for binding, as does Jac1, suggesting that Jac1 and Nfs1 binding is mutually exclusive. In support of this conclusion, Jac1 and Nfs1 compete for binding to Isu. Evolutionary analysis revealed that residues involved in these interactions are conserved and that they are critical residues for the biogenesis of Fe/S cluster protein in vivo. We propose that competition between Jac1 and Nfs1 for Isu binding plays an important role in transitioning the Fe/S cluster biogenesis machinery from the cluster assembly step to the Hsp70-mediated transfer of the Fe/S cluster to recipient proteins.

  17. Pseudorabies virus and equine herpesvirus 1 share a nonessential gene which is absent in other herpesviruses and located adjacent to a highly conserved gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, J; Klupp, B G; Mettenleiter, T C

    1995-09-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence and transcriptional pattern of a group of open reading frames in the pseudorabies virus (PrV) genome located near the left end of the unique long region within BamHI 5' fragment at map positions 0.01 to 0.06. The 7,412-bp BamHI 5' fragment was found to contain five complete open reading frames and part of a sixth whose deduced amino acid sequences showed homology to the UL50 (partial), UL51, UL52, UL53, and UL54 gene products of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and corresponding genes identified in other alphaherpesviruses. Homologs to the UL55 and UL56 genes of HSV-1 were not detected. However, we identified a gene with homology only to the first open reading frame (ORF-1) of the equine herpesvirus 1 strain Ab4 (E. A. Telford, M. S. Watson, K. McBride, and A. J. Davison, Virology 189:304-316, 1992). Northern blot analyses revealed unique mRNAs for the UL51, UL54, and ORF-1 genes and a set of 3'-coterminal mRNAs for the UL52 to UL54 genes. A PrV mutant lacking ORF-1 was isolated after deletion of ORF-1 coding sequences and insertion of a lacZ expression cassette. The ORF-1- PrV mutant was able to productively replicate in noncomplementing cells to levels similar to those of wild-type PrV, proving that ORF-1 is not essential for replication of PrV in cell culture. The conservation of this gene between PrV and equine herpesvirus 1 documents the close evolutionary relationship between these animal herpesviruses and points to a possible function of the respective proteins in infection of the natural host.

  18. Pseudorabies virus and equine herpesvirus 1 share a nonessential gene which is absent in other herpesviruses and located adjacent to a highly conserved gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Baumeister, J; Klupp, B G; Mettenleiter, T C

    1995-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence and transcriptional pattern of a group of open reading frames in the pseudorabies virus (PrV) genome located near the left end of the unique long region within BamHI 5' fragment at map positions 0.01 to 0.06. The 7,412-bp BamHI 5' fragment was found to contain five complete open reading frames and part of a sixth whose deduced amino acid sequences showed homology to the UL50 (partial), UL51, UL52, UL53, and UL54 gene products of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and corresponding genes identified in other alphaherpesviruses. Homologs to the UL55 and UL56 genes of HSV-1 were not detected. However, we identified a gene with homology only to the first open reading frame (ORF-1) of the equine herpesvirus 1 strain Ab4 (E. A. Telford, M. S. Watson, K. McBride, and A. J. Davison, Virology 189:304-316, 1992). Northern blot analyses revealed unique mRNAs for the UL51, UL54, and ORF-1 genes and a set of 3'-coterminal mRNAs for the UL52 to UL54 genes. A PrV mutant lacking ORF-1 was isolated after deletion of ORF-1 coding sequences and insertion of a lacZ expression cassette. The ORF-1- PrV mutant was able to productively replicate in noncomplementing cells to levels similar to those of wild-type PrV, proving that ORF-1 is not essential for replication of PrV in cell culture. The conservation of this gene between PrV and equine herpesvirus 1 documents the close evolutionary relationship between these animal herpesviruses and points to a possible function of the respective proteins in infection of the natural host. PMID:7637001

  19. Sirtuin/Sir2 Phylogeny, Evolutionary Considerations and Structural Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Greiss, Sebastian; Gartner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    The sirtuins are a protein family named after the first identified member, S. cerevisiae Sir2p. Sirtuins are protein deacetylases whose activity is dependent on NAD+ as a cosubstrate. They are structurally defined by two central domains that together form a highly conserved catalytic center, which catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl moiety from acetyllysine to NAD+, yielding nicotinamide, the unique metabolite O-acetyl-ADP-ribose and deacetylated lysine. One or more sirtuins are present in virtually all species from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of sirtuins. Based on their phylogenetic relationship, sirtuins can be grouped into over a dozen classes and subclasses. Humans, like most vertebrates, have seven sirtuins: SIRT1-SIRT7. These function in diverse cellular pathways, regulating transcriptional repression, aging, metabolism, DNA damage responses and apoptosis. We show that these seven sirtuins arose early during animal evolution. Conserved residues cluster around the catalytic center of known sirtuin family members. PMID:19936627

  20. Collections Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, Robert

    Collections conservation is an approach to the preservation treatment of books and book-like materials that is conceptualized and organized in terms of large groups of materials. This guide is intended to enable a library to evaluate its current collections conservation activities. The introduction describes collections conservation and gives…

  1. Iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Aaron P.; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2013-01-01

    Iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis requires coordinated delivery of iron and sulphur to scaffold proteins, followed by transfer of the assembled clusters from scaffold proteins to target proteins. This complex process is accomplished by a group of dedicated iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins that are conserved from bacteria to humans. While sulphur in iron-sulphur clusters is provided by L-cysteine via cysteine desulfurase, the iron donor(s) for iron-sulphur cluster assembly remains largely elusive. Here we report that among the primary iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins, IscA has a unique and strong binding activity for mononuclear iron in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the ferric iron centre tightly bound in IscA can be readily extruded by L-cysteine, followed by reduction to ferrous iron for iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis. Substitution of the highly conserved residue tyrosine 40 with phenylalanine (Y40F) in IscA results in a mutant protein that has a diminished iron binding affinity but retains the iron-sulphur cluster binding activity. Genetic complementation studies show that the IscA Y40F mutant is inactive in vivo, suggesting that the iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis. PMID:23258274

  2. Iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Landry, Aaron P; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2013-03-07

    Iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis requires coordinated delivery of iron and sulphur to scaffold proteins, followed by transfer of the assembled clusters from scaffold proteins to target proteins. This complex process is accomplished by a group of dedicated iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins that are conserved from bacteria to humans. While sulphur in iron-sulphur clusters is provided by L-cysteine via cysteine desulfurase, the iron donor(s) for iron-sulphur cluster assembly remains largely elusive. Here we report that among the primary iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins, IscA has a unique and strong binding activity for mononuclear iron in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the ferric iron centre tightly bound in IscA can be readily extruded by l-cysteine, followed by reduction to ferrous iron for iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis. Substitution of the highly conserved residue tyrosine 40 with phenylalanine (Y40F) in IscA results in a mutant protein that has a diminished iron binding affinity but retains the iron-sulphur cluster binding activity. Genetic complementation studies show that the IscA Y40F mutant is inactive in vivo, suggesting that the iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis.

  3. Cluster bulleticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure the signal in hydrodynamical simulations. The phase space of substructure orbits also exhibits symmetries that provide an equivalent control test. Any detection of bulleticity in real data would indicate a difference in the interaction cross-sections of baryonic and dark matter that may rule out hypotheses of non-particulate dark matter that are otherwise able to model individual systems. A subsequent measurement of bulleticity could constrain the dark matter cross-section. Even with conservative estimates, the existing Hubble Space Telescope archive should yield an independent constraint tighter than that from the bullet cluster. This technique is then trivially extendable to and benefits enormously from larger, future surveys.

  4. Acquisition and Evolution of Plant Pathogenesis–Associated Gene Clusters and Candidate Determinants of Tissue-Specificity in Xanthomonas

    PubMed Central

    Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; White, Frank F.; Ryan, Robert P.; Dow, J. Maxwell; Rabinowicz, Pablo; Salzberg, Steven L.; Leach, Jan E.; Sonti, Ramesh; Brendel, Volker; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Xanthomonas is a large genus of plant-associated and plant-pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, members cause diseases on over 392 plant species. Individually, they exhibit marked host- and tissue-specificity. The determinants of this specificity are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess potential contributions to host- and tissue-specificity, pathogenesis-associated gene clusters were compared across genomes of eight Xanthomonas strains representing vascular or non-vascular pathogens of rice, brassicas, pepper and tomato, and citrus. The gum cluster for extracellular polysaccharide is conserved except for gumN and sequences downstream. The xcs and xps clusters for type II secretion are conserved, except in the rice pathogens, in which xcs is missing. In the otherwise conserved hrp cluster, sequences flanking the core genes for type III secretion vary with respect to insertion sequence element and putative effector gene content. Variation at the rpf (regulation of pathogenicity factors) cluster is more pronounced, though genes with established functional relevance are conserved. A cluster for synthesis of lipopolysaccharide varies highly, suggesting multiple horizontal gene transfers and reassortments, but this variation does not correlate with host- or tissue-specificity. Phylogenetic trees based on amino acid alignments of gum, xps, xcs, hrp, and rpf cluster products generally reflect strain phylogeny. However, amino acid residues at four positions correlate with tissue specificity, revealing hpaA and xpsD as candidate determinants. Examination of genome sequences of xanthomonads Xylella fastidiosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia revealed that the hrp, gum, and xcs clusters are recent acquisitions in the Xanthomonas lineage. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide insight into the ancestral Xanthomonas genome and indicate that differentiation with respect to host- and tissue-specificity involved not major modifications or wholesale

  5. Evidence for a Proton Transfer Network and a Required Persulfide-Bond-Forming Cysteine Residue in Ni-Containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Eun Jin Kim; Jian Feng; Matthew R. Bramlett; Paul A. Lindahl

    2004-05-18

    OAK-B135 Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Moorella thermoacetica catalyzes the reversible oxidation of CO to CO2 at a nickel-iron-sulfur active-site called the C-cluster. Mutants of a proposed proton transfer pathway and of a cysteine residue recently found to form a persulfide bond with the C-cluster were characterized. Four semi-conserved histidine residues were individually mutated to alanine. His116 and His122 were essential to catalysis, while His113 and His119 attenuated catalysis but were not essential. Significant activity was ''rescued'' by a double mutant where His116 was replaced by Ala and His was also introduced at position 115. Activity was also rescued in double mutants where His122 was replaced by Ala and His was simultaneously introduced at either position 121 or 123. Activity was also ''rescued'' by replacing His with Cys at position 116. Mutation of conserved Lys587 near the C-cluster attenuated activity but did not eliminate it. Activity was virtually abolished in a double mutant where Lys587 and His113 were both changed to Ala. Mutations of conserved Asn284 also attenuated activity. These effects suggest the presence of a network of amino acid residues responsible for proton transfer rather than a single linear pathway. The Ser mutant of the persulfide-forming Cys316 was essentially inactive and displayed no EPR signals originating from the C-cluster. Electronic absorption and metal analysis suggests that the C-cluster is absent in this mutant. The persulfide bond appears to be essential for either the assembly or stability of the C-cluster, and/or for eliciting the redox chemistry of the C-cluster required for catalytic activity.

  6. Cancer Clusters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Clusters On This Page What is a cancer cluster? ... the number of cancer cases in the suspected cluster Many reported clusters include too few cancer cases ...

  7. Chloroplast HCF101 is a scaffold protein for [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schwenkert, Serena; Netz, Daili J. A.; Frazzon, Jeverson; Pierik, Antonio J.; Bill, Eckhard; Gross, Jeferson; Lill, Roland; Meurer, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving chloroplasts possess their own iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins including members of the SUF (sulfur mobilization) and the NFU family. Recently, the chloroplast protein HCF101 (high chlorophyll fluorescence 101) has been shown to be essential for the accumulation of the membrane complex Photosystem I and the soluble ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductases, both containing [4Fe-4S] clusters. The protein belongs to the FSC-NTPase ([4Fe-4S]-cluster-containing P-loop NTPase) superfamily, several members of which play a crucial role in Fe/S cluster biosynthesis. Although the C-terminal ISC-binding site, conserved in other members of the FSC-NTPase family, is not present in chloroplast HCF101 homologues using Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopy, we provide evidence that HCF101 binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster. 55Fe incorporation studies of mitochondrially targeted HCF101 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed the assembly of an Fe/S cluster in HCF101 in an Nfs1-dependent manner. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three HCF101-specific cysteine residues required for assembly and/or stability of the cluster. We further demonstrate that the reconstituted cluster is transiently bound and can be transferred from HCF101 to a [4Fe-4S] apoprotein. Together, our findings suggest that HCF101 may serve as a chloroplast scaffold protein that specifically assembles [4Fe-4S] clusters and transfers them to the chloroplast membrane and soluble target proteins. PMID:19817716

  8. Copper binding in IscA inhibits iron-sulfur cluster assembly in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Zishuo; Pang, Yilin; Landry, Aaron P.; Li, Jianghui; Lu, Jianxin; Ding, Huangen

    2014-01-01

    Among the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins encoded by gene cluster iscSUA-hscBA-fdx in Escherichia coli, IscA has a unique and strong iron binding activity and can provide iron for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in proteins in vitro. Deletion of IscA and its paralogue SufA results in an E. coli mutant that fails to assemble [4Fe-4S] clusters in proteins under aerobic conditions, suggesting that IscA has a crucial role for iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. Here we report that among the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins, IscA also has a strong and specific binding activity for Cu(I) in vivo and in vitro. The Cu(I) center in IscA is stable and resistant to oxidation under aerobic conditions. Mutation of the conserved cysteine residues that are essential for the iron binding in IscA abolishes the copper binding activity, indicating that copper and iron may share the same binding site in the protein. Additional studies reveal that copper can compete with iron for the metal binding site in IscA and effectively inhibits the IscA-mediated [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly in E. coli cells. The results suggest that copper may not only attack the [4Fe-4S] clusters in dehydratases, but also block the [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly in proteins by targeting IscA in cells. PMID:24946160

  9. Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt, Bryce; Christensen, Steven M.

    In the case of the free particle, we interpreted various components of the energy-momentum-stress density as fluxes of energy and momentum. This interpretation can obviously be extended also to particle ensembles and gases. When we speak of fluxes we usually think of quantities that are conserved. In special relativity, energy and momentum are conserved. In general relativity, they are no longer generally conserved, at least if we do not include the energy and momentum of the gravitational field itself. Nevertheless, their densities and fluxes satisfy a covariant generalization of a true conservation law, which is quite easy to obtain.

  10. Discovering key residues of dengue virus NS2b-NS3-protease: New binding sites for antiviral inhibitors design.

    PubMed

    Aguilera-Pesantes, D; Robayo, L E; Méndez, P E; Mollocana, D; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Torres, F J; Méndez, M A

    2017-03-23

    The NS2B-NS3 protease is essential for the Dengue Virus (DENV) replication process. This complex constitutes a target for efficient antiviral discovery because a drug could inhibit the viral polyprotein processing. Furthermore, since the protease is highly conserved between the four Dengue virus serotypes, it is probable that a drug would be equally effective against all of them. In this article, a strategy is reported that allowed us to identify influential residues on the function of the Dengue NS2b-NS3 Protease. Moreover, this is a strategy that could be applied to virtually any protein for the search of alternative influential residues, and for non-competitive inhibitor development. First, we incorporated several features derived from computational alanine scanning mutagenesis, sequence, structure conservation, and other structure-based characteristics. Second, these features were used as variables to obtain a multilayer perceptron model to identify defined groups (clusters) of key residues as possible candidate pockets for binding sites of new leads on the DENV protease. The identified residues included: i) amino acids close to the beta sheet-loop-beta sheet known to be important in its closed conformation for NS2b ii) residues close to the active site, iii) several residues evenly spread on the NS2b-NS3 contact surface, and iv) some inner residues most likely related to the overall stability of the protease. In addition, we found concordance on our list of residues with previously identified amino acids part of a highly conserved peptide studied for vaccine development.

  11. Subspace K-means clustering.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Marieke E; Ceulemans, Eva; De Roover, Kim; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2013-12-01

    To achieve an insightful clustering of multivariate data, we propose subspace K-means. Its central idea is to model the centroids and cluster residuals in reduced spaces, which allows for dealing with a wide range of cluster types and yields rich interpretations of the clusters. We review the existing related clustering methods, including deterministic, stochastic, and unsupervised learning approaches. To evaluate subspace K-means, we performed a comparative simulation study, in which we manipulated the overlap of subspaces, the between-cluster variance, and the error variance. The study shows that the subspace K-means algorithm is sensitive to local minima but that the problem can be reasonably dealt with by using partitions of various cluster procedures as a starting point for the algorithm. Subspace K-means performs very well in recovering the true clustering across all conditions considered and appears to be superior to its competitor methods: K-means, reduced K-means, factorial K-means, mixtures of factor analyzers (MFA), and MCLUST. The best competitor method, MFA, showed a performance similar to that of subspace K-means in easy conditions but deteriorated in more difficult ones. Using data from a study on parental behavior, we show that subspace K-means analysis provides a rich insight into the cluster characteristics, in terms of both the relative positions of the clusters (via the centroids) and the shape of the clusters (via the within-cluster residuals).

  12. β-Amyrin synthase from Euphorbia tirucalli L. functional analyses of the highly conserved aromatic residues Phe413, Tyr259 and Trp257 disclose the importance of the appropriate steric bulk, and cation-π and CH-π interactions for the efficient catalytic action of the polyolefin cyclization cascade.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryousuke; Nakada, Chika; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2016-12-20

    Many of the functions of the active site residues in β-amyrin synthase and its catalytic mechanism remain unclear. Herein, we examined the functions of the highly conserved Phe413, Tyr259, and Trp257 residues in the β-amyrin synthase of Euphorbia tirucalli. The site-specific mutants F416V and F416M showed nearly the same enzymatic activities as the wild type, indicating that π-electrons are not needed for the catalytic reaction. However, the F416A mutant yielded a large amount of the tetracyclic dammarane skeleton, with decreased production of β-amyrin. This indicates that the Phe416 residue is located near the D-ring formation site and works to position the oxidosqualene substrate correctly within the reaction cavity. On the other hand, the major catalysis-related function of the Tyr259 and Trp257 residues is to yield their π-electrons to the cationic intermediates. The Y259F variant showed nearly equivalent activity to that of the wild type, but aliphatic mutants such as the Ala, Val, and Leu variants showed significantly decreased the activity and yielded the tetracyclic dammarane scaffold, strongly demonstrating that the Tyr259 residue stabilizes the baccharenyl secondary cation via cation-π interaction. The aliphatic variants of Trp257 exhibited remarkably decreased enzymatic activity, and lupeol was produced in a high production ratio, indicating that Trp257 stabilizes the oleanyl cation via cation-π interaction. The aromatic Phe and Tyr mutants exhibited high activities owing to their more increased π-electron density relative to that of the aliphatic mutants, but lupeol was produced in a significantly high yield besides β-amyrin. The Trp residue is likely to be responsible for the robust binding of Me-30 through CH-π interaction. The decreased π-electron density of the Phe and Tyr mutants compared to that of Trp would have resulted in the high production of lupeol.

  13. Conservation Tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Maurice R.; Daniel, Tommy C.; Schweizer, Edward E.; Allmaras, Raymond R.

    1985-11-01

    Conservation production systems combine tillage and planting practices to reduce soil erosion and loss of water from farmland. Successful conservation tillage practices depend on the ability of farm managers to integrate sound crop production practices with effective pest management systems. More scientific information is needed to determine the relations between tillage practices and physical, chemical, and biological soil factors that affect plant and pest ecology. There is a need to devise improved pest management strategies for conservation tillage and to better understand the impact of conservation tillage on water quality, especially as it is related to use of agricultural chemicals. While savings in fuel, labor, and soil have induced many farmers to adopt conservation tillage, improved methods and equipment should increase adoption even more.

  14. The evolutionary origins and catalytic importance of conserved electrostatic networks within TIM-barrel proteins.

    PubMed

    Livesay, Dennis R; La, David

    2005-05-01

    Conservation of function is the basic tenet of protein evolution. Conservation of key electrostatic properties is a frequently employed mechanism that leads to conserved function. In a previous report, we identified several conserved electrostatic properties in four protein families and one functionally diverse enzyme superfamily. In this report, we demonstrate the evolutionary and catalytic importance of electrostatic networks in three ubiquitous metabolic enzymes: triosephosphate isomerase, enolase, and transaldolase. Evolutionary importance is demonstrated using phylogenetic motifs (sequence fragments that parallel the overall familial phylogeny). Phylogenetic motifs frequently correspond to both catalytic residues and conserved interactions that fine-tune catalytic residue pKa values. Further, in the case of triosephosphate isomerase, quantitative differences in the catalytic Glu169 pKa values parallel subfamily differentiation. Finally, phylogenetic motifs are shown to structurally cluster around the active sites of eight different TIM-barrel families. Depending upon the mechanistic requisites of each reaction catalyzed, interruptions to the canonical fold may or may not be identified as phylogenetic motifs.

  15. Evaporation residue cross-section in the decay of 254No* formed in 206Pb + 48Ca and its isotopic dependence using other Pb targets within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyti; Gupta, Raj K.; Hess, Peter Otto

    2015-06-01

    The dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), with deformation and orientation effects included, is used to calculate the fusion evaporation residue cross-sections σxn for x = 1, 2, 3 and 4 neutrons emission in a fusion reaction 206Pb + 48Ca → 254No* at various 48Ca-beam energies Elab = 212.7- 242.5 MeV (equivalently, E* = 19.8- 43.9 MeV). Considering the higher multipole deformations up to hexadecapole deformation β4i and the sticking moment-of-inertia IS, the DCM with pocket formula for nuclear proximity potential is shown to give a good description of the measured individual light-particle (here neutrons) decay channels for configurations of "hot, compact" orientations θci, within one parameter fitting of the neck-length ΔR. A check on some of the variables involved in DCM shows that (i) spherical configurations give nearly the same result as above for deformed and oriented ones; (ii) the non-sticking moment-of-inertia INS gives unphysical results; and (iii) configurations of "cold, elongated" orientations do not fit the data at all. Furthermore, for the four different isotopes of 204,206,207,208Pb-based reactions, the dependence of, say, the 2n-emission yield σ2n on the isotopic composition of the compound nucleus is also studied within the DCM for "hot" fusion process. Of all the four Pb-isotopes and three excitation energies E* considered, at each E*, the ΔR is largest for compound system 256No*, followed by 255No*, 254No* and smallest for 252No*, which means to suggest that the neutrons emission occur earliest for 256No*, then for 255No*, 254No* and finally by 252No*, in complete agreement with experimental data according to which compound system 256No* has the highest cross-section and 252No* the lowest with 255No* and 254No* lying in between. This result is related to the double magicity of both the target (208Pb) and projectile (48Ca) nuclei, as well as to the experimentally known result of projectile with a larger number of neutrons (here the target

  16. Basic residues within the ebolavirus VP35 protein are required for its viral polymerase cofactor function.

    PubMed

    Prins, Kathleen C; Binning, Jennifer M; Shabman, Reed S; Leung, Daisy W; Amarasinghe, Gaya K; Basler, Christopher F

    2010-10-01

    The ebolavirus (EBOV) VP35 protein binds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), inhibits host alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) production, and is an essential component of the viral polymerase complex. Structural studies of the VP35 C-terminal IFN inhibitory domain (IID) identified specific structural features, including a central basic patch and a hydrophobic pocket, that are important for dsRNA binding and IFN inhibition. Several other conserved basic residues bordering the central basic patch and a separate cluster of basic residues, called the first basic patch, were also identified. Functional analysis of alanine substitution mutants indicates that basic residues outside the central basic patch are not required for dsRNA binding or for IFN inhibition. However, minigenome assays, which assess viral RNA polymerase complex function, identified these other basic residues to be critical for viral RNA synthesis. Of these, a subset located within the first basic patch is important for VP35-nucleoprotein (NP) interaction, as evidenced by the inability of alanine substitution mutants to coimmunoprecipitate with NP. Therefore, first basic patch residues are likely critical for replication complex formation through interactions with NP. Coimmunoprecipitation studies further demonstrate that the VP35 IID is sufficient to interact with NP and that dsRNA can modulate VP35 IID interactions with NP. Other basic residue mutations that disrupt the VP35 polymerase cofactor function do not affect interaction with NP or with the amino terminus of the viral polymerase. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of conserved basic residues from the EBOV VP35 C-terminal IID and validate the VP35 IID as a potential therapeutic target.

  17. Characterization of the [2Fe-2S] cluster of the Escherichia coli transcription factor IscR†

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhacker, Angela S.; Stubna, Audria; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Guo, Yisong; Teter, Sarah J.; Rose, Justin C.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Markley, John L.; Münck, Eckard; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    IscR is a Fe-S cluster-containing transcription factor involved in a homeostatic mechanism that controls Fe-S cluster biogenesis in Escherichia coli. Although IscR has been proposed to act as a sensor of the cellular demands for Fe-S cluster biogenesis, the mechanism by which IscR performs this function is not known. In this study, we investigated the biochemical properties of the Fe-S cluster of IscR to gain insight into the proposed sensing activity. Mössbauer studies revealed that IscR contains predominantly a reduced [2Fe-2S]1+ cluster in vivo. However, upon anaerobic isolation of IscR some clusters became oxidized to the [2Fe-2S]2+ form. Cluster oxidation did not, however, alter the affinity of IscR for its binding site within the iscR promoter in vitro, indicating that cluster oxidation state is not important for regulation of DNA binding. Furthermore, characterization of anaerobically isolated IscR using resonance Raman, Mössbauer, and NMR spectroscopies leads to the proposal that the [2Fe-2S] cluster does not have full cysteinyl ligation. Mutagenesis studies indicate that, in addition to the three previously identified cysteine residues (Cys92, Cys98, and Cys104), the highly conserved residue His107 is essential for cluster ligation. Thus, these data suggest that IscR binds the cluster with an atypical ligation scheme of three cysteines and one histidine, a feature that may be relevant to the proposed function of IscR as a sensor of cellular Fe-S cluster status. PMID:22583201

  18. DR_bind: a web server for predicting DNA-binding residues from the protein structure based on electrostatics, evolution and geometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao Chi; Wright, Jon D; Lim, Carmay

    2012-07-01

    DR_bind is a web server that automatically predicts DNA-binding residues, given the respective protein structure based on (i) electrostatics, (ii) evolution and (iii) geometry. In contrast to machine-learning methods, DR_bind does not require a training data set or any parameters. It predicts DNA-binding residues by detecting a cluster of conserved, solvent-accessible residues that are electrostatically stabilized upon mutation to Asp(-)/Glu(-). The server requires as input the DNA-binding protein structure in PDB format and outputs a downloadable text file of the predicted DNA-binding residues, a 3D visualization of the predicted residues highlighted in the given protein structure, and a downloadable PyMol script for visualization of the results. Calibration on 83 and 55 non-redundant DNA-bound and DNA-free protein structures yielded a DNA-binding residue prediction accuracy/precision of 90/47% and 88/42%, respectively. Since DR_bind does not require any training using protein-DNA complex structures, it may predict DNA-binding residues in novel structures of DNA-binding proteins resulting from structural genomics projects with no conservation data. The DR_bind server is freely available with no login requirement at http://dnasite.limlab.ibms.sinica.edu.tw.

  19. Molecular mediators for raft-dependent endocytosis of syndecan-1, a highly conserved, multifunctional receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keyang; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2013-05-17

    Endocytosis via rafts has attracted considerable recent interest, but the molecular mediators remain incompletely characterized. Here, we focused on the syndecan-1 heparan sulfate proteoglycan, a highly conserved, multifunctional receptor that we previously showed to undergo raft-dependent endocytosis upon clustering. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of three to five consecutive cytoplasmic residues at a time revealed that a conserved juxtamembrane motif, MKKK, was the only region required for efficient endocytosis after clustering. Endocytosis of clustered syndecan-1 occurs in two phases, each requiring a kinase and a corresponding cytoskeletal partner. In the initial phase, ligands trigger rapid MKKK-dependent activation of ERK and the localization of syndecan-1 into rafts. Activation of ERK drives the dissociation of syndecan-1 from α-tubulin, a molecule that may act as an anchor for syndecan-1 at the plasma membrane in the basal state. In the second phase, Src family kinases phosphorylate tyrosyl residues within the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of syndecan-1, a process that also requires MKKK. Tyrosine phosphorylation of syndecan-1 triggers the robust recruitment of cortactin, which we found to be an essential mediator of efficient actin-dependent endocytosis. These findings represent the first detailed characterization of the molecular events that drive endocytosis of a raft-dependent receptor and identify a novel endocytic motif, MKKK. Moreover, the results provide new tools to study syndecan function and regulation during uptake of its biologically and medically important ligands, such as HIV-1, atherogenic postprandial remnant lipoproteins, and molecules implicated in Alzheimer disease.

  20. Conservation Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students teach about the importance of recycling and conservation by presenting demonstrations. Includes demonstrations on water, plastic, and other recycling products such as steel. (YDS)

  1. Energy Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelson, Philip H.

    1972-01-01

    Comments on The Potential for Energy Conservation,'' a study by the Office of Emergency Preparedness, emphasizing the coming dependence on foreign oil, and presses for government influence to encourage development of more efficient cars. (AL)

  2. Conservation Agriculture in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation agriculture (CA) is a production paradigm that groups reduced tillage, mulching with crop residues or cover crops, and diversified crop rotations, especially those that incorporate leguminous crops. In North America, reduced tillage is the most widely-adopted practice that seeks the ide...

  3. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  4. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  5. Structural Basis of Human Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency: Mutation E104D is Related to Alterations of a Conserved Water Network at the Dimer Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Almazan, Claudia; Arreola, Rodrigo; Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Aguirre-Lopez, Beatriz; Gomez-Puyou, Marietta Tuena de; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Costas, Miguel; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2010-01-07

    Human triosephosphate isomerase deficiency is a rare autosomal disease that causes premature death of homozygous individuals. The most frequent mutation that leads to this illness is in position 104, which involves a conservative change of a Glu for Asp. Despite the extensive work that has been carried out on the E104D mutant enzyme in hemolysates and whole cells, the molecular basis of this disease is poorly understood. Here, we show that the purified, recombinant mutant enzyme E104D, while exhibiting normal catalytic activity, shows impairments in the formation of active dimers and low thermostability and monomerizes under conditions in which the wild type retains its dimeric form. The crystal structure of the E104D mutant at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution showed that its global structure was similar to that of the wild type; however, residue 104 is part of a conserved cluster of 10 residues, five from each subunit. An analysis of the available high resolution structures of TIM dimers revealed that this cluster forms a cavity that possesses an elaborate conserved network of buried water molecules that bridge the two subunits. In the E104D mutant, a disruption of contacts of the amino acid side chains in the conserved cluster leads to a perturbation of the water network in which the water-protein and water-water interactions that join the two monomers are significantly weakened and diminished. Thus, the disruption of this solvent system would stand as the underlying cause of the deficiency.

  6. Structural basis of human triosephosphate isomerase deficiency: mutation E104D is related to alterations of a conserved water network at the dimer interface.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Arreola, Rodrigo; Rodríguez-Larrea, David; Aguirre-López, Beatriz; de Gómez-Puyou, Marietta Tuena; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Costas, Miguel; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2008-08-22

    Human triosephosphate isomerase deficiency is a rare autosomal disease that causes premature death of homozygous individuals. The most frequent mutation that leads to this illness is in position 104, which involves a conservative change of a Glu for Asp. Despite the extensive work that has been carried out on the E104D mutant enzyme in hemolysates and whole cells, the molecular basis of this disease is poorly understood. Here, we show that the purified, recombinant mutant enzyme E104D, while exhibiting normal catalytic activity, shows impairments in the formation of active dimers and low thermostability and monomerizes under conditions in which the wild type retains its dimeric form. The crystal structure of the E104D mutant at 1.85 A resolution showed that its global structure was similar to that of the wild type; however, residue 104 is part of a conserved cluster of 10 residues, five from each subunit. An analysis of the available high resolution structures of TIM dimers revealed that this cluster forms a cavity that possesses an elaborate conserved network of buried water molecules that bridge the two subunits. In the E104D mutant, a disruption of contacts of the amino acid side chains in the conserved cluster leads to a perturbation of the water network in which the water-protein and water-water interactions that join the two monomers are significantly weakened and diminished. Thus, the disruption of this solvent system would stand as the underlying cause of the deficiency.

  7. Residual Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions. The variation in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors including, but not limited to, varying proportions of dust and solid carbon dioxide, undulating topography, and differences in the roughness of the slopes versus the flat surfaces.

    Location near: 86.7oS, 343.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  8. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  9. Conservation endocrinology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, Stephen; Romero, L. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Endocrinologists can make significant contributions to conservation biology by helping to understand the mechanisms by which organisms cope with changing environments. Field endocrine techniques have advanced rapidly in recent years and can provide substantial information on the growth, stress, and reproductive status of individual animals, thereby providing insight into current and future responses of populations to changes in the environment. Environmental stressors and reproductive status can be detected nonlethally by measuring a number of endocrine-related endpoints, including steroids in plasma, living and nonliving tissue, urine, and feces. Information on the environmental or endocrine requirements of individual species for normal growth, development, and reproduction will provide critical information for species and ecosystem conservation. For many taxa, basic information on endocrinology is lacking, and advances in conservation endocrinology will require approaches that are both “basic” and “applied” and include integration of laboratory and field approaches.

  10. Identification of kinetically hot residues in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Demirel, M. C.; Atilgan, A. R.; Jernigan, R. L.; Erman, B.; Bahar, I.

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent studies called attention to the presence of kinetically important residues underlying the formation and stabilization of folding nuclei in proteins, and to the possible existence of a correlation between conserved residues and those participating in the folding nuclei. Here, we use the Gaussian network model (GNM), which recently proved useful in describing the dynamic characteristics of proteins for identifying the kinetically hot residues in folded structures. These are the residues involved in the highest frequency fluctuations near the native state coordinates. Their high frequency is a manifestation of the steepness of the energy landscape near their native state positions. The theory is applied to a series of proteins whose kinetically important residues have been extensively explored: chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, cytochrome c, and related C2 proteins. Most of the residues previously pointed out to underlie the folding process of these proteins, and to be critically important for the stabilization of the tertiary fold, are correctly identified, indicating a correlation between the kinetic hot spots and the early forming structural elements in proteins. Additionally, a strong correlation between kinetically hot residues and loci of conserved residues is observed. Finally, residues that may be important for the stability of the tertiary structure of CheY are proposed. PMID:9865946

  11. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  12. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  13. Marketing Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, William B.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986, Northeast Utilities began helping shool administrators combat school building energy wastage through a program called Energy Alliance. The typical school can reduce its energy bill by 30 percent by adopting a wide range of conservation measures, including cogeneration, relamping, and energy audits. (MLH)

  14. Lighting Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Frank D.

    1975-01-01

    With the energy crisis has come an awareness of wasteful consumption practices. One area where research is being done is in lighting conservation. Information in this article is concerned with finding more effective and efficient lighting designs which include daylight utilization, task-oriented lighting, and lighting controls. (MA)

  15. Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Amy A.

    This selection of class activities involves a sequence of 10 class sessions. The goal of the collection is to aid students in learning the concepts of energy conservation and to put this knowledge into practice. Attention is also given to the development of alternate energy sources. Each lesson includes an activity title, motivational hints,…

  16. Colorful Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Some people only think about conservation on Earth Day. Being in the "art business" however, this author is always conscious of the many products she thinks get wasted when they could be reused, recycled, and restored--especially in a school building and art room. In this article, she describes an art lesson that allows students to paint…

  17. Colorful Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Some people only think about conservation on Earth Day. Being in the "art business" however, this author is always conscious of the many products she thinks get wasted when they could be reused, recycled, and restored--especially in a school building and art room. In this article, she describes an art lesson that allows students to paint…

  18. Universal partitioning of the hierarchical fold network of 50-residue segments in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun-ichi; Sonobe, Yuki; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Tomii, Kentaro; Higo, Junichi

    2009-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that protein fold space is structured hierarchically and that power-law statistics are satisfied in relation between the numbers of protein families and protein folds (or superfamilies). We examined the internal structure and statistics in the fold space of 50 amino-acid residue segments taken from various protein folds. We used inter-residue contact patterns to measure the tertiary structural similarity among segments. Using this similarity measure, the segments were classified into a number (Kc) of clusters. We examined various Kc values for the clustering. The special resolution to differentiate the segment tertiary structures increases with increasing Kc. Furthermore, we constructed networks by linking structurally similar clusters. Results The network was partitioned persistently into four regions for Kc ≥ 1000. This main partitioning is consistent with results of earlier studies, where similar partitioning was reported in classifying protein domain structures. Furthermore, the network was partitioned naturally into several dozens of sub-networks (i.e., communities). Therefore, intra-sub-network clusters were mutually connected with numerous links, although inter-sub-network ones were rarely done with few links. For Kc ≥ 1000, the major sub-networks were about 40; the contents of the major sub-networks were conserved. This sub-partitioning is a novel finding, suggesting that the network is structured hierarchically: Segments construct a cluster, clusters form a sub-network, and sub-networks constitute a region. Additionally, the network was characterized by non-power-law statistics, which is also a novel finding. Conclusion Main findings are: (1) The universe of 50 residue segments found here was characterized by non-power-law statistics. Therefore, the universe differs from those ever reported for the protein domains. (2) The 50-residue segments were partitioned persistently and universally into some dozens (ca

  19. FeoC from Klebsiella pneumoniae Contains a [4Fe-4S] Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Yu, Liang-Kun; Chen, Yung-Han; Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Ke, Shyue-chu; Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for pathogen survival, virulence, and colonization. Feo is suggested to function as the ferrous iron (Fe2+) transporter. The enterobacterial Feo system is composed of 3 proteins: FeoB is the indispensable component and is a large membrane protein likely to function as a permease; FeoA is a small Src homology 3 (SH3) domain protein that interacts with FeoB; FeoC is a winged-helix protein containing 4 conserved Cys residues in a sequence suitable for harboring a putative iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster. The presence of an iron-sulfur cluster on FeoC has never been shown experimentally. We report that under anaerobic conditions, the recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae FeoC (KpFeoC) exhibited hyperfine-shifted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and a UV-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance spectrum characteristic of a paramagnetic center. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results were consistent only with the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Substituting the cysteinyl sulfur with oxygen resulted in significantly reduced cluster stability, establishing the roles of these cysteines as the ligands for the Fe-S cluster. When exposed to oxygen, the [4Fe-4S] cluster degraded to [3Fe-4S] and eventually disappeared. We propose that KpFeoC may regulate the function of the Feo transporter through the oxygen- or iron-sensitive coordination of the Fe-S cluster. PMID:23955005

  20. Two aspartic acid residues in the PSST-homologous NUKM subunit of complex I from Yarrowia lipolytica are essential for catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Garofano, Aurelio; Zwicker, Klaus; Kerscher, Stefan; Okun, Pamela; Brandt, Ulrich

    2003-10-24

    Mitochondrial proton-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) couples the transfer of two electrons from NADH to ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Subunit PSST is the most likely carrier of iron-sulfur cluster N2, which has been proposed to play a crucial role in ubiquinone reduction and proton pumping. To explore the function of this subunit we have generated site-directed mutants of all eight highly conserved acidic residues in the Yarrowia lipolytica homologue, the NUKM protein. Mutants D99N and D115N had only 5 and 8% of the wild type catalytic activity, respectively. In both cases complex I was stably assembled but electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the purified enzyme showed a reduced N2 signal (about 50%). In terms of complex I catalytic activity, almost identical results were obtained when the aspartates were individually changed to glutamates or to glycines. Mutations of other conserved acidic residues had less dramatic effects on catalytic activity and did not prevent assembly of iron-sulfur cluster N2. This excludes all conserved acidic residues in the PSST subunit as fourth ligands of this redox center. The results are discussed in the light of the structural similarities to the homologous small subunit of water-soluble [NiFe] hydrogenases.

  1. Development of a protein-ligand-binding site prediction method based on interaction energy and sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Hiroto; Sato, Kenta; Wei, Cao; Saad, Gul; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Shugo; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for predicting protein-ligand-binding sites based on protein three-dimensional structure and amino acid conservation. This method involves calculation of the van der Waals interaction energy between a protein and many probes placed on the protein surface and subsequent clustering of the probes with low interaction energies to identify the most energetically favorable locus. In addition, it uses amino acid conservation among homologous proteins. Ligand-binding sites were predicted by combining the interaction energy and the amino acid conservation score. The performance of our prediction method was evaluated using a non-redundant dataset of 348 ligand-bound and ligand-unbound protein structure pairs, constructed by filtering entries in a ligand-binding site structure database, LigASite. Ligand-bound structure prediction (bound prediction) indicated that 74.0 % of predicted ligand-binding sites overlapped with real ligand-binding sites by over 25 % of their volume. Ligand-unbound structure prediction (unbound prediction) indicated that 73.9 % of predicted ligand-binding residues overlapped with real ligand-binding residues. The amino acid conservation score improved the average prediction accuracy by 17.0 and 17.6 points for the bound and unbound predictions, respectively. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the combined use of the interaction energy and amino acid conservation in the ligand-binding site prediction.

  2. Effects of charging and tunnelling in a structure based on magic and non-magic metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Pogosov, V V; Vasyutin, E V

    2006-07-28

    The effects of charging and single-electron tunnelling in a metal cluster structure are investigated theoretically. In the framework of the particle-in-a-box model for spherical and disc-shaped gold clusters, the electron spectrum and the temperature dependence of the electron chemical potential are calculated. The difference between the electron chemical potentials of massive electrodes and islands leads to the noticeable charging of the electrode. We show that the effective residual charge is equal to the non-integer value of the elementary charge e and depends on the shape of the cluster. The equations for the analysis of the current-voltage characteristic are used under the conditions of conservation of the total energy of the structure, taking into account the contact potential difference. Restrictions associated with the Coulomb instability of a cluster are introduced into the theory in a simple way. It is shown that the critical charge of the cluster in an open electron system is close to the effective residual charge. For single-electron molecular transistors based on small gold clusters the current gap and its voltage asymmetry are computed. We demonstrate that the current gap exhibits non-monotonic size dependences which are related to the quantization of the electron spectrum and the Coulomb blockade.

  3. Energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    Under the Warner Amendment, oil overcharge funds are designated for states' use in certain authorized energy conservation and assistance programs. During FY 1982-87 Warner funds accounted for $200 million of the $3.3 billion states received from the oil overcharge escrow account. The $3.3 billion was in addition to the $13.3 billion that the Congress appropriated for the conservation and assistance programs. More than 4 years after their distribution, states had not used all the Warner funds. This report provides the status of all oil overcharge funds; the use of Warner funds and the time it is taking to spend the funds in Arizona, California, and Illinois.

  4. Strategy of mutual compensation of green and red mutants of firefly luciferase identifies a mutation of the highly conservative residue E457 with a strong red shift of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2013-11-01

    Bioluminescence spectra of firefly luciferases demonstrate highly pH-sensitive spectra changing the color from green to red light when pH is lowered from alkaline to acidic. This reflects a change of ratio of the green and red emitters in the bimodal spectra of bioluminescence. We show that the mutations strongly stabilizing green (Y35N) or red (H433Y) emission compensate each other leading to the WT color of firefly luciferase. We further used this compensating ability of Y35N to search for strong red-shifting mutations in the C-domain of firefly luciferase by random mutagenesis. The discovered mutation E457K substantially increased the contribution of the red emitter and caused a 12 nm red shift of the green emitter as well. E457 is highly conservative not only in beetle luciferases but also in a whole ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes and forms a conservative structural hydrogen bond with V471. Our results suggest that the removal of this hydrogen bond only mildly affects luciferase properties and that most of the effect of E457K is caused by the introduction of positive charge. E457 forms a salt bridge with R534 in most ANL enzymes including pH-insensitive luciferases which is absent in pH-sensitive firefly luciferases. The mutant A534R shows that this salt bridge is not important for pH-sensitivity but considerably improves in vivo thermostability. Although E457 is located far from the oxyluciferin-binding site, the properties of the mutant E457K suggest that it affects color by influencing the AMP binding.

  5. Automatic identification of highly conserved family regions and relationships in genome wide datasets including remote protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Tunca; Karaçalı, Bilge

    2013-01-01

    Identifying shared sequence segments along amino acid sequences generally requires a collection of closely related proteins, most often curated manually from the sequence datasets to suit the purpose at hand. Currently developed statistical methods are strained, however, when the collection contains remote sequences with poor alignment to the rest, or sequences containing multiple domains. In this paper, we propose a completely unsupervised and automated method to identify the shared sequence segments observed in a diverse collection of protein sequences including those present in a smaller fraction of the sequences in the collection, using a combination of sequence alignment, residue conservation scoring and graph-theoretical approaches. Since shared sequence fragments often imply conserved functional or structural attributes, the method produces a table of associations between the sequences and the identified conserved regions that can reveal previously unknown protein families as well as new members to existing ones. We evaluated the biological relevance of the method by clustering the proteins in gold standard datasets and assessing the clustering performance in comparison with previous methods from the literature. We have then applied the proposed method to a genome wide dataset of 17793 human proteins and generated a global association map to each of the 4753 identified conserved regions. Investigations on the major conserved regions revealed that they corresponded strongly to annotated structural domains. This suggests that the method can be useful in predicting novel domains on protein sequences.

  6. Heron conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kushlan, J.A.; Hafner, H.

    2000-01-01

    Herons are large, popular and, in many cases, spectacular birds found in wetlands world-wide, both tropical and temperate, natural and man-made. Some populations are very small and localized, some have decreased, some have expanded their ranges, and a few are pests of human activities. In the fifteen years since the publication of the latest monographic treatment of the family, The Herons Handbook, there has been a tremendous increase in our knowledge of heron status and conservation requirements, set against a backdrop of increasing concern about the future of the world?s wetland habitats. This book provides a comprehensive update following two distinct threads. The status and conservation needs of herons are first presented on a regional basis, in a series of chapters set at a continental or subcontinental scale. Over 200 biologists and heron conservationists have contributed to the data summarized here, and the very latest census and survey results provide the most up-to-date and detailed picture of heron populations currently available. Chapters discussing several critical issues in heron conservation follow, tending to focus on the international nature of the problems.

  7. Identification of conformationally sensitive residues essential for inhibition of vesicular monoamine transport by the noncompetitive inhibitor tetrabenazine.

    PubMed

    Ugolev, Yelena; Segal, Tali; Yaffe, Dana; Gros, Yael; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2013-11-08

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) transports monoamines into storage vesicles in a process that involves exchange of the charged monoamine with two protons. VMAT2 is a member of the DHA12 family of multidrug transporters that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of secondary transporters. Tetrabenazine (TBZ) is a non-competitive inhibitor of VMAT2 that is used in the treatment of hyperkinetic disorders associated with Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. Previous biochemical studies suggested that the recognition site for TBZ and monoamines is different. However, the precise mechanism of TBZ interaction with VMAT2 remains unknown. Here we used a random mutagenesis approach and selected TBZ-resistant mutants. The mutations clustered around the lumenal opening of the transporter and mapped to either conserved proline or glycine, or to residues immediately adjacent to conserved proline and glycine. Directed mutagenesis provides further support for the essential role of the latter residues. Our data strongly suggest that the conserved α-helix breaking residues identified in this work play an important role in conformational rearrangements required for TBZ binding and substrate transport. Our results provide a novel insight into the mechanism of transport and TBZ binding by VMAT2.

  8. Sequence coevolution between RNA and protein characterized by mutual information between residue triplets.

    PubMed

    Brandman, Relly; Brandman, Yigal; Pande, Vijay S

    2012-01-01

    Coevolving residues in a multiple sequence alignment provide evolutionary clues of biophysical interactions in 3D structure. Despite a rich literature describing amino acid coevolution within or between proteins and nucleic acid coevolution within RNA, to date there has been no direct evidence of coevolution between protein and RNA. The ribosome, a structurally conserved macromolecular machine composed of over 50 interacting protein and RNA chains, provides a natural example of RNA/protein interactions that likely coevolved. We provide the first direct evidence of RNA/protein coevolution by characterizing the mutual information in residue triplets from a multiple sequence alignment of ribosomal protein L22 and neighboring 23S RNA. We define residue triplets as three positions in the multiple sequence alignment, where one position is from the 23S RNA and two positions are from the L22 protein. We show that residue triplets with high mutual information are more likely than residue doublets to be proximal in 3D space. Some high mutual information residue triplets cluster in a connected series across the L22 protein structure, similar to patterns seen in protein coevolution. We also describe RNA nucleotides for which switching from one nucleotide to another (or between purines and pyrimidines) results in a change in amino acid distribution for proximal amino acid positions. Multiple crystal structures for evolutionarily distinct ribosome species can provide structural evidence for these differences. For one residue triplet, a pyrimidine in one species is a purine in another, and RNA/protein hydrogen bonds are present in one species but not the other. The results provide the first direct evidence of RNA/protein coevolution by using higher order mutual information, suggesting that biophysical constraints on interacting RNA and protein chains are indeed a driving force in their evolution.

  9. Sequence Coevolution between RNA and Protein Characterized by Mutual Information between Residue Triplets

    PubMed Central

    Brandman, Relly; Brandman, Yigal; Pande, Vijay S.

    2012-01-01

    Coevolving residues in a multiple sequence alignment provide evolutionary clues of biophysical interactions in 3D structure. Despite a rich literature describing amino acid coevolution within or between proteins and nucleic acid coevolution within RNA, to date there has been no direct evidence of coevolution between protein and RNA. The ribosome, a structurally conserved macromolecular machine composed of over 50 interacting protein and RNA chains, provides a natural example of RNA/protein interactions that likely coevolved. We provide the first direct evidence of RNA/protein coevolution by characterizing the mutual information in residue triplets from a multiple sequence alignment of ribosomal protein L22 and neighboring 23S RNA. We define residue triplets as three positions in the multiple sequence alignment, where one position is from the 23S RNA and two positions are from the L22 protein. We show that residue triplets with high mutual information are more likely than residue doublets to be proximal in 3D space. Some high mutual information residue triplets cluster in a connected series across the L22 protein structure, similar to patterns seen in protein coevolution. We also describe RNA nucleotides for which switching from one nucleotide to another (or between purines and pyrimidines) results in a change in amino acid distribution for proximal amino acid positions. Multiple crystal structures for evolutionarily distinct ribosome species can provide structural evidence for these differences. For one residue triplet, a pyrimidine in one species is a purine in another, and RNA/protein hydrogen bonds are present in one species but not the other. The results provide the first direct evidence of RNA/protein coevolution by using higher order mutual information, suggesting that biophysical constraints on interacting RNA and protein chains are indeed a driving force in their evolution. PMID:22279560

  10. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  11. The functional importance of a pair of conserved glutamic acid residues and of Ca2+ binding in the cbb3–type oxygen reductases from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Hanlin; Han, Huazhi; Roh, Jung H.; Hemp, James; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Gennis, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    The cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases are members of the heme-copper proton pumping respiratory oxygen reductases. The structure of the cbb3-type oxidase from Pseudomonas stutzeri reveals that, in addition to the six redox-active metal centers (two hemes b, three hemes c and CuB), the enzyme also contains at least one Ca2+. The calcium bridges two propionate carboxyls at the interface between the low-spin heme b and the active-site heme b3 and, in addition, is ligated to a serine in subunit CcoO and by a glutamate in CcoN. The glutamate that is ligated to Ca2+ is one of a pair of glutamic acid residues that has previously been suggested to be part of a proton exit pathway for pumped protons. In the current work, mutants in these glutamates are investigated in the cbb3-type oxidases from Vibrio cholerae and from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Metal analysis shows that each of these wild type enzymes contains Ca2+. Mutations of the glutamate expected to ligate the Ca2+ in each of these enzymes (E126 in V. cholerae; E180 in R. sphaeroides) result in the loss of activity as well as loss of Ca2+. Mutations in the nearby glutamate (E129 in V. cholerae; E183 in R. sphaeroides) also resulted in loss of oxidase activity and loss of Ca2+. It is concluded that the Ca2+ is essential for assembly of the fully functional enzyme and that neither of the glutamates is likely to be part of a pathway for pumped protons within the cbb3-type oxygen reductases. A more likely role for these glutamates is the maintenance of the structural integrity of the active conformation of the enzyme. PMID:22913716

  12. Energy Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, P.

    1995-06-01

    There are two fundamental reasons or motivations for energy conservation: (1) economics; and (2) consideration of energy - its sources and availability. Economics speaks for itself and needs little explanation: a project is undertaken, the cost is recovered in a given period of time (we hope) and our company realizes cost savings thereafter. We study and propose a project; we estimate the payback. If approved, we implement the project. Then, we eagerly watch for its effectiveness - for the proposed payback. The second consideration in regard to energy conservation might - in the foreseeable future - become by far the most important - that of availability. Very knowledgeable persons have stated that this - in reality - is the most serious problem facing our nation today. Readily available, reasonably priced energy has given to the US the high form of living experienced today. An interruption in this flow could catapult our nation in an awesome catastrophe. The energy shortage of the late 70`s might be a forerunner of such an experience.

  13. Species-specific differences of the spectroscopic properties of P700: analysis of the influence of non-conserved amino acid residues by site-directed mutagenesis of photosystem I from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Witt, Heike; Bordignon, Enrica; Carbonera, Donatella; Dekker, Jan P; Karapetyan, Navassard; Teutloff, Christian; Webber, Andrew; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Schlodder, Eberhard

    2003-11-21

    We applied optical spectroscopy, magnetic resonance techniques, and redox titrations to investigate the properties of the primary electron donor P700 in photosystem I (PS I) core complexes from cyanobacteria (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Spirulina platensis, and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), algae (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC2696), and higher plants (Spinacia oleracea). Remarkable species-specific differences of the optical properties of P700 were revealed monitoring the (3P700-P700) and (P700+.-P700) absorbance and CD difference spectra. The main bleaching band in the Qy region differs in peak position and line width for the various species. In cyanobacteria the absorbance of P700 extends more to the red compared with algae and higher plants which is favorable for energy transfer from red core antenna chlorophylls to P700 in cyanobacteria. The amino acids in the environment of P700 are highly conserved with two distinct deviations. In C. reinhardtii a Tyr is found at position PsaB659 instead of a Trp present in all other organisms, whereas in Synechocystis a Phe is found instead of a Trp at the homologous position PsaA679. We constructed several mutants in C. reinhardtii CC2696. Strikingly, no PS I could be detected in the mutant YW B659 indicating steric constraints unique to this organism. In the mutants WA A679 and YA B659 significant changes of the spectral features in the (3P700-P700), the (P700+.-P700) absorbance difference and in the (P700+.-P700) CD difference spectra are induced. The results indicate structural differences among PS I from higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria and give further insight into specific protein-cofactor interactions contributing to the optical spectra.

  14. About the Clusters Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  15. Priority Based Congestion Control Dynamic Clustering Protocol in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Beulah Jayakumari, R.; Jawahar Senthilkumar, V.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor network is widely used to monitor natural phenomena because natural disaster has globally increased which causes significant loss of life, economic setback, and social development. Saving energy in a wireless sensor network (WSN) is a critical factor to be considered. The sensor nodes are deployed to sense, compute, and communicate alerts in a WSN which are used to prevent natural hazards. Generally communication consumes more energy than sensing and computing; hence cluster based protocol is preferred. Even with clustering, multiclass traffic creates congested hotspots in the cluster, thereby causing packet loss and delay. In order to conserve energy and to avoid congestion during multiclass traffic a novel Priority Based Congestion Control Dynamic Clustering (PCCDC) protocol is developed. PCCDC is designed with mobile nodes which are organized dynamically into clusters to provide complete coverage and connectivity. PCCDC computes congestion at intra- and intercluster level using linear and binary feedback method. Each mobile node within the cluster has an appropriate queue model for scheduling prioritized packet during congestion without drop or delay. Simulation results have proven that packet drop, control overhead, and end-to-end delay are much lower in PCCDC which in turn significantly increases packet delivery ratio, network lifetime, and residual energy when compared with PASCC protocol. PMID:26504898

  16. Priority Based Congestion Control Dynamic Clustering Protocol in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Jayakumari, R Beulah; Senthilkumar, V Jawahar

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor network is widely used to monitor natural phenomena because natural disaster has globally increased which causes significant loss of life, economic setback, and social development. Saving energy in a wireless sensor network (WSN) is a critical factor to be considered. The sensor nodes are deployed to sense, compute, and communicate alerts in a WSN which are used to prevent natural hazards. Generally communication consumes more energy than sensing and computing; hence cluster based protocol is preferred. Even with clustering, multiclass traffic creates congested hotspots in the cluster, thereby causing packet loss and delay. In order to conserve energy and to avoid congestion during multiclass traffic a novel Priority Based Congestion Control Dynamic Clustering (PCCDC) protocol is developed. PCCDC is designed with mobile nodes which are organized dynamically into clusters to provide complete coverage and connectivity. PCCDC computes congestion at intra- and intercluster level using linear and binary feedback method. Each mobile node within the cluster has an appropriate queue model for scheduling prioritized packet during congestion without drop or delay. Simulation results have proven that packet drop, control overhead, and end-to-end delay are much lower in PCCDC which in turn significantly increases packet delivery ratio, network lifetime, and residual energy when compared with PASCC protocol.

  17. Decentralizing conservation and diversifying livelihoods within Kanchenjunga Conservation Area, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Parker, Pete; Thapa, Brijesh; Jacob, Aerin

    2015-12-01

    To alleviate poverty and enhance conservation in resource dependent communities, managers must identify existing livelihood strategies and the associated factors that impede household access to livelihood assets. Researchers increasingly advocate reallocating management power from exclusionary central institutions to a decentralized system of management based on local and inclusive participation. However, it is yet to be shown if decentralizing conservation leads to diversified livelihoods within a protected area. The purpose of this study was to identify and assess factors affecting household livelihood diversification within Nepal's Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Project, the first protected area in Asia to decentralize conservation. We randomly surveyed 25% of Kanchenjunga households to assess household socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and access to livelihood assets. We used a cluster analysis with the ten most common income generating activities (both on- and off-farm) to group the strategies households use to diversify livelihoods, and a multinomial logistic regression to identify predictors of livelihood diversification. We found four distinct groups of household livelihood strategies with a range of diversification that directly corresponded to household income. The predictors of livelihood diversification were more related to pre-existing socioeconomic and demographic factors (e.g., more landholdings and livestock, fewer dependents, receiving remittances) than activities sponsored by decentralizing conservation (e.g., microcredit, training, education, interaction with project staff). Taken together, our findings indicate that without direct policies to target marginalized groups, decentralized conservation in Kanchenjunga will continue to exclude marginalized groups, limiting a household's ability to diversify their livelihood and perpetuating their dependence on natural resources.

  18. New insights into the catalytic mechanism of histidine phosphatases revealed by a functionally essential arginine residue within the active site of the Sts phosphatases.

    PubMed

    San Luis, Boris; Nassar, Nicolas; Carpino, Nick

    2013-07-01

    Sts (suppressor of T-cell receptor signalling)-1 and Sts-2 are HPs (histidine phosphatases) that negatively regulate TCR (T-cell receptor) signalling pathways, including those involved in cytokine production. HPs play key roles in such varied biological processes as metabolism, development and intracellular signalling. They differ considerably in their primary sequence and substrate specificity, but possess a catalytic core formed by an invariant quartet of active-site residues. Two histidine and two arginine residues cluster together within the HP active site and are thought to participate in a two-step dephosphorylation reaction. To date there has been little insight into any additional residues that might play an important functional role. In the present study, we identify and characterize an additional residue within the Sts phosphatases (Sts-1 Arg383 or Sts-2 Arg369) that is critical for catalytic activity and intracellular function. Mutation of Sts-1 Arg383 to an alanine residue compromises the enzyme's activity and renders Sts-1 unable to suppress TCR-induced cytokine induction. Of the multiple amino acids substituted for Arg383, only lysine partially rescues the catalytic activity of Sts-1. Although Sts-1 Arg383 is conserved in all Sts homologues, it is only conserved in one of the two sub-branches of HPs. The results of the present study highlight an essential role for Sts-1 phosphatase activity in regulating T-cell activation and add a new dimension of complexity to our understanding of HP catalytic activity.

  19. The Importance of the Strictly Conserved, C-terminal Glycine Residue in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase for Overall Catalysis: Mutagenesis and Truncation of GLY-961 in the Sorghum C4 Leaf Isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,W.; Ahmed, S.; Moriyama, H.; Chollet, R.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a 'multifaceted', allosteric enzyme involved in C4 acid metabolism in green plants/microalgae and prokaryotes. Before the elucidation of the three-dimensional structures of maize C4 leaf and Escherichia coli PEPC, our truncation analysis of the sorghum C4 homologue revealed important roles for the enzyme's C-terminal {alpha}-helix and its appended QNTG{sup 961} tetrapeptide in polypeptide stability and overall catalysis, respectively. Collectively, these functional and structural observations implicate the importance of the PEPC C-terminal tetrapeptide for both catalysis and negative allosteric regulation. We have now more finely dissected this element of PEPC structure-function by modification of the absolutely conserved C-terminal glycine of the sorghum C4 isoform by site-specific mutagenesis (G961(A/V/D)) and truncation ({Delta}C1/C4). Although the C4 polypeptide failed to accumulate in a PEPC{sup -} strain (XH11) of E. coli transformed with the Asp mutant, the other variants were produced at wild-type levels. Although neither of these four mutants displayed an apparent destabilization of the purified PEPC homotetramer, all were compromised catalytically in vivo and in vitro. Functional complementation of XH11 cells under selective growth conditions was restricted progressively by the Ala, {Delta}C1 and Val, and {Delta}C4 modifications. Likewise, steady-state kinetic analysis of the purified mutant enzymes revealed corresponding negative trends in k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K0.5 (phosphoenolpyruvate) but not in K{sub 0.5} or the Hill coefficient. Homology modeling of these sorghum C-terminal variants against the structure of the closely related maize C4 isoform predicted perturbations in active-site molecular cavities and/or ion-pairing with essential, invariant Arg-638. These collective observations reveal that even a modest, neutral alteration of the PEPC C-terminal hydrogen atom side chain is detrimental to enzyme

  20. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; ...

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential formore » mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.« less

  1. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin. PMID:25724962

  2. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  3. Protein modules conserved since LUCA.

    PubMed

    Sobolevsky, Yehoshua; Trifonov, Edward N

    2006-11-01

    Universal scale of the sequence conservation has been recently introduced based on omnipresence of the protein sequence motifs across species. A large spectrum of short sequences, up to eight residues has been found to reside in all or almost all prokaryotic organisms. By this discovery a principally novel quantitative approach is introduced to the problem of reconstruction of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). The most conserved elements (protein modules) with defined structures and sequences harboring the omnipresent motifs are outlined in this work, by combining the sequence and protein crystal structure data. The structurally conserved modules involve 25-30 amino acid residues and have appearance of closed loops, loop-n-lock structures. This confirms earlier conclusions on the loop-fold structure of globular proteins. Many of the topmost conserved modules represent the primary closed loop prototypes, that have been derived by whole genome sequence searches. The data presented, thus, make a basis for further developments toward the earliest stages of protein evolution.

  4. Fourier Analysis of Conservation Patterns in Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Ashok; Jakobsson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Residue conservation is a common observation in alignments of protein families, underscoring positions important in protein structure and function. Though many methods measure the level of conservation of particular residue positions, currently we do not have a way to study spatial oscillations occurring in protein conservation patterns. It is known that hydrophobicity shows spatial oscillations in proteins, which is characterized by computing the hydrophobic moment of the protein domains. Here, we advance the study of moments of conservation of protein families to know whether there might exist spatial asymmetry in the conservation patterns of regular secondary structures. Analogous to the hydrophobic moment, the conservation moment is defined as the modulus of the Fourier transform of the conservation function of an alignment of related protein, where the conservation function is the vector of conservation values at each column of the alignment. The profile of the conservation moment is useful in ascertaining any periodicity of conservation, which might correlate with the period of the secondary structure. To demonstrate the concept, conservation in the family of potassium ion channel proteins was analyzed using moments. It was shown that the pore helix of the potassium channel showed oscillations in the moment of conservation matching the period of the α-helix. This implied that one side of the pore helix was evolutionarily conserved in contrast to its opposite side. In addition, the method of conservation moments correctly identified the disposition of the voltage sensor of voltage-gated potassium channels to form a 310 helix in the membrane.

  5. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  6. An inter-residue network model to identify mutational-constrained regions on the Ebola coat glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Devin S; Raman, Rahul; Tharakaraman, Kannan; Subramanian, Vidya; Del Hierro, Gabriella; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2017-04-11

    Recently, progress has been made in the development of vaccines and monoclonal antibody cocktails that target the Ebola coat glycoprotein (GP). Based on the mutation rates for Ebola virus given its natural sequence evolution, these treatment strategies are likely to impose additional selection pressure to drive acquisition of mutations in GP that escape neutralization. Given the high degree of sequence conservation among GP of Ebola viruses, it would be challenging to determine the propensity of acquiring mutations in response to vaccine or treatment with one or a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies. In this study, we analyzed the mutability of each residue using an approach that captures the structural constraints on mutability based on the extent of its inter-residue interaction network within the three-dimensional structure of the trimeric GP. This analysis showed two distinct clusters of highly networked residues along the GP1-GP2 interface, part of which overlapped with epitope surfaces of known neutralizing antibodies. This network approach also permitted us to identify additional residues in the network of the known hotspot residues of different anti-Ebola antibodies that would impact antibody-epitope interactions.

  7. Cfr and RlmN Contain a Single [4Fe-4S] Cluster, which Directs Two Distinct Reactivities for S-Adenosylmethionine: Methyl Transfer by SN2 Displacement and Radical Generation

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tyler L.; Radle, Matthew I.; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J.

    2012-01-01

    The radical SAM (RS) proteins RlmN and Cfr catalyze methylation of carbons 2 and 8, respectively, of adenosine 2503 in 23S rRNA. Both reactions are similar in scope, entailing the synthesis of a methyl group partially derived from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) onto electrophilic sp2-hybridized carbon atoms via the intermediacy of a protein S-methylcysteinyl (mCys) residue. Both proteins contain five conserved Cys residues, each of which is required for turnover. Three cysteines lie in a canonical RS CxxxCxxC motif and coordinate a [4Fe–4S]-cluster cofactor. The remaining two cysteines are at opposite ends of the polypeptide. Herein we show that each protein contains only the one “radical SAM” [4Fe–4S] cluster, and that the two remaining conserved cysteines do not coordinate additional iron-containing species. In addition, we show that while wild-type RlmN bears the C355 mCys residue in its as-isolated state, RlmN that is either engineered to lack the [4Fe–4S] cluster by substitution of the coordinating cysteines, or isolated from Escherichia coli cultured under iron-limiting conditions, does not bear a C355 mCys residue. Reconstitution of the [4Fe–4S] cluster on wild-type apo RlmN followed by addition of SAM results in rapid production of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and the mCys residue, while treatment of apo RlmN with SAM affords no observable reaction. These results indicate that in Cfr and RlmN, SAM bound to the unique iron of the [4Fe–4S] cluster displays two reactivities. It serves to methylate C355 of RlmN (C338 of Cfr), or it serves to generate the 5’-deoxyadenosyl 5’-radical, required for substrate-dependent methyl synthase activity. PMID:21916495

  8. Cfr and RlmN contain a single [4Fe-4S] cluster, which directs two distinct reactivities for S-adenosylmethionine: methyl transfer by SN2 displacement and radical generation.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler L; Radle, Matthew I; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J

    2011-12-14

    The radical SAM (RS) proteins RlmN and Cfr catalyze methylation of carbons 2 and 8, respectively, of adenosine 2503 in 23S rRNA. Both reactions are similar in scope, entailing the synthesis of a methyl group partially derived from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) onto electrophilic sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms via the intermediacy of a protein S-methylcysteinyl (mCys) residue. Both proteins contain five conserved Cys residues, each required for turnover. Three cysteines lie in a canonical RS CxxxCxxC motif and coordinate a [4Fe-4S]-cluster cofactor; the remaining two are at opposite ends of the polypeptide. Here we show that each protein contains only the one "radical SAM" [4Fe-4S] cluster and the two remaining conserved cysteines do not coordinate additional iron-containing species. In addition, we show that, while wild-type RlmN bears the C355 mCys residue in its as-isolated state, RlmN that is either engineered to lack the [4Fe-4S] cluster by substitution of the coordinating cysteines or isolated from Escherichia coli cultured under iron-limiting conditions does not bear a C355 mCys residue. Reconstitution of the [4Fe-4S] cluster on wild-type apo RlmN followed by addition of SAM results in rapid production of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and the mCys residue, while treatment of apo RlmN with SAM affords no observable reaction. These results indicate that in Cfr and RlmN, SAM bound to the unique iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster displays two reactivities. It serves to methylate C355 of RlmN (C338 of Cfr), or to generate the 5'-deoxyadenosyl 5'-radical, required for substrate-dependent methyl synthase activity. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. On residues in the disallowed region of the Ramachandran map.

    PubMed

    Pal, Debnath; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2002-03-01

    An analysis of the occurrence of nonglycyl residues in conformations disallowed in the Ramachandran plot is presented. Ser, Asn, Thr, and Cys have the highest propensities to exhibit such conformations, and the branched aliphatic residues the lowest. Residues cluster in five regions and there are some trends in the types of residues and their side-chain conformations (chi(1)) occupying these. Majority of the residues are found at the edge of helices and strands and in short loops, and are involved in different types of weak, stabilizing interactions. A structural motif has been identified where a residue in disallowed conformation occurs as the first residue of a short 3(10)-helix. On the basis of the types of neighboring residues, the location in the three-dimensional structure and accessibility, there are similarities with the occurrence of cis peptide bonds in protein structures.

  10. The corrinoid-containing 23-kDa subunit MtrA of the energy-conserving N5-methyltetrahydromethanopterin:coenzyme M methyltransferase complex from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. EPR spectroscopic evidence for a histidine residue as a cobalt ligand of the cobamide.

    PubMed

    Harms, U; Thauer, R K

    1996-10-01

    N5-Methyltetrahydromethanopterin:coenzyme M methyltransferase (Mtr) from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum is a membrane-associated enzyme complex that catalyzes an energy-conserving, sodium ion translocating step in methanogenesis from H2 and CO2. The complex is composed of eight different subunits, MtrA-H, one of which (MtrA) harbours a corrinoid as prosthetic group. In this study, we report the structural properties of MtrA1 [des-(214-239)-MtrA], which is a deletion mutant of MtrA that lacks the last 25 C-terminal hydrophobic amino acids rendering the membrane protein soluble: (a) mtrA1 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Overexpression yielded a cytoplasmic protein which was purified approximately tenfold to apparent homogeneity. The purified protein was devoid of its corrinoid prosthetic group and not correctly folded as was evident from its electrophoretic mobility in SDS/PAGE. (b) Unfolding of MtrA1 with guanidine/HCl and refolding in the presence of cobalamin resulted in the formation of the correctly folded MtrA1 holoprotein that contained tightly bound cob(II)-alamin; the rate of reconstitution was highest when the refolding proceeded in the presence of titanium(III) citrate, which suggested that cob(I)alamin is the corrinoid species that binds to the apoprotein. (c) EPR spectra of the cob(II)alamin-containing holoprotein differentially labelled with 14N (nuclear spin 1) and 15N (nuclear spin 1/2) revealed that the corrinoid is bound to MtrA1 in the base-off form and that the Co(II) of the prosthetic group is coordinated by a histidine residue of the apoprotein. The results are interpreted with respect to the mechanism of energy conservation by the MtrA-H complex.

  11. Structural assessment of glycyl mutations in invariantly conserved motifs.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Tulika; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bhasin, Yasha; Ramakrishnan, C; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2007-11-15

    Motifs that are evolutionarily conserved in proteins are crucial to their structure and function. In one of our earlier studies, we demonstrated that the conserved motifs occurring invariantly across several organisms could act as structural determinants of the proteins. We observed the abundance of glycyl residues in these invariantly conserved motifs. The role of glycyl residues in highly conserved motifs has not been studied extensively. Thus, it would be interesting to examine the structural perturbations induced by mutation in these conserved glycyl sites. In this work, we selected a representative set of invariant signature (IS) peptides for which both the PDB structure and mutation information was available. We thoroughly analyzed the conformational features of the glycyl sites and their local interactions with the surrounding residues. Using Ramachandran angles, we showed that the glycyl residues occurring in these IS peptides, which have undergone mutation, occurred more often in the L-disallowed as compared with the L-allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. Short range contacts around the mutation site were analyzed to study the steric effects. With the results obtained from our analysis, we hypothesize that any change of activity arising because of such mutations must be attributed to the long-range interaction(s) of the new residue if the glycyl residue in the IS peptide occurred in the L-allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. However, the mutation of those conserved glycyl residues that occurred in the L-disallowed region of the Ramachandran plot might lead to an altered activity of the protein as a result of an altered conformation of the backbone in the immediate vicinity of the glycyl residue, in addition to long range effects arising from the long side chains of the new residue. Thus, the loss of activity because of mutation in the conserved glycyl site might either relate to long range interactions or to local perturbations around the site

  12. Acid clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Keesee, R.G.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    Molecular clusters can be considered to be the smallest size range of an aerosol particle size distribution. Nucleation from the gas phase to particles or droplets involves the formation of clusters in the initial stages. Consequently, knowledge of the properties and formation of clusters containing acids contribute to an understanding of acid rain. This paper presents an overview of results obtained in the laboratory on the formation and stability of both neutral and ionized acid clusters. With free jet expansion techniques, the authors have produced clusters of aqueous nitric acid, aqueous hydrochloric acid, aqueous sulfuric acid, acetic acid and aqueous sulfur dioxide. For analogy to buffering, the formation of clusters containing ammonia have also been examined. These have included ammonia with aqueous nitric acid, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. The basic experiment involves expansion of vapor through a nozzle, collimation of the jet with a skimmer to form a well-directed molecular beam, and detection of clusters via electron impact ionization and mass spectrometry. Some variations include the introduction of a reactive gas into vacuum near the expansion as described elsewhere and the implementation of an electrostatic quadrupolar field to examine the polarity of the neutral clusters.

  13. Structural and functional characterization of an iron-sulfur cluster assembly scaffold protein-SufA from Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Pala, Zarna Rajeshkumar; Saxena, Vishal; Saggu, Gagandeep Singh; Yadav, Sushil Kumar; Pareek, R P; Kochar, Sanjay Kumar; Kochar, Dhanpat Kumar; Garg, Shilpi

    2016-07-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are utilized as prosthetic groups in all living organisms for diverse range of cellular processes including electron transport in respiration and photosynthesis, sensing of ambient conditions, regulation of gene expression and catalysis. In Plasmodium, two Fe-S cluster biogenesis pathways are reported, of which the Suf pathway in the apicoplast has been shown essential for the erythrocytic stages of the parasite. While the initial components of this pathway detailing the sulfur mobilization have been elucidated, the components required for the assembly and transfer of Fe-S clusters are not reported from the parasite. In Escherichia coli, SufB acts as a scaffold protein and SufA traffics the assembled Fe-S cluster from SufB to target apo-proteins. However, in Plasmodium, the homologs of these proteins are yet to be characterized for their function. Here, we report a putative SufA protein from Plasmodium vivax with signature motifs of A-type scaffold proteins, which is evolutionarily conserved. The presence of the [Fe4S4](3+) cluster under reduced conditions was confirmed by UV-visible and EPR spectroscopy and the interaction of these clusters with the conserved cysteine residues of chains A and B of PvSufA, validates its existence as a dimer, similar to that in E. coli. The H-bond interactions at the PvSufA-SufB interface demonstrate SufA as a scaffold protein in conjunction with SufB for the pre-assembly of Fe-S clusters and their transfer to the target proteins. Co-localization of the protein to the apicoplast further provides an experimental evidence of a functional scaffold protein SufA for the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters in apicoplast of Plasmodium.

  14. Physical Motif Clustering within Intrinsically Disordered Nucleoporin Sequences Reveals Universal Functional Features

    PubMed Central

    Ando, David; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Bioinformatics of disordered proteins is especially challenging given high mutation rates for homologous proteins and that functionality may not be strongly related to sequence. Here we have performed a novel bioinformatic analysis, based on the spatial clustering of physically relevant features such as binding motifs and charges within disordered proteins, on thousands of Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) FG motif containing proteins (FG nups). The biophysical mechanism by which FG nups regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport has remained elusive. Our analysis revealed a set of highly conserved spatial features in the sequence structure of individual FG nups, such as the separation, localization, and ordering of FG motifs and charged residues along the protein chain. These functionally conserved features provide insight into the particular biophysical mechanisms responsible for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic traffic in the NPC, strongly constraining current models. Additionally this method allows us to identify potentially functionally analogous disordered proteins across distantly related species. PMID:24066078

  15. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  16. A Bridging [4Fe-4S] Cluster and Nucleotide Binding Are Essential for Function of the Cfd1-Nbp35 Complex as a Scaffold in Iron-Sulfur Protein Maturation*

    PubMed Central

    Netz, Daili J. A.; Pierik, Antonio J.; Stümpfig, Martin; Bill, Eckhard; Sharma, Anil K.; Pallesen, Leif J.; Walden, William E.; Lill, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The essential P-loop NTPases Cfd1 and Nbp35 of the cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly machinery perform a scaffold function for Fe-S cluster synthesis. Both proteins contain a nucleotide binding motif of unknown function and a C-terminal motif with four conserved cysteine residues. The latter motif defines the Mrp/Nbp35 subclass of P-loop NTPases and is suspected to be involved in transient Fe-S cluster binding. To elucidate the function of these two motifs, we first created cysteine mutant proteins of Cfd1 and Nbp35 and investigated the consequences of these mutations by genetic, cell biological, biochemical, and spectroscopic approaches. The two central cysteine residues (CPXC) of the C-terminal motif were found to be crucial for cell viability, protein function, coordination of a labile [4Fe-4S] cluster, and Cfd1-Nbp35 hetero-tetramer formation. Surprisingly, the two proximal cysteine residues were dispensable for all these functions, despite their strict evolutionary conservation. Several lines of evidence suggest that the C-terminal CPXC motifs of Cfd1-Nbp35 coordinate a bridging [4Fe-4S] cluster. Upon mutation of the nucleotide binding motifs Fe-S clusters could no longer be assembled on these proteins unless wild-type copies of Cfd1 and Nbp35 were present in trans. This result indicated that Fe-S cluster loading on these scaffold proteins is a nucleotide-dependent step. We propose that the bridging coordination of the C-terminal Fe-S cluster may be ideal for its facile assembly, labile binding, and efficient transfer to target Fe-S apoproteins, a step facilitated by the cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly proteins Nar1 and Cia1 in vivo. PMID:22362766

  17. A bridging [4Fe-4S] cluster and nucleotide binding are essential for function of the Cfd1-Nbp35 complex as a scaffold in iron-sulfur protein maturation.

    PubMed

    Netz, Daili J A; Pierik, Antonio J; Stümpfig, Martin; Bill, Eckhard; Sharma, Anil K; Pallesen, Leif J; Walden, William E; Lill, Roland

    2012-04-06

    The essential P-loop NTPases Cfd1 and Nbp35 of the cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly machinery perform a scaffold function for Fe-S cluster synthesis. Both proteins contain a nucleotide binding motif of unknown function and a C-terminal motif with four conserved cysteine residues. The latter motif defines the Mrp/Nbp35 subclass of P-loop NTPases and is suspected to be involved in transient Fe-S cluster binding. To elucidate the function of these two motifs, we first created cysteine mutant proteins of Cfd1 and Nbp35 and investigated the consequences of these mutations by genetic, cell biological, biochemical, and spectroscopic approaches. The two central cysteine residues (CPXC) of the C-terminal motif were found to be crucial for cell viability, protein function, coordination of a labile [4Fe-4S] cluster, and Cfd1-Nbp35 hetero-tetramer formation. Surprisingly, the two proximal cysteine residues were dispensable for all these functions, despite their strict evolutionary conservation. Several lines of evidence suggest that the C-terminal CPXC motifs of Cfd1-Nbp35 coordinate a bridging [4Fe-4S] cluster. Upon mutation of the nucleotide binding motifs Fe-S clusters could no longer be assembled on these proteins unless wild-type copies of Cfd1 and Nbp35 were present in trans. This result indicated that Fe-S cluster loading on these scaffold proteins is a nucleotide-dependent step. We propose that the bridging coordination of the C-terminal Fe-S cluster may be ideal for its facile assembly, labile binding, and efficient transfer to target Fe-S apoproteins, a step facilitated by the cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly proteins Nar1 and Cia1 in vivo.

  18. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  19. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  20. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  1. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  2. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  3. Hausdorff clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basalto, Nicolas; Bellotti, Roberto; de Carlo, Francesco; Facchi, Paolo; Pantaleo, Ester; Pascazio, Saverio

    2008-10-01

    A clustering algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance is analyzed and compared to the single, complete, and average linkage algorithms. The four clustering procedures are applied to a toy example and to the time series of financial data. The dendrograms are scrutinized and their features compared. The Hausdorff linkage relies on firm mathematical grounds and turns out to be very effective when one has to discriminate among complex structures.

  4. NMR structure of the conserved hypothetical protein TM0487 from Thermotoga maritima: implications for 216 homologous DUF59 proteins.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Marcius S; Herrmann, Torsten; Peti, Wolfgang; Wilson, Ian A; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2005-11-01

    The NMR structure of the conserved hypothetical protein TM0487 from Thermotoga maritima represents an alpha/beta-topology formed by the regular secondary structures alpha1-beta1-beta2-alpha2-beta3-beta4-alpha3- beta5-3(10)-alpha4, with a small anti-parallel beta-sheet of beta-strands 1 and 2, and a mixed parallel/anti-parallel beta-sheet of beta-strands 3-5. Similar folds have previously been observed in other proteins, with amino acid sequence identity as low as 3% and a variety of different functions. There are also 216 sequence homologs of TM0487, which all have the signature sequence of domains of unknown function 59 (DUF59), for which no three-dimensional structures have as yet been reported. The TM0487 structure thus presents a platform for homology modeling of this large group of DUF59 proteins. Conserved among most of the DUF59s are 13 hydrophobic residues, which are clustered in the core of TM0487. A putative active site of TM0487 consisting of residues D20, E22, L23, T51, T52, and C55 is conserved in 98 of the 216 DUF59 sequences. Asp20 is buried within the proposed active site without any compensating positive charge, which suggests that its pK(a) value may be perturbed. Furthermore, the DUF59 family includes ORFs that are part of a conserved chromosomal group of proteins predicted to be involved in Fe-S cluster metabolism.

  5. Sequence and structure conservation in a protein core.

    PubMed

    Rodionov, M A; Blundell, T L

    1998-11-15

    In order to study structural aspects of sequence conservation in families of homologous proteins, we have analyzed structurally aligned sequences of 585 proteins grouped into 128 homologous families. The conservation of a residue in a family is defined as the average residue similarity in a given position of aligned sequences. The residue similarities were expressed in the form of log-odd substitution tables that take into account the environments of amino acids in three-dimensional structures. The protein core is defined as those residues that have less then 7% solvent accessibility. The density of a protein core is described in terms of atom packing, which is investigated as a criterion for residue substitution and conservation. Although there is no significant correlation between sequence conservation and average atom packing around nonpolar residues such as leucine, valine and isoleucine, a significant correlation is observed for polar residues in the protein core. This may be explained by the hydrogen bonds in which polar residues are involved; the better their protection from water access the more stable should be the structure in that position.

  6. Assessing the extent of conservation tillage across agricultural landscapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residue (or plant litter) on the soil surface can decrease soil erosion and runoff and improve soil quality. Quantification of crop residue cover is required to evaluate the effectiveness of conservation tillage practices as well as the extent of biofuel harvesting. With Landsat Thematic Mapper...

  7. Assessing the extent of conservation tillage in agricultural landscapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residue (or plant litter) on the soil surface can decrease soil erosion and runoff and improve soil quality. Quantification of crop residue cover is required to evaluate the effectiveness of conservation tillage practices as well as the extent of biofuel harvesting. Remote sensing techniques ca...

  8. Architecture of the Human Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery*

    PubMed Central

    Gakh, Oleksandr; Ranatunga, Wasantha; Smith, Douglas Y.; Ahlgren, Eva-Christina; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Thompson, James R.; Isaya, Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Fe-S clusters, essential cofactors needed for the activity of many different enzymes, are assembled by conserved protein machineries inside bacteria and mitochondria. As the architecture of the human machinery remains undefined, we co-expressed in Escherichia coli the following four proteins involved in the initial step of Fe-S cluster synthesis: FXN42–210 (iron donor); [NFS1]·[ISD11] (sulfur donor); and ISCU (scaffold upon which new clusters are assembled). We purified a stable, active complex consisting of all four proteins with 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry. Using negative staining transmission EM and single particle analysis, we obtained a three-dimensional model of the complex with ∼14 Å resolution. Molecular dynamics flexible fitting of protein structures docked into the EM map of the model revealed a [FXN42–210]24·[NFS1]24·[ISD11]24·[ISCU]24 complex, consistent with the measured 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry of its four components. The complex structure fulfills distance constraints obtained from chemical cross-linking of the complex at multiple recurring interfaces, involving hydrogen bonds, salt bridges, or hydrophobic interactions between conserved residues. The complex consists of a central roughly cubic [FXN42–210]24·[ISCU]24 sub-complex with one symmetric ISCU trimer bound on top of one symmetric FXN42–210 trimer at each of its eight vertices. Binding of 12 [NFS1]2·[ISD11]2 sub-complexes to the surface results in a globular macromolecule with a diameter of ∼15 nm and creates 24 Fe-S cluster assembly centers. The organization of each center recapitulates a previously proposed conserved mechanism for sulfur donation from NFS1 to ISCU and reveals, for the first time, a path for iron donation from FXN42–210 to ISCU. PMID:27519411

  9. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  10. Finding approximate gene clusters with Gecko 3

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Sascha; Jahn, Katharina; Wehner, Stefanie; Kuchenbecker, Leon; Marz, Manja; Stoye, Jens; Böcker, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Gene-order-based comparison of multiple genomes provides signals for functional analysis of genes and the evolutionary process of genome organization. Gene clusters are regions of co-localized genes on genomes of different species. The rapid increase in sequenced genomes necessitates bioinformatics tools for finding gene clusters in hundreds of genomes. Existing tools are often restricted to few (in many cases, only two) genomes, and often make restrictive assumptions such as short perfect conservation, conserved gene order or monophyletic gene clusters. We present Gecko 3, an open-source software for finding gene clusters in hundreds of bacterial genomes, that comes with an easy-to-use graphical user interface. The underlying gene cluster model is intuitive, can cope with low degrees of conservation as well as misannotations and is complemented by a sound statistical evaluation. To evaluate the biological benefit of Gecko 3 and to exemplify our method, we search for gene clusters in a dataset of 678 bacterial genomes using Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a reference. We confirm detected gene clusters reviewing the literature and comparing them to a database of operons; we detect two novel clusters, which were confirmed by publicly available experimental RNA-Seq data. The computational analysis is carried out on a laptop computer in <40 min. PMID:27679480

  11. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.