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Sample records for conserved testicular gene

  1. Pituitary-tumour-transforming-gene 1 expression in testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Pierconti, F; Milardi, D; Martini, M; Grande, G; Cenci, T; Gulino, G; Larocca, L M; Rindi, G; Pontecorvi, A; De Marinis, L

    2015-05-01

    Genomic instability is a feature of germ cell tumours. The pituitary-tumour-transforming-gene 1 (PTTG1) is the major effector of chromosome segregation during mitosis, protecting the cell from aneuploidy. The protein expression of this gene has been evaluated in testicular tumours by immunohistochemistry. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens of testicular tissues from 83 patients undergoing therapeutic orchidectomy for seminomas (n = 53), embryonal carcinoma (n = 10), yolk sac tumour (n = 10) and teratoma (n = 10) were examined. Seminoma was associated with in situ carcinoma (CIS) in 23 samples. PTTG1 immunostaining was performed using rabbit anti-PTTG1 as a primary antibody. In CIS, only isolated cells showed nuclear staining for PTTG1. In the peripheral area of seminoma, PTTG1 was mostly detected as localised in the nucleus; in the central area of seminoma, PTTG1 staining was more intense in cytoplasm. PTTG1-positive cells were also present in the areas of seminoma infiltration. On the other hand, in embryonal carcinoma, cells had a diffuse positive immunostaining, mainly cytoplasmatic, while we did not observe an expression of PTTG1 in yolk sac tumour and mature teratoma. We firstly identified the PTTG1 expression pattern in normal testis, CIS and testicular cancer. Further investigation is needed to clarify the functional activity of PTTG1 in testicular oncogenesis. PMID:24754453

  2. Evaluation of involvement of testicular metallothionein gene expression in the protective effect of zinc against cadmium-induced testicular pathophysiology in rat.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Imed; Banni, Mohamed; Saïd, Lamia; Saïd, Khaled; Kerkeni, Abdelhamid

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effects of exposure to Cd and Zn on testicular MT-1 and MT-2 gene expression and evaluate their involvement in Zn protection against Cd-induced testicular pathophysiology, male rats received either tap water, Cd or Cd+Zn in their drinking water for 35 days. Cd induced histopathological changes in testicular tissues were accompanied by decreased plasma testosterone level, plasma and testicular Zn concentrations, oxidative stress, and by increased MT-1 and MT-2 gene expression. Co-treatment with Cd and Zn reversed the Cd-induced decrease testosterone level and SOD activity, decreased testicular Cd accumulation and partially restored Cd-induced histological changes, lipid peroxidation, and Zn depletion. The increase of testicular MT-1 and MT-2 gene expression under Cd influence was significantly reduced in Cd+Zn group. These data suggest that Zn enhances the protection against Cd-induced testicular pathophysiology through non-MT gene expression mechanisms but essentially by preventing Cd accumulation, Zn deprivation and by ameliorating the testicular antioxidant status. PMID:20096345

  3. Promoter methylation of candidate genes associated with familial testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirabello, Lisa; Kratz, Christian P; Savage, Sharon A; Greene, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Recent genomic studies have identified risk SNPs in or near eight genes associated with testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). Mouse models suggest a role for Dnd1 epigenetics in TGCT susceptibility, and we have recently reported that transgenerational inheritance of epigenetic events may be associated with familial TGCT risk. We now investigate whether aberrant promoter methylation of selected candidate genes is associated with familial TGCT risk. Pyrosequencing assays were designed to evaluate CpG methylation in the promoters of selected genes in peripheral blood DNA from 153 TGCT affecteds and 116 healthy male relatives from 101 multiple-case families. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between promoter methylation and TGCT. We also quantified gene product expression of these genes, using quantitative PCR. We observed increased PDE11A, SPRY4 and BAK1 promoter methylation, and decreased KITLG promoter methylation, in familial TGCT cases versus healthy male family controls. A significant upward risk trend was observed for PDE11A when comparing the middle and highest tertiles of methylation to the lowest [odds ratio (OR) =1.55, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.82-2.93, and 1.94, 95% CI 1.03-3.66], respectively; P(trend)=0.042). A significant inverse association was observed for KITLG when comparing the middle and lowest tertiles to the highest (OR=2.15, 95% CI 1.12-4.11, and 2.15, 95% CI 1.12-4.14, respectively; P(trend)=0.031). There was a weak inverse correlation between promoter methylation and KITLG expression. Our results suggest that familial TGCT susceptibility may be associated with promoter methylation of previously-identified TGCT risk-modifying genes. Larger studies are warranted. PMID:23050052

  4. Identification of novel fusion genes in testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Andreas M.; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Bruun, Jarle; Andrews, Peter W.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most frequently diagnosed solid tumors in young men ages 15 to 44 years. Embryonal carcinomas (EC) comprise a subset of TGCTs that exhibit pluripotent characteristics similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the genetic drivers underlying malignant transformation of ECs are unknown. To elucidate the abnormal genetic events potentially contributing to TGCT malignancy, such as the existence of fusion genes or aberrant fusion transcript expression, we performed RNA sequencing of EC cell lines and their non-malignant ES cell line counterparts. We identified eight novel fusion transcripts and one gene with alternative promoter usage, ETV6. Four out of nine transcripts were found recurrently expressed in an extended panel of primary TGCTs and additional EC cell lines, but not in normal parenchyma of the testis, implying tumor-specific expression. Two of the recurrent transcripts involved an intrachromosomal fusion between RCC1 and HENMT1 located 80 Mbp apart and an interchromosomal fusion between RCC1 and ABHD12B. RCC1-ABHD12B and the ETV6 transcript variant were found to be preferentially expressed in the more undifferentiated TGCT subtypes. In vitro differentiation of the NTERA2 EC cell line resulted in significantly reduced expression of both fusion transcripts involving RCC1 and the ETV6 transcript variant, indicating that they are markers of pluripotency in a malignant setting. In conclusion, we identified eight novel fusion transcripts that, to our knowledge, are the first fusion genes described in TGCT and may therefore potentially serve as genomic biomarkers of malignant progression. PMID:26659575

  5. Conservation and gene banking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant conservation has several objectives the main ones include safeguarding our food supply, preserving crop wild relatives for breeding and selection of new cultivars, providing material for industrial and pharmaceutical uses and preserving the beauty and diversity of our flora for generations to ...

  6. Anchoring Ethinylestradiol Induced Gene Expression Changes with Testicular Morphology and Reproductive Function in the Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Hilary D.; Clark, Bryan W.; Hinton, David E.; Whitehead, Andrew; Martin, Stan; Kwok, Kevin W.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental estrogens are ubiquitous in the environment and can cause detrimental effects on male reproduction. In fish, a multitude of effects from environmental estrogens have been observed including altered courting behavior and fertility, sex reversal, and gonadal histopathology. However, few studies in fish assess the impacts of estrogenic exposure on a physiological endpoint, such as reproduction, as well as the associated morphologic response and underlying global gene expression changes. This study assessed the implications of a 14 day sub-chronic exposure of ethinylestradiol (EE2; 1.0 or 10.0 µg/L EE2) on male medaka fertility, testicular histology and testicular gene expression. The findings demonstrate that a 14 day exposure to EE2 induced impaired male reproductive capacity and time- and dose-dependent alterations in testicular morphology and gene expression. The average fertilization rate/day following the exposure for control, 1.0 and 10.0 µg/L EE2 was 91.3% (±4.4), 62.8% (±8.3) and 28.8% (±5.8), respectively. The testicular morphologic alterations included increased germ cell apoptosis, decreased germinal epithelium and thickening of the interstitium. These changes were highly associated with testicular gene expression changes using a medaka-specific microarray. A pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes emphasized genes and pathways associated with apoptosis, cell cycle and proliferation, collagen production/extracellular matrix organization, hormone signaling, male reproduction and protein ubiquitination among others. These findings highlight the importance of anchoring global gonadal gene expression changes with morphology and ultimately with tissue/organ function. PMID:23300682

  7. Mild calorie restriction does not affect testosterone levels and testicular gene expression in mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana S; Bonkowski, Michael S; França, Luiz R; Bartke, Andrzej

    2007-09-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and the somatotropic axis are influenced by nutritional factors. Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan but suppresses both the HPG and the somatotropic axes. Since most CR studies use a fairly severe (40%-60%) reduction of calorie intake, we hypothesized that a milder CR (20%) might not be deleterious to reproduction in male mice. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of 20% CR on testicular testosterone content and on testicular expression of genes that are relevant to testicular function and reproductive competence, including insulin-like growth factor-I, cytochrome P450 aromatase (Cyp19a1), androgen receptor, luteinizing hormone receptor, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, cytochrome P450c17 and 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase. To relate CR effects to the activity of the somatotropic axis, we have used growth hormone-resistant GHR knockout mice as well as transgenic mice overexpressing GH. Mild CR did not affect testosterone levels in testis homogenates and had little effect on expression of the examined genes in the reproductive organs. Altered activity of the GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis had a major impact on the parameters analyzed. The results also suggest that expression of several key genes involved in the control of testicular function is preserved under conditions of mild CR and encourage speculation that mild regimens of CR can produce longevity benefits without impairing reproduction.

  8. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens.

  9. Levonorgestrel enhances spermatogenesis suppression by testosterone with greater alteration in testicular gene expression in men.

    PubMed

    Lue, YanHe; Wang, Christina; Cui, YuGui; Wang, XingHai; Sha, JiaHao; Zhou, ZuoMin; Xu, Jun; Wang, Charles; Hikim, Amiya P Sinha; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2009-03-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that combined treatment of testosterone with a progestin induces a more rapid and greater suppression of spermatogenesis than testosterone treatment alone. We hypothesized that the suppressive effects of the combination of testosterone undecanoate (TU) injections plus oral levonorgestrel (LNG) on spermatogenesis may be mediated through a greater perturbation of testicular gene expression than TU alone. To test this hypothesis, we performed open testicular biopsy on 12 different adult healthy subjects: 1) four healthy men as controls; 2) four men 2 wk after TU treatment; and 3) four men 2 wk after TU + LNG administration. RNA isolated from biopsies was used for DNA microarray using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene expression with >or=2-fold changes (P < 0.05) compared with control was analyzed using the National Institutes of Health Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery 2008 resource. The TU treatment altered the gene expression in 109 transcripts, whereas TU + LNG altered the gene expression in 207 transcripts compared with control. Both TU and TU + LNG administration suppressed gene expression of insulin-like 3; cytochrome P450, family 17, subfamily A1 in Leydig cells; and inhibin alpha in Sertoli cells; they increased proapoptotic transcripts BCL2-like 14, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3; and they decreased X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein. In comparison with TU treatment alone, TU + LNG treatment upregulated insulin-like 6 and relaxin 1, and downregulated RNA-binding protein transcripts. We conclude that TU + LNG administration induces more changes in testicular gene expression than TU alone. This exploratory study provided a novel and valuable database to study the mechanisms of action of hormonal regulation of spermatogenesis in men and identified testicular-specific molecules that may serve as potential targets for male contraceptive

  10. ROS inhibit the expression of testicular steroidogenic enzyme genes via the suppression of Nur77 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yon; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Hong, Cheol Yi; Kim, Keon-Hee; Han, Jung-Soo; Ryu, Jae Chun; Chae, Ho Zoon; Yun, Chul-Ho; Lee, Keesook

    2009-12-01

    Steroidogenesis decreases with aging in the testis, whereas the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase. In addition, ROS have been reported to inhibit testicular steroidogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ROS on the transcriptional activity of Nur77, one of the major transcription factors that regulate the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes. ROS signaling inhibited Nur77 transactivation, which was diminished by either treatment with c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor or the expression of a dominant negative form of JNK. This suggests the involvement of JNK signaling, which elevates the expression of c-Jun as well as its phosphorylation in Leydig cells. In transient transfection assays, c-Jun suppressed Nur77 transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies using c-Jun mutants revealed that the protein level of c-Jun, but not phosphorylation itself, was important for the suppression of Nur77 transactivation. Nur77 directly interacted with c-Jun in vivo, which blocked the DNA binding activity of Nur77. Together, these results suggest that ROS signaling-mediated c-Jun upregulation suppresses the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes by inhibiting Nur77 transactivation, resulting in the reduction of testicular steroidogenesis. These findings may provide a mechanistic explanation for the age-related decline in testicular steroid hormone production. PMID:19751824

  11. Involvement of selenoprotein P and GPx4 gene expression in cadmium-induced testicular pathophysiology in rat.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Imed; Banni, Mohamed; Saïd, Lamia; Saïd, Khaled; Kerkeni, Abdelhamid

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the effect of co-exposure to cadmium (Cd) and selenium (Se) on selenoprotein P (SelP) and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPx4) gene expression in testis and to evaluate their possible involvement in Cd-induced testicular pathophysiology, male rats received either tap water, Cd or Cd+Se in their drinking water for 5 weeks. Cd exposure caused a down-regulation of SelP and GPx4 gene expression and a significant decrease in plasma and testicular concentrations of Se. These changes were accompanied by decreased plasma testosterone level, sperm count and motility, GSH content, protein-bound sulfhydryl concentration (PSH), enzymatic activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) as well as by increased glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, lipid peroxidation (as malondialdehyde, MDA) and proteins carbonyls (PC). The decrease of testicular SelP and GPx4 gene expression under Cd influence was significantly restored in Cd+Se group. Co-treatment with Cd and Se also totally reversed the Cd-induced depletion of Se, decrease in plasma testosterone level and partially restored Cd-induced oxidative stress and decrease in sperm count and motility. Taken together, these data suggest that down-regulation of SelP and GPx4 gene expression induces plasma and testicular Se depletion leading, at least in part, to Cd-induced testicular pathophysiology. PMID:20643113

  12. Testicular cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer ... The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Factors that may ... increases if he has: Abnormal testicle development Exposure ...

  13. Testicular torsion

    MedlinePlus

    Torsion of the testis; Testicular ischemia; Testicular twisting ... Symptoms include: Sudden severe pain in one testicle. The pain may occur ... ). Nausea or vomiting. Lightheadedness . Additional symptoms ...

  14. DSCR9 gene simultaneous expression in placental, testicular and renal tissues from baboon (papio hamadryas)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2002 Takamatsu and co-workers described the human DSCR9 gene and observed that it was transcriptionally active in human testicular tissue, but no protein was identified as a product of this transcript. Similar results were obtained in chimpanzee tissue. This gene has not been detected in species other than primates, suggesting that DSCR9 is exclusively found in these mammals. Results We report evidence of DSCR9 expression in placenta, testis and kidney of baboon (Papio hamadryas). We used primers specific for DSCR9 to amplify transcripts through reverse transcription (RT) coupled to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Furthermore, PCR was used to amplify the complete DSCR9 gene from genomic DNA from three baboons. We amplified and sequenced five overlapping segments that were assembled into the 3284 bp baboon DSCR9 gene, including the putative promoter and the entire transcriptional unit (5'-UTR, CDS and 3'-UTR). Conclusions The baboon DSCR9 gene is highly similar to the human counterpart. The isolated transcripts from baboon tissues (placenta, testis and kidney) of three different baboons correspond to the human orthologous gene. PMID:22704171

  15. Highly Conserved Testicular Localization of Claudin-11 in Normal and Impaired Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stammler, Angelika; Lüftner, Benjamin Udo; Kliesch, Sabine; Weidner, Wolfgang; Bergmann, Martin; Middendorff, Ralf; Konrad, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    In this study we tested expression of tight junction proteins in human, mouse and rat and analyzed the localization of claudin-11 in testis of patients with normal and impaired spermatogenesis. Recent concepts generated in mice suggest that the stage-specifically expressed claudin-3 acts as a basal barrier, sealing the seminiferous epithelium during migration of spermatocytes. Corresponding mechanisms have never been demonstrated in humans. Testicular biopsies (n = 103) from five distinct groups were analyzed: normal spermatogenesis (NSP, n = 28), hypospermatogenesis (Hyp, n = 24), maturation arrest at the level of primary spermatocytes (MA, n = 24), Sertoli cell only syndrome (SCO, n = 19), and spermatogonial arrest (SGA, n = 8). Protein expression of claudin-3, -11 and occludin was analyzed. Human, mice and rat testis robustly express claudin-11 protein. Occludin was detected in mouse and rat and claudin-3 was found only in mice. Thus, we selected claudin-11 for further analysis of localization. In NSP, claudin-11 is located at Sertoli-Sertoli junctions and in Sertoli cell contacts towards spermatogonia. Typically, claudin-11 patches do not reach the basal membrane, unless flanked by the Sertoli cell body or patches between two Sertoli cell bodies. The amount of basal claudin-11 patches was found to be increased in impaired spermatogenesis. Only claudin-11 is expressed in all three species examined. The claudin-11 pattern is robust in man with impaired spermatogenesis, but the proportion of localization is altered in SCO and MA. We conclude that claudin-11 might represent the essential component of the BTB in human. PMID:27486954

  16. EFFECT OF SEASONAL CHANGES ON TESTICULAR MORPHOLOGY AND THE EXPRESSION OF CIRCADIAN CLOCK GENES IN JAPANESE WOOD MICE (APODEMUS SPECIOSUS).

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M; Takino, S; Sugano, Y; Yamada, T; Nakata, A; Miura, T; Fukumoto, M; Yamashiro, H

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the seasonality of reproduction throughout the year in Japanese wood mice (Apodemus speciosus). The effect of seasonal changes on testicular morphology and the periodic expression of circadian clock genes in the hypothalamus and testes of male individuals was evaluated. We also examined the morphology of the testes and caudae epididymides of male mice. In addition, RT-PCR analysis was carried out with mRNA extracted from the hypothalamus and testes to evaluate the expression of the circadian clock genes Clock, Bmal1, Per1, and Cry1. The complete induction of testicular activity was detected from February to April and from August to October, with testes weight increasing with the completion of spermatogenesis (reproductive season). From May to early June and from November to early January, testicular weight declined, the seminiferous tubules reduced in size, spermatogenesis was arrested, and sperm were not produced (non-reproductive season). From mid- June to July and mid-January, the re-induction of testicular activity for spermatogenesis was observed in the seminiferous tubules (transitional season). Out of the four examined genes, Cry1 had the highest expression level in both the hypothalamus and testes throughout the year, followed by Bmal1, Per1, and Clock. The expression of Bmal1 was significantly lower in the hypothalamus and testes during the transitional season compared to the reproductive and non-reproductive seasons. Cry1 transcript levels were also significantly lower in the hypothalamus and testes during the transitional season compared to the reproductive season. In conclusion, the results indicating changes in testicular morphology revealed annual reproductive, non-reproductive, and transmission periods in Japanese wood mice. When an increase in testicular activity was observed indicating the onset of the reproductive season, the mean day length was approximately 11–13 h. The expression of the circadian clock genes Bmal1

  17. Dexamethasone acutely regulates endocrine parameters in stallions and subsequently affects gene expression in testicular germ cells.

    PubMed

    Ing, N H; Brinsko, S P; Curley, K O; Forrest, D W; Love, C C; Hinrichs, K; Vogelsang, M M; Varner, D D; Welsh, T H

    2015-01-01

    Testicular steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis are negatively impacted by stress-related hormones such as glucocorticoids. The effects of two injections of a therapeutic dose of dexamethasone (a synthetic glucocorticoid, 0.1mg/kg; i.v.) given 24h apart to each of three stallions were investigated and compared to three saline-injected control stallions. Dexamethasone decreased circulating concentrations of cortisol by 50% at 24h after the initial injection. Serum testosterone decreased by a maximum of 94% from 4 to 20h after the initial injection of dexamethasone. Semen parameters of the dexamethasone-treated stallions were unchanged in the subsequent two weeks. Two weeks after treatment, stallions were castrated. Functional genomic analyses of the testes revealed that, of eight gene products analyzed, dexamethasone depressed concentrations of heat shock protein DNAJC4 and sperm-specific calcium channel CATSPER1 mRNAs by more than 60%. Both genes are expressed in germ cells during spermiogenesis and have been related to male fertility in other species, including humans. This is the first report of decreased DNAJC4 and CATSPER1 mRNA concentrations in testes weeks after dexamethasone treatment. Concentrations of these mRNAs in sperm may be useful as novel markers of fertility in stallions. PMID:25487569

  18. Ectopic Hydrocele After Testicular Transposition.

    PubMed

    Berli, Jens U; Zelken, Jonathan; Schuyler, Kyle; Naslund, Michael; Rasko, Yvonne

    2016-04-01

    A 55-year-old man was treated for Fournier gangrene in 2004 with radical debridement and bilateral testicular transposition to the medial thighs. Eight years later, bilateral hydroceles formed. After conservative measures failed for treatment of the hydroceles, the condition was treated during desired testicular relocation, and creation of a neoscrotum. In the case presented, bilateral thigh hydroceles may have developed from lymphatic injury during testicular transposition. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of bilateral hydrocele testis in the medial thigh pouches following ectopic testicular transposition.

  19. Resveratrol reverses cadmium chloride-induced testicular damage and subfertility by downregulating p53 and Bax and upregulating gonadotropins and Bcl-2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eleawa, Samy M; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud A; Alhashem, Fahaid H; Bin-Jaliah, Ismaeel; Sakr, Hussein F; Elrefaey, Hesham M; Elkarib, Abbas O; Alessa, Riyad M; Haidara, Mohammad A; Shatoor, Abdullah S; Khalil, Mohammad A

    2014-04-24

    This study was performed to investigate the protective and therapeutic effects of resveratrol (RES) against CdCl2-induced toxicity in rat testes. Seven experimental groups of adult male rats were formulated as follows: A) controls+NS, B) control+vehicle (saline solution of hydroxypropyl cyclodextrin), C) RES treated, D) CdCl2+NS, E) CdCl2+vehicle, F) RES followed by CdCl2 and M) CdCl2 followed by RES. At the end of the protocol, serum levels of FSH, LH and testosterone were measured in all groups, and testicular levels of TBARS and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. Epididymal semen analysis was performed, and testicular expression of Bcl-2, p53 and Bax was assessed by RT-PCR. Also, histopathological changes of the testes were examined microscopically. Administration of RES before or after cadmium chloride in rats improved semen parameters including count, motility, daily sperm production and morphology, increased serum concentrations of gonadotropins and testosterone, decreased testicular lipid peroxidation and increased SOD activity. RES not only attenuated cadmium chloride-induced testicular histopathology but was also able to protect against the onset of cadmium chloride testicular toxicity. Cadmium chloride downregulated the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2 and upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. Resveratrol protected against and partially reversed cadmium chloride testicular toxicity via upregulation of Bcl2 and downregulation of p53 and Bax gene expression. The antioxidant activity of RES protects against cadmium chloride testicular toxicity and partially reverses its effect via upregulation of BCl2 and downregulation of p53 and Bax expression. PMID:24492640

  20. Resveratrol Reverses Cadmium Chloride-induced Testicular Damage and Subfertility by Downregulating p53 and Bax and Upregulating Gonadotropins and Bcl-2 gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    ELEAWA, Samy M; ALKHATEEB, Mahmoud A; ALHASHEM, Fahaid H; BIN-JALIAH, Ismaeel; SAKR, Hussein F; ELREFAEY, Hesham M; ELKARIB, Abbas O; ALESSA, Riyad M; HAIDARA, Mohammad A; SHATOOR, Abdullah S.; KHALIL, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the protective and therapeutic effects of resveratrol (RES) against CdCl2-induced toxicity in rat testes. Seven experimental groups of adult male rats were formulated as follows: A) controls+NS, B) control+vehicle (saline solution of hydroxypropyl cyclodextrin), C) RES treated, D) CdCl2+NS, E) CdCl2+vehicle, F) RES followed by CdCl2 and M) CdCl2 followed by RES. At the end of the protocol, serum levels of FSH, LH and testosterone were measured in all groups, and testicular levels of TBARS and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. Epididymal semen analysis was performed, and testicular expression of Bcl-2, p53 and Bax was assessed by RT-PCR. Also, histopathological changes of the testes were examined microscopically. Administration of RES before or after cadmium chloride in rats improved semen parameters including count, motility, daily sperm production and morphology, increased serum concentrations of gonadotropins and testosterone, decreased testicular lipid peroxidation and increased SOD activity. RES not only attenuated cadmium chloride-induced testicular histopathology but was also able to protect against the onset of cadmium chloride testicular toxicity. Cadmium chloride downregulated the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2 and upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. Resveratrol protected against and partially reversed cadmium chloride testicular toxicity via upregulation of Bcl2 and downregulation of p53 and Bax gene expression. The antioxidant activity of RES protects against cadmium chloride testicular toxicity and partially reverses its effect via upregulation of BCl2 and downregulation of p53 and Bax expression. PMID:24492640

  1. Resveratrol reverses cadmium chloride-induced testicular damage and subfertility by downregulating p53 and Bax and upregulating gonadotropins and Bcl-2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eleawa, Samy M; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud A; Alhashem, Fahaid H; Bin-Jaliah, Ismaeel; Sakr, Hussein F; Elrefaey, Hesham M; Elkarib, Abbas O; Alessa, Riyad M; Haidara, Mohammad A; Shatoor, Abdullah S; Khalil, Mohammad A

    2014-04-24

    This study was performed to investigate the protective and therapeutic effects of resveratrol (RES) against CdCl2-induced toxicity in rat testes. Seven experimental groups of adult male rats were formulated as follows: A) controls+NS, B) control+vehicle (saline solution of hydroxypropyl cyclodextrin), C) RES treated, D) CdCl2+NS, E) CdCl2+vehicle, F) RES followed by CdCl2 and M) CdCl2 followed by RES. At the end of the protocol, serum levels of FSH, LH and testosterone were measured in all groups, and testicular levels of TBARS and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. Epididymal semen analysis was performed, and testicular expression of Bcl-2, p53 and Bax was assessed by RT-PCR. Also, histopathological changes of the testes were examined microscopically. Administration of RES before or after cadmium chloride in rats improved semen parameters including count, motility, daily sperm production and morphology, increased serum concentrations of gonadotropins and testosterone, decreased testicular lipid peroxidation and increased SOD activity. RES not only attenuated cadmium chloride-induced testicular histopathology but was also able to protect against the onset of cadmium chloride testicular toxicity. Cadmium chloride downregulated the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2 and upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. Resveratrol protected against and partially reversed cadmium chloride testicular toxicity via upregulation of Bcl2 and downregulation of p53 and Bax gene expression. The antioxidant activity of RES protects against cadmium chloride testicular toxicity and partially reverses its effect via upregulation of BCl2 and downregulation of p53 and Bax expression.

  2. Testicular biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... egg in the lab. This process is called in vitro fertilization. Testicular biopsy may also be done if you have found a lump during testicular self-examination . If tests ... the lump may be in the testicle, surgery may be needed to look ...

  3. Age-related alterations in pituitary and testicular functions in long-lived growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Varadaraj; Dawson, Christina R; Martin, Eric R; Rocha, Juliana S; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J

    2007-12-01

    The somatotropic axis, GH, and IGF-I interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in health and disease. GH-resistant GH receptor-disrupted knockout (GHRKO) male mice are fertile but exhibit delayed puberty and decreases in plasma FSH levels, testicular content of LH, and prolactin (PRL) receptors, whereas PRL levels are elevated. Because the lifespan of GHRKO mice is much greater than the lifespan of their normal siblings, it was of interest to compare age-related changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in GHRKO and normal animals. Plasma IGF-I, insulin, PRL, LH, FSH, androstenedione and testosterone levels, and acute responses to GnRH and LH were measured in young (2-4 and 5-6 months of age) and old (18-19 and 23-26 months of age) male GHRKO mice and their normal siblings. Plasma IGF-I was not detectable in GHRKO mice. Plasma PRL levels increased with age in normal mice but declined in GHRKO males, and did not differ in old GHRKO and normal animals. Plasma LH responses to acute GnRH stimulation were attenuated in GHRKO mice but increased with age only in normal mice. Plasma FSH levels were decreased in GHRKO mice regardless of age. Plasma testosterone responses to LH stimulation were attenuated in old mice regardless of genotype, whereas plasma androstenedione responses were reduced with age only in GHRKO mice. Testicular IGF-I mRNA levels were normal in young and increased in old GHRKO mice, whereas testicular concentrations and total IGF-I levels were decreased in these animals. These findings indicate that GH resistance due to targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene in mice leads to suppression of testicular IGF-I levels, and modifies the effects of aging on plasma PRL levels and responses of the pituitary and testes to GnRH and LH stimulation. Plasma testosterone levels declined during aging in normal but not in GHRKO mice, and the age-related increase in the LH responses to exogenous GnRH was absent in GHRKO mice, perhaps reflecting a

  4. A novel mammalian protein kinase gene (mak) is highly expressed in testicular germ cells at and after meiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Matsushime, H; Jinno, A; Takagi, N; Shibuya, M

    1990-01-01

    We isolated a novel gene designated mak (male germ cell-associated kinase) by using weak cross-hybridization with a tyrosine kinase gene (v-ros). Sequence analysis of the cDNA corresponding to the 2.6-kilobase transcript revealed that the predicted product of rat mak consisted of 622 amino acids and contained protein kinase consensus motifs in its amino-terminal region. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of mak in the kinase domain with those of other protein kinase genes demonstrated that mak was approximately 40% identical to the cdc2-CDC28 gene family in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and humans but less identical to most other protein kinase gene products. Expression of mak was highly tissue specific, and its transcripts were detected almost exclusively in testicular cells entering and after meiosis but hardly detectable in ovarian cells including oocytes, after the dictyotene stage. These results suggest that the mak gene plays an important role in spermatogenesis. Images PMID:2183027

  5. Refining the mouse chromosomal location of Cdm, the major gene associated with susceptibility to cadmium-induced testicular necrosis.

    PubMed

    Dalton, T P; Miller, M L; Wu, X; Menon, A; Cianciolo, E; McKinnon, R A; Smith, P W; Robinson, L J; Nebert, D W

    2000-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd++) is a widespread environmental pollutant and classifed as an IARC 'Category I' human carcinogen. Cd++ can also cause severe renal toxicity and may be involved clinically in cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Genetic differences in sensitivity to cadmium toxicity have been noted in humans, whereas, among inbred mouse strains, unequivocal genetic data exist. Resistance to cadmium-induced testicular damage was reported in 1973 to be associated with a single major recessive gene, named Cdm, which has now been localized to mouse chromosome (Chr) 3. Using polymorphic microsatellite markers and semiquantitative histological parameters, we have corroborated the original 1973 data concerning mendelian inheritance and have further refined the region containing the Cdm gene from more than 24 cM to 0.64 cM (estimated 40-80 genes). We phenotyped 26 recombinant inbred lines generated from C57BL/6J (B6, resistant) and DBA/2J (D2, sensitive) inbred mice, and determined that the Cdm gene maps between microsatellite markers D3Mit110 and D3Mit255. Although toxicity to numerous heavy metals is well known, virtually no molecular mechanisms have yet been uncovered either in humans or laboratory animals. Identification and characterization of the mouse Cdm gene should enhance our understanding of heavy metal toxicity by identifying and characterizing, for the first time, a major mammalian gene responsible for susceptibility to diseases caused by heavy metal toxicity. PMID:10762002

  6. Testicular failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... LH . Your doctor may also order a semen analysis to examine the number of healthy sperm you are producing. Sometimes, an ultrasound of the testes will be ordered. Testicular failure and low testosterone level may be hard to ...

  7. Evolutionary conservation of neighbouring gene pairs in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiling; Han, Bin

    2009-05-15

    Evolutionary conservation of neighbouring gene pairs has been widely explored in many species, but remains poorly understood in plants. The availability of several plant genome sequences allows for an in-depth investigation of this problem in plants. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic conservation of physically linked gene pairs in nine plant genomes and compared the conservation in different orientations. We also examined several potential determinants to detect whether they affect the conservation of neighbouring gene pairs. Our results suggested that among the three types of neighbouring gene pairs, closely linked parallel pairs might be the least conserved. Intergenic distance was shown to be a major determinant of linkage conservation, suggesting that the conservation of gene order in plants was determined primarily by chance. The enrichment of housekeeping genes was identified to contribute to the conservation of all three types and the enrichment of genes involved in protein metabolism might contribute to the conservation of parallel pairs. Moreover, a co-expressed signal was detected in conserved divergent pairs, which might be determined by intergenic distance.

  8. Polymorphism of the CTNNB1 and FOXL2 Genes is not Associated with Canine XX Testicular/Ovotesticular Disorder of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Salamon, Sylwia; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Switonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    78,XX testicular or ovotesticular disorder of sex development (DSD) is the most common sex anomaly in dogs, but its molecular background remains unknown. It was hypothesized that the causative mutation may reside in canine chromosome 23 (CFA23), where two genes playing a pivotal role in ovarian development (CTNNB1 and FOXL2) are located. The aim of our study was to search for polymorphism in both candidate genes in 15 DSD dogs (78,XX and a lack of the SRYgene) and 29 normal females. Altogether, 7 novel polymorphic variants were identified: 5 SNPs in CTNNB1 and 2 indels in the FOXL2 gene. The distribution of the identified variants was similar in the DSD and control dogs. Therefore, we concluded that the conducted research did not prove an association between these polymorphisms and canine testicular or ovotesticular XX DSD.

  9. Isoform-Level Gene Expression Profiles of Human Y Chromosome Azoospermia Factor Genes and Their X Chromosome Paralogs in the Testicular Tissue of Non-Obstructive Azoospermia Patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi Rastegar, Diba; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Alikhani, Mehdi; Parsamatin, Pouria; Sahraneshin Samani, Fazel; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Mohammad Ahadi, Ali; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita; Piryaei, Abbas; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    The human Y chromosome has an inevitable role in male fertility because it contains many genes critical for spermatogenesis and the development of the male gonads. Any genetic variation or epigenetic modification affecting the expression pattern of Y chromosome genes may thus lead to male infertility. In this study, we performed isoform-level gene expression profiling of Y chromosome genes within the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions, their X chromosome counterparts, and few autosomal paralogues in testicular biopsies of 12 men with preserved spermatogenesis and 68 men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) (40 Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) and 28 premiotic maturation arrest (MA)). This was undertaken using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) at the transcript level and Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) at the protein level. We profiled the expression of 41 alternative transcripts encoded by 14 AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc region genes (USP9Y, DDX3Y, XKRY, HSFY1, CYORF15A, CYORF15B, KDM5D, EIF1AY, RPS4Y2, RBMY1A1, PRY, BPY2, DAZ1, and CDY1) as well as their X chromosome homologue transcripts and a few autosomal homologues. Of the 41 transcripts, 18 were significantly down-regulated in men with NOA when compared with those of men with complete spermatogenesis. In contrast, the expression of five transcripts increased significantly in NOA patients. Furthermore, to confirm the qPCR results at the protein level, we performed immunoblotting and IHC experiments (based on 24 commercial and homemade antibodies) that detected 10 AZF-encoded proteins. In addition, their localization in testis cell types and organelles was determined. Interestingly, the two missing proteins, XKRY and CYORF15A, were detected for the first time. Finally, we focused on the expression patterns of the significantly altered genes in 12 MA patients with successful sperm retrieval compared to those of 12 MA patients with failed sperm retrieval to predict the success of sperm retrieval in

  10. A Study of Differential Expression of Testicular Genes in Various Reproductive Phases of Hemidactylus flaviviridis (Wall Lizard) to Derive Their Association with Onset of Spermatogenesis and Its Relevance to Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Hironmoy; Arya, Satyapal; Rai, Umesh; Majumdar, Subeer S.

    2016-01-01

    Testis of Hemidactylus flaviviridis, commonly known as Indian wall lizard, displays a lack of cellular and metabolic activity in regressed phase of testis during non-breeding season of the year. Retracted Sertoli cells (Sc), fibroid myoid cells and pre-meiotic resting spermatogonia are observed in such testis. This situation is akin to certain forms of infertility in men where hormone supplementation fails to generate sperm despite the presence of Sc and germ cells (Gc) in testis. In testis of lizard, spermatogenesis is reinitiated upon increased level of hormones during appropriate season (phase of recrudescence). Study of genes associated with generation of sperm, from regressed adult testis in lizard, may provide valuable information for understanding certain forms of male idiopathic infertility. Subtractive hybridization using testicular RNA obtained from the regressed and active phases of lizard reproductive cycle led to identify eight partial mRNA sequences that showed sequence homology with mice genes. We further evaluated the gene expression prolife by real-time PCR in three different reproductive phases of H. flaviviridis: regressed (pre-meiotic), recrudescent (meiotic) and active (post meiotic), for comparison with the corresponding testicular phases found in testis of 5 days (pre-meiotic), 20 days (meiotic) and 60 days (post-meiotic) old mouse. This is the first report where genes associated with progression of spermatogenesis during active phase, which follows a regressed state of adult testis, were identified in lizard and found to be conserved in mouse. Six important genes, Hk1, Nme5, Akap4, Arih1, Rassf7 and Tubb4b were found to be strictly associated with active spermatogenesis in both mouse and lizard. Factors interfering with the expression of any of these genes may potentially abrogate the process of spermatogenesis leading to infertility. Such information may shed light on unknown causes of idiopathic male infertility. PMID:26963275

  11. A Study of Differential Expression of Testicular Genes in Various Reproductive Phases of Hemidactylus flaviviridis (Wall Lizard) to Derive Their Association with Onset of Spermatogenesis and Its Relevance to Mammals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Hironmoy; Arya, Satyapal; Rai, Umesh; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2016-01-01

    Testis of Hemidactylus flaviviridis, commonly known as Indian wall lizard, displays a lack of cellular and metabolic activity in regressed phase of testis during non-breeding season of the year. Retracted Sertoli cells (Sc), fibroid myoid cells and pre-meiotic resting spermatogonia are observed in such testis. This situation is akin to certain forms of infertility in men where hormone supplementation fails to generate sperm despite the presence of Sc and germ cells (Gc) in testis. In testis of lizard, spermatogenesis is reinitiated upon increased level of hormones during appropriate season (phase of recrudescence). Study of genes associated with generation of sperm, from regressed adult testis in lizard, may provide valuable information for understanding certain forms of male idiopathic infertility. Subtractive hybridization using testicular RNA obtained from the regressed and active phases of lizard reproductive cycle led to identify eight partial mRNA sequences that showed sequence homology with mice genes. We further evaluated the gene expression prolife by real-time PCR in three different reproductive phases of H. flaviviridis: regressed (pre-meiotic), recrudescent (meiotic) and active (post meiotic), for comparison with the corresponding testicular phases found in testis of 5 days (pre-meiotic), 20 days (meiotic) and 60 days (post-meiotic) old mouse. This is the first report where genes associated with progression of spermatogenesis during active phase, which follows a regressed state of adult testis, were identified in lizard and found to be conserved in mouse. Six important genes, Hk1, Nme5, Akap4, Arih1, Rassf7 and Tubb4b were found to be strictly associated with active spermatogenesis in both mouse and lizard. Factors interfering with the expression of any of these genes may potentially abrogate the process of spermatogenesis leading to infertility. Such information may shed light on unknown causes of idiopathic male infertility.

  12. A Sexual Shift Induced by Silencing of a Single Insulin-Like Gene in Crayfish: Ovarian Upregulation and Testicular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Ohad; Manor, Rivka; Weil, Simy; Gafni, Ohad; Linial, Assaf; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Ventura, Tomer; Sagi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    In sequential hermaphrodites, intersexuality occurs naturally, usually as a transition state during sexual re-differentiation processes. In crustaceans, male sexual differentiation is controlled by the male-specific androgenic gland (AG). An AG-specific insulin-like gene, previously identified in the red-claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (designated Cq-IAG), was found in this study to be the prominent transcript in an AG cDNA subtractive library. In C. quadricarinatus, sexual plasticity is exhibited by intersex individuals in the form of an active male reproductive system and male secondary sex characters, along with a constantly arrested ovary. This intersexuality was exploited to follow changes caused by single gene silencing, accomplished via dsRNA injection. Cq-IAG silencing induced dramatic sex-related alterations, including male feature feminization, a reduction in sperm production, extensive testicular degeneration, expression of the vitellogenin gene, and accumulation of yolk proteins in the developing oocytes. Upon silencing of the gene, AG cells hypertrophied, possibly to compensate for low hormone levels, as reflected in the poor production of the insulin-like hormone (and revealed by immunohistochemistry). These results demonstrate both the functionality of Cq-IAG as an androgenic hormone-encoding gene and the dependence of male gonad viability on the Cq-IAG product. This study is the first to provide evidence that silencing an insulin-like gene in intersex C. quadricarinatus feminizes male-related phenotypes. These findings, moreover, contribute to the understanding of the regulation of sexual shifts, whether naturally occurring in sequential hermaphrodites or abnormally induced by endocrine disruptors found in the environment, and offer insight into an unusual gender-related link to the evolution of insulins. PMID:21151555

  13. Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  14. Associations of Filaggrin Gene Loss-of-Function Variants with Urinary Phthalate Metabolites and Testicular Function in Young Danish Men

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Niels; Meldgaard, Michael; Frederiksen, Hanne; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Carlsen, Berit Christina; Stender, Steen; Szecsi, Pal Bela; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik; De Meyts, Ewa Rajpert; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Filaggrin is an epidermal protein that is crucial for skin barrier function. Up to 10% of Europeans and 5% of Asians carry at least one null allele in the filaggrin gene (FLG). Reduced expression of filaggrin in carriers of the null allele is associated with facilitated transfer of allergens across the epidermis. We hypothesized that these individuals may have increased transdermal uptake of endocrine disruptors, including phthalates. Objectives: We investigated urinary excretion of phthalate metabolites and testicular function in young men with and without FLG loss-of-function variants in a cross-sectional study of 861 young men from the general Danish population. Methods: All men were genotyped for FLG R501X, 2282del4, and R2447X loss-of-function variants. We measured urinary concentrations of 14 phthalate metabolites and serum levels of reproductive hormones. We also evaluated semen quality. Results: Sixty-five men (7.5%) carried at least one FLG-null allele. FLG-null carriers had significantly higher urinary concentrations of several phthalate metabolites, including a 33% higher concentration of MnBP (mono-n-butyl phthalate; 95% CI: 16, 51%). FLG-null variants were not significantly associated with reproductive hormones or semen quality parameters. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that carriers of FLG loss-of-function alleles may have higher internal exposure to phthalates, possibly due to increased transepidermal absorption. FLG loss-of-function variants may indicate susceptible populations for which special attention to transepidermal absorption of chemicals and medication may be warranted. Citation: Joensen UN, Jørgensen N, Meldgaard M, Frederiksen H, Andersson AM, Menné T, Johansen JD, Carlsen BC, Stender S, Szecsi PB, Skakkebæk NE, Rajpert-De Meyts E, Thyssen JP. 2014. Associations of filaggrin gene loss-of-function variants with urinary phthalate metabolites and testicular function in young Danish men. Environ Health Perspect 122

  15. Testicular degeneration in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M; Murphy, Zoe; Selva, David M; Hamidizadeh, Reza; Pearson, Jacqueline; Petersén, Asa; Björkqvist, Maria; Muir, Cameron; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hammond, Geoffrey L; Vogl, A Wayne; Hayden, Michael R; Leavitt, Blair R

    2007-06-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an adult onset, neurodegenerative disorder that results from CAG expansion in the HD gene. Recent work has demonstrated testicular degeneration in mouse models of HD and alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in HD patients. Here, we show that HD patients have specific testicular pathology with reduced numbers of germ cells and abnormal seminiferous tubule morphology. In the YAC128 mouse model, testicular degeneration develops prior to 12 months of age, but at 12 months, there is no evidence for decreased testosterone levels or loss of GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus. This suggests that testicular pathology results from a direct toxic effect of mutant huntingtin in the testis and is supported by the fact that huntingtin is highly expressed in the affected cell populations in the testis. Understanding the pathogenesis of HD in the testis may reveal common critical pathways which lead to degeneration in both the brain and testis.

  16. What Is Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a microscope). Some cases are found incidentally (by accident) when a testicular biopsy is done for another ... Testicular Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Testicular Cancer Talking With ...

  17. Sensitivity to cadmium-induced genotoxicity in rat testicular cells is associated with minimal expression of the metallothionein gene.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, N; Hochadel, J F; Coogan, T P; Koropatnick, J; Waalkes, M P

    1995-02-01

    Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal. Although the mechanism of tumor induction is unknown, DNA/metal interactions may be involved. Metallothionein can protect against cadmium toxicity in our previous work it was shown to reduce cadmium genotoxicity in cultured cells. To extend these results, the genotoxicity of cadmium was studied in R2C cells, a rat testicular Leydig cell line. The R2C cells were very sensitive to cadmium-induced single-strand DNA damage (SSD), as measured by alkaline elution. SSD occurred in R2C cells after treatment with 25 and 50 microM CdCl2 for 2 hr. Prior work showed other cells required much higher levels of cadmium (approximately 500 microM) to induce genotoxicity. The genotoxic levels of cadmium (25-50 microM) were not cytotoxic in R2C cells as assessed by a metabolic activity (MTT) assay. Pretreatment of R2C cells with a low cadmium dose (2 microM, 24 hr) had no effect on cadmium-induced SSD, in contrast to prior work in other cells where such pretreatments reduced SSD through metallothionein gene activation. In fact, cadmium or zinc treatments resulted in little or no increase in metallothionein gene expression in R2C cells as determined by Northern blot analysis for metallothionein mRNA using cDNA or oligonucleotide probes and radioimmunoassay for metallothionein protein production. Basal metallothionein mRNA was essentially nondetectable. Induction of a cadmium-binding protein in R2C cells did occur, as determined by Cd-heme assay, but did not induce tolerance to SSD. In vivo, the Leydig cell is a target for cadmium carcinogenicity and its cadmium-binding protein is thought not to be a true metallothionein. These results indicate that R2C cells are sensitive to cadmium-induced genotoxicity and that this sensitivity is associated with minimal expression of the metallothionein gene. PMID:7871536

  18. The Ter Mutation In The Dead End Gene Causes Germ Cell Loss And Testicular Germ Cell Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Youngren, Kirsten K.; Coveney, Douglas; Peng, Xiaoning; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Schmidt, Laura S.; Nickerson, Michael L.; Lamb, Bruce T.; Deng Jian Min; Behringer, Richard R.; Capel, Blanche; Rubin, Edward M.; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Matin, Angabin

    2005-01-01

    In mice, the Ter mutation causes primordial germ cell (PGC) loss in all genetic backgrounds1. Ter is also a potent modifier of spontaneous testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) susceptibility in the 129 family of inbred strains, and markedly increases TGCT incidence in 129-Ter/Ter males2 4. In 129-Ter/Ter mice, some of the remaining PGCs transform into undifferentiated pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells2 6, and after birth differentiate into various cells and tissues that compose TGCTs. Here, we report the positional cloning of Ter, revealing a point mutation that introduces a termination codon in the mouse orthologue (Dnd1) of the zebrafish dead end (dnd) gene. PGC deficiency is corrected both with bacterial artificial chromosomes that contain Dnd1 and with a Dnd1-encoding transgene. Dnd1 is expressed in fetal gonads during the critical period when TGCTs originate. DND1 has an RNA recognition motif and is most similar to the apobec complementation factor, a component of the cytidine t o uridine RNA-editing complex. These results suggest that Ter may adversely affect essential aspects of RNA biology during PGC development. DND1 is the first protein known to have an RNA recognition motif directly implicated as a heritable cause of spontaneous tumorigenesis. TGCT development in the 129-Ter mouse strain models paediatric TGCT in humans. This work will have important implications for our understanding of the genetic control of TGCT pathogenesis and PGC biology.

  19. Evolution of Vertebrate Adam Genes; Duplication of Testicular Adams from Ancient Adam9/9-like Loci.

    PubMed

    Bahudhanapati, Harinath; Bhattacharya, Shashwati; Wei, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Members of the disintegrin metalloproteinase (ADAM) family have important functions in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as cell signaling. There are two major types of ADAMs: the somatic ADAMs (sADAMs) that have a significant presence in somatic tissues, and the testicular ADAMs (tADAMs) that are expressed predominantly in the testis. Genes encoding tADAMs can be further divided into two groups: group I (intronless) and group II (intron-containing). To date, tAdams have only been reported in placental mammals, and their evolutionary origin and relationship to sAdams remain largely unknown. Using phylogenetic and syntenic tools, we analyzed the Adam genes in various vertebrates ranging from fishes to placental mammals. Our analyses reveal duplication and loss of some sAdams in certain vertebrate species. In particular, there exists an Adam9-like gene in non-mammalian vertebrates but not mammals. We also identified putative group I and group II tAdams in all amniote species that have been examined. These tAdam homologues are more closely related to Adams 9 and 9-like than to other sAdams. In all amniote species examined, group II tAdams lie in close vicinity to Adam9 and hence likely arose from tandem duplication, whereas group I tAdams likely originated through retroposition because of their lack of introns. Clusters of multiple group I tAdams are also common, suggesting tandem duplication after retroposition. Therefore, Adam9/9-like and some of the derived tAdam loci are likely preferred targets for tandem duplication and/or retroposition. Consistent with this hypothesis, we identified a young retroposed gene that duplicated recently from Adam9 in the opossum. As a result of gene duplication, some tAdams were pseudogenized in certain species, whereas others acquired new expression patterns and functions. The rapid duplication of Adam genes has a major contribution to the diversity of ADAMs in various vertebrate species. PMID:26308360

  20. Evolution of Vertebrate Adam Genes; Duplication of Testicular Adams from Ancient Adam9/9-like Loci

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Members of the disintegrin metalloproteinase (ADAM) family have important functions in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as cell signaling. There are two major types of ADAMs: the somatic ADAMs (sADAMs) that have a significant presence in somatic tissues, and the testicular ADAMs (tADAMs) that are expressed predominantly in the testis. Genes encoding tADAMs can be further divided into two groups: group I (intronless) and group II (intron-containing). To date, tAdams have only been reported in placental mammals, and their evolutionary origin and relationship to sAdams remain largely unknown. Using phylogenetic and syntenic tools, we analyzed the Adam genes in various vertebrates ranging from fishes to placental mammals. Our analyses reveal duplication and loss of some sAdams in certain vertebrate species. In particular, there exists an Adam9-like gene in non-mammalian vertebrates but not mammals. We also identified putative group I and group II tAdams in all amniote species that have been examined. These tAdam homologues are more closely related to Adams 9 and 9-like than to other sAdams. In all amniote species examined, group II tAdams lie in close vicinity to Adam9 and hence likely arose from tandem duplication, whereas group I tAdams likely originated through retroposition because of their lack of introns. Clusters of multiple group I tAdams are also common, suggesting tandem duplication after retroposition. Therefore, Adam9/9-like and some of the derived tAdam loci are likely preferred targets for tandem duplication and/or retroposition. Consistent with this hypothesis, we identified a young retroposed gene that duplicated recently from Adam9 in the opossum. As a result of gene duplication, some tAdams were pseudogenized in certain species, whereas others acquired new expression patterns and functions. The rapid duplication of Adam genes has a major contribution to the diversity of ADAMs in various vertebrate species. PMID:26308360

  1. Molecular identification of genes involved in testicular steroid synthesis and characterization of the response to gonadotropic stimulation in the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) testis.

    PubMed

    Marín-Juez, Rubén; Castellana, Barbara; Manchado, Manuel; Planas, Josep V

    2011-05-15

    In male teleosts, testicular steroids are essential hormones for the regulation of spermatogenesis and their production is regulated by pituitary gonadotropins. In the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), an economically important flatfish with semi-cystic and asynchronous spermatogenesis, the gonadotropic regulation of spermatogenesis, particularly regarding the production and regulation of testicular steroids, are not well understood. For this reason, we first cloned and characterized the response of several key genes for the production and action of testicular steroids to the in vivo administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and, second, we investigated the transcriptomic effects of hCG in the Senegalese sole testis. We succeeded in cloning the full-length cDNAs for Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein (StAR), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), 17β-HSD and 20β-HSD and a partial cDNA for the nuclear progesterone receptor. In this study we also identified a transcript encoding a protein with homology to StAR, which we named StAR-like, that could represent a new member of the StAR-related lipid transfer (START) family. All the cloned genes were expressed in the testis and their expression levels were significantly increased by the in vivo administration of hCG. The plasma levels of testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone also increased in response to hCG administration, likely as a result of the induction of the expression of steroidogenic enzymes by hCG. Furthermore, gene expression analysis by microarray identified 90 differentially expressed genes in the testis in response to hCG administration, including genes potentially involved in steroidogenesis, progression of spermatogenesis and germ cell maturation and cytoskeletal organization. Our results have identified for the first time a number of key genes involved in the regulation of steroid production and spermatogenesis in the Senegalese sole testis that are under gonadotropic control.

  2. Genes conserved for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis identified through phylogenomics.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Armando; York, Thomas; Pumplin, Nathan; Mueller, Lukas A; Harrison, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis (AMS), a widespread mutualistic association of land plants and fungi(1), is predicted to have arisen once, early in the evolution of land plants(2-4). Consistent with this notion, several genes required for AMS have been conserved throughout evolution(5) and their symbiotic functions preserved, at least between monocot and dicot plants(6,7). Despite its significance, knowledge of the plants' genetic programme for AMS is limited. To date, most genes required for AMS have been found through commonalities with the evolutionarily younger nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium legume symbiosis (RLS)(8) or by reverse genetic analyses of differentially expressed candidate genes(9). Large sequence-indexed insertion mutant collections and recent genome editing technologies have vastly increased the power of reverse genetics but selection of candidate genes, from the thousands of genes that change expression during AMS, remains an arbitrary process. Here, we describe a phylogenomics approach to identify genes whose evolutionary history predicts conservation for AMS and we demonstrate the accuracy of the predictions through reverse genetics analysis. Phylogenomics analysis of 50 plant genomes resulted in 138 genes from Medicago truncatula predicted to function in AMS. This includes 15 genes with known roles in AMS. Additionally, we demonstrate that mutants in six previously uncharacterized AMS-conserved genes are all impaired in AMS. Our results demonstrate that phylogenomics is an effective strategy to identify a set of evolutionarily conserved genes required for AMS. PMID:27249190

  3. Patterns of sequence conservation in presynaptic neural genes

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Dexter; Murphy, Tara; Valladares, Otto; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Ungar, Lyle; Kim, Junhyong; Bućan, Maja

    2006-01-01

    Background The neuronal synapse is a fundamental functional unit in the central nervous system of animals. Because synaptic function is evolutionarily conserved, we reasoned that functional sequences of genes and related genomic elements known to play important roles in neurotransmitter release would also be conserved. Results Evolutionary rate analysis revealed that presynaptic proteins evolve slowly, although some members of large gene families exhibit accelerated evolutionary rates relative to other family members. Comparative sequence analysis of 46 megabases spanning 150 presynaptic genes identified more than 26,000 elements that are highly conserved in eight vertebrate species, as well as a small subset of sequences (6%) that are shared among unrelated presynaptic genes. Analysis of large gene families revealed that upstream and intronic regions of closely related family members are extremely divergent. We also identified 504 exceptionally long conserved elements (≥360 base pairs, ≥80% pair-wise identity between human and other mammals) in intergenic and intronic regions of presynaptic genes. Many of these elements form a highly stable stem-loop RNA structure and consequently are candidates for novel regulatory elements, whereas some conserved noncoding elements are shown to correlate with specific gene expression profiles. The SynapseDB online database integrates these findings and other functional genomic resources for synaptic genes. Conclusion Highly conserved elements in nonprotein coding regions of 150 presynaptic genes represent sequences that may be involved in the transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Furthermore, comparative sequence analysis will facilitate selection of genes and noncoding sequences for future functional studies and analysis of variation studies in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:17096848

  4. [Radiotherapy after testicular-sparing surgery for bilateral or monorchide testicular tumours: an innovative approach].

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Ferretti, L; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Cornelis, F; Belhomme, S; Dallaudière, B; Richaud, P

    2013-01-01

    Testicular-sparing surgery may avoid definitive testosterone supplementation and preserve fertility in selected cases of men presenting with bilateral testicular tumours or in case of monorchidia. Testicular-sparing surgery may enable the conservation of both endocrine function and spermatogenesis in selected young men in order to preserve natural fatherhood, avoid definitive androgen replacement therapy and probably improve quality of life by reducing psychosexual consequences of anorchia. The tumorectomy must be followed by an external irradiation of the remaining testicle to eradicate testicular intratubular neoplasia revealed in 82% of cases after per-surgery biopsy. This approach concerns some rare indications. Dose level and technical consideration are still debated. PMID:23810303

  5. Investigation of six testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility genes suggests a parent-of-origin effect in SPRY4.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Robert; Andreassen, Kristine E; Kristiansen, Wenche; Aschim, Elin L; Bremnes, Roy M; Dahl, Olav; Fosså, Sophie D; Klepp, Olbjørn; Langberg, Carl W; Solberg, Arne; Tretli, Steinar; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Haugen, Trine B; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik

    2013-08-15

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) risk in the genes ATF7IP, BAK1, DMRT1, KITLG, SPRY4 and TERT. In the present study, we validate these associations in a Scandinavian population, and explore effect modification by parental sex and differences in associations between the major histological subtypes seminoma and non-seminoma. A total of 118 SNPs in the six genes were genotyped in a population-based Swedish-Norwegian sample comprising 831 TGCT case-parent triads, 474 dyads, 712 singletons and 3919 population controls. Seven hundred and thirty-four additional SNPs were imputed using reference haplotypes from the 1000 genomes project. SNP-TGCT association was investigated using a likelihood-based association test for nuclear families and unrelated subjects implemented in the software package UNPHASED. Forward stepwise regression within each gene was applied to determine independent association signals. Effect modifications by parent-of-origin and effect differences between histological subtypes were explored. We observed strong association between SNPs in all six genes and TGCT (lowest P-value per gene: ATF7IP 6.2 × 10(-6); BAK1 2.1 × 10(-10); DMRT1 6.7 × 10(-25); KITLG 2.1 × 10(-48); SPRY4 1.4 × 10(-29); TERT 1.8 × 10(-18)). Stepwise regression indicated three independent signals for BAK1 and TERT, two for SPRY4 and one each for DMRT1, ATF7IP and KITLG. A significant parent-of-origin effect was observed for rs10463352 in SPRY4 (maternal odds ratio = 1.72, paternal odds ratio = 0.99, interaction P = 0.0013). No significant effect differences between seminomas and non-seminomas were found. In summary, we validated previously reported genetic associations with TGCT in a Scandinavian population, and observed suggestive evidence of a parent-of-origin effect in SPRY4. PMID:23640991

  6. Visualizing conserved gene location across microbe genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces an analysis-based zoomable visualization technique for displaying the location of genes across many related species of microbes. The purpose of this visualizatiuon is to enable a biologist to examine the layout of genes in the organism of interest with respect to the gene organization of related organisms. During the genomic annotation process, the ability to observe gene organization in common with previously annotated genomes can help a biologist better confirm the structure and function of newly analyzed microbe DNA sequences. We have developed a visualization and analysis tool that enables the biologist to observe and examine gene organization among genomes, in the context of the primary sequence of interest. This paper describes the visualization and analysis steps, and presents a case study using a number of Rickettsia genomes.

  7. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  8. Regulation of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Hutson, John M; Li, Ruili; Southwell, Bridget R; Newgreen, Don; Cousinery, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Testicular descent occurs in two morphologically distinct phases, each under different hormonal control from the testis itself. The first phase occurs between 8 and 15 weeks when insulin-like hormone 3 (Insl3) from the Leydig cells stimulates the gubernaculum to swell, thereby anchoring the testis near the future inguinal canal as the foetus grows. Testosterone causes regression of the cranial suspensory ligament to augment the transabdominal phase. The second, or inguinoscrotal phase, occurs between 25 and 35 weeks, when the gubernaculum bulges out of the external ring and migrates to the scrotum, all under control of testosterone. However, androgen acts mostly indirectly via the genitofemoral nerve (GFN), which produces calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to control the direction of migration. In animal models the androgen receptors are in the inguinoscrotal fat pad, which probably produces a neurotrophin to masculinise the GFN sensory fibres that regulate gubernacular migration. There is little direct evidence that this same process occurs in humans, but CGRP can regulate closure of the processus vaginalis in inguinal hernia, confirming that the GFN probably mediates human testicular descent by a similar mechanism as seen in rodent models. Despite increased understanding about normal testicular descent, the common causes of cryptorchidism remain elusive.

  9. Intron conservation in the fragile X gene (FMR 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Panther, R.; Ostrowski, R.S.; Stoerker, J.

    1994-09-01

    The intron probe STB12.3 was used to search for conservation of the intron sequence corresponding to the PstI fragment located approximately 450 bp downstream of the end of the first exon of the fragile X (FMR 1) gene. Standard techniques for DNA extraction, isolation, restriction enzyme digestion, blotting and probing were employed. The probe STB12.3 that hybridizes to an intron sequence in the human MR 1 gene is 1.2 bp long. Our results demonstrated that the STB12.3 sequence is conserved across at least two Kindgoms. Specifically, we have observed cross-hybridization between STB12.3 and sequences in Drosophila, Apis and Saccharomyces. Hybridization was not observed in Triticum. Most surprising was our observation of intron hybridization in Drosophila since Annemieke et al. (1991) did not find FMR 1 exon conservation in Drosophila. Intron sequence conservation had been previously reported but only between closely related (same Order) species.

  10. Bioinformatic Identification of Conserved Cis-Sequences in Coregulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics tools can be employed to identify conserved cis-sequences in sets of coregulated plant genes because more and more gene expression and genomic sequence data become available. Knowledge on the specific cis-sequences, their enrichment and arrangement within promoters, facilitates the design of functional synthetic plant promoters that are responsive to specific stresses. The present chapter illustrates an example for the bioinformatic identification of conserved Arabidopsis thaliana cis-sequences enriched in drought stress-responsive genes. This workflow can be applied for the identification of cis-sequences in any sets of coregulated genes. The workflow includes detailed protocols to determine sets of coregulated genes, to extract the corresponding promoter sequences, and how to install and run a software package to identify overrepresented motifs. Further bioinformatic analyses that can be performed with the results are discussed. PMID:27557771

  11. In situ localization of mRNAs coding for mouse testicular structural genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, N.B. ); Penshow, J.D. )

    1987-11-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry has been used to localize mRNA transcripts of five nuclear and cytoplasmic structural genes in the mouse testis. The mRNAs for three nuclear structural proteins involved in chromatin transformation during spermatogenesis (the two protamine variants of the mouse and one of the testis-specific proteins) are restricted solely to postmeiotic germ cells. In contrast, mRNAs for two other structural proteins, actin and {alpha} tubulin, are detected throughout spermatogenesis. Although present in premeiotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic cell types, the mRNA levels of actin and {alpha} tubulin differ considerably during spermiogenesis, the haploid phase of spermatogenesis. Actin mRNA levels decrease markedly as the male gamete differentiates during spermiogenesis whereas {alpha}-tubulin mRNAs are equally abundant in the haploid round and elongating spermatids.

  12. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  13. Simvastatin and Dipentyl Phthalate Lower Ex vivo Testicular Testosterone Production and Exhibit Additive Effects on Testicular Testosterone and Gene Expression Via Distinct Mechanistic Pathways in the Fetal Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sex differentiation of the male reproductive tract in mammals is driven, in part, by fetal androgen production. In utero, some phthalate esters (PEs) alter fetal Leydig cell differentiation, reducing the expression of several genes associated with steroid synthesis/transport, and...

  14. Testicular Torsion (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ON THIS TOPIC Hernias Ultrasound: Scrotum Undescended Testicles Male Reproductive System PQ: I have a lump on one of ... How to Perform a Testicular Self-Examination Varicocele Male Reproductive System Testicular Torsion Contact Us Print Resources Send to ...

  15. Functional conservation of the promoter regions of vertebrate tyrosinase genes.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Tanaka, M; Miura, H; Ikeo, K; Gojobori, T; Takeuchi, T; Yamamoto, H

    2001-11-01

    Tyrosinase is the key enzyme for synthesizing melanin pigments, which primarily determine mammalian skin coloration. Considering the important roles of pigments in the evolution and the adaptation of vertebrates, phylogenetic changes in the coding and flanking regulatory sequences of the tyrosinase gene are particularly intriguing. We have now cloned cDNA encoding tyrosinase from Japanese quail and snapping turtle. These nonmammalian cDNA are highly homologous to those of the mouse and human tyrosinases, whereas the 5' flanking sequences are far less conserved except for a few short sequence motifs. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the 5' flanking sequences from the quail or turtle tyrosinase genes are capable of directing the expression of a fused mouse tyrosinase cDNA when introduced into cultured mouse albino melanocytes. This experimental method, which reveals the functional conservation of regulatory sequences in one cell type (the melanocyte), may be utilized to evaluate phylogenetic differences in mechanisms controlling specific gene expression in many other types of cells. We also provide evidence that the 5' flanking sequences from these nonmammalian genes are functional in vivo by producing transgenic mice. Phylogenetic changes of vertebrate tyrosinase promoters and the possible involvement of conserved sequence motifs in melanocyte-specific expression of tyrosinase are discussed. PMID:11764277

  16. Human Intellectual Disability Genes Form Conserved Functional Modules in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oti, Martin; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fernandes, Ana Clara; Kochinke, Korinna; Castells-Nobau, Anna; van Engelen, Eva; Ellenkamp, Thijs; Eshuis, Lilian; Galy, Anne; van Bokhoven, Hans; Habermann, Bianca; Brunner, Han G.; Zweier, Christiane; Verstreken, Patrik; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual Disability (ID) disorders, defined by an IQ below 70, are genetically and phenotypically highly heterogeneous. Identification of common molecular pathways underlying these disorders is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of cognition and for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. To systematically establish their functional connectivity, we used transgenic RNAi to target 270 ID gene orthologs in the Drosophila eye. Assessment of neuronal function in behavioral and electrophysiological assays and multiparametric morphological analysis identified phenotypes associated with knockdown of 180 ID gene orthologs. Most of these genotype-phenotype associations were novel. For example, we uncovered 16 genes that are required for basal neurotransmission and have not previously been implicated in this process in any system or organism. ID gene orthologs with morphological eye phenotypes, in contrast to genes without phenotypes, are relatively highly expressed in the human nervous system and are enriched for neuronal functions, suggesting that eye phenotyping can distinguish different classes of ID genes. Indeed, grouping genes by Drosophila phenotype uncovered 26 connected functional modules. Novel links between ID genes successfully predicted that MYCN, PIGV and UPF3B regulate synapse development. Drosophila phenotype groups show, in addition to ID, significant phenotypic similarity also in humans, indicating that functional modules are conserved. The combined data indicate that ID disorders, despite their extreme genetic diversity, are caused by disruption of a limited number of highly connected functional modules. PMID:24204314

  17. Selective Ablation of Ppp1cc Gene in Testicular Germ Cells Causes Oligo-Teratozoospermia and Infertility in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nilam; Puri, Pawan; Nairn, Angus C.; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four isoforms of serine/threonine phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 (PP1), derived from three genes, are among the most conserved proteins known. The Ppp1cc gene encodes two alternatively spliced variants, PP1 gamma1 (PPP1CC1) and PP1 gamma2 (PPP1CC2). Global deletion of the Ppp1cc gene, which causes loss of both isoforms, results in male infertility due to impaired spermatogenesis. This phenotype was assumed to be due to the loss of PPP1CC2, which is abundant in testis. While PPP1CC2 is predominant, other PP1 isoforms are also expressed in testis. Given the significant homology between the four PP1 isoforms, the lack of compensation by the other PP1 isoforms for loss of one, only in testis, is surprising. Here we document, for the first time, expression patterns of the PP1 isoforms in postnatal developing and adult mouse testis. The timing and sites of testis expression of PPP1CC1 and PPP1CC2 in testis are nonoverlapping. PPP1CC2 is the only one of the four PP1 isoforms not detected in sertoli cells and spermatogonia. Conversely, PPP1CC2 may be the only PP1 isoform expressed in postmeiotic germ cells. Deletion of the Ppp1cc gene in germ cells at the differentiated spermatogonia stage of development and beyond in Stra8 promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice results in oligo-terato-asthenozoospermia and male infertility, thus phenocopying global Ppp1cc null (−/−) mice. Taken together, these results confirm that spermatogenic defects observed in the global Ppp1cc knockout mice and in mice expressing low levels of PPP1CC2 in testis are due to compromised functions of PPP1CC2 in meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells. PMID:24089200

  18. Gene family size conservation is a good indicator of evolutionary rates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Chen, Chiuan-Jung; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chuang, Trees-Juen

    2010-08-01

    The evolution of duplicate genes has been a topic of broad interest. Here, we propose that the conservation of gene family size is a good indicator of the rate of sequence evolution and some other biological properties. By comparing the human-chimpanzee-macaque orthologous gene families with and without family size conservation, we demonstrate that genes with family size conservation evolve more slowly than those without family size conservation. Our results further demonstrate that both family expansion and contraction events may accelerate gene evolution, resulting in elevated evolutionary rates in the genes without family size conservation. In addition, we show that the duplicate genes with family size conservation evolve significantly more slowly than those without family size conservation. Interestingly, the median evolutionary rate of singletons falls in between those of the above two types of duplicate gene families. Our results thus suggest that the controversy on whether duplicate genes evolve more slowly than singletons can be resolved when family size conservation is taken into consideration. Furthermore, we also observe that duplicate genes with family size conservation have the highest level of gene expression/expression breadth, the highest proportion of essential genes, and the lowest gene compactness, followed by singletons and then by duplicate genes without family size conservation. Such a trend accords well with our observations of evolutionary rates. Our results thus point to the importance of family size conservation in the evolution of duplicate genes.

  19. Vertebrate Paralogous MEF2 Genes: Origin, Conservation, and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenwu; de Folter, Stefan; Shen, Xia; Zhang, Wenqian; Tao, Shiheng

    2011-01-01

    Background The myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) gene family is broadly expressed during the development and maintenance of muscle cells. Although a great deal has been elucidated concerning MEF2 transcription factors' regulation of specific gene expression in diverse programs and adaptive responses, little is known about the origin and evolution of the four members of the MEF2 gene family in vertebrates. Methodology/Principal Findings By phylogenetic analyses, we investigated the origin, conservation, and evolution of the four MEF2 genes. First, among the four MEF2 paralogous branches, MEF2B is clearly distant from the other three branches in vertebrates, mainly because it lacks the HJURP_C (Holliday junction recognition protein C-terminal) region. Second, three duplication events might have occurred to produce the four MEF2 paralogous genes and the latest duplication event occurred near the origin of vertebrates producing MEF2A and MEF2C. Third, the ratio (Ka/Ks) of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution rates showed that MEF2B evolves faster than the other three MEF2 proteins despite purifying selection on all of the four MEF2 branches. Moreover, a pair model of M0 versus M3 showed that variable selection exists among MEF2 proteins, and branch-site analysis presented that sites 53 and 64 along the MEF2B branch are under positive selection. Finally, and interestingly, substitution rates showed that type II MADS genes (i.e., MEF2-like genes) evolve as slowly as type I MADS genes (i.e., SRF-like genes) in animals, which is inconsistent with the fact that type II MADS genes evolve much slower than type I MADS genes in plants. Conclusion Our findings shed light on the relationship of MEF2A, B, C, and D with functional conservation and evolution in vertebrates. This study provides a rationale for future experimental design to investigate distinct but overlapping regulatory roles of the four MEF2 genes in various tissues. PMID:21394201

  20. A case of Carney complex presenting as acute testicular pain.

    PubMed

    Alleemudder, Adam; Pillai, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with testicular pain but was found to have bilateral testicular lesions later confirmed as Sertoli cell tumors. Genetic testing confirmed a PRKAR1A gene mutation consistent with Carney complex, a rare genetic disorder characterized by skin lesions, myxomas, and multiple endocrine neoplasms. A review of the condition is made highlighting the association with testicular tumors, particularly of Sertoli cell origin. PMID:27453662

  1. A case of Carney complex presenting as acute testicular pain

    PubMed Central

    Alleemudder, Adam; Pillai, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with testicular pain but was found to have bilateral testicular lesions later confirmed as Sertoli cell tumors. Genetic testing confirmed a PRKAR1A gene mutation consistent with Carney complex, a rare genetic disorder characterized by skin lesions, myxomas, and multiple endocrine neoplasms. A review of the condition is made highlighting the association with testicular tumors, particularly of Sertoli cell origin. PMID:27453662

  2. Comparison of Protamine 1 to Protamine 2 mRNA Ratio and YBX2 gene mRNA Content in Testicular Tissue of Fertile and Azoospermic Men

    PubMed Central

    Moghbelinejad, Sahar; Najafipour, Reza; Hashjin, Amir Samimi

    2015-01-01

    Background Although aberrant protamine (PRM) ratios have been observed in infertile men, the mechanisms that implicit the uncoupling of PRM1 and PRM2 expression remain unclear. To uncover these mechanisms, in this observational study we have compared the PRM1/PRM2 mRNA ratio and mRNA contents of two regulatory factors of these genes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, sampling was performed by a multi-step method from 50 non-obstructive azoospermic and 12 normal men. After RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT- QPCR) was used to analyze the PRM1, PRM2, Y box binding protein 2 (YBX2) and JmjC-containing histone demethylase 2a (JHDM2A) genes in testicular biopsies of the studied samples. Results The PRM1/PRM2 mRNA ratio differed significantly among studied groups, namely 0.21 ± 0.13 in azoospermic samples and -0.8 ± 0.22 in fertile samples. The amount of PRM2 mRNA, significantly reduced in azoospermic patients. Azoospermic men exhibited significant under expression of YBX2 gene compared to controls (P<0.001). mRNA content of this gene showed a positive correlation with PRM mRNA ratio (R=0.6, P=0.007). JHDM2A gene expression ratio did not show any significant difference between the studied groups (P=0.3). We also observed no correlation between JHDM2A mRNA content and the PRM mRNA ratio (R=0.2, P=0.3). Conclusion We found significant correlation between the aberrant PRM ratio (PRM2 under expression) and lower YBX2 mRNA content in testicular biopsies of azoospermic men compared to controls, which suggested that downregulation of the YBX2 gene might be involved in PRM2 under expression. These molecules could be useful biomarkers for predicting male infertility. PMID:26644857

  3. Adrenocorticotropin-dependent precocious puberty of testicular origin in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita due to a novel mutation in the DAX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Domenice, S; Latronico, A C; Brito, V N; Arnhold, I J; Kok, F; Mendonca, B B

    2001-09-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is a rare condition in pediatric age, and its association with precocious sexual development is very uncommon. We report a 2-yr-old Brazilian boy with DAX1 gene mutation whose first clinical manifestation was isosexual gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. He presented with pubic hair, enlarged penis and testes, and advanced bone age. T levels were elevated, whereas basal and GnRH-stimulated LH levels were compatible with a prepubertal pattern. Chronic GnRH agonist therapy did not reduce T levels, supporting the diagnosis of gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. Testotoxicosis was ruled out after normal sequencing of exon 11 of the LH receptor gene. At age 3 yr he developed clinical and hormonal features of severe primary adrenal insufficiency. The entire coding region of the DAX1 gene was analyzed through direct sequencing. A nucleotide G insertion between nucleotides 430 and 431 in exon 1, resulting in a novel frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon at position 71 of DAX-1, was identified. Surprisingly, steroid replacement therapy induced a clear decrease in testicular size and T levels to the prepubertal range. These findings suggest that chronic excessive ACTH levels resulting from adrenal insufficiency may stimulate Leydig cells and lead to gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty in some boys with DAX1 gene mutations. PMID:11549627

  4. [Epidemiology and risk factors of testicular tumours].

    PubMed

    Kozłowski, Piotr; Starosławska, Elżbieta; Szumiło, Justyna; Jankiewicz, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2016-04-01

    Testicular tumours are rare neoplasms, which most commonly affects men aged 25 to 35 years. Among young adult males it is the most common cause of testicular swelling. In recent decades, the number of cases of testicular tumours has greatly increased. The most significant predisposing factors are cryptorchidism and some endocrine disorders, especially increased levels of gonadotropins and female sex hormones. Testicular trauma, inguinal hernia, extreme values of body mass index (BMI), high-calorie diet rich in dairy products as well as high social status are also regarded as risk factors. Furthermore, some chromosomal abnormalities like increased number of chromosomes 7, 8. 12, 21 and X, loss of chromosomes 4, 5, 11, 13, 18, or Y, mutation in the gene Xq27; as well as multiplied copy of the gene i(12p) are associated with tumor development. It has been proven that high testosterone levels and regular physical activity may prevent testicular tumours. Since one of the first sign the lesion is often a lump or swelling of the testis and the appearance of abnormal structure in the scrotum routine testicular self-examination seems to be important in early detection. In all suspected cases an immediate ultrasound examination of both testicles is highly recommended. It is also advised to conduct a computerized tomography (CT) and a positron emission tomography (PET) scan for staging of the tumor to select the best mode of treatment. PMID:27137819

  5. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer This page lists cancer ... in testicular cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer Blenoxane (Bleomycin) Bleomycin Cisplatin ...

  6. Enhanced cadmium-induced testicular necrosis and renal proximal tubule damage caused by gene-dose increase in a Slc39a8-transgenic mouse line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Schneider, Scott N; Dragin, Nadine; Girijashanker, Kuppuswami; Dalton, Timothy P; He, Lei; Miller, Marian L; Stringer, Keith F; Soleimani, Manoocher; Richardson, Douglas D; Nebert, Daniel W

    2007-04-01

    Resistance to cadmium (Cd)-induced testicular necrosis is an autosomal recessive trait defined as the Cdm locus. Using positional cloning, we previously identified the Slc39a8 (encoding an apical-surface ZIP8 transporter protein) as the gene most likely responsible for the phenotype. In situ hybridization revealed that endothelial cells of the testis vasculature express high ZIP8 levels in two sensitive inbred mouse strains and negligible amounts in two resistant strains. In the present study, we isolated a 168.7-kb bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), carrying only the Slc39a8 gene, from a Cd-sensitive 129/SvJ BAC library and generated BAC-transgenic mice. The BTZIP8-3 line, having three copies of the 129/SvJ Slc39a8 gene inserted into the Cd-resistant C57BL/6J genome (having its normal two copies of the Slc39a8 gene), showed tissue-specific ZIP8 mRNA expression similar to wild-type mice, mainly in lung, testis, and kidney. The approximately 2.5-fold greater expression paralleled the fact that the BTZIP8-3 line has five copies, whereas wild-type mice have two copies, of the Slc39a8 gene. The ZIP8 mRNA and protein localized especially to endothelial cells of the testis vasculature in BTZIP8-3 mice. Cd treatment reversed Cd resistance (seen in nontransgenic littermates) to Cd sensitivity in BTZIP8-3 mice; reversal of the testicular necrosis phenotype confirms that Slc39a8 is unequivocally the Cdm locus. ZIP8 also localized specifically to the apical surface of proximal tubule cells in the BTZIP8-3 kidney. Cd treatment caused acute renal failure and signs of proximal tubular damage in the BTZIP8-3 but not nontransgenic littermates. BTZIP8-3 mice should be a useful model for studying Cd-induced disease in kidney. PMID:17108009

  7. Imaging of testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Owens, E J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis, pathology and imaging of testicular tumours, predominantly germ cell tumours. It will discuss the imaging techniques used in their diagnosis, staging and surveillance.

  8. The gsdf gene locus harbors evolutionary conserved and clustered genes preferentially expressed in fish previtellogenic oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Aude; Le Gac, Florence; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques

    2011-02-01

    The gonadal soma-derived factor (GSDF) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is conserved in teleostean fish species. Gsdf is specifically expressed in the gonads, and gene expression is restricted to the granulosa and Sertoli cells in trout and medaka. The gsdf gene expression is correlated to early testis differentiation in medaka and was shown to stimulate primordial germ cell and spermatogonia proliferation in trout. In the present study, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment conserved among vertebrates although no gsdf-related gene is detected on the corresponding genomic region in tetrapods. We demonstrate using quantitative RT-PCR that most of the genes localized in the synteny are specifically expressed in medaka gonads. Gsdf is the only gene of the synteny with a much higher expression in the testis compared to the ovary. In contrast, gene expression pattern analysis of the gsdf surrounding genes (nup54, aff1, klhl8, sdad1, and ptpn13) indicates that these genes are preferentially expressed in the female gonads. The tissue distribution of these genes is highly similar in medaka and zebrafish, two teleostean species that have diverged more than 110 million years ago. The cellular localization of these genes was determined in medaka gonads using the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique. We confirm that gsdf gene expression is restricted to Sertoli and granulosa cells in contact with the premeiotic and meiotic cells. The nup54 gene is expressed in spermatocytes and previtellogenic oocytes. Transcripts corresponding to the ovary-specific genes (aff1, klhl8, and sdad1) are detected only in previtellogenic oocytes. No expression was detected in the gonocytes in 10 dpf embryos. In conclusion, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment harboring evolutionary conserved genes in vertebrates. These genes are preferentially expressed in previtelloogenic oocytes, and thus, they

  9. Evolutionary conservation and disease gene association of the human genes composing pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kamalika; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2012-06-15

    Pseudogenes, the 'genomic fossils' present portrayal of evolutionary history of human genome. The human genes configuring pseudogenes are also now coming forth as important resources in the study of human protein evolution. In this communication, we explored evolutionary conservation of the genes forming pseudogenes over the genes lacking any pseudogene and delving deeper, we probed an evolutionary rate difference between the disease genes in the two groups. We illustrated this differential evolutionary pattern by gene expressivity, number of regulatory miRNA targeting per gene, abundance of protein complex forming genes and lesser percentage of protein intrinsic disorderness. Furthermore, pseudogenes are observed to harbor sequence variations, over their entirety, those become degenerative disease-causing mutations though the disease involvement of their progenitors is still unexplored. Here, we unveiled an immense association of disease genes in the genes casting pseudogenes in human. We interpreted the issue by disease associated miRNA targeting, genes containing polymorphisms in miRNA target sites, abundance of genes having disease causing non-synonymous mutations, disease gene specific network properties, presence of genes having repeat regions, affluence of dosage sensitive genes and the presence of intrinsically unstructured protein regions.

  10. Mimivirus gene promoters exhibit an unprecedented conservation among all eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Audic, Stéphane; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2005-10-11

    The initial analysis of the recently sequenced genome of Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus, the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, predicted a proteome of size and complexity more akin to small parasitic bacteria than to other nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and identified numerous functions never before described in a virus. It has been proposed that the Mimivirus lineage could have emerged before the individualization of cellular organisms from the three domains of life. An exhaustive in silico analysis of the noncoding moiety of all known viral genomes now uncovers the unprecedented perfect conservation of an AAAATTGA motif in close to 50% of the Mimivirus genes. This motif preferentially occurs in genes transcribed from the predicted leading strand and is associated with functions required early in the viral infectious cycle, such as transcription and protein translation. A comparison with the known promoter of unicellular eukaryotes, amoebal protists in particular, strongly suggests that the AAAATTGA motif is the structural equivalent of the TATA box core promoter element. This element is specific to the Mimivirus lineage and may correspond to an ancestral promoter structure predating the radiation of the eukaryotic kingdoms. This unprecedented conservation of core promoter regions is another exceptional feature of Mimivirus that again raises the question of its evolutionary origin.

  11. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed. PMID:26216827

  12. Conserved Gene Expression Programs in Developing Roots from Diverse Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-08-01

    The molecular basis for the origin and diversification of morphological adaptations is a central issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we defined temporal transcript accumulation in developing roots from seven vascular plants, permitting a genome-wide comparative analysis of the molecular programs used by a single organ across diverse species. The resulting gene expression maps uncover significant similarity in the genes employed in roots and their developmental expression profiles. The detailed analysis of a subset of 133 genes known to be associated with root development in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that most of these are used in all plant species. Strikingly, this was also true for root development in a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii), which forms morphologically different roots and is thought to have evolved roots independently. Thus, despite vast differences in size and anatomy of roots from diverse plants, the basic molecular mechanisms employed during root formation appear to be conserved. This suggests that roots evolved in the two major vascular plant lineages either by parallel recruitment of largely the same developmental program or by elaboration of an existing root program in the common ancestor of vascular plants.

  13. Exposure in utero to 2,2',3,3',4,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 132) impairs sperm function and alters testicular apoptosis-related gene expression in rat offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.-C.; Pan, M.-H.; Li, L.-A.; Chen, C.-J.; Tsai, S.-S.; Guo, Y.L. . E-mail: leonguo@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2007-05-15

    Toxicity of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) depends on their molecular structure. Mechanisms by prenatal exposure to a non-dioxin-like PCB, 2,2',3,4',5',6-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 132) that may act on reproductive pathways in male offspring are relatively unknown. The purpose was to determine whether epididymal sperm function and expression of apoptosis-related genes were induced or inhibited by prenatal exposure to PCB 132. Pregnant rats were treated with a single dose of PCB 132 at 1 or 10 mg/kg on gestational day 15. Male offspring were killed and the epididymal sperm counts, motility, velocity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, sperm-oocyte penetration rate (SOPR), testicular histopathology, apoptosis-related gene expression and caspase activation were assessed on postnatal day 84. Prenatal exposure to PCB 132 with a single dose of 1 or 10 mg/kg decreased cauda epididymal weight, epididymal sperm count and motile epididymal sperm count in adult offspring. The spermatozoa of PCB 132-exposed offspring produced significantly higher levels of ROS than the controls; ROS induction and SOPR reduction were dose-related. In the low-dose PCB 132 group, p53 was significantly induced and caspase-3 was inhibited. In the high-dose group, activation of caspase-3 and -9 was significantly increased, while the expressions of Fas, Bax, bcl-2, and p53 genes were significantly decreased. Gene expression and caspase activation data may provide insight into the mechanisms by which exposure to low-dose or high-dose PCB 132 affects reproduction in male offspring in rats. Because the doses of PCB 132 administered to the dams were approximately 625-fold in low-dose group and 6250-fold higher in high-dose group than the concentration in human tissue levels, the concentrations are not biologically or environmentally relevant. Further studies using environmentally relevant doses are needed for hazard identification.

  14. Inference of gene interaction networks using conserved subsequential patterns from multiple time course gene expression datasets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Deciphering gene interaction networks (GINs) from time-course gene expression (TCGx) data is highly valuable to understand gene behaviors (e.g., activation, inhibition, time-lagged causality) at the system level. Existing methods usually use a global or local proximity measure to infer GINs from a single dataset. As the noise contained in a single data set is hardly self-resolved, the results are sometimes not reliable. Also, these proximity measurements cannot handle the co-existence of the various in vivo positive, negative and time-lagged gene interactions. Methods and results We propose to infer reliable GINs from multiple TCGx datasets using a novel conserved subsequential pattern of gene expression. A subsequential pattern is a maximal subset of genes sharing positive, negative or time-lagged correlations of one expression template on their own subsets of time points. Based on these patterns, a GIN can be built from each of the datasets. It is assumed that reliable gene interactions would be detected repeatedly. We thus use conserved gene pairs from the individual GINs of the multiple TCGx datasets to construct a reliable GIN for a species. We apply our method on six TCGx datasets related to yeast cell cycle, and validate the reliable GINs using protein interaction networks, biopathways and transcription factor-gene regulations. We also compare the reliable GINs with those GINs reconstructed by a global proximity measure Pearson correlation coefficient method from single datasets. It has been demonstrated that our reliable GINs achieve much better prediction performance especially with much higher precision. The functional enrichment analysis also suggests that gene sets in a reliable GIN are more functionally significant. Our method is especially useful to decipher GINs from multiple TCGx datasets related to less studied organisms where little knowledge is available except gene expression data. PMID:26681650

  15. Fluoride exposure changed the structure and the expressions of reproductive related genes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-testicular axis of male mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Haijun; Sun, Zilong; Luo, Guangying; Wang, Chong; Wei, Ruifen; Wang, Jundong

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies have shown that fluoride exposure adversely affected the male reproductive function, while the molecular mechanism is not clear. The present study was to investigate the effects of fluoride exposure (60 days) on the expressions of reproductive related genes, serum sex hormone levels and structures of the hypothalamus-pituitary-testicular axis (HPTA), which plays a vital role in regulating the spermatogenesis in male mice. In this study, 48 male mice were administrated with 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/L NaF through drinking water. Results showed that the malformation ratio of sperm was significantly increased (P<0.05). At transcriptional level, the expression levels of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR), inhibin alpha (INHα), inhibin beta-B (INHβB), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) mRNA in testis were significantly decreased (P<0.05). Moreover, histological lesions in testis and ultrastructural alterations in hypothalamus, pituitary and testis were obvious. However, the same fluoride exposure did not lead to significant changes of related mRNA expressions in hypothalamus and pituitary (P>0.05). Also, there were no marked changes in serum hormones. Taken together, we conclude that the mechanism of HPTA dysfunction is mainly elucidated through affecting testes, and its effect on hypothalamus and pituitary was secondary at exposure for 60 days.

  16. Fluoride exposure changed the structure and the expressions of reproductive related genes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-testicular axis of male mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Haijun; Sun, Zilong; Luo, Guangying; Wang, Chong; Wei, Ruifen; Wang, Jundong

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies have shown that fluoride exposure adversely affected the male reproductive function, while the molecular mechanism is not clear. The present study was to investigate the effects of fluoride exposure (60 days) on the expressions of reproductive related genes, serum sex hormone levels and structures of the hypothalamus-pituitary-testicular axis (HPTA), which plays a vital role in regulating the spermatogenesis in male mice. In this study, 48 male mice were administrated with 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/L NaF through drinking water. Results showed that the malformation ratio of sperm was significantly increased (P<0.05). At transcriptional level, the expression levels of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR), inhibin alpha (INHα), inhibin beta-B (INHβB), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) mRNA in testis were significantly decreased (P<0.05). Moreover, histological lesions in testis and ultrastructural alterations in hypothalamus, pituitary and testis were obvious. However, the same fluoride exposure did not lead to significant changes of related mRNA expressions in hypothalamus and pituitary (P>0.05). Also, there were no marked changes in serum hormones. Taken together, we conclude that the mechanism of HPTA dysfunction is mainly elucidated through affecting testes, and its effect on hypothalamus and pituitary was secondary at exposure for 60 days. PMID:25966048

  17. Cytochrome b gene for species identification of the conservation animals.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, H M; Chiang, H L; Tsai, L C; Lai, S Y; Huang, N E; Linacre, A; Lee, J C

    2001-10-15

    A partial DNA sequence of cytochrome b gene was used to identify the remains of endangered animals and species endemic to Taiwan. The conservation of animals species included in this study were: the formosan gem-faced civets, leopard cats, tigers, clouded leopards, lion, formosan muntjacs, formosan sika deers, formosan sambars, formosan serows, water buffalo, formosan pangolins and formosan macaques. The control species used included domestic cats, domestic dogs, domestic sheeps, domestic cattles, domestic pigs and humans. Heteroplasmy was detected in the formosan macaque, domestic pig and domestic cats. The frequencies of heteroplasmy in these animals were about 0.25% (1 in 402bp). Sequences were aligned by Pileup program of GCG computer package, and the phylogenetic tree was constructed by the neighbor-joining method. The results of sequence comparison showed that the percentage range of sequence diversity in the same species was from 0.25 to 2.74%, and that between the different species was from 5.97 to 34.83%. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that the genetic distance between the different species was from 6.33 to 40.59. Animals of the same species, both the endangered animal species and domestic animals, were clustered together in the neighbor-joining tree. Three unknown samples of animal remains were identified by this system. The partial sequence of cytochrome b gene adopted in this study proved to be usable for animal identification.

  18. PHYLOGENOMICS - GUIDED VALIDATION OF FUNCTION FOR CONSERVED UNKNOWN GENES

    SciTech Connect

    V, DE CRECY-LAGARD; D, HANSON A

    2012-01-03

    Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown function, or wrongly or vaguely annotated. Many of these 'unknown' proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We accordingly set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction is integrative, coupling the extensive post-genomic resources available for plants with comparative genomics based on hundreds of microbial genomes, and functional genomic datasets from model microorganisms. The early phase is computer-assisted; later phases incorporate intellectual input from expert plant and microbial biochemists. The approach thus bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is much more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total) that (i) are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii) are conserved between plants and prokaryotes, and (iii) have unknown or poorly known functions. Computer-assisted selection of promising targets for deeper analysis was based on homology .. independent characteristics associated in the SEED database with the prokaryotic members of each family, specifically gene clustering and phyletic spread, as well as availability of functional genomics data, and publications that could link candidate families to general metabolic areas, or to specific functions. In-depth comparative genomic analysis was then performed for about 500 top candidate families, which connected ~55 of them to general areas of metabolism and led to specific functional predictions for a subset of ~25 more. Twenty predicted functions were experimentally tested in at least one prokaryotic organism via reverse

  19. Testicular self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Testicular self-exam is an examination of the testicles that you do on yourself. ... The testicles (also called the testes) are the male reproductive organs that produce sperm and the hormone testosterone. They ...

  20. Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemo is an effective way to destroy any cancer cells that break off from the main tumor and travel to lymph nodes or distant organs. Chemo is often used to cure testicular cancer when it has spread outside the ...

  1. Do We Know What Causes Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... testicular cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes testicular cancer? The exact cause of most testicular cancers is ... Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Testicular Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and ...

  2. Dissecting the Gene Network of Dietary Restriction to Identify Evolutionarily Conserved Pathways and New Functional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR–essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR–essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR–essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR–essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR–induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple

  3. Dissecting the gene network of dietary restriction to identify evolutionarily conserved pathways and new functional genes.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR-essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR-essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR-essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR-essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR-induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led

  4. Teaching about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Because testicular cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in young men, it is important that they become informed about it. This paper reviews the pathology and epidemiology of testicular cancer, the technique of testicular self-examination, and some suggestions for teaching about this subject. (Authors/JMK)

  5. Conservation of silk genes in Trichoptera and Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Naoyuki; Mita, Kazuei; Tamura, Toshiki; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2009-06-01

    Larvae of the sister orders Trichoptera and Lepidoptera are characterized by silk secretion from a pair of labial glands. In both orders the silk filament consists of heavy (H)- and light (L)-chain fibroins and in Lepidoptera it also includes a P25 glycoprotein. The L-fibroin and H-fibroin genes of Rhyacophila obliterata and Hydropsyche angustipennis caddisflies have exon/intron structuring (seven exons in L-fibroin and two in H-fibroin) similar to that in their counterparts in Lepidoptera. Fibroin cDNAs are also known in Limnephilus decipiens, representing the third caddisfly suborder. Amino acid sequences of deduced L-fibroin proteins and of the terminal H-fibroin regions are about 50% identical among the three caddisfly species but their similarity to lepidopteran fibroins is <25%. Positions of some residues are conserved, including cysteines that were shown to link the L-fibroin and H-fibroin by a disulfide bridge in Lepidoptera. The long internal part of H-fibroins is composed of short motifs arranged in species-specific repeats. They are extremely uniform in R. obliterata. Motifs (SX)(n), GGX, and GPGXX occur in both Trichoptera and Lepidoptera. The trichopteran H-fibroins further contain charged amphiphilic motifs but lack the strings of alanines or alanine-glycine dipeptides that are typical lepidopteran motifs. On the other hand, sequences composed of a motif similar to ERIVAPTVITR surrounded by the (SX)(4-6) strings and modifications of the GRRGWGRRG motif occur in Trichoptera and not in Lepidoptera.

  6. Conservation of genes and culture: historical and contemporary issues.

    PubMed

    Hodges, J

    2006-02-01

    The paper examines the reasons for and consequences of lost domestic animal biodiversity. The origin of domestic poultry and livestock diversity is reviewed from the first center of domestication in the Middle East during the Neolithic Revolution. Accompanied by domestic animals and birds, mankind spread worldwide over the last 12,000 yr, thereby increasing domestic animal biodiversity via adaptation to many environmental challenges, resulting in about 6,000 breeds within only a small number of species used for food. During the last 50 yr of the 20th century, about 20% of these livestock and poultry breeds have become extinct, and the remainder is at risk. This erosion of unique biodiversity is due to changes in farm practices developed in the West that involve mono-breed, intensive farming systems that are unsustainable. The close symbiotic relationship of Homo sapiens and domestic animals and birds over millennia is changing, resulting in a lost understanding of sustainability among urban communities. The single-minded focus on profit is resulting in the loss of the historic European and Western culture based on Judeo-Christian values. Respect for biological boundaries, community, and quality of life are disappearing in Western society. Concurrently, farming is now only a business. The principal decision makers are no longer farmers but business executives, who are remote from the farm. The emphasis on cheap food is the principal driver that leads to increased competition and unsustainable practices. Farmers as well as their breeds are disappearing. The advent of gene technology and transgenic livestock is reviewed with the prospect of extensive manipulation of animal form and function and abuse of genotypes as animals are redesigned, suffer, and lose all dignity. By handling its animals in this manner, high Western civilization is losing its culture and values and becoming simply the top animal species by using its power selfishly. The case is presented that the

  7. Genes with stable DNA methylation levels show higher evolutionary conservation than genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Wenhua; Luan, Meiwei; Zheng, Jiajia; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Li, Jin; Lv, Hongchao; Zhang, Mingming; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-24

    Different human genes often exhibit different degrees of stability in their DNA methylation levels between tissues, samples or cell types. This may be related to the evolution of human genome. Thus, we compared the evolutionary conservation between two types of genes: genes with stable DNA methylation levels (SM genes) and genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels (FM genes). For long-term evolutionary characteristics between species, we compared the percentage of the orthologous genes, evolutionary rate dn/ds and protein sequence identity. We found that the SM genes had greater percentages of the orthologous genes, lower dn/ds, and higher protein sequence identities in all the 21 species. These results indicated that the SM genes were more evolutionarily conserved than the FM genes. For short-term evolutionary characteristics among human populations, we compared the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density, and the linkage disequilibrium (LD) degree in HapMap populations and 1000 genomes project populations. We observed that the SM genes had lower SNP densities, and higher degrees of LD in all the 11 HapMap populations and 13 1000 genomes project populations. These results mean that the SM genes had more stable chromosome genetic structures, and were more conserved than the FM genes.

  8. Multiple Promoter Elements Contribute to Activity of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor (FSHR) Gene in Testicular Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heckert, Leslie L.; Daggett, Melissa A. F.; Chen, Jiangkai

    2006-01-01

    The FSH receptor (FSHR) is expressed only in granulosa cells of the ovary and Sertoli cells of the testis. This highly specific pattern of gene expression asserts that transcriptional events unique to these two cell types are responsible for activation of the FSHR gene. We have characterized the promoter elements required for activity of the rat FSHR gene in a Sertoli cell line MSC-1, primary cultures of rat Sertoli cells, and two non-Sertoli cell lines. Transient transfection analysis of deletion and block replacement mutants identified several elements, both 5′ and 3′ to the transcriptional start sites, that are essential for full promoter activity in Sertoli cells. These studies confirmed the use of an important E box element (CACGTG), which had the single greatest impact on promoter function. Bases within the core CACGTG of the E box, as well as flanking sequences, were shown to be essential for its function. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified both upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1) and USF2 as primary components of the complexes binding the E box. Sequence requirements for USF binding in vitro modestly diverged from the sequence requirements for in vivo function of the element. Comparison of the E box binding proteins in different cell types revealed that similar proteins bind the E box in Sertoli and non-Sertoli cell lines. Extracts from primary cultures of rat and mouse Sertoli cells have a second E box-binding complex that cross-reacts with USF antibodies that is not present in the cell lines. PMID:9773974

  9. Antidepressants and testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gary D.; Schwalbe, Joan; Achacoso, Ninah; Meng, Maxwell V.; Kroenke, Candyce H.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Re-examine association of fluoxetine and paroxetine with risk of testicular cancer noted in drug screening, with four years more follow-up and expanded study of these and other antidepressant drugs. Methods In the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in northern California, 906 men with testicular cancer diagnosed August 1996–December 2010 were compared with 38,253 matched controls with race/ethnicity recorded regarding receipt of antidepressant drugs at least two years before diagnosis or control index date. Analyses emphasized duration of use and histological subgroups. Results With control for race/ethnicity and use of other antidepressant drugs, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations with testicular cancer were: fluoxetine 1.22 (0.88–1.71), paroxetine 1.19 (0.78–1.83), and 1.21 (0.92–1.58) for all SSRI’s. There was no statistically significant association with risk of all testicular cancers or their histologic subtypes for any individual drug or for tricyclics or all antidepressants combined except for citalopram with all testicular cancers 2.55 (1.43–4.52) and those of mixed histology 4.36 (1.50–12.68) and nefazodone with embryonal cancers 9.79 (1.85–51.81). These could readily be chance findings in the context of the many analyses that were performed. Duration of use was not associated with risk for the drugs and drug groups with sufficient numbers of exposed cases for analysis. Conclusions We found little evidence to support a testicular carcinogenic effect of fluoxetine, paroxetine, or other antidepressant drugs but a weakly positive association is not ruled out. The signals in prior screening may have been due to chance and/or uncontrolled confounding. PMID:24276357

  10. Evolutionary conservation analysis between the essential and nonessential genes in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao; Gao, Feng; Lin, Yan

    2015-08-14

    Essential genes are thought to be critical for the survival of the organisms under certain circumstances, and the natural selection acting on essential genes is expected to be stricter than on nonessential ones. Up to now, essential genes have been identified in approximately thirty bacterial organisms by experimental methods. In this paper, we performed a comprehensive comparison between the essential and nonessential genes in the genomes of 23 bacterial species based on the Ka/Ks ratio, and found that essential genes are more evolutionarily conserved than nonessential genes in most of the bacteria examined. Furthermore, we also analyzed the conservation by functional clusters with the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs), and found that the essential genes in the functional categories of G (Carbohydrate transport and metabolism), H (Coenzyme transport and metabolism), I (Transcription), J (Translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis), K (Lipid transport and metabolism) and L (Replication, recombination and repair) tend to be more evolutionarily conserved than the corresponding nonessential genes in bacteria. The results suggest that the essential genes in these subcategories are subject to stronger selective pressure than the nonessential genes, and therefore, provide more insights of the evolutionary conservation for the essential and nonessential genes in complex biological processes.

  11. Endocrinology of testicular neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J C

    1981-02-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis finely regulates levels of circulating sex steroids--especially testosterone and estradiol--and spermatogenesis. Testosterone, directly as an androgen and as a prehormone for estradiol, regulates LH secretion at both hypothalamic and pituitary levels. Leydig cells, principally under the control of LH, produce testosterone. Sertoli cells, under the control of FSH, and sensitive to intratesticular levels of testosterone, produce estradiol. This locally produced estrogen seems to be necessary for maturation of the germ cells. An abnormality in this sensitive control system, leading to elevations in gonadotrophins or steroid levels, may be etiologically important in both germ cell and nongerm cell neoplasia. Testicular cancers are associated frequently with endocrinologic manifestations, which may be more disabling to the patient than the malignant potential of the tumor, especially with childhood Leydig cell tumors. Estrogen dominance with an elevated estrogen/testosterone ratio can be seen in any testicular neoplasm and may result in gynecomastia. It may be due to a decrease in circulating testosterone or to an increase in estrogens. Virilization is seen frequently in Leydig cell tumors of adolescents. Further elucidation of hormonal interrelationships should lead to better understanding of the genesis of testicular neoplasia and to more effective therapy.

  12. Gene sequence, localization, and evolutionary conservation of DAZLA, a candidate male sterility gene.

    PubMed

    Seboun, E; Barbaux, S; Bourgeron, T; Nishi, S; Agulnik, A; Egashira, M; Nikkawa, N; Bishop, C; Fellous, M; McElreavey, K; Kasahara, M; Algonik, A

    1997-04-15

    We have isolated the human homologue of the mouse germ cell-specific transcript Tpx2, which we had previously mapped to mouse chromosome 17. Sequence analysis shows that the human gene is part of the DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia) family, represents the human homologue of the mouse Dazla and Drosophila boule genes, and is termed DAZLA. Like Dazla and boule, DAZLA is single copy and maps to 3p25. This defines a new region of synteny between mouse chromosome 17 and human chromosome 3. Unlike DAZ, which has multiple DAZ repeats, DAZLA encodes a putative RNA-binding protein with a single RNA-binding motif and a single DAZ repeat. DAZLA is more closely related to Dazla in the mouse than to the Y-linked homologue DAZ (88% identity overall with mouse Dazla compared to 76% identity with the human DAZ protein sequence). Southern blot analysis showed that DAZLA is autosomal in all mammals tested and that DAZ has been recently translocated to the Y chromosome, sometime after the divergence of Old World and New World primates. To investigate the evolutionary relatedness of DAZLA and DAZ further, their partial genomic structures were obtained and compared. This revealed that the genomic organization of both genes in the 5' region is highly conserved. DAZLA is a new member of the DAZ family of genes, which is associated with spermatogenesis and male sterility. Familial cases of male infertility in humans show an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. It is possible that some of these families may carry mutations in the DAZLA gene.

  13. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  14. Evolutionary Conservation of Bacterial Essential Metabolic Genes across All Bacterial Culture Media.

    PubMed

    Ish-Am, Oren; Kristensen, David M; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic postulates of molecular evolution is that functionally important genes should evolve slower than genes of lesser significance. Essential genes, whose knockout leads to a lethal phenotype are considered of high functional importance, yet whether they are truly more conserved than nonessential genes has been the topic of much debate, fuelled by a host of contradictory findings. Here we conduct the first large-scale study utilizing genome-scale metabolic modeling and spanning many bacterial species, which aims to answer this question. Using the novel Media Variation Analysis, we examine the range of conservation of essential vs. nonessential metabolic genes in a given species across all possible media. We are thus able to obtain for the first time, exact upper and lower bounds on the levels of differential conservation of essential genes for each of the species studied. The results show that bacteria do exhibit an overall tendency for differential conservation of their essential genes vs. their non-essential ones, yet this tendency is highly variable across species. We show that the model bacterium E. coli K12 may or may not exhibit differential conservation of essential genes depending on its growth medium, shedding light on previous experimental studies showing opposite trends.

  15. Evolutionary Conservation of Bacterial Essential Metabolic Genes across All Bacterial Culture Media

    PubMed Central

    Ish-Am, Oren; Kristensen, David M.; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic postulates of molecular evolution is that functionally important genes should evolve slower than genes of lesser significance. Essential genes, whose knockout leads to a lethal phenotype are considered of high functional importance, yet whether they are truly more conserved than nonessential genes has been the topic of much debate, fuelled by a host of contradictory findings. Here we conduct the first large-scale study utilizing genome-scale metabolic modeling and spanning many bacterial species, which aims to answer this question. Using the novel Media Variation Analysis, we examine the range of conservation of essential vs. nonessential metabolic genes in a given species across all possible media. We are thus able to obtain for the first time, exact upper and lower bounds on the levels of differential conservation of essential genes for each of the species studied. The results show that bacteria do exhibit an overall tendency for differential conservation of their essential genes vs. their non-essential ones, yet this tendency is highly variable across species. We show that the model bacterium E. coli K12 may or may not exhibit differential conservation of essential genes depending on its growth medium, shedding light on previous experimental studies showing opposite trends. PMID:25894004

  16. Can Testicular Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... staged? Testicular cancer survival rates Previous Topic Can testicular cancer be prevented? Next Topic Signs and symptoms of testicular cancer ... 2016 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Testicular ... Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Testicular Cancer ...

  17. Sexually dimorphic gene expressions in eels: useful markers for early sex assessment in a conservation context

    PubMed Central

    Geffroy, Benjamin; Guilbaud, Florian; Amilhat, Elsa; Beaulaton, Laurent; Vignon, Matthias; Huchet, Emmanuel; Rives, Jacques; Bobe, Julien; Fostier, Alexis; Guiguen, Yann; Bardonnet, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Environmental sex determination (ESD) has been detected in a range of vertebrate reptile and fish species. Eels are characterized by an ESD that occurs relatively late, since sex cannot be histologically determined before individuals reach 28 cm. Because several eel species are at risk of extinction, assessing sex at the earliest stage is a crucial management issue. Based on preliminary results of RNA sequencing, we targeted genes susceptible to be differentially expressed between ovaries and testis at different stages of development. Using qPCR, we detected testis-specific expressions of dmrt1, amh, gsdf and pre-miR202 and ovary-specific expressions were obtained for zar1, zp3 and foxn5. We showed that gene expressions in the gonad of intersexual eels were quite similar to those of males, supporting the idea that intersexual eels represent a transitional stage towards testicular differentiation. To assess whether these genes would be effective early molecular markers, we sampled juvenile eels in two locations with highly skewed sex ratios. The combined expression of six of these genes allowed the discrimination of groups according to their potential future sex and thus this appears to be a useful tool to estimate sex ratios of undifferentiated juvenile eels. PMID:27658729

  18. Conserved transcriptional responses to cyanobacterial stressors are mediated by alternate regulation of paralogous genes in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; Pfrender, Michael E; Lopez, Jacqueline A; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-04-01

    Despite a significant increase in genomic data, our knowledge of gene functions and their transcriptional responses to environmental stimuli remains limited. Here, we use the model keystone species Daphnia pulex to study environmental responses of genes in the context of their gene family history to better understand the relationship between genome structure and gene function in response to environmental stimuli. Daphnia were exposed to five different treatments, each consisting of a diet supplemented with one of five cyanobacterial species, and a control treatment consisting of a diet of only green algae. Differential gene expression profiles of Daphnia exposed to each of these five cyanobacterial species showed that genes with known functions are more likely to be shared by different expression profiles, whereas genes specific to the lineage of Daphnia are more likely to be unique to a given expression profile. Furthermore, while only a small number of nonlineage-specific genes were conserved across treatment type, there was a high degree of overlap in expression profiles at the functional level. The conservation of functional responses across the different cyanobacterial treatments can be attributed to the treatment-specific expression of different paralogous genes within the same gene family. Comparison with available gene expression data in the literature suggests differences in nutritional composition in diets with cyanobacterial species compared to diets of green algae as a primary driver for cyanobacterial effects on Daphnia. We conclude that conserved functional responses in Daphnia across different cyanobacterial treatments are mediated through alternate regulation of paralogous gene families.

  19. Conserved nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.F.; Tu, J.K.; Long, S.R.

    1985-06-01

    Plasmids which contained wild-type or mutated Rhizobium meliloti nodulation (Nod) genes were introduced into Nod/sup -/ R. trifolii mutants ANU453 and ANU851 and tested for their ability to nodulate clover. Cloned wild-type and mutated R. meliloti Nod gene segments restored ANU851 to Nod/sup +/, with the exception of nodD mutants. Similarly, wild-type and mutant R. meliloti nod genes complemented ANU453 to Nod/sup +/, except for nod CII mutants. Thus, ANU851 identifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodD genes, and ANU453 specifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodCII genes. In addition, cloned wild-type R. trifolii nod genes were introduced into seven R. meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutants. All seven mutants were restored to Nod/sup +/ on alfalfa. Our results indicate that these genes represent common nodulation functions and argue for an allelic relationship between nod genes in R. meliloti and R. trifolii.

  20. An atlas of tissue-specific conserved coexpression for functional annotation and disease gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Rosario Michael; Ala, Ugo; Molineris, Ivan; Grassi, Elena; Bracco, Chiara; Perego, Gian Paolo; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2011-01-01

    Gene coexpression relationships that are phylogenetically conserved between human and mouse have been shown to provide important clues about gene function that can be efficiently used to identify promising candidate genes for human hereditary disorders. In the past, such approaches have considered mostly generic gene expression profiles that cover multiple tissues and organs. The individual genes of multicellular organisms, however, can participate in different transcriptional programs, operating at scales as different as single-cell types, tissues, organs, body regions or the entire organism. Therefore, systematic analysis of tissue-specific coexpression could be, in principle, a very powerful strategy to dissect those functional relationships among genes that emerge only in particular tissues or organs. In this report, we show that, in fact, conserved coexpression as determined from tissue-specific and condition-specific data sets can predict many functional relationships that are not detected by analyzing heterogeneous microarray data sets. More importantly, we find that, when combined with disease networks, the simultaneous use of both generic (multi-tissue) and tissue-specific conserved coexpression allows a more efficient prediction of human disease genes than the use of generic conserved coexpression alone. Using this strategy, we were able to identify high-probability candidates for 238 orphan disease loci. We provide proof of concept that this combined use of generic and tissue-specific conserved coexpression can be very useful to prioritize the mutational candidates obtained from deep-sequencing projects, even in the case of genetic disorders as heterogeneous as XLMR. PMID:21654723

  1. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  2. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  3. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization.

  4. Propolis attenuates doxorubicin-induced testicular toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Sherine M; Zaki, Hala F; Mina, Mary A M

    2014-05-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox), an effective anticancer agent, can impair testicular function leading to infertility. The present study aimed to explore the protective effect of propolis extract on Dox-induced testicular injury. Rats were divided into four groups (n=10). Group I (normal control), group II received propolis extract (200 mg kg(-1); p.o.), for 3 weeks. Group III received 18 mg kg(-1) total cumulative dose of Dox i.p. Group IV received Dox and propolis extract. Serum and testicular samples were collected 48 h after the last treatment. In addition, the effects of propolis extract and Dox on the growth of solid Ehrlich carcinoma in mice were investigated. Dox reduced sperm count, markers of testicular function, steroidogenesis and gene expression of testicular 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). In addition, it increased testicular oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers. Morphometric and histopathologic studies supported the biochemical findings. Treatment with propolis extract prevented Dox-induced changes without reducing its antitumor activity. Besides, administration of propolis extract to normal rats increased serum testosterone level coupled by increased activities and gene expression of 3ß-HSD and 17ß-HSD. Propolis extract may protect the testis from Dox-induced toxicity without reducing its anticancer potential.

  5. Conservation of Transcription Start Sites within Genes across a Bacterial Genus

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Wenjun; Price, Morgan N.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-07-01

    Transcription start sites (TSSs) lying inside annotated genes, on the same or opposite strand, have been observed in diverse bacteria, but the function of these unexpected transcripts is unclear. Here, we use the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and its relatives to study the evolutionary conservation of unexpected TSSs. Using high-resolution tiling microarrays and 5'-end RNA sequencing, we identified 2,531 TSSs in S. oneidensis MR-1, of which 18% were located inside coding sequences (CDSs). Comparative transcriptome analysis with seven additional Shewanella species revealed that the majority (76%) of the TSSs within the upstream regions of annotated genes (gTSSs) were conserved. Thirty percent of the TSSs that were inside genes and on the sense strand (iTSSs) were also conserved. Sequence analysis around these iTSSs showed conserved promoter motifs, suggesting that many iTSS are under purifying selection. Furthermore, conserved iTSSs are enriched for regulatory motifs, suggesting that they are regulated, and they tend to eliminate polar effects, which confirms that they are functional. In contrast, the transcription of antisense TSSs located inside CDSs (aTSSs) was significantly less likely to be conserved (22%). However, aTSSs whose transcription was conserved often have conserved promoter motifs and drive the expression of nearby genes. Overall, our findings demonstrate that some internal TSSs are conserved and drive protein expression despite their unusual locations, but the majority are not conserved and may reflect noisy initiation of transcription rather than a biological function.

  6. Association of tissue lineage and gene expression: conservatively and differentially expressed genes define common and special functions of tissues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Embryogenesis is the process by which the embryo is formed, develops, and establishes developmental hierarchies of tissues. The recent advance in microarray technology made it possible to investigate the tissue specific patterns of gene expression and their relationship with tissue lineages. This study is focused on how tissue specific functions, tissue lineage, and cell differentiation are correlated, which is essential to understand embryonic development and organism complexity. Results We performed individual gene and gene set based analysis on multiple tissue expression data, in association with the classic topology of mammalian fate maps of embryogenesis. For each sub-group of tissues on the fate map, conservatively, differentially and correlatively expressed genes or gene sets were identified. Tissue distance was found to correlate with gene expression divergence. Tissues of the ectoderm or mesoderm origins from the same segments on the fate map shared more similar expression pattern than those from different origins. Conservatively expressed genes or gene sets define common functions in a tissue group and are related to tissue specific diseases, which is supported by results from Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Gene expression divergence is larger in certain human tissues than in the mouse homologous tissues. Conclusion The results from tissue lineage and gene expression analysis indicate that common function features of neighbor tissue groups were defined by the conservatively expressed genes and were related to tissue specific diseases, and differentially expressed genes contribute to the functional divergence of tissues. The difference of gene expression divergence in human and mouse homologous tissues reflected the organism complexity, i.e. distinct neural development levels and different body sizes. PMID:21172044

  7. Conservation of Hox gene clusters in the self-fertilizing fish Kryptolebias marmoratus (Cyprinodontiformes; Rivulidae).

    PubMed

    Kim, B-M; Lee, B-Y; Lee, J-H; Rhee, J-S; Lee, J-S

    2016-03-01

    In this study, whole Hox gene clusters in the self-fertilizing mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus (Cyprinodontiformes; Rivulidae), a unique hermaphroditic vertebrate in which both sex organs are functional at the same time, were identified from whole genome and transcriptome sequences. The aim was to increase the understanding of the evolutionary status of conservation of this Hox gene cluster across fish species. PMID:26822496

  8. Transverse testicular ectopia.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Abdullah; Yiğiter, Murat; Oral, Akgün; Bakan, Vedat

    2014-02-01

    Described herein are six cases of transverse testicular ectopia. All patients who underwent orchidopexy at the one pediatric surgical unit between October 2001 and January 2008 were evaluated. The medical records of all patients diagnosed with transverse testicular ectopia were evaluated retrospectively. Five patients (84%) were admitted with a symptomatic right inguinal hernia and empty scrotum on the left side. Only one child (16%) had left-sided hernia and right non-palpable testis (age ranged from 1 month to 3 years). Four patients (66%) were diagnosed in the operating theatre and the last two (33%) on inguinal ultrasound preoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in the last patient. Herniorrhaphy with fixation of the ectopic gonad to the opposite hemiscrotum through a transseptal incision was performed in all patients. Postoperative complications were not observed. PMID:24548194

  9. Testicular neoplasm diagnosed by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Senay, B A; Stein, B S

    1986-06-01

    The diagnosis of testicular cancer is usually made by the findings of a testicular mass on physical examination. In rare cases a young man will present with retroperitoneal nodes and a normal testicular examination. In such cases a testicular ultrasound may localize the testis which harbors a subclinical neoplasm. In addition serum markers of B-HCG and AFP are essential. As a screening procedure a urine pregnancy test is helpful, since it can be obtained quickly while quantitative B-HCG and APF results are delayed. PMID:3523046

  10. Conserved repeats in diverged ice nucleation structural genes from two species of Pseudomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, G; Corotto, L; Wolber, P

    1986-01-01

    Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene (inaW) from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the inaZ gene of Pseudomonas syringae. The two genes have diverged by many amino acid substitutions, and have effectively randomized the third bases of homologous codons. By reference to their potential for change, it is shown that certain conserved features must have been maintained by selection pressure. In particular, their conservation of internal sequence repetition, with three orders of repeat periodicity in each gene, suggests that the pattern of repetition is significant to the gene products' function. We propose models for the structure of the gene products in which each order of periodicity would be required for the nucleation function. PMID:3774551

  11. Conserved meiotic genes point to sex in the choanoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Carr, Martin; Leadbeater, Barry S C; Baldauf, Sandra L

    2010-01-01

    The choanoflagellates are a widespread group of heterotrophic aquatic nanoflagellates, which have recently been confirmed as the sister-group to Metazoa. Asexual reproduction is the only mode of cell division that has been observed within the group; at present the range of reproductive modes, as well as the ploidy level, within choanoflagellates are unknown. The recent discovery of long terminal repeat retrotransposons within the genome of Monosiga brevicollis suggests that this species also has sexual stages in its life cycle because asexual organisms cannot tolerate retrotransposons due to the rapid accumulation of deleterious mutations caused by their transposition. We screened the M. brevicollis genome for known eukaryotic meiotic genes, using a recently established "meiosis detection toolkit" of 19 genes. Eighteen of these genes were identified, none of which appears to be a pseudogene. Four of the genes were also identified in expressed sequence tag data from the distantly related Monosiga ovata. The presence of these meiosis-specific genes provides evidence for meiosis, and by implication sex, within this important group of protists.

  12. Identification of a conserved set of upregulated genes in mouse skeletal muscle hypertrophy and regrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chaillou, Thomas; Jackson, Janna R.; England, Jonathan H.; Kirby, Tyler J.; Richards-White, Jena; Esser, Karyn A.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the gene expression profile of mouse skeletal muscle undergoing two forms of growth (hypertrophy and regrowth) with the goal of identifying a conserved set of differentially expressed genes. Expression profiling by microarray was performed on the plantaris muscle subjected to 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 days of hypertrophy or regrowth following 2 wk of hind-limb suspension. We identified 97 differentially expressed genes (≥2-fold increase or ≥50% decrease compared with control muscle) that were conserved during the two forms of muscle growth. The vast majority (∼90%) of the differentially expressed genes was upregulated and occurred at a single time point (64 out of 86 genes), which most often was on the first day of the time course. Microarray analysis from the conserved upregulated genes showed a set of genes related to contractile apparatus and stress response at day 1, including three genes involved in mechanotransduction and four genes encoding heat shock proteins. Our analysis further identified three cell cycle-related genes at day and several genes associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) at both days 3 and 10. In conclusion, we have identified a core set of genes commonly upregulated in two forms of muscle growth that could play a role in the maintenance of sarcomere stability, ECM remodeling, cell proliferation, fast-to-slow fiber type transition, and the regulation of skeletal muscle growth. These findings suggest conserved regulatory mechanisms involved in the adaptation of skeletal muscle to increased mechanical loading. PMID:25554798

  13. Conserved deployment of genes during odontogenesis across osteichthyans.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Gareth J; Graham, Anthony; Smith, Moya M

    2004-11-22

    Odontogenesis has only been closely scrutinized at the molecular level in the mouse, an animal with an extremely restricted dentition of only two types and one set. However, within osteichthyans many species display complex and extensive dentitions, which questions the extent to which information from the mouse is applicable to all osteichthyans. We present novel comparative molecular and morphological data in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that show that three genes, essential for murine odontogenesis, follow identical spatial-temporal expression. Thus, at all tooth bud sites, epithelial genes Pitx-2 and Shh initiate the odontogenic cascade, resulting in dental mesenchymal Bmp-4 expression, importantly, including the previously unknown formation of replacement teeth. Significantly, this spatial-temporal sequence is the same for marginal and lingual dentitions, but we find notable differences regarding the deployment of Pitx-2 in the developing pharyngeal dentition. This difference may be highly significant in relation to the theory that dentitions may have evolved from pharyngeal tooth sets in jawless fishes. We have provided the first data on operational genes in tooth development to show that the same signalling genes choreograph this evolutionary stable event in fishes since the osteichthyan divergence 420 Myr ago, with the identical spatial-temporal expression as in mammals.

  14. Identification of essential Alphaproteobacterial genes reveals operational variability in conserved developmental and cell cycle systems

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Patrick D.; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is controlled by a complex signaling network that coordinates events. Genome sequencing has revealed many C. crescentus cell cycle genes are conserved in other Alphaproteobacteria, but it is not clear to what extent their function is conserved. As many cell cycle regulatory genes are essential in C. crescentus, the essential genes of two Alphaproteobacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Rhizobiales) and Brevundimonas subvibrioides (Caulobacterales), were elucidated to identify changes in cell cycle protein function over different phylogenetic distances as demonstrated by changes in essentiality. The results show the majority of conserved essential genes are involved in critical cell cycle processes. Changes in component essentiality reflect major changes in lifestyle, such as divisome components in A. tumefaciens resulting from that organism’s different growth pattern. Larger variability of essentiality was observed in cell cycle regulators, suggesting regulatory mechanisms are more customizable than the processes they regulate. Examples include variability in the essentiality of divJ and divK spatial cell cycle regulators, and non-essentiality of the highly conserved and usually essential DNA methyltransferase CcrM. These results show that while essential cell functions are conserved across varying genetic distance, much of a given organism’s essential gene pool is specific to that organism. PMID:24975755

  15. Ultrasonography of Extravaginal Testicular Torsion in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Bombiński, Przemysław; Warchoł, Stanisław; Brzewski, Michał; Majkowska, Zofia; Dudek-Warchoł, Teresa; Żerańska, Maria; Panek, Małgorzata; Drop, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Extravaginal testicular torsion (ETT), also called prenatal or perinatal, occurs prenatally and is present at birth or appears within the first month of life. It has different etiology than intravaginal torsion, which appears later in life. Testicular torsion must be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis of acute scrotum and should be confirmed or ruled out at first diagnostic step. Ultrasonography is a basic imaging modality, however diagnostic pitfalls are still possible. There is still wide discussion concerning management of ETT, which varies from immediate orchiectomy to conservative treatment resulting in testicle atrophy. Material/Methods In this article we present ultrasonographic spectrum of ETT in neonates, which were diagnosed and treated in our hospital during the last 8 years (2008–2015), in correlation with clinical and intraoperative findings. Results Thirteen neonates with ETT were enrolled in the study – 11 patients with a single testicle affected and 2 patients with bilateral testicular torsion. Most common signs on clinical examination were: hardened and enlarged testicle and discoloration of the scrotum. Most common ultrasonographic signs were: abnormal size or echostructure of the affected testicle and absence of the blood flow in Doppler ultrasonography. In 3 patients ultrasound elastography was performed, which appeared very useful in testicle structure assessment. Conclusions Testicular torsion may concern boys even in the perinatal period. Ultrasonographic picture of acute scrotum in young boys may be confused. Coexistence of the abnormal size or echostructure of the torsed testicle with absence of the blood flow in Doppler ultrasonography appear as very specific but late ultrasonographic sings. Ultrasound elastography may be a very useful tool for visualisation of a very common clinical sign – hardening of the necrotic testicle. PMID:27757176

  16. Low temperature-induced circulating triiodothyronine accelerates seasonal testicular regression.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Atsumi, Yusuke; Yorinaga, Eriko; Ono, Hiroko; Murayama, Itaru; Nakane, Yusuke; Ota, Wataru; Arai, Natsumi; Tega, Akinori; Iigo, Masayuki; Darras, Veerle M; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Yoshida, Shosei; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    In temperate zones, animals restrict breeding to specific seasons to maximize the survival of their offspring. Birds have evolved highly sophisticated mechanisms of seasonal regulation, and their testicular mass can change 100-fold within a few weeks. Recent studies on Japanese quail revealed that seasonal gonadal development is regulated by central thyroid hormone activation within the hypothalamus, depending on the photoperiodic changes. By contrast, the mechanisms underlying seasonal testicular regression remain unclear. Here we show the effects of short day and low temperature on testicular regression in quail. Low temperature stimulus accelerated short day-induced testicular regression by shutting down the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis and inducing meiotic arrest and germ cell apoptosis. Induction of T3 coincided with the climax of testicular regression. Temporal gene expression analysis over the course of apoptosis revealed the suppression of LH response genes and activation of T3 response genes involved in amphibian metamorphosis within the testis. Daily ip administration of T3 mimicked the effects of low temperature stimulus on germ cell apoptosis and testicular mass. Although type 2 deiodinase, a thyroid hormone-activating enzyme, in the brown adipose tissue generates circulating T3 under low-temperature conditions in mammals, there is no distinct brown adipose tissue in birds. In birds, type 2 deiodinase is induced by low temperature exclusively in the liver, which appears to be caused by increased food consumption. We conclude that birds use low temperature-induced circulating T3 not only for adaptive thermoregulation but also to trigger apoptosis to accelerate seasonal testicular regression.

  17. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained. PMID:24834046

  18. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  19. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Lisa M.; Vallender, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained. PMID:24834046

  20. Conservation of the pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic gene cluster among six pyrrolnitrin-producing strains.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P E; Burd, W; Hill, D S; Ligon, J M; van Pée, K

    1999-11-01

    The prnABCD gene cluster from Pseudomonas fluorescens encodes the biosynthetic pathway for pyrrolnitrin, a secondary metabolite derived from tryptophan which has strong anti-fungal activity. We used the prn genes from P. fluorescens strain BL915 as a probe to clone and sequence homologous genes from three other Pseudomonas strains, Burkholderia cepacia and Myxococcus fulvus. With the exception of the prnA gene from M. fulvus59% similar among the strains, indicating that the biochemical pathway for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis is highly conserved. The prnA gene from M. fulvus is about 45% similar to prnA from the other strains and contains regions which are highly conserved among all six strains.

  1. Constraints on genes shape long-term conservation of macro-synteny in metazoan genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many metazoan genomes conserve chromosome-scale gene linkage relationships (“macro-synteny”) from the common ancestor of multicellular animal life [1-4], but the biological explanation for this conservation is still unknown. Double cut and join (DCJ) is a simple, well-studied model of neutral genome evolution amenable to both simulation and mathematical analysis [5], but as we show here, it is not sufficent to explain long-term macro-synteny conservation. Results We examine a family of simple (one-parameter) extensions of DCJ to identify models and choices of parameters consistent with the levels of macro- and micro-synteny conservation observed among animal genomes. Our software implements a flexible strategy for incorporating genomic context into the DCJ model to incorporate various types of genomic context (“DCJ-[C]”), and is available as open source software from http://github.com/putnamlab/dcj-c. Conclusions A simple model of genome evolution, in which DCJ moves are allowed only if they maintain chromosomal linkage among a set of constrained genes, can simultaneously account for the level of macro-synteny conservation and for correlated conservation among multiple pairs of species. Simulations under this model indicate that a constraint on approximately 7% of metazoan genes is sufficient to constrain genome rearrangement to an average rate of 25 inversions and 1.7 translocations per million years. PMID:22151646

  2. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods. PMID:23880430

  3. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods.

  4. A cross-species bi-clustering approach to identifying conserved co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangwen; Jiang, Zongliang; Tian, Xiuchun; Bi, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A growing number of studies have explored the process of pre-implantation embryonic development of multiple mammalian species. However, the conservation and variation among different species in their developmental programming are poorly defined due to the lack of effective computational methods for detecting co-regularized genes that are conserved across species. The most sophisticated method to date for identifying conserved co-regulated genes is a two-step approach. This approach first identifies gene clusters for each species by a cluster analysis of gene expression data, and subsequently computes the overlaps of clusters identified from different species to reveal common subgroups. This approach is ineffective to deal with the noise in the expression data introduced by the complicated procedures in quantifying gene expression. Furthermore, due to the sequential nature of the approach, the gene clusters identified in the first step may have little overlap among different species in the second step, thus difficult to detect conserved co-regulated genes. Results: We propose a cross-species bi-clustering approach which first denoises the gene expression data of each species into a data matrix. The rows of the data matrices of different species represent the same set of genes that are characterized by their expression patterns over the developmental stages of each species as columns. A novel bi-clustering method is then developed to cluster genes into subgroups by a joint sparse rank-one factorization of all the data matrices. This method decomposes a data matrix into a product of a column vector and a row vector where the column vector is a consistent indicator across the matrices (species) to identify the same gene cluster and the row vector specifies for each species the developmental stages that the clustered genes co-regulate. Efficient optimization algorithm has been developed with convergence analysis. This approach was first validated on

  5. Malignant testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Pierre Del; Tawil, Elie; Béland, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    A series of 71 patients with malignant testicular tumours treated primarily by orchiectomy and irradiation is reviewed with respect to pathological and clinical features and modes of treatment. The three-year crude survival rate in 36 patients with seminoma was 86% and in 24 patients with carcinoma it was 41.7%. There were no survivors among patients with choriocarcinoma. Our results are comparable with those of other series. A prospective study is proposed of the value of irradiation and subsequent limited lymph node dissection following orchiectomy in cases of carcinoma of the testis. PMID:4855670

  6. Conservation of position-specific gene expression in axolotl limb skin.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Makanae, Aki

    2014-01-01

    Urodele amphibians can regenerate their limbs after amputation. After amputation, undifferentiated cells appear on the amputation plane and form regeneration blastema. A limb blastema recreates a complete replica of the original limb. It is well known that disturbance of the location of limb tissues prior to amputation perturbs limb patterning, suggesting that different intact limb tissues carry different location information despite their identical appearance. The cause of such differences in intact tissues remains unknown. In this study, we found that Lmx1b, Tbx2, and Tbx3 genes, which are expressed in developing limb in a region specific manner, remained detectable in a mature axolotl limb. Furthermore, those position-specific gene expression patterns were conserved in mature limbs. Treatment with retinoic acid (RA), which is known to have ventralizing activity, changed Lmx1b expression in intact dorsal skin and dorsal character to ventral, indicating that conserved Lmx1b expression was due to the dorsal character and not leaky gene expression. Furthermore, we found that such conserved gene expression was rewritable in regeneration blastemas. These results suggest that axolotl limb cells can recognize their locations and maintain limbness via conserved expression profiles of developmental genes.

  7. Conservation of position-specific gene expression in axolotl limb skin.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Makanae, Aki

    2014-01-01

    Urodele amphibians can regenerate their limbs after amputation. After amputation, undifferentiated cells appear on the amputation plane and form regeneration blastema. A limb blastema recreates a complete replica of the original limb. It is well known that disturbance of the location of limb tissues prior to amputation perturbs limb patterning, suggesting that different intact limb tissues carry different location information despite their identical appearance. The cause of such differences in intact tissues remains unknown. In this study, we found that Lmx1b, Tbx2, and Tbx3 genes, which are expressed in developing limb in a region specific manner, remained detectable in a mature axolotl limb. Furthermore, those position-specific gene expression patterns were conserved in mature limbs. Treatment with retinoic acid (RA), which is known to have ventralizing activity, changed Lmx1b expression in intact dorsal skin and dorsal character to ventral, indicating that conserved Lmx1b expression was due to the dorsal character and not leaky gene expression. Furthermore, we found that such conserved gene expression was rewritable in regeneration blastemas. These results suggest that axolotl limb cells can recognize their locations and maintain limbness via conserved expression profiles of developmental genes. PMID:24410490

  8. Identification and analysis of a highly conserved chemotaxis gene cluster in Shewanella species.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Ward, M.

    2007-08-01

    A conserved cluster of chemotaxis genes was identified from the genome sequences of fifteen Shewanella species. An in-frame deletion of the cheA-3 gene, which is located in this cluster, was created in S. oneidensis MR-1 and the gene shown to be essential for chemotactic responses to anaerobic electron acceptors. The CheA-3 protein showed strong similarity to Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 and P. aeruginosa CheA-1, two proteins that are also essential for chemotaxis. The genes encoding these proteins were shown to be located in chemotaxis gene clusters closely related to the cheA-3-containing cluster in Shewanella species. The results of this study suggest that a combination of gene neighborhood and homology analyses may be used to predict which cheA genes are essential for chemotaxis in groups of closely related microorganisms.

  9. CENP-B is a conserved gene among vegetal species.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Cisneros, Olga; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    To explore the CENP-B centromere protein in beans, carrots, onions and potatoes, total RNA was isolated and reverse transcribed by PCR, and the cDNA encoding the CENP-B amino terminus domain amplified using CENP-B oligonucleotides. Blots containing PCR products were hybridized with a nick-translated pG/CNPB probe containing a complete human CENP-B gene. In all the plant species, anti-CENP-B antibodies recognized an 80-kDa protein. A 360-bp sequence encoding for the amino terminus region of the CENP-B protein was amplified by PCR in all the species and the nick translated pG/CNPB probe hybridized with the PCR products. Apparently the CENP-B centromere protein or an equivalent protein is widely distributed in the vegetal kingdom. PMID:14963831

  10. Syntenic conservation of HSP70 genes in cattle and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Grosz, M.D.; Womack, J.E.; Skow, L.C. )

    1992-12-01

    A phage library of bovine genomic DNA was screened for hybridization with a human HSP70 cDNA probe, and 21 positive plaques were identified and isolated. Restriction mapping and blot hybridization analysis of DNA from the recombinant plaques demonstrated that the cloned DNAs were derived from three different regions of the bovine genome. Ore region contains two tandemly arrayed HSP70 sequences, designated HSP70-1 and HSP70-2, separated by approximately 8 kb of DNA. Single HSP70 sequences, designated HSP70-3 and HSP70-4, were found in two other genomic regions. Locus-specific probes of unique flanking sequences from representative HSP70 clones were hybridized to restriction endonuclease-digested DNA from bovine-hamster and bovine-mouse somatic cell hybrid panels to determine the chromosomal location of the HSP70 sequences. The probe for the tandemly arrayed HSP70-1 and HSP70-2 sequences mapped to bovine chromosome 23, syntenic with glyoxalase 1, 21 steroid hydroxylase, and major histocompatibility class I loci. HSP70-3 sequences mapped to bovine chromosome 10, syntenic with nucleoside phosphorylase and murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene (v-fos), and HSP70-4 mapped to bovine syntenic group U6, syntenic with amylase 1 and phosphoglucomutase 1. On the basis of these data, the authors propose that bovine HSP70-1,2 are homologous to human HSPA1 and HSPA1L on chromosome 6p21.3, bovine HSP70-3 is the homolog of an unnamed human HSP70 gene on chromosome 14q22-q24, and bovine HSP70-4 is homologous to one of the human HSPA-6,-7 genes on chromosome 1. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Genetic background but not metallothionein phenotype dictates sensitivity to cadmium-induced testicular injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Corton, C; Dix, D J; Liu, Y; Waalkes, M P; Klaassen, C D

    2001-10-01

    Sensitivity to cadmium (Cd)-induced testicular injury varies greatly among mouse strains. For instance, 129/SvJ (129) mice are highly sensitive while C57BL/6J (C57) mice are refractory to Cd-induced testicular injury. Metallothionein (MT), a Cd-binding protein, is thought to be responsible for the strain susceptibility to Cd toxicity. In this study, MT-I/II knockout (MT-null) and wild-type 129 mice were used to determine the role of MT in Cd-induced testicular injury. Two additional strains of mice (C57 and the C57 x 129 F1cross) were also used to help define the role of genetic background in Cd toxicity. Mice were given 5-20 micromol/kg ip CdCl(2) and testicular injury was examined 24 h later by histopathology and testicular hemoglobin concentration. Cd produced dose-dependent testicular injury in all strains of mice, except for C57 mice, in which testicular injury could not be produced. MT-null mice were more sensitive than C57 x 129 mice but were equally sensitive as 129 mice to Cd-induced testicular injury. Fourteen days after 15 micromol/kg ip Cd administration, testicular atrophy was evident in MT-null, 129, and C57 x 129 mice but was absent in C57 mice. The resistance of C57 mice to Cd-induced testicular injury could not be attributed solely to a decreased uptake of (109)Cd nor to a greater amount of testicular MT. Microarray analysis revealed a higher expression of glutathione peroxidase in the testes of C57 mice, as well as genes encoding antioxidant components and DNA damage/repair, but their significance to Cd-induced injury is not immediately clear. Thus, this study demonstrates that it is genetic strain, not MT genotype, that is mechanistically important in determining susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular injury. PMID:11578143

  12. Testicular cancer in Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Magoha, G A

    1995-09-01

    This is a report of prospective study of eight patients with testicular tumours seen at the Urology Unit of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital over a five-year period (1979-1983). The mean age was 32.7 years. Four patients (50%) had germ cell tumours including embryonal carcinoma 25%, seminoma 12.5% and malignant teratoma undifferentiated (MTU) 12.5%. The seminoma in this group originated from a testis which was previously undescended but brought into the scrotum at six years of age. The other four patients (50%), had non germ cell tumours. Two of these patients (25%) had paratesticular tumours including rhabdomyosarcoma of paratesticular adnexae and liposarcoma. One (12.5%) had adenomatoid tumour of the epididymis while the last patient (12.5%) had malignant fibrous mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis. This study reaffirms the fact that testicular tumours are rare in blacks and that Nigeria has the lowest incidence reported at 0.1 per 100,000 per annum.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of animal TALE homeobox genes: new conserved motifs and cases of accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Krishanu; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2007-08-01

    TALE homeodomain proteins are an ancient subgroup within the group of homeodomain transcription factors that play important roles in animal, plant, and fungal development. We have extracted the full complement of TALE superclass homeobox genes from the genome projects of seven protostomes, seven deuterostomes, and Nematostella. This was supplemented with TALE homeobox genes from additional species and phylogenetic analyses were carried out with 276 sequences. We found 20 homeobox genes and 4 pseudogenes in humans, 21 genes in mouse, 8 genes in Drosophila, and 5 genes plus one truncated gene in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apart from the previously identified TALE classes MEIS, PBC, IRO, and TGIF, a novel class is identified, termed MOHAWK (MKX). Further, we show that the MEIS class can be divided into two families, PREP and MEIS. Prep genes have previously only been described in vertebrates but are lacking in Drosophila. Here we identify orthologues in other insect taxa as well as in the cnidarian Nematostella. In C. elegans, a divergent Prep protein has lost the homeodomain. Full-length multiple sequence alignment of the protostome and deuterostome sequences allowed us to identify several novel conserved motifs within the MKX, TGIF, and MEIS classes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed fast-evolving PBC class genes; in particular, some X-linked PBC genes in nematodes are subject to rapid evolution. In addition, several instances of gene loss were identified. In conclusion, our comprehensive analysis provides a defining framework for the classification of animal TALE homeobox genes and the understanding of their evolution.

  14. A subset of conserved tRNA genes in plastid DNA of nongreen plants.

    PubMed Central

    Lohan, A J; Wolfe, K H

    1998-01-01

    The plastid genome of the nonphotosynthetic parasitic plant Epifagus virginiana contains only 17 of the 30 tRNA genes normally found in angiosperm plastid DNA. Although this is insufficient for translation, the genome is functional, so import of cytosolic tRNAs into plastids has been suggested. This raises the question of whether the tRNA genes that remain in E. virginiana plastid DNA are active or have just fortuitously escaped deletion. We report the sequences of 20 plastid tRNA loci from Orobanche minor, which shares a nonphotosynthetic ancestor with E. virginiana. The two species have 9 intact tRNA genes in common, the others being defunct in one or both species. The intron-containing trnLUAA gene is absent from E. virginiana, but it is intact, transcribed, and spliced in O. minor. The shared intact genes are better conserved than intergenic sequences, which indicates that these genes are being maintained by natural selection and, therefore, must be functional. For the most part, the tRNA species conserved in nonphotosynthetic plastids are also those that have never been found to be imported in plant mitochondria, which suggests that the same rules may govern tRNA import in the two organelles. A small photosynthesis gene, psbI, is still intact in O. minor, and computer simulations show that some small nonessential genes have an appreciable chance of escaping deletion. PMID:9725858

  15. A Collection of Conserved Noncoding Sequences to Study Gene Regulation in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Jan; Van Bel, Michiel; Vaneechoutte, Dries; Vandepoele, Klaas

    2016-08-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression by binding cis-regulatory elements, of which the identification remains an ongoing challenge owing to the prevalence of large numbers of nonfunctional TF binding sites. Powerful comparative genomics methods, such as phylogenetic footprinting, can be used for the detection of conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs), which are functionally constrained and can greatly help in reducing the number of false-positive elements. In this study, we applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach for the identification of CNSs in 10 dicot plants, yielding 1,032,291 CNSs associated with 243,187 genes. To annotate CNSs with TF binding sites, we made use of binding site information for 642 TFs originating from 35 TF families in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In three species, the identified CNSs were evaluated using TF chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data, resulting in significant overlap for the majority of data sets. To identify ultraconserved CNSs, we included genomes of additional plant families and identified 715 binding sites for 501 genes conserved in dicots, monocots, mosses, and green algae. Additionally, we found that genes that are part of conserved mini-regulons have a higher coherence in their expression profile than other divergent gene pairs. All identified CNSs were integrated in the PLAZA 3.0 Dicots comparative genomics platform (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/plaza/versions/plaza_v3_dicots/) together with new functionalities facilitating the exploration of conserved cis-regulatory elements and their associated genes. The availability of this data set in a user-friendly platform enables the exploration of functional noncoding DNA to study gene regulation in a variety of plant species, including crops. PMID:27261064

  16. A Collection of Conserved Noncoding Sequences to Study Gene Regulation in Flowering Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression by binding cis-regulatory elements, of which the identification remains an ongoing challenge owing to the prevalence of large numbers of nonfunctional TF binding sites. Powerful comparative genomics methods, such as phylogenetic footprinting, can be used for the detection of conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs), which are functionally constrained and can greatly help in reducing the number of false-positive elements. In this study, we applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach for the identification of CNSs in 10 dicot plants, yielding 1,032,291 CNSs associated with 243,187 genes. To annotate CNSs with TF binding sites, we made use of binding site information for 642 TFs originating from 35 TF families in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In three species, the identified CNSs were evaluated using TF chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data, resulting in significant overlap for the majority of data sets. To identify ultraconserved CNSs, we included genomes of additional plant families and identified 715 binding sites for 501 genes conserved in dicots, monocots, mosses, and green algae. Additionally, we found that genes that are part of conserved mini-regulons have a higher coherence in their expression profile than other divergent gene pairs. All identified CNSs were integrated in the PLAZA 3.0 Dicots comparative genomics platform (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/plaza/versions/plaza_v3_dicots/) together with new functionalities facilitating the exploration of conserved cis-regulatory elements and their associated genes. The availability of this data set in a user-friendly platform enables the exploration of functional noncoding DNA to study gene regulation in a variety of plant species, including crops. PMID:27261064

  17. Metazoan remaining genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis: sequence conservation and evolutionary analyses.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor R; Thompson, Julie D; Ortega, José Miguel; Prosdocimi, Francisco

    2014-12-24

    Essential amino acids (EAA) consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS) and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL) relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  18. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, L A; Slagle, B L; Wilde, M; Darlington, G; Butel, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. The sequence element was usually found once or twice in a gene, either in an intron or in the 5' or 3' flanking regions. It did not share any similarities with known short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) or presently known gene regulatory elements. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome. Images PMID:2536922

  19. Discovery of five conserved beta -defensin gene clusters using a computational search strategy.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Brian C; Mitros, Joseph P; Bartlett, Jennifer A; Walters, Jesse D; Jia, Hong Peng; Welsh, Michael J; Casavant, Thomas L; McCray, Paul B

    2002-02-19

    The innate immune system includes antimicrobial peptides that protect multicellular organisms from a diverse spectrum of microorganisms. beta-Defensins comprise one important family of mammalian antimicrobial peptides. The annotation of the human genome fails to reveal the expected diversity, and a recent query of the draft sequence with the blast search engine found only one new beta-defensin gene (DEFB3). To define better the beta-defensin gene family, we adopted a genomics approach that uses hmmer, a computational search tool based on hidden Markov models, in combination with blast. This strategy identified 28 new human and 43 new mouse beta-defensin genes in five syntenic chromosomal regions. Within each syntenic cluster, the gene sequences and organization were similar, suggesting each cluster pair arose from a common ancestor and was retained because of conserved functions. Preliminary analysis indicates that at least 26 of the predicted genes are transcribed. These results demonstrate the value of a genomewide search strategy to identify genes with conserved structural motifs. Discovery of these genes represents a new starting point for exploring the role of beta-defensins in innate immunity.

  20. Testicular torsion repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The testicles are suspended in the scrotal sac. ... Testicular torsion occurs when the testicle, normally attached to the scrotum by a small ligament at its base, becomes loose. The testicle can then twist on itself, ...

  1. Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy for testicular cancer Radiation therapy uses a beam of high-energy rays (such as gamma rays ... machine outside the body is known as external beam radiation . The treatment is much like getting an ...

  2. Testicular obstruction: clinicopathological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, W. F.; Levison, D. A.; Parkinson, M. C.; Parslow, J. M.; Royle, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    Genital tract reconstruction has been attempted in subfertile men with obstructive azoospermia (370 patients) or unilateral testicular obstruction (80 patients), and in vasectomised men undergoing reversal for the first (130 patients) or subsequent (32 patients) time. Histopathological changes in the obstructed testes and epididymes, and immunological responses to the sequestered spermatozoa have been studied to gain insight into possible causes of failure of surgical treatment. The results of surgery have been assessed by follow-up sperm counts and occurrence of pregnancies in the female partners. The best results were obtained with vasectomy reversal (patency 90%, pregnancy 45%), even after failed previous attempts (patency 87%, pregnancy 37%). Epididymovasostomy gave good results with postinfective caudal blocks (patency 52%, pregnancy 38%), while postinfective vasal blocks were better corrected by total anatomical reconstruction (patency 73%, pregnancy 27%) than by transvasovasostomy (patency 9%, no pregnancies). Poor results were obtained with capital blocks (patency 12%, pregnancy 3%), in which substantial lipid accumulation was demonstrated in the ductuli efferentes; three-quarters of these patients had sinusitis, bronchitis or bronchiectasis (Young's syndrome). There is circumstantial evidence to suggest that this syndrome may be a late complication of mercury intoxication in childhood. After successful reconstruction, fertility was relatively reduced in those men who had antibodies to spermatozoa, particularly amongst the postinfective cases. Similarly, impaired fertility was found in men with unilateral testicular obstruction and antibodies to spermatozoa. Mononuclear cell infiltration of seminiferous tubules and rete testis was noted occasionally, supporting a diagnosis of autoimmune orchitis; although rare, this was an important observation as the sperm output became normal with adjuvant prednisolone therapy. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 10

  3. Discovering gene re-ranking efficiency and conserved gene-gene relationships derived from gene co-expression network analysis on breast cancer data.

    PubMed

    Bourdakou, Marilena M; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I; Spyrou, George M

    2016-01-01

    Systemic approaches are essential in the discovery of disease-specific genes, offering a different perspective and new tools on the analysis of several types of molecular relationships, such as gene co-expression or protein-protein interactions. However, due to lack of experimental information, this analysis is not fully applicable. The aim of this study is to reveal the multi-potent contribution of statistical network inference methods in highlighting significant genes and interactions. We have investigated the ability of statistical co-expression networks to highlight and prioritize genes for breast cancer subtypes and stages in terms of: (i) classification efficiency, (ii) gene network pattern conservation, (iii) indication of involved molecular mechanisms and (iv) systems level momentum to drug repurposing pipelines. We have found that statistical network inference methods are advantageous in gene prioritization, are capable to contribute to meaningful network signature discovery, give insights regarding the disease-related mechanisms and boost drug discovery pipelines from a systems point of view. PMID:26892392

  4. Discovering gene re-ranking efficiency and conserved gene-gene relationships derived from gene co-expression network analysis on breast cancer data

    PubMed Central

    Bourdakou, Marilena M.; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I.; Spyrou, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic approaches are essential in the discovery of disease-specific genes, offering a different perspective and new tools on the analysis of several types of molecular relationships, such as gene co-expression or protein-protein interactions. However, due to lack of experimental information, this analysis is not fully applicable. The aim of this study is to reveal the multi-potent contribution of statistical network inference methods in highlighting significant genes and interactions. We have investigated the ability of statistical co-expression networks to highlight and prioritize genes for breast cancer subtypes and stages in terms of: (i) classification efficiency, (ii) gene network pattern conservation, (iii) indication of involved molecular mechanisms and (iv) systems level momentum to drug repurposing pipelines. We have found that statistical network inference methods are advantageous in gene prioritization, are capable to contribute to meaningful network signature discovery, give insights regarding the disease-related mechanisms and boost drug discovery pipelines from a systems point of view. PMID:26892392

  5. Conservation of Pax gene expression in ectodermal placodes of the lamprey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    Ectodermal placodes contribute to the cranial ganglia and sense organs of the head and, together with neural crest cells, represent defining features of the vertebrate embryo. The identity of different placodes appears to be specified in part by the expression of different Pax genes, with Pax-3/7 class genes being expressed in the trigeminal placode of mice, chick, frogs and fish, and Pax-2/5/8 class genes expressed in the otic placode. Here, we present the cloning and expression pattern of lamprey Pax-7 and Pax-2, which mark the trigeminal and otic placodes, respectively, as well as other structures characteristic of vertebrate Pax genes. These results suggest conservation of Pax genes and placodal structures in basal and derived vertebrates.

  6. Similarity-based gene detection: using COGs to find evolutionarily-conserved ORFs

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Bradford C; Hutchison, Clyde A

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental verification of gene products has not kept pace with the rapid growth of microbial sequence information. However, existing annotations of gene locations contain sufficient information to screen for probable errors. Furthermore, comparisons among genomes become more informative as more genomes are examined. We studied all open reading frames (ORFs) of at least 30 codons from the genomes of 27 sequenced bacterial strains. We grouped the potential peptide sequences encoded from the ORFs by forming Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs). We used this grouping in order to find homologous relationships that would not be distinguishable from noise when using simple BLAST searches. Although COG analysis was initially developed to group annotated genes, we applied it to the task of grouping anonymous DNA sequences that may encode proteins. Results "Mixed COGs" of ORFs (clusters in which some sequences correspond to annotated genes and some do not) are attractive targets when seeking errors of gene predicion. Examination of mixed COGs reveals some situations in which genes appear to have been missed in current annotations and a smaller number of regions that appear to have been annotated as gene loci erroneously. This technique can also be used to detect potential pseudogenes or sequencing errors. Our method uses an adjustable parameter for degree of conservation among the studied genomes (stringency). We detail results for one level of stringency at which we found 83 potential genes which had not previously been identified, 60 potential pseudogenes, and 7 sequences with existing gene annotations that are probably incorrect. Conclusion Systematic study of sequence conservation offers a way to improve existing annotations by identifying potentially homologous regions where the annotation of the presence or absence of a gene is inconsistent among genomes. PMID:16423288

  7. Fibrinogen {alpha} genes: Conservation of bipartite transcripts and carboxy-terminal-extended {alpha} subunits in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Hertzberg, K.M.; Grieninger, G.

    1995-11-01

    All three well-studied subunits of the clotting protein fibrinogen ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) share N-terminal structural homologies, but until recently only the {beta} and {gamma} chains were recognized as having similar globular C-termini. With the discovery of an extra exon in the human fibrinogen {alpha} gene (exon VI), a minor form of the {alpha} subunit ({alpha}{sub E}) with an extended {beta}- and {gamma}-like C-terminus has been identified. In the present study, the polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify sequences that encode counterparts to {alpha}{sub E} in chicken, rabbit, rat, and baboon. The basic six-exon structure of the fibrinogen {alpha} genes is shown to be conserved among mammals and birds, as are the intron positions. Bipartite transcripts - still bearing an intron prior to the last exon - are found among the products of the various vertebrate fibrinogen {alpha} genes. The last exon represents the largest conserved segment of the gene and, in each species examined, encodes exactly 236 amino acids. The C-termini of these {alpha}{sub E} chains align without a single gap and are between 76 and 99% identical. Since the exon VI-encoded domain of {alpha}{sub E} is as well conserved as the corresponding regions of the {beta} and {gamma} chains, it follows that it is equally important and that {alpha}{sub E}-fibrinogen plays a vital, if as-yet unrecognized physiological role. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Gene expression of pluripotency determinants is conserved between mammalian and planarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Onal, Pinar; Grün, Dominic; Adamidi, Catherine; Rybak, Agnieszka; Solana, Jordi; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Wang, Yongbo; Rahn, Hans-Peter; Chen, Wei; Kempa, Stefan; Ziebold, Ulrike; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2012-06-13

    Freshwater planaria possess extreme regeneration capabilities mediated by abundant, pluripotent stem cells (neoblasts) in adult animals. Although planaria emerged as an attractive in vivo model system for stem cell biology, gene expression in neoblasts has not been profiled comprehensively and it is unknown how molecular mechanisms for pluripotency in neoblasts relate to those in mammalian embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We purified neoblasts and quantified mRNA and protein expression by sequencing and shotgun proteomics. We identified ∼4000 genes specifically expressed in neoblasts, including all ∼30 known neoblast markers. Genes important for pluripotency in ESCs, including regulators as well as targets of OCT4, were well conserved and upregulated in neoblasts. We found conserved expression of epigenetic regulators and demonstrated their requirement for planarian regeneration by knockdown experiments. Post-transcriptional regulatory genes characteristic for germ cells were also enriched in neoblasts, suggesting the existence of a common ancestral state of germ cells and ESCs. We conclude that molecular determinants of pluripotency are conserved throughout evolution and that planaria are an informative model system for human stem cell biology.

  9. Gene expression of pluripotency determinants is conserved between mammalian and planarian stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Önal, Pinar; Grün, Dominic; Adamidi, Catherine; Rybak, Agnieszka; Solana, Jordi; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Wang, Yongbo; Rahn, Hans-Peter; Chen, Wei; Kempa, Stefan; Ziebold, Ulrike; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater planaria possess extreme regeneration capabilities mediated by abundant, pluripotent stem cells (neoblasts) in adult animals. Although planaria emerged as an attractive in vivo model system for stem cell biology, gene expression in neoblasts has not been profiled comprehensively and it is unknown how molecular mechanisms for pluripotency in neoblasts relate to those in mammalian embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We purified neoblasts and quantified mRNA and protein expression by sequencing and shotgun proteomics. We identified ∼4000 genes specifically expressed in neoblasts, including all ∼30 known neoblast markers. Genes important for pluripotency in ESCs, including regulators as well as targets of OCT4, were well conserved and upregulated in neoblasts. We found conserved expression of epigenetic regulators and demonstrated their requirement for planarian regeneration by knockdown experiments. Post-transcriptional regulatory genes characteristic for germ cells were also enriched in neoblasts, suggesting the existence of a common ancestral state of germ cells and ESCs. We conclude that molecular determinants of pluripotency are conserved throughout evolution and that planaria are an informative model system for human stem cell biology. PMID:22543868

  10. Evolution of a large, conserved, and syntenic gene family in insects.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neethu; Dorer, Douglas R; Moriyama, Etsuko N; Christensen, Alan C

    2012-02-01

    The Osiris gene family, first described in Drosophila melanogaster, is clustered in the genomes of all Drosophila species sequenced to date. In D. melanogaster, it explains the enigmatic phenomenon of the triplo-lethal and haploinsufficient locus Tpl. The synteny of Osiris genes in flies is well conserved, and it is one of the largest syntenic blocks in the Drosophila group. By examining the genome sequences of other insects in a wide range of taxonomic orders, we show here that the gene family is well-conserved and syntenic not only in the diptera but across the holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects. Osiris gene homologs have also been found in the expressed sequence tag sequences of various other insects but are absent from all groups that are not insects, including crustacea and arachnids. It is clear that the gene family evolved by gene duplication and neofunctionalization very soon after the divergence of the insects from other arthropods but before the divergence of the insects from one another and that the sequences and synteny have been maintained by selection ever since.

  11. Conserved gene clusters in bacterial genomes provide further support for the primacy of RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefert, J. L.; Martin, K. A.; Abdi, F.; Widger, W. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Five complete bacterial genome sequences have been released to the scientific community. These include four (eu)Bacteria, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, M. pneumoniae, and Synechocystis PCC 6803, as well as one Archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii. Features of organization shared by these genomes are likely to have arisen very early in the history of the bacteria and thus can be expected to provide further insight into the nature of early ancestors. Results of a genome comparison of these five organisms confirm earlier observations that gene order is remarkably unpreserved. There are, nevertheless, at least 16 clusters of two or more genes whose order remains the same among the four (eu)Bacteria and these are presumed to reflect conserved elements of coordinated gene expression that require gene proximity. Eight of these gene orders are essentially conserved in the Archaea as well. Many of these clusters are known to be regulated by RNA-level mechanisms in Escherichia coli, which supports the earlier suggestion that this type of regulation of gene expression may have arisen very early. We conclude that although the last common ancestor may have had a DNA genome, it likely was preceded by progenotes with an RNA genome.

  12. Epigenetic conservation at gene regulatory elements revealed by non-methylated DNA profiling in seven vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Long, Hannah K; Sims, David; Heger, Andreas; Blackledge, Neil P; Kutter, Claudia; Wright, Megan L; Grützner, Frank; Odom, Duncan T; Patient, Roger; Ponting, Chris P; Klose, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Two-thirds of gene promoters in mammals are associated with regions of non-methylated DNA, called CpG islands (CGIs), which counteract the repressive effects of DNA methylation on chromatin. In cold-blooded vertebrates, computational CGI predictions often reside away from gene promoters, suggesting a major divergence in gene promoter architecture across vertebrates. By experimentally identifying non-methylated DNA in the genomes of seven diverse vertebrates, we instead reveal that non-methylated islands (NMIs) of DNA are a central feature of vertebrate gene promoters. Furthermore, NMIs are present at orthologous genes across vast evolutionary distances, revealing a surprising level of conservation in this epigenetic feature. By profiling NMIs in different tissues and developmental stages we uncover a unifying set of features that are central to the function of NMIs in vertebrates. Together these findings demonstrate an ancient logic for NMI usage at gene promoters and reveal an unprecedented level of epigenetic conservation across vertebrate evolution. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00348.001. PMID:23467541

  13. Testicular toxicity of profenofos in matured male rats.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Gihan Gamal; Ibrahim, Zein Shaban; Hashimoto, Yoshiharu; Alkelch, Alkelch M; Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Fujita, Shoichi

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the effect of the phosphorothoate insecticide profenofos on male specific gene expression on rat testis, 16-week-old Wistar rats were orally administered at dose of 17.8 mg/kg twice weekly for 65 days. Gene expression in the testes was monitored by DNA microarray analysis and real-time RT-PCR, which revealed that genes related to steroidogenesis including cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and CYP11A1 were significantly increased. Besides the testes were histopathologicaly examined, which revealed testicular destruction and degeneration represented by a layer of columnar epithelium, oedematous changes surrounding the seminiferous tubules besides vacuolated spermatogonial cells and more elongated Leydig cells. These data suggest that profenofos considered as one of the male reproductive toxicants. Furthermore, we propose that the above three steroidogenic-related genes and the gene of acrosomal reaction as potential biomarkers of testicular toxicity. PMID:17569032

  14. Expression analysis of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologues reveals evolutionary conservation of gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Donizetti, Aldo; Fiengo, Marcella; Iazzetti, Giovanni; del Gaudio, Rosanna; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Pariante, Paolo; Minucci, Sergio; Aniello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptides exert different functions in reproduction and neuroendocrine processes via interaction with two evolutionarily unrelated groups of receptors: RXFP1 and RXFP2 on one hand, RXFP3 and RXFP4 on the other hand. Evolution of receptor genes after splitting of tetrapods and teleost lineage led to a different retention rate between mammals and fish, with the latter having more gene copies compared to the former. In order to improve our knowledge on the evolution of the relaxin ligands/receptors system and have insights on their function in early stages of life, in the present paper we analyzed the expression pattern of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologue genes during embryonic development. In our analysis, we show that only two of the five genes are expressed during embryogenesis and that their transcripts are present in all the developmental stages. Spatial localization analysis of these transcripts revealed that the gene expression is restricted in specific territories starting from early pharyngula stage. Both genes are expressed in the brain but in different cell clusters and in extra-neural territories, one gene in the interrenal gland and the other in the pancreas. These two genes share expression territories with the homologue mammalian counterpart, highlighting a general conservation of gene expression regulatory processes and their putative function during evolution that are established early in vertebrate embryogenesis.

  15. Genetic background of resistance to cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in inbred Wistar-Imamichi rats.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Hata, Iori; Hashiguchi, Takashi; Imamura, Yorishige

    2011-10-01

    We have previously reported that inbred Wistar-Imamichi (WI) rats are highly resistant to cadmium (Cd)-induced testicular toxicity compared with inbred Fischer 344 (F344) rats. The present study was to elucidate the genetic background of resistance to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in WI rats. The genetic analysis of susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity was conducted by using Cd-resistant WI and Cd-sensitive F344 strains as the parental rats and by using the testicular hemoglobin level as the indicator. In the frequency distribution of testicular hemoglobin levels in parental, first filial (F(1)) and second filial (F(2)) rats treated with Cd at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg, F(1) rats had testicular hemoglobin levels intermediate to WI and F344 rats, and F(2) rats segregated into three groups of low, intermediate, and high phenotypes at the expected ratio. Furthermore, the backcross progeny between WI and F(1) or between F344 and F(1) segregated into two groups with the expected ratio. Based on a simple Mendelian genetic analysis, these segregation patterns lead us to conclude that two codominant alleles at a gene locus are responsible for the susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in rats. This is the first report for the genetic analysis of susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in inbred rat strains. PMID:21318357

  16. Genetic background of resistance to cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in inbred Wistar-Imamichi rats.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Hata, Iori; Hashiguchi, Takashi; Imamura, Yorishige

    2011-10-01

    We have previously reported that inbred Wistar-Imamichi (WI) rats are highly resistant to cadmium (Cd)-induced testicular toxicity compared with inbred Fischer 344 (F344) rats. The present study was to elucidate the genetic background of resistance to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in WI rats. The genetic analysis of susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity was conducted by using Cd-resistant WI and Cd-sensitive F344 strains as the parental rats and by using the testicular hemoglobin level as the indicator. In the frequency distribution of testicular hemoglobin levels in parental, first filial (F(1)) and second filial (F(2)) rats treated with Cd at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg, F(1) rats had testicular hemoglobin levels intermediate to WI and F344 rats, and F(2) rats segregated into three groups of low, intermediate, and high phenotypes at the expected ratio. Furthermore, the backcross progeny between WI and F(1) or between F344 and F(1) segregated into two groups with the expected ratio. Based on a simple Mendelian genetic analysis, these segregation patterns lead us to conclude that two codominant alleles at a gene locus are responsible for the susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in rats. This is the first report for the genetic analysis of susceptibility to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in inbred rat strains.

  17. A Rare Case of Testicular Disorder of Sex Development in a Dog (78,XX; SRY-Negative) with Male External Genitalia and Detection of Copy Number Variation in the Region Upstream of the SOX9 Gene.

    PubMed

    Szczerbal, Izabela; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Atamaniuk, Wojciech; Nizanski, Wojciech; Switonski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Testicular or ovotesticular disorder of sex development (DSD) in genetic females (78,XX; SRY-negative) has been reported quite frequently in numerous dog breeds and is usually diagnosed due to the presence of female external genitalia with an enlarged clitoris. The molecular background of this disorder, diagnosed also in human and other mammals, is not fully understood. However, it has recently been proposed that a copy number variation (CNV) in the region upstream of the SOX9 gene is associated with it. We described a rare case of this disorder in a French Bulldog with abdominal testes and male external genitalia (a slightly malformed penis). FISH studies showed a female karyotype, lack of a translocation involving the Y chromosome, and a distinct size variation in the CNV region (CNVR) upstream of the SOX9 gene, located on chromosome 9 (CFA9). A large FISH variant on a single CFA9 and a lack of the variant on its homologue was observed. Surprisingly, in the mother of this DSD dog, 2 normal-sized variants were identified which means that the CNV in the DSD dog was de novo. Our observations are in agreement with earlier suggestions that a high number of copies at the CNVR upstream of SOX9 may be associated with this type of DSD.

  18. Phylogenetic conservation of immunoglobulin heavy chains: direct comparison of hamster and mouse Cmu genes.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, K L; Duncan, W R; Tucker, P W

    1985-01-01

    We have analyzed the JH-Cmu locus of the Syrian hamster by DNA cloning and sequencing. The single Cmu gene is highly homologous to that of the mouse. The hamster equivalents of the JH and switch (S) recombination regions are arranged as in the mouse, but surprisingly are not highly conserved. Also unlike its close murine relative, the Smu regions among inbred hamster strains are not polymorphic. The complete nucleotide sequence of hamster and mouse Cmu genes have been compared to partial Cmu sequences of other species. Conservation within a portion of the 3' untranslated region may signify functional requirements for 3' end processing. Mutational frequencies within exons and introns of hamster and mouse do not support the theory that the rate of DNA transitions to transversions decreases with evolutionary distance. Images PMID:2994005

  19. Ancient conserved regions in new gene sequences and the protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R. ); Lipman, D.; States, D.; Claverie, J.M. )

    1993-03-19

    Sets of new gene sequences from human, nematode, and yeast were compared with each other and with a set of Escherichia coli genes in order to detect ancient evolutionarily conserved regions (ACRs) in the encoded proteins. Nearly all of the ACRs so identified were found to be homologous to sequences in the protein databases. This suggests that currently known proteins may already include representatives of most ACRs and that new sequences not similar to any database sequence are unlikely to contain ACRs. Preliminary analyses indicate that moderately expressed genes may be more likely to contain ACRs than rarely expressed genes. It is estimated that there are fewer than 900 ACRs in all. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. A Conserved Structural Signature of the Homeobox Coding DNA in HOX genes

    PubMed Central

    Fongang, Bernard; Kong, Fanping; Negi, Surendra; Braun, Werner; Kudlicki, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The homeobox encodes a DNA-binding domain found in transcription factors regulating key developmental processes. The most notable examples of homeobox containing genes are the Hox genes, arranged on chromosomes in the same order as their expression domains along the body axis. The mechanisms responsible for the synchronous regulation of Hox genes and the molecular function of their colinearity remain unknown. Here we report the discovery of a conserved structural signature of the 180-base pair DNA fragment comprising the homeobox. We demonstrate that the homeobox DNA has a characteristic 3-base-pair periodicity in the hydroxyl radical cleavage pattern. This periodic pattern is significant in most of the 39 mammalian Hox genes and in other homeobox-containing transcription factors. The signature is present in segmented bilaterian animals as evolutionarily distant as humans and flies. It remains conserved despite the fact that it would be disrupted by synonymous mutations, which raises the possibility of evolutionary selective pressure acting on the structure of the coding DNA. The homeobox coding DNA may therefore have a secondary function, possibly as a regulatory element. The existence of such element may have important consequences for understanding how these genes are regulated. PMID:27739488

  1. Conserved or lost: molecular evolution of the key gene GULO in vertebrate vitamin C biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongwen

    2013-06-01

    L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase (GULO) catalyzes the final step in vertebrate vitamin C biosynthesis. Vitamin C-incapable vertebrates lack the GULO gene. Gene structure and phylogenetic analyses showed that vertebrate GULO genes are 64-95% identical at the amino acid level and consist of 11 conserved exons. GULO pseudogenes have multiple indel mutations and premature stop codons in higher primates, guinea pigs, and some bats. No GULO-like sequences were identified in teleost fishes. During animal GULO evolution, exon F was subdivided into F1 and F2. Additional GULO retropseudogenes were identified in dogs, cats, and giant pandas. GULO-flanking genome regions acquired frequent segment translocations and inversions during vertebrate evolution. Purifying selection was detected across vertebrate GULO genes (d(N)/d(S) = 0.069), except for some positively selected sites identified in sharks and frogs. These positive sites demonstrated little functional significance when mapped onto the three-dimensional GULO protein structure. Vertebrate GULO genes are conserved except for those that are lost. PMID:23404229

  2. Comparative genomic analysis reveals the evolutionary conservation of Pax gene family.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhong, Jing; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2010-01-01

    The Pax gene family encodes a group of transcription factors whose evolution has accompanied the major morphological and functional innovations of vertebrate species. The evolutionary conservation throughout diverse lineages of metazoan and the functional importance in development rendered Pax family an ideal system to address the relationship inside Chordata phylum. In the present study, we sequenced and annotated four genomic regions containing Chinese amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) Pax genes, and retrieved homologous sequences from public database. In comparison with vertebrate homologues, the predicted amphioxus Pax proteins display high sequence conservation. Evidences from the molecular phylogenetic studies and gene organization analyses supports cephalochordates have a much closer relationship to vertebrates than that between tunicates and vertebrates, contrasting to urochordate relatives hypothesis proposed by several latest studies. Analysis of phylogenetic topology derived from concatenated subfamily datasets uncovered a potential statistical bias of supermatrix approach. Furthermore, we deduced an evolutionary scenario of Pax gene family. This scenario provided a plausible explanation for the origin and dynamics of the Pax gene members.

  3. rbcS genes in Solanum tuberosum: conservation of transit peptide and exon shuffling during evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, F P; Fritz, C C; Willmitzer, L; Schell, J; Schreier, P H

    1988-01-01

    Five genes of the rbcS gene family of Solanum tuberosum (potato) were studied. One of these is a cDNA clone; the other four are located on two genomic clones representing two different chromosomal loci containing one (locus 1) and three genes (locus 2), respectively. The intron/exon structure of the three genes in locus 2 is highly conserved with respect to size and position. These genes contain two introns, whereas the gene from locus 1 contains three introns. Although in most cases the amino acid sequences in the transit peptide part of different rbcS genes from the same species varied considerably more than the corresponding mature amino acid sequences, one exception found in tomato and potato indicates that the transit peptide of rbcS could have a special function. A comparison of the rbcS genes of higher plants with those of prokaryotes offers suggestive evidence that introns first served as spacer material in the process of exon shuffling and then were removed stepwise during the evolution of higher plants. PMID:3422467

  4. The Mdm2 and p53 genes are conserved in the Arachnids.

    PubMed

    Lane, David P; Cheok, Chit Fang; Brown, Christopher J; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Ghadessy, Farid J; Verma, Chandra

    2010-02-15

    The p53 protein and its negative regulator the ubiquitin E3 ligase Mdm2 have been shown to be conserved from the T. adhaerens to man. In common with D. melanogaster and C. elegans, there is a single copy of the p53 gene in T. adhaerens, while in the vertebrates three p53-like genes can be found: p53, p63 and p73. The Mdm2 gene is not present within the fully sequenced and highly annotated genomes of C. elegans and D. melanogaster. However, it is present in Placazoanand the presence of multiple distinct p53 genes in the Sea anemone N. vectensis led us to examine the genomes of other phyla for p53 and Mdm2-like genes. We report here the discovery of an Mdm2-like gene and two distinct p53-like genes in the Arachnid Ioxodes scapularis (Northern Deer Tick). The two predicted Deer Tick p53 proteins are much more highly related to the human p53 protein in sequence than are the fruit fly and nematode proteins. One of the Deer Tick genes encodes a p53 protein that is initiated within the DNA binding domain of p53 and shows remarkable homology to the newly described N-terminally truncated delta isoforms of human and zebrafish p53. PMID:20160485

  5. Phylogenetic Resolution of Deep Eukaryotic and Fungal Relationships Using Highly Conserved Low-Copy Nuclear Genes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ren; Sun, Yazhou; Zhao, Yue; Geiser, David; Ma, Hong; Zhou, Xiaofan

    2016-09-11

    A comprehensive and reliable eukaryotic tree of life is important for many aspects of biological studies from comparative developmental and physiological analyses to translational medicine and agriculture. Both gene-rich and taxon-rich approaches are effective strategies to improve phylogenetic accuracy and are greatly facilitated by marker genes that are universally distributed, well conserved, and orthologous among divergent eukaryotes. In this article, we report the identification of 943 low-copy eukaryotic genes and we show that many of these genes are promising tools in resolving eukaryotic phylogenies, despite the challenges of determining deep eukaryotic relationships. As a case study, we demonstrate that smaller subsets of ∼20 and 52 genes could resolve controversial relationships among widely divergent taxa and provide strong support for deep relationships such as the monophyly and branching order of several eukaryotic supergroups. In addition, the use of these genes resulted in fungal phylogenies that are congruent with previous phylogenomic studies that used much larger datasets, and successfully resolved several difficult relationships (e.g., forming a highly supported clade with Microsporidia, Mitosporidium and Rozella sister to other fungi). We propose that these genes are excellent for both gene-rich and taxon-rich analyses and can be applied at multiple taxonomic levels and facilitate a more complete understanding of the eukaryotic tree of life.

  6. Phylogenetic Resolution of Deep Eukaryotic and Fungal Relationships Using Highly Conserved Low-Copy Nuclear Genes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ren; Sun, Yazhou; Zhao, Yue; Geiser, David; Ma, Hong; Zhou, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive and reliable eukaryotic tree of life is important for many aspects of biological studies from comparative developmental and physiological analyses to translational medicine and agriculture. Both gene-rich and taxon-rich approaches are effective strategies to improve phylogenetic accuracy and are greatly facilitated by marker genes that are universally distributed, well conserved, and orthologous among divergent eukaryotes. In this article, we report the identification of 943 low-copy eukaryotic genes and we show that many of these genes are promising tools in resolving eukaryotic phylogenies, despite the challenges of determining deep eukaryotic relationships. As a case study, we demonstrate that smaller subsets of ∼20 and 52 genes could resolve controversial relationships among widely divergent taxa and provide strong support for deep relationships such as the monophyly and branching order of several eukaryotic supergroups. In addition, the use of these genes resulted in fungal phylogenies that are congruent with previous phylogenomic studies that used much larger datasets, and successfully resolved several difficult relationships (e.g., forming a highly supported clade with Microsporidia, Mitosporidium and Rozella sister to other fungi). We propose that these genes are excellent for both gene-rich and taxon-rich analyses and can be applied at multiple taxonomic levels and facilitate a more complete understanding of the eukaryotic tree of life. PMID:27604879

  7. Evolutionary analyses of the small subunit of glutamate synthase: gene order conservation, gene fusions, and prokaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jan O; Roger, Andrew J

    2002-04-01

    Lateral gene transfer has been identified as an important mode of genome evolution within prokaryotes. Except for the special case of gene transfer from organelle genomes to the eukaryotic nucleus, only a few cases of lateral gene transfer involving eukaryotes have been described. Here we present phylogenetic and gene order analyses on the small subunit of glutamate synthase (encoded by gltD) and its homologues, including the large subunit of sulfide dehydrogenase (encoded by sudA). The scattered distribution of the sudA and sudB gene pair and the phylogenetic analysis strongly suggest that lateral gene transfer was involved in the propagation of the genes in the three domains of life. One of these transfers most likely occurred between a prokaryote and an ancestor of diplomonad protists. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that the gene for the small subunit of glutamate synthase was transferred from a low-GC gram-positive bacterium to a common ancestor of animals, fungi, and plants. Interestingly, in both examples, the eukaryotes encode a single gene that corresponds to a conserved operon structure in prokaryotes. Our analyses, together with several recent publications, show that lateral gene transfers from prokaryotes to unicellular eukaryotes occur with appreciable frequency. In the case of the genes for sulfide dehydrogenase, the transfer affected only a limited group of eukaryotes--the diplomonads--while the transfer of the glutamate synthase gene probably happened earlier in evolution and affected a wider range of eukaryotes.

  8. Evolutionary analysis of the mammalian M1 aminopeptidases reveals conserved exon structure and gene death.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Karen Beasley; Smith, Shannon A; Davis, Anthony C; Trivette, Andrew; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L

    2014-11-15

    The members of the M1 aminopeptidase family share conserved domains, yet show functional divergence within the family as a whole. In order to better understand this family, this study analyzed the mammalian members in depth at exon, gene, and protein levels. The twelve human members, eleven rat members, and eleven mouse members were first analyzed in multiple alignments to visualize both reported and unreported conserved domains. Phylogenetic trees were then generated for humans, rats, mice, and all mammals to determine how closely related the homologs were and to gain insight to the divergence in the family members. This produced three groups with similarity within the family. Next, a synteny study was completed to determine the present locations of the genes and changes that had occurred. It became apparent that gene death likely resulted in the lack of one member in mouse and rat. Finally, an in-depth analysis of the exon structure revealed that nine members of the human family and eight in mouse, are highly conserved within the exon structure. Taken together, these results indicate that the M1 aminopeptidase family is a divergent family with three subgroups and that genetic evidence mirrors categorization of the family by enzymatic function.

  9. Making teeth to order: conserved genes reveal an ancient molecular pattern in paddlefish (Actinopterygii)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Moya M.; Johanson, Zerina; Butts, Thomas; Ericsson, Rolf; Modrell, Melinda; Tulenko, Frank J.; Davis, Marcus C.; Fraser, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) are the dominant vertebrate group today (+30 000 species, predominantly teleosts), with great morphological diversity, including their dentitions. How dental morphological variation evolved is best addressed by considering a range of taxa across actinopterygian phylogeny; here we examine the dentition of Polyodon spathula (American paddlefish), assigned to the basal group Acipenseriformes. Although teeth are present and functional in young individuals of Polyodon, they are completely absent in adults. Our current understanding of developmental genes operating in the dentition is primarily restricted to teleosts; we show that shh and bmp4, as highly conserved epithelial and mesenchymal genes for gnathostome tooth development, are similarly expressed at Polyodon tooth loci, thus extending this conserved developmental pattern within the Actinopterygii. These genes map spatio-temporal tooth initiation in Polyodon larvae and provide new data in both oral and pharyngeal tooth sites. Variation in cellular intensity of shh maps timing of tooth morphogenesis, revealing a second odontogenic wave as alternate sites within tooth rows, a dental pattern also present in more derived actinopterygians. Developmental timing for each tooth field in Polyodon follows a gradient, from rostral to caudal and ventral to dorsal, repeated during subsequent loss of teeth. The transitory Polyodon dentition is modified by cessation of tooth addition and loss. As such, Polyodon represents a basal actinopterygian model for the evolution of developmental novelty: initial conservation, followed by tooth loss, accommodating the adult trophic modification to filter-feeding. PMID:25788604

  10. CORECLUST: identification of the conserved CRM grammar together with prediction of gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nikulova, Anna A.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Sutormin, Roman A.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Mironov, Andrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of transcriptional regulatory regions and tracing their internal organization are important for understanding the eukaryotic cell machinery. Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of higher eukaryotes are believed to possess a regulatory ‘grammar’, or preferred arrangement of binding sites, that is crucial for proper regulation and thus tends to be evolutionarily conserved. Here, we present a method CORECLUST (COnservative REgulatory CLUster STructure) that predicts CRMs based on a set of positional weight matrices. Given regulatory regions of orthologous and/or co-regulated genes, CORECLUST constructs a CRM model by revealing the conserved rules that describe the relative location of binding sites. The constructed model may be consequently used for the genome-wide prediction of similar CRMs, and thus detection of co-regulated genes, and for the investigation of the regulatory grammar of the system. Compared with related methods, CORECLUST shows better performance at identification of CRMs conferring muscle-specific gene expression in vertebrates and early-developmental CRMs in Drosophila. PMID:22422836

  11. Making teeth to order: conserved genes reveal an ancient molecular pattern in paddlefish (Actinopterygii).

    PubMed

    Smith, Moya M; Johanson, Zerina; Butts, Thomas; Ericsson, Rolf; Modrell, Melinda; Tulenko, Frank J; Davis, Marcus C; Fraser, Gareth J

    2015-04-22

    Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) are the dominant vertebrate group today (+30 000 species, predominantly teleosts), with great morphological diversity, including their dentitions. How dental morphological variation evolved is best addressed by considering a range of taxa across actinopterygian phylogeny; here we examine the dentition of Polyodon spathula (American paddlefish), assigned to the basal group Acipenseriformes. Although teeth are present and functional in young individuals of Polyodon, they are completely absent in adults. Our current understanding of developmental genes operating in the dentition is primarily restricted to teleosts; we show that shh and bmp4, as highly conserved epithelial and mesenchymal genes for gnathostome tooth development, are similarly expressed at Polyodon tooth loci, thus extending this conserved developmental pattern within the Actinopterygii. These genes map spatio-temporal tooth initiation in Polyodon larvae and provide new data in both oral and pharyngeal tooth sites. Variation in cellular intensity of shh maps timing of tooth morphogenesis, revealing a second odontogenic wave as alternate sites within tooth rows, a dental pattern also present in more derived actinopterygians. Developmental timing for each tooth field in Polyodon follows a gradient, from rostral to caudal and ventral to dorsal, repeated during subsequent loss of teeth. The transitory Polyodon dentition is modified by cessation of tooth addition and loss. As such, Polyodon represents a basal actinopterygian model for the evolution of developmental novelty: initial conservation, followed by tooth loss, accommodating the adult trophic modification to filter-feeding. PMID:25788604

  12. Disorders of Sex Development with Testicular Differentiation in SRY-Negative 46,XX Individuals: Clinical and Genetic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Grinspon, Romina P; Rey, Rodolfo A

    2016-01-01

    Virilisation of the XX foetus is the result of androgen excess, resulting most frequently from congenital adrenal hyperplasia in individuals with typical ovarian differentiation. In rare cases, 46,XX gonads may differentiate into testes, a condition known as 46,XX testicular disorders of sex development (DSD), or give rise to the coexistence of ovarian and testicular tissue, a condition known as 46,XX ovotesticular DSD. Testicular tissue differentiation may be due to the translocation of SRY to the X chromosome or an autosome. In the absence of SRY, overexpression of other pro-testis genes, e.g. SOX family genes, or failure of pro-ovarian/anti-testis genes, such as WNT4 and RSPO1, may underlie the development of testicular tissue. Recent experimental and clinical evidence giving insight into SRY-negative 46,XX testicular or ovotesticular DSD is discussed.

  13. Disorders of Sex Development with Testicular Differentiation in SRY-Negative 46,XX Individuals: Clinical and Genetic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Grinspon, Romina P; Rey, Rodolfo A

    2016-01-01

    Virilisation of the XX foetus is the result of androgen excess, resulting most frequently from congenital adrenal hyperplasia in individuals with typical ovarian differentiation. In rare cases, 46,XX gonads may differentiate into testes, a condition known as 46,XX testicular disorders of sex development (DSD), or give rise to the coexistence of ovarian and testicular tissue, a condition known as 46,XX ovotesticular DSD. Testicular tissue differentiation may be due to the translocation of SRY to the X chromosome or an autosome. In the absence of SRY, overexpression of other pro-testis genes, e.g. SOX family genes, or failure of pro-ovarian/anti-testis genes, such as WNT4 and RSPO1, may underlie the development of testicular tissue. Recent experimental and clinical evidence giving insight into SRY-negative 46,XX testicular or ovotesticular DSD is discussed. PMID:27055195

  14. Transfer RNA gene arrangement and codon usage in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes: a new insight into gene order conservation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial (mt) gene arrangement has been highly conserved among vertebrates from jawless fishes to mammals for more than 500 million years. It remains unclear, however, whether such long-term persistence is a consequence of some constraints on the gene order. Results Based on the analysis of codon usage and tRNA gene positions, we suggest that tRNA gene order of the typical vertebrate mt-genomes may be important for their translational efficiency. The vertebrate mt-genome encodes 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA, and 13 transmembrane proteins consisting mainly of hydrophobic domains. We found that the tRNA genes specifying the hydrophobic residues were positioned close to the control region (CR), where the transcription efficiency is estimated to be relatively high. Using 47 vertebrate mt-genome sequences representing jawless fishes to mammals, we further found a correlation between codon usage and tRNA gene positions, implying that highly-used tRNA genes are located close to the CR. In addition, an analysis considering the asymmetric nature of mtDNA replication suggested that the tRNA loci that remain in single-strand for a longer time tend to have more guanine and thymine not suffering deamination mutations in their anticodon sites. Conclusions Our analyses imply the existence of translational constraint acting on the vertebrate mt-gene arrangement. Such translational constraint, together with the deamination-related constraint, may have contributed to long-term maintenance of gene order. PMID:20723209

  15. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2014-02-01

    Human germ cell tumors are of interest because of their epidemiology, clinical behavior and pathobiology. Histologically, they are subdivided into various elements, with similarities to embryogenesis. Recent insights resulted in a division of five types of human germ cell tumors. In the context of male germ cells, three are relevant; Type I: teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants; Type II: seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults; and Type III: spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly. Recent studies led to significant increases in understanding of the parameters involved in the earliest pathogenetic steps of human germ cells tumors, in particularly the seminomas and nonseminomas (Type II). In case of a disturbed gonadal physiology, either due to the germ cell itself, or the micro-environment, embryonic germ cells during a specific window of sensitization can be blocked in their maturation, resulting in carcinoma in situ or gonadoblastoma, the precursors of seminomas and nonseminomas. The level of testicularization of the gonad determines the histological composition of the precursor. These insights will allow better definition of individuals at risk to develop a germ cell malignancy, with putative preventive measurements, and allow better selection of scientific approaches to elucidate the pathogenesis. PMID:24683949

  16. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson’s disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson’s disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson’s disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process. PMID:25566351

  17. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson's disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson's disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson's disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process.

  18. Intra-testicular injection of adenoviral constructs results in Sertoli cell-specific gene expression and disruption of the seminiferous epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hooley, R P; Paterson, M; Brown, P; Kerr, K; Saunders, P T K

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process that cannot be modelled in vitro. The somatic Sertoli cells (SCs) within the seminiferous tubules perform a key role in supporting maturation of germ cells (GCs). Progress has been made in determining what aspects of SC function are critical to maintenance of fertility by developing rodent models based on the Cre/LoxP system; however, this is time-consuming and is only applicable to mice. The aim of the present study was to establish methods for direct injection of adenoviral vectors containing shRNA constructs into the testis as a way of inducing target-selective knock-down in vivo. This paper describes a series of experiments using adenovirus expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene. Injection via the efferent ductules resulted in SC-specific expression of GFP; expression levels paralleled the amount of infective viral particles injected. At the highest doses of virus seminiferous tubule architecture were grossly disturbed and immune cell invasion noted. At lower concentrations, the expression of GFP was variable/negligible, the seminiferous tubule lumen was maintained but stage-dependent GC loss and development of numerous basal vacuoles was observed. These resembled intercellular dilations of SC junctional complexes previously described in rats and may be a consequence of disturbances in SC function due to interaction of the viral particles with the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor that is a component of the junctional complexes within the blood testis barrier. In conclusion, intra-testicular injection of adenoviral vectors disturbs SC function in vivo and future work will therefore focus on the use of lentiviral delivery systems. PMID:18955374

  19. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  20. Conserved and divergent processing of neuroligin and neurexin genes: from the nematode C. elegans to human.

    PubMed

    Calahorro, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Neuroligins are cell-adhesion proteins that interact with neurexins at the synapse. This interaction may contribute to differentiation, plasticity and specificity of synapses. In humans, single mutations in neuroligin-encoding genes are implicated in autism spectrum disorder and/or mental retardation. Moreover, some copy number variations and point mutations in neurexin-encoding genes have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders including autism. Neurexins are subject to extensive alternative splicing, highly regulated in mammals, with a great physiological importance. In addition, neuroligins and neurexins are subjected to proteolytic processes that regulate synaptic transmission modifying pre- and postsynaptic activities and may also regulate the remodelling of spines at specific synapses. Four neuroligin genes exist in mice and five in human, whilst in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, there is only one orthologous gene. In a similar manner, in mammals, there are three neurexin genes, each of them encoding two major isoforms named α and β, respectively. In contrast, there is one neurexin gene in C. elegans that also generates two isoforms like mammals. The complexity of the genetic organization of neurexins is due to extensive processing resulting in hundreds of isoforms. In this review, a wide comparison is made between the genes in the nematode and human with a view to better understanding the conservation of processing in these synaptic proteins in C. elegans, which may serve as a genetic model to decipher the synaptopathies underpinning neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

  1. Phylogeny of Bacterial and Archaeal Genomes Using Conserved Genes: Supertrees and Supermatrices

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Jenna Morgan; Darling, Aaron E.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Over 3000 microbial (bacterial and archaeal) genomes have been made publically available to date, providing an unprecedented opportunity to examine evolutionary genomic trends and offering valuable reference data for a variety of other studies such as metagenomics. The utility of these genome sequences is greatly enhanced when we have an understanding of how they are phylogenetically related to each other. Therefore, we here describe our efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of all available bacterial and archaeal genomes. We identified 24, single-copy, ubiquitous genes suitable for this phylogenetic analysis. We used two approaches to combine the data for the 24 genes. First, we concatenated alignments of all genes into a single alignment from which a Maximum Likelihood (ML) tree was inferred using RAxML. Second, we used a relatively new approach to combining gene data, Bayesian Concordance Analysis (BCA), as implemented in the BUCKy software, in which the results of 24 single-gene phylogenetic analyses are used to generate a “primary concordance” tree. A comparison of the concatenated ML tree and the primary concordance (BUCKy) tree reveals that the two approaches give similar results, relative to a phylogenetic tree inferred from the 16S rRNA gene. After comparing the results and the methods used, we conclude that the current best approach for generating a single phylogenetic tree, suitable for use as a reference phylogeny for comparative analyses, is to perform a maximum likelihood analysis of a concatenated alignment of conserved, single-copy genes. PMID:23638103

  2. Role of Conserved Non-Coding Regulatory Elements in LMW Glutenin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Angéla; Makai, Szabolcs; Sebestyén, Endre; Tamás, László; Balázs, Ervin

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of LMW glutenin genes were investigated in-silico, using publicly available gene sequences and expression data. Genes were grouped into different LMW glutenin types and their promoter profiles were determined using cis-acting regulatory elements databases and published results. The various cis-acting elements belong to some conserved non-coding regulatory regions (CREs) and might act in two different ways. There are elements, such as GCN4 motifs found in the long endosperm box that could serve as key factors in tissue-specific expression. Some other elements, such as the AACA/TA motifs or the individual prolamin box variants, might modulate the level of expression. Based on the promoter sequences and expression characteristic LMW glutenin genes might be transcribed following two different mechanisms. Most of the s- and i-type genes show a continuously increasing expression pattern. The m-type genes, however, demonstrate normal distribution in their expression profiles. Differences observed in their expression could be related to the differences found in their promoter sequences. Polymorphisms in the number and combination of cis-acting elements in their promoter regions can be of crucial importance in the diverse levels of production of single LMW glutenin gene types. PMID:22242127

  3. Evolutionary analysis of multidrug resistance genes in fungi - impact of gene duplication and family conservation.

    PubMed

    Gossani, Cristiani; Bellieny-Rabelo, Daniel; Venancio, Thiago M

    2014-11-01

    Although the emergence of bacterial drug resistance is of great concern to the scientific community, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon systematically in fungi by using genome-wide datasets. In the present study, we assembled a large compendium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemical genetic data to study the evolution of multidrug resistance genes (MDRs) in the fungal lineage. We found that MDRs typically emerge in widely conserved families, most of which containing homologs from pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans and Coccidioides immitis, which could favor the evolution of drug resistance in those species. By integrating data from chemical genetics with protein family conservation, genetic and protein interactions, we found that gene families rarely have more than one MDR, indicating that paralogs evolve asymmetrically with regard to multidrug resistance roles. Furthermore, MDRs have more genetic and protein interaction partners than non-MDRs, supporting their participation in complex biochemical systems underlying the tolerance to multiple bioactive molecules. MDRs share more chemical genetic interactions with other MDRs than with non-MDRs, regardless of their evolutionary affinity. These results suggest the existence of an intricate system involved in the global drug tolerance phenotypes. Finally, MDRs are more likely to be hit repeatedly by mutations in laboratory evolution experiments, indicating that they have great adaptive potential. The results presented here not only reveal the main genomic features underlying the evolution of MDRs, but also shed light on the gene families from which drug resistance is more likely to emerge in fungi.

  4. Functional conservation and diversification of the soybean maturity gene E1 and its homologs in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingzheng; Zhai, Hong; Wang, Yaying; Tian, Xiaojie; Zhang, Yupeng; Wu, Hongyan; Lü, Shixiang; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuqiu; Wang, Lu; Hu, Bo; Bu, Qingyun; Xia, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks involved in flowering time and photoperiodic responses in legumes remain unknown. Although the major maturity gene E1 has been successfully deciphered in soybean, knowledge on the functional conservation of this gene is limited to a certain extent to E1 homologs in legumes. The ectopic expression of Phvul.009G204600 (PvE1L), an E1 homolog from common bean, delayed the onset of flowering in soybean. By contrast, the ectopic expression of Medtr2g058520 (MtE1L) from Medicago truncatula did not affect the flowering of soybean. Characterization of the late-flowering mte1l mutant indicated that MtE1L promoted flowering in Medicago truncatula. Moreover, all transgenic E1, PvE1L and MtE1L soybean lines exhibited phenotypic changes in terms of plant height. Transgenic E1 or PvE1L plants were taller than the wild-type, whereas transgenic MtE1L plants produced dwarf phenotype with few nodes and short internode. Thus, functional conservation and diversification of E1 family genes from legumes in the regulation of flowering and plant growth may be associated with lineage specification and genomic duplication. PMID:27405888

  5. Functional conservation and diversification of the soybean maturity gene E1 and its homologs in legumes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingzheng; Zhai, Hong; Wang, Yaying; Tian, Xiaojie; Zhang, Yupeng; Wu, Hongyan; Lü, Shixiang; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuqiu; Wang, Lu; Hu, Bo; Bu, Qingyun; Xia, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks involved in flowering time and photoperiodic responses in legumes remain unknown. Although the major maturity gene E1 has been successfully deciphered in soybean, knowledge on the functional conservation of this gene is limited to a certain extent to E1 homologs in legumes. The ectopic expression of Phvul.009G204600 (PvE1L), an E1 homolog from common bean, delayed the onset of flowering in soybean. By contrast, the ectopic expression of Medtr2g058520 (MtE1L) from Medicago truncatula did not affect the flowering of soybean. Characterization of the late-flowering mte1l mutant indicated that MtE1L promoted flowering in Medicago truncatula. Moreover, all transgenic E1, PvE1L and MtE1L soybean lines exhibited phenotypic changes in terms of plant height. Transgenic E1 or PvE1L plants were taller than the wild-type, whereas transgenic MtE1L plants produced dwarf phenotype with few nodes and short internode. Thus, functional conservation and diversification of E1 family genes from legumes in the regulation of flowering and plant growth may be associated with lineage specification and genomic duplication. PMID:27405888

  6. Evolutionary Conservation of Xylan Biosynthetic Genes in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Haghighat, Marziyeh; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Xylan is a major cross-linking hemicellulose in secondary walls of vascular tissues, and the recruitment of xylan as a secondary wall component was suggested to be a pivotal event for the evolution of vascular tissues. To decipher the evolution of xylan structure and xylan biosynthetic genes, we analyzed xylan substitution patterns and characterized genes mediating methylation of glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains in xylan of the model seedless vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and investigated GT43 genes from S. moellendorffii and the model non-vascular plant, Physcomitrella patens, for their roles in xylan biosynthesis. Using nuclear magentic resonance spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that S. moellendorffii xylan consists of β-1,4-linked xylosyl residues subsituted solely with methylated GlcA residues and that xylans from both S. moellendorffii and P. patens are acetylated at O-2 and O-3. To investigate genes responsible for GlcA methylation of xylan, we identified two DUF579 genes in the S. moellendorffii genome and showed that one of them, SmGXM, encodes a glucuronoxylan methyltransferase capable of adding the methyl group onto the GlcA side chain of xylooligomers. Furthermore, we revealed that the two GT43 genes in S. moellendorffii, SmGT43A and SmGT43B, are functional orthologs of the Arabidopsis xylan backbone biosynthetic genes IRX9 and IRX14, respectively, indicating the evolutionary conservation of the involvement of two functionally non-redundant groups of GT43 genes in xylan backbone biosynthesis between seedless and seed vascular plants. Among the five GT43 genes in P. patens, PpGT43A was found to be a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis IRX9, suggesting that the recruitment of GT43 genes in xylan backbone biosynthesis occurred when non-vascular plants appeared on land. PMID:27345025

  7. Functional conservation of the Drosophila gooseberry gene and its evolutionary alleles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xue, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila Pax gene gooseberry (gsb) is required for development of the larval cuticle and CNS, survival to adulthood, and male fertility. These functions can be rescued in gsb mutants by two gsb evolutionary alleles, gsb-Prd and gsb-Pax3, which express the Drosophila Paired and mouse Pax3 proteins under the control of gooseberry cis-regulatory region. Therefore, both Paired and Pax3 proteins have conserved all the Gsb functions that are required for survival of embryos to fertile adults, despite the divergent primary sequences in their C-terminal halves. As gsb-Prd and gsb-Pax3 uncover a gsb function involved in male fertility, construction of evolutionary alleles may provide a powerful strategy to dissect hitherto unknown gene functions. Our results provide further evidence for the essential role of cis-regulatory regions in the functional diversification of duplicated genes during evolution.

  8. Downregulation of miR-320a/383-sponge-like long non-coding RNA NLC1-C (narcolepsy candidate-region 1 genes) is associated with male infertility and promotes testicular embryonal carcinoma cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lü, M; Tian, H; Cao, Y-x; He, X; Chen, L; Song, X; Ping, P; Huang, H; Sun, F

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are extensively transcribed from the genome, have been proposed to be key regulators of diverse biological processes. However, little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulating spermatogenesis in human males. Here, using microarray technology, we show altered expression of lncRNAs in the testes of infertile men with maturation arrest (MA) or hypospermatogenesis (Hypo), with 757 and 2370 differentially down-regulated and 475 and 163 up-regulated lncRNAs in MA and Hypo, respectively. These findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays on select lncRNAs, including HOTTIP, imsrna320, imsrna292 and NLC1-C (narcolepsy candidate-region 1 genes). Interestingly, NLC1-C, also known as long intergenic non-protein-coding RNA162 (LINC00162), was down-regulated in the cytoplasm and accumulated in the nucleus of spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes in the testes of infertile men with mixed patterns of MA compared with normal control. The accumulation of NLC1-C in the nucleus repressed miR-320a and miR-383 transcript and promoted testicular embryonal carcinoma cell proliferation by binding to Nucleolin. Here, we define a novel mechanism by which lncRNAs modulate miRNA expression at the transcriptional level by binding to RNA-binding proteins to regulate human spermatogenesis. PMID:26539909

  9. The rnhB gene encoding RNase HII of Streptococcus pneumoniae and evidence of conserved motifs in eucaryotic genes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y B; Ayalew, S; Lacks, S A

    1997-01-01

    A single RNase H enzyme was detected in extracts of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The gene encoding this enzyme was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, as demonstrated by its ability to complement a double-mutant rnhA recC strain. Sequence analysis of the cloned DNA revealed an open reading frame of 290 codons that encodes a polypeptide of 31.9 kDa. The predicted protein exhibits a low level of homology (19% identity of amino acid residues) to RNase HII encoded by rnhB of E. coli. Identification of the S. pneumoniae RNase HII translation start site by amino-terminal sequencing of the protein and of mRNA start sites by primer extension with reverse transcriptase showed that the major transcript encoding rnhB begins at the protein start site. Comparison of the S. pneumoniae and E. coli RNase HII sequences and sequences of other, putative bacterial rnhB gene products surmised from sequencing data revealed three conserved motifs. Use of these motifs to search for homologous genes in eucaryotes demonstrated the presence of rnhB genes in a yeast and a roundworm. Partial rnhB gene sequences were detected among expressed sequences of mouse and human cells. From these data, it appears that RNase HII is universally present in living cells. PMID:9190796

  10. A Large Gene Cluster Encoding Several Magnetosome Proteins Is Conserved in Different Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Karen; Wawer, Cathrin; Tebo, Bradley M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In magnetotactic bacteria, a number of specific proteins are associated with the magnetosome membrane (MM) and may have a crucial role in magnetite biomineralization. We have cloned and sequenced the genes of several of these polypeptides in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense that could be assigned to two different genomic regions. Except for mamA, none of these genes have been previously reported to be related to magnetosome formation. Homologous genes were found in the genome sequences of M. magnetotacticum and magnetic coccus strain MC-1. The MM proteins identified display homology to tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (MamA), cation diffusion facilitators (MamB), and HtrA-like serine proteases (MamE) or bear no similarity to known proteins (MamC and MamD). A major gene cluster containing several magnetosome genes (including mamA and mamB) was found to be conserved in all three of the strains investigated. The mamAB cluster also contains additional genes that have no known homologs in any nonmagnetic organism, suggesting a specific role in magnetosome formation. PMID:11571158

  11. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams, M.J.; Lapis, P.; Lautenberger, J.A.; Schweinfest, C.W.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, the authors have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is >95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published finding indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains.

  12. The Neurospora crassa carotenoid biosynthetic gene (albino 3) reveals highly conserved regions among prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, A; Romano, N; Ballario, P; Morelli, G; Macino, G

    1991-03-25

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa the biosynthesis of carotenoids is regulated by blue light. Here we report the characterization of the albino-3 (al-3) gene of N. crassa, which encodes the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate synthetase. This is the first geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate synthetase gene isolated. Nucleotide sequence comparison of al-3 genomic and cDNA clones revealed that the al-3 gene is not interrupted by introns. Transcription of the al-3 gene has been examined in dark-grown and light-induced mycelia. The analysis revealed that the al-3 gene is not expressed in the dark and that its transcription is induced by blue light (Nelson, M. A., Morelli, G., Carattoli, A., Romano, N., and Macino, G. (1989) Mol. Cell. Biol. 9, 1271-1276). The al-3 gene encodes a polypeptide of 428 amino acids. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of al-3 with the sequences of prenyltransferases of other species, from bacteria to humans, showed three highly conserved homologous regions. These homologous regions may be involved in the formation of the catalytic site of the prenyltransferases.

  13. In the QTL region surrounding porcine MHC, gene order is conserved with human genome.

    PubMed

    Genêt, C; Renard, C; Cabau, C; Rogel-Gaillard, C; Gellin, J; Milan, D

    2001-03-01

    On the porcine genome, the region surrounding the Major Histocompatibility Complex, also called Swine Leukocyte Antigens (SLA), is of particular interest not only owing to itq role in the control of immune response, but also because of its influence on many traits such as growth, fatness, and meat quality. To help in the identification of responsible genes, detailed comparative maps of the MHC region in mammalian species and powerful mapping tools allowing accurate ordering of genes and markers in this region are needed. In this report, we describe the use of the recently developed IMpRH radiation hybrid panel, to construct a higher density radiation hybrid map of swine Sscr 7p-q12, containing 23 additional loci. Our results show that the gene order is conserved between the two MHC-containing regions, even if an inversion is observed above the QTL region in the region containing DEK, SCA1, and EDN1 genes. The framework map produced shows that the IMpRH panel permits the ordering of genes and markers in the three MHC classes and would thus allow accurate localization of ESTs and candidate genes. PMID:11252175

  14. Divergent mechanisms regulate conserved cardiopharyngeal development and gene expression in distantly related ascidians

    PubMed Central

    Stolfi, Alberto; Lowe, Elijah K; Racioppi, Claudia; Ristoratore, Filomena; Brown, C Titus; Swalla, Billie J; Christiaen, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Ascidians present a striking dichotomy between conserved phenotypes and divergent genomes: embryonic cell lineages and gene expression patterns are conserved between distantly related species. Much research has focused on Ciona or Halocynthia spp. but development in other ascidians remains poorly characterized. In this study, we surveyed the multipotent myogenic B7.5 lineage in Molgula spp. Comparisons to the homologous lineage in Ciona revealed identical cell division and fate specification events that result in segregation of larval, cardiac, and pharyngeal muscle progenitors. Moreover, the expression patterns of key regulators are conserved, but cross-species transgenic assays uncovered incompatibility, or ‘unintelligibility’, of orthologous cis-regulatory sequences between Molgula and Ciona. These sequences drive identical expression patterns that are not recapitulated in cross-species assays. We show that this unintelligibility is likely due to changes in both cis- and trans-acting elements, hinting at widespread and frequent turnover of regulatory mechanisms underlying otherwise conserved aspects of ascidian embryogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03728.001 PMID:25209999

  15. Composition and Expression of Conserved MicroRNA Genes in Diploid Cotton (Gossypium) Species

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lei; Kakrana, Atul; Arikit, Siwaret; Meyers, Blake C.; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are ubiquitous in plant genomes but vary greatly in their abundance within and conservation among plant lineages. To gain insight into the evolutionary birth/death dynamics of microRNA families, we sequenced small RNA and 5′-end PARE libraries generated from two closely related species of Gossypium. Here, we demonstrate that 33 microRNA families, with similar copy numbers and average evolutionary rates, are conserved in the two congeneric cottons. Analysis of the presence/absence of these microRNA families in other land plants sheds light on their depth of phylogenetic origin and lineage-specific loss/gain. Conserved microRNA families in Gossypium exhibit a striking interspecific asymmetry in expression, potentially connected to relative proximity to neighboring transposable elements. A complex correlated expression pattern of microRNA target genes with their controlling microRNAs indicates that possible functional divergence of conserved microRNA families can also exist even within a single plant genus. PMID:24281048

  16. Contribution of IL-12/IL-35 common subunit p35 to maintaining the testicular immune privilege.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Hayato; Yoshimoto, Takayuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Naito, Munekazu; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Shogo; Mitobe, Kana; Furusawa, Jun-Ichi; Mizoguchi, Izuru; Kezuka, Takeshi; Goto, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kaori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Sakabe, Kou; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The testis is an organ with immune privilege. The comprehensive blood-testis barrier formed by Sertoli cells protects autoimmunogenic spermatozoa and spermatids from attack by the body's immune system. The interleukin (IL)-6/IL-12 family cytokines IL-12 (p35/p40), IL-23 (p19/p40), IL-27 (p28/Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 [EBI3]), and IL-35 (p35/EBI3) play critical roles in the regulation of various immune responses, but their roles in testicular immune privilege are not well understood. In the present study, we investigated whether these cytokines are expressed in the testes and whether they function in the testicular immune privilege by using mice deficient in their subunits. Expression of EBI3 was markedly increased at both mRNA and protein levels in the testes of 10- or 12-week-old wild-type mice as compared with levels in 2-week-old mice, whereas the mRNA expression of p40 was markedly decreased and that of p35 was conserved between these two groups. Lack of EBI3, p35, and IL-12 receptor β2 caused enhanced infiltration of lymphocytes into the testicular interstitium, with increased interferon-γ expression in the testes and autoantibody production against mainly acrosomal regions of spermatids. Spermatogenic disturbance was more frequently observed in the seminiferous tubules, especially when surrounded by infiltrating lymphocytes, of these deficient mice than in those of wild-type mice. In particular, p35-deficient mice showed the most severe spermatogenic disturbance. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that endothelial cells and peritubular cells in the interstitium were highly positive for p35 at both ages, and CD163+ resident macrophages positive for p35 and EBI3, possibly producing IL-35, were also detected in the interstitium of 12-week-old mice but not those of 2-week-old mice. These results suggest that p35 helps in maintaining the testicular immune privilege, in part in an IL-35-dependent manner.

  17. Conserved and Diversified Gene Families of Monovalent Cation/H+ Antiporters from Algae to Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chanroj, Salil; Wang, Guoying; Venema, Kees; Zhang, Muren Warren; Delwiche, Charles F.; Sze, Heven

    2012-01-01

    All organisms have evolved strategies to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental and environmental cues. One strategy is mediated by monovalent cation–proton antiporters (CPA) that are classified in two superfamilies. Many CPA1 genes from bacteria, fungi, metazoa, and plants have been functionally characterized; though roles of plant CPA2 genes encoding K+-efflux antiporter (KEA) and cation/H+ exchanger (CHX) families are largely unknown. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three clades of the CPA1 Na+–H+ exchanger (NHX) family have been conserved from single-celled algae to Arabidopsis. These are (i) plasma membrane-bound SOS1/AtNHX7 that share ancestry with prokaryote NhaP, (ii) endosomal AtNHX5/6 that is part of the eukaryote Intracellular-NHE clade, and (iii) a vacuolar NHX clade (AtNHX1–4) specific to plants. Early diversification of KEA genes possibly from an ancestral cyanobacterium gene is suggested by three types seen in all plants. Intriguingly, CHX genes diversified from three to four members in one subclade of early land plants to 28 genes in eight subclades of Arabidopsis. Homologs from Spirogyra or Physcomitrella share high similarity with AtCHX20, suggesting that guard cell-specific AtCHX20 and its closest relatives are founders of the family, and pollen-expressed CHX genes appeared later in monocots and early eudicots. AtCHX proteins mediate K+ transport and pH homeostasis, and have been localized to intracellular and plasma membrane. Thus KEA genes are conserved from green algae to angiosperms, and their presence in red algae and secondary endosymbionts suggest a role in plastids. In contrast, AtNHX1–4 subtype evolved in plant cells to handle ion homeostasis of vacuoles. The great diversity of CHX genes in land plants compared to metazoa, fungi, or algae would imply a significant role of ion and pH homeostasis at dynamic endomembranes in the vegetative and reproductive success of flowering plants. PMID:22639643

  18. [Analysis of conserved flanking elements associated with antibiotic resistance genes dissemination].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Mao, Da-Qing; Ren, Jun; Luo, Yi; Cao, Wen-Qing

    2012-01-01

    The overuse of antibiotics in medicine, animal husbandry, and aquiculture industry increases the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), and also, accelerates the dissemination of ARGs within environmental bacteria. In this study, the total DNA was directly extracted from environmental samples, and the upstream and downstream of antibiotic resistance genes were directly amplified by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (Tail-PCR) technique. By optimizing the Tail-PCR program, the multiple flanking sequences of tetW, including 6 upstream sequences and 9 downstream sequences, were simultaneously acquired. Through the bioinformatics analysis, the upstream of tetW presented a perfect inverted repeat (IR), a known tetW regulator peptide, and an insertional sequence (IS), whereas the downstream of tetW presented a most conservative fragment and a common open reading frame (ORF) coding methyltransferase. This study not only revealed several conserved flanking tetW gene modules, but also supplied a highly-efficient and convenient methodology for the research of tetW's dissemination within bacteria, i. e., several flanking sequences could be concisely obtained from one sample by using Tail-PCR program.

  19. Conservation of endangered Spanish cattle breeds using markers of candidate genes for meat quality.

    PubMed

    Rodero, E; González, A; Avilés, C; Luque, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the allelic and genotypic frequencies for two genes associated with tenderness of meat (CAPN1 and CAST) and one with fat deposits (DGAT1) in three endangered Spanish cattle breeds: Berrenda en Colorado (BC), Berrenda en Negro (BN), and Cardena Andaluza (CA) to utility of their involvement in the selection of them and to help the adoption of conservation measurement. Seventy-five males and 298 females of those breeds were genotyped. Genotypic and allelic frequencies for each polymorphic locus were estimated. There were significant differences in the genotypic frequencies among breeds in CAPN1 and DGTA1 genes and in the case of the genic frequencies in CAPN1, CAST, and DGAT1 genes. The three breeds analyzed (BC, BN, and CA) presented high allelic frequencies for the favorable allele of the three markers (from 0.41 to 0.75). The association between the favorable allele and meat quality must be confirmed. In cases of association with differences in quality meat, the absence of differences in the genotypic and genic frequency distributions between the sexes is advantageous in mating planning because it implies that there is no handicap to be overcome for the conservation program and it would allow the use of sires to promote the increase in improvements within a short period of time.

  20. Nucleotide Variation and Conservation at the Dpp Locus, a Gene Controlling Early Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Richter, B.; Long, M.; Lewontin, R. C.; Nitasaka, E.

    1997-01-01

    A study of polymorphism and species divergence of the dpp gene of Drosophila has been made. Eighteen lines from a population of D. melanogaster were sequenced for 5200 bp of the Hin region of the gene, coding for the dpp polypeptide. A comparison was made with sequence from D. simulans. Ninety-six silent polymorphisms and three amino acid replacement polymorphisms were found. The overall silent polymorphism (0.0247) is low, but haplotype diversity (0.0066 for effectively silent sites and 0.0054 for all sites) is in the range found for enzyme loci. Amino acid variation is absent in the N-terminal signal peptide, the C-terminal TGF-β peptide and in the N-terminal half of the pro-protein region. At the nucleotide level there is strong conservation in the middle half of the large intron and in the 3' untranslated sequence of the last exon. The 3' untranslated conservation, which is perfect for 110 bp among all the divergent species, is unexplained. There is strong positive linkage disequilibrium among polymorphic sites, with stretches of apparent gene conversion among originally divergent sequences. The population apparently is a migration mixture of divergent clades. PMID:9071586

  1. Ancestral major histocompatibility complex DRB genes beget conserved patterns of localized polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, L K; Nepom, G T

    1996-01-01

    Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are characterized by extensive polymorphism within species and also by a remarkable conservation of contemporary human allelic sequences in evolutionarily distant primates. Mechanisms proposed to account for strict nucleotide conservation in the context of highly variable genes include the suggestion that intergenic exchange generates repeated sets of MHC DRB polymorphisms [Gyllensten, U. B., Sundvall, M. & Erlich, H. A. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 3686-3690; Lundberg, A. S. & McDevitt, H. 0. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 6545-6549]. We analyzed over 50 primate MHC DRB sequences, and identified nucleotide elements within macaque and baboon DRB6-like sequences with deletions corresponding to specific exon 2 hypervariable regions, which encode a discrete alpha helical segment of the MHC antigen combining site. This precisely localized deletion provides direct evidence implicating segmental exchange of MHC-encoded DRB gene fragments as one of the evolutionary mechanisms both generating and maintaining MHC diversity. Intergenic exchange at this site may be fundamental to the diversification of immune protection in populations by permitting alteration in the specificity of the MHC that determines the repertoire of antigens bound. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8643583

  2. Strict evolutionary conservation followed rapid gene loss on human and rhesus Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Brown, Laura G; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Graves, Tina; Fulton, Robert S; Dugan, Shannon; Ding, Yan; Buhay, Christian J; Kremitzki, Colin; Wang, Qiaoyan; Shen, Hua; Holder, Michael; Villasana, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne V; Cree, Andrew; Courtney, Laura; Veizer, Joelle; Kotkiewicz, Holland; Cho, Ting-Jan; Koutseva, Natalia; Rozen, Steve; Muzny, Donna M; Warren, Wesley C; Gibbs, Richard A; Wilson, Richard K; Page, David C

    2012-02-22

    The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes during the past 200-300 million years. The human MSY (male-specific region of Y chromosome) retains only three percent of the ancestral autosomes' genes owing to genetic decay. This evolutionary decay was driven by a series of five 'stratification' events. Each event suppressed X-Y crossing over within a chromosome segment or 'stratum', incorporated that segment into the MSY and subjected its genes to the erosive forces that attend the absence of crossing over. The last of these events occurred 30 million years ago, 5 million years before the human and Old World monkey lineages diverged. Although speculation abounds regarding ongoing decay and looming extinction of the human Y chromosome, remarkably little is known about how many MSY genes were lost in the human lineage in the 25 million years that have followed its separation from the Old World monkey lineage. To investigate this question, we sequenced the MSY of the rhesus macaque, an Old World monkey, and compared it to the human MSY. We discovered that during the last 25 million years MSY gene loss in the human lineage was limited to the youngest stratum (stratum 5), which comprises three percent of the human MSY. In the older strata, which collectively comprise the bulk of the human MSY, gene loss evidently ceased more than 25 million years ago. Likewise, the rhesus MSY has not lost any older genes (from strata 1-4) during the past 25 million years, despite its major structural differences to the human MSY. The rhesus MSY is simpler, with few amplified gene families or palindromes that might enable intrachromosomal recombination and repair. We present an empirical reconstruction of human MSY evolution in which each stratum transitioned from rapid, exponential loss of ancestral genes to strict conservation through purifying selection.

  3. Reanalyze unassigned reads in Sanger based metagenomic data using conserved gene adjacency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Investigation of metagenomes provides greater insight into uncultured microbial communities. The improvement in sequencing technology, which yields a large amount of sequence data, has led to major breakthroughs in the field. However, at present, taxonomic binning tools for metagenomes discard 30-40% of Sanger sequencing data due to the stringency of BLAST cut-offs. In an attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of metagenomic data, we re-analyzed the discarded metagenomes by using less stringent cut-offs. Additionally, we introduced a new criterion, namely, the evolutionary conservation of adjacency between neighboring genes. To evaluate the feasibility of our approach, we re-analyzed discarded contigs and singletons from several environments with different levels of complexity. We also compared the consistency between our taxonomic binning and those reported in the original studies. Results Among the discarded data, we found that 23.7 ± 3.9% of singletons and 14.1 ± 1.0% of contigs were assigned to taxa. The recovery rates for singletons were higher than those for contigs. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a high degree of similarity (0.94 ± 0.03 at the phylum rank and 0.80 ± 0.11 at the family rank) between the proposed taxonomic binning approach and those reported in original studies. In addition, an evaluation using simulated data demonstrated the reliability of the proposed approach. Conclusions Our findings suggest that taking account of conserved neighboring gene adjacency improves taxonomic assignment when analyzing metagenomes using Sanger sequencing. In other words, utilizing the conserved gene order as a criterion will reduce the amount of data discarded when analyzing metagenomes. PMID:21083935

  4. The insect cytochrome oxidase I gene: evolutionary patterns and conserved primers for phylogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Lunt, D H; Zhang, D X; Szymura, J M; Hewitt, G M

    1996-08-01

    Insect mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes are used as a model to examine the within-gene heterogeneity of evolutionary rate and its implications for evolutionary analyses. The complete sequence (1537 bp) of the meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) COI gene has been determined, and compared with eight other insect COI genes at both the DNA and amino acid sequence levels. This reveals that different regions evolve at different rates, and the patterns of sequence variability seems associated with functional constraints on the protein. The COOH-terminal was found to be significantly more variable than internal loops (I), external loops (E), transmembrane helices (M) or the NH2 terminal. The central region of COI (M5-M8) has lower levels of sequence variability, which is related to several important functional domains in this region. Highly conserved primers which amplify regions of different variabilities have been designed to cover the entire insect COI gene. These primers have been shown to amplify COI in a wide range of species, representing all the major insect groups; some even in an arachnid. Implications of the observed evolutionary pattern for phylogenetic analysis are discussed, with particular regard to the choice of regions of suitable variability for specific phylogenetic projects.

  5. Involvement of the conserved Hox gene Antennapedia in the development and evolution of a novel trait

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hox proteins specify segment identity during embryogenesis and have typical associated expression patterns. Changes in embryonic expression and activity of Hox genes were crucial in the evolution of animal body plans, but their role in the post-embryonic development of lineage-specific traits remains largely unexplored. Here, we focus on the insect Hox genes Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and Antennapedia (Antp), and implicate the latter in the formation and diversification of novel, butterfly-specific wing patterns. Results First, we describe a conserved pattern of Ubx expression and a novel pattern of Antp expression in wing discs of Bicyclus anynana butterflies. The discrete, reiterated domains of Antp contrast with the typical expression of Hox genes in single continuous regions in arthropod embryos. Second, we show that this pattern is associated with the establishment of the organizing centres of eyespots. Antp upregulation is the earliest event in organizer development described to date, and in contrast to all genes implicated in eyespot formation, is exclusive to those centres. Third, our comparative analysis of gene expression across nymphalids reveals unexpected differences in organizer determination. Conclusions We show that the Antp's recruitment for the formation of novel traits in butterfly wing discs involved the evolution of new expression domains, and is restricted to a particular lineage. This study contributes novel insights into the evolution of Antp expression, as well as into the genetic mechanisms underlying morphological diversification. Our results also underscore how a wider representation of morphological and phylogenetic diversity is essential in evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:21504568

  6. Preferential utilization of conserved immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene segments during human fetal life.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, H W; Wang, J Y

    1990-01-01

    The ability to respond to specific antigens develops in a programmed fashion. Although the antibody repertoire in adults is presumably generated by stochastic combinatorial joining of rearranged heavy variable, diversity, and joining (VH-DH-JH) and light (VL-JL) chains, experimental evidence in the mouse has shown nonrandom utilization of variable gene segments during ontogeny and in response to specific antigens. In this study, we have performed sequence analysis of 104-day human fetal liver-derived, randomly isolated constant region C+ mu transcripts and demonstrate a consistent preference during fetal life for a small subset of three highly conserved VH3 family gene segments. In addition, the data show that this preferential gene segment utilization extends to the DHQ52 and the JH3 and JH4 loci. Sequence analysis of two "sterile" DH-JH transcripts suggests that transcriptional activation of the JH-proximal DHQ52 element may precede initiation of DH-JH rearrangement and influence fetal DH utilization. Sequence comparisons reveal striking nucleotide polymorphism in allelic gene segments which is poorly reflected in the peptide sequence, implying considerable evolutionary selection pressure. Although vertebrate species utilize a variety of strategies to generate their antibody repertoire, preferential utilization of VH3 elements is consistently found during early development. These data support the hypothesis that VH3 gene segments play an essential role in the development of the immune response. Images PMID:2117273

  7. An evolutionarily conserved mutual interdependence between Aire and microRNAs in promiscuous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Olga; Tykocinski, Lars-Oliver; Dooley, James; Liston, Adrian; Kyewski, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The establishment and maintenance of central tolerance depends to a large extent on the ability of medullary thymic epithelial cells to express a variety of tissue-restricted antigens, the so-called promiscuous gene expression (pGE). Autoimmune regulator (Aire) is to date the best characterised transcriptional regulator known to at least partially coordinate pGE. There is accruing evidence that the expression of Aire-dependent and -independent genes is modulated by higher order chromatin configuration, epigenetic modifications and post-transcriptional control. Given the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) as potent post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression, we investigated their role in the regulation of pGE in purified mouse and human thymic epithelial cells (TECs). Microarray profiling of TEC subpopulations revealed evolutionarily conserved cell type and differentiation-specific miRNA signatures with a subset of miRNAs being significantly upregulated during terminal medullary thymic epithelial cell differentiation. The differential regulation of this subset of miRNAs was correlated with Aire expression and some of these miRNAs were misexpressed in the Aire knockout thymus. In turn, the specific absence of miRNAs in TECs resulted in a progressive reduction of Aire expression and pGE, affecting both Aire-dependent and -independent genes. In contrast, the absence of miR-29a only affected the Aire-dependent gene pool. These findings reveal a mutual interdependence of miRNA and Aire.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Strain-Specific and Conserved Stemness Genes in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Chien; Horowitz, Michael; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2012-01-01

    The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea is a powerful model organism for studying stem cell biology due to its extraordinary regenerative ability mediated by neoblasts, a population of adult somatic stem cells. Elucidation of the S. mediterranea transcriptome and the dynamics of transcript expression will increase our understanding of the gene regulatory programs that regulate stem cell function and differentiation. Here, we have used RNA-Seq to characterize the S. mediterranea transcriptome in sexual and asexual animals and in purified neoblast and differentiated cell populations. Our analysis identified many uncharacterized genes, transcripts, and alternatively spliced isoforms that are differentially expressed in a strain or cell type-specific manner. Transcriptome profiling of purified neoblasts and differentiated cells identified neoblast-enriched transcripts, many of which likely play important roles in regeneration and stem cell function. Strikingly, many of the neoblast-enriched genes are orthologs of genes whose expression is enriched in human embryonic stem cells, suggesting that a core set of genes that regulate stem cell function are conserved across metazoan species. PMID:22496805

  9. Testicular Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of testicular cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  10. Micropenis associated with testicular agenesis.

    PubMed

    Grant, D B; Dillon, M J

    1975-03-01

    This paper describes 2 male infants who were born with sever micropenis and in whom testicular tissue could not be identified at surgery. HCG stimulation in one infant was not followed by a rise in plasma testosterone. It was decided that both cases would be best raised as females, despite their male chromosomal sex.

  11. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Conservation and divergence of autonomous pathway genes in the flowering regulatory network of Beta vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elwafa, Salah F; Büttner, Bianca; Chia, Tansy; Schulze-Buxloh, Gretel; Hohmann, Uwe; Mutasa-Göttgens, Effie; Jung, Christian; Müller, Andreas E

    2011-06-01

    The transition from vegetative growth to reproductive development is a complex process that requires an integrated response to multiple environmental cues and endogenous signals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which has a facultative requirement for vernalization and long days, the genes of the autonomous pathway function as floral promoters by repressing the central repressor and vernalization-regulatory gene FLC. Environmental regulation by seasonal changes in daylength is under control of the photoperiod pathway and its key gene CO. The root and leaf crop species Beta vulgaris in the caryophyllid clade of core eudicots, which is only very distantly related to Arabidopsis, is an obligate long-day plant and includes forms with or without vernalization requirement. FLC and CO homologues with related functions in beet have been identified, but the presence of autonomous pathway genes which function in parallel to the vernalization and photoperiod pathways has not yet been reported. Here, this begins to be addressed by the identification and genetic mapping of full-length homologues of the RNA-regulatory gene FLK and the chromatin-regulatory genes FVE, LD, and LDL1. When overexpressed in A. thaliana, BvFLK accelerates bolting in the Col-0 background and fully complements the late-bolting phenotype of an flk mutant through repression of FLC. In contrast, complementation analysis of BvFVE1 and the presence of a putative paralogue in beet suggest evolutionary divergence of FVE homologues. It is further shown that BvFVE1, unlike FVE in Arabidopsis, is under circadian clock control. Together, the data provide first evidence for evolutionary conservation of components of the autonomous pathway in B. vulgaris, while also suggesting divergence or subfunctionalization of one gene. The results are likely to be of broader relevance because B. vulgaris expands the spectrum of evolutionarily diverse species which are subject to differential developmental and/or environmental regulation

  13. Synteny conservation of the Huntington's disease gene and surrounding loci on mouse Chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Grosson, C L; MacDonald, M E; Duyao, M P; Ambrose, C M; Roffler-Tarlov, S; Gusella, J F

    1994-07-01

    The mouse homologs of the Huntington's disease (HD) gene and 17 other human Chromosome (Chr) 4 loci (including six previously unmapped) were localized by use of an interspecific cross. All loci mapped in a continuous linkage group on mouse Chr 5, distal to En2 and I16, whose human counterparts are located on Chr 7. The relative order of the loci on human Chr 4 and mouse Chr 5 was maintained, except for a break between D5H4S115E and Idua/rd, with relocation of the latter to the opposite end of the map. The mouse HD homolog (Hdh) mapped within a cluster of seven genes that were completely linked in our data set. In human these loci span a approximately 1.8 Mb stretch of human 4p16.3 that has been entirely cloned. To date, there is no phenotypic correspondence between human and mouse mutations mapping to this region of synteny conservation.

  14. Prospectively-Identified Incident Testicular Cancer Risk in a Familial Testicular Cancer Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anand; Adams, Charleen D.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Nichols, Kathryn; Stewart, Douglas R.; Greene, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) have a strong genetic component and a high familial relative risk. However, linkage analyses have not identified a rare, highly-penetrant familial TGCT (FTGCT) susceptibility locus. Currently, multiple low-penetrance genes are hypothesized to underlie the familial multiple-case phenotype. The observation that two is the most common number of affected individuals per family presents an impediment to FTGCT gene discovery. Clinically, the prospective TGCT risk in the multiple-case family context is unknown. Methods We performed a prospective analysis of TGCT incidence in a cohort of multiple-affected-person families and sporadic-bilateral-case families; 1,260 men from 140 families (10,207 person-years of follow-up) met our inclusion criteria. Age-, gender-, and calendar time-specific standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for TGCT relative to the general population were calculated using SEER*Stat. Results Eight incident TGCTs occurred during prospective FTGCT cohort follow-up (versus 0.67 expected; SIR=11.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]=5.1–23.4; excess absolute risk=7.2/10,000). We demonstrate that the incidence rate of TGCT is greater among bloodline male relatives from multiple-case testicular cancer families than that expected in the general population, a pattern characteristic of adult-onset Mendelian cancer susceptibility disorders. Two of these incident TGCTs occurred in relatives of sporadic-bilateral cases (0.15 expected; SIR=13.4; 95%CI=1.6–48.6). Conclusions Our data are the first indicating that despite relatively low numbers of affected individuals per family, members of both multiple-affected-person FTGCT families and sporadic-bilateral TGCT families comprise high-risk groups for incident testicular cancer. Impact Men at high TGCT risk might benefit from tailored risk stratification and surveillance strategies. PMID:26265202

  15. Left-Right Function of dmrt2 Genes Is Not Conserved between Zebrafish and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Raquel; Lopes, Susana S.; Saúde, Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Background Members of the Dmrt family, generally associated with sex determination, were shown to be involved in several other functions during embryonic development. Dmrt2 has been studied in the context of zebrafish development where, due to a duplication event, two paralog genes dmrt2a and dmrt2b are present. Both zebrafish dmrt2a/terra and dmrt2b are important to regulate left-right patterning in the lateral plate mesoderm. In addition, dmrt2a/terra is necessary for symmetric somite formation while dmrt2b regulates somite differentiation impacting on slow muscle development. One dmrt2 gene is also expressed in the mouse embryo, where it is necessary for somite differentiation but with an impact on axial skeleton development. However, nothing was known about its role during left-right patterning in the lateral plate mesoderm or in the symmetric synchronization of somite formation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a dmrt2 mutant mouse line, we show that this gene is not involved in symmetric somite formation and does not regulate the laterality pathway that controls left-right asymmetric organ positioning. We reveal that dmrt2a/terra is present in the zebrafish laterality organ, the Kupffer's vesicle, while its homologue is excluded from the mouse equivalent structure, the node. On the basis of evolutionary sub-functionalization and neo-functionalization theories we discuss this absence of functional conservation. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that the role of dmrt2 gene is not conserved during zebrafish and mouse embryonic development. PMID:21203428

  16. Evaluation of mRNA Contents of YBX2 and JHDM2A Genes on Testicular Tissues of Azoospermic Men with Different Classes of Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Najafipour, Reza; Moghbelinejad, Sahar; Samimi Hashjin, Amir; Rajaei, Farzad; Rashvand, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Objective Animal model studies have shown that MSY2 and JHDM2A genes have an important role in spermatogenesis process and fertility of male mice. But the potential role of these genes in human spermatogenesis and fertility is not known yet. Therefore, we evaluated expression ratios of these genes in testis tissues of men with normal and impaired spermatogenesis. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, after RNA extraction and cDNA syn- thesis from 50 non-obstructive azoospermic and 12 normal testis tissues, the expression ratios of genes were evaluated by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Hematoxcylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used for histological classification of testis tissues. For statistical analysis, one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was carried out. Results Our results showed a significant reduction in mRNA level of YBX2 in samples with impaired spermatogenesis (p<0.001) compared to samples with qualitatively normal spermatogenesis and normal spermatogenesis; however, in JHDM2A gene, despite sensible reduction in gene expression level in men with impaired spermatogenesis, no significant differences were shown (p>0.05). Furthermore in YBX2, a significant negative correlation was demonstrated between the efficiency score of spermatogenesis and the threshold cycle (CT) (r=-0.7, p<0.0001), whereas in JHDM2A, this negative correlation was not significant (r=-0.4, p=0.06). Conclusion Generally, these data indicated that YBX2 and JHDM2A genes may play an important role in male infertility, and suggested that these molecules can act as useful biomarkers for predicting male infertility. PMID:25870841

  17. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and identification of mycotoxigenic Penicillium species using conserved genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of conserved genes and sequence analysis provides a very powerful tool for the identification of toxigenic as well as non-toxigenic Penicillium species. Sequences are obtained by amplification of the gene fragment, sequencing via capillary electrophoresis of d...

  18. Buffering by gene duplicates: an analysis of molecular correlates and evolutionary conservation

    PubMed Central

    Hannay, Kevin; Marcotte, Edward M; Vogel, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Background One mechanism to account for robustness against gene knockouts or knockdowns is through buffering by gene duplicates, but the extent and general correlates of this process in organisms is still a matter of debate. To reveal general trends of this process, we provide a comprehensive comparison of gene essentiality, duplication and buffering by duplicates across seven bacteria (Mycoplasma genitalium, Bacillus subtilis, Helicobacter pylori, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli), and four eukaryotes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), Caenorhabditis elegans (worm), Drosophila melanogaster (fly), Mus musculus (mouse)). Results In nine of the eleven organisms, duplicates significantly increase chances of survival upon gene deletion (P-value ≤ 0.05), but only by up to 13%. Given that duplicates make up to 80% of eukaryotic genomes, the small contribution is surprising and points to dominant roles of other buffering processes, such as alternative metabolic pathways. The buffering capacity of duplicates appears to be independent of the degree of gene essentiality and tends to be higher for genes with high expression levels. For example, buffering capacity increases to 23% amongst highly expressed genes in E. coli. Sequence similarity and the number of duplicates per gene are weak predictors of the duplicate's buffering capacity. In a case study we show that buffering gene duplicates in yeast and worm are somewhat more similar in their functions than non-buffering duplicates and have increased transcriptional and translational activity. Conclusion In sum, the extent of gene essentiality and buffering by duplicates is not conserved across organisms and does not correlate with the organisms' apparent complexity. This heterogeneity goes beyond what would be expected from differences in experimental approaches alone. Buffering by duplicates contributes to robustness in several organisms, but to a small extent

  19. The human archain gene, ARCN1, has highly conserved homologs in rice and drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Radice, P.; Jones, C.; Perry, H.

    1995-03-01

    A novel human gene, ARCN1, has been identified in chromosome band 11q23.3. It maps approximately 50 kb telomeric to MLL, a gene that is disrupted in a number of leukemia-associated translocation chromosomes. cDNA clones representing ARCN1 hybridize to 4-kb mRNA species present in all tissues tested. Sequencing of cDNAs suggests that at least two forms of mRNA with alternative 5 {prime} ends are present within the cell. The mRNA with the longest open reading frame gives rise to a protein of 57 kDa. Although the sequence reported is novel, remarkable similarity is observed with two predicted protein sequences from partial DNA sequences generated by rice (Oryza sativa) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) genome projects. The degree of sequence conservation is comparable to that observed for highly conserved structural proteins, such as heat shock protein HSP70, and is greater than that of {gamma}-gubulin and heat shock protein HSP60. A more distant relationship to the group of clathrin-associated proteins suggests a possible role in vesicle structure or trafficking. In view of its ancient pedigree and a potential involvement in cellular architecture, the authors propose that the ARCN1 protein be named archain. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Association analysis between polymorphisms in the conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) gene and cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Bloch, Paul J.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Berrettini, Wade H.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Dackis, Charles A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Oslin, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine induced neuroplasticity changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of cocaine dependence. Since neurotrophic factors have been observed to prevent/reverse and mimic cocaine-induced neurobiological changes in the brain, related genes are plausible candidates for susceptibility to cocaine dependence. The novel conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor protein (CDNF) promotes the survival, growth, and function of dopamine-specific neurons and is expressed in brain regions that undergo cocaine-induced neuroplasticity. In this study, we hypothesize that polymorphisms in the CDNF gene (CDNF/ARMETL1) contribute to increased risk for cocaine dependence. Cocaine dependent individuals (n=351) and unaffected controls (n=257) of African descent were genotyped for four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CDNF gene (rs11259365, rs7094179, rs7900873, rs2278871). We observed no significant differences in allele, genotype, or haplotype frequencies between cases and controls for any of the tested SNPs. Our study suggests that there is no association between variants in the CDNF gene and cocaine dependence. However, additional studies using larger sample sizes, comprehensive SNP coverage, and clinically homogenous populations are necessary before confidently excluding CDNF as a significant genetic risk factor for cocaine dependence. PMID:19429035

  1. Conservation of Arabidopsis thaliana photoperiodic flowering time genes in onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew; Massiah, Andrea Juliet; Thomas, Brian

    2010-10-01

    The genetics underlying onion development are poorly understood. Here the characterization of onion homologs of Arabidopsis photoperiodic flowering pathway genes is reported with the end goal of accelerating onion breeding programs by understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to different latitudes. The expression of onion GI, FKF1 and ZTL homologs under short day (SD) and long day (LD) conditions was examined using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). The expression of AcGI and AcFKF1 was examined in onion varieties which exhibit different daylength responses. Phylogenetic trees were constructed to confirm the identity of the homologs. AcGI and AcFKF1 showed diurnal expression patterns similar to their Arabidopsis counterparts, while AcZTL was found to be constitutively expressed. AcGI showed similar expression patterns in varieties which exhibit different daylength responses, whereas AcFKF1 showed differences. It is proposed that these differences could contribute to the different daylength responses in these varieties. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all the genes isolated are very closely related to their proposed homologs. The results presented here show that key genes controlling photoperiodic flowering in Arabidopsis are conserved in onion, and a role for these genes in the photoperiodic control of bulb initiation is predicted. This theory is supported by expression and phylogenetic data.

  2. Conservation, Duplication, and Divergence of Five Opsin Genes in Insect Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Feuda, Roberto; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Bentley, Michael A.; Holland, Peter W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Opsin proteins covalently bind to small molecular chromophores and each protein-chromophore complex is sensitive to particular wavelengths of light. Multiple opsins with different wavelength absorbance peaks are required for color vision. Comparing opsin responses is challenging at low light levels, explaining why color vision is often lost in nocturnal species. Here, we investigated opsin evolution in 27 phylogenetically diverse insect species including several transitions between photic niches (nocturnal, diurnal, and crepuscular). We find widespread conservation of five distinct opsin genes, more than commonly considered. These comprise one c-opsin plus four r-opsins (long wavelength sensitive or LWS, blue sensitive, ultra violet [UV] sensitive and the often overlooked Rh7 gene). Several recent opsin gene duplications are also detected. The diversity of opsin genes is consistent with color vision in diurnal, crepuscular, and nocturnal insects. Tests for positive selection in relation to photic niche reveal evidence for adaptive evolution in UV-sensitive opsins in day-flying insects in general, and in LWS opsins of day-flying Lepidoptera specifically. PMID:26865071

  3. Conservation, Duplication, and Divergence of Five Opsin Genes in Insect Evolution.

    PubMed

    Feuda, Roberto; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Bentley, Michael A; Holland, Peter W H

    2016-03-01

    Opsin proteins covalently bind to small molecular chromophores and each protein-chromophore complex is sensitive to particular wavelengths of light. Multiple opsins with different wavelength absorbance peaks are required for color vision. Comparing opsin responses is challenging at low light levels, explaining why color vision is often lost in nocturnal species. Here, we investigated opsin evolution in 27 phylogenetically diverse insect species including several transitions between photic niches (nocturnal, diurnal, and crepuscular). We find widespread conservation of five distinct opsin genes, more than commonly considered. These comprise one c-opsin plus four r-opsins (long wavelength sensitive or LWS, blue sensitive, ultra violet [UV] sensitive and the often overlooked Rh7 gene). Several recent opsin gene duplications are also detected. The diversity of opsin genes is consistent with color vision in diurnal, crepuscular, and nocturnal insects. Tests for positive selection in relation to photic niche reveal evidence for adaptive evolution in UV-sensitive opsins in day-flying insects in general, and in LWS opsins of day-flying Lepidoptera specifically. PMID:26865071

  4. Sphingolipids, Transcription Factors, and Conserved Toolkit Genes: Developmental Plasticity in the Ant Cardiocondyla obscurior

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Lukas; Simola, Daniel F.; Heinze, Jürgen; Oettler, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Developmental plasticity allows for the remarkable morphological specialization of individuals into castes in eusocial species of Hymenoptera. Developmental trajectories that lead to alternative caste fates are typically determined by specific environmental stimuli that induce larvae to express and maintain distinct gene expression patterns. Although most eusocial species express two castes, queens and workers, the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior expresses diphenic females and males; this provides a unique system with four discrete phenotypes to study the genomic basis of developmental plasticity in ants. We sequenced and analyzed the transcriptomes of 28 individual C. obscurior larvae of known developmental trajectory, providing the first in-depth analysis of gene expression in eusocial insect larvae. Clustering and transcription factor binding site analyses revealed that different transcription factors and functionally distinct sets of genes are recruited during larval development to induce the four alternative trajectories. In particular, we found complex patterns of gene regulation pertaining to sphingolipid metabolism, a conserved molecular pathway involved in development, obesity, and aging. PMID:25725431

  5. A highly conserved sequence is a novel gene involved in de novo vitamin B6 biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Bilski, Piotr; Li, Ming Y.; Chignell, Colin F.; Daub, Margaret E.

    1999-01-01

    The Cercospora nicotianae SOR1 (singlet oxygen resistance) gene was identified previously as a gene involved in resistance of this fungus to singlet-oxygen-generating phototoxins. Although homologues to SOR1 occur in organisms in four kingdoms and encode one of the most highly conserved proteins yet identified, the precise function of this protein has, until now, remained unknown. We show that SOR1 is essential in pyridoxine (vitamin B6) synthesis in C. nicotianae and Aspergillus flavus, although it shows no homology to previously identified pyridoxine synthesis genes identified in Escherichia coli. Sequence database analysis demonstrated that organisms encode either SOR1 or E. coli pyridoxine biosynthesis genes, but not both, suggesting that there are two divergent pathways for de novo pyridoxine biosynthesis in nature. Pathway divergence appears to have occurred during the evolution of the eubacteria. We also present data showing that pyridoxine quenches singlet oxygen at a rate comparable to that of vitamins C and E, two of the most highly efficient biological antioxidants, suggesting a previously unknown role for pyridoxine in active oxygen resistance. PMID:10430950

  6. Conservation in the involvement of heterochronic genes and hormones during developmental transitions.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Fernando; Larraín, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Developmental transitions include molting in some invertebrates and the metamorphosis of insects and amphibians. While the study of Caenorhabditis elegans larval transitions was crucial to determine the genetic control of these transitions, Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis have been classic models to study the role of hormones in metamorphosis. Here we review how heterochronic genes (lin-4, let-7, lin-28, lin-41), hormones (dafachronic acid, ecdysone, thyroid hormone) and the environment regulate developmental transitions. Recent evidence suggests that some heterochronic genes also regulate transitions in higher organisms that they are controlled by hormones involved in metamorphosis. We also discuss evidence demonstrating that heterochronic genes and hormones regulate the proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells. We propose the hypothesis that developmental transitions are regulated by an evolutionary conserved mechanism in which heterochronic genes and hormones interact to control stem/progenitor cells proliferation, cell cycle exit, quiescence and differentiation and determine the proper timing of developmental transitions. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these studies to understand post-embryonic development, puberty and regeneration in humans. PMID:27297887

  7. [Bioinformatic prediction of conserved microRNAs and their target genes in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chao, Jiang-Tao; Cui, Meng-Meng; Chen, Ya-Qiong; Zong, Peng; Sun, Yu-He

    2011-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a recently discovered class of small (-21nt), non-coding, endogenous, single-stranded RNAs in eukaryotes, regulate gene expression negatively at the post-transcriptional levels depending on the extent of complementation between miRNA and mRNA. To date, a large number of miRNAs have been reported in many species, but none for eggplant (Solanum melongena L.). In this paper, a computational homology search approach based on the conservation of miRNA sequences and the stem-loop hairpin secondary structures of miRNAs was adopted. The search was started with the known plant miRNAs compared to eggplant expressed sequence tags (EST) databases to find potential miRNAs. Following a range of filtering criteria, a total of 16 potential miRNAs belonging to 12 families were identified. Three pairs of sense and antisense strand eggplant miRNAs belonging to three different miRNA families were also found. Furthermore, miR390 and miR399 sense/antisense pairs are identified for the first time in plants. Using online software psRNATarget, we further predicted the target genes of these 16 miRNAs and got 71 potential targets genes on base of 15 eggplant miRNAs. Most of these target genes were predicted to encode proteins that play key role in eggplant growth, development, metabolism, and stress responses.

  8. Evolutionary conservation pattern of zinc-finger domains of Drosophila segmentation genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, R J; Retzlaff, M; Goerlich, K; Sander, K; Tautz, D

    1992-01-01

    A number of genes of the developmental gene hierarchy in Drosophila encode transcription factors containing Cys2His2 zinc finger domains as DNA-binding motifs. To learn more about the evolution of these genes, it is necessary to clone the homologs, or more correctly the orthologs, from different species. Using PCR, we were able to obtain apparently orthologous fragments of hunchback (hb), Krüppel (Kr), and snail (sna) from a variety of arthropods and partly also from other animal phyla. Sequence alignments of these fragments show that the amino acid differences can normally not be correlated with the evolutionary distances of the respective species. This is due to an apparent saturation of potential replacements within the finger domains, which is also evident from the frequent occurrence of convergent replacements. Another recurrent feature of these alignments is that those amino acids that are directly involved in determining the DNA-binding specificity of the fingers are most conserved. Using in vitro bandshift experiments we can indeed show that the binding specificity of a hunchback finger fragment from different species is not changed. This implies that there is a high selective pressure to maintain the regulatory target elements of these genes during evolution. Images PMID:1438276

  9. Conservation, Duplication, and Divergence of Five Opsin Genes in Insect Evolution.

    PubMed

    Feuda, Roberto; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Bentley, Michael A; Holland, Peter W H

    2016-02-09

    Opsin proteins covalently bind to small molecular chromophores and each protein-chromophore complex is sensitive to particular wavelengths of light. Multiple opsins with different wavelength absorbance peaks are required for color vision. Comparing opsin responses is challenging at low light levels, explaining why color vision is often lost in nocturnal species. Here, we investigated opsin evolution in 27 phylogenetically diverse insect species including several transitions between photic niches (nocturnal, diurnal, and crepuscular). We find widespread conservation of five distinct opsin genes, more than commonly considered. These comprise one c-opsin plus four r-opsins (long wavelength sensitive or LWS, blue sensitive, ultra violet [UV] sensitive and the often overlooked Rh7 gene). Several recent opsin gene duplications are also detected. The diversity of opsin genes is consistent with color vision in diurnal, crepuscular, and nocturnal insects. Tests for positive selection in relation to photic niche reveal evidence for adaptive evolution in UV-sensitive opsins in day-flying insects in general, and in LWS opsins of day-flying Lepidoptera specifically.

  10. Redeployment of a conserved gene regulatory network during Aedes aegypti development.

    PubMed

    Suryamohan, Kushal; Hanson, Casey; Andrews, Emily; Sinha, Saurabh; Scheel, Molly Duman; Halfon, Marc S

    2016-08-15

    Changes in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) underlie the evolution of morphological novelty and developmental system drift. The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the dengue and Zika vector mosquito Aedes aegypti have substantially similar nervous system morphology. Nevertheless, they show significant divergence in a set of genes co-expressed in the midline of the Drosophila central nervous system, including the master regulator single minded and downstream genes including short gastrulation, Star, and NetrinA. In contrast to Drosophila, we find that midline expression of these genes is either absent or severely diminished in A. aegypti. Instead, they are co-expressed in the lateral nervous system. This suggests that in A. aegypti this "midline GRN" has been redeployed to a new location while lost from its previous site of activity. In order to characterize the relevant GRNs, we employed the SCRMshaw method we previously developed to identify transcriptional cis-regulatory modules in both species. Analysis of these regulatory sequences in transgenic Drosophila suggests that the altered gene expression observed in A. aegypti is the result of trans-dependent redeployment of the GRN, potentially stemming from cis-mediated changes in the expression of sim and other as-yet unidentified regulators. Our results illustrate a novel "repeal, replace, and redeploy" mode of evolution in which a conserved GRN acquires a different function at a new site while its original function is co-opted by a different GRN. This represents a striking example of developmental system drift in which the dramatic shift in gene expression does not result in gross morphological changes, but in more subtle differences in development and function of the late embryonic nervous system.

  11. Nematode orphan genes are adopted by conserved regulatory networks and find a home in ecology.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Melanie G; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-01-01

    Nematode dauer formation represents an essential survival and dispersal strategy and is one of a few ecologically relevant traits that can be studied in laboratory approaches. Under harsh environmental conditions, the nematode model organisms Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus arrest their development and induce the formation of stress-resistant dauer larvae in response to dauer pheromones, representing a key example of phenotypic plasticity. Previous studies have indicated that in P. pacificus, many wild isolates show cross-preference of dauer pheromones and compete for access to a limited food source. When investigating the genetic mechanisms underlying this intraspecific competition, we recently discovered that the orphan gene dauerless (dau-1) controls dauer formation by copy number variation. Our results show that dau-1 acts in parallel to or downstream of steroid hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear hormone receptor daf-12, suggesting that DAU-1 represents a novel inhibitor of DAF-12. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the observed copy number variation is part of a complex series of gene duplication events that occurred over short evolutionary time scales. Here, we comment on the incorporation of novel or fast-evolving genes into conserved genetic networks as a common principle for the evolution of phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific competition. We discuss the possibility that orphan genes might often function in the regulation and execution of ecologically relevant traits. Given that only few ecological processes can be studied in model organisms, the function of such genes might often go unnoticed, explaining the large number of uncharacterized genes in model system genomes. PMID:27123366

  12. Redeployment of a conserved gene regulatory network during Aedes aegypti development.

    PubMed

    Suryamohan, Kushal; Hanson, Casey; Andrews, Emily; Sinha, Saurabh; Scheel, Molly Duman; Halfon, Marc S

    2016-08-15

    Changes in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) underlie the evolution of morphological novelty and developmental system drift. The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the dengue and Zika vector mosquito Aedes aegypti have substantially similar nervous system morphology. Nevertheless, they show significant divergence in a set of genes co-expressed in the midline of the Drosophila central nervous system, including the master regulator single minded and downstream genes including short gastrulation, Star, and NetrinA. In contrast to Drosophila, we find that midline expression of these genes is either absent or severely diminished in A. aegypti. Instead, they are co-expressed in the lateral nervous system. This suggests that in A. aegypti this "midline GRN" has been redeployed to a new location while lost from its previous site of activity. In order to characterize the relevant GRNs, we employed the SCRMshaw method we previously developed to identify transcriptional cis-regulatory modules in both species. Analysis of these regulatory sequences in transgenic Drosophila suggests that the altered gene expression observed in A. aegypti is the result of trans-dependent redeployment of the GRN, potentially stemming from cis-mediated changes in the expression of sim and other as-yet unidentified regulators. Our results illustrate a novel "repeal, replace, and redeploy" mode of evolution in which a conserved GRN acquires a different function at a new site while its original function is co-opted by a different GRN. This represents a striking example of developmental system drift in which the dramatic shift in gene expression does not result in gross morphological changes, but in more subtle differences in development and function of the late embryonic nervous system. PMID:27341759

  13. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX) family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG) using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most likely by preventing premature

  14. Two males with SRY-positive 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Sezgin; Asci, Ramazan; Okten, Gülsen; Atac, Fatih; Onat, Onur E; Ogur, Gonul; Aydin, Oguz; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Bagci, Hasan

    2013-02-01

    The 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development (46,XX testicular DSD) is a rare phenotype associated with disorder of the sex chromosomes. We describe the clinical, molecular, and cytogenetic findings of a 16- and a 30-year-old male patient with sex-determining region Y (SRY)-positive 46,XX testicular DSD. Chromosomal analysis revealed 46,XX karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed the SRY region translocated to the short arm of the X chromosome. The presence of the SRY gene was also confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The X chromosome inactivation (XCI) assay showed that both patients have a random pattern of X chromosome inactivation. This report compares the symptoms and features of the SRY-positive 46,XX testicular DSD patients.

  15. The annual testicular cycle in an equatorial colony of lesser rock hyrax, Heterohyrax brucei.

    PubMed

    Neaves, W B

    1979-11-30

    Adult males from a colony of lesser rock hyrax found near the equator in Kenya exhibited an annual cycle of testicular activity characterized by intense spermatogenesis and elevated androgen status from May to July. Average masses of testes and seminal vesicles taken in these months were almost fourfold greater than those from September to January. During the months of peak testicular activity average diameters of Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules were increased by approximately one half and total tubule length was doubled, compared with values for the quiescent months. Variable testicular development occurred during transitional intervals preceding and following peak testicular activity. From February to Aril thickening of the seminiferous epithelium and appearance of spermatozoa in the caput epididymidis signalled re-establishment of sperm production. In August shedding of germinal cells from the epithelium heralded impending failure of spermatogenesis. Evidence of an annual testicular cycle contradicted the prevalent belief that equatorial hyrax breed all year and suggested that the testicular cycle is a conservative element of hyracoid reproductive strategy.

  16. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2010-01-01

    Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx) in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of the bithoraxoid (bxd) locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly.Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp) has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods.Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda. PMID:20849647

  17. A stationary-phase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a member of a novel, highly conserved gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, E L; Fuge, E K; Padilla, P A; Werner-Washburne, M

    1996-01-01

    The regulation of cellular growth and proliferation in response to environmental cues is critical for development and the maintenance of viability in all organisms. In unicellular organisms, such as the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, growth and proliferation are regulated by nutrient availability. We have described changes in the pattern of protein synthesis during the growth of S. cerevisiae cells to stationary phase (E. K. Fuge, E. L. Braun, and M. Werner-Washburne, J. Bacteriol. 176:5802-5813, 1994) and noted a protein, which we designated Snz1p (p35), that shows increased synthesis after entry into stationary phase. We report here the identification of the SNZ1 gene, which encodes this protein. We detected increased SNZ1 mRNA accumulation almost 2 days after glucose exhaustion, significantly later than that of mRNAs encoded by other postexponential genes. SNZ1-related sequences were detected in phylogenetically diverse organisms by sequence comparisons and low-stringency hybridization. Multiple SNZ1-related sequences were detected in some organisms, including S. cerevisiae. Snz1p was found to be among the most evolutionarily conserved proteins currently identified, indicating that we have identified a novel, highly conserved protein involved in growth arrest in S. cerevisiae. The broad phylogenetic distribution, the regulation of the SNZ1 mRNA and protein in S. cerevisiae, and identification of a Snz protein modified during sporulation in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis support the hypothesis that Snz proteins are part of an ancient response that occurs during nutrient limitation and growth arrest. PMID:8955308

  18. Functional Conservation of MIKC*-Type MADS Box Genes in Arabidopsis and Rice Pollen Maturation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Shaojie; Wu, Feng; Yan, Shuo; Lin, Xuelei; Du, Xiaoqiu; Chong, Kang; Schilling, Susanne; Theißen, Günter; Meng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    There are two groups of MADS intervening keratin-like and C-terminal (MIKC)-type MADS box genes, MIKCC type and MIKC* type. In seed plants, the MIKCC type shows considerable diversity, but the MIKC* type has only two subgroups, P- and S-clade, which show conserved expression in the gametophyte. To examine the functional conservation of MIKC*-type genes, we characterized all three rice (Oryza sativa) MIKC*-type genes. All three genes are specifically expressed late in pollen development. The single knockdown or knockout lines, respectively, of the S-clade MADS62 and MADS63 did not show a mutant phenotype, but lines in which both S-clade genes were affected showed severe defects in pollen maturation and germination, as did knockdown lines of MADS68, the only P-clade gene in rice. The rice MIKC*-type proteins form strong heterodimeric complexes solely with partners from the other subclade; these complexes specifically bind to N10-type C-A-rich-G-boxes in vitro and regulate downstream gene expression by binding to N10-type promoter motifs. The rice MIKC* genes have a much lower degree of functional redundancy than the Arabidopsis thaliana MIKC* genes. Nevertheless, our data indicate that the function of heterodimeric MIKC*-type protein complexes in pollen development has been conserved since the divergence of monocots and eudicots, roughly 150 million years ago. PMID:23613199

  19. What's New in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for testicular cancer What’s new in testicular cancer research and treatment? Important research ... findings may help individualize treatment and help find new drugs to treat testicular cancer that can target ...

  20. A highly conserved gene island of three genes on chromosome 3B of hexaploid wheat: diverse gene function and genomic structure maintained in a tightly linked block

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The complexity of the wheat genome has resulted from waves of retrotransposable element insertions. Gene deletions and disruptions generated by the fast replacement of repetitive elements in wheat have resulted in disruption of colinearity at a micro (sub-megabase) level among the cereals. In view of genomic changes that are possible within a given time span, conservation of genes between species tends to imply an important functional or regional constraint that does not permit a change in genomic structure. The ctg1034 contig completed in this paper was initially studied because it was assigned to the Sr2 resistance locus region, but detailed mapping studies subsequently assigned it to the long arm of 3B and revealed its unusual features. Results BAC shotgun sequencing of the hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring) genome has been used to assemble a group of 15 wheat BACs from the chromosome 3B physical map FPC contig ctg1034 into a 783,553 bp genomic sequence. This ctg1034 sequence was annotated for biological features such as genes and transposable elements. A three-gene island was identified among >80% repetitive DNA sequence. Using bioinformatics analysis there were no observable similarity in their gene functions. The ctg1034 gene island also displayed complete conservation of gene order and orientation with syntenic gene islands found in publicly available genome sequences of Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays, even though the intergenic space and introns were divergent. Conclusion We propose that ctg1034 is located within the heterochromatic C-band region of deletion bin 3BL7 based on the identification of heterochromatic tandem repeats and presence of significant matches to chromodomain-containing gypsy LTR retrotransposable elements. We also speculate that this location, among other highly repetitive sequences, may account for the relative stability in gene order and orientation within the gene

  1. Candidate genes associated with testicular development, sperm quality, and hormone levels of inhibin, luteinizing hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 in Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Marina R S; Reverter, Antonio; Hawken, Rachel J; Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Lehnert, Sigrid A

    2012-09-01

    Bull fertility is an important target for genetic improvement, and early prediction using genetic markers is therefore a goal for livestock breeding. We performed genome-wide association studies to identify genes associated with fertility traits measured in young bulls. Data from 1118 Brahman bulls were collected for six traits: blood hormone levels of inhibin (IN) at 4 mo, luteinizing hormone (LH) following a gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge at 4 mo, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) at 6 mo, scrotal circumference (SC) at 12 mo, ability to produce sperm (Sperm) at 18 mo, and percentage of normal sperm (PNS) at 24 mo. All the bulls were genotyped with the BovineSNP50 chip. Sires and dams of the bull population (n = 304) were genotyped with the high-density chip (∼800 000 polymorphisms) to allow for imputation, thereby contributing detail on genome regions of interest. Polymorphism associations were discovered for all traits, except for Sperm. Chromosome 2 harbored polymorphisms associated with IN. For LH, associated polymorphisms were located in five different chromosomes. A region of chromosome 14 contained polymorphisms associated with IGF1 and SC. Regions of the X chromosome showed associations with SC and PNS. Associated polymorphisms yielded candidate genes in chromosomes 2, 14, and X. These findings will contribute to the development of genetic markers to help select cattle with improved fertility and will lead to better annotation of gene function in the context of reproductive biology.

  2. [Cryopreservation of testicular tissue in children].

    PubMed

    Rives, Nathalie; Milazzo, Jean-Pierre; Travers, Albanne; Arkoun, Brahim; Bironneau, Amandine; Sibert, Louis; Liard-Zmuda, Agnès; Marie-Cardine, Aude; Schneider, Pascale; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Macé, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of cancer therapies can affect all organs and tissues. Some treatments damage spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), with a risk of infertility. Storage and reimplantation of frozen testicular tissue is a recent approach tofertilitypreservationfor young boys. However, thawed frozen prepubertal testicular tissue must undergo a maturation process to restore sperm production. This process, currently being studied in animal models, can be achieved by in vivo transplantation of SSCs into seminiferous tubules or by testicular grafting, possibly following in vitro maturation. PMID:25518156

  3. [Cystic testicular lesions in infancy].

    PubMed

    Calleja Escudero, J; Pascual Samaniego, M; Garrido Redondo, M; Matas Gómez, V; Fernández Domínguez, L; Fernández del Busto, E

    2004-09-01

    The present article reports a case 11 month-old infant with a right intratesticular cyst. We analyze the etiology, differential diagnosis and management off all cystic lesions of the pediatric testis. Patient age at presentation, examination features, tumor markers and sonographic appearance may assist in making a presumptive and occasionally definitive diagnosis preoperatively. The differential diagnosis include intratesticular simple cyst, epidermoid cyst, tunica albuginea cyst, testicular teratoma, juvenil granulosa cell tumor-gonadal stromal tumor, cystic dysplasia of the rete testis, cystic lymphangioma, and testicular torsion. Usually enucleation is the best treatment. A thorough understanding of potentially cystic testis lesions in children leads to the best management choices and often to preservation of a substantial portion of the affected testis.

  4. [Two cases of testicular rupture].

    PubMed

    Tsujino, S; Hirata, T; Shimizu, H; Ito, T; Shiozawa, H; Koshiba, K

    1989-06-01

    Two cases of testicular rupture are presented and 119 cases in Japanese literature are reviewed. A 29-year-old man and a 32-year-old man were admitted to our hospital with the complaint of gradually increasing pains and swelling on the right testicle. Four days and three days before admission they experienced trauma during athletic activities. The diagnosis was established preoperatively by means of ultrasonography in the first one, but not in the other. The necrotic tissue of 1/3-1/2 of testis was removed and tunica albuginea was repaired in both cases. Of 119 cases of testicular rupture in Japanese literature a peak occurs in the 2nd decade and during contact sports. The ultrasonography is an effective diagnostic modality. The rate of orchiectomy has been decreasing. The function of the affected testis is hard to evaluate.

  5. Cloning and expression study of the lobster (Homarus americanus) vitellogenin: Conservation in gene structure among decapods.

    PubMed

    Tiu, Shirley Hiu Kwan; Hui, Ho-Lam; Tsukimura, Brian; Tobe, Stephen S; He, Jian-Guo; Chan, Siu-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the molecular characterization of the vitellogenin (Vg) of the lobster, Homarus americanus. Based on the annual collection of female lobsters, vitellogenesis commences in early March and continues through to September of each year. Using an antibody to vitellin of the lobster, H. americanus, several immunoreactive ovarian proteins were initially identified by Western blot analysis. The 80kDa protein contained the amino acid sequence APWGGNTPRC, identified subsequently by cDNA cloning to be identical to the lobster Vg. In common with the shrimp Metapenaeus ensis and crab Charybdis feriatus, the lobster HaVg1 gene comprises 14 introns and 15 exons. The deduced HaVg1 precursor is most similar to the Vg of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (57%), followed by M. ensis (40-43% identity) and C. feriatus (38%). The results from genomic and RT-PCR cloning also confirmed the presence of multiple Vg genes in lobster. At early reproductive stages, the hepatopancreas HaVg1 transcript levels are low but increased to a maximum in animals with mature oocytes. The ovary, however, also expressed low levels of HaVg1. Using in vitro explant culture, treatment of hepatopancreas fragments with farnesoic acid or 20-hydroxyecdysone resulted in a significant stimulation in HaVg1 expression. From this study, it appears that Vg gene organization and expression pattern in decapods is highly conserved. Similar endocrine mechanisms may govern the process of vitellogenesis across the decapods.

  6. Deep Conservation of Genes Required for Both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans Sleep Includes a Role for Dopaminergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Komudi; Ju, Jennifer Y.; Walsh, Melissa B.; DiIorio, Michael A.; Hart, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cross-species conservation of sleep-like behaviors predicts the presence of conserved molecular mechanisms underlying sleep. However, limited experimental evidence of conservation exists. Here, this prediction is tested directly. Measurements and Results: During lethargus, Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneously sleep in short bouts that are interspersed with bouts of spontaneous locomotion. We identified 26 genes required for Drosophila melanogaster sleep. Twenty orthologous C. elegans genes were selected based on similarity. Their effect on C. elegans sleep and arousal during the last larval lethargus was assessed. The 20 most similar genes altered both the quantity of sleep and arousal thresholds. In 18 cases, the direction of change was concordant with Drosophila studies published previously. Additionally, we delineated a conserved genetic pathway by which dopamine regulates sleep and arousal. In C. elegans neurons, G-alpha S, adenylyl cyclase, and protein kinase A act downstream of D1 dopamine receptors to regulate these behaviors. Finally, a quantitative analysis of genes examined herein revealed that C. elegans arousal thresholds were directly correlated with amount of sleep during lethargus. However, bout duration varies little and was not correlated with arousal thresholds. Conclusions: The comprehensive analysis presented here suggests that conserved genes and pathways are required for sleep in invertebrates and, likely, across the entire animal kingdom. The genetic pathway delineated in this study implicates G-alpha S and previously known genes downstream of dopamine signaling in sleep. Quantitative analysis of various components of quiescence suggests that interdependent or identical cellular and molecular mechanisms are likely to regulate both arousal and sleep entry. Citation: Singh K, Ju JY, Walsh MB, Dilorio MA, Hart AC. Deep conservation of genes required for both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans sleep includes a role for

  7. Conserved sequences in both coding and 5' flanking regions of mammalian opal suppressor tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, K; Eden, F C; You, K H; O'Neill, V A; Hatfield, D

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit genome encodes an opal suppressor tRNA gene. The coding region is strictly conserved between the rabbit gene and the corresponding gene in the human genome. The rabbit opal suppressor gene contains the consensus sequence in the 3' internal control region but like the human and chicken genes, the rabbit 5' internal control region contains two additional nucleotides. The 5' flanking sequences of the rabbit and the human opal suppressor genes contain extensive regions of homology. A subset of these homologies is also present 5' to the chicken opal suppressor gene. Both the rabbit and the human genomes also encode a pseudogene. That of the rabbit lacks the 3' half of the coding region. Neither pseudogene has homologous regions to the 5' flanking regions of the genes. The presence of 5' homologies flanking only the transcribed genes and not the pseudogenes suggests that these regions may be regulatory control elements specifically involved in the expression of the eukaryotic opal suppressor gene. Moreover the strict conservation of coding sequences indicates functional importance for the opal suppressor tRNA genes. Images PMID:4022772

  8. Evidence for positive selection of taurine genes within a QTL region on chromosome X associated with testicular size in Australian Brahman cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous genome-wide association studies have identified significant regions of the X chromosome associated with reproductive traits in two Bos indicus-influenced breeds: Brahman cattle and Tropical Composites. Two QTL regions on this chromosome were identified in both breeds as strongly associated with scrotal circumference measurements, a reproductive trait previously shown to be useful for selection of young bulls. Scrotal circumference is genetically correlated with early age at puberty in both male and female offspring. These QTL were located at positions 69–77 and 81–92 Mb respectively, large areas each to which a significant number of potential candidate genes were mapped. Results To further characterise these regions, a bioinformatic approach was undertaken to identify novel non-synonymous SNP within the QTL regions of interest in Brahman cattle. After SNP discovery, we used conventional molecular assay technologies to perform studies of two candidate genes in both breeds. Non-synonymous SNP mapped to Testis-expressed gene 11 (Tex11) were associated (P < 0.001) with scrotal circumference in both breeds, and associations with percentage of normal sperm cells were also observed (P < 0.05). Evidence for recent selection was found as Tex11 SNP form a haplotype segment of Bos taurus origin that is retained within Brahman and Tropical Composite cattle with greatest reproductive potential. Conclusions Association of non-synonymous SNP presented here are a first step to functional genetic studies. Bovine species may serve as a model for studying the role of Tex11 in male fertility, warranting further in-depth molecular characterisation. PMID:24410912

  9. Regulatory function of conserved sequences upstream of the long-wave sensitive opsin genes in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kevin J; Watson, Corey T; Massah, Shabnam; Kolybaba, Addie M; Breden, Felix; Prefontaine, Gratien G; Beischlag, Timothy V

    2011-11-01

    Vertebrate opsin genes often occur in sets of tandem duplicates, and their expression varies developmentally and in response to environmental cues. We previously identified two highly conserved regions upstream of the long-wave sensitive opsin (LWS) gene cluster in teleosts. This region has since been shown in zebrafish to drive expression of LWS genes in vivo. In order to further investigate how elements in this region control opsin gene expression, we tested constructs encompassing the highly conserved regions and the less conserved portions upstream of the coding sequences in a promoter-less luciferase expression system. A ∼4500 bp construct of the upstream region, including the highly-conserved regions Reg I and Reg II, increased expression 100-fold, and successive 5' deletions reduced expression relative to the full 4.5 Kb region. Gene expression was highest when the transcription factor RORα was co-transfected with the proposed regulatory regions. Because these regions were tested in a promoter-less expression system, they include elements able to initiate and drive transcription. Teleosts exhibit complex color-mediated adaptive behavior and their adaptive significance has been well documented in several species. Therefore these upstream regions of LWS represent a model system for understanding the molecular basis of adaptive variation in gene regulation of color vision.

  10. Copy number variation in the region harboring SOX9 gene in dogs with testicular/ovotesticular disorder of sex development (78,XX; SRY-negative).

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska-Swojak, Malgorzata; Szczerbal, Izabela; Pausch, Hubert; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Nizanski, Wojciech; Payan-Carreira, Rita; Fries, Ruedi; Kozlowski, Piotr; Switonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Although the disorder of sex development in dogs with female karyotype (XX DSD) is quite common, its molecular basis is still unclear. Among mutations underlying XX DSD in mammals are duplication of a long sequence upstream of the SOX9 gene (RevSex) and duplication of the SOX9 gene (also observed in dogs). We performed a comparative analysis of 16 XX DSD and 30 control female dogs, using FISH and MLPA approaches. Our study was focused on a region harboring SOX9 and a region orthologous to the human RevSex (CanRevSex), which was located by in silico analysis downstream of SOX9. Two highly polymorphic copy number variable regions (CNVRs): CNVR1 upstream of SOX9 and CNVR2 encompassing CanRevSex were identified. Although none of the detected copy number variants were specific to either affected or control animals, we observed that the average number of copies in CNVR1 was higher in XX DSD. No copy variation of SOX9 was observed. Our extensive studies have excluded duplication of SOX9 as the common cause of XX DSD in analyzed samples. However, it remains possible that the causative mutation is hidden in highly polymorphic CNVR1. PMID:26423656

  11. Copy number variation in the region harboring SOX9 gene in dogs with testicular/ovotesticular disorder of sex development (78,XX; SRY-negative).

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska-Swojak, Malgorzata; Szczerbal, Izabela; Pausch, Hubert; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Nizanski, Wojciech; Payan-Carreira, Rita; Fries, Ruedi; Kozlowski, Piotr; Switonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Although the disorder of sex development in dogs with female karyotype (XX DSD) is quite common, its molecular basis is still unclear. Among mutations underlying XX DSD in mammals are duplication of a long sequence upstream of the SOX9 gene (RevSex) and duplication of the SOX9 gene (also observed in dogs). We performed a comparative analysis of 16 XX DSD and 30 control female dogs, using FISH and MLPA approaches. Our study was focused on a region harboring SOX9 and a region orthologous to the human RevSex (CanRevSex), which was located by in silico analysis downstream of SOX9. Two highly polymorphic copy number variable regions (CNVRs): CNVR1 upstream of SOX9 and CNVR2 encompassing CanRevSex were identified. Although none of the detected copy number variants were specific to either affected or control animals, we observed that the average number of copies in CNVR1 was higher in XX DSD. No copy variation of SOX9 was observed. Our extensive studies have excluded duplication of SOX9 as the common cause of XX DSD in analyzed samples. However, it remains possible that the causative mutation is hidden in highly polymorphic CNVR1.

  12. Copy number variation in the region harboring SOX9 gene in dogs with testicular/ovotesticular disorder of sex development (78,XX; SRY-negative)

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkowska-Swojak, Malgorzata; Szczerbal, Izabela; Pausch, Hubert; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Nizanski, Wojciech; Payan-Carreira, Rita; Fries, Ruedi; Kozlowski, Piotr; Switonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Although the disorder of sex development in dogs with female karyotype (XX DSD) is quite common, its molecular basis is still unclear. Among mutations underlying XX DSD in mammals are duplication of a long sequence upstream of the SOX9 gene (RevSex) and duplication of the SOX9 gene (also observed in dogs). We performed a comparative analysis of 16 XX DSD and 30 control female dogs, using FISH and MLPA approaches. Our study was focused on a region harboring SOX9 and a region orthologous to the human RevSex (CanRevSex), which was located by in silico analysis downstream of SOX9. Two highly polymorphic copy number variable regions (CNVRs): CNVR1 upstream of SOX9 and CNVR2 encompassing CanRevSex were identified. Although none of the detected copy number variants were specific to either affected or control animals, we observed that the average number of copies in CNVR1 was higher in XX DSD. No copy variation of SOX9 was observed. Our extensive studies have excluded duplication of SOX9 as the common cause of XX DSD in analyzed samples. However, it remains possible that the causative mutation is hidden in highly polymorphic CNVR1. PMID:26423656

  13. Structural levansucrase gene (lsdA) constitutes a functional locus conserved in the species Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, L; Sotolongo, M; Rosabal, Y; Menéndez, C; Ramírez, R; Caballero-Mellado, J; Arrieta, J

    2000-01-01

    Levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) was identified as a constitutive exoenzyme in 14 Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus strains recovered from different host plants in diverse geographical regions. The enzyme, consisting of a single 60-kDa polypeptide, hydrolysed sucrose to synthesise oligofructans and levan. Sugar-cane-associated strains of the most abundant genotype (electrophoretic type 1) showed maximal values of levansucrase production. These values were three-fold higher than those of the isolates recovered from coffee plants. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed a high degree of conservation of the levansucrase locus (IsdA) among the 14 strains under study, which represented 11 different G. diazotrophicus genotypes. Targeted disruption of the lsdA gene in four representative strains abolished their ability to grow on sucrose, indicating that the endophytic species G. diazotrophicus utilises plant sucrose via levansucrase.

  14. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed.

  15. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:27367684

  16. FK506, a calcineurin inhibitor, prevents cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lisa Joy; Chen, Haiyan; Liao, Xiaoyan; Allayee, Hooman; Shih, Diana Mouhan; Lee, Grace Sangeun; Hovland, David Norman; Robbins, Wendie Anne; Carnes, Kay; Hess, Rex Allen; Lusis, Aldons Jake; Collins, Michael David

    2007-12-01

    Cadmium, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, damages several major organs in humans and other mammals. The molecular mechanisms for damage are not known. At high doses (5 mg/kg cadmium chloride or higher), testicular damage in mice, rats, and other rodents includes interstitial edema, hemorrhage, and changes in the seminiferous tubules affecting spermatogenesis. Necrosis is evident by 48 h. The goal of this study was to fine map and identify the cdm gene, a gene that when mutated prevents cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in mouse strains with a mutation in this gene. A serine-threonine phosphatase, calcineurin (CN), subunit A, alpha isoform (Ppp3ca), was one of the seven candidates in the cdm region that was narrowed from 5.6 to 2.0 Mb on mouse chromosome 3. An inhibitor of CN, the immunosuppressant, FK506, prevented cadmium-induced testicular damage in five pathological categories, including vascular endothelial and seminiferous epithelial endpoints. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry revealed that FK506 protected without lowering the amount of cadmium in the testes. Ppp3ca(-/-) mice were investigated but were found to exhibit endogenous testicular abnormalities, making them an inappropriate model for determining whether the inactivation of the Ppp3ca gene would afford protection from cadmium-induced testicular toxicity. The protection afforded by FK506, found by the current study, indicated that CN is likely to be important in the mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the testis and possibly other organs. PMID:17785681

  17. Cloning of noggin gene from hydra and analysis of its functional conservation using Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Chandramore, Kalpana; Ito, Yuzuro; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    Hydra, a member of phylum Cnidaria that arose early in evolution, is endowed with a defined axis, organized nervous system, and active behavior. It is a powerful model system for the elucidation of evolution of developmental mechanisms in animals. Here, we describe the identification and cloning of noggin-like gene from hydra. Noggin is a secreted protein involved at multiple stages of vertebrate embryonic development including neural induction and is known to exert its effects by inhibiting the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-signaling pathway. Sequence analysis revealed that hydra Noggin shows considerable similarity with its orthologs at the amino acid level. When microinjected in the early Xenopus embryos, hydra noggin mRNA induced a secondary axis in 100% of the injected embryos, demonstrating functional conservation of hydra noggin in vertebrates. This was further confirmed by the partial rescue of Xenopus embryos by hydra noggin mRNA from UV-induced ventralization. By using animal cap assay in Xenopus embryos, we demonstrate that these effects of hydra noggin in Xenopus embryos are because of inhibition of BMP signaling by Noggin. Our data indicate that BMP/Noggin antagonism predates the bilaterian divergence and is conserved during the evolution. PMID:20565537

  18. ACP5 (Uteroferrin): phylogeny of an ancient and conserved gene expressed in the endometrium of mammals.

    PubMed

    Padua, Maria B; Lynch, Vincent J; Alvarez, Natalia V; Garthwaite, Mark A; Golos, Thaddeus G; Bazer, Fuller W; Kalkunte, Satyan; Sharma, Surendra; Wagner, Gunter P; Hansen, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Type 5 acid phosphatase (ACP5; also known as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase or uteroferrin) is a metalloprotein secreted by the endometrial glandular epithelium of pigs, mares, sheep, and water buffalo. In this paper, we describe the phylogenetic distribution of endometrial expression of ACP5 and demonstrate that endometrial expression arose early in evolution (i.e., before divergence of prototherian and therian mammals ~166 million years ago). To determine expression of ACP5 in the pregnant endometrium, RNA was isolated from rhesus, mouse, rat, dog, sheep, cow, horse, armadillo, opossum, and duck-billed platypus. Results from RT-PCR and RNA-Seq experiments confirmed that ACP5 is expressed in all species examined. ACP5 was also demonstrated immunochemically in endometrium of rhesus, marmoset, sheep, cow, goat, and opossum. Alignment of inferred amino acid sequences shows a high conservation of ACP5 throughout speciation, with species-specific differences most extensive in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein. Analysis by Selecton indicated that most of the sites in ACP5 are undergoing purifying selection, and no sites undergoing positive selection were found. In conclusion, endometrial expression of ACP5 is a common feature in all orders of mammals and has been subjected to purifying selection. Expression of ACP5 in the uterus predates the divergence of therians and prototherians. ACP5 is an evolutionary conserved gene that likely exerts a common function important for pregnancy in mammals using a wide range of reproductive strategies. PMID:22278982

  19. ACP5 (Uteroferrin): phylogeny of an ancient and conserved gene expressed in the endometrium of mammals.

    PubMed

    Padua, Maria B; Lynch, Vincent J; Alvarez, Natalia V; Garthwaite, Mark A; Golos, Thaddeus G; Bazer, Fuller W; Kalkunte, Satyan; Sharma, Surendra; Wagner, Gunter P; Hansen, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Type 5 acid phosphatase (ACP5; also known as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase or uteroferrin) is a metalloprotein secreted by the endometrial glandular epithelium of pigs, mares, sheep, and water buffalo. In this paper, we describe the phylogenetic distribution of endometrial expression of ACP5 and demonstrate that endometrial expression arose early in evolution (i.e., before divergence of prototherian and therian mammals ~166 million years ago). To determine expression of ACP5 in the pregnant endometrium, RNA was isolated from rhesus, mouse, rat, dog, sheep, cow, horse, armadillo, opossum, and duck-billed platypus. Results from RT-PCR and RNA-Seq experiments confirmed that ACP5 is expressed in all species examined. ACP5 was also demonstrated immunochemically in endometrium of rhesus, marmoset, sheep, cow, goat, and opossum. Alignment of inferred amino acid sequences shows a high conservation of ACP5 throughout speciation, with species-specific differences most extensive in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein. Analysis by Selecton indicated that most of the sites in ACP5 are undergoing purifying selection, and no sites undergoing positive selection were found. In conclusion, endometrial expression of ACP5 is a common feature in all orders of mammals and has been subjected to purifying selection. Expression of ACP5 in the uterus predates the divergence of therians and prototherians. ACP5 is an evolutionary conserved gene that likely exerts a common function important for pregnancy in mammals using a wide range of reproductive strategies.

  20. Conserving Plants in Gene Banks and Nature: Investigating Complementarity with Trifolium thompsonii Morton

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Stephanie L.; Kisha, Theodore J.; Yu, Long-Xi; Parra-Quijano, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    A standard conservation strategy for plant genetic resources integrates in situ (on-farm or wild) and ex situ (gene or field bank) approaches. Gene bank managers collect ex situ accessions that represent a comprehensive snap shot of the genetic diversity of in situ populations at a given time and place. Although simple in theory, achieving complementary in situ and ex situ holdings is challenging. Using Trifolium thompsonii as a model insect-pollinated herbaceous perennial species, we used AFLP markers to compare genetic diversity and structure of ex situ accessions collected at two time periods (1995, 2004) from four locations, with their corresponding in situ populations sampled in 2009. Our goal was to assess the complementarity of the two approaches. We examined how gene flow, selection and genetic drift contributed to population change. Across locations, we found no difference in diversity between ex situ and in situ samples. One population showed a decline in genetic diversity over the 15 years studied. Population genetic differentiation among the four locations was significant, but weak. Association tests suggested infrequent, long distance gene flow. Selection and drift occurred, but differences due to spatial effects were three times as strong as differences attributed to temporal effects, and suggested recollection efforts could occur at intervals greater than fifteen years. An effective collecting strategy for insect pollinated herbaceous perennial species was to sample >150 plants, equalize maternal contribution, and sample along random transects with sufficient space between plants to minimize intrafamilial sampling. Quantifying genetic change between ex situ and in situ accessions allows genetic resource managers to validate ex situ collecting and maintenance protocols, develop appropriate recollection intervals, and provide an early detection mechanism for identifying problematic conditions that can be addressed to prevent further decline in

  1. Conserved but Attenuated Parental Gene Expression in Allopolyploids: Constitutive Zinc Hyperaccumulation in the Allotetraploid Arabidopsis kamchatica

    PubMed Central

    Paape, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Masaomi; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Cereghetti, Teo; Onda, Yoshihiko; Kenta, Tanaka; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K.

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization combines parental genomes and often confers broader species distribution. However, little is known about parentally transmitted gene expression underlying quantitative traits following allopolyploidization because of the complexity of polyploid genomes. The allopolyploid species Arabidopsis kamchatica is a natural hybrid of the zinc hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and of the nonaccumulator Arabidopsis lyrata. We found that A. kamchatica retained the ability to hyperaccumulate zinc from A. halleri and grows in soils with both low and high metal content. Hyperaccumulation of zinc by A. kamchatica was reduced to about half of A. halleri, but is 10-fold greater than A. lyrata. Homeologs derived from A. halleri had significantly higher levels of expression of genes such as HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4), METAL TRANSPORTER PROTEIN1 and other metal ion transporters than those derived from A. lyrata, which suggests cis-regulatory differences. A. kamchatica has on average about half the expression of these genes compared with A. halleri due to fixed heterozygosity inherent in allopolyploids. Zinc treatment significantly changed the ratios of expression of 1% of homeologous pairs, including genes putatively involved in metal homeostasis. Resequencing data showed a significant reduction in genetic diversity over a large genomic region (290 kb) surrounding the HMA4 locus derived from the A. halleri parent compared with the syntenic A. lyrata-derived region, which suggests different evolutionary histories. We also estimated that three A. halleri-derived HMA4 copies are present in A. kamchatica. Our findings support a transcriptomic model in which environment-related transcriptional patterns of both parents are conserved but attenuated in the allopolyploids. PMID:27413047

  2. Pectinase-treated Panax ginseng ameliorates hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in GC-2 sperm cells and modulates testicular gene expression in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Kopalli, Spandana Rajendra; Cha, Kyu-Min; Jeong, Min-Sik; Lee, Sang-Ho; Sung, Jong-Hwan; Seo, Seok-Kyo; Kim, Si-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of pectinase-treated Panax ginseng (GINST) in cellular and male subfertility animal models. Methods Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced mouse spermatocyte GC-2spd cells were used as an in vitro model. Cell viability was measured using MTT assay. For the in vivo study, GINST (200 mg/kg) mixed with a regular pellet diet was administered orally for 4 mo, and the changes in the mRNA and protein expression level of antioxidative and spermatogenic genes in young and aged control rats were compared using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Results GINST treatment (50 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL, and 200 μg/mL) significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited the H2O2-induced (200 μM) cytotoxicity in GC-2spd cells. Furthermore, GINST (50 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL) significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated the H2O2-induced decrease in the expression level of antioxidant enzymes (peroxiredoxin 3 and 4, glutathione S-transferase m5, and glutathione peroxidase 4), spermatogenesis-related protein such as inhibin-α, and specific sex hormone receptors (androgen receptor, luteinizing hormone receptor, and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor) in GC-2spd cells. Similarly, the altered expression level of the above mentioned genes and of spermatogenesis-related nectin-2 and cAMP response element-binding protein in aged rat testes was ameliorated with GINST (200 mg/kg) treatment. Taken together, GINST attenuated H2O2-induced oxidative stress in GC-2 cells and modulated the expression of antioxidant-related genes and of spermatogenic-related proteins and sex hormone receptors in aged rats. Conclusion GINST may be a potential natural agent for the protection against or treatment of oxidative stress-induced male subfertility and aging-induced male subfertility. PMID:27158240

  3. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  4. Refining the regulatory region upstream of SOX9 associated with 46,XX testicular disorders of Sex Development (DSD).

    PubMed

    Hyon, Capucine; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Harbuz, Radu; Bhouri, Rakia; Perrot, Nicolas; Peycelon, Matthieu; Sibony, Mathilde; Rojo, Sandra; Piguel, Xavier; Bilan, Frederic; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Kitzis, Alain; McElreavey, Ken; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Bashamboo, Anu

    2015-08-01

    Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) are a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting gonad and/or genito-urinary tract development and usually the endocrine-reproductive system. A genetic diagnosis is made in only around 20% of these cases. The genetic causes of 46,XX-SRY negative testicular DSD as well as ovotesticular DSD are poorly defined. Duplications involving a region located ∼600 kb upstream of SOX9, a key gene in testis development, were reported in several cases of 46,XX DSD. Recent studies have narrowed this region down to a 78 kb interval that is duplicated or deleted respectively in 46,XX or 46,XY DSD. We identified three phenotypically normal patients presenting with azoospermia and 46,XX testicular DSD. Two brothers carried a 83.8 kb duplication located ∼600 kb upstream of SOX9 that overlapped with the previously reported rearrangements. This duplication refines the minimal region associated with 46,XX-SRY negative DSD to a 40.7-41.9 kb element located ∼600 kb upstream of SOX9. Predicted enhancer elements and evolutionary-conserved binding sites for proteins known to be involved in testis determination are located within this region.

  5. Vitamin D supplement improved testicular function in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chenzhao; Wang, Qinzhu; Hao, Yue; Ma, Xiaojun; Wu, Lina; du, Mengmeng; Li, Wen; Wu, Yang; Guo, Feng; Ma, Siyuan; Huang, Fengjuan; Qin, Guijun

    2016-04-22

    This study was designed to investigate the role that 1,25(OH)2D3 plays against testicular lesion in diabetic rats and try to find its possible mechanism of the steroidogenesis and the spermatogenesis. In diabetic rats, prolonged hyperglycemia evaluated inflammatory cytokines, damaged sperm production function and redox balance, diminished serum testosterone. After treated with 1,25(OH)2D3 at two different doses respectively for 12 months, all the alternations were effectively normalized. 1,25(OH)2D3 showed inhibitory effect on excessive inflammatory biomarkers and adjusted the expression reproductive genes and testicular androgen synthesis. It also upregulated Bcl-2 expression, decreased Bax and COX-2 expression and inhibited active caspase cascade (caspase 8 and caspase 3), which may preserved the testicular cells under diabetic condition. It revealed that vitamin D supplement may protect the cells through suppressing inflammation factors and alleviating cell apoptotic death, as well as upregulating the expression of genes related to reproductive and testosterone synthesis. PMID:27003251

  6. Conservation, Spillover and Gene Flow within a Network of Northern European Marine Protected Areas

    PubMed Central

    Huserbråten, Mats Brockstedt Olsen; Moland, Even; Knutsen, Halvor; Olsen, Esben Moland; André, Carl; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2013-01-01

    To ensure that marine protected areas (MPAs) benefit conservation and fisheries, the effectiveness of MPA designs has to be evaluated in field studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we empirically assessed the design of a network of northern MPAs where fishing for European lobster (Homarusgammarus) is prohibited. First, we demonstrate a high level of residency and survival (50%) for almost a year (363 days) within MPAs, despite small MPA sizes (0.5-1 km2). Second, we demonstrate limited export (4.7%) of lobsters tagged within MPAs (N = 1810) to neighbouring fished areas, over a median distance of 1.6 km out to maximum 21 km away from MPA centres. In comparison, median movement distance of lobsters recaptured within MPAs was 164 m, and recapture rate was high (40%). Third, we demonstrate a high level of gene flow within the study region, with an estimated FST of less than 0.0001 over a ≈ 400 km coastline. Thus, the restricted movement of older life stages, combined with a high level of gene flow suggests that connectivity is primarily driven by larval drift. Larval export from the MPAs can most likely affect areas far beyond their borders. Our findings are of high importance for the design of MPA networks for sedentary species with pelagic early life stages. PMID:24039927

  7. Conserved Senescence Associated Genes and Pathways in Primary Human Fibroblasts Detected by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Marthandan, S.; Baumgart, M.; Priebe, S.; Groth, M.; Schaer, J.; Kaether, C.; Guthke, R.; Cellerino, A.; Platzer, M.; Diekmann, S.; Hemmerich, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence correlates with changes in the transcriptome. To obtain a complete view on senescence-associated transcription networks and pathways, we assessed by deep RNA sequencing the transcriptomes of five of the most commonly used laboratory strains of human fibroblasts during their transition into senescence. In a number of cases, we verified the RNA-seq data by real-time PCR. By determining cellular protein levels we observed that the age-related expression of most but not all genes is regulated at the transcriptional level. We found that 78% of the age-affected differentially expressed genes were commonly regulated in the same direction (either up- or down-regulated) in all five fibroblast strains, indicating a strong conservation of age-associated changes in the transcriptome. KEGG pathway analyses confirmed up-regulation of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype and down-regulation of DNA synthesis/repair and most cell cycle pathways common in all five cell strains. Newly identified senescence-induced pathways include up-regulation of endocytotic/phagocytic pathways and down-regulation of the mRNA metabolism and the mRNA splicing pathways. Our results provide an unprecedented comprehensive and deep view into the individual and common transcriptome and pathway changes during the transition into of senescence of five human fibroblast cell strains. PMID:27140416

  8. The current source of human Alu retroposons is a conserved gene shared with Old World monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, R.J.; Stout, D.B.; Davidson, E.H. )

    1989-05-01

    A significant fraction of human Alu repeated sequences are members of the precise, recently inserted class. A cloned member of this class has been used as a probe for interspecies hybridization and thermal stability determination. The probe was reassociated with human, mandrill, and spider monkey DNA under conditions such that only almost perfectly matching duplexes could form. Equally precise hybrids were formed with human and mandrill DNA (Old World monkey) but not with spider monkey DNA (New World). These measurements as well as reassociation kinetics show the presence in mandrill DNA of many precise class Alu sequences that are very similar or identical in quantity and sequence to those in human DNA. Human and mandrill are moderately distant species with a single-copy DNA divergence of about 6%. Nevertheless, their recently inserted Alu sequences arise by retroposition of transcripts of source genes with nearly identical sequences. Apparently a gene present in our common ancestor at the time of branching was inherited and highly conserved in sequence in both the lineage of Old World monkeys and the lineage of apes and man.

  9. REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1, a conserved gene that regulates ethylene receptor function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Josephine S; Wen, Chi-Kuang; Shockey, Jason A; Chang, Caren

    2006-05-16

    Arabidopsis thaliana has five ethylene hormone receptors, which bind ethylene and elicit responses critical for plant growth and development. Here we describe a negative regulator of ethylene responses, REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), which regulates the function of at least one of the receptors, ETR1, in Arabidopsis. RTE1 was identified based on the ability of rte1 mutations to suppress ethylene insensitivity of the dominant gain-of-function allele etr1-2. rte1 loss-of-function mutants have an enhanced ethylene response that closely resembles the etr1 null phenotype. The etr1 rte1 double null mutant is identical to the etr1 and rte1 single null mutants, suggesting that the two genes act in the same pathway. rte1 is unable to suppress the etr1-1 gain-of-function allele, placing RTE1 at or upstream of ETR1. rte1 also fails to suppress gain-of-function mutations in each of the four other ethylene receptor genes. RTE1 encodes a previously undescribed predicted membrane protein, which is highly conserved in plants, animals [corrected] and protists but absent in fungi and prokaryotes. Ethylene treatment induces RTE1 expression, and overexpression of RTE1 confers reduced ethylene sensitivity that partially depends on ETR1. These findings demonstrate that RTE1 is a negative regulator of ethylene signaling and suggest that RTE1 plays an important role in ETR1 function.

  10. Phylogenetic conservation of the 3' cryptic recombination signal sequence (3'cRSS) in the VH genes of jawed vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Liu, Zhancai; Li, Zhaoyong; Lian, Zhengxing; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2012-01-01

    The VH replacement process is a RAG-mediated secondary recombination in which the variable region of a rearranged VHDJH is replaced by a different germline VH gene. In almost all human and mouse VH genes, two sequence features appear to be crucial for VH replacement. First, an embedded heptamer, which is located near the 3' end of the rearranged VH gene, serves as a cryptic recombination signal sequence (3'cRSS) for the VH replacement process. Second, a short stretch of nucleotides located downstream of the 3'cRSS serve as a footprint of the original VH region, frequently encoding charged amino acids. In this review, we show that both of these two features are conserved in the VH genes of all jawed vertebrates, which suggests that the VH replacement process may be a conserved mechanism.

  11. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V.; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  12. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  13. Plasticity of the Reproductive Axis Caused by Social Status Change in an African Cichlid Fish: II. Testicular Gene Expression and Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maruska, Karen P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction in all vertebrates is controlled by the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis, which is regulated socially in males of the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni. Although social information influences GnRH1 neurons at the apex of the BPG axis, little is known about how the social environment and dominance affects the cellular and molecular composition of the testes to regulate reproductive capacity. We created an opportunity for reproductively suppressed males to ascend in status and then measured changes in gene expression and tissue morphology to discover how quickly the perception of this opportunity can influence the testes. Our results show rapid up-regulation of mRNA levels of FSH receptor and several steroid receptor subtypes in the testes during social ascent. In contrast, LH receptor was not elevated until 72 h after ascent, but this increase was coincident with elevated circulating androgens and early stages of spermatogenesis, suggesting a role in steroidogenesis. The spermatogenic potential of the testes, as measured by cellular composition, was also elevated before the overall increase in testes size. The presence of cysts at all stages of spermatogenesis, coupled with lower levels of gonadotropin and steroid receptors in subordinate males, suggests that the BPG axis and spermatogenesis are maintained at a subthreshold level in anticipation of the chance to gain a territory and become reproductively active. Our results show that the testis is stimulated extremely quickly after perception of social opportunity, presumably to allow suppressed males to rapidly achieve high reproductive success in a dynamic social environment. PMID:21084443

  14. Testicular Cancer Education in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohl, Royal E.

    1998-01-01

    Testicular cancer (TC) education is not widespread, though TC is the most common cancer in men ages 15-34 years. Teachers can positively influence young men by providing TC and testicular self-examination (TSE) education in school. The paper describes TC and TSE, discussing strategies for and barriers to implementation of TC/TSE instruction in the…

  15. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis....

  16. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis....

  17. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis....

  18. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis....

  19. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis....

  20. Evolutionary conservation of an atypical glucocorticoid-responsive element in the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Sheela Rani, C S; Soto-Pina, Alexandra; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Strong, Randy

    2013-07-01

    The human tyrosine hydroxylase (hTH) gene has a 42 bp evolutionarily conserved region designated (CR) II at -7.24 kb, which bears 93% homology to the region we earlier identified as containing the glucocorticoid response element, a 7 bp activator protein-1 (AP-1)-like motif in the rat TH gene. We cloned this hTH-CRII region upstream of minimal basal hTH promoter in luciferase (Luc) reporter vector, and tested glucocorticoid responsiveness in human cell lines. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII in HeLa cells, while mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, prevented Dex stimulation. Deletion of the 7 bp 5'-TGACTAA at -7243 bp completely abolished the Dex-stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII construct. The AP-1 agonist, tetradeconoyl-12,13-phorbol acetate (TPA), also stimulated hTH promoter activity, and Dex and TPA together further accentuated this response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the presence of both GR and AP-1 proteins, especially Jun family members, at this hTH promoter site. Dex did not stimulate hTH promoter activity in a catecholaminergic cell line, which had low endogenous GR levels, but did activate the response when GR was expressed exogenously. Thus, our studies have clearly identified a glucocorticoid-responsive element in a 7 bp AP-1-like motif in the promoter region at -7.24 kb of the human TH gene.

  1. A Korean boy with 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development caused by SOX9 duplication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyung Min; Ko, Jung Min; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2014-06-01

    The 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development (DSD), also known as 46,XX male syndrome, is a rare form of DSD and clinical phenotype shows complete sex reversal from female to male. The sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene can be identified in most 46,XX testicular DSD patients; however, approximately 20% of patients with 46,XX testicular DSD are SRY-negative. The SRY-box 9 (SOX9) gene has several important functions during testis development and differentiation in males, and overexpression of SOX9 leads to the male development of 46,XX gonads in the absence of SRY. In addition, SOX9 duplication has been found to be a rare cause of 46,XX testicular DSD in humans. Here, we report a 4.2-year-old SRY-negative 46,XX boy with complete sex reversal caused by SOX9 duplication for the first time in Korea. He showed normal external and internal male genitalia except for small testes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses failed to detect the presence of SRY, and SOX9 intragenic mutation was not identified by direct sequencing analysis. Therefore, we performed real-time PCR analyses with specific primer pairs, and duplication of the SOX9 gene was revealed. Although SRY-negative 46,XX testicular DSD is a rare condition, an effort to make an accurate diagnosis is important for the provision of proper genetic counseling and for guiding patients in their long-term management.

  2. A Korean boy with 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development caused by SOX9 duplication

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyung Min; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2014-01-01

    The 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development (DSD), also known as 46,XX male syndrome, is a rare form of DSD and clinical phenotype shows complete sex reversal from female to male. The sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene can be identified in most 46,XX testicular DSD patients; however, approximately 20% of patients with 46,XX testicular DSD are SRY-negative. The SRY-box 9 (SOX9) gene has several important functions during testis development and differentiation in males, and overexpression of SOX9 leads to the male development of 46,XX gonads in the absence of SRY. In addition, SOX9 duplication has been found to be a rare cause of 46,XX testicular DSD in humans. Here, we report a 4.2-year-old SRY-negative 46,XX boy with complete sex reversal caused by SOX9 duplication for the first time in Korea. He showed normal external and internal male genitalia except for small testes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses failed to detect the presence of SRY, and SOX9 intragenic mutation was not identified by direct sequencing analysis. Therefore, we performed real-time PCR analyses with specific primer pairs, and duplication of the SOX9 gene was revealed. Although SRY-negative 46,XX testicular DSD is a rare condition, an effort to make an accurate diagnosis is important for the provision of proper genetic counseling and for guiding patients in their long-term management. PMID:25077096

  3. Ancora: a web resource for exploring highly conserved noncoding elements and their association with developmental regulatory genes

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Pär G; Fredman, David; Lenhard, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan genomes contain arrays of highly conserved noncoding elements (HCNEs) that span developmental regulatory genes and define regulatory domains. We describe Ancora , a web resource that provides data and tools for exploring genomic organization of HCNEs for multiple genomes. Ancora includes a genome browser that shows HCNE locations and features novel HCNE density plots as a powerful tool to discover developmental regulatory genes and distinguish their regulatory elements and domains. PMID:18279518

  4. Sequence conservation of homeologous bacterial artificial chromosomes and transcription of homeologous genes in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.).

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Jessica A; Scheffler, Brian E; Schlueter, Shannon D; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2006-10-01

    The paleopolyploid soybean genome was investigated by sequencing homeologous BAC clones anchored by duplicate N-hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase (HCBT) genes. The homeologous BACs were genetically mapped to linkage groups C1 and C2. Annotation of the 173,747- and 98,760-bp BACs showed that gene conservation in both order and orientation is high between homeologous regions with only a single gene insertion/deletion and local tandem duplications differing between the regions. The nucleotide sequence conservation extends into intergenic regions as well, probably due to conserved regulatory sequences. Most of the homeologs appear to have a role in either transcription/DNA binding or cellular signaling, suggesting a potential preference for retention of duplicate genes with these functions. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of homeologs showed that in the tissues sampled, most homeologs have not diverged greatly in their transcription profiles. However, four cases of changes in transcription were identified, primarily in the HCBT gene cluster. Because a mapped locus corresponds to a soybean cyst nematode (SCN) QTL, the potential role of HCBT genes in response to SCN is discussed. These results are the first sequenced-based analysis of homeologous BACs in soybean, a diploidized paleopolyploid. PMID:16888343

  5. Conservation of Gene Order and Content in the Circular Chromosomes of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Other Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Kuykendall, L. David; Shao, Jonathan Y.; Hartung, John S.

    2012-01-01

    ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ an insect-vectored, obligate intracellular bacterium associated with citrus-greening disease, also called “HLB," is a member of the Rhizobiales along with nitrogen-fixing microsymbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and facultative intracellular mammalian pathogen Bartonella henselae. Comparative analyses of their circular chromosomes identified 514 orthologous genes shared among all five species. Shared among all five species are 50 identical blocks of microsyntenous orthologous genes (MOGs), containing a total of 283 genes. While retaining highly conserved genomic blocks of microsynteny, divergent evolution, horizontal gene transfer and niche specialization have disrupted macrosynteny among the five circular chromosomes compared. Highly conserved microsyntenous gene clusters help define the Rhizobiales, an order previously defined by 16S RNA gene similarity and herein represented by the three families: Bartonellaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Rhizobiaceae. Genes without orthologs in the other four species help define individual species. The circular chromosomes of each of the five Rhizobiales species examined had genes lacking orthologs in the other four species. For example, 63 proteins are encoded by genes of ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ not shared with other members of the Rhizobiales. Of these 63 proteins, 17 have predicted functions related to DNA replication or RNA transcription, and some of these may have roles related to low genomic GC content. An additional 17 proteins have predicted functions relevant to cellular processes, particularly modifications of the cell surface. Seventeen unshared proteins have specific metabolic functions including a pathway to synthesize cholesterol encoded by a seven-gene operon. The remaining 12 proteins encoded by ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ genes not shared with other Rhizobiales are of bacteriophage origin.

  6. Patterns of Evolutionary Conservation of Ascorbic Acid-Related Genes Following Whole-Genome Triplication in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase–ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12–18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa. PMID:25552535

  7. Patterns of evolutionary conservation of ascorbic acid-related genes following whole-genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2014-12-31

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12-18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa.

  8. Patterns of evolutionary conservation of ascorbic acid-related genes following whole-genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12-18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa. PMID:25552535

  9. A Functionally Conserved Gene Regulatory Network Module Governing Olfactory Neuron Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Okuwa, Sumie; Maciejewski, Abigail; Brandt, Alicia T.; Reinhold, Dominik; Jones, Corbin D.; Volkan, Pelin Cayirlioglu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuron diversity is required for organisms to decipher complex environmental cues. In Drosophila, the olfactory environment is detected by 50 different olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes that are clustered in combinations within distinct sensilla subtypes. Each sensilla subtype houses stereotypically clustered 1–4 ORN identities that arise through asymmetric divisions from a single multipotent sensory organ precursor (SOP). How each class of SOPs acquires a unique differentiation potential that accounts for ORN diversity is unknown. Previously, we reported a critical component of SOP diversification program, Rotund (Rn), increases ORN diversity by generating novel developmental trajectories from existing precursors within each independent sensilla type lineages. Here, we show that Rn, along with BarH1/H2 (Bar), Bric-à-brac (Bab), Apterous (Ap) and Dachshund (Dac), constitutes a transcription factor (TF) network that patterns the developing olfactory tissue. This network was previously shown to pattern the segmentation of the leg, which suggests that this network is functionally conserved. In antennal imaginal discs, precursors with diverse ORN differentiation potentials are selected from concentric rings defined by unique combinations of these TFs along the proximodistal axis of the developing antennal disc. The combinatorial code that demarcates each precursor field is set up by cross-regulatory interactions among different factors within the network. Modifications of this network lead to predictable changes in the diversity of sensilla subtypes and ORN pools. In light of our data, we propose a molecular map that defines each unique SOP fate. Our results highlight the importance of the early prepatterning gene regulatory network as a modulator of SOP and terminally differentiated ORN diversity. Finally, our model illustrates how conserved developmental strategies are used to generate neuronal diversity. PMID:26765103

  10. A Functionally Conserved Gene Regulatory Network Module Governing Olfactory Neuron Diversity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Barish, Scott; Okuwa, Sumie; Maciejewski, Abigail; Brandt, Alicia T; Reinhold, Dominik; Jones, Corbin D; Volkan, Pelin Cayirlioglu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuron diversity is required for organisms to decipher complex environmental cues. In Drosophila, the olfactory environment is detected by 50 different olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes that are clustered in combinations within distinct sensilla subtypes. Each sensilla subtype houses stereotypically clustered 1-4 ORN identities that arise through asymmetric divisions from a single multipotent sensory organ precursor (SOP). How each class of SOPs acquires a unique differentiation potential that accounts for ORN diversity is unknown. Previously, we reported a critical component of SOP diversification program, Rotund (Rn), increases ORN diversity by generating novel developmental trajectories from existing precursors within each independent sensilla type lineages. Here, we show that Rn, along with BarH1/H2 (Bar), Bric-à-brac (Bab), Apterous (Ap) and Dachshund (Dac), constitutes a transcription factor (TF) network that patterns the developing olfactory tissue. This network was previously shown to pattern the segmentation of the leg, which suggests that this network is functionally conserved. In antennal imaginal discs, precursors with diverse ORN differentiation potentials are selected from concentric rings defined by unique combinations of these TFs along the proximodistal axis of the developing antennal disc. The combinatorial code that demarcates each precursor field is set up by cross-regulatory interactions among different factors within the network. Modifications of this network lead to predictable changes in the diversity of sensilla subtypes and ORN pools. In light of our data, we propose a molecular map that defines each unique SOP fate. Our results highlight the importance of the early prepatterning gene regulatory network as a modulator of SOP and terminally differentiated ORN diversity. Finally, our model illustrates how conserved developmental strategies are used to generate neuronal diversity. PMID:26765103

  11. A conserved role for CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON genes during ovule development.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Beatriz; Hasson, Alice; Belcram, Katia; Cortizo, Millán; Morin, Halima; Nikovics, Krisztina; Vialette-Guiraud, Aurélie; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Laufs, Patrick; Arnaud, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of plant reproductive strategies has led to a remarkable diversity of structures, especially within the flower, a structure characteristic of the angiosperms. In flowering plants, sexual reproduction depends notably on the development of the gynoecium that produces and protects the ovules. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ovule initiation is promoted by the concerted action of auxin with CUC1 (CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON1) and CUC2, two genes that encode transcription factors of the NAC family (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC). Here we highlight an additional role for CUC2 and CUC3 in Arabidopsis thaliana ovule separation. While CUC1 and CUC2 are broadly expressed in the medial tissue of the gynoecium, CUC2 and CUC3 are expressed in the placental tissue between developing ovules. Consistent with the partial overlap between CUC1, CUC2 and CUC3 expression patterns, we show that CUC proteins can physically interact, both in yeast cells and in planta. We found that the cuc2;cuc3 double mutant specifically harbours defects in ovule separation, producing fused seeds that share the seed coat, and suggesting that CUC2 and CUC3 promote ovule separation in a partially redundant manner. Functional analyses show that CUC transcription factors are also involved in ovule development in Cardamine hirsuta. Additionally we show a conserved expression pattern of CUC orthologues between ovule primordia in other phylogenetically distant species with different gynoecium architectures. Taken together these results suggest an ancient role for CUC transcription factors in ovule separation, and shed light on the conservation of mechanisms involved in the development of innovative structures.

  12. Dishevelled genes mediate a conserved mammalian PCP pathway to regulate convergent extension during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Hamblet, Natasha S; Mark, Sharayne; Dickinson, Mary E; Brinkman, Brendan C; Segil, Neil; Fraser, Scott E; Chen, Ping; Wallingford, John B; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2006-05-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is conserved throughout evolution, but it mediates distinct developmental processes. In Drosophila, members of the PCP pathway localize in a polarized fashion to specify the cellular polarity within the plane of the epithelium, perpendicular to the apicobasal axis of the cell. In Xenopus and zebrafish, several homologs of the components of the fly PCP pathway control convergent extension. We have shown previously that mammalian PCP homologs regulate both cell polarity and polarized extension in the cochlea in the mouse. Here we show, using mice with null mutations in two mammalian Dishevelled homologs, Dvl1 and Dvl2, that during neurulation a homologous mammalian PCP pathway regulates concomitant lengthening and narrowing of the neural plate, a morphogenetic process defined as convergent extension. Dvl2 genetically interacts with Loop-tail, a point mutation in the mammalian PCP gene Vangl2, during neurulation. By generating Dvl2 BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenes and introducing different domain deletions and a point mutation identical to the dsh1 allele in fly, we further demonstrated a high degree of conservation between Dvl function in mammalian convergent extension and the PCP pathway in fly. In the neuroepithelium of neurulating embryos, Dvl2 shows DEP domain-dependent membrane localization, a pre-requisite for its involvement in convergent extension. Intriguing, the Loop-tail mutation that disrupts both convergent extension in the neuroepithelium and PCP in the cochlea does not disrupt Dvl2 membrane distribution in the neuroepithelium, in contrast to its drastic effect on Dvl2 localization in the cochlea. These results are discussed in light of recent models on PCP and convergent extension.

  13. A Functionally Conserved Gene Regulatory Network Module Governing Olfactory Neuron Diversity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Barish, Scott; Okuwa, Sumie; Maciejewski, Abigail; Brandt, Alicia T; Reinhold, Dominik; Jones, Corbin D; Volkan, Pelin Cayirlioglu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuron diversity is required for organisms to decipher complex environmental cues. In Drosophila, the olfactory environment is detected by 50 different olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes that are clustered in combinations within distinct sensilla subtypes. Each sensilla subtype houses stereotypically clustered 1-4 ORN identities that arise through asymmetric divisions from a single multipotent sensory organ precursor (SOP). How each class of SOPs acquires a unique differentiation potential that accounts for ORN diversity is unknown. Previously, we reported a critical component of SOP diversification program, Rotund (Rn), increases ORN diversity by generating novel developmental trajectories from existing precursors within each independent sensilla type lineages. Here, we show that Rn, along with BarH1/H2 (Bar), Bric-à-brac (Bab), Apterous (Ap) and Dachshund (Dac), constitutes a transcription factor (TF) network that patterns the developing olfactory tissue. This network was previously shown to pattern the segmentation of the leg, which suggests that this network is functionally conserved. In antennal imaginal discs, precursors with diverse ORN differentiation potentials are selected from concentric rings defined by unique combinations of these TFs along the proximodistal axis of the developing antennal disc. The combinatorial code that demarcates each precursor field is set up by cross-regulatory interactions among different factors within the network. Modifications of this network lead to predictable changes in the diversity of sensilla subtypes and ORN pools. In light of our data, we propose a molecular map that defines each unique SOP fate. Our results highlight the importance of the early prepatterning gene regulatory network as a modulator of SOP and terminally differentiated ORN diversity. Finally, our model illustrates how conserved developmental strategies are used to generate neuronal diversity.

  14. The human homolog of a candidate mouse t complex responder gene: conserved motifs and evolution with punctuated equilibria.

    PubMed

    Islam, S D; Pilder, S H; Decker, C L; Cebra-Thomas, J A; Silver, L M

    1993-12-01

    The mouse Tcp-10 gene has been established as a molecular candidate for the t complex responder locus which plays a central role in the transmission ratio distortion phenotype expressed by males heterozygous for a t haplotype. Here we describe a comparison of the mouse and human TCP10 coding sequences. The results show that whole exons have been added or eliminated from the transcripts expressed in each species, suggesting an evolutionary process of punctuated equilibria for this gene. Two of the polypeptide regions that are most conserved between the two species contain specific peptide motifs. The conserved C-terminal region contains a unique nonapeptide repeat of unknown function and the conserved N-terminal region contains a pair of leucine zippers within a region that shows additional similarity to the coiled-coil regions of various cytosolic polypeptides. These results are discussed in terms of the possible function of the TCP10 protein.

  15. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  16. Comparative analysis of a conserved zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.; Mucenski, M.L.; Stubbs, L.

    1996-04-01

    Several lines of evidence now suggest that many of the zinc-finger-containing (ZNF) genes in the human genome are arranged in clusters. However, little is known about the structure or function of the clusters or about their conservation throughout evolution. Here, we report the analysis of a conserved ZNF gene cluster located in human chromosome 19q13.2 and mouse chromosome 7. Our results indicate that the human cluster consists of at least 10 related Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing ZNF genes organized in tandem over a distance of 350-450 kb. Two cDNA clones representing genes in the murine cluster have been studied in detail. The KRAB A domains of these genes are nearly identical and are highly similar to human 19q13.2-derived KRAB sequences, but DNA-binding ZNF domains and other portions of the genes differ considerably. The two murine genes display distinct expression patterns, but are coexpressed in some adult tissues. These studies pave the way for a systematic analysis of the evolution of structure and function of genes within the numerous clustered ZNF families located on human chromosome 19 and elsewhere in the human and mouse genomes. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Regulation of Dlx3 gene expression in visceral arches by evolutionarily conserved enhancer elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kenta Sumiyama; Frank H. Ruddle

    2003-04-01

    The mammalian Distal-less (Dlx) clusters (Dlx1-2, Dlx5-6, and Dlx3-7) have a nested expression pattern in developing visceral (branchial) arches. Genetic regulatory mechanisms controlling Dlx spatial expression within the visceral arches have not yet been defined. Here we show that an enhancer in the Dlx3-7 cluster can regulate the visceral arch specific expression pattern of the Dlx3 gene. We have used a 79-kb transgene construct containing the entire Dlx3-7 bigene cluster with a LacZ reporter inserted in frame in the first exon of the Dlx3 gene. Visceral arch expression is absent when a 4-kb element located within the Dlx3-7 intergenic region is deleted. A 245-bp element (I37-2) whose DNA sequence is highly conserved between human and mouse located within the 4kb-deleted region can drive visceral arch expression when fused to a hsp68-lacZ reporter transgene construct. Reporter expression is detected in 9.5 and 10.5 days postcoitum transgenic embryos in a manner consistent with the endogenous Dlx3 expression pattern in the mesenchyme of the first and second visceral arches. Thus the I37-2 element is both necessary and sufficient for Dlx3 expression. The I37-2 element contains several putative binding sites for several transcription factors including Dlx and other homeodomain proteins within the evolutionarily conserved region. Significantly, the I37-2 element shows a sequence-match including a Dlx binding site to a cis-element in the Dlx5-6 intermediate region designated mI56i [Zerucha, T., Stuhmer, T., Hatch, G., Park, B. K., Long, Q., Yu, G., Gambarotta, A., Schultz, J. R., Rubenstein, J. L. & Ekker, M. (2000) J. Neurosci. 20, 709-721], despite distant phylogenetic relationship between these clusters. Our results provide evidence for a concerted role for DLX auto- and cross-regulation in the establishment of a nested expression pattern for Dlx3-7 and Dlx5-6 clusters within the visceral arches.

  18. Genetic determination of coat color affects testicular steroidogenesis in the Mustela vison.

    PubMed

    Amador, A G; Sundqvist, C; Bartke, A

    1996-06-01

    Coat color genes in mammals are known to be developmental genes with wide pleiotropic effects. The present study was undertaken to study testicular steroidogenesis in American Mink (Mustela vison) of various coat color phenotypes. No differences in testicular steroid levels were observed between fertile and infertile mink with the standard phenotype and genotype (BB jj MM PP). Mink with the opaline phenotype and genotype (bb mm pp), were found to have in their testes, 20-40% higher levels of progesterone, five times higher levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and eight times higher levels of testosterone, than the corresponding values in other mink. No other differences were observed among the different types of mink. Since the genotype of the opaline mink differs from the other mink studied, only in their combination at the pastel (b) and moyle (m) loci, their bb mm genotype could be assumed to be responsible for the increase in testicular steroids.

  19. Variable Gene Dispersal Conditions and Spatial Deforestation Patterns Can Interact to Affect Tropical Tree Conservation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with ‘Near’ distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  20. Variable gene dispersal conditions and spatial deforestation patterns can interact to affect tropical tree conservation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with 'Near' distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  1. Complete structural organization of the human {alpha}1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1): Divergence from the conserved organization of other characterized fibrillar collagen genes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kazuhiko; Hoffman, G.G.; Greenspan, D.S.

    1995-10-10

    Genes that encode the vertebrate fibrillar collagen types I-III have previously been shown to share a highly conserved intron/exon organization, thought to reflect common ancestry and evolutionary pressures at the protein level. We report here the complete intron/exon organization of COL5A1, the human gene that encodes the {alpha}1 chain of fibrillar collagen type V. The structure of COL5A1 is shown to be considerably diverged from the conserved structure of the genes for fibrillar collagen types I-III. COL5A1 has 66 exons, which is greater than the number of exons found in the genes for collagen types I-III. The increased number of exons is partly due to the increased size of the pro-{alpha}1(V) N-propeptide, relative to the sizes of the N-propeptides of the types I-III procollagen molecules. In addition, however, the increased number of exons is due to differences in the intron/exon organization of the triple-helix coding region of COL5A1 compared to the organization of the triple-helix coding regions of the genes for collagen types I-III. Of particular interest is the increase of 54 bp exons in this region of COL5A1, strongly supporting the proposal that the triple-helix coding regions of fibrillar collagen genes evolved from duplication of a 54 bp primordial genetic element. Moreover, comparison of the structure of COL5A1 to the highly conserved structure of the genes of collagen types I-III provides insights into the probable structure of the ancestral gene that gave rise to what appears to be two classes of vertebrate fibrillar collagen genes. 50 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Testicular function after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, D J; Ralec, V L; Tiller, D J; Horvath, J S; Turtle, J R

    1981-05-01

    Gonadal function was assessed in seventeen adult male renal transplant recipients, with well established good homograft function, for a mean of 4.9 years. Patients were assessed clinically and by measurement of basal concentrations of FSH, LH, prolactin, testosterone and oestradiol, FSH and LH responses to bolus injections of LHRH and semen analysis. Retrospectively all had symptoms consistent with marked hypogonadism prior to transplantation but in nine out of sixteen this was reversed with transplantation. Residual hypogonadism was evident in seven of sixteen patients and correlated with duration of haemodialysis longer than 1 year (P less than 0.01). Even among patients with clinically normal gonadal function, defects in the hypothalamic--pituitary--testicular axis remained. Elevated basal serum FSH, excessive FSH responses to LHRH and lowered basal serum testosterone were found. In the group with residual hypogonadism more marked changes, including elevated basal LH and excessive LH responses to LHRH, were also found. Fertility was recorded in two men on three occasions since transplantation. Sperm counts were normal in five and abnormal in four patients. Testicular volume and sperm density were inversely correlated with basal and stimulated FSH and LH levels.

  3. Genome engineering uncovers 54 evolutionarily conserved and testis-enriched genes that are not required for male fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Castaneda, Julio M; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Yu, Zhifeng; Archambeault, Denise R; Isotani, Ayako; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Kriseman, Maya L; Mashiko, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takafumi; Matzuk, Ryan M; Mori, Masashi; Noda, Taichi; Oji, Asami; Okabe, Masaru; Prunskaite-Hyyrylainen, Renata; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Zhang, Qian; Ikawa, Masahito; Matzuk, Martin M

    2016-07-12

    Gene-expression analysis studies from Schultz et al. estimate that more than 2,300 genes in the mouse genome are expressed predominantly in the male germ line. As of their 2003 publication [Schultz N, Hamra FK, Garbers DL (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(21):12201-12206], the functions of the majority of these testis-enriched genes during spermatogenesis and fertilization were largely unknown. Since the study by Schultz et al., functional analysis of hundreds of reproductive-tract-enriched genes have been performed, but there remain many testis-enriched genes for which their relevance to reproduction remain unexplored or unreported. Historically, a gene knockout is the "gold standard" to determine whether a gene's function is essential in vivo. Although knockout mice without apparent phenotypes are rarely published, these knockout mouse lines and their phenotypic information need to be shared to prevent redundant experiments. Herein, we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to uncover mouse testis-enriched genes that are evolutionarily conserved in humans. We then used gene-disruption approaches, including Knockout Mouse Project resources (targeting vectors and mice) and CRISPR/Cas9, to mutate and quickly analyze the fertility of these mutant mice. We discovered that 54 mutant mouse lines were fertile. Thus, despite evolutionary conservation of these genes in vertebrates and in some cases in all eukaryotes, our results indicate that these genes are not individually essential for male mouse fertility. Our phenotypic data are highly relevant in this fiscally tight funding period and postgenomic age when large numbers of genomes are being analyzed for disease association, and will prevent unnecessary expenditures and duplications of effort by others. PMID:27357688

  4. Marker production by PCR amplification with primer pairs from conserved sequences of WRKY genes in chili pepper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun-Joung; Lee, Heung-Ryul; Han, Jung-Heon; Yeom, Seon-In; Harn, Chee-Hark; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2008-04-30

    Despite increasing awareness of the importance of WRKY genes in plant defense signaling, the locations of these genes in the Capsicum genome have not been established. To develop WRKY-based markers, primer sequences were deduced from the conserved sequences of the DNA binding motif within the WRKY domains of tomato and pepper genes. These primers were derived from upstream and downstream parts of the conserved sequences of the three WRKY groups. Six primer combinations of each WRKY group were tested for polymorphisms between the mapping parents, C. annuum 'CM334' and C. annuum 'Chilsungcho'. DNA fragments amplified by primer pairs deduced from WRKY Group II genes revealed high levels of polymorphism. Using 32 primer pairs to amplify upstream and downstream parts of the WRKY domain of WRKY group II genes, 60 polymorphic bands were detected. Polymorphisms were not detected with primer pairs from downstream parts of WRKY group II genes. Half of these primers were subjected to F2 genotyping to construct a linkage map. Thirty of 41 markers were located evenly spaced on 20 of the 28 linkage groups, without clustering. This linkage map also consisted of 199 AFLP and 26 SSR markers. This WRKY-based marker system is a rapid and simple method for generating sequence-specific markers for plant gene families.

  5. Bacterial intra-species gene loss occurs in a largely clocklike manner mostly within a pool of less conserved and constrained genes

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Evgeni; Hershberg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Gene loss is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial gene content. Gene loss may occur as a result of shifts in environment leading to changes in the intensity and/or directionality of selection applied for the maintenance of specific genes. Gene loss may also occur in a more neutral manner, when gene functions are lost that were not subject to strong selection to be maintained, irrespective of changes to environment. Here, we used a pangenome-based approach to investigate patterns of gene loss across 15 bacterial species. We demonstrate that gene loss tends to occur mostly within a pool of genes that are less constrained within species, even in those strains from which they are not lost, and less conserved across bacterial species. Our results indicate that shifts in selection, resulting from shifts in environment are not required to explain the majority of gene loss events occurring within a diverse collection of bacterial species. Caution should therefore be taken when attributing differences in gene content to differences in environment. PMID:27734920

  6. [Verification of testicular cancer guidelines].

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Norio; Azuma, Haruhito

    2012-12-01

    Testicular cancer is a rare disease that affects 1-2 in 100,000 people in Japan ; however, it is a very significant disease in that it has a high prevalence amongst young adults aged in their 20s and 30s and it brings about metastasis from a relatively early stage. The 2009 edition of the Testicular Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines sets out a detailed summary of 32 clinical questions (CQ) considered necessary in routine clinical practice across the fields of epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, etc, in the form of recommendations and commentary. These CQs are considered extremely important in understanding the foundation of future testicular cancer treatment guidelines. In this symposium, five doctors gave lectures consisting of the following contents in which they validated the guidelines and gave concrete clinical practice examples through cases they had experienced themselves with regards to the treatment strategies for (1) stage I patients, (2) patients with advanced cancer and (3) patients with extragonadal germ cell tumors. (1) Stage I patients : In seminoma cases, the doctors focused on the relapse prevention effect provided by single-agent carboplatin adjuvant chemotherapy. In non-seminoma cases, treatment options were considered according to risk based on the presence or absence of vascular invasion, a prognostic factor. (2) Patients with advanced cancer : 30% of testicular cancers are metastatic and progress to advanced cancer. In refractory cases resistant to bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin therapy, etoposide ifosfamide, and cisplatin therapy and vinblastine, ifosfamide and cisplatin therapy have been used, but without satisfactory results and the development of new salvage chemotherapy is an important issue. The therapeutic strategies against advanced testicular cancer were narrowed down to (2) -1) therapeutic effects from ultra-high-dose chemotherapy, (2) -2) salvage chemotherapy in cases where residual tumors are observed in induction

  7. Maximal Expression of the Evolutionarily Conserved Slit2 Gene Promoter Requires Sp1.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Jacquelyn; Wisidagama, D Roonalika; Morford, Travis; Malone, Cindy S

    2016-08-01

    Slit2 is a neural axon guidance and chemorepellent protein that stimulates motility in a variety of cell types. The role of Slit2 in neural development and neoplastic growth and migration has been well established, while the genetic mechanisms underlying regulation of the Slit2 gene have not. We identified the core and proximal promoter of Slit2 by mapping multiple transcriptional start sites, analyzing transcriptional activity, and confirming sequence homology for the Slit2 proximal promoter among a number of species. Deletion series and transient transfection identified the Slit2 proximal promoter as within 399 base pairs upstream of the start of transcription. A crucial region for full expression of the Slit2 proximal promoter lies between 399 base pairs and 296 base pairs upstream of the start of transcription. Computer modeling identified three transcription factor-binding consensus sites within this region, of which only site-directed mutagenesis of one of the two identified Sp1 consensus sites inhibited transcriptional activity of the Slit2 proximal promoter (-399 to +253). Bioinformatics analysis of the Slit2 proximal promoter -399 base pair to -296 base pair region shows high sequence conservation over twenty-two species, and that this region follows an expected pattern of sequence divergence through evolution.

  8. blue cheese Mutations Define a Novel, Conserved Gene Involved in Progressive Neural Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Kim D.; Edeen, Philip T.; Cumming, Robert C.; Mardahl-Dumesnil, Michelle D.; Taylor, Barbara J.; Rodriguez, Maria H.; Hwang, Calvin E.; Benedetti, Michael; McKeown, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A common feature of many human neurodegenerative diseases is the accumulation of insoluble ubiquitin-containing protein aggregates in the CNS. Although Drosophila has been helpful in understanding several human neurodegenerative disorders, a loss-of-function mutation has not been identified that leads to insoluble CNS protein aggregates. The study of Drosophila mutations may identify unique components that are associated with human degenerative diseases. The Drosophila blue cheese (bchs) gene defines such a novel degenerative pathway. bchs mutants have a reduced adult life span with the age-dependent formation of protein aggregates throughout the neuropil of the CNS. These inclusions contain insoluble ubiquitinated proteins and amyloid precursor-like protein. Progressive loss of CNS size and morphology along with extensive neuronal apoptosis occurs in aged bchs mutants. BCHS protein is widely expressed in the cytoplasm of CNS neurons and is present over the entire length of axonal projections. BCHS is nearly 3500 amino acids in size, with the last 1000 amino acids consisting of three functional protein motifs implicated in vesicle transport and protein processing. This region along with previously unidentified proteins encoded in the human, mouse, and nematode genomes shows striking homology along the full length of the BCHS protein. The high degree of conservation between Drosophila and human bchs suggests that study of the functional pathway of BCHS and associated mutant phenotype may provide useful insights into human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:12598614

  9. Testicular Schistosomiasis Mimicking Malignancy in a Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ekenze, Sebastian O; Modekwe, Victor O; Nzegwu, Martin A; Ekpemo, Samuel C; Ezomike, Uchechukwu O

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important communicable disease in the developing world. However, testicular schistosomiasis is an extremely rare condition. We report a case of testicular schistosomiasis mimicking testicular tumour in a 13 year old who presented with huge unilateral testicular mass. The dilemma encountered in the diagnosis and treatment of this child is presented to highlight the need for high index of suspicion of this pathology in children with testicular mass presenting from schistosomiasis-endemic areas.

  10. Integrating bioinformatic resources to predict transcription factors interacting with cis-sequences conserved in co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Using motif detection programs it is fairly straightforward to identify conserved cis-sequences in promoters of co-regulated genes. In contrast, the identification of the transcription factors (TFs) interacting with these cis-sequences is much more elaborate. To facilitate this, we explore the possibility of using several bioinformatic and experimental approaches for TF identification. This starts with the selection of co-regulated gene sets and leads first to the prediction and then to the experimental validation of TFs interacting with cis-sequences conserved in the promoters of these co-regulated genes. Results Using the PathoPlant database, 32 up-regulated gene groups were identified with microarray data for drought-responsive gene expression from Arabidopsis thaliana. Application of the binding site estimation suite of tools (BEST) discovered 179 conserved sequence motifs within the corresponding promoters. Using the STAMP web-server, 49 sequence motifs were classified into 7 motif families for which similarities with known cis-regulatory sequences were identified. All motifs were subjected to a footprintDB analysis to predict interacting DNA binding domains from plant TF families. Predictions were confirmed by using a yeast-one-hybrid approach to select interacting TFs belonging to the predicted TF families. TF-DNA interactions were further experimentally validated in yeast and with a Physcomitrella patens transient expression system, leading to the discovery of several novel TF-DNA interactions. Conclusions The present work demonstrates the successful integration of several bioinformatic resources with experimental approaches to predict and validate TFs interacting with conserved sequence motifs in co-regulated genes. PMID:24773781

  11. Novel parasitic nematode-specific protein of bovine filarial parasite Setaria digitata displays conserved gene structure and ubiquitous expression.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, W W; Dassanayake, R S; Weerasena, S J; Silva Gunawardene, Y I

    2014-09-01

    Setaria digitata is an animal filarial parasite, which can cause fatal diseases to livestock such as cattle, sheep, goat, buffaloes, horses etc. inflicting considerable economic losses to livelihood of livestock farmers. In spite of this, the biology and parasitic nature of this organism is largely unknown. As a step towards understanding these, we screened the cDNA library of S. digitata and identified an open reading frame that code for parasitic nematode-specific protein, which showed a significant homology to functionally and structurally unannotated sequences of parasitic nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa etc., suggesting its role in parasitism. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the S. digitata novel gene (SDNP) is expressed in adult female and male, and microfilariae. Southern hybridization studies revealed that this gene is a single-copy gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic region obtained from overlapping PCR amplification indicated that the size of the genomic region is 1819 bp in which four exons encoding 205 amino acids were interrupted by three introns of varying lengths of 419, 659 and 123 bp, and also the expansion of the size of the introns of S. digitata compared to its orthologues by integrating micro and mini-satellite containing sequence. Sequences around the splice junctions were conserved and agreed with the general GT-AG splicing rule. The gene was found to be AT rich with a GC content of 38.1%. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the gene structure of SDNP and its orthologues is conserved and it expressed ubiqutously in all the stages of nematode's life cycle. Therefore, taking these outcomes together, it can be concluded that SDNP is a parasitic nematode-specific, single copy gene having conserved gene structure of four exons interrupted by three introns and that the gene is expressed ubiquitously throughout nematode's life cycle. PMID:25382479

  12. Overview of Pediatric Testicular Tumors in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Min

    2014-01-01

    Prepubertal testicular tumors are rare compared with postpubertal testicular tumors. The incidence of prepubertal testicular tumors peaks at 2 years of age, tapers off after 4 years of age, and then begins to rise again at puberty. Prepubertal and postpubertal testicular tumors show many differences, including the typical tumor histology, molecular biological differences, and the malignant potential of tumors at different ages. Pediatric testicular tumors are classified as benign or malignant on the basis of their clinical behavior and histologically are divided into germ cell and gonadal stromal (nongerm cell) tumors. Many histological and biological studies have further confirmed the distinct nature of prepubertal and postpubertal testicular tumors. These differences have led to various management strategies for prepubertal and postpubertal tumors. Because overall about 75% of prepubertal testicular tumors are benign, a testis-sparing approach is becoming more common in children. Orchiectomy and observation with very selective use of chemotherapy has become the standard approach when a malignant tumor is identified. Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and radiation therapy play very limited roles. PMID:25512812

  13. Identification of CROWN ROOTLESS1-regulated genes in rice reveals specific and conserved elements of postembryonic root formation.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Yoan; Le, Van Anh Thi; Adam, Hélène; Bès, Martine; Vignols, Florence; Jouannic, Stefan; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Gantet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In monocotyledons, the root system is mostly composed of postembryonic shoot-borne roots called crown roots. In rice (Oryza sativa), auxin promotes crown root initiation via the LOB-domain transcription factor (LBD) transcription factor CROWN ROOTLESS1 (CRL1); however, the gene regulatory network downstream of CRL1 remains largely unknown. We tested CRL1 transcriptional activity in yeast and in planta, identified CRL1-regulated genes using an inducible gene expression system and a transcriptome analysis, and used in situ hybridization to demonstrate coexpression of a sample of CRL1-regulated genes with CRL1 in crown root primordia. We show that CRL1 positively regulates 277 genes, including key genes involved in meristem patterning (such as QUIESCENT-CENTER SPECIFIC HOMEOBOX; QHB), cell proliferation and hormone homeostasis. Many genes are homologous to Arabidopsis genes involved in lateral root formation, but about a quarter are rice-specific. Our study reveals that several genes acting downstream of LBD transcription factors controlling postembryonic root formation are conserved between monocots and dicots. It also provides evidence that specific genes are involved in the formation of shoot-derived roots in rice.

  14. The evolution of novelty in conserved genes; evidence of positive selection in the Drosophila fruitless gene is localised to alternatively spliced exons

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D J; Gardiner, A; Neville, M C; Ritchie, M G; Goodwin, S F

    2014-01-01

    There has been much debate concerning whether cis-regulatory or coding changes are more likely to produce evolutionary innovation or adaptation in gene function, but an additional complication is that some genes can dramatically diverge through alternative splicing, increasing the diversity of gene function within a locus. The fruitless gene is a major transcription factor with a wide range of pleiotropic functions, including a fundamental conserved role in sexual differentiation, species-specific morphology and an important influence on male sexual behaviour. Here, we examine the structure of fruitless in multiple species of Drosophila, and determine the patterns of selective constraint acting across the coding region. We found that the pattern of selection, estimated from the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, varied considerably across the gene, with most regions of the gene evolutionarily conserved but with several regions showing evidence of divergence as a result of positive selection. The regions that showed evidence of positive selection were found to be localised to relatively consistent regions across multiple speciation events, and are associated with alternative splicing. Alternative splicing may thus provide a route to gene diversification in key regulatory loci. PMID:24149653

  15. Mitochondrial genomes of Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae): evidence for conserved gene order in annelida.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert M; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2005-02-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are useful tools for inferring evolutionary history. However, many taxa are poorly represented by available data. Thus, to further understand the phylogenetic potential of complete mitochondrial genome sequence data in Annelida (segmented worms), we examined the complete mitochondrial sequence for Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and an estimated 80% of the sequence of Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae). These genomes have remarkably similar gene orders to previously published annelid genomes, suggesting that gene order is conserved across annelids. This result is interesting, given the high variation seen in the closely related Mollusca and Brachiopoda. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence, amino acid sequence, and gene order all support the recent hypothesis that Sipuncula and Annelida are closely related. Our findings suggest that gene order data is of limited utility in annelids but that sequence data holds promise. Additionally, these genomes show AT bias (approximately 66%) and codon usage biases but have a typical gene complement for bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. PMID:15483328

  16. Mitochondrial genomes of Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae): evidence for conserved gene order in annelida.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert M; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2005-02-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are useful tools for inferring evolutionary history. However, many taxa are poorly represented by available data. Thus, to further understand the phylogenetic potential of complete mitochondrial genome sequence data in Annelida (segmented worms), we examined the complete mitochondrial sequence for Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and an estimated 80% of the sequence of Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae). These genomes have remarkably similar gene orders to previously published annelid genomes, suggesting that gene order is conserved across annelids. This result is interesting, given the high variation seen in the closely related Mollusca and Brachiopoda. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence, amino acid sequence, and gene order all support the recent hypothesis that Sipuncula and Annelida are closely related. Our findings suggest that gene order data is of limited utility in annelids but that sequence data holds promise. Additionally, these genomes show AT bias (approximately 66%) and codon usage biases but have a typical gene complement for bilaterian mitochondrial genomes.

  17. Conservation of the gene for outer membrane protein OprF in the family Pseudomonadaceae: sequence of the Pseudomonas syringae oprF gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ullstrom, C A; Siehnel, R; Woodruff, W; Steinbach, S; Hancock, R E

    1991-01-01

    The conservation of the oprF gene for the major outer membrane protein OprF was determined by restriction mapping and Southern blot hybridization with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprF gene as a probe. The restriction map was highly conserved among 16 of the 17 serotype strains and 42 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Only the serotype 12 isolate and one clinical isolate showed small differences in restriction pattern. Southern probing of PstI chromosomal digests of 14 species from the family Pseudomonadaceae revealed that only the nine members of rRNA homology group I hybridized with the oprF gene. To reveal the actual extent of homology, the oprF gene and its product were characterized in Pseudomonas syringae. Nine strains of P. syringae from seven different pathovars hybridized with the P. aeruginosa gene to produce five different but related restriction maps. All produced an OprF protein in their outer membranes with the same apparent molecular weight as that of P.aeruginosa OprF. In each case the protein reacted with monoclonal antibody MA4-10 and was similarly heat and 2-mercaptoethanol modifiable. The purified OprF protein of the type strain P. syringae pv. syringae ATCC 19310 reconstituted small channels in lipid bilayer membranes. The oprF gene from this latter strain was cloned and sequenced. Despite the low level of DNA hybridization between P. aeruginosa and P. syringae DNA, the OprF gene was highly conserved between the species with 72% DNA sequence identity and 68% amino acid sequence identity overall. The carboxy terminus-encoding region of P. syringae oprF showed 85 and 33% identity, respectively, with the same regions of the P. aeruginosa oprF and Escherichia coli ompA genes. Images PMID:1898935

  18. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu2+, MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments. PMID:27313597

  19. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu(2+), MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments.

  20. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu(2+), MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments. PMID:27313597

  1. Morphologic manifestations of testicular and epididymal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Justin D; Whitney, Katharine M

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic examination of the testis is the most sensitive means to detect effects on spermatogenesis; however, the complexity of testicular histology, interrelatedness of cell types within the testis, and long duration of spermatogenesis can make assessment of a testicular toxicant challenging. A thorough understanding of the histology and morphologic manifestations of response to injury is critical to successfully identify a testicular effect and to begin to understand the underlying mechanism of action. The basic patterns of response to xenobiotic-induced injury to the testis and epididymis are detailed and discussed. PMID:26413388

  2. [Segmental testicular infarction in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Mueller, F E

    2014-05-01

    Vascular occlusions are the clinical indicators of sickle cell disease and in urology they can lead to papillary necrosis, renal infarction or priapism. Segmental testicular infarction in patients with sickle cell disease is a rare event and only a few cases have been reported. We present a 25-year-old man with right testicular pain increasing over 3 days and sickle cell disease. Ultrasound of the right scrotum presented an inhomogeneous, mainly hypoechegenic mass with a hyperechogenic margin and no sign of blood flow. A partial orchiectomy was performed with total enucleation of the lesion, which was histologically diagnosed as benign hemorrhagic necrotic testicular tissue.

  3. Lead induced testicular hypersensitivity in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D K; Lal, B; Srivastava, R S; Chandra, S V

    1990-01-01

    Rats were immobilized for 2 h and treated i.p. with lead Pb2+ (8 mg/kg/day) for 45 d to investigate the testicular effects of lead on rats kept under immobilization stress. Marked alteration in SDH. G6PDH activity, cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents and reduced sperm counts associated with marked pathological changes in the testis of rats were observed after combined treatment with lead and immobilization stress in comparison to either alone. An increase in the disturbances of testicular androgen synthesis seems to be responsible for enhanced testicular injury in lead induced stressed rats. PMID:2401350

  4. Lead induced testicular hypersensitivity in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D K; Lal, B; Srivastava, R S; Chandra, S V

    1990-01-01

    Rats were immobilized for 2 h and treated i.p. with lead Pb2+ (8 mg/kg/day) for 45 d to investigate the testicular effects of lead on rats kept under immobilization stress. Marked alteration in SDH. G6PDH activity, cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents and reduced sperm counts associated with marked pathological changes in the testis of rats were observed after combined treatment with lead and immobilization stress in comparison to either alone. An increase in the disturbances of testicular androgen synthesis seems to be responsible for enhanced testicular injury in lead induced stressed rats.

  5. The First Myriapod Genome Sequence Reveals Conservative Arthropod Gene Content and Genome Organisation in the Centipede Strigamia maritima

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, Ariel D.; Ferrier, David E. K.; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C.; Alonso, Claudio R.; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C. J.; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K.; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J.; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D.; Extavour, Cassandra G.; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J.; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A.; Green, Jack E.; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H. L.; Hunn, Julia P.; Hunnekuhl, Vera S.; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jones, Tamsin E.; Kaiser, Tobias S.; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J.; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L.; Kraus, F. Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L.; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N.; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J.; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H.; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C.; Robertson, Helen E.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E.; Schurko, Andrew M.; Siggens, Kenneth W.; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J.; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M.; Willis, Judith H.; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M.; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  6. The first myriapod genome sequence reveals conservative arthropod gene content and genome organisation in the centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Chipman, Ariel D; Ferrier, David E K; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S T; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C; Alonso, Claudio R; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C J; Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D; Extavour, Cassandra G; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A; Green, Jack E; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H L; Hunn, Julia P; Hunnekuhl, Vera S; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Jiggins, Francis M; Jones, Tamsin E; Kaiser, Tobias S; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L; Kraus, F Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Robertson, Helen E; Robertson, Hugh M; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E; Schurko, Andrew M; Siggens, Kenneth W; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  7. The first myriapod genome sequence reveals conservative arthropod gene content and genome organisation in the centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Chipman, Ariel D; Ferrier, David E K; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S T; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C; Alonso, Claudio R; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C J; Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D; Extavour, Cassandra G; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A; Green, Jack E; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H L; Hunn, Julia P; Hunnekuhl, Vera S; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Jiggins, Francis M; Jones, Tamsin E; Kaiser, Tobias S; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L; Kraus, F Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Robertson, Helen E; Robertson, Hugh M; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E; Schurko, Andrew M; Siggens, Kenneth W; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  8. Genome engineering uncovers 54 evolutionarily conserved and testis-enriched genes that are not required for male fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Castaneda, Julio M.; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Yu, Zhifeng; Archambeault, Denise R.; Isotani, Ayako; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Kriseman, Maya L.; Mashiko, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takafumi; Matzuk, Ryan M.; Mori, Masashi; Noda, Taichi; Oji, Asami; Okabe, Masaru; Prunskaite-Hyyrylainen, Renata; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Zhang, Qian; Ikawa, Masahito; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    Gene-expression analysis studies from Schultz et al. estimate that more than 2,300 genes in the mouse genome are expressed predominantly in the male germ line. As of their 2003 publication [Schultz N, Hamra FK, Garbers DL (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(21):12201–12206], the functions of the majority of these testis-enriched genes during spermatogenesis and fertilization were largely unknown. Since the study by Schultz et al., functional analysis of hundreds of reproductive-tract–enriched genes have been performed, but there remain many testis-enriched genes for which their relevance to reproduction remain unexplored or unreported. Historically, a gene knockout is the “gold standard” to determine whether a gene’s function is essential in vivo. Although knockout mice without apparent phenotypes are rarely published, these knockout mouse lines and their phenotypic information need to be shared to prevent redundant experiments. Herein, we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to uncover mouse testis-enriched genes that are evolutionarily conserved in humans. We then used gene-disruption approaches, including Knockout Mouse Project resources (targeting vectors and mice) and CRISPR/Cas9, to mutate and quickly analyze the fertility of these mutant mice. We discovered that 54 mutant mouse lines were fertile. Thus, despite evolutionary conservation of these genes in vertebrates and in some cases in all eukaryotes, our results indicate that these genes are not individually essential for male mouse fertility. Our phenotypic data are highly relevant in this fiscally tight funding period and postgenomic age when large numbers of genomes are being analyzed for disease association, and will prevent unnecessary expenditures and duplications of effort by others. PMID:27357688

  9. Isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) mesenchyme fork head-1 genes reveals conservation of their gene and protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Naoyuki; Iida, Kiyoshi; Yang, Xiao-Li

    1997-05-01

    The very recently found evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding domain of 100 amino acids, termed the fork head domain, emerged from a sequence comparison of the rat hepatocyte transcription factor HNF-3{alpha} and the homeotic gene fork head of Drosophila. We previously isolated a new member of this family, the mesenchyme fork head-1 (MFH-1) gene, which is expressed in developing mesenchyme. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) chromosomal MFH-1 genes and the determination of the gene and protein structures of MFH-1. We found that the MFH-1 gene has no introns and that the identity of the amino acid sequences of mouse and human MFH-1 proteins is 94%. We also investigated the transcriptional activity of the mouse and human MFH-1 proteins and found that both proteins act as positive transactivators. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Educating young men about testicular cancer: support for a comprehensive testicular cancer campaign.

    PubMed

    Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Foster, S Catherine; Servoss, Timothy; LaBelle, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of testicular cancer among men 15-39 years of age, little has been done to increase awareness of this disease or educate males about its prevention. To fill this gap, the Standard Model of Health Communication was incorporated to design and implement a comprehensive testicular cancer campaign among male college students. To test the effectiveness of these messages, college students (N = 220) completed measures before and after the campaign. In addition, the authors obtained a control group of male college students (N = 52) who were not exposed to the messages. Survey items assessed awareness of testicular cancer and behaviors related to testicular cancer. Participants' knowledge of testicular cancer and likelihood of conducting a testicular self-exam increased significantly after being exposed to the campaign information. Men who were exposed to testicular cancer messages were more knowledgeable about testicular cancer and were more likely to conduct testicular self-examinations than were men in the control group. PMID:24117344

  11. Understanding the basis of a novel fruit type in Brassicaceae: conservation and deviation in expression patterns of six genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variation in fruit morphology is important for plant fitness because it influences dispersal capabilities. Approximately half the members of tribe Brassiceae (Brassicaceae) exhibit fruits with segmentation and variable dehiscence, called heteroarthrocarpy. The knowledge of the genetics of fruit patterning in Arabidopsis offers the opportunity to ask: (1) whether this genetic pathway is conserved in taxa with different fruit morphologies; (2) how the pathway may be modified to produce indehiscence; and (3) whether the pathway has been recruited for a novel abscission zone. Methods We identified homologs of ALCATRAZ, FRUITFULL, INDEHISCENT, SHATTERPROOF, and REPLUMLESS from two taxa, representing different types of heteroarthrocarpy. Comparative gene expression of twelve loci was assessed to address how their expression may have been modified to produce heteroarthrocarpy. Results Studies demonstrated overall conservation in gene expression patterns between dehiscent segments of Erucaria erucarioides and Arabidopsis, with some difference in expression of genes that position the valve margin. In contrast, indehiscence in heteroarthrocarpic fruit segments was correlated with the elimination of the entire valve margin pathway in Erucaria and Cakile lanceolata as well as its absence from a novel lateral abscission zone. Conclusions These findings suggest that modifications in the valve margin positioning genes are responsible for differences between heteroarthrocarpic and Arabidopsis-like fruits and support the hypothesis that heteroarthrocarpy evolved via repositioning the valve margin. They also highlight conservation in the dehiscence pathway across Brassicaceae. PMID:22943452

  12. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  13. Landscape genetics as a tool for conservation planning: predicting the effects of landscape change on gene flow.

    PubMed

    van Strien, Maarten J; Keller, Daniela; Holderegger, Rolf; Ghazoul, Jaboury; Kienast, Felix; Bolliger, Janine

    2014-03-01

    For conservation managers, it is important to know whether landscape changes lead to increasing or decreasing gene flow. Although the discipline of landscape genetics assesses the influence of landscape elements on gene flow, no studies have yet used landscape-genetic models to predict gene flow resulting from landscape change. A species that has already been severely affected by landscape change is the large marsh grasshopper (Stethophyma grossum), which inhabits moist areas in fragmented agricultural landscapes in Switzerland. From transects drawn between all population pairs within maximum dispersal distance (< 3 km), we calculated several measures of landscape composition as well as some measures of habitat configuration. Additionally, a complete sampling of all populations in our study area allowed incorporating measures of population topology. These measures together with the landscape metrics formed the predictor variables in linear models with gene flow as response variable (F(ST) and mean pairwise assignment probability). With a modified leave-one-out cross-validation approach, we selected the model with the highest predictive accuracy. With this model, we predicted gene flow under several landscape-change scenarios, which simulated construction, rezoning or restoration projects, and the establishment of a new population. For some landscape-change scenarios, significant increase or decrease in gene flow was predicted, while for others little change was forecast. Furthermore, we found that the measures of population topology strongly increase model fit in landscape genetic analysis. This study demonstrates the use of predictive landscape-genetic models in conservation and landscape planning.

  14. Testicular myeloid sarcoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Luzia Beatriz Ribeiro; Ladeia, Antônio Alexandre Lisbôa; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; de Oliveira, Leonardo Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcomas are extramedullary solid tumors composed of immature granulocytic precursor cells. In association with acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders, they may arise concurrently with compromised bone marrow related to acute myeloid leukemia, as a relapsed presentation, or occur as the first manifestation. The testicles are considered to be an uncommon site for myeloid sarcomas. No therapeutic strategy has been defined as best but may include chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study reports the evolution of a patient with testicular myeloid sarcoma as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. The patient initially refused medical treatment and died five months after the clinical condition started. PMID:23580888

  15. Small RNA pathway genes identified by patterns of phylogenetic conservation and divergence

    PubMed Central

    Tabach, Yuval; Billi, Allison C.; Hayes, Gabriel D.; Newman, Martin A.; Zuk, Or; Gabel, Harrison; Kamath, Ravi; Yacoby, Keren; Chapman, Brad; Garcia, Susana M.; Borowsky, Mark; Kim, John K.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical analyses of RNA interference (RNAi) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways have revealed proteins such as Argonaute/PIWI and Dicer that process and present small RNAs to their targets. Well validated small RNA pathway cofactors, such as the Argonaute/PIWI proteins show distinctive patterns of conservation or divergence in particular animal, plant, fungal, and protist species. We compared 86 divergent eukaryotic genome sequences to discern sets of proteins that show similar phylogenetic profiles with known small RNA cofactors. A large set of additional candidate small RNA cofactors have emerged from functional genomic screens for defects in miRNA- or siRNA-mediated repression in C. elegans and D. melanogaster1,2 and from proteomic analyses of proteins co-purifying with validated small RNA pathway proteins3,4. The phylogenetic profiles of many of these candidate small RNA pathway proteins are similar to those of known small RNA cofactor proteins. We used a Bayesian approach to integrate the phylogenetic profile analysis with predictions from diverse transcriptional coregulation and proteome interaction datasets to assign a probability for each protein for a role in a small RNA pathway. Testing high-confidence candidates from this analysis for defects in RNAi silencing, we found that about half of the predicted small RNA cofactors are required for RNAi silencing. Many of the newly identified small RNA pathway proteins are orthologues of proteins implicated in RNA splicing. In support of a deep connection between the mechanism of RNA splicing and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, the presence of the Argonaute proteins and other small RNA components in the many species analysed strongly correlates with the number of introns in that species. PMID:23364702

  16. How to Do a Testicular Self Examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... testicular cancer to keep in mind are: Any enlargement of a testicle A significant loss of size ... discomfort in a testicle or in the scrotum Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts I hesitate to ...

  17. Cadmium-induced testicular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn{sup 2+} and/or Ca{sup 2+} mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  18. Cadmium-induced testicular injury.

    PubMed

    Siu, Erica R; Mruk, Dolores D; Porto, Catarina S; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn(2+) and/or Ca(2+) mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  19. Cadmium-induced Testicular Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, and the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor, oxidative stress inducer and how it may disrupt the Zn+2 and/or Ca+2 mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity is emerged, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  20. Integrating gene flow, crop biology, and farm management in on-farm conservation of avocado (Persea americana, Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Kenneth; Desalle, Rob; Peters, Charles M; Benfey, Philip N

    2003-11-01

    Maintaining crop diversity on farms where cultivars can evolve is a conservation goal, but few tools are available to assess the long-term maintenance of genetic diversity on farms. One important issue for on-farm conservation is gene flow from crops with a narrow genetic base into related populations that are genetically diverse. In a case study of avocado (Persea americana var. americana) in one of its centers of diversity (San Jerónimo, Costa Rica), we used 10 DNA microsatellite markers in a parentage analysis to estimate gene flow from commercialized varieties into a traditional crop population. Five commercialized genotypes comprised nearly 40% of orchard trees, but they contributed only about 14.5% of the gametes to the youngest cohort of trees. Although commercialized varieties and the diverse population were often planted on the same farm, planting patterns appeared to keep the two types of trees separated on small scales, possibly explaining the limited gene flow. In a simulation that combined gene flow estimates, crop biology, and graft tree management, loss of allelic diversity was less than 10% over 150 yr, and selection was effective in retaining desirable alleles in the diverse subpopulation. Simulations also showed that, in addition to gene flow, managing the genetic makeup and life history traits of the invasive commercialized varieties could have a significant impact on genetic diversity in the target population. The results support the feasibility of on-farm crop conservation, but simulations also showed that higher levels of gene flow could lead to severe losses of genetic diversity even if farmers continue to plant diverse varieties. PMID:21653337

  1. A Conserved Helicobacter pylori Gene, HP0102, Is Induced Upon Contact With Gastric Cells and Has Multiple Roles in Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chowdhury, Rukhsana

    2016-07-15

    Contact with host cells is recognized as a signal capable of triggering expression of bacterial genes important for host pathogen interaction. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric epithelial cell line AGS strongly upregulated expression of a gene, HP0102, in the adhered bacteria in all strains examined, including several Indian clinical isolates. The gene is highly conserved and ubiquitously present in all 69 sequenced H. pylori genomes at the same genomic locus, as well as in 15 Indian clinical isolates. The gene is associated with 2 distinct phenotypes related to pathogenicity. In AGS cell-adhered H. pylori, it has a role in upregulation of cagA expression from a specific σ(28)-RNAP promoter and consequent induction of the hummingbird phenotype in the infected AGS cells. Furthermore, HP0102 has a role in chemotaxis and a ΔHP0102 mutant exhibited low acid-escape response that might account for the poor colonization efficiency of the mutant.

  2. A Conserved Helicobacter pylori Gene, HP0102, Is Induced Upon Contact With Gastric Cells and Has Multiple Roles in Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chowdhury, Rukhsana

    2016-07-15

    Contact with host cells is recognized as a signal capable of triggering expression of bacterial genes important for host pathogen interaction. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric epithelial cell line AGS strongly upregulated expression of a gene, HP0102, in the adhered bacteria in all strains examined, including several Indian clinical isolates. The gene is highly conserved and ubiquitously present in all 69 sequenced H. pylori genomes at the same genomic locus, as well as in 15 Indian clinical isolates. The gene is associated with 2 distinct phenotypes related to pathogenicity. In AGS cell-adhered H. pylori, it has a role in upregulation of cagA expression from a specific σ(28)-RNAP promoter and consequent induction of the hummingbird phenotype in the infected AGS cells. Furthermore, HP0102 has a role in chemotaxis and a ΔHP0102 mutant exhibited low acid-escape response that might account for the poor colonization efficiency of the mutant. PMID:27056952

  3. The protective effect of dexpanthenol on testicular atrophy at 60th day following experimental testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Etensel, Barlas; Ozkisacik, Sezen; Ozkara, Esra; Serbest, Yeşim Aksu; Oztan, Onur; Yazici, Mesut; Gürsoy, Harun

    2007-03-01

    Despite the prompt diagnosis and treatment of testicular torsion (TT), there are problems with fertility and atrophy after testicular salvage. Dexpanthenol (Dxp) is the biologically active alcohol of pantothenic acid (PA). Dxp is converted to PA in tissues. PA increases the content of reduced glutathione (GSH), Coenzyme A and ATP synthesis in cells. GSH and glutathione-dependent peroxidases (GPX) are the major defense systems against oxidative stress. GPX-4 is the major antioxidant in testicular tissue. However, the activity of GPX-4 appeared and increased only after puberty. We investigated the effect of Dxp on testicular atrophy after TT at the 60th day. Rats were separated randomly into four groups. Group C: control group, group Td: torsion + detorsion, group Sal: torsion + saline + detorsion, group Dxp: torsion + Dxp + detorsion. The left testis was rotated 720 degrees for 2 h. In group Sal, normal saline and in group Dxp, Dexpanthenol were injected intraperitonally, 30 min before detorsion. After 60 days, the testicular weights and volumes were measured. Histopathology of the left testis was evaluated with mean seminiferous tubular diameter (MSTD) and mean testicular biopsy score (MTBS). The left (torsed) testicular weight and volume of groups Td and Sal were significantly lower compared to group Dxp. The MSTD and MTBS of group Td and Sal were significantly lower than group Dxp. Contralateral testicular weight and volume of groups Td, Sal and Dxp had no significant difference compared to the control group. Dxp significantly prevented testicular atrophy after 60 days of TT. Dxp has FDA approval, is safe, cost effective and readily available. Its relevance for clinical trials may especially be for the problem of testicular atrophy catastrophe, seen very frequently following testicular salvage. PMID:17205291

  4. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression. PMID:25429295

  5. Genetic diversity of the conserved motifs of six bacterial leaf blight resistance genes in a set of rice landraces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) caused by the vascular pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most serious diseases leading to crop failure in rice growing countries. A total of 37 resistance genes against Xoo has been identified in rice. Of these, ten BLB resistance genes have been mapped on rice chromosomes, while 6 have been cloned, sequenced and characterized. Diversity analysis at the resistance gene level of this disease is scanty, and the landraces from West Bengal and North Eastern states of India have received little attention so far. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity at conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes in a set of 22 rice accessions including landraces and check genotypes collected from the states of Assam, Nagaland, Mizoram and West Bengal. Results In this study 34 pairs of primers were designed from conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes; Xa1, xa5, Xa21, Xa21(A1), Xa26 and Xa27. The designed primer pairs were used to generate PCR based polymorphic DNA profiles to detect and elucidate the genetic diversity of the six genes in the 22 diverse rice accessions of known disease phenotype. A total of 140 alleles were identified including 41 rare and 26 null alleles. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) value was 0.56/primer pair. The DNA profiles identified each of the rice landraces unequivocally. The amplified polymorphic DNA bands were used to calculate genetic similarity of the rice landraces in all possible pair combinations. The similarity among the rice accessions ranged from 18% to 89% and the dendrogram produced from the similarity values was divided into 2 major clusters. The conserved domains identified within the sequenced rare alleles include Leucine-Rich Repeat, BED-type zinc finger domain, sugar transferase domain and the domain of the carbohydrate esterase 4 superfamily. Conclusions This study revealed high genetic diversity at conserved domains of six BLB

  6. Conservation and expression of PIWI-interacting RNA pathway genes in male and female adult gonad of amniotes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shu Ly; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Kortschak, R Daniel; Jacob, Reuben; Ricciardelli, Carmela; Oehler, Martin K; Grützner, Frank

    2013-12-01

    The PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is essential for germline development and transposable element repression. Key elements of this pathway are members of the piRNA-binding PIWI/Argonaute protein family and associated factors (e.g., VASA, MAELSTROM, and TUDOR domain proteins). PIWI-interacting RNAs have been identified in mouse testis and oocytes, but information about the expression of the different piRNA pathway genes, in particular in the mammalian ovary, remains incomplete. We investigated the evolution and expression of piRNA pathway genes in gonads of amniote species (chicken, platypus, and mouse). Database searches confirm a high level of conservation and revealed lineage-specific gain and loss of Piwi genes in vertebrates. Expression analysis in mammals shows that orthologs of Piwi-like (Piwil) genes, Mael (Maelstrom), Mvh (mouse vasa homolog), and Tdrd1 (Tudor domain-containing protein 1) are expressed in platypus adult testis. In contrast to mouse, Piwil4 is expressed in platypus and human adult testis. We found evidence for Mael and Piwil2 expression in mouse Sertoli cells. Importantly, we show mRNA expression of Piwil2, Piwil4, and Mael in oocytes and supporting cells of human, mouse, and platypus ovary. We found no Piwil1 expression in mouse and chicken ovary. The conservation of gene expression in somatic parts of the gonad and germ cells of species that diverged over 800 million yr ago indicates an important role in adult male and female gonad. PMID:24108303

  7. Involvement of Fibroblast Growth Factors and Their Receptors in Epididymo-Testicular Descent and Maldescent

    PubMed Central

    Hadziselimovic, Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Maldescent of the epididymo-testicular unit can occur as an isolated event or as a component of various syndromes. When part of a syndrome, crypto-epididymis is usually accompanied by other genital and/or extragenital features. Epididymis development is primarily regulated by androgens, and successful epididymo-testicular unit development and descent requires an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The developing gonadotropin-releasing hormone system is essential for epididymo-testicular descent and is highly sensitive to reduced fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Our understanding of the impact of FGFR1 in the process of epididymo-testicular descent has recently improved. At later stages of embryonic development, the undifferentiated epididymal mesenchyme is a specific domain for FGFR1 expression. The majority of individuals with syndromic crypto-epididymis, as well as individuals with isolated maldescent of the epididymo-testicular unit, exhibit some disturbance of FGF, FGFR1 and/or genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation. However, the mechanisms underlying FGF dysregulation may differ between various syndromes. PMID:27022326

  8. Involvement of Fibroblast Growth Factors and Their Receptors in Epididymo-Testicular Descent and Maldescent.

    PubMed

    Hadziselimovic, Faruk

    2016-02-01

    Maldescent of the epididymo-testicular unit can occur as an isolated event or as a component of various syndromes. When part of a syndrome, crypto-epididymis is usually accompanied by other genital and/or extragenital features. Epididymis development is primarily regulated by androgens, and successful epididymo-testicular unit development and descent requires an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The developing gonadotropin-releasing hormone system is essential for epididymo-testicular descent and is highly sensitive to reduced fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Our understanding of the impact of FGFR1 in the process of epididymo-testicular descent has recently improved. At later stages of embryonic development, the undifferentiated epididymal mesenchyme is a specific domain for FGFR1 expression. The majority of individuals with syndromic crypto-epididymis, as well as individuals with isolated maldescent of the epididymo-testicular unit, exhibit some disturbance of FGF, FGFR1 and/or genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation. However, the mechanisms underlying FGF dysregulation may differ between various syndromes.

  9. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  10. Systematic analysis of maize class III peroxidase gene family reveals a conserved subfamily involved in abiotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Qianqian; Zhao, Yang; Han, Guomin; Zhu, Suwen

    2015-07-15

    Class III peroxidases (PRXs) are plant-specific enzymes that play key roles in the responses to biotic and abiotic stress during plant growth and development. In this study, we identified 119 nonredundant PRX genes (designated ZmPRXs). These PRX genes were divided into 18 groups based on their phylogenetic relationships. We performed systematic bioinformatics analysis of the PRX genes, including analysis of gene structures, conserved motifs, phylogenetic relationships and gene expression profiles. The ZmPRXs are unevenly distributed on the 10 maize chromosomes. In addition, these genes have undergone 16 segmental duplication and 12 tandem duplication events, indicating that both segmental and tandem duplication were the main contributors to the expansion of the maize PRX family. Ka/Ks analysis suggested that most duplicated ZmPRXs experienced purifying selection, with limited functional divergence during the duplication events, and comparative analysis among maize, sorghum and rice revealed that there were independent duplication events besides the whole-genome duplication of the maize genome. Furthermore, microarray analysis indicated that most highly expressed genes might play significant roles in root. We examined the expression of five candidate ZmPRXs under H2O2, SA, NaCl and PEG stress conditions using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), revealing differential expression patterns. This study provides useful information for further functional analysis of the PRX gene family in maize.

  11. Comparative Mitogenomics of the Genus Odontobutis (Perciformes: Gobioidei: Odontobutidae) Revealed Conserved Gene Rearrangement and High Sequence Variations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhihong; Yang, Xuefen; Bercsenyi, Miklos; Wu, Junjie; Yu, Yongyao; Wei, Kaijian; Fan, Qixue; Yang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular evolution of mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) in the genus Odontobutis, the mitogenome of Odontobutis yaluensis was sequenced and compared with those of another four Odontobutis species. Our results displayed similar mitogenome features among species in genome organization, base composition, codon usage, and gene rearrangement. The identical gene rearrangement of trnS-trnL-trnH tRNA cluster observed in mitogenomes of these five closely related freshwater sleepers suggests that this unique gene order is conserved within Odontobutis. Additionally, the present gene order and the positions of associated intergenic spacers of these Odontobutis mitogenomes indicate that this unusual gene rearrangement results from tandem duplication and random loss of large-scale gene regions. Moreover, these mitogenomes exhibit a high level of sequence variation, mainly due to the differences of corresponding intergenic sequences in gene rearrangement regions and the heterogeneity of tandem repeats in the control regions. Phylogenetic analyses support Odontobutis species with shared gene rearrangement forming a monophyletic group, and the interspecific phylogenetic relationships are associated with structural differences among their mitogenomes. The present study contributes to understanding the evolutionary patterns of Odontobutidae species. PMID:26492246

  12. Cetuximab intensifies cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Levi, Mattan; Popovtzer, Aron; Tzabari, Moran; Mizrachi, Aviram; Savion, Naphtali; Stemmer, Salomon M; Shalgi, Ruth; Ben-Aharon, Irit

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has proliferative properties in the testis. Cetuximab, an anti-EGFR, is administered together with chemotherapy to patients with various types of cancer. This studies aim was to investigate the effect of cetuximab on testicular function. Adult male mice were injected with cetuximab (10 mg/kg), cisplatin (8 mg/kg) or a combination of both, and killed one week or one month later. The doses were chosen by human equivalent dose calculation. Testicular function was evaluated by epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count and sperm motility, weights of testes and epididymides, and the level of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in the serum. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine germ cell proliferation (Ki-67), apoptosis (Terminal transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphosphate nick-end labelling), reserve (DAZL-Deleted in azoospermia-like, Promyelocytic leukaemia zinc-finger), blood vessels (CD34) and Sertoli cells (GATA-4). Administration of cetuximab alone increased testicular apoptosis and decreased epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count over time. When added to cisplatin, cetuximab exacerbated most of the recorded testicular parameters, compared with the effect of cisplatin alone, including testis and epididymis weights, epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count, AMH concentration, meiosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, cetuximab has only a mild effect on testicular reserve, but when added to cisplatin, it exacerbates cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:27184186

  13. Testicular feminization syndrome in a mare.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, B G; Freeman, D A; Grant, B D; Kennedy, P; Whitlatch, L; MacRae, K

    1992-06-01

    Testicular feminization syndrome was diagnosed in a mare with aggressive, stallion like behavior and a history of infertility. She was found to have a high baseline testosterone concentration suggesting that testicular tissue was present, and ovarian-like structures examined by use of transrectal ultrasonography had the appearance typical of testicular tissue. Although her external female genitalia appeared normal, her vagina ended in a blind sac, and no cervix or uterus were identified. Surgery was performed, and structures removed from the abdominal cavity were determined to be hypoplastic testicles. Removal of the testicular tissue resulted in complete resolution of her aggressive behavior. Chromosomal evaluation revealed that the mare had 64X,Y (normal male) karyotype. Testicular feminization syndrome is a condition characterized by insensitivity of reproductive tissues to androgens during development because of an abnormality in androgen receptors. This androgen insensitivity results in development of normal external female genitalia, with high testosterone concentrations being released from developing testicles. Testicular feminization syndrome has not been commonly diagnosed in horses, but should be considered as a differential diagnosis for overly aggressive mares with a history of infertility. PMID:1624347

  14. Dexrazoxane exacerbates doxorubicin-induced testicular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Levi, Mattan; Tzabari, Moran; Savion, Naphtali; Stemmer, Salomon M; Shalgi, Ruth; Ben-Aharon, Irit

    2015-10-01

    Infertility induced by anti-cancer treatments pose a major concern for cancer survivors. Doxorubicin (DXR) has been previously shown to exert toxic effects on the testicular germinal epithelium. Based upon the cardioprotective traits of dexrazoxane (DEX), we studied its potential effect in reducing DXR-induced testicular toxicity. Male mice were injected with 5  mg/kg DXR, 100  mg/kg DEX, combination of both or saline (control) and sacrificed either 1, 3 or 6 months later. Testes were excised and further processed. Glutathione and apoptosis assays were performed to determine oxidative stress. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to study the effects of the drugs on testicular histology and on spermatogonial reserve. DXR and the combined treatment induced a striking decline in testicular weight. DEX prevented DXR-induced oxidative stress, but enhanced DXR-induced apoptosis within the testes. Furthermore, the combined treatment depleted the spermatogonial reserve after 1 month, with impaired recovery at 3 and 6 months post-treatment. This resulted in compromised sperm parameters, testicular and epididymal weights as well as significantly reduced sperm motility, all of which were more severe than those observed in DXR-treated mice. The activity of DEX in the testis may differ from its activity in cardiomyocytes. Adding DEX to DXR exacerbates DXR-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:26329125

  15. Multiple Conserved Heteroplasmic Sites in tRNA Genes in the Mitochondrial Genomes of Terrestrial Isopods (Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Badawi, Myriam; Moumen, Bouziane; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome structure and organization are relatively conserved among metazoans. However, in many isopods, especially the terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the mitochondrial genome consists of both ∼14-kb linear monomers and ∼28-kb circular dimers. This unusual organization is associated with an ancient and conserved constitutive heteroplasmic site. This heteroplasmy affects the anticodon of a tRNA gene, allowing this single locus to function as a “dual” tRNA gene for two different amino acids. Here, we further explore the evolution of these unusual mitochondrial genomes by assembling complete mitochondrial sequences for two additional Oniscidean species, Trachelipus rathkei and Cylisticus convexus. Strikingly, we find evidence of two additional heteroplasmic sites that also alter tRNA anticodons, creating additional dual tRNA genes, and that are conserved across both species. These results suggest that the unique linear/circular organization of isopods’ mitochondrial genomes may facilitate the evolution of stable mitochondrial heteroplasmies, and, conversely, once such heteroplasmies have evolved, they constrain the multimeric structure of the mitochondrial genome in these species. Finally, we outline some possible future research directions to identify the factors influencing mitochondrial genome evolution in this group. PMID:25911226

  16. Multiple Conserved Heteroplasmic Sites in tRNA Genes in the Mitochondrial Genomes of Terrestrial Isopods (Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher H; Badawi, Myriam; Moumen, Bouziane; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2015-04-24

    Mitochondrial genome structure and organization are relatively conserved among metazoans. However, in many isopods, especially the terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the mitochondrial genome consists of both ∼14-kb linear monomers and ∼28-kb circular dimers. This unusual organization is associated with an ancient and conserved constitutive heteroplasmic site. This heteroplasmy affects the anticodon of a tRNA gene, allowing this single locus to function as a "dual" tRNA gene for two different amino acids. Here, we further explore the evolution of these unusual mitochondrial genomes by assembling complete mitochondrial sequences for two additional Oniscidean species, Trachelipus rathkei and Cylisticus convexus. Strikingly, we find evidence of two additional heteroplasmic sites that also alter tRNA anticodons, creating additional dual tRNA genes, and that are conserved across both species. These results suggest that the unique linear/circular organization of isopods' mitochondrial genomes may facilitate the evolution of stable mitochondrial heteroplasmies, and, conversely, once such heteroplasmies have evolved, they constrain the multimeric structure of the mitochondrial genome in these species. Finally, we outline some possible future research directions to identify the factors influencing mitochondrial genome evolution in this group.

  17. Molecular evolution of the insect Halloween family of cytochrome P450s: phylogeny, gene organization and functional conservation.

    PubMed

    Rewitz, Kim F; O'Connor, Michael B; Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2007-08-01

    The insect molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), is a major modulator of the developmental processes resulting in molting and metamorphosis. During evolution selective forces have preserved the Halloween genes encoding cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes that mediate the biosynthesis of 20E. In the present study, we examine the phylogenetic relationships of these P450 genes in holometabolous insects belonging to the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. The analyzed insect genomes each contains single orthologs of Phantom (CYP306A1), Disembodied (CYP302A1), Shadow (CYP315A1) and Shade (CYP314A1), the terminal hydroxylases. In Drosophila melanogaster, the Halloween gene spook (Cyp307a1) is required for the biosynthesis of 20E, although a function has not yet been identified. Unlike the other Halloween genes, the ancestor of this gene evolved into three paralogs, all in the CYP307 family, through gene duplication. The genomic stability of these paralogs varies among species. Intron-exon structures indicate that D. melanogaster Cyp307a1 is a mRNA-derived paralog of spookier (Cyp307a2), which is the ancestral gene and the closest ortholog of the coleopteran, lepidopteran and mosquito CYP307A subfamily genes. Evolutionary links between the insect Halloween genes and vertebrate steroidogenic P450s suggest that they originated from common ancestors, perhaps destined for steroidogenesis, before the deuterostome-arthropod split. Conservation of putative substrate recognition sites of orthologous Halloween genes indicates selective constraint on these residues to prevent functional divergence. The results suggest that duplications of ancestral P450 genes that acquired novel functions may have been an important mechanism for evolving the ecdysteroidogenic pathway. PMID:17628274

  18. Molecular evolution of the insect Halloween family of cytochrome P450s: phylogeny, gene organization and functional conservation.

    PubMed

    Rewitz, Kim F; O'Connor, Michael B; Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2007-08-01

    The insect molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), is a major modulator of the developmental processes resulting in molting and metamorphosis. During evolution selective forces have preserved the Halloween genes encoding cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes that mediate the biosynthesis of 20E. In the present study, we examine the phylogenetic relationships of these P450 genes in holometabolous insects belonging to the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. The analyzed insect genomes each contains single orthologs of Phantom (CYP306A1), Disembodied (CYP302A1), Shadow (CYP315A1) and Shade (CYP314A1), the terminal hydroxylases. In Drosophila melanogaster, the Halloween gene spook (Cyp307a1) is required for the biosynthesis of 20E, although a function has not yet been identified. Unlike the other Halloween genes, the ancestor of this gene evolved into three paralogs, all in the CYP307 family, through gene duplication. The genomic stability of these paralogs varies among species. Intron-exon structures indicate that D. melanogaster Cyp307a1 is a mRNA-derived paralog of spookier (Cyp307a2), which is the ancestral gene and the closest ortholog of the coleopteran, lepidopteran and mosquito CYP307A subfamily genes. Evolutionary links between the insect Halloween genes and vertebrate steroidogenic P450s suggest that they originated from common ancestors, perhaps destined for steroidogenesis, before the deuterostome-arthropod split. Conservation of putative substrate recognition sites of orthologous Halloween genes indicates selective constraint on these residues to prevent functional divergence. The results suggest that duplications of ancestral P450 genes that acquired novel functions may have been an important mechanism for evolving the ecdysteroidogenic pathway.

  19. INSL3/RXFP2 signaling in testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu; Ferlin, Alberto; Truong, Anne; Bathgate, Ross; Wade, John D; Corbett, Sean; Han, Shuo; Tannour-Louet, Mounia; Lamb, Dolores J; Foresta, Carlo; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2009-04-01

    Mutations of the insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) hormone or its receptor, RXFP2, cause intraabdominal cryptorchidism in male mice. Specific RXFP2 expression in mouse gubernacula was detected at embryonic day 14.5 and markedly increased after birth in the developing cremaster muscle, as well as in the epididymis and testicular Leydig and germ cells. INSL3 treatment stimulated cell proliferation of embryonic gubernacular and Leydig cells, implicating active INSL3-mediated signaling. The transcription factor SOX9, a known male sex determination factor, upregulated the activity of the RXFP2 promoter. INSL3 is sufficient to direct the first transabdominal phase of testicular descent in the absence of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis signaling or Hoxa10, although these factors are important for inguinoscrotal testicular descent. Similarly, conditional ablation of the androgen receptor gene in gubernacular cells resulted in disruption of inguinoscrotal descent. We performed mutation screening of INSL3 and RXFP2 in human patients with cryptorchidism and control subjects from different populations in Europe and the USA. Several missense mutations were described in both the INSL3 and RXFP2 genes. A novel V39G INSL3 mutation in a patient with cryptorchidism was identified; however, the functional analysis of the mutant peptide did not reveal compromised function. In more than 2000 patients and controls analyzed to date, the T222P RXFP2 mutation is the only one strongly associated with the mutant phenotype. The T222P mutant receptor, when transfected into 293T cells, had severely decreased cell membrane expression, providing the basis for the functional deficiency of this mutation.

  20. Transcriptional co-regulation of evolutionarily conserved microRNA/cone opsin gene pairs: implications for photoreceptor subtype specification.

    PubMed

    Daido, Yutaka; Hamanishi, Sakurako; Kusakabe, Takehiro G

    2014-08-01

    The vertebrate retina contains two types of photoreceptor cells, rods and cones, which use distinct types of opsins and phototransduction proteins. Cones can be further divided into several subtypes with differing wavelength sensitivity and morphology. Although photoreceptor development has been extensively studied in a variety of vertebrate species, the mechanism by which photoreceptor subtypes are established is still largely unknown. Here we report two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-726 and miR-729, which are potentially involved in photoreceptor subtype specification. In the medaka Oryzias latipes, the genes encoding miR-726 and miR-729 are located upstream of the red-sensitive opsin gene LWS-A and the UV-sensitive opsin gene SWS1, respectively, and are transcribed in the opposite direction from the respective opsin genes. The miR-726/LWS pair is conserved between teleosts and tetrapods, and the miR-729/SWS1 pair is conserved among teleosts. in situ hybridization analyses and fluorescence reporter assays suggest that these miRNAs are co-expressed with the respective opsins in specific cone subtypes. Potential targets of miR-726 and miR-729 predicted in silico include several transcription factors that regulate photoreceptor development. Functional analyses of cis-regulatory sequences in vivo suggest that transcription of the paired microRNA and opsin genes is co-regulated by common cis-regulatory modules. We propose an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that controls photoreceptor subtype identity through coupling between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations.

  1. Rye Pm8 and wheat Pm3 are orthologous genes and show evolutionary conservation of resistance function against powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Hurni, Severine; Brunner, Susanne; Buchmann, Gabriele; Herren, Gerhard; Jordan, Tina; Krukowski, Patricia; Wicker, Thomas; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Mago, Rohit; Keller, Beat

    2013-12-01

    The improvement of wheat through breeding has relied strongly on the use of genetic material from related wild and domesticated grass species. The 1RS chromosome arm from rye was introgressed into wheat and crossed into many wheat lines, as it improves yield and fungal disease resistance. Pm8 is a powdery mildew resistance gene on 1RS which, after widespread agricultural cultivation, is now widely overcome by adapted mildew races. Here we show by homology-based cloning and subsequent physical and genetic mapping that Pm8 is the rye orthologue of the Pm3 allelic series of mildew resistance genes in wheat. The cloned gene was functionally validated as Pm8 by transient, single-cell expression analysis and stable transformation. Sequence analysis revealed a complex mosaic of ancient haplotypes among Pm3- and Pm8-like genes from different members of the Triticeae. These results show that the two genes have evolved independently after the divergence of the species 7.5 million years ago and kept their function in mildew resistance. During this long time span the co-evolving pathogens have not overcome these genes, which is in strong contrast to the breakdown of Pm8 resistance since its introduction into commercial wheat 70 years ago. Sequence comparison revealed that evolutionary pressure acted on the same subdomains and sequence features of the two orthologous genes. This suggests that they recognize directly or indirectly the same pathogen effectors that have been conserved in the powdery mildews of wheat and rye.

  2. Inutero exposure to diisononyl phthalate caused testicular dysgenesis of rat fetal testis.

    PubMed

    Li, Linxi; Bu, Tiao; Su, Huina; Chen, Zhichuan; Liang, Yuyuan; Zhang, Gaolong; Zhu, Danyan; Shan, Yuanyuan; Xu, Renai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Li, Junwei; Hu, Guoxin; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2015-01-22

    Diisononyl phthalate (DINP) is a synthetic material that has been widely used as a substitute for other plasticizers prohibited due to reproductive toxicity in consumer products. Some phthalates have been associated with testicular dysgenesis syndrome in male fetus when female pregnant dams were exposed to them. The present study investigated effects of DINP on fetal Leydig cell function and testis development. Female pregnant Sprague Dawley rats received control vehicle (corn oil) or DINP (10, 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) by oral gavage from gestational day (GD) 12 to 21. At GD 21.5, testicular testosterone production, fetal Leydig cell numbers and distribution, testicular gene and protein expression levels were examined. DINP showed dose-dependent increase of fetal Leydig cell aggregation with the low observed adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of 10 mg/kg and multinucleated gonocyte with LOAEL of 100 mg/kg. At 10 mg/kg, DINP also significantly increased fetal Leydig cell size, but inhibited insulin-like 3 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression and protein levels. DINP inhibited testicular testosterone levels at 1000 mg/kg. The results indicate that in utero exposure to DINP affects the expression levels of some fetal Leydig cell steroidogenic genes, gonocyte multinucleation and Leydig cell aggregation. PMID:25445723

  3. Cimetidine disrupts the renewal of testicular cells and the steroidogenesis in a hermaphrodite fish.

    PubMed

    García-García, María; Liarte, Sergio; Gómez-González, Nuria E; García-Alcázar, Alicia; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Chaves-Pozo, Elena

    2016-11-01

    The importance of histamine in the physiology of the testis in mammals and reptiles has been recently shown. Histamine receptors (Hrs) are well conserved in fish and are functional in several fish species. We report here for the first time that histamine and the mRNA of Hrh1, Hrh2 and Hrh3 are all present in the gonad of the hermaphrodite teleost fish gilthead seabream. Moreover, cimetidine, which acts in vitro as an agonist of Hrh1 and Hrh2 on this species, was intraperitoneally injected in one and two years old gilthead seabream males. After three and five days of cimetidine injection, we found that this compound differently modified the gonadal hrs transcript levels and affects the testicular cell renewal and the gene expression of steroidogenesis-related molecules as well as the serum steroid levels. Our data point to cimetidine as a reproductive disruptor and elucidate a role for histamine in the gonad of this hermaphrodite fish species through Hr signalling. PMID:27475025

  4. K+ current diversity is produced by an extended gene family conserved in Drosophila and mouse.

    PubMed

    Wei, A; Covarrubias, M; Butler, A; Baker, K; Pak, M; Salkoff, L

    1990-05-01

    The Drosophila Shaker gene on the X chromosome has three sister genes, Shal, Shab, and Shaw, which map to the second and third chromosomes. This extended gene family encodes voltage-gated potassium channels with widely varying kinetics (rate of macroscopic current activation and inactivation) and voltage sensitivity of steady-state inactivation. The differences in the currents of the various gene products are greater than the differences produced by alternative splicing of the Shaker gene. In Drosophila, the transient (A current) subtype of the potassium channel (Shaker and Shal) and the delayed-rectifier subtype (Shab and Shaw) are encoded by homologous genes, and there is more than one gene for each subtype of channel. Homologs of Shaker, Shal, Shab, and Shaw are present in mammals; each Drosophila potassium-channel gene may be represented as a multigene subfamily in mammals.

  5. Plastid-LCGbase: a collection of evolutionarily conserved plastid-associated gene pairs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dapeng; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Plastids carry their own genetic material that encodes a variable set of genes that are limited in number but functionally important. Aside from orthology, the lineage-specific order and orientation of these genes are also relevant. Here, we develop a database, Plastid-LCGbase (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/plastid-LCGbase/), which focuses on organizational variability of plastid genes and genomes from diverse taxonomic groups. The current Plastid-LCGbase contains information from 470 plastid genomes and exhibits several unique features. First, through a genome-overview page generated from OrganellarGenomeDRAW, it displays general arrangement of all plastid genes (circular or linear). Second, it shows patterns and modes of all paired plastid genes and their physical distances across user-defined lineages, which are facilitated by a step-wise stratification of taxonomic groups. Third, it divides the paired genes into three categories (co-directionally-paired genes or CDPGs, convergently-paired genes or CPGs and divergently-paired genes or DPGs) and three patterns (separation, overlap and inclusion) and provides basic statistics for each species. Fourth, the gene pairing scheme is expandable, where neighboring genes can also be included in species-/lineage-specific comparisons. We hope that Plastid-LCGbase facilitates gene variation (insertion-deletion, translocation and rearrangement) and transcription-level studies of plastid genomes. PMID:25378306

  6. Plastid-LCGbase: a collection of evolutionarily conserved plastid-associated gene pairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Plastids carry their own genetic material that encodes a variable set of genes that are limited in number but functionally important. Aside from orthology, the lineage-specific order and orientation of these genes are also relevant. Here, we develop a database, Plastid-LCGbase (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/plastid-LCGbase/), which focuses on organizational variability of plastid genes and genomes from diverse taxonomic groups. The current Plastid-LCGbase contains information from 470 plastid genomes and exhibits several unique features. First, through a genome-overview page generated from OrganellarGenomeDRAW, it displays general arrangement of all plastid genes (circular or linear). Second, it shows patterns and modes of all paired plastid genes and their physical distances across user-defined lineages, which are facilitated by a step-wise stratification of taxonomic groups. Third, it divides the paired genes into three categories (co-directionally-paired genes or CDPGs, convergently-paired genes or CPGs and divergently-paired genes or DPGs) and three patterns (separation, overlap and inclusion) and provides basic statistics for each species. Fourth, the gene pairing scheme is expandable, where neighboring genes can also be included in species-/lineage-specific comparisons. We hope that Plastid-LCGbase facilitates gene variation (insertion-deletion, translocation and rearrangement) and transcription-level studies of plastid genomes. PMID:25378306

  7. Genetics Home Reference: 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sex development 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Close All Description 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development is a condition in which individuals with ...

  8. Conserved interactions of a compact highly active enhancer/promoter upstream of the rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) gene.

    PubMed

    Young, Joyce E; Kasperek, Eileen M; Vogt, Todd M; Lis, Agnieszka; Khani, Shahrokh C

    2007-08-01

    Rhodopsin kinase (RK) is a conserved component of the light adaptation and recovery pathways shared among rod and cone photoreceptors of a variety of species. To gain insight into transcriptional mechanisms driving RK and potentially other genes of similar spatial profile, the components and the interactions of the highly compact enhancer/promoter region (E/P) upstream of the human RK gene were examined. Cross-species comparison outlined an active 49-bp widely shared E/P core as the major site of conservation in the entire 5' flanking sequence. The area consisted of a bicoid-type homeodomain recognition cassette and a unique T-rich module interacting with TATA-binding proteins. Homeodomain interactions involved primarily Crx and secondarily Otx2. Both strongly stimulated the E/P. In the absence of Crx, persistent E/P activity shifted from the outer retina to the inner to follow the Otx2 pattern. The spatial patterns were largely unaffected by the absence of rod transcription factors, Nrl and Nr2e3, and the RK transcriptional activity preceded the surge in rod-specific transcription. Conserved bicoid homeodomain factors thus appear to be the key factors governing localization of RK E/P activity in retina and photoreceptors.

  9. The gp63 Gene Cluster Is Highly Polymorphic in Natural Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Populations, but Functional Sites Are Conserved.

    PubMed

    Medina, Lilian S; Souza, Bruno Araújo; Queiroz, Adriano; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Lima Machado, Paulo Roberto; M Carvalho, Edgar; Wilson, Mary Edythe; Schriefer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    GP63 or leishmanolysin is the major surface protease of Leishmania spp. involved in parasite virulence and host cell interaction. As such, GP63 is a potential target of eventual vaccines against these protozoa. In the current study we evaluate the polymorphism of gp63 in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis isolated from two sets of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) cases from Corte de Pedra, Brazil, including 35 cases diagnosed between 1994 and 2001 and 6 cases diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Parasites were obtained from lesions by needle aspiration and cultivation. Genomic DNA was extracted, and 405 bp fragments, including sequences encoding the putative macrophage interacting sites, were amplified from gp63 genes of all isolates. DNA amplicons were cloned into plasmid vectors and ten clones per L. (V.) braziliensis isolate were sequenced. Alignment of cloned sequences showed extensive polymorphism among gp63 genes within, and between parasite isolates. Overall, 45 different polymorphic alleles were detected in all samples, which could be segregated into two clusters. Cluster one included 25, and cluster two included 20 such genotypes. The predicted peptides showed overall conservation below 50%. In marked contrast, the conservation at segments with putative functional domains approached 90% (Fisher's exact test p<0.0001). These findings show that gp63 is very polymorphic even among parasites from a same endemic focus, but the functional domains interacting with the mammalian host environment are conserved.

  10. The gp63 Gene Cluster Is Highly Polymorphic in Natural Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Populations, but Functional Sites Are Conserved

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Lilian S.; Souza, Bruno Araújo; Queiroz, Adriano; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Lima Machado, Paulo Roberto; M Carvalho, Edgar; Wilson, Mary Edythe; Schriefer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    GP63 or leishmanolysin is the major surface protease of Leishmania spp. involved in parasite virulence and host cell interaction. As such, GP63 is a potential target of eventual vaccines against these protozoa. In the current study we evaluate the polymorphism of gp63 in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis isolated from two sets of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) cases from Corte de Pedra, Brazil, including 35 cases diagnosed between 1994 and 2001 and 6 cases diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Parasites were obtained from lesions by needle aspiration and cultivation. Genomic DNA was extracted, and 405 bp fragments, including sequences encoding the putative macrophage interacting sites, were amplified from gp63 genes of all isolates. DNA amplicons were cloned into plasmid vectors and ten clones per L. (V.) braziliensis isolate were sequenced. Alignment of cloned sequences showed extensive polymorphism among gp63 genes within, and between parasite isolates. Overall, 45 different polymorphic alleles were detected in all samples, which could be segregated into two clusters. Cluster one included 25, and cluster two included 20 such genotypes. The predicted peptides showed overall conservation below 50%. In marked contrast, the conservation at segments with putative functional domains approached 90% (Fisher’s exact test p<0.0001). These findings show that gp63 is very polymorphic even among parasites from a same endemic focus, but the functional domains interacting with the mammalian host environment are conserved. PMID:27648939

  11. The gp63 Gene Cluster Is Highly Polymorphic in Natural Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Populations, but Functional Sites Are Conserved.

    PubMed

    Medina, Lilian S; Souza, Bruno Araújo; Queiroz, Adriano; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Lima Machado, Paulo Roberto; M Carvalho, Edgar; Wilson, Mary Edythe; Schriefer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    GP63 or leishmanolysin is the major surface protease of Leishmania spp. involved in parasite virulence and host cell interaction. As such, GP63 is a potential target of eventual vaccines against these protozoa. In the current study we evaluate the polymorphism of gp63 in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis isolated from two sets of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) cases from Corte de Pedra, Brazil, including 35 cases diagnosed between 1994 and 2001 and 6 cases diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Parasites were obtained from lesions by needle aspiration and cultivation. Genomic DNA was extracted, and 405 bp fragments, including sequences encoding the putative macrophage interacting sites, were amplified from gp63 genes of all isolates. DNA amplicons were cloned into plasmid vectors and ten clones per L. (V.) braziliensis isolate were sequenced. Alignment of cloned sequences showed extensive polymorphism among gp63 genes within, and between parasite isolates. Overall, 45 different polymorphic alleles were detected in all samples, which could be segregated into two clusters. Cluster one included 25, and cluster two included 20 such genotypes. The predicted peptides showed overall conservation below 50%. In marked contrast, the conservation at segments with putative functional domains approached 90% (Fisher's exact test p<0.0001). These findings show that gp63 is very polymorphic even among parasites from a same endemic focus, but the functional domains interacting with the mammalian host environment are conserved. PMID:27648939

  12. Localization of a highly conserved human potassium channel gene (NGK2-KV4-KCNC1) to chromosome 11p15

    SciTech Connect

    Ried, T.; Ward, D.C. ); Rudy, B.; Miera, V.S. de; Lau, D.; Sen, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Several genes (the Shaker or Sh gene family) encoding components of voltage-gated K[sub +] channels have been identified in various species. Based on sequence similarities Sh genes are classified into four groups or subfamilies. Mammalian genes of each one of these subfamilies also show high levels of sequence similarity to one of four related Drosophila genes: Shaker, Shab, Shaw, and Shal. Here we report the isolation of human cDNAs for a Shaw-related product (NGK2,KV2.1a) previously identified in rat and mice. A comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of NGK2 in rodents and humans shows that this product is highly conserved in mammals; the human NGK2 protein shows over 99% amino acid sequence identity to its rodent homologue. The gene (NGK2-KV4; KCNC1) encoding NGK2 was mapped to human chromosome 11p15 by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the human NGK2 cDNAs. 65 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Conservation of the organization of the mitochondrial nad3 and rps12 genes in evolutionarily distant angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, G; Regina, T M; Ceci, L R; Quagliariello, C

    1996-06-12

    The organization of the genes nad3 and rps12 has been investigated in the mitochondrial genome of two dicotyledonous plants - Helianthus and Magnolia - and one monocotyledonous plant (Allium). These plants all contain a complete rps12 gene downstream of the nad3 gene. This arrangement is thus highly conserved within angiosperms. The two genes are co-transcribed and the transcript is modified at several positions by RNA editing of the C to U-type, thus confirming that both genes encode functional proteins. Some 26, 35 and 27 editing events have been identified in the PCR-derived nad3-rps12 cDNA population from sunflower, Magnolia and onion, respectively. Editing of the nad3-rps12 transcript is thus more extensive in Magnolia than in the other angiosperms so far investigated and radically changes the genomically encoded polypeptide sequence. A novel species-specific codon modification was observed in Magnolia. Several homologous sites show differences in editing pattern among plant species. A C-to-U alteration is also found in the non-coding region separating the nad3 and rps12 genes in sunflower. The PCR-derived cDNA populations from the nad3-rps12 loci analysed were found to be differently edited. In addition the plant species show marked variations in the completeness of RNA editing, with only the Magnolia nad3 mRNA being edited fully. PMID:8676875

  14. FUS regulates genes coding for RNA-binding proteins in neurons by binding to their highly conserved introns

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Tadashi; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Maragkakis, Manolis; Chang, Alexandra; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2013-01-01

    Dominant mutations and mislocalization or aggregation of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS), an RNA-binding protein (RBP), cause neuronal degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD), two incurable neurological diseases. However, the function of FUS in neurons is not well understood. To uncover the impact of FUS in the neuronal transcriptome, we used high-throughput sequencing of immunoprecipitated and cross-linked RNA (HITS–CLIP) of FUS in human brains and mouse neurons differentiated from embryonic stem cells, coupled with RNA-seq and FUS knockdowns. We report conserved neuronal RNA targets and networks that are regulated by FUS. We find that FUS regulates splicing of genes coding for RBPs by binding to their highly conserved introns. Our findings have important implications for understanding the impact of FUS in neurodegenerative diseases and suggest that perturbations of FUS can impact the neuronal transcriptome via perturbations of RBP transcripts. PMID:23389473

  15. Pubertal cadmium exposure impairs testicular development and spermatogenesis via disrupting testicular testosterone synthesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-Li; Wang, Hua; Liu, Ping; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Xian-Feng; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Xu, De-Xiang

    2010-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a well-known testicular toxicant. However, the effects of pubertal Cd exposure on testicular development and spermatogenesis remained to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of pubertal Cd exposure on testicular development and spermatogenesis. Male CD-1 mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl(2) (1mg/kg) daily from postnatal day 35 (PND35) to PND70. As expected, pubertal Cd exposure significantly decreased the number of spermatozoa in epididymides. In addition, pubertal Cd exposure markedly reduced the weights of testes, epididymides and prostate and seminal vesicle in adult mice. A significant decrease in serum and testicular testosterone (T) was observed in mice exposed to Cd during puberty. Moreover, pubertal Cd exposure markedly reduced mRNA and protein levels of testicular StAR, P450scc, P450(17alpha) and 17beta-HSD. Taken together, these results suggest that the decreased testicular T synthesis might partially contribute to pubertal Cd-induced impairment on testicular development and spermatogenesis in mice. PMID:19897027

  16. Trehalose synthesis in Aspergillus niger: characterization of six homologous genes, all with conserved orthologs in related species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The disaccharide trehalose is a major component of fungal spores and is released upon germination. Moreover, the sugar is well known for is protective functions, e.g. against thermal stress and dehydration. The properties and synthesis of trehalose have been well investigated in the bakers’ yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In filamentous fungi, such knowledge is limited, although several gene products have been identified. Results Using Aspergillus niger as a model fungus, the aim of this study was to provide an overview of all genes involved in trehalose synthesis. This fungus has three potential trehalose-6-phosphate synthase encoding genes, tpsA-C, and three putative trehalose phosphate phosphatase encoding genes, tppA-C, of which two have not previously been identified. Expression of all six genes was confirmed using real-time PCR, and conserved orthologs could be identified in related Aspergilli. Using a two-hybrid approach, there is a strong indication that four of the proteins physically interact, as has previously been shown in S. cerevisiae. When creating null mutants of all the six genes, three of them, ΔtpsA, ΔtppA and ΔtppB, had lower internal trehalose contents. The only mutant with a pronounced morphological difference was ΔtppA, in which sporulation was severely reduced with abnormal conidiophores. This was also the only mutant with accumulated levels of trehalose-6-phosphate, indicating that the encoded protein is the main phosphatase under normal conditions. Besides ΔtppA, the most studied deletion mutant in this work was ΔtppB. This gene encodes a protein conserved in filamentous Ascomycota. The ΔtppB mutant displayed a low, but not depleted, internal trehalose content, and conidia were more susceptible to thermal stress. Conclusion A. niger contains at least 6 genes putatively involved in trehalose synthesis. Gene expressions related to germination have been quantified and deletion mutants characterized: Mutants lacking tps

  17. Production of live offspring from testicular tissue cryopreserved by vitrification procedures in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianan; Cheng, Kimberly M; Silversides, Frederick G

    2013-05-01

    Cryopreservation of testicular tissue can be used for ex situ conservation of male germplasm of avian species. The possibility of using vitrification and transplantation of testicular tissue for fertility preservation and recovery was tested in Japanese quail. Testes were removed from 1-wk-old Japanese quail; transfixed on acupuncture needles; equilibrated with dimethyl sulphoxide, ethylene glycol, and sucrose; plunged into liquid nitrogen; and stored in 2-ml straws. Cryopreserved tissue was warmed in sucrose solution at room temperature or at 40°C. Fresh and cryopreserved tissue were transplanted subcutaneously into castrated, 1-wk-old recipients. Twenty of 21 recipients survived the surgery, and 18 had viable transplants at maturity, with no difference in transplantation success between fresh and cryopreserved tissue. Fluid extrusion from 11 of the transplants was collected and inseminated surgically into the magnum of 22 quail hens, and 10 inseminations included foam from the proctodeal gland of the same recipients. Egg production in the 2 wk after insemination was reduced, and none of the hens inseminated with foam produced fertile eggs. Five hens inseminated without foam produced a total of eight live offspring; four of these hens had been inseminated with fluid extrusion from cryopreserved tissue. Histological examination showed spermatogenesis in the transplants, and the tubules, lumens, and epithelium of the seminiferous tubules were of comparable size to those of testicular tissue from intact males. These results demonstrate that testicular tissue of Japanese quail can be preserved using vitrification procedures and recovered through transplantation.

  18. Localization of a highly divergent mammalian testicular alpha tubulin that is not detectable in brain.

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, N B; Distel, R J; Yelick, P C; Tanhauser, S M; Driscoll, C E; Goldberg, E; Tung, K S

    1988-01-01

    Sequence analysis of a mouse testicular alpha-tubulin partial cDNA, pRD alpha TT1, reveals an isotype that differs from both the somatic and the predominant testicular alpha tubulins at approximately 30% of the 212 amino acid residues determined. Although this mouse testicular cDNA retains the highly conserved sequence, Glu-Gly-Glu-Glu, found in the carboxyl termini of many alpha tubulins, the protein extends substantially beyond this sequence and does not terminate with a C-terminal tyrosine. Using rabbit antiserum prepared to a novel synthetic peptide predicted from this mouse testis alpha-tubulin cDNA, we have have detected by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence an antigenic epitope present in testicular alpha tubulin that is not detectable in brain alpha tubulins. We find that the antiserum specifically binds to the manchettes and meiotic spindles of the mouse testis but not with neural fibers or tubulin extracts of the adult mouse brain. These results demonstrate that at least one of the multiple alpha-tubulin isotypes of the mammalian testis is expressed and used in male germ cells but not in the brain. Images PMID:3352610

  19. Testicular self-examination amongst genitourinary medicine clinic attendees.

    PubMed

    Kennett, Alexandra; Shaw, Jonathan W; Woolley, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    Advancements in the diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer now give a five-year survival rate of 97.2%. Delayed presentation remains the primary cause of poor outcome and recommendations have stressed that men, particularly those with risk factors, should undertake regular testicular self-examination. This study aimed to determine testicular self-examination knowledge and practices amongst 740 unselected men attending a genitourinary medicine clinic via questionnaire survey. Of respondents, 75.8% of men had heard of testicular cancer, and 79.9% had heard of testicular self-examination. Of these, 41% of men had been taught testicular self-examination; 73.9% of them by a doctor or nurse. Importantly, 79.2% had previously performed testicular self-examination. The most common reason for not performing testicular self-examination was 'Don't really know what to look for' (59.5%). Men previously taught testicular self-examination were 11.5 times more likely to perform the practice than those untaught. Of respondents, 74.1% wanted more information regarding testicular self-examination whilst attending the clinic. This study shows an increased level of testicular self-examination amongst genitourinary medicine attendees than has been previously demonstrated in other patient groups. There remains room for improvement via further health promotion and research on the effectiveness of testicular self-examination. PMID:24516080

  20. A Conserved Core of Programmed Cell Death Indicator Genes Discriminates Developmentally and Environmentally Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Van Bel, Michiel; Van Hautegem, Tom; Fendrych, Matyáš; Huysmans, Marlies; Simaskova, Maria; van Durme, Matthias; Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana; S Coll, Nuria; Coppens, Frederik; Maere, Steven; Nowack, Moritz K

    2015-12-01

    A plethora of diverse programmed cell death (PCD) processes has been described in living organisms. In animals and plants, different forms of PCD play crucial roles in development, immunity, and responses to the environment. While the molecular control of some animal PCD forms such as apoptosis is known in great detail, we still know comparatively little about the regulation of the diverse types of plant PCD. In part, this deficiency in molecular understanding is caused by the lack of reliable reporters to detect PCD processes. Here, we addressed this issue by using a combination of bioinformatics approaches to identify commonly regulated genes during diverse plant PCD processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the transcriptional signatures of developmentally controlled cell death are largely distinct from the ones associated with environmentally induced cell death. Moreover, different cases of developmental PCD share a set of cell death-associated genes. Most of these genes are evolutionary conserved within the green plant lineage, arguing for an evolutionary conserved core machinery of developmental PCD. Based on this information, we established an array of specific promoter-reporter lines for developmental PCD in Arabidopsis. These PCD indicators represent a powerful resource that can be used in addition to established morphological and biochemical methods to detect and analyze PCD processes in vivo and in planta.

  1. Conservation of the Low-shear Modeled Microgravity Response in Enterobacteriaceae and Analysis of the trp Genes in this Response.

    PubMed

    Soni, Anjali; O'Sullivan, Laura; Quick, Laura N; Ott, C Mark; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Wilson, James W

    2014-01-01

    Low fluid shear force, including that encountered in microgravity models, induces bacterial responses, but the range of bacteria capable of responding to this signal remains poorly characterized. We systematically analyzed a range of Gram negative Enterobacteriaceae for conservation of the low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) response using phenotypic assays, qPCR, and targeted mutations. Our results indicate LSMMG response conservation across Enterobacteriacae with potential variance in up- or down-regulation of a given response depending on genus. Based on the data, we analyzed the role of the trp operon genes and the TrpR regulator in the LSMMG response using targeted mutations in these genes in S. Typhimurium and E. coli. We found no alteration of the LSMMG response compared to WT in these mutant strains under the conditions tested here. To our knowledge, this study is first-of-kind for Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia, presents novel data for Escherichia, and provides the first analysis of trp genes in LSMMG responses. This impacts our understanding of how LSMMG affects bacteria and our ability to modify bacteria with this condition in the future. PMID:25006354

  2. Conservation of a vitellogenin gene cluster in oviparous vertebrates and identification of its traces in the platypus genome.

    PubMed

    Babin, Patrick J

    2008-04-30

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) derivatives are the main egg-yolk proteins in most oviparous animal species, and are, therefore, key players in reproduction and embryo development. Conserved synteny and phylogeny were used to identify a Vtg gene cluster (VGC) that had been evolutionarily conserved in most oviparous vertebrates, encompassing the three linked Vtgs on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome 8. Tandem arranged homologs to chicken VtgII and VtgIII were retrieved in similar locations in Xenopus (Xenopus tropicalis) and homologous transcribed inverted genes were found in medaka (Oryzias latipes), stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes), and Tetrahodon (Tetraodon nigroviridis), while zebrafish (Danio rerio) Vtg3 may represent a residual trace of VGC in this genome. Vtgs were not conserved in the paralogous chromosomal segment attributed to a whole-genome duplication event in the ancestor of teleosts, while tandem duplicated forms have survived the recent African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) tetraploidization. Orthologs to chicken VtgI were found in similar locations in teleost fish, as well as in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). Additional Vtg fragments found suggested that VGC had been conserved in this egg-laying mammal. A low ratio of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution values and the paucity of pseudogene features suggest functional platypus Vtg products. Genomic identification of Vtgs, Apob, and Mtp in this genome, together with maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses, support the existence of these three large lipid transfer protein superfamily members at the base of the mammalian lineage. In conclusion, the establishment of a VGC in the vertebrate lineage predates the divergence of ray-finned fish and tetrapods and the shift in reproductive and developmental strategy observed between prototherians and therians may be associated with its loss, as shown by its absence from the genomic resources currently

  3. Conservation of a vitellogenin gene cluster in oviparous vertebrates and identification of its traces in the platypus genome.

    PubMed

    Babin, Patrick J

    2008-04-30

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) derivatives are the main egg-yolk proteins in most oviparous animal species, and are, therefore, key players in reproduction and embryo development. Conserved synteny and phylogeny were used to identify a Vtg gene cluster (VGC) that had been evolutionarily conserved in most oviparous vertebrates, encompassing the three linked Vtgs on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome 8. Tandem arranged homologs to chicken VtgII and VtgIII were retrieved in similar locations in Xenopus (Xenopus tropicalis) and homologous transcribed inverted genes were found in medaka (Oryzias latipes), stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes), and Tetrahodon (Tetraodon nigroviridis), while zebrafish (Danio rerio) Vtg3 may represent a residual trace of VGC in this genome. Vtgs were not conserved in the paralogous chromosomal segment attributed to a whole-genome duplication event in the ancestor of teleosts, while tandem duplicated forms have survived the recent African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) tetraploidization. Orthologs to chicken VtgI were found in similar locations in teleost fish, as well as in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). Additional Vtg fragments found suggested that VGC had been conserved in this egg-laying mammal. A low ratio of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution values and the paucity of pseudogene features suggest functional platypus Vtg products. Genomic identification of Vtgs, Apob, and Mtp in this genome, together with maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses, support the existence of these three large lipid transfer protein superfamily members at the base of the mammalian lineage. In conclusion, the establishment of a VGC in the vertebrate lineage predates the divergence of ray-finned fish and tetrapods and the shift in reproductive and developmental strategy observed between prototherians and therians may be associated with its loss, as shown by its absence from the genomic resources currently

  4. Discovery of conserved motifs in promoters of orthologous genes in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Janky, Rekin's; van Helden, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to predict cis-acting elements for a given gene by detecting over-represented motifs in promoters of a set of ortholo gous genes in prokaryotes (single-gene, multiple-genomes approach). The method has been used successfully to detect regulatory elements at various taxonomical levels in prokaryotes. A web interface is available at the Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools site (http://rsat.scmbb.ulb.ac.be/rsat/).

  5. Testicular volume and fertility potential in men operated due to varicocele and testicular hypotrophy in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kaletka, Zbigniew; Huk, Jacek; Fryczkowski, Mieczysław; Prokopowicz, Grzegorz; Życzkowski, Marcin; Muskała, Bartosz; Taborowski, Piotr; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Failure to perform surgical repair of varicocele before puberty is among the common causes of male infertility. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the testicular volume and fertility potential in men after laparoscopic varicocelectomy conducted in adolescence due to varicocele and concomitant testicular hypotrophy. Material and methods From 1996 through 2011, eighty–two adolescents were operated on for unilateral primary varicocele with testicular hypotrophy. Sixty–eight patients were subject to the current analysis. The age of the patients was 13 to 17 years (mean 15.3 years). Clinical diagnosis was established on the basis of andrologic examination and ultrasonography with an assessment of testicular size and varicocele severity. Laparoscopic surgical repair was performed by a transperitoneal approach with division of testicular vein only. Results An increase in left testicular volume when compared with the contralateral testis was found in 25 (78.1%) young men with clinical grade 2 varicocele (p = 0.02) and in 32 (88.8%) subjects with grade 3 abnormality (p = 0.04). An increase in left testicular volume was found in 46 (85.1%) of 54 patients with unilateral varicocele and in 12 (85.7%) of 14 subjects operated on for bilateral disease. A left testicular volume increase was comparable independent of the use of uni– or bilateral repair. Fifty–eight (85.2%) of our 68 patients had normozoospermia. Conclusions Laparoscopic varicocele repair resulted in a significant increase of hypotrophic testicular volume in 83.8% of our subjects. PMID:24578992

  6. Phylogenetic footprinting reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene that enhance cell-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Givens, Marjory L; Kurotani, Reiko; Rave-Harel, Naama; Miller, Nichol L G; Mellon, Pamela L

    2004-12-01

    Reproductive function is controlled by the hypothalamic neuropeptide, GnRH, which serves as the central regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnRH expression is limited to a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus. Targeting this minute population of neurons (as few as 800 in the mouse) requires regulatory elements upstream of the GnRH gene that remain to be fully characterized. Previously, we have identified an evolutionarily conserved promoter region (-173 to +1) and an enhancer (-1863 to -1571) in the rat gene that targets a subset of the GnRH neurons in vivo. In the present study, we used phylogenetic sequence comparison between human and rodents and analysis of the transcription factor clusters within conserved regions in an attempt to identify additional upstream regulatory elements. This approach led to the characterization of a new upstream enhancer that regulates expression of GnRH in a cell-specific manner. Within this upstream enhancer are nine binding sites for Octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (OCT1), known to be an important transcriptional regulator of GnRH gene expression. In addition, we have identified nuclear factor I (NF1) binding to multiple elements in the GnRH-regulatory regions, each in close proximity to OCT1. We show that OCT1 and NF1 physically and functionally interact. Moreover, the OCT1 and NF1 binding sites in the regulatory regions appear to be essential for appropriate GnRH gene expression. These findings indicate a role for this upstream enhancer and novel OCT1/NF1 complexes in neuron-restricted expression of the GnRH gene.

  7. Differential Responses to Wnt and PCP Disruption Predict Expression and Developmental Function of Conserved and Novel Genes in a Cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Lapébie, Pascal; Ruggiero, Antonella; Barreau, Carine; Chevalier, Sandra; Chang, Patrick; Dru, Philippe; Houliston, Evelyn; Momose, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We have used Digital Gene Expression analysis to identify, without bilaterian bias, regulators of cnidarian embryonic patterning. Transcriptome comparison between un-manipulated Clytia early gastrula embryos and ones in which the key polarity regulator Wnt3 was inhibited using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (Wnt3-MO) identified a set of significantly over and under-expressed transcripts. These code for candidate Wnt signaling modulators, orthologs of other transcription factors, secreted and transmembrane proteins known as developmental regulators in bilaterian models or previously uncharacterized, and also many cnidarian-restricted proteins. Comparisons between embryos injected with morpholinos targeting Wnt3 and its receptor Fz1 defined four transcript classes showing remarkable correlation with spatiotemporal expression profiles. Class 1 and 3 transcripts tended to show sustained expression at “oral” and “aboral” poles respectively of the developing planula larva, class 2 transcripts in cells ingressing into the endodermal region during gastrulation, while class 4 gene expression was repressed at the early gastrula stage. The preferential effect of Fz1-MO on expression of class 2 and 4 transcripts can be attributed to Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) disruption, since it was closely matched by morpholino knockdown of the specific PCP protein Strabismus. We conclude that endoderm and post gastrula-specific gene expression is particularly sensitive to PCP disruption while Wnt-/β-catenin signaling dominates gene regulation along the oral-aboral axis. Phenotype analysis using morpholinos targeting a subset of transcripts indicated developmental roles consistent with expression profiles for both conserved and cnidarian-restricted genes. Overall our unbiased screen allowed systematic identification of regionally expressed genes and provided functional support for a shared eumetazoan developmental regulatory gene set with both predicted and previously

  8. The trehalose pathway in maize: conservation and gene regulation in response to the diurnal cycle and extended darkness

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Clémence; Bledsoe, Samuel W.; Siekman, Allison; Kollman, Alec; Waters, Brian M.; Feil, Regina; Stitt, Mark; Lagrimini, L. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Energy resources in plants are managed in continuously changing environments, such as changes occurring during the day/night cycle. Shading is an environmental disruption that decreases photosynthesis, compromises energy status, and impacts on crop productivity. The trehalose pathway plays a central but not well-defined role in maintaining energy balance. Here, we characterized the maize trehalose pathway genes and deciphered the impacts of the diurnal cycle and disruption of the day/night cycle on trehalose pathway gene expression and sugar metabolism. The maize genome encodes 14 trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) genes, 11 trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) genes, and one trehalase gene. Transcript abundance of most of these genes was impacted by the day/night cycle and extended dark stress, as were sucrose, hexose sugars, starch, and trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) levels. After extended darkness, T6P levels inversely followed class II TPS and sucrose non-fermenting-related protein kinase 1 (SnRK1) target gene expression. Most significantly, T6P no longer tracked sucrose levels after extended darkness. These results showed: (i) conservation of the trehalose pathway in maize; (ii) that sucrose, hexose, starch, T6P, and TPS/TPP transcripts respond to the diurnal cycle; and(iii) that extended darkness disrupts the correlation between T6P and sucrose/hexose pools and affects SnRK1 target gene expression. A model for the role of the trehalose pathway in sensing of sucrose and energy status in maize seedlings is proposed. PMID:25271261

  9. Computational identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes induced in rat brain by transient focal ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, John V.K.; Xu, Zhenfeng; Ford, Gregory D.; Liu, Cuimei; Li, Yonggang; Stovall, Kyndra; Cannon, Virginetta S.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Moreno, Carlos S.; Ford, Byron D.

    2013-01-01

    Microarray analysis has been used to understand how gene regulation plays a critical role in neuronal injury, survival and repair following ischemic stroke. To identify the transcriptional regulatory elements responsible for ischemia-induced gene expression, we examined gene expression profiles of rat brains following focal ischemia and performed computational analysis of consensus transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the genes of the dataset. In this study, rats were sacrificed 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke and gene transcription in brain tissues following ischemia/reperfusion was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The CONserved transcription FACtor binding site (CONFAC) software package was used to identify over-represented TFBS in the upstream promoter regions of ischemia-induced genes compared to control datasets. CONFAC identified 12 TFBS that were statistically over-represented from our dataset of ischemia-induced genes, including three members of the Ets-1 family of transcription factors (TFs). Microarray results showed that mRNA for Ets-1 was increased following tMCAO but not pMCAO. Immunohistochemical analysis of Ets-1 protein in rat brains following MCAO showed that Ets-1 was highly expressed in neurons in the brain of sham control animals. Ets-1 protein expression was virtually abolished in injured neurons of the ischemic brain but was unchanged in peri-infarct brain areas. These data indicate that TFs, including Ets-1, may influence neuronal injury following ischemia. These findings could provide important insights into the mechanisms that lead to brain injury and could provide avenues for the development of novel therapies. PMID:23246490

  10. ACC deaminase genes are conserved among Mesorhizobium species able to nodulate the same host plant.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Francisco X; Brígido, Clarisse; Glick, Bernard R; Oliveira, Solange

    2012-11-01

    Rhizobia strains expressing the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase have been reported to display an augmented symbiotic performance as a consequence of lowering the plant ethylene levels that inhibit the nodulation process. Genes encoding ACC deaminase (acdS) have been studied in Rhizobium spp.; however, not much is known about the presence of acdS genes in Mesorhizobium spp. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and phylogeny of acdS genes in Mesorhizobium strains including a collection of chickpea-nodulating mesorhizobia from Portugal. ACC deaminase genes were detected in 10 of 12 mesorhizobia type strains as well as in 18 of 18 chickpea Mesorhizobium isolates studied in this work. No ACC deaminase activity was detected in any Mesorhizobium strain tested under free-living conditions. Despite the lack of ACC deaminase activity, it was possible to demonstrate that in Mesorhizobium ciceri UPM-Ca7(T) , the acdS gene is transcribed under symbiotic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that strains belonging to different species of Mesorhizobium, but nodulating the same host plant, have similar acdS genes, suggesting that acdS genes are horizontally acquired by transfer of the symbiosis island. This data, together with analysis of the symbiosis islands from completely sequenced Mesorhizobium genomes, suggest the presence of the acdS gene in a Mesorhizobium common ancestor that possessed this gene in a unique symbiosis island.

  11. Identification of Novel Human Genes Evolutionarily Conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans by Comparative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun-Hung; Chou, Chang-Yuan; Ch'ang, Lan-Yang; Liu, Chung-Shyan; Lin, Wen-chang

    2000-01-01

    Modern biomedical research greatly benefits from large-scale genome-sequencing projects ranging from studies of viruses, bacteria, and yeast to multicellular organisms, like Caenorhabditis elegans. Comparative genomic studies offer a vast array of prospects for identification and functional annotation of human ortholog genes. We presented a novel comparative proteomic approach for assembling human gene contigs and assisting gene discovery. The C. elegans proteome was used as an alignment template to assist in novel human gene identification from human EST nucleotide databases. Among the available 18,452 C. elegans protein sequences, our results indicate that at least 83% (15,344 sequences) of C. elegans proteome has human homologous genes, with 7,954 records of C. elegans proteins matching known human gene transcripts. Only 11% or less of C. elegans proteome contains nematode-specific genes. We found that the remaining 7,390 sequences might lead to discoveries of novel human genes, and over 150 putative full-length human gene transcripts were assembled upon further database analyses. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession nos. AF132936–AF132973, AF151799–AF151909, and AF152097.] PMID:10810093

  12. Abnormal branch of the testicular artery.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, P Vijaya; Bhasin, Vishu; Kumar, Sushil

    2006-09-01

    We present a case report of an abnormal course and branching of the right testicular artery, which was uncovered during routine dissection of the abdomen in our first year medical class. It arose from the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta and immediately divided into two branches; one branch coursed inferiorly behind the inferior vena cava as the testicular artery proper, while the other branch passed behind the inferior vena cava and emerged on the anterior surface of the right kidney. After crossing the anterior surface of the kidney, it bifurcated into an ascending branch that went to the right suprarenal gland and a descending branch that ended in the posterior abdominal wall. The left testicular artery was normal in its course and distribution. This is a very rare variation.

  13. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J. Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P.; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1. Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  14. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  15. Mapping of the gene for a major penicillin-binding protein to a genetically conserved region of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome and conservation of the protein among related species of Bacillus.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, C E; Gustafson, A

    1991-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 is the most abundant penicillin-binding protein in the vegetative membranes of Bacillus subtilis and accounts for 95% of the D,D-carboxypeptidase activity of the cell. The structural gene for penicillin-binding protein 5 was mapped to a genetically conserved region near guaB at 0 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome, and immunoassays revealed that there is conservation of this major penicillin-binding protein among related species. Images PMID:1900282

  16. SPN1, a conserved gene identified by suppression of a postrecruitment-defective yeast TATA-binding protein mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Julie A; Kraemer, Susan M; Stargell, Laurie A

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about TATA-binding protein (TBP) functions after recruitment to the TATA element, although several TBP mutants display postrecruitment defects. Here we describe a genetic screen for suppressors of a postrecruitment-defective TBP allele. Suppression was achieved by a single point mutation in a previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, SPN1 (suppresses postrecruitment functions gene number 1). SPN1 is an essential yeast gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. The suppressing mutation in SPN1 substitutes an asparagine for an invariant lysine at position 192 (spn1(K192N)). The spn1(K192N) strain is able to suppress additional alleles of TBP that possess postrecruitment defects, but not a TBP allele that is postrecruitment competent. In addition, Spn1p does not stably associate with TFIID in vivo. Cells containing the spn1(K192N) allele exhibit a temperature-sensitive phenotype and some defects in activated transcription, whereas constitutive transcription appears relatively robust in the mutant background. Consistent with an important role in postrecruitment functions, transcription from the CYC1 promoter, which has been shown to be regulated by postrecruitment mechanisms, is enhanced in spn1(K192N) cells. Moreover, we find that SPN1 is a member of the SPT gene family, further supporting a functional requirement for the SPN1 gene product in transcriptional processes. PMID:12524336

  17. Pi class glutathione S-transferase genes are regulated by Nrf 2 through an evolutionarily conserved regulatory element in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Takagi, Yaeko; Osanai, Hitoshi; Li, Li; Takeuchi, Miki; Katoh, Yasutake; Kobayashi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    Pi class GSTs (glutathione S-transferases) are a member of the vertebrate GST family of proteins that catalyse the conjugation of GSH to electrophilic compounds. The expression of Pi class GST genes can be induced by exposure to electrophiles. We demonstrated previously that the transcription factor Nrf 2 (NF-E2 p45-related factor 2) mediates this induction, not only in mammals, but also in fish. In the present study, we have isolated the genomic region of zebrafish containing the genes gstp1 and gstp2. The regulatory regions of zebrafish gstp1 and gstp2 have been examined by GFP (green fluorescent protein)-reporter gene analyses using microinjection into zebrafish embryos. Deletion and point-mutation analyses of the gstp1 promoter showed that an ARE (antioxidant-responsive element)-like sequence is located 50 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site which is essential for Nrf 2 transactivation. Using EMSA (electrophoretic mobility-shift assay) analysis we showed that zebrafish Nrf 2–MafK heterodimer specifically bound to this sequence. All the vertebrate Pi class GST genes harbour a similar ARE-like sequence in their promoter regions. We propose that this sequence is a conserved target site for Nrf 2 in the Pi class GST genes. PMID:15654768

  18. The Conservation and Application of Three Hypothetical Protein Coding Gene for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lianhua; Gao, Shihui; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Ruijuan; Lu, Junmei; Hu, Zhongyi

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate and early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is of major importance in the control of TB. One of the most important technical advances in diagnosis of tuberculosis is the development of nucleic acid amplification (NAA) tests. However, the choice of the target sequence remains controversial in NAA tests. Recently, interesting alternatives have been found in hypothetical protein coding sequences from mycobacterial genome. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain rational biomarker for TB diagnosis, the conservation of three hypothetical genes was firstly evaluated in 714 mycobacterial strains. The results showed that SCAR1 (Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region) based on Rv0264c coding gene showed the highest conservation (99.8%) and SCAR2 based on Rv1508c gene showed the secondary high conservation (99.7%) in M. tuberculosis (MTB) strains. SCAR3 based on Rv2135c gene (3.2%) and IS6110 (8%) showed relatively high deletion rate in MTB strains. Secondly, three SCAR markers were evaluated in 307 clinical sputum from patients in whom TB was suspected or patients with diseases other than TB. The amplification of IS6110 and 16SrRNA sequences together with both clinical and bacteriological identification was as a protocol to evaluate the efficacy of SCAR markers. The sensitivities and specificities, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of all NAA tests were higher than those of bacteriological detection. In four NAA tests, IS6110 and SCAR3 showed the highest PPV (100%) and low NPV (70% and 68.8%, respectively), and SCAR1 and SCAR2 showed the relatively high PPV and NPV (97% and 82.6%, 95.6% and 88.8%, respectively). Conclusions/Significance Our result indicated that SCAR1 and SCAR2 with a high degree of sequence conservation represent efficient and promising alternatives as NAA test targets in identification of MTB. Moreover, the targets developed from this study may provide more alternative targets for the development of a

  19. Testicular Cancer Survivorship: Research Strategies and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Clair; Allan, James M.; Dahl, Alv A.; Feldman, Darren R.; Oldenburg, Jan; Daugaard, Gedske; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Hannigan, Robyn; Constine, Louis S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Okunieff, Paul; Armstrong, Greg; Wiljer, David; Miller, Robert C.; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Nichols, Craig R.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2010-01-01

    Testicular cancer represents the most curable solid tumor, with a 10-year survival rate of more than 95%. Given the young average age at diagnosis, it is estimated that effective treatment approaches, in particular, platinum-based chemotherapy, have resulted in an average gain of several decades of life. This success, however, is offset by the emergence of considerable long-term morbidity, including second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, pulmonary toxicity, hypogonadism, decreased fertility, and psychosocial problems. Data on underlying genetic or molecular factors that might identify those patients at highest risk for late sequelae are sparse. Genome-wide association studies and other translational molecular approaches now provide opportunities to identify testicular cancer survivors at greatest risk for therapy-related complications to develop evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventional strategies. We review research priorities identified during an international workshop devoted to testicular cancer survivors. Recommendations include 1) institution of lifelong follow-up of testicular cancer survivors within a large cohort setting to ascertain risks of emerging toxicities and the evolution of known late sequelae, 2) development of comprehensive risk prediction models that include treatment factors and genetic modifiers of late sequelae, 3) elucidation of the effect(s) of decades-long exposure to low serum levels of platinum, 4) assessment of the overall burden of medical and psychosocial morbidity, and 5) the eventual formulation of evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventions. Just as testicular cancer once served as the paradigm of a curable malignancy, comprehensive follow-up studies of testicular cancer survivors can pioneer new methodologies in survivorship research for all adult-onset cancer. PMID:20585105

  20. Malignant testicular tumour incidence and mortality trends

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyła-Buciora, Paulina; Więckowska, Barbara; Krzywinska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Gromadecka-Sutkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In Poland testicular tumours are the most frequent cancer among men aged 20–44 years. Testicular tumour incidence since the 1980s and 1990s has been diversified geographically, with an increased risk of mortality in Wielkopolska Province, which was highlighted at the turn of the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of the study was the comparative analysis of the tendencies in incidence and death rates due to malignant testicular tumours observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province. Material and methods Data from the National Cancer Registry were used for calculations. The incidence/mortality rates among men due to malignant testicular cancer as well as the tendencies in incidence/death ratio observed in Poland and Wielkopolska were established based on regression equation. The analysis was deepened by adopting the multiple linear regression model. A p-value < 0.05 was arbitrarily adopted as the criterion of statistical significance, and for multiple comparisons it was modified according to the Bonferroni adjustment to a value of p < 0.0028. Calculations were performed with the use of PQStat v1.4.8 package. Results The incidence of malignant testicular neoplasms observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province indicated a significant rising tendency. The multiple linear regression model confirmed that the year variable is a strong incidence forecast factor only within the territory of Poland. A corresponding analysis of mortality rates among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province did not show any statistically significant correlations. Conclusions Late diagnosis of Polish patients calls for undertaking appropriate educational activities that would facilitate earlier reporting of the patients, thus increasing their chances for recovery. Introducing preventive examinations in the regions of increased risk of testicular tumour may allow earlier diagnosis. PMID:27095941

  1. Evolutionary history of the recruitment of conserved developmental genes in association to the formation and diversification of a novel trait

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The origin and modification of novel traits are important aspects of biological diversification. Studies combining concepts and approaches of developmental genetics and evolutionary biology have uncovered many examples of the recruitment, or co-option, of genes conserved across lineages for the formation of novel, lineage-restricted traits. However, little is known about the evolutionary history of the recruitment of those genes, and of the relationship between them -for example, whether the co-option involves whole or parts of existing networks, or whether it occurs by redeployment of individual genes with de novo rewiring. We use a model novel trait, color pattern elements on butterfly wings called eyespots, to explore these questions. Eyespots have greatly diversified under natural and sexual selection, and their formation involves genetic circuitries shared across insects. Results We investigated the evolutionary history of the recruitment and co-recruitment of four conserved transcription regulators to the larval wing disc region where circular pattern elements develop. The co-localization of Antennapedia, Notch, Distal-less, and Spalt with presumptive (eye)spot organizers was examined in 13 butterfly species, providing the largest comparative dataset available for the system. We found variation between families, between subfamilies, and between tribes. Phylogenetic reconstructions by parsimony and maximum likelihood methods revealed an unambiguous evolutionary history only for Antennapedia, with a resolved single origin of eyespot-associated expression, and many homoplastic events for Notch, Distal-less, and Spalt. The flexibility in the (co-)recruitment of the targeted genes includes cases where different gene combinations are associated with morphologically similar eyespots, as well as cases where identical protein combinations are associated with very different phenotypes. Conclusions The evolutionary history of gene (co-)recruitment is

  2. Global incidence and outcome of testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugalingam, Thurkaa; Soultati, Aspasia; Chowdhury, Simon; Rudman, Sarah; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    Background Testicular cancer is a rare tumor type accounting for 1% of malignancies in men. It is, however, the most common cancer in young men in Western populations. The incidence of testicular cancer is increasing globally, although a decline in mortality rates has been reported in Western countries. It is important to identify whether the variations in trends observed between populations are linked to genetic or environmental factors. Methods Age-standardized incidence rates and age-standardized mortality rates for testicular cancer were obtained for men of all ages in ten countries from the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania using the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5plus) and World Health Organization (WHO) mortality databases. The annual percent change was calculated using Joinpoint regression to assess temporal changes between geographical regions. Results Testicular cancer age-standardized incidence rates are highest in New Zealand (7.8), UK (6.3), Australia (6.1), Sweden (5.6), USA (5.2), Poland (4.9), and Spain (3.8) per 100,000 men. India, China, and Colombia had the lowest incidence (0.5, 1.3, and 2.2, respectively) per 100,000 men. The annual percent changes for overall testicular cancer incidence significantly increased in the European countries Sweden 2.4%, (2.2; 2.6); UK 2.9%, (2.2; 3.6); and Spain 5.0%, (1.7; 8.4), Australia 3.0%, (2.2; 3.7), and China 3.5%, (1.9; 5.1). India had the lowest overall testicular cancer incidence −1.7%, (−2.5; −0.8). Annual percent changes for overall testicular cancer mortality rates were decreasing in all study populations, with the greatest decline observed in Sweden −4.2%, (−4.8; −3.6) and China −4.9%, (−6.5; −3.3). Conclusion Testicular cancer is increasing in incidence in many countries; however, mortality rates remain low and most men are cured. An understanding of the risks and long-term side effects of treatment are important in managing men with this disease. PMID:24204171

  3. Antidepressants and testicular cancer: cause versus association.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-03-01

    A data mining study that examined associations between 105 drugs and 55 cancer sites found significant associations between 2 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine and paroxetine) and testicular cancer. The study suggested several reasons why these associations merited further investigation. A later study tested specific relationships between 12 antidepressant drugs and testicular cancer and subtypes thereof; whereas significant relationships were again found, these disappeared after adjusting for confounding variables. These 2 studies are educative because they illustrate how false-positive results can easily arise in exploratory research and how confounding may be responsible for statistically significant relationships in study designs that are not randomized controlled trials.

  4. [PVB therapy for advanced testicular cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakao, M; Nakagawa, S; Toyoda, K; Nukui, M; Takada, H; Ebisui, K; Sugimoto, K; Watanabe, H; Maegawa, M; Miyakoda, K

    1989-11-01

    Twelve cases of advanced testicular cancer, including 5 cases of seminoma, 3 cases of teratocarcinoma, 1 case of yolk sac tumor, 1 case of embryonal carcinoma and 2 cases of mixed cell type, were treated with cisplatin-vinblastine-bleomycin (PVB) therapy. Among them, 10 cases had measurable metastatic lesions and the objective response rate was 80%. Three cases showed complete response. Ten cases showed nonexistent disease after PVB therapy and salvage operation. Though PVB therapy was useful for the treatment of advanced testicular cancer, a few cases having poor prognostic factors showed no response to the therapy.

  5. An Amphioxus Gli Gene Reveals Conservation of Midline Patterning and the Evolution of Hedgehog Signalling Diversity in Chordates

    PubMed Central

    Shimeld, Sebastian M.; van den Heuvel, Marcel; Dawber, Rebecca; Briscoe, James

    2007-01-01

    Background Hedgehog signalling, interpreted in receiving cells by Gli transcription factors, plays a central role in the development of vertebrate and Drosophila embryos. Many aspects of the signalling pathway are conserved between these lineages, however vertebrates have diverged in at least one key aspect: they have evolved multiple Gli genes encoding functionally-distinct proteins, increasing the complexity of the hedgehog-dependent transcriptional response. Amphioxus is one of the closest living relatives of the vertebrates, having split from the vertebrate lineage prior to the widespread gene duplication prominent in early vertebrate evolution. Principal Findings We show that amphioxus has a single Gli gene, which is deployed in tissues adjacent to sources of hedgehog signalling derived from the midline and anterior endoderm. This shows the duplication and divergence of the Gli gene family, and hence the origin of vertebrate Gli functional diversity, was specific to the vertebrate lineage. However we also show that the single amphioxus Gli gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding different proteins. We utilise three tests of Gli function to examine the transcription regulatory capacities of these different proteins, demonstrating one has activating activity similar to Gli2, while the other acts as a weak repressor, similar to Gli3. Conclusions These data show that vertebrates and amphioxus have evolved functionally-similar repertoires of Gli proteins using parallel molecular routes; vertebrates via gene duplication and divergence, and amphioxus via alternate splicing of a single gene. Our results demonstrate that similar functional complexity of intercellular signalling can be achieved via different evolutionary pathways. PMID:17848995

  6. Abscisic acid-induced gene expression in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha is mediated by evolutionarily conserved promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Totan K; Kaneko, Midori; Akter, Khaleda; Murai, Shuhei; Komatsu, Kenji; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone widely distributed among members of the land plant lineage (Embryophyta), regulating dormancy, stomata closure and tolerance to environmental stresses. In angiosperms (Magnoliophyta), ABA-induced gene expression is mediated by promoter elements such as the G-box-like ACGT-core motifs recognized by bZIP transcription factors. In contrast, the mode of regulation by ABA of gene expression in liverworts (Marchantiophyta), representing one of the earliest diverging land plant groups, has not been elucidated. In this study, we used promoters of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha dehydrin and the wheat Em genes fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to investigate ABA-induced gene expression in liverworts. Transient assays of cultured cells of Marchantia indicated that ACGT-core motifs proximal to the transcription initiation site play a role in the ABA-induced gene expression. The RY sequence recognized by B3 transcriptional regulators was also shown to be responsible for the ABA-induced gene expression. In transgenic Marchantia plants, ABA treatment elicited an increase in GUS expression in young gemmalings, which was abolished by simultaneous disruption of the ACGT-core and RY elements. ABA-induced GUS expression was less obvious in mature thalli than in young gemmalings, associated with reductions in sensitivity to exogenous ABA during gametophyte growth. In contrast, lunularic acid, which had been suggested to function as an ABA-like substance, had no effect on GUS expression. The results demonstrate the presence of ABA-specific response mechanisms mediated by conserved cis-regulatory elements in liverworts, implying that the mechanisms had been acquired in the common ancestors of embryophytes. PMID:26456006

  7. Evolutionary conservation of candidate osmoregulation genes in plant phloem sap-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Jing, X; White, T A; Luan, J; Jiao, C; Fei, Z; Douglas, A E

    2016-06-01

    The high osmotic pressure generated by sugars in plant phloem sap is reduced in phloem-feeding aphids by sugar transformations and facilitated water flux in the gut. The genes mediating these osmoregulatory functions have been identified and validated empirically in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum: sucrase 1 (SUC1), a sucrase in glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), and aquaporin 1 (AQP1), a member of the Drosophila integral protein (DRIP) family of aquaporins. Here, we describe molecular analysis of GH13 and AQP genes in phloem-feeding representatives of the four phloem-feeding groups: aphids (Myzus persicae), coccids (Planococcus citri), psyllids (Diaphorina citri, Bactericera cockerelli) and whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 and MED). A single candidate GH13-SUC gene and DRIP-AQP gene were identified in the genome/transcriptome of most insects tested by the criteria of sequence motif and gene expression in the gut. Exceptionally, the psyllid Ba. cockerelli transcriptome included a gut-expressed Pyrocoelia rufa integral protein (PRIP)-AQP, but has no DRIP-AQP transcripts, suggesting that PRIP-AQP is recruited for osmoregulatory function in this insect. This study indicates that phylogenetically related SUC and AQP genes may generally mediate osmoregulatory functions in these diverse phloem-feeding insects, and provides candidate genes for empirical validation and development as targets for osmotic disruption of pest species. PMID:26896054

  8. Grayscale and color Doppler features of testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, Michele; Derchi, Lorenzo E; Secil, Mustafa; Dogra, Vikram; Sidhu, Paul S; Clements, Richard; Freeman, Simon; Grenier, Nicolas; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ramchandani, Parvati; Cicero, Calogero; Abete, Luca; Bussani, Rossana; Rocher, Laurence; Spencer, John; Tsili, Athina; Valentino, Massimo; Pavlica, Pietro

    2015-06-01

    Pooled data from 16 radiology centers were retrospectively analyzed to seek patients with pathologically proven testicular lymphoma and grayscale and color Doppler images available for review. Forty-three cases were found: 36 (84%) primary and 7 (16%) secondary testicular lymphoma. With unilateral primary lymphoma, involvement was unifocal (n = 10), multifocal (n = 11), or diffuse (n = 11). Synchronous bilateral involvement occurred in 6 patients. Color Doppler sonography showed normal testicular vessels within the tumor in 31 of 43 lymphomas (72%). Testicular lymphoma infiltrates through the tubules, preserving the normal vascular architecture of the testis. Depiction of normal testicular vessels crossing the lesion is a useful adjunctive diagnostic criterion. PMID:26014335

  9. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Obraztsova, Anna; Wang, Yanbing; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Kora, Guruprasad; Park, Byung H.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F.; Land, Miriam L.; Kothe, Terence B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria of the genus Shewanella can thrive in different environments and demonstrate significant variability in their metabolic and ecophysiological capabilities including cold and salt tolerance. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are largely unknown. In this study we address the problem by a comparison of the physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. We have employed two novel approaches based on association of a phenotypic trait with the number of the trait-specific protein families (Pfam domains) and on the conservation of synteny (order in the genome) of the trait-related genes. Our first approach is top-down and involves experimental evaluation and quantification of the species’ cold tolerance followed by identification of the correlated Pfam domains and genes with a conserved synteny. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts novel phenotypes of the species by calculating profiles of each Pfam domain among their genomes and following pair-wise correlation of the profiles and their network clustering. Using the first approach we find a link between cold and salt tolerance of the species and the presence in the genome of a Na+/H+ antiporter gene cluster. Other cold tolerance related genes includes peptidases, chemotaxis sensory transducer proteins, a cysteine exporter, and helicases. Using the bottom-up approach we found several novel phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species, including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway in S. woodyi, degradation of ethanolamine by S. benthica, and propanediol degradation by S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. sp. W3-18-1.

  10. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  11. Structural analysis of the regulatory elements of the type-II procollagen gene. Conservation of promoter and first intron sequences between human and mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Vikkula, M; Metsäranta, M; Syvänen, A C; Ala-Kokko, L; Vuorio, E; Peltonen, L

    1992-01-01

    Transcription of the type-II procollagen gene (COL2A1) is very specifically restricted to a limited number of tissues, particularly cartilages. In order to identify transcription-control motifs we have sequenced the promoter region and the first intron of the human and mouse COL2A1 genes. With the assumption that these motifs should be well conserved during evolution, we have searched for potential elements important for the tissue-specific transcription of the COL2A1 gene by aligning the two sequences with each other and with the available rat type-II procollagen sequence for the promoter. With this approach we could identify specific evolutionarily well-conserved motifs in the promoter area. On the other hand, several suggested regulatory elements in the promoter region did not show evolutionary conservation. In the middle of the first intron we found a cluster of well-conserved transcription-control elements and we conclude that these conserved motifs most probably possess a significant function in the control of the tissue-specific transcription of the COL2A1 gene. We also describe locations of additional, highly conserved nucleotide stretches, which are good candidate regions in the search for binding sites of yet-uncharacterized cartilage-specific transcription regulators of the COL2A1 gene. PMID:1637314

  12. Regulation of carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis genes and identification of an evolutionarily conserved gene required for bacteriochlorophyll accumulation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, G A; Cook, D N; Ma, D; Alberti, M; Burke, D H; Hearst, J E

    1993-05-01

    The temporal expression of ten clustered genes required for carotenoid (crt) and bacteriochlorophyll (bch) biosynthesis was examined during the transition from aerobic respiration to anaerobiosis requisite for the development of the photosynthetic membrane in the bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Accumulation of crtA, crtC, crtD, crtE, crtF, crtK, bchC and bchD mRNAs increased transiently and coordinately, up to 12-fold following removal of oxygen from the growth medium, paralleling increases in mRNAs encoding pigment-binding polypeptides of the photosynthetic apparatus. The crtB and crtI genes, in contrast, were expressed similarly in the presence or absence of oxygen. The regulation patterns of promoters for the crtA and crtI genes and the bchCXYZ operon were characterized using lacZ transcriptional fusion and qualitatively reflected the corresponding mRNA accumulation patterns. We also report that the bchI gene product, encoded by a DNA sequence previously considered to be a portion of crtA, shares 49% sequence identity with the nuclear-encoded Arabidopsis thaliana Cs chloroplast protein required for normal pigmentation in plants.

  13. Testicular transcript responses in rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus following different concentrations bisphenol A exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Yuan, Cong; Gao, Jiancao; Liu, Yan; Wang, Zaizhao

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely spread in the environment. It can cause various reproductive disrupting effects on different organisms, including fish. To investigate the effect of BPA at different concentrations comprehensively, RNA-seq was performed on the testicular mRNA libraries of adult male rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus that exposed to 0, 1, 15 and 225 μg/L BPA for 7 days. Meanwhile, biological indicators and sex steroid hormone levels were investigated. Result showed that (1) BPA at all three concentrations affected the expression of genes related to testicular steroid hormone biosynthesis, blood-testis barrier, proteolysis, and lipid transport and metabolism. (2) BPA at 1 μg/L induced gene expression in renin-angiotensin system pathway and possibly initiate membrane form of estrogen receptor (mER); 1 and 15 μg/L BPA inhibited tRNA processing-related genes expression; 15 and 225 μg/L BPA decreased hemostasis and blood coagulation-related gene expression. The present study indicated that BPA did influence rare minnow testicular gene expressing, and the effect BPA effects varied with concentration. PMID:27183338

  14. An expanded inventory of conserved meiotic genes provides evidence for sex in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Pightling, Arthur W; Stefaniak, Lauren M; Schurko, Andrew M; Logsdon, John M

    2008-01-01

    Meiosis is a defining feature of eukaryotes but its phylogenetic distribution has not been broadly determined, especially among eukaryotic microorganisms (i.e. protists)-which represent the majority of eukaryotic 'supergroups'. We surveyed genomes of animals, fungi, plants and protists for meiotic genes, focusing on the evolutionarily divergent parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis. We identified homologs of 29 components of the meiotic recombination machinery, as well as the synaptonemal and meiotic sister chromatid cohesion complexes. T. vaginalis has orthologs of 27 of 29 meiotic genes, including eight of nine genes that encode meiosis-specific proteins in model organisms. Although meiosis has not been observed in T. vaginalis, our findings suggest it is either currently sexual or a recent asexual, consistent with observed, albeit unusual, sexual cycles in their distant parabasalid relatives, the hypermastigotes. T. vaginalis may use meiotic gene homologs to mediate homologous recombination and genetic exchange. Overall, this expanded inventory of meiotic genes forms a useful "meiosis detection toolkit". Our analyses indicate that these meiotic genes arose, or were already present, early in eukaryotic evolution; thus, the eukaryotic cenancestor contained most or all components of this set and was likely capable of performing meiotic recombination using near-universal meiotic machinery. PMID:18663385

  15. An expanded inventory of conserved meiotic genes provides evidence for sex in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Pightling, Arthur W; Stefaniak, Lauren M; Schurko, Andrew M; Logsdon, John M

    2008-01-01

    Meiosis is a defining feature of eukaryotes but its phylogenetic distribution has not been broadly determined, especially among eukaryotic microorganisms (i.e. protists)-which represent the majority of eukaryotic 'supergroups'. We surveyed genomes of animals, fungi, plants and protists for meiotic genes, focusing on the evolutionarily divergent parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis. We identified homologs of 29 components of the meiotic recombination machinery, as well as the synaptonemal and meiotic sister chromatid cohesion complexes. T. vaginalis has orthologs of 27 of 29 meiotic genes, including eight of nine genes that encode meiosis-specific proteins in model organisms. Although meiosis has not been observed in T. vaginalis, our findings suggest it is either currently sexual or a recent asexual, consistent with observed, albeit unusual, sexual cycles in their distant parabasalid relatives, the hypermastigotes. T. vaginalis may use meiotic gene homologs to mediate homologous recombination and genetic exchange. Overall, this expanded inventory of meiotic genes forms a useful "meiosis detection toolkit". Our analyses indicate that these meiotic genes arose, or were already present, early in eukaryotic evolution; thus, the eukaryotic cenancestor contained most or all components of this set and was likely capable of performing meiotic recombination using near-universal meiotic machinery.

  16. The clinical utility of testicular prosthesis placement in children with genital and testicular disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Testicular prosthesis placement is a useful important adjunctive reconstructive therapy for managing children with testicular loss or absence. Though these prostheses are functionless, experience has shown that they are extremely helpful in creating a more normal male body image and in preventing/relieving psychological stress in males with a missing testicle. With attention to details of implant technique, excellent cosmetic results can be anticipated in simulating a normal appearing scrotum. PMID:26816795

  17. A conserved gene regulatory network subcircuit drives different developmental fates in the vegetal pole of highly divergent echinoderm embryos.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Brenna S; Weideman, Erin P; Hinman, Veronica F

    2010-04-15

    Comparisons of orthologous developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from different organisms explain how transcriptional regulation can, or cannot, change over time to cause morphological evolution and stasis. Here, we examine a subset of the GRN connections in the central vegetal pole mesoderm of the late sea star blastula and compare them to the GRN for the same embryonic territory of sea urchins. In modern sea urchins, this territory gives rise to skeletogenic mesoderm; in sea stars, it develops into other mesodermal derivatives. Orthologs of many transcription factors that function in the sea urchin skeletogenic mesoderm are co-expressed in the sea star vegetal pole, although this territory does not form a larval skeleton. Systematic perturbation of erg, hex, tbr, and tgif gene function was used to construct a snapshot of the sea star mesoderm GRN. A comparison of this network to the sea urchin skeletogenic mesoderm GRN revealed a conserved, recursively wired subcircuit operating in both organisms. We propose that, while these territories have evolved different functions in sea urchins and sea stars, this subcircuit is part of an ancestral GRN governing echinoderm vegetal pole mesoderm development. The positive regulatory feedback between these transcription factors may explain the conservation of this subcircuit.

  18. Automated conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) discovery reveals differences in gene content and promoter evolution among grasses

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Gina; Schnable, James C.; Pedersen, Brent; Freeling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) are islands of non-coding sequence that, like protein coding exons, show less divergence in sequence between related species than functionless DNA. Several CNSs have been demonstrated experimentally to function as cis-regulatory regions. However, the specific functions of most CNSs remain unknown. Previous searches for CNS in plants have either anchored on exons and only identified nearby sequences or required years of painstaking manual annotation. Here we present an open source tool that can accurately identify CNSs between any two related species with sequenced genomes, including both those immediately adjacent to exons and distal sequences separated by >12 kb of non-coding sequence. We have used this tool to characterize new motifs, associate CNSs with additional functions, and identify previously undetected genes encoding RNA and protein in the genomes of five grass species. We provide a list of 15,363 orthologous CNSs conserved across all grasses tested. We were also able to identify regulatory sequences present in the common ancestor of grasses that have been lost in one or more extant grass lineages. Lists of orthologous gene pairs and associated CNSs are provided for reference inbred lines of arabidopsis, Japonica rice, foxtail millet, sorghum, brachypodium, and maize. PMID:23874343

  19. Pleiotropic effect of disrupting a conserved sequence involved in a long-range compensatory interaction in the Drosophila Adh gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, John F; Parsch, John; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental analyses of the evolution of RNA secondary structures suggest a more complex scenario than that typically considered by Kimura's classical model of compensatory evolution. In this study, we examine one such case in more detail. Previous experimental analysis of long-range compensatory interactions between the two ends of Drosophila Adh mRNA failed to fit the classical model of compensatory evolution. To further investigate and verify long-range pairing in Drosophila Adh with respect to models of compensatory evolution and its potential functional role, we introduced site-directed mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene. We explore two alternative hypotheses for why previous analysis of long-range compensatory interactions failed to fit the classical model. Specifically, we investigate whether the disruption of a conserved short-range pairing within Adh exon 2 has an effect on Adh expression or if there is a dual functional role of a conserved sequence in the 3'-UTR in both long-range pairing and the negative regulation of Adh expression. We find that a classical result was not observed due to the pleiotropic effect of changing a nucleotide involved in both long-range base pairing and the negative regulation of gene expression. PMID:15020421

  20. Anxa4 Genes are Expressed in Distinct Organ Systems in Xenopus laevis and tropicalis But are Functionally Conserved

    PubMed Central

    Massé, Karine L; Collins, Robert J; Bhamra, Surinder; Seville, Rachel A

    2007-01-01

    Anxa4 belongs to the multigenic annexin family of proteins which are characterized by their ability to interact with membranes in a calcium-dependent manner. Defined as a marker for polarized epithelial cells, Anxa4 is believed to be involved in many cellular processes but its functions in vivo are still poorly understood. Previously, we cloned Xanx4 in Xenopus laevis (now referred to as anxa4a) and demonstrated its role during organogenesis of the pronephros, providing the first evidence of a specific function for this protein during the development of a vertebrate. Here, we describe the strict conservation of protein sequence and functional domains of anxa4 during vertebrate evolution. We also identify the paralog of anxa4a, anxa4b and show its specific temporal and spatial expression pattern is different from anxa4a. We show that anxa4 orthologs in X. laevis and tropicalis display expression domains in different organ systems. Whilst the anxa4a gene is mainly expressed in the kidney, Xt anxa4 is expressed in the liver. Finally, we demonstrate Xt anxa4 and anxa4a can display conserved function during kidney organogenesis, despite the fact that Xt anxa4 transcripts are not expressed in this domain. This study highlights the divergence of expression of homologous genes during Xenopus evolution and raises the potential problems of using X. tropicalis promoters in X. laevis. PMID:19279706

  1. Computational identification and characterization of conserved miRNAs and their target genes in beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Li, J L; Cui, J; Cheng, D Y

    2015-08-07

    Highly conserved endogenous non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in plants and animals by silencing genes via destruction or blocking of translation of homologous mRNA. Sugar beet, Beta vulgaris, is one of the most important sugar crops in China, with properties that include wide adaptability and strong tolerance to salinity and impoverished soils. Seedlings of B. vulgaris can grow in soils containing up to 0.6% salt; it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance to enrich genetic resources for breeding salt-tolerant sugar beets. Here, we report 13 mature miRNAs from 12 families, predicted using an in silico approach from 29,857 expressed sequence tags and 279,223 genome survey sequences. The psRNATarget server predicted 25 target genes for the 13 miRNAs. Most of the target genes appeared to encode transcription factors or were involved in metabolism, signal transduction, stress response, growth, and development. These results improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of miRNA in beet and may aid in the development of novel and precise techniques for understanding post-transcriptional gene-silencing mechanisms in response to stress tolerance.

  2. Autosomal location of genes from the conserved mammalian X in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): implications for mammalian sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Waters, Paul D; Delbridge, Margaret L; Deakin, Janine E; El-Mogharbel, Nisrine; Kirby, Patrick J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes evolved from an ancient autosomal pair. Mapping of human X- and Y-borne genes in distantly related mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates has proved valuable to help deduce the evolution of this unique part of the genome. The platypus, a monotreme mammal distantly related to eutherians and marsupials, has an extraordinary sex chromosome system comprising five X and five Y chromosomes that form a translocation chain at male meiosis. The largest X chromosome (X1), which lies at one end of the chain, has considerable homology to the human X. Using comparative mapping and the emerging chicken database, we demonstrate that part of the therian X chromosome, previously thought to be conserved across all mammals, was lost from the platypus X1 to an autosome. This region included genes flanking the XIST locus, and also genes with Y-linked homologues that are important to male reproduction in therians. Since these genes lie on the X in marsupials and eutherians, and also on the homologous region of chicken chromosome 4, this represents a loss from the monotreme X rather than an additional evolutionary stratum of the human X. PMID:15973504

  3. Conserved factor Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2 triggers premature transcription termination and nucleates heterochromatin to promote gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Chalamcharla, Venkata R.; Folco, H. Diego; Dhakshnamoorthy, Jothy; Grewal, Shiv I. S.

    2015-01-01

    Cotranscriptional RNA processing and surveillance factors mediate heterochromatin formation in diverse eukaryotes. In fission yeast, RNAi machinery and RNA elimination factors including the Mtl1–Red1 core and the exosome are involved in facultative heterochromatin assembly; however, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that RNA elimination factors cooperate with the conserved exoribonuclease Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2, which couples pre-mRNA 3′-end processing to transcription termination, to promote premature termination and facultative heterochromatin formation at meiotic genes. We also find that Dhp1 is critical for RNAi-mediated heterochromatin assembly at retroelements and regulated gene loci and facilitates the formation of constitutive heterochromatin at centromeric and mating-type loci. Remarkably, our results reveal that Dhp1 interacts with the Clr4/Suv39h methyltransferase complex and acts directly to nucleate heterochromatin. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified role for 3′-end processing and transcription termination machinery in gene silencing through premature termination and suggests that noncanonical transcription termination by Dhp1 and RNA elimination factors is linked to heterochromatin assembly. These findings have important implications for understanding silencing mechanisms targeting genes and repeat elements in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26631744

  4. cDNA sequence, genomic organization, and evolutionary conservation of a novel gene from the WAGR region

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.; Eisenman, R.; Knoll, J.; Bruns, G.

    1995-09-20

    A new gene (239FB) with predominant and differential expression in fetal brain has recently been isolated from a chromosome 11p13-p14 boundary area near FSHB. The corresponding mRNA has an open reading frame of 294 amino acids, a 3` untranslated region of 1247 nucleotides, and a highly GC-rich 5` untranslated region. The coding and 3` UT sequence is specified by 6 exons within nearly 87 kb of isolated genomic locus. The 5` end region of the transcript maps adjacent to the only genomically defined CpG island in a chromosomal subregion that may be associated with part of the mental retardation of some WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation) syndrome patients. In addition to nucleotide and amino acid similarity to an EST from a normalized infant brain cDNA library, the predicted protein has extensive similarity to Caenorhbditis elegans polypeptides of, as yet, unknown function. The 239FB locus is, therefore, likely part of a family of genes with two members expressed in human brain. The extensive conservation of the predicted protein suggests a fundamental function of the gene product and will enable evaluation of the role of the 239FB gene in neurogenesis in model organisms. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Different Sets of Post-Embryonic Development Genes Are Conserved or Lost in Two Caryophyllales Species (Reaumuria soongorica and Agriophyllum squarrosum).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengshan; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Guoxiong; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Reaumuria soongorica and sand rice (Agriophyllum squarrosum) belong to the clade of Caryophyllales and are widely distributed in the desert regions of north China. Both plants have evolved many specific traits and adaptation strategies to cope with recurring environmental threats. However, the genetic basis that underpins their unique traits and adaptation remains unknown. In this study, the transcriptome data of R. soongorica and sand rice were compared with three other species with previously sequenced genomes (Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, and Beta vulgaris). Four different gene sets were identified, namely, the genes conserved in both species, those lost in both species, those conserved in R. soongorica only, and those conserved in sand rice only. Gene ontology showed that post-embryonic development genes (PEDGs) were enriched in all gene sets, and different sets of PEDGs were conserved or lost in both the R. soongorica and sand rice genomes. Expression profiles of Arabidopsis orthologs further provided some clues to the function of the species-specific conserved PEDGs. Such orthologs included LEAFY PETIOLE, which could be a candidate gene involved in the development of branch priority in sand rice. PMID:26815143

  6. Different Sets of Post-Embryonic Development Genes Are Conserved or Lost in Two Caryophyllales Species (Reaumuria soongorica and Agriophyllum squarrosum)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengshan; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Guoxiong; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Reaumuria soongorica and sand rice (Agriophyllum squarrosum) belong to the clade of Caryophyllales and are widely distributed in the desert regions of north China. Both plants have evolved many specific traits and adaptation strategies to cope with recurring environmental threats. However, the genetic basis that underpins their unique traits and adaptation remains unknown. In this study, the transcriptome data of R. soongorica and sand rice were compared with three other species with previously sequenced genomes (Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, and Beta vulgaris). Four different gene sets were identified, namely, the genes conserved in both species, those lost in both species, those conserved in R. soongorica only, and those conserved in sand rice only. Gene ontology showed that post-embryonic development genes (PEDGs) were enriched in all gene sets, and different sets of PEDGs were conserved or lost in both the R. soongorica and sand rice genomes. Expression profiles of Arabidopsis orthologs further provided some clues to the function of the species-specific conserved PEDGs. Such orthologs included LEAFY PETIOLE, which could be a candidate gene involved in the development of branch priority in sand rice. PMID:26815143

  7. Short-tailed stx phages exploit the conserved YaeT protein to disseminate Shiga toxin genes among enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren L; James, Chloë E; Sergeant, Martin J; Yaxian, Yan; Saunders, Jon R; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2007-10-01

    Infection of Escherichia coli by Shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages (Stx phages) was the pivotal event in the evolution of the deadly Shiga toxin-encoding E. coli (STEC), of which serotype O157:H7 is the most notorious. The number of different bacterial species and strains reported to produce Shiga toxin is now more than 500, since the first reported STEC infection outbreak in 1982. Clearly, Stx phages are spreading rapidly, but the underlying mechanism for this dissemination has not been explained. Here we show that an essential and highly conserved gene product, YaeT, which has an essential role in the insertion of proteins in the gram-negative bacterial outer membrane, is the surface molecule recognized by the majority (ca. 70%) of Stx phages via conserved tail spike proteins associated with a short-tailed morphology. The yaeT gene was initially identified through complementation, and its role was confirmed in phage binding assays with and without anti-YaeT antiserum. Heterologous cloning of E. coli yaeT to enable Stx phage adsorption to Erwinia carotovora and the phage adsorption patterns of bacterial species possessing natural yaeT variants further supported this conclusion. The use of an essential and highly conserved protein by the majority of Stx phages is a strategy that has enabled and promoted the rapid spread of shigatoxigenic potential throughout multiple E. coli serogroups and related bacterial species. Infection of commensal bacteria in the mammalian gut has been shown to amplify Shiga toxin production in vivo, and the data from this study provide a platform for the development of a therapeutic strategy to limit this YaeT-mediated infection of the commensal flora.

  8. Resveratrol and curcumin ameliorate di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate induced testicular injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Fattah, Amal Ahmed; Fahim, Atef Tadros; Sadik, Nermin Abdel Hamid; Ali, Bassam Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the protective role of resveratrol and curcumin on oxidative testicular damage induced by di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups; three groups received oral daily doses of DEHP (2g/kgBW) for 45days to induce testicular injury. Two of these groups received either resveratrol (80mg/kgBW) or curcumin (200mg/kgBW) orally for 30days before and 45days after DEHP administration. A vehicle-treated control group was also included. Another two groups of rats received either resveratrol or curcumin alone. Oxidative damage was observed by decreased levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and glutathione (GSH) and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the testes of DEHP-administered rats. Serum testosterone level as well as testicular marker enzymes activities; acid and alkaline phosphatases (ACP and ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) showed severe declines. DEHP administration caused significant increases in the testicular gene expression levels of Nrf2, HO-1, HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90 as well as a significant decrease in c-Kit protein when compared with the control group. Histopathological observations provided evidence for the biochemical and molecular analysis. These DEHP-induced pathological alterations were attenuated by pretreatment with resveratrol and curcumin. We conclude that DEHP-induced injuries in biochemical, molecular and histological structure of testis were recovered by pretreatment with resveratrol and curcumin. The chemoprotective effects of these compounds may be due to their intrinsic antioxidant properties along with boosting Nrf2, HSP 60, HSP 70 and HSP 90 gene expression levels and as such may be useful potential tools in combating DEHP-induced testicular dysfunction.

  9. Resveratrol and curcumin ameliorate di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate induced testicular injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Fattah, Amal Ahmed; Fahim, Atef Tadros; Sadik, Nermin Abdel Hamid; Ali, Bassam Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the protective role of resveratrol and curcumin on oxidative testicular damage induced by di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups; three groups received oral daily doses of DEHP (2g/kgBW) for 45days to induce testicular injury. Two of these groups received either resveratrol (80mg/kgBW) or curcumin (200mg/kgBW) orally for 30days before and 45days after DEHP administration. A vehicle-treated control group was also included. Another two groups of rats received either resveratrol or curcumin alone. Oxidative damage was observed by decreased levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and glutathione (GSH) and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the testes of DEHP-administered rats. Serum testosterone level as well as testicular marker enzymes activities; acid and alkaline phosphatases (ACP and ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) showed severe declines. DEHP administration caused significant increases in the testicular gene expression levels of Nrf2, HO-1, HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90 as well as a significant decrease in c-Kit protein when compared with the control group. Histopathological observations provided evidence for the biochemical and molecular analysis. These DEHP-induced pathological alterations were attenuated by pretreatment with resveratrol and curcumin. We conclude that DEHP-induced injuries in biochemical, molecular and histological structure of testis were recovered by pretreatment with resveratrol and curcumin. The chemoprotective effects of these compounds may be due to their intrinsic antioxidant properties along with boosting Nrf2, HSP 60, HSP 70 and HSP 90 gene expression levels and as such may be useful potential tools in combating DEHP-induced testicular dysfunction. PMID:26361869

  10. Climate-Driven Reshuffling of Species and Genes: Potential Conservation Roles for Species Translocations and Recombinant Hybrid Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Scriber, Jon Mark

    2013-01-01

    Comprising 50%-75% of the world's fauna, insects are a prominent part of biodiversity in communities and ecosystems globally. Biodiversity across all levels of biological classifications is fundamentally based on genetic diversity. However, the integration of genomics and phylogenetics into conservation management may not be as rapid as climate change. The genetics of hybrid introgression as a source of novel variation for ecological divergence and evolutionary speciation (and resilience) may generate adaptive potential and diversity fast enough to respond to locally-altered environmental conditions. Major plant and herbivore hybrid zones with associated communities deserve conservation consideration. This review addresses functional genetics across multi-trophic-level interactions including "invasive species" in various ecosystems as they may become disrupted in different ways by rapid climate change. "Invasive genes" (into new species and populations) need to be recognized for their positive creative potential and addressed in conservation programs. "Genetic rescue" via hybrid translocations may provide needed adaptive flexibility for rapid adaptation to environmental change. While concerns persist for some conservationists, this review emphasizes the positive aspects of hybrids and hybridization. Specific implications of natural genetic introgression are addressed with a few examples from butterflies, including transgressive phenotypes and climate-driven homoploid recombinant hybrid speciation. Some specific examples illustrate these points using the swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae) with their long-term historical data base (phylogeographical diversity changes) and recent (3-decade) climate-driven temporal and genetic divergence in recombinant homoploid hybrids and relatively recent hybrid speciation of Papilio appalachiensis in North America. Climate-induced "reshuffling" (recombinations) of species composition, genotypes, and genomes may become

  11. Effects of age on testicular function.

    PubMed

    Tsitouras, P D

    1987-12-01

    Although frequency of sexual activity declines dramatically with age, most investigators have been able to define rather small physiologic function (hormonal and spermatogenic) changes with advancing age. Despite the development of subtle intrinsic age-related defects at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, reproductive capacity is maintained in healthy elderly men.

  12. [Sclerosing therapy of testicular hydrocele with tetracycline].

    PubMed

    Losada Guerra, J L; Hernández Navarro, E

    1992-12-01

    Twenty-six patients, aged 38 to 78 years, with testicular hydrocele were treated by aspiration, punction and tetracycline instillation. The cure rate was 79%. Inflammation of the scrotum was observed in all of the cases. Due to recurrence two patients underwent surgery, which revealed a hematocele.

  13. Conserved and novel gene expression between regeneration and asexual fission in Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Burton, Patrick M; Finnerty, John R

    2009-02-01

    Due to work in model systems (e.g., flies and mice), the molecular mechanisms of embryogenesis are known in exquisite detail. However, these organisms are incapable of asexual reproduction and possess limited regenerative abilities. Thus, the mechanisms of alternate developmental trajectories and their relation to embryonic mechanisms remain understudied. Because these developmental trajectories are present in a diverse group of animal phyla spanning the metazoan phylogeny, including cnidarians, annelids, and echinoderms, they are likely to have played a major role in animal evolution. The starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, an emerging model system, undergoes larval development, asexual fission, and complete bi-directional regeneration in the field and laboratory. In order to investigate to what extent embryonic patterning mechanisms are utilized during alternate developmental trajectories, we examined expression of developmental regulatory genes during regeneration and fission. When compared to previously reported embryonic expression patterns, we found that all genes displayed some level of expression consistent with embryogenesis. However, five of seven genes investigated also displayed striking differences in gene expression between one or more developmental trajectory. These results demonstrate that alternate developmental trajectories utilize distinct molecular mechanisms upstream of major developmental regulatory genes such as fox, otx, and Hox-like. PMID:19184098

  14. Comparison of Different Electroporation Parameters on Transfection Efficiency of Sheep Testicular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niakan, Sarah; Heidari, Banafsheh; Akbari, Ghasem; Nikousefat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroporation can be a highly efficient method for introducing the foreign genetic materials into the targeted cells for transient and/or permanent genetic modification. Considering the application of this technique as a very efficient method for drug, oligonucleotide, antibody and plasmid delivery for clinical applications and production of transgenic animals, the present study aimed to optimize the transfection efficiency of sheep testicular cells including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) via electroporation. Materials and Methods This study is an experimental research conducted in Biotechnology Research Center (Avicenna Research Institute, Tehran, Iran) from September 2013 to March 2014. Following isolation and propagation of one-month lamb testicular cells (SSCs and somatic testicular cells including; Sertoli, Leydig, and myoid cells), the effect of different electroporation parameters including total voltages (280, 320, and 350 V), burst durations (10, 8, and 5 milliseconds), burst modes (single or double) and addition of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were evaluated on transfection efficiency, viability rate and mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of sheep testicular cells. Results The most transfection efficiency was obtained in 320 V/8 milliseconds/single burst group in transduction medium with and without DMSO. There was a significantly inverse correlation between transfection efficiency with application of both following parameters: addition of DMSO and double burst. After transfection, the highest and lowest viability rates of testicular cells were demonstrated in 320 V/8 milliseconds with transduction medium without DMSO and 350 V/5 milliseconds in medium containing DMSO. Ad- dition of DMSO to transduction medium in all groups significantly decreased the viability rate. The comparison of gene expression indicated that Sertoli and SSCs had the most fluorescence intensity in 320 V/double burst/DMSO positive. However, myoid and Leydig cells showed the

  15. Comparison of Different Electroporation Parameters on Transfection Efficiency of Sheep Testicular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niakan, Sarah; Heidari, Banafsheh; Akbari, Ghasem; Nikousefat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroporation can be a highly efficient method for introducing the foreign genetic materials into the targeted cells for transient and/or permanent genetic modification. Considering the application of this technique as a very efficient method for drug, oligonucleotide, antibody and plasmid delivery for clinical applications and production of transgenic animals, the present study aimed to optimize the transfection efficiency of sheep testicular cells including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) via electroporation. Materials and Methods This study is an experimental research conducted in Biotechnology Research Center (Avicenna Research Institute, Tehran, Iran) from September 2013 to March 2014. Following isolation and propagation of one-month lamb testicular cells (SSCs and somatic testicular cells including; Sertoli, Leydig, and myoid cells), the effect of different electroporation parameters including total voltages (280, 320, and 350 V), burst durations (10, 8, and 5 milliseconds), burst modes (single or double) and addition of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were evaluated on transfection efficiency, viability rate and mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of sheep testicular cells. Results The most transfection efficiency was obtained in 320 V/8 milliseconds/single burst group in transduction medium with and without DMSO. There was a significantly inverse correlation between transfection efficiency with application of both following parameters: addition of DMSO and double burst. After transfection, the highest and lowest viability rates of testicular cells were demonstrated in 320 V/8 milliseconds with transduction medium without DMSO and 350 V/5 milliseconds in medium containing DMSO. Ad- dition of DMSO to transduction medium in all groups significantly decreased the viability rate. The comparison of gene expression indicated that Sertoli and SSCs had the most fluorescence intensity in 320 V/double burst/DMSO positive. However, myoid and Leydig cells showed the

  16. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Robert M; Amsterdam, Adam; Hopkins, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    % of the essential genes required for craniofacial development. The identification of zebrafish models for two human disease syndromes indicates that homologs to the other genes are likely to also be relevant for human craniofacial development. The initial characterization of wdr68 suggests an important role in craniofacial development for the highly conserved Wdr68-Dyrk1 protein complexes. PMID:16759393

  17. Sequence conservation of the 12D3 gene in Mexican isolates of Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Perez, J; Javier Perez, J; Vargas, P; Antonio Alvarez, J; Rojas, C; Figueroa, J V

    2010-04-01

    The 12D3 antigen present in Babesia bovis has been evaluated as a recombinant vaccine candidate and the 12d3 coding sequence has been reported for an Australian and an USA (Texas) isolate of B. bovis. However, no approach has been conducted to perform analysis of 12d3 sequence conservation on a larger number of B. bovis isolates. This could provide important information to determine whether a recombinant vaccine containing this antigen could be widely used. This study reports the cloning and sequencing analysis of the 12d3 coding region in 20 different B. bovis isolates collected from various geographical regions in the tropics and subtropics of Mexico. Comparative analysis of the consensus nucleotide sequences obtained for each isolate revealed a high degree of conservation (94-99% sequence identity) among the 12d3 alleles present in the Mexican isolates when compared with the 12d3 ORF sequences from the Texan (T2Bo) B. bovis isolate. Similarly, BLASTX sequence homology search showed a high percent identity (93-99%) of the deduced amino acid 12D3 sequence as compared with the T2Bo isolate sequence. The high level of sequence conservation in 12d3 among the 20 B. bovis isolates collected from geographically distant locations in Mexico suggests that there exists a minimal bovine-host immunological pressure which could be translated into antigenic diversity or variation, and most probably this is reflected in the non-inmunodominant characteristic of the 12D3 antigen as it has been previously described in the literature. 12D3 antigen can be considered as a viable candidate for inclusion in a recombinant vaccine for cattle babesiosis caused by B. bovis in Mexico.

  18. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the murine 2 P domain potassium channel gene Kcnk8: conservation of gene structure in 2 P domain potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bockenhauer, D; Nimmakayalu, M A; Ward, D C; Goldstein, S A; Gallagher, P G

    2000-12-31

    A 2 P domain potassium channel expressed in eye, lung, and stomach, Kcnk8, has recently been identified. To initiate further biochemical and genetic studies of this channel, we assembled the murine Kcnk8 cDNA sequence, characterized the genomic structure of the Kcnk8 gene, determined its chromosomal localization, and analyzed its activity in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. The composite cDNA has an open reading frame of 1029 bp and encodes a protein of 343 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 36 kDa. Structure analyses predict 2 P domains and four potential transmembrane helices with a potential single EF-hand motif and four potential SH3-binding motifs in the COOH-terminus. Cloning of the Kcnk8 chromosomal gene revealed that it is composed of three exons distributed over 4 kb of genomic DNA. Genome database searching revealed that one of the intron/exon boundaries identified in Kcnk8 is present in other mammalian 2 P domain potassium channels genes and many C. elegans 2P domain potassium channel genes, revealing evolutionary conservation of gene structure. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the murine Kcnk8 gene was mapped to chromosome 19, 2B, the locus of the murine dancer phenotype, and syntenic to 11q11-11q13, the location of the human homologue. No significant currents were generated in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system using the composite Kcnk8 cDNA sequence, suggesting, like many potassium channels, additional channel subunits, modulator substances, or cellular chaperones are required for channel function.

  19. Conservative Inheritance of Newly Synthesized DNA in Double-Strand Break-Induced Gene Conversion▿

    PubMed Central

    Ira, Grzegorz; Satory, Dominik; Haber, James E.

    2006-01-01

    To distinguish among possible mechanisms of repair of a double-strand break (DSB) by gene conversion in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we employed isotope density transfer to analyze budding yeast mating type (MAT) gene switching in G2/M-arrested cells. Both of the newly synthesized DNA strands created during gene conversion are found at the repaired locus, leaving the donor unchanged. These results support suggestions that mitotic DSBs are primarily repaired by a synthesis-dependent strand-annealing mechanism. We also show that the proportion of crossing-over associated with DSB-induced ectopic recombination is not affected by the presence of nonhomologous sequences at one or both ends of the DSB or the presence of additional sequences that must be copied from the donor. PMID:17030630

  20. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  1. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  2. Conserved structure and varied expression reveal key roles of phosphoglucan phosphatase gene starch excess 4 in barley.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Wei, Long; Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Peng, Yuan-Ying; Chen, Guo-Yue; Wei, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chunji; Zheng, You-Liang

    2014-12-01

    As one of the phosphoglucan phosphatases, starch excess 4 (SEX4) encoded by SEX4 gene has recently been intensively studied because of its vital role in the degradation of leaf starch. In this study, we isolated and chromosomally mapped barley SEX4, characterized its gene and protein structure, predicted the cis-elements of its promoter, and analysed its expression based on real-time quantitative PCR and publically available microarray data. The full length of barely SEX4 (HvSEX4) was 4,598 bp and it was mapped on the long arm of chromosome 4H (4HL). This gene contained 14 exons and 13 introns in all but two of the species analysed, Arabidopsis (13 exons and 12 introns) and Oryza brachyantha (12 exons and 11 introns). An exon-intron junction composed of intron 4 to intron 7 and exon 5 to exon 8 was highly conserved among the analysed species. SEX4 is characterized with conserved functional domains (dual specificity phosphatase domain and carbohydrate-binding module 48) and varied chloroplast transit peptide and C-terminal. Expression analyses indicated that: (1) SEX4 was mainly expressed in anthers of barley, young leaf and anthers of rice, and leaf of Arabidopsis; (2) it exhibited a diurnal pattern in barley, rice and Arabidopsis; (3) significant difference in the expression of SEX4 was not detected for either barley or rice under any of the investigated stresses; and (4) it was significantly down-regulated at middle stage and up-regulated at late stage under cold treatment, down-regulated at early stage under heat treatment, and up-regulated at late stage under salt treatment in Arabidopsis. The strong relationships detected in the current study between SEX4 and glucan, water dikinases (GWD) or phosphoglucan, water dikinases (PWD) were discussed. Collectively, our results provide insights into genetic manipulation of SEX4, especially in monocotyledon and uncovering the possible roles of SEX4 in plant development.

  3. A survey of well conserved families of C2H2 zinc-finger genes in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A recent comparative genomic analysis tentatively identified roughly 40 orthologous groups of C2H2 Zinc-finger proteins that are well conserved in "bilaterians" (i.e. worms, flies, and humans). Here we extend that analysis to include a second arthropod genome from the crustacean, Daphnia pulex. Results Most of the 40 orthologous groups of C2H2 zinc-finger proteins are represented by just one or two proteins within each of the previously surveyed species. Likewise, Daphnia were found to possess a similar number of orthologs for all of these small orthology groups. In contrast, the number of Sp/KLF homologs tends to be greater and to vary between species. Like the corresponding mammalian Sp/KLF proteins, most of the Drosophila and Daphnia homologs can be placed into one of three sub-groups: Class I-III. Daphnia were found to have three Class I proteins that roughly correspond to their Drosophila counterparts, dSP1, btd, CG5669, and three Class II proteins that roughly correspond to Luna, CG12029, CG9895. However, Daphnia have four additional KLF-Class II proteins that are most similar to the vertebrate KLF1/2/4 proteins, a subset not found in Drosophila. Two of these four proteins are encoded by genes linked in tandem. Daphnia also have three KLF-Class III members, one more than Drosophila. One of these is a likely Bteb2 homolog, while the other two correspond to Cabot and KLF13, a vertebrate homolog of Cabot. Conclusion Consistent with their likely roles as fundamental determinants of bilaterian form and function, most of the 40 groups of C2H2 zinc-finger proteins are conserved in kind and number in Daphnia. However, the KLF family includes several additional genes that are most similar to genes present in vertebrates but missing in Drosophila. PMID:20433734

  4. Conservation of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.P.; Monaco, A.P.; Feener, C.C.; Kunkel, L.M.

    1987-10-16

    A portion of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript from human fetal skeletal muscle and mouse adult heart was sequence, representing approximately 25 percent of the total, 14-kb DMD transcript. The nucleic acid and predicted amino acid sequences from the two species are nearly 90 percent homologous. The amino acid sequence that is predicted from this portion of the DMD gene indicates that the protein product might serve a structural role in muscle, but the abundance and tissue distribution of the messenger RNA suggest that the DMD protein is not nebulin.

  5. Conservation of the genes for HC-toxin biosynthesis in Alternaria jesenskae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HC-toxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide, is a virulence determinant for the plant pathogenic fungus Cochliobolus carbonum. It was recently discovered that another fungus, Alternaria jesenskae, also produces HC-toxin. Results The major genes (collectively known as AjTOX2) involved in the biosynthesis of HC-toxin were identified from A. jesenskae by genomic sequencing. The encoded orthologous proteins share 75-85% amino acid identity, and the genes for HC-toxin biosynthesis are duplicated in both fungi. The genomic organization of the genes in the two fungi show a similar but not identical partial clustering arrangement. A set of representative housekeeping proteins show a similar high level of amino acid identity between C. carbonum and A. jesenskae, which is consistent with the close relatedness of these two genera within the family Pleosporaceae (Dothideomycetes). Conclusions This is the first report that the plant virulence factor HC-toxin is made by an organism other than C. carbonum. The genes may have moved by horizontal transfer between the two species, but it cannot be excluded that they were present in a common ancestor and lost from other species of Alternaria and Cochliobolus. PMID:23865912

  6. Transcriptome shock invokes disruption of parental expression-conserved genes in tetraploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huakun; Gou, Xiaowan; Zhang, Ai; Wang, Xutong; Zhao, Na; Dong, Yuzhu; Li, Linfeng; Liu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidy often triggers phenotypic novelty and gene expression remolding in the resulting polyploids. In this study, we employed multiple phenotypic and genetic approaches to investigate the nature and consequences of allotetraploidization between A- and S-subgenome of tetraploid wheat. Results showed that karyotype of the nascent allopolyploid plants (AT2) is stable but they showed clear novelty in multiple morphological traits which might have positively contributed to the initial establishment of the tetraploids. Further microarray-based transcriptome profiling and gene-specific cDNA-pyrosequencing have documented that transcriptome shock was exceptionally strong in AT2, but a substantial proportion of the induced expression changes was rapidly stabilized in early generations. Meanwhile, both additive and nonadditive expression genes showed extensive homeolog expression remodeling and which have led to the subgenome expression dominance in leaf and young inflorescence of AT2. Through comparing the homeolog-expressing patterns between synthetic and natural tetraploid wheats, it appears that the shock-induced expression changes at both the total expression level and subgenome homeolog partitioning are evolutionarily persistent. Together, our study shed new light on how gene expression changes have rapidly occurred at the initial stage following allotetraploidization, as well as their evolutionary relevance, which may have implications for wheat improvements. PMID:27198893

  7. Evolutionary conservation of the insulinoma gene rig and its possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, C.; Shiga, K.; Takasawa, S.; Kitagawa, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Okamoto, H.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have identified a gene, rig (rat insulinoma gene), that is activated in chemically induced rat insulinomas but not in normal pancreatic islets or in regenerating islets. In the present study, they have found that the insulinoma gene was activated in a BK virus-induced hamster insulinoma cell line and in a spontaneously occurring human insulinoma. From the hamster and human insulinoma cDNA libraries, rig homologues were isolated, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. In the same manner as the rat gene, both hamster and human homologues contained one open reading frame of 435 nucleotides, differing by 32- and 41-base substitutions, respectively. All the base substitutions were same-sense mutations. Accordingly, the deduced 145-amino acid sequence remained invariant in hamster, human, and rat insulinomas, suggesting that rig has evolved under extraordinarily strong selective constraints. Computerized structure analysis indicated that rig-encoded protein is a possible DNA-binding protein. The antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary to hamster rig mRNA was synthesized and injected into the hamster insulinoma cells. The antisense rig oligodeoxyribouncleotide inhibited DNA synthesis in the insulinoma cells, whereas the sense rig oligodeoxyribonucleotide or antisense insulin oligodeoxyribonucleotide had no inhibitory effect. These results strongly suggest that the activation of rig is both common and potentially significant in the oncogenic growth of pancreatic B cells of islets of Langerhans.

  8. Transcriptome shock invokes disruption of parental expression-conserved genes in tetraploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huakun; Gou, Xiaowan; Zhang, Ai; Wang, Xutong; Zhao, Na; Dong, Yuzhu; Li, Linfeng; Liu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidy often triggers phenotypic novelty and gene expression remolding in the resulting polyploids. In this study, we employed multiple phenotypic and genetic approaches to investigate the nature and consequences of allotetraploidization between A- and S-subgenome of tetraploid wheat. Results showed that karyotype of the nascent allopolyploid plants (AT2) is stable but they showed clear novelty in multiple morphological traits which might have positively contributed to the initial establishment of the tetraploids. Further microarray-based transcriptome profiling and gene-specific cDNA-pyrosequencing have documented that transcriptome shock was exceptionally strong in AT2, but a substantial proportion of the induced expression changes was rapidly stabilized in early generations. Meanwhile, both additive and nonadditive expression genes showed extensive homeolog expression remodeling and which have led to the subgenome expression dominance in leaf and young inflorescence of AT2. Through comparing the homeolog-expressing patterns between synthetic and natural tetraploid wheats, it appears that the shock-induced expression changes at both the total expression level and subgenome homeolog partitioning are evolutionarily persistent. Together, our study shed new light on how gene expression changes have rapidly occurred at the initial stage following allotetraploidization, as well as their evolutionary relevance, which may have implications for wheat improvements. PMID:27198893

  9. Morgan’s Legacy: Fruit Flies and the Functional Annotation of Conserved Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, Hugo J.; Yamamoto, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    In 1915, “The Mechanism of Mendelian Heredity” was published by four prominent Drosophila geneticists. They discovered that genes form linkage groups on chromosomes inherited in a Mendelian fashion and laid the genetic foundation that promoted Drosophila as a model organism. Flies continue to offer great opportunities, including studies in the field of functional genomics. PMID:26406362

  10. Divergent Expression Regulation of Gonad Development Genes in Medaka Shows Incomplete Conservation of the Downstream Regulatory Network of Vertebrate Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Herpin, Amaury; Adolfi, Mateus C.; Nicol, Barbara; Hinzmann, Maria; Schmidt, Cornelia; Klughammer, Johanna; Engel, Mareen; Tanaka, Minoru; Guiguen, Yann; Schartl, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Genetic control of male or female gonad development displays between different groups of organisms a remarkable diversity of “master sex-determining genes” at the top of the genetic hierarchies, whereas downstream components surprisingly appear to be evolutionarily more conserved. Without much further studies, conservation of sequence has been equalized to conservation of function. We have used the medaka fish to investigate the generality of this paradigm. In medaka, the master male sex-determining gene is dmrt1bY, a highly conserved downstream regulator of sex determination in vertebrates. To understand its function in orchestrating the complex gene regulatory network, we have identified targets genes and regulated pathways of Dmrt1bY. Monitoring gene expression and interactions by transgenic fluorescent reporter fish lines, in vivo tissue-chromatin immunoprecipitation and in vitro gene regulation assays revealed concordance but also major discrepancies between mammals and medaka, notably amongst spatial, temporal expression patterns and regulations of the canonical Hedgehog and R-spondin/Wnt/Follistatin signaling pathways. Examination of Foxl2 protein distribution in the medaka ovary defined a new subpopulation of theca cells, where ovarian-type aromatase transcriptional regulation appears to be independent of Foxl2. In summary, these data show that the regulation of the downstream regulatory network of sex determination is less conserved than previously thought. PMID:23883523

  11. Seminal-type ribonuclease genes in ruminants, sequence conservation without protein expression?

    PubMed

    Kleineidam, R G; Jekel, P A; Beintema, J J; Situmorang, P

    1999-04-29

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) is an interesting enzyme both for functional and structural reasons. The enzyme is the product of a gene duplication that occurred in an ancestral ruminant. It is possible to demonstrate the presence of seminal-type genes in all other investigated ruminant species, but they are not expressed and show features of pseudogenes. In this paper we report the determination of two pancreatic and one seminal-type ribonuclease gene sequences of swamp-type water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The two pancreatic sequences encode proteins with identical amino acid sequences as previously determined for the enzymes isolated from swamp-type and river-type water buffalo, respectively. The seminal-type sequence has no pseudogene features and codes for an enzyme with no unusual features compared with the active bovine enzyme, except for the replacement of one of the cysteines which takes part in the two intersubunit disulfide bridges. However, Western blotting demonstrates the presence of only small amounts of the pancreatic enzymes in water buffalo semen, suggesting that also in this species the seminal-type sequence is not expressed. But it is still possible that the gene is expressed somewhere else in the body or during development. Reconstruction of seminal-type ribonuclease sequences in ancestors of Bovinae and Bovidae indicates no serious abnormalities in the encoded proteins and leads us to the hypothesis that the ruminant seminal-type ribonuclease gene has not come to expression during most of its evolutionary history, but did not exhibit a high evolutionary rate that is generally observed in pseudogenes.

  12. A subgroup of MYB transcription factor genes undergoes highly conserved alternative splicing in Arabidopsis and rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jigang; Li, Xiaojuan; Guo, Lei; Lu, Feng; Feng, Xiaojie; He, Kun; Wei, Liping; Chen, Zhangliang; Qu, Li-Jia; Gu, Hongya

    2006-01-01

    MYB transcription factor genes play important roles in many developmental processes and in various defence responses of plants. Two Arabidopsis R2R3-type MYB genes, AtMYB59 and AtMYB48, were found to undergo similar alternative splicing. Both genes have four distinctively spliced transcripts that encode either MYB-related proteins or R2R3-MYB proteins. An extensive BLAST search of the GenBank database resulted in finding and cloning two rice homologues, both of which were also found to share a similar alternative splicing pattern. In a semi-quantitative study, the expression of one splice variant of AtMYB59 was found to be differentially regulated in treatments with different phytohormones and stresses. GFP fusion protein analysis revealed that both of the two predicted nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in the R3 domain are required for localizing to the nucleus. Promoter-GUS analysis in transgenic plants showed that 5'-UTR is sufficient for the translation initiation of type 3 transcripts (encoding R2R3-MYB proteins), but not for type 2 transcripts (encoding MYB-related proteins). Moreover, a new type of non-canonical intron, with the same nucleotide repeats at the 5' and 3' splice sites, was identified. Thirty-eight Arabidopsis and rice genes were found to have this type of non-canonical intron, most of which undergo alternative splicing. These data suggest that this subgroup of transcription factor genes may be involved in multiple biological processes and may be transcriptionally regulated by alternative splicing. PMID:16531467

  13. Marker genes that are less conserved in their sequences are useful for predicting genome-wide similarity levels between closely related prokaryotic strains

    DOE PAGES

    Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail; Hershberg, Ruth

    2016-05-03

    The 16s rRNA gene is so far the most widely used marker for taxonomical classification and separation of prokaryotes. Since it is universally conserved among prokaryotes, it is possible to use this gene to classify a broad range of prokaryotic organisms. At the same time, it has often been noted that the 16s rRNA gene is too conserved to separate between prokaryotes at finer taxonomic levels. In this paper, we examine how well levels of similarity of 16s rRNA and 73 additional universal or nearly universal marker genes correlate with genome-wide levels of gene sequence similarity. We demonstrate that themore » percent identity of 16s rRNA predicts genome-wide levels of similarity very well for distantly related prokaryotes, but not for closely related ones. In closely related prokaryotes, we find that there are many other marker genes for which levels of similarity are much more predictive of genome-wide levels of gene sequence similarity. Finally, we show that the identities of the markers that are most useful for predicting genome-wide levels of similarity within closely related prokaryotic lineages vary greatly between lineages. However, the most useful markers are always those that are least conserved in their sequences within each lineage. In conclusion, our results show that by choosing markers that are less conserved in their sequences within a lineage of interest, it is possible to better predict genome-wide gene sequence similarity between closely related prokaryotes than is possible using the 16s rRNA gene. We point readers towards a database we have created (POGO-DB) that can be used to easily establish which markers show lowest levels of sequence conservation within different prokaryotic lineages.« less

  14. Nme Gene Family Evolutionary History Reveals Pre-Metazoan Origins and High Conservation between Humans and the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    Desvignes, Thomas; Pontarotti, Pierre; Bobe, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Background The Nme gene family is involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes such as cellular differentiation, development, metastatic dissemination, and cilia functions. Despite the known importance of Nme genes and their use as clinical markers of tumor aggressiveness, the associated cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Over the last 20 years, several non-vertebrate model species have been used to investigate Nme functions. However, the evolutionary history of the family remains poorly understood outside the vertebrate lineage. The aim of the study was thus to elucidate the evolutionary history of the Nme gene family in Metazoans. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a total of 21 eukaryote species including 14 metazoans, the evolutionary history of Nme genes was reconstructed in the metazoan lineage. We demonstrated that the complexity of the Nme gene family, initially thought to be restricted to chordates, was also shared by the metazoan ancestor. We also provide evidence suggesting that the complexity of the family is mainly a eukaryotic innovation, with the exception of Nme8 that is likely to be a choanoflagellate/metazoan innovation. Highly conserved gene structure, genomic linkage, and protein domains were identified among metazoans, some features being also conserved in eukaryotes. When considering the entire Nme family, the starlet sea anemone is the studied metazoan species exhibiting the most conserved gene and protein sequence features with humans. In addition, we were able to show that most of the proteins known to interact with human NME proteins were also found in starlet sea anemone. Conclusion/Significance Together, our observations further support the association of Nme genes with key cellular functions that have been conserved throughout metazoan evolution. Future investigations of evolutionarily conserved Nme gene functions using the starlet sea anemone could shed new light on a wide variety of key developmental and

  15. Conserved and divergent expression patterns of the proteolipid protein gene family in the amphibian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Shan, W S; Colman, D R

    1999-07-01

    The recent discovery of a proteolipid protein gene family has revealed that its members are in fact widely distributed and are not exclusively associated with myelination. To date, three different gene products, DMalpha/DM-20/PLP, DMbeta/M6a, and DMgamma/M6b, have been isolated from certain primitive fish species, mouse, and human central nervous system (CNS). We cloned Xenopus laevis orthologues of DMbeta/M6a and DMgamma/M6b and investigated the expression patterns of these gene transcripts as well as that of PLP in developing Xenopus CNS. As is the case in shark and mouse, the mRNA encoding the major myelin integral protein, PLP, is first detected at stage 42/43 in tadpoles and is exclusively found in morphologically recognizable oligodendrocytes throughout the brain, while DMbeta mRNA is solely expressed in young presumptive neurons in the gray matter. There exist two distinct DMgamma mRNAs and, in contrast to these evolutionarily conserved expression patterns, DMgamma mRNAs distribute uniquely within the ventricular zone in young tadpoles (stage 25) through maturity. Furthermore, both DMbeta and DMgamma are expressed in the developing retina, and their distributions are different from one other. In Xenopus CNS, therefore, the expression patterns of three proteolipid proteins, PLP, DMbeta, and DMgamma, are distinct from each other, implying very different roles for their protein products within the cell populations in which they are expressed. PMID:10397631

  16. The clot gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a conserved member of the thioredoxin-like protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Giordano, E; Peluso, I; Rendina, R; Digilio, A; Furia, M

    2003-02-01

    The conversion of pyruvoyl-H(4)-pterin to pyrimidodiazepine (PDA), which is an essential step in the biosynthesis of the red components of Drosophila eye pigments known as drosopterins, requires the products of the genes sepia and clot. While the product of sepia has been shown to correspond to the enzyme PDA-synthase, the role of clot remains unknown, although the clot(1) allele was one of the first eye-color mutants to be isolated in Drosophila melanogaster,and much genetic and biochemical data has become available since. Here we report the cloning of the clot gene, describe its molecular organization and characterize the sequence alterations associated with the alleles cl(1) and cl(2). The coding properties of the gene show that it encodes a protein related to the Glutaredoxin class of the Thioredoxin-like enzyme superfamily, conserved members of which are found in human, mouse and plants. We suggest that the Clot protein is an essential component of a glutathione redox system required for the final step in the biosynthetic pathway for drosopterins. PMID:12589444

  17. Distorting Gene Pools by Conservation: Assessing the Case of Doomed Turtle Eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrosovsky, N.

    2006-10-01

    Sea turtles have a high reproductive output and high mortality at early stages of the life cycle. In particular, many nests are laid below or close to high tide lines, and subsequently large numbers of eggs may be inundated and destroyed. A common conservation procedure is to relocate such doomed eggs to higher ground. This article examines this practice in the light of recent data revealing that some individual turtles tend to nest relatively near the water and others relatively higher up the beach. Discussion is focused on the question of why apparently poor placement of nests has not been selected against. Comparison between the ecology of leatherback and hawksbill turtle nesting beaches suggests that predictability of environmental conditions on the nesting beaches has an important influence on patterns of nest-site selection. Options are outlined for the management of nesting beaches where a high proportion of turtle eggs is subject to destruction by flooding.

  18. Structure Conservation and Differential Expression of Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Genes in Euphorbiaceous Plants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Li, Hui-Liang; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) is a key enzyme of isoprenoids biosynthesis. However, knowledge of the FPSs of euphorbiaceous species is limited. In this study, ten FPSs were identified in four euphorbiaceous plants. These FPSs exhibited similar exon/intron structure. The deduced FPS proteins showed close identities and exhibited the typical structure of plant FPS. The members of the FPS family exhibit tissue expression patterns that vary among several euphorbiaceous plant species under normal growth conditions. The expression profiles reveal spatial and temporal variations in the expression of FPSs of different tissues from Euphorbiaceous plants. Our results revealed wide conservation of FPSs and diverse expression in euphorbiaceous plants during growth and development. PMID:26389894

  19. Functional conservation of cis-regulatory elements of heat-shock genes over long evolutionary distances.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengying; Eichel, Kelsie; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene regulation is an intricate process that requires precise orchestration of a number of molecular components. Studying its evolution can serve as a useful model for understanding how complex molecular machines evolve. One way to investigate evolution of transcriptional regulation is to test the functions of cis-elements from one species in a distant relative. Previous results suggested that few, if any, tissue-specific promoters from Drosophila are faithfully expressed in C. elegans. Here we show that, in contrast, promoters of fly and human heat-shock genes are upregulated in C. elegans upon exposure to heat. Inducibility under conditions of heat shock may represent a relatively simple "on-off" response, whereas complex expression patterns require integration of multiple signals. Our results suggest that simpler aspects of regulatory logic may be retained over longer periods of evolutionary time, while more complex ones may be diverging more rapidly.

  20. Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Renran; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Angiosperms are the most successful plants and support human livelihood and ecosystems. Angiosperm phylogeny is the foundation of studies of gene function and phenotypic evolution, divergence time estimation and biogeography. The relationship of the five divergent groups of the Mesangiospermae (~99.95% of extant angiosperms) remains uncertain, with multiple hypotheses reported in the literature. Here transcriptome data sets are obtained from 26 species lacking sequenced genomes, representing each of the five groups: eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using 59 carefully selected low-copy nuclear genes resulted in highly supported relationships: sisterhood of eudicots and a clade containing Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae, with magnoliids being the next sister group, followed by monocots. Our topology allows a re-examination of the evolutionary patterns of 110 morphological characters. The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation. PMID:25249442