Science.gov

Sample records for conserved wd40 domain

  1. The WD40 Domain Is Required for LRRK2 Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Nathan D.; Peng, Yong; Ho, Cherry C.-Y.; Rideout, Hardy J.; Petrey, Donald; Liu, Peng; Dauer, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson disease (PD). LRRK2 contains an “enzymatic core” composed of GTPase and kinase domains that is flanked by leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and WD40 protein-protein interaction domains. While kinase activity and GTP-binding have both been implicated in LRRK2 neurotoxicity, the potential role of other LRRK2 domains has not been as extensively explored. Principal Findings We demonstrate that LRRK2 normally exists in a dimeric complex, and that removing the WD40 domain prevents complex formation and autophosphorylation. Moreover, loss of the WD40 domain completely blocks the neurotoxicity of multiple LRRK2 PD mutations. Conclusion These findings suggest that LRRK2 dimerization and autophosphorylation may be required for the neurotoxicity of LRRK2 PD mutations and highlight a potential role for the WD40 domain in the mechanism of LRRK2-mediated cell death. PMID:20041156

  2. BmPLA2 containing conserved domain WD40 affects the metabolic functions of fat body tissue in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Orville Singh, Chabungbam; Xin, Hu-Hu; Chen, Rui-Ting; Wang, Mei-Xian; Liang, Shuang; Lu, Yan; Cai, Zi-Zheng; Miao, Yun-Gen

    2016-02-01

    PLA2 enzyme hydrolyzes arachidonic acid, and other polyunsaturated fatty acids, from the sn-2 position to release free arachidonic acid and a lysophospholipid. Previous studies reported that the PLA2 in invertebrate organisms participates in lipid signaling molecules like arachidonic acid release in immune-associated tissues like hemocytes and fat bodies. In the present study, we cloned the BmPLA2 gene from fat body tissue of silkworm Bombyx mori, which has a total sequence of 1.031 kb with a 31.90 kDa protein. In silico results of BmPLA2 indicated that the protein has a putative WD40 conserved domain and its phylogeny tree clustered with Danaus plexippus species. We investigated the transcriptional expression in development stages and tissues. The highest expression of BmPLA2 was screened in fat body among the studied tissues of third day fifth instar larva, with a high expression on third day fifth instar larva followed by a depression of expression in the wandering stage of the fifth instar larva. The expression of BmPLA2 in female pupa was higher than that of male pupa. Our RNAi-mediated gene silencing results showed highest reduction of BmPLA2 expression in post-24 h followed by post-48 and post-72 h. The BmPLA2-RNAi larvae and pupa could be characterized by pharate adult lethality and underdevelopment. The phenotypic characters of fat body cells in RNAi-induced larva implied that BmPLA2 affects the metabolic functions of fat body tissue in silkworm Bombyx mori.

  3. Integrating population variation and protein structural analysis to improve clinical interpretation of missense variation: application to the WD40 domain.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Tyagi, Nidhi; Johnson, Diana; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; McWilliam, Catherine; Splitt, Miranda; Thornton, Janet M; Firth, Helen V; Wright, Caroline F

    2016-03-01

    We present a generic, multidisciplinary approach for improving our understanding of novel missense variants in recently discovered disease genes exhibiting genetic heterogeneity, by combining clinical and population genetics with protein structural analysis. Using six new de novo missense diagnoses in TBL1XR1 from the Deciphering Developmental Disorders study, together with population variation data, we show that the β-propeller structure of the ubiquitous WD40 domain provides a convincing way to discriminate between pathogenic and benign variation. Children with likely pathogenic mutations in this gene have severely delayed language development, often accompanied by intellectual disability, autism, dysmorphology and gastrointestinal problems. Amino acids affected by likely pathogenic missense mutations are either crucial for the stability of the fold, forming part of a highly conserved symmetrically repeating hydrogen-bonded tetrad, or located at the top face of the β-propeller, where 'hotspot' residues affect the binding of β-catenin to the TBLR1 protein. In contrast, those altered by population variation are significantly less likely to be spatially clustered towards the top face or to be at buried or highly conserved residues. This result is useful not only for interpreting benign and pathogenic missense variants in this gene, but also in other WD40 domains, many of which are associated with disease. PMID:26740553

  4. Integrating population variation and protein structural analysis to improve clinical interpretation of missense variation: application to the WD40 domain

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Roman A.; Tyagi, Nidhi; Johnson, Diana; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; McWilliam, Catherine; Splitt, Miranda; Thornton, Janet M.; Firth, Helen V.; Wright, Caroline F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a generic, multidisciplinary approach for improving our understanding of novel missense variants in recently discovered disease genes exhibiting genetic heterogeneity, by combining clinical and population genetics with protein structural analysis. Using six new de novo missense diagnoses in TBL1XR1 from the Deciphering Developmental Disorders study, together with population variation data, we show that the β-propeller structure of the ubiquitous WD40 domain provides a convincing way to discriminate between pathogenic and benign variation. Children with likely pathogenic mutations in this gene have severely delayed language development, often accompanied by intellectual disability, autism, dysmorphology and gastrointestinal problems. Amino acids affected by likely pathogenic missense mutations are either crucial for the stability of the fold, forming part of a highly conserved symmetrically repeating hydrogen-bonded tetrad, or located at the top face of the β-propeller, where ‘hotspot’ residues affect the binding of β-catenin to the TBLR1 protein. In contrast, those altered by population variation are significantly less likely to be spatially clustered towards the top face or to be at buried or highly conserved residues. This result is useful not only for interpreting benign and pathogenic missense variants in this gene, but also in other WD40 domains, many of which are associated with disease. PMID:26740553

  5. The T300A Crohn's disease risk polymorphism impairs function of the WD40 domain of ATG16L1.

    PubMed

    Boada-Romero, Emilio; Serramito-Gómez, Inmaculada; Sacristán, María P; Boone, David L; Xavier, Ramnik J; Pimentel-Muiños, Felipe X

    2016-01-01

    A coding polymorphism of human ATG16L1 (rs2241880; T300A) increases the risk of Crohn's disease and it has been shown to enhance susceptibility of ATG16L1 to caspase cleavage. Here we show that T300A also alters the ability of the C-terminal WD40-repeat domain of ATG16L1 to interact with an amino acid motif that recognizes this region. Such alteration impairs the unconventional autophagic activity of TMEM59, a transmembrane protein that contains the WD40 domain-binding motif, and disrupts its normal intracellular trafficking and its ability to engage ATG16L1 in response to bacterial infection. TMEM59-induced autophagy is blunted in cells expressing the fragments generated by caspase processing of the ATG16L1-T300A risk allele, whereas canonical autophagy remains unaffected. These results suggest that the T300A polymorphism alters the function of motif-containing molecules that engage ATG16L1 through the WD40 domain, either by influencing this interaction under non-stressful conditions or by inhibiting their downstream autophagic signalling after caspase-mediated cleavage. PMID:27273576

  6. The T300A Crohn's disease risk polymorphism impairs function of the WD40 domain of ATG16L1

    PubMed Central

    Boada-Romero, Emilio; Serramito-Gómez, Inmaculada; Sacristán, María P.; Boone, David L.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Pimentel-Muiños, Felipe X.

    2016-01-01

    A coding polymorphism of human ATG16L1 (rs2241880; T300A) increases the risk of Crohn's disease and it has been shown to enhance susceptibility of ATG16L1 to caspase cleavage. Here we show that T300A also alters the ability of the C-terminal WD40-repeat domain of ATG16L1 to interact with an amino acid motif that recognizes this region. Such alteration impairs the unconventional autophagic activity of TMEM59, a transmembrane protein that contains the WD40 domain-binding motif, and disrupts its normal intracellular trafficking and its ability to engage ATG16L1 in response to bacterial infection. TMEM59-induced autophagy is blunted in cells expressing the fragments generated by caspase processing of the ATG16L1-T300A risk allele, whereas canonical autophagy remains unaffected. These results suggest that the T300A polymorphism alters the function of motif-containing molecules that engage ATG16L1 through the WD40 domain, either by influencing this interaction under non-stressful conditions or by inhibiting their downstream autophagic signalling after caspase-mediated cleavage. PMID:27273576

  7. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Binds to Neuronal Vesicles through Protein Interactions Mediated by Its C-Terminal WD40 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Giovanni; Onofri, Franco; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Kaiser, Christoph J. O.; Jagtap, Pravinkumar; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Pischedda, Francesca; Marte, Antonella; von Zweydorf, Felix; Vogt, Andreas; Giesert, Florian; Pan, Lifeng; Antonucci, Flavia; Kiel, Christina; Zhang, Mingjie; Weinkauf, Sevil; Sattler, Michael; Sala, Carlo; Matteoli, Michela; Ueffing, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including predicted C-terminal WD40 repeats. In this study, we analyzed functional and molecular features conferred by the WD40 domain. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified LRRK2 C-terminal domain revealed doughnut-shaped particles, providing experimental evidence for its WD40 fold. We demonstrate that LRRK2 WD40 binds and sequesters synaptic vesicles via interaction with vesicle-associated proteins. In fact, a domain-based pulldown approach combined with mass spectrometric analysis identified LRRK2 as being part of a highly specific protein network involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking. In addition, we found that a C-terminal sequence variant associated with an increased risk of developing PD, G2385R, correlates with a reduced binding affinity of LRRK2 WD40 to synaptic vesicles. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the WD40 domain within LRRK2 function. PMID:24687852

  8. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 binds to neuronal vesicles through protein interactions mediated by its C-terminal WD40 domain.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giovanni; Onofri, Franco; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Kaiser, Christoph J O; Jagtap, Pravinkumar; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Pischedda, Francesca; Marte, Antonella; von Zweydorf, Felix; Vogt, Andreas; Giesert, Florian; Pan, Lifeng; Antonucci, Flavia; Kiel, Christina; Zhang, Mingjie; Weinkauf, Sevil; Sattler, Michael; Sala, Carlo; Matteoli, Michela; Ueffing, Marius; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including predicted C-terminal WD40 repeats. In this study, we analyzed functional and molecular features conferred by the WD40 domain. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified LRRK2 C-terminal domain revealed doughnut-shaped particles, providing experimental evidence for its WD40 fold. We demonstrate that LRRK2 WD40 binds and sequesters synaptic vesicles via interaction with vesicle-associated proteins. In fact, a domain-based pulldown approach combined with mass spectrometric analysis identified LRRK2 as being part of a highly specific protein network involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking. In addition, we found that a C-terminal sequence variant associated with an increased risk of developing PD, G2385R, correlates with a reduced binding affinity of LRRK2 WD40 to synaptic vesicles. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the WD40 domain within LRRK2 function. PMID:24687852

  9. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 binds to neuronal vesicles through protein interactions mediated by its C-terminal WD40 domain.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giovanni; Onofri, Franco; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Kaiser, Christoph J O; Jagtap, Pravinkumar; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Pischedda, Francesca; Marte, Antonella; von Zweydorf, Felix; Vogt, Andreas; Giesert, Florian; Pan, Lifeng; Antonucci, Flavia; Kiel, Christina; Zhang, Mingjie; Weinkauf, Sevil; Sattler, Michael; Sala, Carlo; Matteoli, Michela; Ueffing, Marius; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including predicted C-terminal WD40 repeats. In this study, we analyzed functional and molecular features conferred by the WD40 domain. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified LRRK2 C-terminal domain revealed doughnut-shaped particles, providing experimental evidence for its WD40 fold. We demonstrate that LRRK2 WD40 binds and sequesters synaptic vesicles via interaction with vesicle-associated proteins. In fact, a domain-based pulldown approach combined with mass spectrometric analysis identified LRRK2 as being part of a highly specific protein network involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking. In addition, we found that a C-terminal sequence variant associated with an increased risk of developing PD, G2385R, correlates with a reduced binding affinity of LRRK2 WD40 to synaptic vesicles. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the WD40 domain within LRRK2 function.

  10. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1(WD40)). To understand how Apc1(WD40) contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1(WD40) deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1(WD40) abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C-Cdh1 complex with Apc1(WD40) deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1(WD40) is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C.

  11. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1(WD40)). To understand how Apc1(WD40) contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1(WD40) deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1(WD40) abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C-Cdh1 complex with Apc1(WD40) deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1(WD40) is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C. PMID:27601667

  12. WD40 proteins propel cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Stirnimann, Christian U; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Russell, Robert B; Müller, Christoph W

    2010-10-01

    Recent findings indicate that WD40 domains play central roles in biological processes by acting as hubs in cellular networks; however, they have been studied less intensely than other common domains, such as the kinase, PDZ or SH3 domains. As suggested by various interactome studies, they are among the most promiscuous interactors. Structural studies suggest that this property stems from their ability, as scaffolds, to interact with diverse proteins, peptides or nucleic acids using multiple surfaces or modes of interaction. A general scaffolding role is supported by the fact that no WD40 domain has been found with intrinsic enzymatic activity despite often being part of large molecular machines. We discuss the WD40 domain distributions in protein networks and structures of WD40-containing assemblies to demonstrate their versatility in mediating critical cellular functions.

  13. Novel regulation of Skp1 by the Dictyostelium AgtA α-galactosyltransferase involves the Skp1-binding activity of its WD40 repeat domain.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Christopher M; Sheikh, M Osman; Zhang, Dongmei; West, Christopher M

    2014-03-28

    The role of Skp1 as an adaptor protein that links Cullin-1 to F-box proteins in E3 Skp1/Cullin-1/F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligases is well characterized. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium and probably many other unicellular eukaryotes, Skp1 is modified by a pentasaccharide attached to a hydroxyproline near its C terminus. This modification is important for oxygen-sensing during Dictyostelium development and is mediated by a HIF-α type prolyl 4-hydroxylase and five sequentially acting cytoplasmic glycosyltransferase activities. Gene disruption studies show that AgtA, the enzyme responsible for addition of the final two galactose residues, in α-linkages to the Skp1 core trisaccharide, is unexpectedly critical for oxygen-dependent terminal development. AgtA possesses a WD40 repeat domain C-terminal to its single catalytic domain and, by use of domain deletions, binding studies, and enzyme assays, we find that the WD40 repeats confer a salt-sensitive second-site binding interaction with Skp1 that mediates novel catalytic activation in addition to simple substrate recognition. In addition, AgtA binds similarly well to precursor isoforms of Skp1 by a salt-sensitive mechanism that competes with binding to an F-box protein and recognition by early modification enzymes, and the effect of binding is diminished when AgtA modifies Skp1. Genetic studies show that loss of AgtA is more severe when an earlier glycosylation step is blocked, and overexpressed AgtA is deleterious if catalytically inactivated. Together, the findings suggest that AgtA mediates non-enzymatic control of unmodified and substrate precursor forms of Skp1 by a binding mechanism that is normally relieved by switch-like activation of its glycosylation function. PMID:24550398

  14. A direct interaction between the carboxyl-terminal region of CDC5L and the WD40 domain of PLRG1 is essential for pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Ajuh, P; Sleeman, J; Chusainow, J; Lamond, A I

    2001-11-01

    The human proteins CDC5L (hCDC5) and PLRG1 are both highly conserved components of a multiprotein complex that is a subunit of the spliceosome. The respective homologues in yeast of both proteins are also associated with a sub-spliceosomal multiprotein complex that has been shown to be important for pre-mRNA splicing. We show that these two human proteins are associated in vivo and will interact directly in vitro. The regions containing the interacting domains in both proteins have been identified. Our results indicate that the carboxyl-terminal region of CDC5L and the WD40 domain of PLRG1 are essential for direct interaction between both proteins. By using a bacterially expressed mutant protein, containing the PLRG1 interacting domain in CDC5L, we show that the CDC5L-PLRG1 interaction in HeLa nuclear extract can be disrupted causing pre-mRNA splicing to be inhibited. Thus, a direct interaction between the CDC5L protein and PLRG1 in the CDC5L complex is essential for pre-mRNA splicing progression. PMID:11544257

  15. The WD-40 repeat protein PkwA of Thermomonospora curvata is associated with rapid growth and is localized in the tips of growing hyphae.

    PubMed

    Petrícková, Katerina; Hasek, Jirí; Benada, Oldrich; Petrícek, Miroslav

    2006-05-01

    The PkwA protein of the thermophilic actinomycete Thermomonospora curvata has already been reported as the first instance of a WD-40 module-containing protein of prokaryotic origin. This protein is composed of an N-terminal eukaryotic-type protein kinase domain and of seven C-terminal WD-40 repeats. PkwA is a peripheral membrane protein that is linked to the early exponential growth phase of the bacterium. Its intracellular concentrations are extremely low. We have shown that the protein forms high molecular weight complexes and is localized mainly in the tips of the young Thermomonospora vegetative hyphae.

  16. Identification of WD40 repeats by secondary structure-aided profile-profile alignment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Dong, Xiaobao; Han, Lei; Su, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Ziding; Li, Jinyan; Song, Jiangning

    2016-06-01

    A WD40 protein typically contains four or more repeats of ~40 residues ended with the Trp-Asp dipeptide, which folds into β-propellers with four β strands in each repeat. They often function as scaffolds for protein-protein interactions and are involved in numerous fundamental biological processes. Despite their important functional role, the "velcro" closure of WD40 propellers and the diversity of WD40 repeats make their identification a difficult task. Here we develop a new WD40 Repeat Recognition method (WDRR), which uses predicted secondary structure information to generate candidate repeat segments, and further employs a profile-profile alignment to identify the correct WD40 repeats from candidate segments. In particular, we design a novel alignment scoring function that combines dot product and BLOSUM62, thereby achieving a great balance of sensitivity and accuracy. Taking advantage of these strategies, WDRR could effectively reduce the false positive rate and accurately identify more remote homologous WD40 repeats with precise repeat boundaries. We further use WDRR to re-annotate the Pfam families in the β-propeller clan (CL0186) and identify a number of WD40 repeat proteins with high confidence across nine model organisms. The WDRR web server and the datasets are available at http://protein.cau.edu.cn/wdrr/.

  17. X-linked late-onset sensorineural deafness caused by a deletion involving OA1 and a novel gene containing WD-40 repeats.

    PubMed

    Bassi, M T; Ramesar, R S; Caciotti, B; Winship, I M; De Grandi, A; Riboni, M; Townes, P L; Beighton, P; Ballabio, A; Borsani, G

    1999-06-01

    We have identified a novel gene, transducin (beta)-like 1 (TBL1), in the Xp22.3 genomic region, that shows high homology with members of the WD-40-repeat protein family. The gene contains 18 exons spanning approximately 150 kb of the genomic region adjacent to the ocular albinism gene (OA1) on the telomeric side. However, unlike OA1, TBL1 is transcribed from telomere to centromere. Northern analysis indicates that TBL1 is ubiquitously expressed, with two transcripts of approximately 2.1 kb and 6.0 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 526-amino acid protein, which shows the presence of six beta-transducin repeats (WD-40 motif) in the C-terminal domain. The homology with known beta-subunits of G proteins and other WD-40-repeat containing proteins is restricted to the WD-40 motif. Genomic analysis revealed that the gene is either partly or entirely deleted in patients carrying Xp22.3 terminal deletions. The complexity of the contiguous gene-syndrome phenotype shared by these patients depends on the number of known disease genes involved in the deletions. Interestingly, one patient carrying a microinterstitial deletion involving the 3' portion of both TBL1 and OA1 shows the OA1 phenotype associated with X-linked late-onset sensorineural deafness. We postulate an involvement of TBL1 in the pathogenesis of the ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness phenotype.

  18. Ternary WD40 Repeat-Containing Protein Complexes: Evolution, Composition and Roles in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jimi C.; Chezem, William R.; Clay, Nicole K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants, like mammals, rely on their innate immune system to perceive and discriminate among the majority of their microbial pathogens. Unlike mammals, plants respond to this molecular dialog by unleashing a complex chemical arsenal of defense metabolites to resist or evade pathogen infection. In basal or non-host resistance, plants utilize signal transduction pathways to detect “non-self,” “damaged-self,” and “altered-self”- associated molecular patterns and translate these “danger” signals into largely inducible chemical defenses. The WD40 repeat (WDR)-containing proteins Gβ and TTG1 are constituents of two independent ternary protein complexes functioning at opposite ends of a plant immune signaling pathway. They are also encoded by single-copy genes that are ubiquitous in higher plants, implying the limited diversity and functional conservation of their respective complexes. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about the evolutionary history of these WDR-containing ternary complexes, their repertoire and combinatorial interactions, and their downstream effectors and pathways in plant defense. PMID:26779203

  19. A WD40 repeat protein regulates fungal cell differentiation and can be replaced functionally by the mammalian homologue striatin.

    PubMed

    Pöggeler, Stefanie; Kück, Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Fruiting body development in fungi is a complex cellular differentiation process that is controlled by more than 100 developmental genes. Mutants of the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora showing defects in fruiting body formation are pertinent sources for the identification of components of this multicellular differentiation process. Here we show that the sterile mutant pro11 carries a defect in the pro11 gene encoding a multimodular WD40 repeat protein. Complementation analysis indicates that the wild-type gene or C-terminally truncated versions of the wild-type protein are able to restore the fertile phenotype in mutant pro11. PRO11 shows significant homology to several vertebrate WD40 proteins, such as striatin and zinedin, which seem to be involved in Ca2+-dependent signaling in cells of the central nervous system and are supposed to function as scaffolding proteins linking signaling and eukaryotic endocytosis. Cloning of a mouse cDNA encoding striatin allowed functional substitution of the wild-type protein with restoration of fertility in mutant pro11. Our data strongly suggest that an evolutionarily conserved cellular process controlling eukaryotic cell differentiation may regulate fruiting body formation.

  20. WD40-Repeat Proteins in Plant Cell Wall Formation: Current Evidence and Research Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Ezcurra, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In eukaryotes WD40-repeat (WDR) proteins often function as molecular “hubs” mediating supramolecular interactions. WDR proteins may display a variety of interacting partners and participate in the assembly of complexes involved in distinct cellular functions. In plants, the formation of lignocellulosic biomass involves extensive synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides, a process that requires the assembly of large transmembrane enzyme complexes, intensive vesicle trafficking, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and coordinated gene expression. Because of their function as supramolecular hubs, WDR proteins could participate in each or any of these steps, although to date only few WDR proteins have been linked to the cell wall by experimental evidence. Nevertheless, several potential cell wall-related WDR proteins were recently identified using in silico approaches, such as analyses of co-expression, interactome and conserved gene neighborhood. Notably, some WDR genes are frequently genomic neighbors of genes coding for GT2-family polysaccharide synthases in eukaryotes, and this WDR-GT2 collinear microsynteny is detected in diverse taxa. In angiosperms, two WDR genes are collinear to cellulose synthase genes, CesAs, whereas in ascomycetous fungi several WDR genes are adjacent to chitin synthase genes, chs. In this Perspective we summarize and discuss experimental and in silico studies on the possible involvement of WDR proteins in plant cell wall formation. The prospects of biotechnological engineering for enhanced biomass production are discussed. PMID:26734023

  1. The Multifunctions of WD40 Proteins in Genome Integrity and Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiguo; Zhang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genome encodes numerous WD40 repeat proteins, which generally function as platforms of protein-protein interactions and are involved in numerous biological process, such as signal transduction, gene transcriptional regulation, protein modifications, cytoskeleton assembly, vesicular trafficking, DNA damage and repair, cell death and cell cycle progression. Among these diverse functions, genome integrity maintenance and cell cycle progression are extremely important as deregulation of them is clinically linked to uncontrolled proliferative diseases such as cancer. Thus, we mainly summarize and discuss the recent understanding of WD40 proteins and their molecular mechanisms linked to genome stability and cell cycle progression in this review, thereby demonstrating their pervasiveness and importance in cellular networks. PMID:25653723

  2. HET-E and HET-D belong to a new subfamily of WD40 proteins involved in vegetative incompatibility specificity in the fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Espagne, Eric; Balhadère, Pascale; Penin, Marie-Louise; Barreau, Christian; Turcq, Béatrice

    2002-01-01

    Vegetative incompatibility, which is very common in filamentous fungi, prevents a viable heterokaryotic cell from being formed by the fusion of filaments from two different wild-type strains. Such incompatibility is always the consequence of at least one genetic difference in specific genes (het genes). In Podospora anserina, alleles of the het-e and het-d loci control heterokaryon viability through genetic interactions with alleles of the unlinked het-c locus. The het-d2(Y) gene was isolated and shown to have strong similarity with the previously described het-e1(A) gene. Like the HET-E protein, the HET-D putative protein displayed a GTP-binding domain and seemed to require a minimal number of 11 WD40 repeats to be active in incompatibility. Apart from incompatibility specificity, no other function could be identified by disrupting the het-d gene. Sequence comparison of different het-e alleles suggested that het-e specificity is determined by the sequence of the WD40 repeat domain. In particular, the amino acids present on the upper face of the predicted beta-propeller structure defined by this domain may confer the incompatible interaction specificity. PMID:12019224

  3. The WD40 repeat protein NEDD1 functions in microtubule organization during cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zeng, C J Tracy; Lee, Y-R Julie; Liu, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Although cells of flowering plants lack a structurally defined microtubule-organizing center like the centrosome, organization of the spindles and phragmoplasts in mitosis is known to involve the evolutionarily conserved gamma-tubulin complex. We have investigated the function of Arabidopsis thaliana NEDD1, a WD40 repeat protein related to the animal NEDD1/GCP-WD protein, which interacts with the gamma-tubulin complex. The NEDD1 protein decorates spindle microtubules (MTs) preferentially toward spindle poles and phragmoplast MTs toward their minus ends. A T-DNA insertional allele of the single NEDD1 gene was isolated and maintained in heterozygous sporophytes, and NEDD1's function in cell division was analyzed in haploid microspores produced by the heterozygote. In approximately half of the dividing microspores exhibiting aberrant MT organization, spindles were no longer restricted to the cell periphery and became abnormally elongated. After mitosis, MTs aggregated between reforming nuclei but failed to appear in a bipolar configuration. Consequently, defective microspores did not form a continuous cell plate, and two identical nuclei were produced with no differentiation into generative and vegetative cells. Our results support the notion that the plant NEDD1 homolog plays a critical role in MT organization during mitosis, and its function is likely linked to that of the gamma-tubulin complex. PMID:19383896

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr-Binding Protein VprBP, a WD40 Protein Associated with the DDB1-CUL4 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Is Essential for DNA Replication and Embryonic Development▿

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Chad M.; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Chastain, Paul D.; Jackson, Sarah C.; He, Yizhou J.; Kotake, Yojiro; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Xiong, Yue

    2008-01-01

    Damaged DNA binding protein 1, DDB1, bridges an estimated 90 or more WD40 repeats (DDB1-binding WD40, or DWD proteins) to the CUL4-ROC1 catalytic core to constitute a potentially large number of E3 ligase complexes. Among these DWD proteins is the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr-binding protein VprBP, whose cellular function has yet to be characterized but has recently been found to mediate Vpr-induced G2 cell cycle arrest. We demonstrate here that VprBP binds stoichiometrically with DDB1 through its WD40 domain and through DDB1 to CUL4A, subunits of the COP9/signalsome, and DDA1. The steady-state level of VprBP remains constant during interphase and decreases during mitosis. VprBP binds to chromatin in a DDB1-independent and cell cycle-dependent manner, increasing from early S through G2 before decreasing to undetectable levels in mitotic and G1 cells. Silencing VprBP reduced the rate of DNA replication, blocked cells from progressing through the S phase, and inhibited proliferation. VprBP ablation in mice results in early embryonic lethality. Conditional deletion of the VprBP gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts results in severely defective progression through S phase and subsequent apoptosis. Our studies identify a previously unknown function of VprBP in S-phase progression and suggest the possibility that HIV-1 Vpr may divert an ongoing chromosomal replication activity to facilitate viral replication. PMID:18606781

  5. Conservation and specialization in PAS domain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pandini, A; Bonati, L

    2005-03-01

    The PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim) superfamily is presented as a well-suited study case to demonstrate how comparison of functional motions among distant homologous proteins with conserved fold characteristics may give insight into their functional specialization. Based on the importance of structural flexibility of the receptive structures in anticipating the signal-induced conformational changes of these sensory systems, the dynamics of these structures were analysed. Molecular dynamics was proved to be an effective method to obtain a reliable picture of the dynamics of the crystal structures of HERG, phy3, PYP and FixL, provided that an extensive conformational space sampling is performed. Other reliable sources of dynamic information were the ensembles of NMR structures of hPASK, HIF-2alpha and PYP. Essential dynamics analysis was successfully employed to extract the relevant information from the sampled conformational spaces. Comparison of motion patterns in the essential subspaces, based on the structural alignment, allowed identification of the specialized region in each domain. This appears to be evolved in the superfamily by following a specific trend, that also suggests the presence of a limited number of general solutions adopted by the PAS domains to sense external signals. These findings may give insight into unknown mechanisms of PAS domains and guide further experimental studies. PMID:15820977

  6. The LuWD40-1 gene encoding WD repeat protein regulates growth and pollen viability in flax (Linum Usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Jordan, Mark C; Datla, Raju; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    As a crop, flax holds significant commercial value for its omega-3 rich oilseeds and stem fibres. Canada is the largest producer of linseed but there exists scope for significant yield improvements. Implementation of mechanisms such as male sterility can permit the development of hybrids to assist in achieving this goal. Temperature sensitive male sterility has been reported in flax but the leakiness of this system in field conditions limits the production of quality hybrid seeds. Here, we characterized a 2,588 bp transcript differentially expressed in male sterile lines of flax. The twelve intron gene predicted to encode a 368 amino acid protein has five WD40 repeats which, in silico, form a propeller structure with putative nucleic acid and histone binding capabilities. The LuWD40-1 protein localized to the nucleus and its expression increased during the transition and continued through the vegetative stages (seed, etiolated seedling, stem) while the transcript levels declined during reproductive development (ovary, anthers) and embryonic morphogenesis of male fertile plants. Knockout lines for LuWD40-1 in flax failed to develop shoots while overexpression lines showed delayed growth phenotype and were male sterile. The non-viable flowers failed to open and the pollen grains from these flowers were empty. Three independent transgenic lines overexpressing the LuWD40-1 gene had ∼80% non-viable pollen, reduced branching, delayed flowering and maturity compared to male fertile genotypes. The present study provides new insights into a male sterility mechanism present in flax.

  7. Interactions of an Arabidopsis RanBPM homologue with LisH-CTLH domain proteins revealed high conservation of CTLH complexes in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RanBPM (Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organizing centre) was originally reported as a centrosome-associated protein in human cells. However, RanBPM protein containing highly conserved SPRY, LisH, CTLH and CRA domains is currently considered as a scaffolding protein with multiple cellular functions. A plant homologue of RanBPM has not yet been characterized. Results Based on sequence similarity, we identified a homologue of the human RanBPM in Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRanBPM protein has highly conserved SPRY, LisH, CTLH and CRA domains. Cell fractionation showed that endogenous AtRanBPM or expressed GFP-AtRanBPM are mainly cytoplasmic proteins with only a minor portion detectable in microsomal fractions. AtRanBPM was identified predominantly in the form of soluble cytoplasmic complexes ~230 – 500 kDa in size. Immunopurification of AtRanBPM followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified proteins containing LisH and CRA domains; LisH, CRA, RING-U-box domains and a transducin/WD40 repeats in a complex with AtRanBPM. Homologues of identified proteins are known to be components of the C-terminal to the LisH motif (CTLH) complexes in humans and budding yeast. Microscopic analysis of GFP-AtRanBPM in vivo and immunofluorescence localization of endogenous AtRanBPM protein in cultured cells and seedlings of Arabidopsis showed mainly cytoplasmic and nuclear localization. Absence of colocalization with γ-tubulin was consistent with the biochemical data and suggests another than a centrosomal role of the AtRanBPM protein. Conclusion We showed that as yet uncharacterized Arabidopsis RanBPM protein physically interacts with LisH-CTLH domain-containing proteins. The newly identified high molecular weight cytoplasmic protein complexes of AtRanBPM showed homology with CTLH types of complexes described in mammals and budding yeast. Although the exact functions of the CTLH complexes in scaffolding of protein degradation, in protein interactions and in

  8. Evolutionary immune response to conserved domains in parasites and aeroallergens.

    PubMed

    Bielory, Brett Phillip; Mainardi, Timothy; Rottem, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    The immune response based on immunoglobulin E (IgE) evolved as a defense against specific parasitic infections. In the absence of active helminthic infections, the immune system has redirected its IgE epitopes toward innocuous environmental antigens. Helminths and aeroallergens have a similar stereotypical IgE response to unique antigens that can not be explained by chance alone. This study was designed to evaluate potential homology between conserved protein domains embedded in parasitic organisms and aeroallergens. Search and retrieval systems for nucleotide and protein sequences (Entrez, BLAST, and National Center for Biotechnology Information) were searched to identify conserved domains between allergens and certain parasites. A total score was developed that correlated positively with homology between compared sequences. Over 2000 domains were examined. We found matches with a high total score (>100) that signified a strong positive correlation between sequences in allergens (n = 30) and parasites (n = 13). Multiple shared conserved domains were identified between parasites and allergens. Parasite-allergen combinations with the most significant homology (greatest total score) were Plasmodium falciparum enolase and Hev b9 (total score, 612), Schistosoma mansoni albumin and Fel d 2 (total score, 991), Ascaris lumbricoides tropomyosin and Ani s3 (total score, 531), and Wuchereria bancrofti trypsin and Blo t3 (138). Homologous conserved domains exist in specific parasites and allergens, consistent with the theory that the human IgE-eosinophil immune response to common allergens is a direct consequence of stimulation by parasitic organisms. PMID:23406942

  9. CDD: a Conserved Domain Database for protein classification.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Anderson, John B; Cherukuri, Praveen F; DeWeese-Scott, Carol; Geer, Lewis Y; Gwadz, Marc; He, Siqian; Hurwitz, David I; Jackson, John D; Ke, Zhaoxi; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Liebert, Cynthia A; Liu, Chunlei; Lu, Fu; Marchler, Gabriele H; Mullokandov, Mikhail; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Simonyan, Vahan; Song, James S; Thiessen, Paul A; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Yin, Jodie J; Zhang, Dachuan; Bryant, Stephen H

    2005-01-01

    The Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is the protein classification component of NCBI's Entrez query and retrieval system. CDD is linked to other Entrez databases such as Proteins, Taxonomy and PubMed, and can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=cdd. CD-Search, which is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi, is a fast, interactive tool to identify conserved domains in new protein sequences. CD-Search results for protein sequences in Entrez are pre-computed to provide links between proteins and domain models, and computational annotation visible upon request. Protein-protein queries submitted to NCBI's BLAST search service at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST are scanned for the presence of conserved domains by default. While CDD started out as essentially a mirror of publicly available domain alignment collections, such as SMART, Pfam and COG, we have continued an effort to update, and in some cases replace these models with domain hierarchies curated at the NCBI. Here, we report on the progress of the curation effort and associated improvements in the functionality of the CDD information retrieval system. PMID:15608175

  10. The TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 locus, which regulates trichome differentiation and anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, encodes a WD40 repeat protein.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A R; Davison, P A; Bolognesi-Winfield, A C; James, C M; Srinivasan, N; Blundell, T L; Esch, J J; Marks, M D; Gray, J C

    1999-01-01

    The TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1) locus regulates several developmental and biochemical pathways in Arabidopsis, including the formation of hairs on leaves, stems, and roots, and the production of seed mucilage and anthocyanin pigments. The TTG1 locus has been isolated by positional cloning, and its identity was confirmed by complementation of a ttg1 mutant. The locus encodes a protein of 341 amino acid residues with four WD40 repeats. The protein is similar to AN11, a regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis in petunia, and more distantly related to those of the beta subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, which suggests a role for TTG1 in signal transduction to downstream transcription factors. The 1.5-kb TTG1 transcript is present in all major organs of Arabidopsis. Sequence analysis of six mutant alleles has identified base changes producing truncations or single amino acid changes in the TTG1 protein. PMID:10402433

  11. CDD: a database of conserved domain alignments with links to domain three-dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Panchenko, Anna R; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Thiessen, Paul A; Geer, Lewis Y; Bryant, Stephen H

    2002-01-01

    The Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is a compilation of multiple sequence alignments representing protein domains conserved in molecular evolution. It has been populated with alignment data from the public collections Pfam and SMART, as well as with contributions from colleagues at NCBI. The current version of CDD (v.1.54) contains 3693 such models. CDD alignments are linked to protein sequence and structure data in Entrez. The molecular structure viewer Cn3D serves as a tool to interactively visualize alignments and three-dimensional structure, and to link three-dimensional residue coordinates to descriptions of evolutionary conservation. CDD can be accessed on the World Wide Web at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml. Protein query sequences may be compared against databases of position-specific score matrices derived from alignments in CDD, using a service named CD-Search, which can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi. CD-Search runs reverse-position-specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST), a variant of the widely used PSI-BLAST algorithm. CD-Search is run by default for protein-protein queries submitted to NCBI's BLAST service at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST.

  12. The rice DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein is required for the assembly of the restoration of fertility complex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojian; Huang, Qi; Xiao, Haijun; Zhang, Qiannan; Ni, Chenzi; Xu, Yanghong; Liu, Gai; Yang, Daichang; Zhu, Yingguo; Hu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and restoration of fertility (Rf) are widely distributed in plant species utilized by humans. RF5 and GRP162 are subunits of the restoration of fertility complex (RFC) in Hong-Lian rice. Despite the fact that the RFC is 400-500 kDa in size, the other proteins or factors in the complex still remain unknown. Here, we identified RFC subunit 3, which encodes a DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein (RFC3) that is present in all tissues but highly expressed in leaves. We established that RFC3 interacts with both RF5 and GRP162 in vitro and in vivo, and is transported into the mitochondria as a membrane protein. Furthermore, CMS RNA (atp6-orfH79) and CMS cytotoxic protein (ORFH79) accumulate when RFC3 is silenced in restorer lines. We presented the analysis with blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that RFC is disrupted in the RNAi line. We concluded that RCF3 is indispensable as a scaffold protein for the assembly of the RFC complex. We unveil a new molecular player of the RFC in the Rf pathway in rice and propose the model of RFC based on these data. PMID:26781807

  13. Brassinosteroids control root epidermal cell fate via direct regulation of a MYB-bHLH-WD40 complex by GSK3-like kinases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yinwei; Zhu, Wenjiao; Chen, Yuxiao; Ito, Shinsaku; Asami, Tadao; Wang, Xuelu

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, root hair and non-hair cell fates are determined by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcriptional complex and are regulated by many internal and environmental cues. Brassinosteroids play important roles in regulating root hair specification by unknown mechanisms. Here, we systematically examined root hair phenotypes in brassinosteroid-related mutants, and found that brassinosteroid signaling inhibits root hair formation through GSK3-like kinases or upstream components. We found that with enhanced brassinosteroid signaling, GL2, a cell fate marker for non-hair cells, is ectopically expressed in hair cells, while its expression in non-hair cells is suppressed when brassinosteroid signaling is reduced. Genetic analysis demonstrated that brassinosteroid-regulated root epidermal cell patterning is dependent on the WER-GL3/EGL3-TTG1 transcriptional complex. One of the GSK3-like kinases, BIN2, interacted with and phosphorylated EGL3, and EGL3s mutated at phosphorylation sites were retained in hair cell nuclei. BIN2 phosphorylated TTG1 to inhibit the activity of the WER-GL3/EGL3-TTG1 complex. Thus, our study provides insights into the mechanism of brassinosteroid regulation of root hair patterning. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02525.001 PMID:24771765

  14. Function of a Conserved Checkpoint Recruitment Domain in ATRIP Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Heather L.; Ehrhardt, Mark R.; Mordes, Daniel A.; Glick, Gloria G.; Chazin, Walter J.; Cortez, David

    2007-01-01

    The ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) kinase is essential to maintain genomic integrity. ATR is recruited to DNA lesions in part through its association with ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP), which in turn interacts with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA (replication protein A). In this study, a conserved checkpoint protein recruitment domain (CRD) in ATRIP orthologs was identified by biochemical mapping of the RPA binding site in combination with nuclear magnetic resonance, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. Mutations in the CRD of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATRIP ortholog Ddc2 disrupt the Ddc2-RPA interaction, prevent proper localization of Ddc2 to DNA breaks, sensitize yeast to DNA-damaging agents, and partially compromise checkpoint signaling. These data demonstrate that the CRD is critical for localization and optimal DNA damage responses. However, the stimulation of ATR kinase activity by binding of topoisomerase binding protein 1 (TopBP1) to ATRIP-ATR can occur independently of the interaction of ATRIP with RPA. Our results support the idea of a multistep model for ATR activation that requires separable localization and activation functions of ATRIP. PMID:17339343

  15. Identification and characterization of MYB-bHLH-WD40 regulatory complexes controlling proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruits.

    PubMed

    Schaart, Jan G; Dubos, Christian; Romero De La Fuente, Irene; van Houwelingen, Adèle M M L; de Vos, Ric C H; Jonker, Harry H; Xu, Wenjia; Routaboul, Jean-Marc; Lepiniec, Loïc; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruits contain high concentrations of flavonoids. In unripe strawberries, the flavonoids are mainly represented by proanthocyanidins (PAs), while in ripe fruits the red-coloured anthocyanins also accumulate. Most of the structural genes leading to PA biosynthesis in strawberry have been characterized, but no information is available on their transcriptional regulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana the expression of the PA biosynthetic genes is specifically induced by a ternary protein complex, composed of AtTT2 (AtMYB123), AtTT8 (AtbHLH042) and AtTTG1 (WD40-repeat protein). A strategy combining yeast-two-hybrid screening and agglomerative hierarchical clustering of transcriptomic and metabolomic data was undertaken to identify strawberry PA regulators. Among the candidate genes isolated, four were similar to AtTT2, AtTT8 and AtTTG1 (FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1, respectively) and two encode putative negative regulators (FaMYB5 and FabHLH3∆). Interestingly, FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1 were found to complement the tt2-1, tt8-3 and ttg1-1 transparent testa mutants, respectively. In addition, they interacted in yeast and activated the Arabidopsis BANYULS (anthocyanidin reductase) gene promoter when coexpressed in Physcomitrella patens protoplasts. Taken together, these results demonstrated that FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1 are the respective functional homologues of AtTT2, AtTT8 and AtTTG1, providing new tools for modifying PA content and strawberry fruit quality.

  16. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells. PMID:27310875

  17. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells.

  18. Identification and characterization of MYB-bHLH-WD40 regulatory complexes controlling proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruits.

    PubMed

    Schaart, Jan G; Dubos, Christian; Romero De La Fuente, Irene; van Houwelingen, Adèle M M L; de Vos, Ric C H; Jonker, Harry H; Xu, Wenjia; Routaboul, Jean-Marc; Lepiniec, Loïc; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruits contain high concentrations of flavonoids. In unripe strawberries, the flavonoids are mainly represented by proanthocyanidins (PAs), while in ripe fruits the red-coloured anthocyanins also accumulate. Most of the structural genes leading to PA biosynthesis in strawberry have been characterized, but no information is available on their transcriptional regulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana the expression of the PA biosynthetic genes is specifically induced by a ternary protein complex, composed of AtTT2 (AtMYB123), AtTT8 (AtbHLH042) and AtTTG1 (WD40-repeat protein). A strategy combining yeast-two-hybrid screening and agglomerative hierarchical clustering of transcriptomic and metabolomic data was undertaken to identify strawberry PA regulators. Among the candidate genes isolated, four were similar to AtTT2, AtTT8 and AtTTG1 (FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1, respectively) and two encode putative negative regulators (FaMYB5 and FabHLH3∆). Interestingly, FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1 were found to complement the tt2-1, tt8-3 and ttg1-1 transparent testa mutants, respectively. In addition, they interacted in yeast and activated the Arabidopsis BANYULS (anthocyanidin reductase) gene promoter when coexpressed in Physcomitrella patens protoplasts. Taken together, these results demonstrated that FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1 are the respective functional homologues of AtTT2, AtTT8 and AtTTG1, providing new tools for modifying PA content and strawberry fruit quality. PMID:23157553

  19. The molecular chaperone TRiC/CCT binds to the Trp-Asp 40 (WD40) repeat protein WDR68 and promotes its folding, protein kinase DYRK1A binding, and nuclear accumulation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Takeshi; Aoshima, Masato; Tsubata, Takuichi; Nishida, Eisuke

    2014-11-28

    Trp-Asp (WD) repeat protein 68 (WDR68) is an evolutionarily conserved WD40 repeat protein that binds to several proteins, including dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase (DYRK1A), MAPK/ERK kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1), and Cullin4-damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1 (CUL4-DDB1). WDR68 affects multiple and diverse physiological functions, such as controlling anthocyanin synthesis in plants, tissue growth in insects, and craniofacial development in vertebrates. However, the biochemical basis and the regulatory mechanism of WDR68 activity remain largely unknown. To better understand the cellular function of WDR68, here we have isolated and identified cellular WDR68 binding partners using a phosphoproteomic approach. More than 200 cellular proteins with wide varieties of biochemical functions were identified as WDR68-binding protein candidates. Eight T-complex protein 1 (TCP1) subunits comprising the molecular chaperone TCP1 ring complex/chaperonin-containing TCP1 (TRiC/CCT) were identified as major WDR68-binding proteins, and phosphorylation sites in both WDR68 and TRiC/CCT were identified. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the binding between TRiC/CCT and WDR68. Computer-aided structural analysis suggested that WDR68 forms a seven-bladed β-propeller ring. Experiments with a series of deletion mutants in combination with the structural modeling showed that three of the seven β-propeller blades of WDR68 are essential and sufficient for TRiC/CCT binding. Knockdown of cellular TRiC/CCT by siRNA caused an abnormal WDR68 structure and led to reduction of its DYRK1A-binding activity. Concomitantly, nuclear accumulation of WDR68 was suppressed by the knockdown of TRiC/CCT, and WDR68 formed cellular aggregates when overexpressed in the TRiC/CCT-deficient cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the molecular chaperone TRiC/CCT is essential for correct protein folding, DYRK1A binding, and nuclear accumulation of WDR68. PMID

  20. Basal body stability and ciliogenesis requires the conserved component Poc1.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Chad G; Osborn, Daniel P S; Giddings, Thomas H; Beales, Philip L; Winey, Mark

    2009-12-14

    Centrioles are the foundation for centrosome and cilia formation. The biogenesis of centrioles is initiated by an assembly mechanism that first synthesizes the ninefold symmetrical cartwheel and subsequently leads to a stable cylindrical microtubule scaffold that is capable of withstanding microtubule-based forces generated by centrosomes and cilia. We report that the conserved WD40 repeat domain-containing cartwheel protein Poc1 is required for the structural maintenance of centrioles in Tetrahymena thermophila. Furthermore, human Poc1B is required for primary ciliogenesis, and in zebrafish, DrPoc1B knockdown causes ciliary defects and morphological phenotypes consistent with human ciliopathies. T. thermophila Poc1 exhibits a protein incorporation profile commonly associated with structural centriole components in which the majority of Poc1 is stably incorporated during new centriole assembly. A second dynamic population assembles throughout the cell cycle. Our experiments identify novel roles for Poc1 in centriole stability and ciliogenesis.

  1. Fold of the conserved DTC domain in deltex proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Walker, John R.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2012-04-30

    Human Deltex 3-like (DTX3L) is a member of the Deltex family of proteins. Initially identified as a B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein, DTX3L is an E3 ligase that regulates subcellular localization of its partner protein, BAL, by a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic trafficking mechanism. Unlike other members of the Deltex family of proteins, DTX3L lacks the highly basic N-terminal motif and the central proline-rich motif present in other Deltex proteins, and instead contains other unique N-terminal domains. The C-terminal domains are, however, homologous with other members of the Deltex family of proteins; these include a RING domain and a previously unidentified C-terminal domain. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of this previously uncharacterized C-terminal domain of human DTX3L, which we term the Deltex C-terminal domain.

  2. Charge-based interaction conserved within histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complexes is needed for protein stability, histone methylation, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mersman, Douglas P; Du, Hai-Ning; Fingerman, Ian M; South, Paul F; Briggs, Scott D

    2012-01-20

    Histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases are conserved from yeast to humans, assemble in multisubunit complexes, and are needed to regulate gene expression. The yeast H3K4 methyltransferase complex, Set1 complex or complex of proteins associated with Set1 (COMPASS), consists of Set1 and conserved Set1-associated proteins: Swd1, Swd2, Swd3, Spp1, Bre2, Sdc1, and Shg1. The removal of the WD40 domain-containing subunits Swd1 and Swd3 leads to a loss of Set1 protein and consequently a complete loss of H3K4 methylation. However, until now, how these WD40 domain-containing proteins interact with Set1 and contribute to the stability of Set1 and H3K4 methylation has not been determined. In this study, we identified small basic and acidic patches that mediate protein interactions between the C terminus of Swd1 and the nSET domain of Set1. Absence of either the basic or acidic patches of Set1 and Swd1, respectively, disrupts the interaction between Set1 and Swd1, diminishes Set1 protein levels, and abolishes H3K4 methylation. Moreover, these basic and acidic patches are also important for cell growth, telomere silencing, and gene expression. We also show that the basic and acidic patches of Set1 and Swd1 are conserved in their human counterparts SET1A/B and RBBP5, respectively, and are needed for the protein interaction between SET1A and RBBP5. Therefore, this charge-based interaction is likely important for maintaining the protein stability of the human SET1A/B methyltransferase complexes so that proper H3K4 methylation, cell growth, and gene expression can also occur in mammals. PMID:22147691

  3. Unique Role of the WD-40 Repeat Protein 5 (WDR5) Subunit within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia 3 (MLL3) Histone Methyltransferase Complex.

    PubMed

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2015-10-23

    The MLL3 (mixed lineage leukemia 3) protein is a member of the human SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferases and contains the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif and the catalytic suppressor of variegation, enhancer of zeste, trithorax (SET) domain. The human SET1 family includes MLL1-4 and SETd1A/B, which all interact with a conserved subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the minimal core complex required for full methyltransferase activity. However, recent evidence suggests that the WDR5 subunit may not be utilized in an identical manner within all SET1 family core complexes. Although the roles of WDR5 within the MLL1 core complex have been extensively studied, not much is known about the roles of WDR5 in other SET1 family core complexes. In this investigation, we set out to characterize the roles of the WDR5 subunit in the MLL3 core complex. We found that unlike MLL1, the MLL3 SET domain assembles with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer independently of the Win motif-WDR5 interaction. Furthermore, we observed that WDR5 inhibits the monomethylation activity of the MLL3 core complex, which is dependent on the Win motif. We also found evidence suggesting that the WRAD subcomplex catalyzes weak H3K4 monomethylation within the context of the MLL3 core complex. Furthermore, solution structures of the MLL3 core complex assembled with and without WDR5 by small angle x-ray scattering show similar overall topologies. Together, this work demonstrates a unique role for WDR5 in modulating the enzymatic activity of the MLL3 core complex. PMID:26324722

  4. Unique Role of the WD-40 Repeat Protein 5 (WDR5) Subunit within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia 3 (MLL3) Histone Methyltransferase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Shinsky, Stephen A.; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The MLL3 (mixed lineage leukemia 3) protein is a member of the human SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferases and contains the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif and the catalytic suppressor of variegation, enhancer of zeste, trithorax (SET) domain. The human SET1 family includes MLL1–4 and SETd1A/B, which all interact with a conserved subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the minimal core complex required for full methyltransferase activity. However, recent evidence suggests that the WDR5 subunit may not be utilized in an identical manner within all SET1 family core complexes. Although the roles of WDR5 within the MLL1 core complex have been extensively studied, not much is known about the roles of WDR5 in other SET1 family core complexes. In this investigation, we set out to characterize the roles of the WDR5 subunit in the MLL3 core complex. We found that unlike MLL1, the MLL3 SET domain assembles with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer independently of the Win motif-WDR5 interaction. Furthermore, we observed that WDR5 inhibits the monomethylation activity of the MLL3 core complex, which is dependent on the Win motif. We also found evidence suggesting that the WRAD subcomplex catalyzes weak H3K4 monomethylation within the context of the MLL3 core complex. Furthermore, solution structures of the MLL3 core complex assembled with and without WDR5 by small angle x-ray scattering show similar overall topologies. Together, this work demonstrates a unique role for WDR5 in modulating the enzymatic activity of the MLL3 core complex. PMID:26324722

  5. Nonlinear (time domain) and linearized (time and frequency domain) solutions to the compressible Euler equations in conservation law form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreenivas, Kidambi; Whitfield, David L.

    1995-01-01

    Two linearized solvers (time and frequency domain) based on a high resolution numerical scheme are presented. The basic approach is to linearize the flux vector by expressing it as a sum of a mean and a perturbation. This allows the governing equations to be maintained in conservation law form. A key difference between the time and frequency domain computations is that the frequency domain computations require only one grid block irrespective of the interblade phase angle for which the flow is being computed. As a result of this and due to the fact that the governing equations for this case are steady, frequency domain computations are substantially faster than the corresponding time domain computations. The linearized equations are used to compute flows in turbomachinery blade rows (cascades) arising due to blade vibrations. Numerical solutions are compared to linear theory (where available) and to numerical solutions of the nonlinear Euler equations.

  6. Longins: a new evolutionary conserved VAMP family sharing a novel SNARE domain.

    PubMed

    Filippini, F; Rossi, V; Galli, T; Budillon, A; D'Urso, M; D'Esposito, M

    2001-07-01

    This article describes the discovery of a novel SNARE domain that might be involved in the regulation of membrane fusion. This domain is shared by a novel family of VAMPs called long VAMPs or longins. Members of this family are more conserved among eukaryotes than are classical VAMPs, possibly because of their underlying basic SNARE function.

  7. Crystal structure of EML1 reveals the basis for Hsp90 dependence of oncogenic EML4-ALK by disruption of an atypical β-propeller domain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark W.; Law, Edward W. P.; Rennalls, La’Verne P.; Busacca, Sara; O’Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.; Fennell, Dean A.; Bayliss, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Proteins of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP)-like (EML) family contribute to formation of the mitotic spindle and interphase microtubule network. They contain a unique hydrophobic EML protein (HELP) motif and a variable number of WD40 repeats. Recurrent gene rearrangements in nonsmall cell lung cancer fuse EML4 to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), causing expression of several fusion oncoprotein variants. We have determined a 2.6-Å crystal structure of the representative ∼70-kDa core of EML1, revealing an intimately associated pair of β-propellers, which we term a TAPE (tandem atypical propeller in EMLs) domain. One propeller is highly atypical, having a discontinuous subdomain unrelated to a WD40 motif in place of one of its blades. This unexpected feature shows how a propeller structure can be assembled from subdomains with distinct folds. The HELP motif is not an independent domain but forms part of the hydrophobic core that joins the two β-propellers. The TAPE domain binds α/β-tubulin via its conserved, concave surface, including part of the atypical blade. Mapping the characteristic breakpoints of each EML4-ALK variant onto our structure indicates that the EML4 TAPE domain is truncated in many variants in a manner likely to make the fusion protein structurally unstable. We found that the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor ganetespib induced degradation of these variants whereas others lacking a partial TAPE domain were resistant in both overexpression models and patient-derived cell lines. The Hsp90-sensitive EML4-ALK variants are exceptions to the rule that oncogenic fusion proteins involve breakpoints in disordered regions of both partners. PMID:24706829

  8. TOPDOM: database of conservatively located domains and motifs in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The TOPDOM database—originally created as a collection of domains and motifs located consistently on the same side of the membranes in α-helical transmembrane proteins—has been updated and extended by taking into consideration consistently localized domains and motifs in globular proteins, too. By taking advantage of the recently developed CCTOP algorithm to determine the type of a protein and predict topology in case of transmembrane proteins, and by applying a thorough search for domains and motifs as well as utilizing the most up-to-date version of all source databases, we managed to reach a 6-fold increase in the size of the whole database and a 2-fold increase in the number of transmembrane proteins. Availability and implementation: TOPDOM database is available at http://topdom.enzim.hu. The webpage utilizes the common Apache, PHP5 and MySQL software to provide the user interface for accessing and searching the database. The database itself is generated on a high performance computer. Contact: tusnady.gabor@ttk.mta.hu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153630

  9. Eukaryotic RNAse H shares a conserved domain with caulimovirus proteins that facilitate translation of polycistronic RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Mushegian, A R; Edskes, H K; Koonin, E V

    1994-01-01

    RNAse H (RNH1 protein) from the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata has a functionally uncharacterized N-terminal domain dispensable for the RNAse H activity. Using computer methods for database search and multiple alignment, we show that the N-terminal domains of RNH1 and its homologue encoded by a cDNA from chicken lens are related to the conserved domain in caulimovirus ORF VI product that facilitates translation of polycistronic virus RNA in plant cells. We hypothesize that the N-terminal domain of eukaryotic RNAse H performs an as yet uncharacterized regulatory function, possibly in mRNA translation or turnover. PMID:7937142

  10. The conserved KNOX domain mediates specificity of tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, T; Nishimura, A; Tamaoki, M; Kuba, M; Tanaka, H; Iwahori, S; Matsuoka, M

    1999-01-01

    Overproduction of the tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23 in transgenic tobacco plants causes mild, severe, and no morphological alterations, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the homeodomains and adjacent ELK domains are highly conserved, and the N-terminal KNOX domains also are moderately conserved. To investigate the contributions of both the conserved and divergent regions to the severity of morphological alterations, we generated chimeric proteins by exchanging different regions of NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23. The severity of the abnormal phenotype was dependent upon the synergistic action of both the N terminus, containing the KNOX domain, and the C terminus, containing the ELK homeodomain. Detailed analysis focusing on the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal half of the ELK domain is more effective in inducing the abnormal phenotypes than are the homeodomains. For the N terminus, severe morphological alterations were induced by exchanging a part of the KNOX domain of NTH1 with the corresponding region of NTH15. This limited region in the KNOX domain of all homeodomain proteins includes a predicted alpha-helical region, but only that in NTH15 is predicted to form a typical amphipathic structure. We discuss the possibility, based on these results, that the secondary structure of the KNOX domain is important for the induction of abnormal morphology in transgenic tobacco plants. PMID:10449577

  11. A conservative algorithm for parabolic problems in domains with moving boundaries.

    PubMed

    Novak, Igor L; Slepchenko, Boris M

    2014-08-01

    We describe a novel conservative algorithm for parabolic problems in domains with moving boundaries developed for modeling in cell biology. The spatial discretization is accomplished by applying Voronoi decomposition to a fixed rectangular grid. In the vicinity of the boundary, the procedure generates irregular Voronoi cells that conform to the domain shape and merge seamlessly with regular control volumes in the domain interior. Consequently, our algorithm is free of the CFL stability issue due to moving interfaces and does not involve cell-merging or mass redistribution. Local mass conservation is ensured by finite-volume discretization and natural-neighbor interpolation. Numerical experiments with two-dimensional geometries demonstrate exact mass conservation and indicate an order of convergence in space between one and two. The use of standard meshing techniques makes extension of the method to three dimensions conceptually straightforward.

  12. A conservative algorithm for parabolic problems in domains with moving boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Igor L.; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel conservative algorithm for parabolic problems in domains with moving boundaries developed for modeling in cell biology. The spatial discretization is accomplished by applying Voronoi decomposition to a fixed rectangular grid. In the vicinity of the boundary, the procedure generates irregular Voronoi cells that conform to the domain shape and merge seamlessly with regular control volumes in the domain interior. Consequently, our algorithm is free of the CFL stability issue due to moving interfaces and does not involve cell-merging or mass redistribution. Local mass conservation is ensured by finite-volume discretization and natural-neighbor interpolation. Numerical experiments with two-dimensional geometries demonstrate exact mass conservation and indicate an order of convergence in space between one and two. The use of standard meshing techniques makes extension of the method to three dimensions conceptually straightforward. PMID:25067852

  13. Ancient conserved domains shared by animal soluble guanylyl cyclases and bacterial signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclases (SGCs) are dimeric enzymes that transduce signals downstream of nitric oxide (NO) in animals. They sense NO by means of a heme moiety that is bound to their N-terminal extensions. Results Using sequence profile searches we show that the N-terminal extensions of the SGCs contain two globular domains. The first of these, the HNOB (Heme NO Binding) domain, is a predominantly α-helical domain and binds heme via a covalent linkage to histidine. Versions lacking this conserved histidine and are likely to interact with heme non-covalently. We detected HNOB domains in several bacterial lineages, where they occur fused to methyl accepting domains of chemotaxis receptors or as standalone proteins. The standalone forms are encoded by predicted operons that also contain genes for two component signaling systems and GGDEF-type nucleotide cyclases. The second domain, the HNOB associated (HNOBA) domain occurs between the HNOB and the cyclase domains in the animal SGCs. The HNOBA domain is also detected in bacteria and is always encoded by a gene, which occurs in the neighborhood of a gene for a HNOB domain. Conclusion The HNOB domain is predicted to function as a heme-dependent sensor for gaseous ligands, and transduce diverse downstream signals, in both bacteria and animals. The HNOBA domain functionally interacts with the HNOB domain, and possibly binds a ligand, either in cooperation, or independently of the latter domain. Phyletic profiles and phylogenetic analysis suggest that the HNOB and HNOBA domains were acquired by the animal lineage via lateral transfer from a bacterial source. PMID:12590654

  14. Mouse Brca1: localization sequence analysis and identification of evolutionarily conserved domains.

    PubMed

    Abel, K J; Xu, J; Yin, G Y; Lyons, R H; Meisler, M H; Weber, B L

    1995-12-01

    The human genes BRCA1, conferring susceptibility to early-onset breast and ovarian cancer, has recently been isolated. Here we describe isolation of cDNAs, sequence analysis, and genomic localization of the murine homolog, Brac1. The mouse cDNA sequence predicts a protein of 1812 amino acids; a number of small gaps account for the 51 fewer residues in the mouse protein relative to human BRCA1. While the predicted mouse and human proteins display on the whole a high level of homology (58% identity, 73% similarity), the regions of greatest homology are at the respective amino and carboxyl termini. Most reported disease-associated missense mutations in human BCRA1 occurred within these more highly conserved terminal regions. A predicted zinc-building RING finger domain near the amino terminus lies within a 50 amino acid stretch that is perfectly conserved in both species. The strong conservation during mammalian evolution argues for the importance of this domain, perhaps mediating a role for BRCA1 in DNA and/or protein binding. We have also identified a conserved highly acidic domain in the carboxyl terminal half of the BCRA1 protein resembling acidic transactivation domains of certain transcription factors. Using an interspecific backcross panel, Brca1 was mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 11 that exhibits conserved linkage with 17q21. The sequence and isolated cDNAs will provide useful reagents for studying the expression of Brca1 in the mouse, and for testing the importance of the evolutionarily conserved domains.

  15. Conservation of domain structure in a fast-evolving heterochromatic SUUR protein in drosophilids.

    PubMed

    Yurlova, Anna A; Makunin, Igor V; Kolesnikova, Tatyana D; Posukh, Olga V; Belyaeva, Elena S; Zhimulev, Igor F

    2009-09-01

    Different genomic regions replicate at a distinct time during S-phase. The SuUR mutation alters replication timing and the polytenization level of intercalary and pericentric heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland polytene chromosomes. We analyzed SuUR in different insects, identified conserved regions in the protein, substituted conserved amino acid residues, and studied effects of the mutations on SUUR function. SuUR orthologs were identified in all sequenced drosophilids, and a highly divergent ortholog was found in the mosquito genome. We demonstrated that SUUR evolves at very high rate comparable with that of Transformer. Remarkably, upstream ORF within 5' UTR of the gene is more conserved than SUUR in drosophilids, but it is absent in the mosquito. The domain structure and charge of SUUR are maintained in drosophilids despite the high divergence of the proteins. The N-terminal part of SUUR with similarity to the SNF2/SWI2 proteins displays the highest level of conservation. Mutation of two conserved amino acid residues in this region impairs binding of SUUR to polytene chromosomes and reduces the ability of the protein to cause DNA underreplication. The least conserved middle part of SUUR interacting with HP1 retains positively and negatively charged clusters and nuclear localization signals. The C terminus contains interlacing conserved and variable motifs. Our results suggest that SUUR domains evolve with different rates and patterns but maintain their features.

  16. A structural view of the conserved domain of rice stress-responsive NAC1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingfeng; Wang, Quan; Xiong, Lizhong; Lou, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    The importance of NAC (named as NAM, ATAF1, 2, and CUC2) proteins in plant development, transcription regulation and regulatory pathways involving protein-protein interactions has been increasingly recognized. We report here the high resolution crystal structure of SNAC1 (stress-responsive NAC) NAC domain at 2.5 Å. Although the structure of the SNAC1 NAC domain shares a structural similarity with the reported structure of the ANAC NAC1 domain, some key features, especially relating to two loop regions which potentially take the responsibility for DNA-binding, distinguish the SNAC1 NAC domain from other reported NAC structures. Moreover, the dimerization of the SNAC1 NAC domain is demonstrated by both soluble and crystalline conditions, suggesting this dimeric state should be conserved in this type of NAC family. Additionally, we discuss the possible NAC-DNA binding model according to the structure and reported biological evidences.

  17. A structure-specific nucleic acid-binding domain conserved among DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Aaron C.; Rambo, Robert P.; Greer, Briana; Pritchett, Michael; Tainer, John A.; Cortez, David; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2014-01-01

    SMARCAL1, a DNA remodeling protein fundamental to genome integrity during replication, is the only gene associated with the developmental disorder Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD). SMARCAL1-deficient cells show collapsed replication forks, S-phase cell cycle arrest, increased chromosomal breaks, hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents, and chromosomal instability. The SMARCAL1 catalytic domain (SMARCAL1CD) is composed of an SNF2-type double-stranded DNA motor ATPase fused to a HARP domain of unknown function. The mechanisms by which SMARCAL1 and other DNA translocases repair replication forks are poorly understood, in part because of a lack of structural information on the domains outside of the common ATPase motor. In the present work, we determined the crystal structure of the SMARCAL1 HARP domain and examined its conformation and assembly in solution by small angle X-ray scattering. We report that this domain is conserved with the DNA mismatch and damage recognition domains of MutS/MSH and NER helicase XPB, respectively, as well as with the putative DNA specificity motif of the T4 phage fork regression protein UvsW. Loss of UvsW fork regression activity by deletion of this domain was rescued by its replacement with HARP, establishing the importance of this domain in UvsW and demonstrating a functional complementarity between these structurally homologous domains. Mutation of predicted DNA-binding residues in HARP dramatically reduced fork binding and regression activities of SMARCAL1CD. Thus, this work has uncovered a conserved substrate recognition domain in DNA repair enzymes that couples ATP-hydrolysis to remodeling of a variety of DNA structures, and provides insight into this domain’s role in replication fork stability and genome integrity. PMID:24821763

  18. The structure of a conserved piezo channel domain reveals a topologically distinct β sandwich fold.

    PubMed

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens T; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C

    2014-10-01

    Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2,000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a topologically distinct β sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be-identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

  19. The BEN domain is a novel sequence-specific DNA-binding domain conserved in neural transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Serganov, Artem A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lai, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that Drosophila Insensitive (Insv) promotes sensory organ development and has activity as a nuclear corepressor for the Notch transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)]. Insv lacks domains of known biochemical function but contains a single BEN domain (i.e., a “BEN-solo” protein). Our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis confirmed binding of Insensitive to Su(H) target genes in the Enhancer of split gene complex [E(spl)-C]; however, de novo motif analysis revealed a novel site strongly enriched in Insv peaks (TCYAATHRGAA). We validate binding of endogenous Insv to genomic regions bearing such sites, whose associated genes are enriched for neural functions and are functionally repressed by Insv. Unexpectedly, we found that the Insv BEN domain binds specifically to this sequence motif and that Insv directly regulates transcription via this motif. We determined the crystal structure of the BEN–DNA target complex, revealing homodimeric binding of the BEN domain and extensive nucleotide contacts via α helices and a C-terminal loop. Point mutations in key DNA-contacting residues severely impair DNA binding in vitro and capacity for transcriptional regulation in vivo. We further demonstrate DNA-binding and repression activities by the mammalian neural BEN-solo protein BEND5. Altogether, we define novel DNA-binding activity in a conserved family of transcriptional repressors, opening a molecular window on this extensive gene family. PMID:23468431

  20. Identification of divergent type VI secretion effectors using a conserved chaperone domain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J. Q.; Lam, Linh; Dong, Tao G.

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a lethal weapon used by many bacteria to kill eukaryotic predators or prokaryotic competitors. Killing by the T6SS results from repetitive delivery of toxic effectors. Despite their importance in dictating bacterial fitness, systematic prediction of T6SS effectors remains challenging due to high effector diversity and the absence of a conserved signature sequence. Here, we report a class of T6SS effector chaperone (TEC) proteins that are required for effector delivery through binding to VgrG and effector proteins. The TEC proteins share a highly conserved domain (DUF4123) and are genetically encoded upstream of their cognate effector genes. Using the conserved TEC domain sequence, we identified a large family of TEC genes coupled to putative T6SS effectors in Gram-negative bacteria. We validated this approach by verifying a predicted effector TseC in Aeromonas hydrophila. We show that TseC is a T6SS-secreted antibacterial effector and that the downstream gene tsiC encodes the cognate immunity protein. Further, we demonstrate that TseC secretion requires its cognate TEC protein and an associated VgrG protein. Distinct from previous effector-dependent bioinformatic analyses, our approach using the conserved TEC domain will facilitate the discovery and functional characterization of new T6SS effectors in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26150500

  1. A Conserved Myc Protein Domain, MBIV, Regulates DNA Binding, Apoptosis, Transformation, and G2 Arrest†

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    The myc family of oncogenes is well conserved throughout evolution. Here we present the characterization of a domain conserved in c-, N-, and L-Myc from fish to humans, N-Myc317-337, designated Myc box IV (MBIV). A deletion of this domain leads to a defect in Myc-induced apoptosis and in some transformation assays but not in cell proliferation. Unlike other Myc mutants, MycΔMBIV is not a simple loss-of-function mutant because it is hyperactive for G2 arrest in primary cells. Microarray analysis of genes regulated by N-MycΔMBIV reveals that it is weakened for transactivation and repression but not nearly as defective as N-MycΔMBII. Although the mutated region is not part of the previously defined DNA binding domain, we find that N-MycΔMBIV has a significantly lower affinity for DNA than the wild-type protein in vitro. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation shows reduced binding of N-MycΔMBIV to some target genes in vivo, which correlates with the defect in transactivation. Thus, this conserved domain has an unexpected role in Myc DNA binding activity. These data also provide a novel separation of Myc functions linked to the modulation of DNA binding activity. PMID:16705173

  2. Cystosolic chaperonin subunits have a conserved ATPase domain but diverged polypeptide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Willison, K R; Horwich, A L

    1994-12-01

    CCT (also called the TCP-1 complex or TriC) is a chaperonin found in the eukaryotic cytosol, and has unique structural and functional features. Unlike homo-oligomeric chaperonins, CCT comprises at least eight different subunits, and appears to have a limited range of physiological substrates. We have analysed CCT sequences in light of the recent determination of the crystal structure and mutational identification of the functional domains of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL. A high level of identity among all chaperonin subunits is observed in those regions that correspond to the ATP-binding site of GroEL. By contrast, no significant identity is shared in the region corresponding to the polypeptide-binding region of GroEL, either between CCT subunits or between CCT subunits and GroEL. This suggests that the polypeptide-binding sites of CCT subunits have diverged both from each other and from GroEL, which may explain the apparently different range of substrates recognized by CCT.

  3. Momentum conservation in Multi-Level Multi-Domain (MLMD) simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Beck, A.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    Momentum conservation and self-forces reduction are challenges for all Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes using spatial discretization schemes which do not fulfill the requirement of translational invariance of the grid Green's function. We comment here on the topic applied to the recently developed Multi-Level Multi-Domain (MLMD) method. The MLMD is a semi-implicit method for PIC plasma simulations. The multi-scale nature of plasma processes is addressed by using grids with different spatial resolutions in different parts of the domain.

  4. The Three Domains of Conservation Genetics: Case Histories from Hawaiian Waters.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The scientific field of conservation biology is dominated by 3 specialties: phylogenetics, ecology, and evolution. Under this triad, phylogenetics is oriented towards the past history of biodiversity, conserving the divergent branches in the tree of life. The ecological component is rooted in the present, maintaining the contemporary life support systems for biodiversity. Evolutionary conservation (as defined here) is concerned with preserving the raw materials for generating future biodiversity. All 3 domains can be documented with genetic case histories in the waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago, an isolated chain of volcanic islands with 2 types of biodiversity: colonists, and new species that arose from colonists. This review demonstrates that 1) phylogenetic studies have identified previously unknown branches in the tree of life that are endemic to Hawaiian waters; 2) population genetic surveys define isolated marine ecosystems as management units, and 3) phylogeographic analyses illustrate the pathways of colonization that can enhance future biodiversity. Conventional molecular markers have advanced all 3 domains in conservation biology over the last 3 decades, and recent advances in genomics are especially valuable for understanding the foundations of future evolutionary diversity.

  5. The Three Domains of Conservation Genetics: Case Histories from Hawaiian Waters.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The scientific field of conservation biology is dominated by 3 specialties: phylogenetics, ecology, and evolution. Under this triad, phylogenetics is oriented towards the past history of biodiversity, conserving the divergent branches in the tree of life. The ecological component is rooted in the present, maintaining the contemporary life support systems for biodiversity. Evolutionary conservation (as defined here) is concerned with preserving the raw materials for generating future biodiversity. All 3 domains can be documented with genetic case histories in the waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago, an isolated chain of volcanic islands with 2 types of biodiversity: colonists, and new species that arose from colonists. This review demonstrates that 1) phylogenetic studies have identified previously unknown branches in the tree of life that are endemic to Hawaiian waters; 2) population genetic surveys define isolated marine ecosystems as management units, and 3) phylogeographic analyses illustrate the pathways of colonization that can enhance future biodiversity. Conventional molecular markers have advanced all 3 domains in conservation biology over the last 3 decades, and recent advances in genomics are especially valuable for understanding the foundations of future evolutionary diversity. PMID:27001936

  6. Evolutionarily conserved roles of the dicer helicase domain in regulating RNA interference processing.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Chan, Jessica M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-10-10

    The enzyme Dicer generates 21-25 nucleotide RNAs that target specific mRNAs for silencing during RNA interference and related pathways. Although their active sites and RNA binding regions are functionally conserved, the helicase domains have distinct activities in the context of different Dicer enzymes. To examine the evolutionary origins of Dicer helicase functions, we investigated two related Dicer enzymes from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile. RNA cleavage assays showed that S. thermophile Dicer-1 (StDicer-1) can process hairpin precursor microRNAs, whereas StDicer-2 can only cleave linear double-stranded RNAs. Furthermore, only StDicer-2 possesses robust ATP hydrolytic activity in the presence of double-stranded RNA. Deletion of the StDicer-2 helicase domain increases both StDicer-2 cleavage activity and affinity for hairpin RNA. Notably, both StDicer-1 and StDicer-2 could complement the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacking its endogenous Dicer gene but only in their full-length forms, underscoring the importance of the helicase domain. These results suggest an in vivo regulatory function for the helicase domain that may be conserved from fungi to humans. PMID:25135636

  7. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles of the Dicer Helicase Domain in Regulating RNA Interference Processing*

    PubMed Central

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Chan, Jessica M.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme Dicer generates 21–25 nucleotide RNAs that target specific mRNAs for silencing during RNA interference and related pathways. Although their active sites and RNA binding regions are functionally conserved, the helicase domains have distinct activities in the context of different Dicer enzymes. To examine the evolutionary origins of Dicer helicase functions, we investigated two related Dicer enzymes from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile. RNA cleavage assays showed that S. thermophile Dicer-1 (StDicer-1) can process hairpin precursor microRNAs, whereas StDicer-2 can only cleave linear double-stranded RNAs. Furthermore, only StDicer-2 possesses robust ATP hydrolytic activity in the presence of double-stranded RNA. Deletion of the StDicer-2 helicase domain increases both StDicer-2 cleavage activity and affinity for hairpin RNA. Notably, both StDicer-1 and StDicer-2 could complement the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacking its endogenous Dicer gene but only in their full-length forms, underscoring the importance of the helicase domain. These results suggest an in vivo regulatory function for the helicase domain that may be conserved from fungi to humans. PMID:25135636

  8. A conserved polybasic domain mediates plasma membrane targeting of Lgl and its regulation by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xuejing; Liu, Weijie; Chen, Yi-jiun; Huang, Juan; Austin, Erin; Celotto, Alicia M; Jiang, Wendy Z; Palladino, Michael J; Jiang, Yu; Hammond, Gerald R V; Hong, Yang

    2015-10-26

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays essential and conserved functions in regulating both cell polarity and tumorigenesis in Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates. It is well recognized that plasma membrane (PM) or cell cortex localization is crucial for Lgl function in vivo, but its membrane-targeting mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that hypoxia acutely and reversibly inhibits Lgl PM targeting through a posttranslational mechanism that is independent of the well-characterized atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) or Aurora kinase-mediated phosphorylations. Instead, we identified an evolutionarily conserved polybasic (PB) domain that targets Lgl to the PM via electrostatic binding to membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. Such PB domain-mediated PM targeting is inhibited by hypoxia, which reduces inositol phospholipid levels on the PM through adenosine triphosphate depletion. Moreover, Lgl PB domain contains all the identified phosphorylation sites of aPKC and Aurora kinases, providing a molecular mechanism by which phosphorylations neutralize the positive charges on the PB domain to inhibit Lgl PM targeting. PMID:26483556

  9. Conserved Spatial Organization of FG Domains in the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Claire E.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kampmann, Martin; Simon, Sanford M.

    2013-01-01

    Selective transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) requires nucleoporins containing natively unfolded phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains. Several differing models for their dynamics within the pore have been proposed. We characterize the behavior of the FG nucleoporins in vivo using polarized fluorescence microscopy. Using nucleoporins tagged with green fluorescent protein along their FG domains, we show that some of these proteins are ordered, indicating an overall orientational organization within the NPC. This orientational ordering of the FG domains depends on their specific context within the NPC, but is independent of active transport and cargo load. For most nups, behavior does not depend on the FG motifs. These data support a model whereby local geometry constrains the orientational organization of the FG nups. Intriguingly, homologous yeast and mammalian proteins show conserved behavior, suggesting functional relevance. Our findings have implications for mechanistic models of NPC transport. PMID:23332057

  10. The BEACH is hot: A LYST of emerging roles for BEACH-domain containing proteins in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Cullinane, Andrew R.; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Huizing, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    BEACH (named after ‘Beige and Chediak-Higashi’) is a conserved ~280 residue domain, present in nine human BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs). Most BDCPs are large, containing a PH-like domain for membrane association preceding their BEACH domain, and containing WD40 and other domains for ligand binding. Recent studies found that mutations in individual BDCPs cause several human diseases. BDCP alterations affect lysosome size (LYST and NSMAF), apoptosis (NSMAF), autophagy (LYST, WDFY3, LRBA), granule size (LYST, NBEAL2, NBEA), or synapse formation (NBEA). However, the roles of each BDCP in these membrane events remain controversial. After reviewing studies on individual BDCPs, we propose a unifying hypothesis that BDCPs act as scaffolding proteins that facilitate membrane events, including both fission and fusion, determined by their binding partners. BDCPs may also bind each other, enabling fusion or fission of vesicles that are not necessarily of the same type. Such mechanisms explain why different BDCPs may have roles in autophagy; each BDCP is specific for the cell type or the cargo, but not necessarily specific for attaching to the autophagosome. Further elucidation of these mechanisms, preferably carrying out the same experiment on multiple BDCPs, and possibly using patients’ cells, may identify potential targets for therapy. PMID:23521701

  11. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly.

    PubMed

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-06-23

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits--the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles. PMID:26056272

  12. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  13. Identification of Conserved MEL-28/ELYS Domains with Essential Roles in Nuclear Assembly and Chromosome Segregation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Saldivar, Georgina; Fernandez, Anita; Hirano, Yasuhiro; Mauro, Michael; Lai, Allison; Ayuso, Cristina; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Piano, Fabio; Askjaer, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Nucleoporins are the constituents of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are essential regulators of nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression and genome stability. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS plays a critical role in post-mitotic NPC reassembly through recruitment of the NUP107-160 subcomplex, and is required for correct segregation of mitotic chromosomes. Here we present a systematic functional and structural analysis of MEL-28 in C. elegans early development and human ELYS in cultured cells. We have identified functional domains responsible for nuclear envelope and kinetochore localization, chromatin binding, mitotic spindle matrix association and chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, we found that perturbations to MEL-28's conserved AT-hook domain do not affect MEL-28 localization although they disrupt MEL-28 function and delay cell cycle progression in a DNA damage checkpoint-dependent manner. Our analyses also uncover a novel meiotic role of MEL-28. Together, these results show that MEL-28 has conserved structural domains that are essential for its fundamental roles in NPC assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:27341616

  14. Conserved C-terminal domain of spider tubuliform spidroin 1 contributes to extensibility in synthetic fibers.

    PubMed

    Gnesa, Eric; Hsia, Yang; Yarger, Jeffery L; Weber, Warner; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff; Tang, Simon; Agari, Kimiko; Vierra, Craig

    2012-02-13

    Spider silk is renowned for its extraordinary mechanical properties, having a balance of high tensile strength and extensibility. To date, the majority of studies have focused on the production of dragline silks from synthetic spider silk gene products. Here we report the first mechanical analysis of synthetic egg case silk fibers spun from the Latrodectus hesperus tubuliform silk proteins, TuSp1 and ECP-2. We provide evidence that recombinant ECP-2 proteins can be spun into fibers that display mechanical properties similar to other synthetic spider silks. We also demonstrate that silks spun from recombinant thioredoxin-TuSp1 fusion proteins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain exhibit increased extensibility and toughness when compared to the identical fibers spun from fusion proteins lacking the C-terminus. Mechanical analyses reveal that the properties of synthetic tubuliform silks can be modulated by altering the postspin draw ratios of the fibers. Fibers subject to increased draw ratios showed elevated tensile strength and decreased extensibility but maintained constant toughness. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies indicate that postdrawn fibers containing the C-terminal domain of TuSp1 have more amorphous content when compared to fibers lacking the C-terminus. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that recombinant tubuliform spidroins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain with embedded protein tags can be effectively spun into fibers, resulting in similar tensile strength but increased extensibility relative to nontagged recombinant dragline silk proteins spun from equivalently sized proteins. PMID:22176138

  15. Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Tubuliform Spidroin 1 Contributes to Extensibility in Synthetic Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Gnesa, Eric; Hsia, Yang; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Weber, Warner; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff; Tang, Simon; Agari, Kimiko; Vierra, Craig

    2012-05-24

    Spider silk is renowned for its extraordinary mechanical properties, having a balance of high tensile strength and extensibility. To date, the majority of studies have focused on the production of dragline silks from synthetic spider silk gene products. Here we report the first mechanical analysis of synthetic egg case silk fibers spun from the Latrodectus hesperus tubuliform silk proteins, TuSp1 and ECP-2. We provide evidence that recombinant ECP-2 proteins can be spun into fibers that display mechanical properties similar to other synthetic spider silks. We also demonstrate that silks spun from recombinant thioredoxin-TuSp1 fusion proteins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain exhibit increased extensibility and toughness when compared to the identical fibers spun from fusion proteins lacking the C-terminus. Mechanical analyses reveal that the properties of synthetic tubuliform silks can be modulated by altering the postspin draw ratios of the fibers. Fibers subject to increased draw ratios showed elevated tensile strength and decreased extensibility but maintained constant toughness. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies indicate that postdrawn fibers containing the C-terminal domain of TuSp1 have more amorphous content when compared to fibers lacking the C-terminus. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that recombinant tubuliform spidroins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain with embedded protein tags can be effectively spun into fibers, resulting in similar tensile strength but increased extensibility relative to nontagged recombinant dragline silk proteins spun from equivalently sized proteins.

  16. Identification of Conserved MEL-28/ELYS Domains with Essential Roles in Nuclear Assembly and Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Yasuhiro; Mauro, Michael; Lai, Allison; Ayuso, Cristina; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Piano, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoporins are the constituents of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are essential regulators of nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression and genome stability. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS plays a critical role in post-mitotic NPC reassembly through recruitment of the NUP107-160 subcomplex, and is required for correct segregation of mitotic chromosomes. Here we present a systematic functional and structural analysis of MEL-28 in C. elegans early development and human ELYS in cultured cells. We have identified functional domains responsible for nuclear envelope and kinetochore localization, chromatin binding, mitotic spindle matrix association and chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, we found that perturbations to MEL-28’s conserved AT-hook domain do not affect MEL-28 localization although they disrupt MEL-28 function and delay cell cycle progression in a DNA damage checkpoint-dependent manner. Our analyses also uncover a novel meiotic role of MEL-28. Together, these results show that MEL-28 has conserved structural domains that are essential for its fundamental roles in NPC assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:27341616

  17. A conserved polybasic domain mediates plasma membrane targeting of Lgl and its regulation by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xuejing; Liu, Weijie; Chen, Yi-jiun; Huang, Juan; Austin, Erin; Celotto, Alicia M.; Jiang, Wendy Z.; Palladino, Michael J.; Jiang, Yu; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2015-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays essential and conserved functions in regulating both cell polarity and tumorigenesis in Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates. It is well recognized that plasma membrane (PM) or cell cortex localization is crucial for Lgl function in vivo, but its membrane-targeting mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that hypoxia acutely and reversibly inhibits Lgl PM targeting through a posttranslational mechanism that is independent of the well-characterized atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) or Aurora kinase–mediated phosphorylations. Instead, we identified an evolutionarily conserved polybasic (PB) domain that targets Lgl to the PM via electrostatic binding to membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. Such PB domain–mediated PM targeting is inhibited by hypoxia, which reduces inositol phospholipid levels on the PM through adenosine triphosphate depletion. Moreover, Lgl PB domain contains all the identified phosphorylation sites of aPKC and Aurora kinases, providing a molecular mechanism by which phosphorylations neutralize the positive charges on the PB domain to inhibit Lgl PM targeting. PMID:26483556

  18. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Naeem, Aisha; Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio D.; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production). Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain repertoire characteristic of

  19. Structural and functional conservation of key domains in InsP[subscript 3] and ryanodine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Min-Duk; Velamakanni, Saroj; Ishiyama, Noboru; Stathopulos, Peter B.; Rossi, Ana M.; Khan, Samir A.; Dale, Philippa; Li, Congmin; Ames, James B.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Taylor, Colin W.

    2012-07-11

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP{sub 3}Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric intracellular Ca{sup 2+} channels. In each of these receptor families, the pore, which is formed by carboxy-terminal transmembrane domains, is regulated by signals that are detected by large cytosolic structures. InsP{sub 3}R gating is initiated by InsP{sub 3} binding to the InsP{sub 3}-binding core (IBC, residues 224-604 of InsP{sub 3}R1) and it requires the suppressor domain (SD, residues 1-223 of InsP{sub 3}R1). Here we present structures of the amino-terminal region (NT, residues 1-604) of rat InsP{sub 3}R1 with (3.6 {angstrom}) and without (3.0 {angstrom}) InsP{sub 3} bound. The arrangement of the three NT domains, SD, IBC-{beta} and IBC-{alpha}, identifies two discrete interfaces ({alpha} and {beta}) between the IBC and SD. Similar interfaces occur between equivalent domains (A, B and C) in RyR1 (ref. 9). The orientations of the three domains when docked into a tetrameric structure of InsP{sub 3}R and of the ABC domains docked into RyR are remarkably similar. The importance of the {alpha}-interface for activation of InsP{sub 3}R and RyR is confirmed by mutagenesis and, for RyR, by disease-causing mutations. Binding of InsP{sub 3} causes partial closure of the clam-like IBC, disrupting the {beta}-interface and pulling the SD towards the IBC. This reorients an exposed SD loop ('hotspot' (HS) loop) that is essential for InsP{sub 3}R activation. The loop is conserved in RyR and includes mutations that are associated with malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. The HS loop interacts with an adjacent NT, suggesting that activation re-arranges inter-subunit interactions. The A domain of RyR functionally replaced the SD in full-length InsP{sub 3}R, and an InsP{sub 3}R in which its C-terminal transmembrane region was replaced by that from RyR1 was gated by InsP{sub 3} and blocked by ryanodine. Activation mechanisms are conserved between InsP{sub 3}R and Ry

  20. The evolutionarily conserved Krueppel-associated box domain defines a subfamily of eukaryotic multifingered proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bellefroid, E.J.; Poncelet, D.A.; Lecocq, P.J.; Revelant, O.; Martial, J.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that the human genome includes hundreds of genes coding for putative factors related to the Krueppel zinc-finger protein, which regulates Drosophila segmentation. They report herein that about one-third of these genes code for proteins that share a very conserved region of about 75 amino acids in their N-terminal nonfinger portion. Homologous regions are found in a number of previously described finger proteins, including mouse Zfp-1 and Xenopus Xfin. They named this region the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB). This domain has the potential to form two amphipathic {alpha}-helices. Southern blot analysis of zoo blots suggests that the Krueppel-associated box is highly conserved during evolution. Northern blot analysis shows that these genes are expressed in most adult tissues and are down-regulated during in vitro terminal differentiation of human myeloid cells.

  1. Interfacial partitioning of a loop hinge residue contributes to diacylglycerol affinity of conserved region 1 domains.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mikaela D; Cole, Taylor R; Igumenova, Tatyana I

    2014-10-01

    Conventional and novel isoenzymes of PKC are activated by the membrane-embedded second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) through its interactions with the C1 regulatory domain. The affinity of C1 domains to DAG varies considerably among PKCs. To gain insight into the origin of differential DAG affinities, we conducted high-resolution NMR studies of C1B domain from PKCδ (C1Bδ) and its W252Y variant. The W252Y mutation was previously shown to render C1Bδ less responsive to DAG (Dries, D. R., Gallegos, L. L., and Newton, A. C. (2007) A single residue in the C1 domain sensitizes novel protein kinase C isoforms to cellular diacylglycerol production. J. Biol. Chem. 282, 826-830) and thereby emulate the behavior of C1B domains from conventional PKCs that have a conserved Tyr at the equivalent position. Our data revealed that W252Y mutation did not perturb the conformation of C1Bδ in solution but significantly reduced its propensity to partition into a membrane-mimicking environment in the absence of DAG. Using detergent micelles doped with a paramagnetic lipid, we determined that both the residue identity at position 252 and complexation with diacylglycerol influence the geometry of C1Bδ-micelle interactions. In addition, we identified the C-terminal helix α1 of C1Bδ as an interaction site with the head groups of phosphatidylserine, a known activator of PKCδ. Taken together, our studies (i) reveal the identities of C1Bδ residues involved in interactions with membrane-mimicking environment, DAG, and phosphatidylserine, as well as the affinities associated with each event and (ii) suggest that the initial ligand-independent membrane recruitment of C1B domains, which is greatly facilitated by the interfacial partitioning of Trp-252, is responsible, at least in part, for the differential DAG affinities.

  2. The highly conserved domain of unknown function 1792 has a distinct glycosyltransferase fold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zhu, Fan; Yang, Tiandi; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Meixian; Li, Jingzhi; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Erlandsen, Heidi; Wu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    More than 33,000 glycosyltransferases have been identified. Structural studies, however, have only revealed two distinct glycosyltransferase (GT) folds, GT-A and GT-B. Here we report a 1.34 Å resolution X-ray crystallographic structure of a previously uncharacterized “domain of unknown function” 1792 (DUF1792) and show that the domain adopts a new fold and is required for glycosylation of a family of serine-rich repeat streptococcal adhesins. Biochemical studies reveal that the domain is a glucosyltransferase, and it catalyzes the transfer of glucose to the branch point of the hexasaccharide O-linked to the serine-rich repeat of the bacterial adhesin, Fap1 of Streptococcus parasanguinis. DUF1792 homologs from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria also exhibit the activity. Thus DUF1792 represents a new family of glycosyltransferases, so we designate it as a GT-D glycosyltransferase fold. As the domain is highly conserved in bacteria and not found in eukaryotes, it can be explored as a new antibacterial target. PMID:25023666

  3. Solution structure of villin 14T, a domain conserved among actin-severing proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Markus, M. A.; Nakayama, T.; Matsudaira, P.; Wagner, G.

    1994-01-01

    The solution structure of the N-terminal domain of the actin-severing protein villin has been determined by multidimensional heteronuclear resonance spectroscopy. Villin is a member of a family of actin-severing proteins that regulate the organization of actin in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Members of this family are built from 3 or 6 homologous repeats of a structural domain of approximately 130 amino acids that is unrelated to any previously known structure. The N-terminal domain of villin (14T) contains a central beta-sheet with 4 antiparallel strands and a fifth parallel strand at one edge. This sheet is sandwiched between 2 helices on one side and a 2-stranded parallel beta-sheet with another helix on the other side. The strongly conserved sequence characteristic of the protein family corresponds to internal hydrophobic residues. Calcium titration experiments suggest that there are 2 binding sites for Ca2+, a stronger site near the N-terminal end of the longest helix, with a Kd of 1.8 +/- 0.4 mM, and a weaker site near the C-terminal end of the same helix, with a Kd of 11 +/- 2 mM. Mutational and biochemical studies of this domain in several members of the family suggest that the actin monomer binding site is near the parallel strand at the edge of the central beta-sheet. PMID:8142900

  4. Dual Thermosensitive Hydrogels Assembled from the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Dragline Silk.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Ming-Liang; Song, Wen-Wen; Xia, Xiao-Xia

    2015-11-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have great potentials in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Due to the advantages of precise control over molecular weight and being biodegradable, protein-based hydrogels and their applications have been extensively studied. However, protein hydrogels with dual thermosensitive properties are rarely reported. Here we present the first report of dual thermosensitive hydrogels assembled from the conserved C-terminal domain of spider dragline silk. First, we found that recombinant C-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) of the spider Nephila clavipes formed hydrogels when cooled to approximately 2 °C or heated to 65 °C. The conformational changes and self-assembly of the recombinant protein were studied to understand the mechanism of the gelation processes using multiple methods. It was proposed that the gelation in the low-temperature regime was dominated by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction between folded protein molecules, whereas the gelation in the high-temperature regime was due to cross-linking of the exposed hydrophobic patches resulting from partial unfolding of the protein upon heating. More interestingly, genetic fusion of the C-terminal domain to a short repetitive region of N. clavipes MaSp1 resulted in a chimeric protein that formed a hydrogel with significantly improved mechanical properties at low temperatures between 2 and 10 °C. Furthermore, the formation of similar hydrogels was observed for the recombinant C-terminal domains of dragline silk of different spider species, thus demonstrating the conserved ability to form dual thermosensitive hydrogels. These findings may be useful in the design and construction of novel protein hydrogels with tunable multiple thermosensitivity for applications in the future. PMID:26457360

  5. Dual Thermosensitive Hydrogels Assembled from the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Dragline Silk.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Ming-Liang; Song, Wen-Wen; Xia, Xiao-Xia

    2015-11-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have great potentials in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Due to the advantages of precise control over molecular weight and being biodegradable, protein-based hydrogels and their applications have been extensively studied. However, protein hydrogels with dual thermosensitive properties are rarely reported. Here we present the first report of dual thermosensitive hydrogels assembled from the conserved C-terminal domain of spider dragline silk. First, we found that recombinant C-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) of the spider Nephila clavipes formed hydrogels when cooled to approximately 2 °C or heated to 65 °C. The conformational changes and self-assembly of the recombinant protein were studied to understand the mechanism of the gelation processes using multiple methods. It was proposed that the gelation in the low-temperature regime was dominated by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction between folded protein molecules, whereas the gelation in the high-temperature regime was due to cross-linking of the exposed hydrophobic patches resulting from partial unfolding of the protein upon heating. More interestingly, genetic fusion of the C-terminal domain to a short repetitive region of N. clavipes MaSp1 resulted in a chimeric protein that formed a hydrogel with significantly improved mechanical properties at low temperatures between 2 and 10 °C. Furthermore, the formation of similar hydrogels was observed for the recombinant C-terminal domains of dragline silk of different spider species, thus demonstrating the conserved ability to form dual thermosensitive hydrogels. These findings may be useful in the design and construction of novel protein hydrogels with tunable multiple thermosensitivity for applications in the future.

  6. Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

    2005-06-13

    Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

  7. The E2 Domains of APP and APLP1 Share a Conserved Mode of Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    S Lee; Y Xue; J Hulbert; Y Wang; X Liu; B Demeler; Y Ha

    2011-12-31

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is genetically linked to Alzheimer's disease. APP is a type I membrane protein, and its oligomeric structure is potentially important because this property may play a role in its function or affect the processing of the precursor by the secretases to generate amyloid {beta}-peptide. Several independent studies have shown that APP can form dimers in the cell, but how it dimerizes remains controversial. At least three regions of the precursor, including a centrally located and conserved domain called E2, have been proposed to contribute to dimerization. Here we report two new crystal structures of E2, one from APP and the other from APLP1, a mammalian APP homologue. Comparison with an earlier APP structure, which was determined in a different space group, shows that the E2 domains share a conserved and antiparallel mode of dimerization. Biophysical measurements in solution show that heparin binding induces E2 dimerization. The 2.1 {angstrom} resolution electron density map also reveals phosphate ions that are bound to the protein surface. Mutational analysis shows that protein residues interacting with the phosphate ions are also involved in heparin binding. The locations of two of these residues, Arg-369 and His-433, at the dimeric interface suggest a mechanism for heparin-induced protein dimerization.

  8. In vivo functional mapping of the conserved protein domains within murine Themis1.

    PubMed

    Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Lee, Jan; El-Khoury, Dalal; Barr, Valarie; Akpan, Itoro; Samelson, Lawrence; Love, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    Thymocyte development requires the coordinated input of signals that originate from numerous cell surface molecules. Although the majority of thymocyte signal-initiating receptors are lineage-specific, most trigger 'ubiquitous' downstream signaling pathways. T-lineage-specific receptors are coupled to these signaling pathways by lymphocyte-restricted adapter molecules. We and others recently identified a new putative adapter protein, Themis1, whose expression is largely restricted to the T lineage. Mice lacking Themis1 exhibit a severe block in thymocyte development and a striking paucity of mature T cells revealing a critical role for Themis1 in T-cell maturation. Themis1 orthologs contain three conserved domains: a proline-rich region (PRR) that binds to the ubiquitous cytosolic adapter Grb2, a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), and two copies of a novel cysteine-containing globular (CABIT) domain. In the present study, we evaluated the functional importance of each of these motifs by retroviral reconstitution of Themis1(-/-) progenitor cells. The results demonstrate an essential requirement for the PRR and NLS motifs but not the conserved CABIT cysteines for Themis1 function.

  9. Identifying Potential Recommendation Domains for Conservation Agriculture in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfaye, Kindie; Jaleta, Moti; Jena, Pradyot; Mutenje, Munyaradzi

    2015-02-01

    Conservation agriculture (CA) is being promoted as an option for reducing soil degradation, conserving water, enhancing crop productivity, and maintaining yield stability. However, CA is a knowledge- and technology-intensive practice, and may not be feasible or may not perform better than conventional agriculture under all conditions and farming systems. Using high resolution (≈1 km2) biophysical and socioeconomic geospatial data, this study identified potential recommendation domains (RDs) for CA in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi. The biophysical variables used were soil texture, surface slope, and rainfall while the socioeconomic variables were market access and human and livestock population densities. Based on feasibility and comparative performance of CA over conventional agriculture, the biophysical and socioeconomic factors were first used to classify cultivated areas into three biophysical and three socioeconomic potential domains, respectively. Combinations of biophysical and socioeconomic domains were then used to develop potential RDs for CA based on adoption potential within the cultivated areas. About 39, 12, and 5 % of the cultivated areas showed high biophysical and socioeconomic potential while 50, 39, and 21 % of the cultivated areas showed high biophysical and medium socioeconomic potential for CA in Malawi, Kenya, and Ethiopia, respectively. The results indicate considerable acreages of land with high CA adoption potential in the mixed crop-livestock systems of the studied countries. However, there are large differences among countries depending on biophysical and socio-economic conditions. The information generated in this study could be used for targeting CA and prioritizing CA-related agricultural research and investment priorities in the three countries.

  10. Identifying potential recommendation domains for conservation agriculture in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Kindie; Jaleta, Moti; Jena, Pradyot; Mutenje, Munyaradzi

    2015-02-01

    Conservation agriculture (CA) is being promoted as an option for reducing soil degradation, conserving water, enhancing crop productivity, and maintaining yield stability. However, CA is a knowledge- and technology-intensive practice, and may not be feasible or may not perform better than conventional agriculture under all conditions and farming systems. Using high resolution (≈1 km(2)) biophysical and socioeconomic geospatial data, this study identified potential recommendation domains (RDs) for CA in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi. The biophysical variables used were soil texture, surface slope, and rainfall while the socioeconomic variables were market access and human and livestock population densities. Based on feasibility and comparative performance of CA over conventional agriculture, the biophysical and socioeconomic factors were first used to classify cultivated areas into three biophysical and three socioeconomic potential domains, respectively. Combinations of biophysical and socioeconomic domains were then used to develop potential RDs for CA based on adoption potential within the cultivated areas. About 39, 12, and 5% of the cultivated areas showed high biophysical and socioeconomic potential while 50, 39, and 21% of the cultivated areas showed high biophysical and medium socioeconomic potential for CA in Malawi, Kenya, and Ethiopia, respectively. The results indicate considerable acreages of land with high CA adoption potential in the mixed crop-livestock systems of the studied countries. However, there are large differences among countries depending on biophysical and socio-economic conditions. The information generated in this study could be used for targeting CA and prioritizing CA-related agricultural research and investment priorities in the three countries.

  11. Roles of Conserved Active Site Residues in the Ketosynthase Domain of an Assembly Line Polyketide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Thomas; Kapilivsky, Joshuah; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-08-16

    Ketosynthase (KS) domains of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze intermodular translocation of the growing polyketide chain as well as chain elongation via decarboxylative Claisen condensation. The mechanistic roles of ten conserved residues in the KS domain of Module 1 of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase were interrogated via site-directed mutagenesis and extensive biochemical analysis. Although the C211A mutant at the KS active site exhibited no turnover activity, it was still a competent methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylase. The H346A mutant exhibited reduced rates of both chain translocation and chain elongation, with a greater effect on the latter half-reaction. H384 contributed to methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylation, whereas K379 promoted C-C bond formation. S315 played a role in coupling decarboxylation to C-C bond formation. These findings support a mechanism for the translocation and elongation half-reactions that provides a well-defined starting point for further analysis of the key chain-building domain in assembly line PKSs.

  12. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher A; Epperson, Megan L; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I; Fremont, Daved H

    2015-08-28

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection.

  13. Roles of Conserved Active Site Residues in the Ketosynthase Domain of an Assembly Line Polyketide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Thomas; Kapilivsky, Joshuah; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-08-16

    Ketosynthase (KS) domains of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze intermodular translocation of the growing polyketide chain as well as chain elongation via decarboxylative Claisen condensation. The mechanistic roles of ten conserved residues in the KS domain of Module 1 of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase were interrogated via site-directed mutagenesis and extensive biochemical analysis. Although the C211A mutant at the KS active site exhibited no turnover activity, it was still a competent methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylase. The H346A mutant exhibited reduced rates of both chain translocation and chain elongation, with a greater effect on the latter half-reaction. H384 contributed to methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylation, whereas K379 promoted C-C bond formation. S315 played a role in coupling decarboxylation to C-C bond formation. These findings support a mechanism for the translocation and elongation half-reactions that provides a well-defined starting point for further analysis of the key chain-building domain in assembly line PKSs. PMID:27441852

  14. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Results Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Conclusion Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for

  15. Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of two cytokine receptors mediate conserved interactions with membranes.

    PubMed

    Haxholm, Gitte W; Nikolajsen, Louise F; Olsen, Johan G; Fredsted, Jacob; Larsen, Flemming H; Goffin, Vincent; Pedersen, Stine F; Brooks, Andrew J; Waters, Michael J; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2015-06-15

    Class 1 cytokine receptors regulate essential biological processes through complex intracellular signalling networks. However, the structural platform for understanding their functions is currently incomplete as structure-function studies of the intracellular domains (ICDs) are critically lacking. The present study provides the first comprehensive structural characterization of any cytokine receptor ICD and demonstrates that the human prolactin (PRL) receptor (PRLR) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) ICDs are intrinsically disordered throughout their entire lengths. We show that they interact specifically with hallmark lipids of the inner plasma membrane leaflet through conserved motifs resembling immuno receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). However, contrary to the observations made for ITAMs, lipid association of the PRLR and GHR ICDs was shown to be unaccompanied by changes in transient secondary structure and independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. The results of the present study provide a new structural platform for studying class 1 cytokine receptors and may implicate the membrane as an active component regulating intracellular signalling.

  16. The SWIRM domain: a conserved module found in chromosomal proteins points to novel chromatin-modifying activities

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M

    2002-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic chromosomal components, especially histones, are subject to a wide array of covalent modifications and catalytic reorganization. These modifications have an important role in the regulation of chromatin structure and are mediated by large multisubunit complexes that contain modular proteins with several conserved catalytic and noncatalytic adaptor domains. Results Using computational sequence-profile analysis methods, we identified a previously uncharacterized, predicted α-helical domain of about 85 residues in chromosomal proteins such as Swi3p, Rsc8p, Moira and several other uncharacterized proteins. This module, termed the SWIRM domain, is predicted to mediate specific protein-protein interactions in the assembly of chromatin-protein complexes. In one group of proteins, which are highly conserved throughout the crown-group eukaryotes, the SWIRM domain is linked to a catalytic domain related to the monoamine and polyamine oxidases. Another human protein has the SWIRM domain linked to a JAB domain that is involved in protein degradation through the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions Identification of the SWIRM domain could help in directed experimental analysis of specific interactions in chromosomal proteins. We predict that the proteins in which it is combined with an amino-oxidase domain define a novel class of chromatin-modifying enzymes, which are likely to oxidize either the amino group of basic residues in histones and other chromosomal proteins or the polyamines in chromatin, and thereby alter the charge distribution. Other forms, such as KIAA1915, may link chromatin modification to ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. PMID:12186646

  17. A conservative, positivity preserving scheme for reactive solute transport problems in moving domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabuza, Sibusiso; Kuzmin, Dmitri; Čanić, Sunčica; Bukač, Martina

    2014-11-01

    We study the mathematical models and numerical schemes for reactive transport of a soluble substance in deformable media. The medium is a channel with compliant adsorbing walls. The solutes are dissolved in the fluid flowing through the channel. The fluid, which carries the solutes, is viscous and incompressible. The reactive process is described as a general physico-chemical process taking place on the compliant channel wall. The problem is modeled by a convection-diffusion adsorption-desorption equation in moving domains. We present a conservative, positivity preserving, high resolution ALE-FCT scheme for this problem in the presence of dominant transport processes and wall reactions on the moving wall. A Patankar type time discretization is presented, which provides conservative treatment of nonlinear reactive terms. We establish CFL-type constraints on the time step, and show the mass conservation of the time discretization scheme. Numerical simulations are performed to show validity of the schemes against effective models under various scenarios including linear adsorption-desorption, irreversible wall reaction, infinite adsorption kinetics, and nonlinear Langmuir kinetics. The grid convergence of the numerical scheme is studied for the case of fixed meshes and moving meshes in fixed domains. Finally, we simulate reactive transport in moving domains under linear and nonlinear chemical reactions at the wall, and show that the motion of the compliant channel wall enhances adsorption of the solute from the fluid to the channel wall. Consequences of this result are significant in the area of, e.g., nano-particle cancer drug delivery. Our result shows that periodic excitation of the cancerous tissue using, e.g., ultrasound, may enhance adsorption of cancer drugs carried by nano-particles via the human vasculature. For Taylor dispersion and for other convection dominated flows, numerical schemes for solute transport may lead to undesirable numerical artefacts. These

  18. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserved across SMC types in a wide variety of organisms, including humans.

  19. Centromere Satellites From Arabidopsis Populations: Maintenance of Conserved and Variable Domains

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sarah E.; Kettler, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

    2003-01-01

    The rapid evolution of centromere sequences between species has led to a debate over whether centromere activity is sequence-dependent. The Arabidopsis thaliana centromere regions contain ∼20,000 copies of a 178-bp satellite repeat. Here, we analyzed satellites from 41 Arabidopsis ecotypes, providing the first broad population survey of satellite variation within a species. We found highly conserved segments and consistent sequence lengths in the Arabidopsis satellites and in the published collection of human α-satellites, supporting models for a functional role. Despite this conservation, polymorphisms are significantly enriched at some sites, yielding variation that could restrict binding proteins to a subset of repeat monomers. Some satellite regions vary considerably; at certain bases, consensus sequences derived from each ecotype diverge significantly from the Arabidopsis consensus, indicating substitutions sweep through a genome in less than 5 million years. Such rapid changes generate more variation within the set of Arabidopsis satellites than in genes from the chromosome arms or from the recombinationally suppressed centromere regions. These studies highlight a balance between the mechanisms that maintain particular satellite domains and the forces that disperse sequence changes throughout the satellite repeats in the genome. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12566397

  20. Evolutionary conservation pattern of zinc-finger domains of Drosophila segmentation genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, R J; Retzlaff, M; Goerlich, K; Sander, K; Tautz, D

    1992-01-01

    A number of genes of the developmental gene hierarchy in Drosophila encode transcription factors containing Cys2His2 zinc finger domains as DNA-binding motifs. To learn more about the evolution of these genes, it is necessary to clone the homologs, or more correctly the orthologs, from different species. Using PCR, we were able to obtain apparently orthologous fragments of hunchback (hb), Krüppel (Kr), and snail (sna) from a variety of arthropods and partly also from other animal phyla. Sequence alignments of these fragments show that the amino acid differences can normally not be correlated with the evolutionary distances of the respective species. This is due to an apparent saturation of potential replacements within the finger domains, which is also evident from the frequent occurrence of convergent replacements. Another recurrent feature of these alignments is that those amino acids that are directly involved in determining the DNA-binding specificity of the fingers are most conserved. Using in vitro bandshift experiments we can indeed show that the binding specificity of a hunchback finger fragment from different species is not changed. This implies that there is a high selective pressure to maintain the regulatory target elements of these genes during evolution. Images PMID:1438276

  1. The Conserved Phenylalanine in the Transmembrane Domain Enhances Heteromeric Interactions of Syndecans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Mi-Jung; Park, Jisu; Jang, Sinae; Eom, Chi-Yong; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane domain (TMD) of the syndecans, a family of transmembrane heparin sulfate proteoglycans, is involved in forming homo- and heterodimers and oligomers that transmit signaling events. Recently, we reported that the unique phenylalanine in TMD positively regulates intramolecular interactions of syndecan-2. Besides the unique phenylalanine, syndecan-2 contains a conserved phenylalanine (SDC2-Phe-169) that is present in all syndecan TMDs, but its function has not been determined. We therefore investigated the structural role of SDC2-Phe-169 in syndecan TMDs. Replacement of SDC2-Phe-169 by tyrosine (S2F169Y) did not affect SDS-resistant homodimer formation but significantly reduced SDS-resistant heterodimer formation between syndecan-2 and -4, suggesting that SDC2-Phe-169 is involved in the heterodimerization/oligomerization of syndecans. Similarly, in an in vitro binding assay, a syndecan-2 mutant (S2(F169Y)) showed a significantly reduced interaction with syndecan-4. FRET assays showed that heteromolecular interactions between syndecan-2 and -4 were reduced in HEK293T cells transfected with S2(F169Y) compared with syndecan-2. Moreover, S2(F169Y) reduced downstream reactions mediated by the heterodimerization of syndecan-2 and -4, including Rac activity, cell migration, membrane localization of PKCα, and focal adhesion formation. The conserved phenylalanine in syndecan-1 and -3 also showed heterodimeric interaction with syndecan-2 and -4. Taken together, these findings suggest that the conserved phenylalanine in the TMD of syndecans is crucial in regulating heteromeric interactions of syndecans.

  2. A new, highly conserved domain in Swi2/Snf2 is required for SWI/SNF remodeling.

    PubMed

    Sen, Payel; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B Franklin; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2011-11-01

    SWI/SNF is an ATP-dependent remodeler that mobilizes nucleosomes and has important roles in gene regulation. The catalytic subunit of SWI/SNF has an ATP-dependent DNA translocase domain that is essential for remodeling. Besides the DNA translocase domain there are other domains in the catalytic subunit of SWI/SNF that have important roles in mobilizing nucleosomes. One of these domains, termed SnAC (Snf2 ATP Coupling), is conserved in all eukaryotic SWI/SNF complexes and is located between the ATPase and A-T hook domains. Here, we show that the SnAC domain is essential for SWI/SNF activity. The SnAC domain is not required for SWI/SNF complex integrity, efficient nucleosome binding, or recruitment by acidic transcription activators. The SnAC domain is however required in vivo for transcription regulation by SWI/SNF as seen by alternative carbon source growth assays, northern analysis, and genome-wide expression profiling. The ATPase and nucleosome mobilizing activities of SWI/SNF are severely affected when the SnAC domain is removed or mutated. The SnAC domain positively regulates the catalytic activity of the ATPase domain of SWI/SNF to hydrolyze ATP without significantly affecting its affinity for ATP.

  3. Conservation Patterns of HIV-1 RT Connection and RNase H Domains: Identification of New Mutations in NRTI-Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Santos, André F. A.; Lengruber, Renan B.; Soares, Esmeralda A.; Jere, Abhay; Sprinz, Eduardo; Martinez, Ana M. B.; Silveira, Jussara; Sion, Fernando S.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Soares, Marcelo A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Although extensive HIV drug resistance information is available for the first 400 amino acids of its reverse transcriptase, the impact of antiretroviral treatment in C-terminal domains of Pol (thumb, connection and RNase H) is poorly understood. Methods and Findings We wanted to characterize conserved regions in RT C-terminal domains among HIV-1 group M subtypes and CRF. Additionally, we wished to identify NRTI-related mutations in HIV-1 RT C-terminal domains. We sequenced 118 RNase H domains from clinical viral isolates in Brazil, and analyzed 510 thumb and connection domain and 450 RNase H domain sequences collected from public HIV sequence databases, together with their treatment status and histories. Drug-naïve and NRTI-treated datasets were compared for intra- and inter-group conservation, and differences were determined using Fisher's exact tests. One third of RT C-terminal residues were found to be conserved among group M variants. Three mutations were found exclusively in NRTI-treated isolates. Nine mutations in the connection and 6 mutations in the RNase H were associated with NRTI treatment in subtype B. Some of them lay in or close to amino acid residues which contact nucleic acid or near the RNase H active site. Several of the residues pointed out herein have been recently associated to NRTI exposure or increase drug resistance to NRTI. Conclusions This is the first comprehensive genotypic analysis of a large sequence dataset that describes NRTI-related mutations in HIV-1 RT C-terminal domains in vivo. The findings into the conservation of RT C-terminal domains may pave the way to more rational drug design initiatives targeting those regions. PMID:18335052

  4. The Evolutionarily Conserved Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), Lysin Motif (LysM), Domain Catalytic (TLDc) Domain Is Neuroprotective against Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Mattéa J.; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Liu, Kevin X; Davies, Kay E.; Oliver, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathological feature of many neurological disorders; therefore, utilizing proteins that are protective against such cellular insults is a potentially valuable therapeutic approach. Oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) has been shown previously to be critical for oxidative stress resistance in neuronal cells; deletion of this gene causes neurodegeneration in mice, yet conversely, overexpression of OXR1 is protective in cellular and mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. OXR1 contains the Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), lysin motif (LysM), domain catalytic (TLDc) domain, a motif present in a family of proteins including TBC1 domain family member 24 (TBC1D24), a protein mutated in a range of disorders characterized by seizures, hearing loss, and neurodegeneration. The TLDc domain is highly conserved across species, although the structure-function relationship is unknown. To understand the role of this domain in the stress response, we carried out systematic analysis of all mammalian TLDc domain-containing proteins, investigating their expression and neuroprotective properties in parallel. In addition, we performed a detailed structural and functional study of this domain in which we identified key residues required for its activity. Finally, we present a new mouse insertional mutant of Oxr1, confirming that specific disruption of the TLDc domain in vivo is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration. Our data demonstrate that the integrity of the TLDc domain is essential for conferring neuroprotection, an important step in understanding the functional significance of all TLDc domain-containing proteins in the cellular stress response and disease. PMID:26668325

  5. Syp1 is a conserved endocytic adaptor that contains domains involved in cargo selection and membrane tubulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reider, Amanda; Barker, Sarah L.; Mishra, Sanjay K.; Im, Young Jun; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Hurley, James H.; Traub, Linton M.; Wendland, Beverly

    2010-10-28

    Internalization of diverse transmembrane cargos from the plasma membrane requires a similarly diverse array of specialized adaptors, yet only a few adaptors have been characterized. We report the identification of the muniscin family of endocytic adaptors that is conserved from yeast to human beings. Solving the structures of yeast muniscin domains confirmed the unique combination of an N-terminal domain homologous to the crescent-shaped membrane-tubulating EFC/F-BAR domains and a C-terminal domain homologous to cargo-binding {mu} homology domains ({mu}HDs). In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed membrane-tubulation activity for muniscin EFC/F-BAR domains. The {mu}HD domain has conserved interactions with the endocytic adaptor/scaffold Ede1/eps15, which influences muniscin localization. The transmembrane protein Mid2, earlier implicated in polarized Rho1 signalling, was identified as a cargo of the yeast adaptor protein. These and other data suggest a model in which the muniscins provide a combined adaptor/membrane-tubulation activity that is important for regulating endocytosis.

  6. Conserved TCP domain of Sas-4/CPAP is essential for pericentriolar material tethering during centrosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangdong; Gooi, Li Ming; Wason, Arpit; Gabriel, Elke; Mehrjardi, Narges Zare; Yang, Qian; Zhang, Xingrun; Debec, Alain; Basiri, Marcus L; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Poser, Ina; Saric, Tomo; Hyman, Anthony A; Li, Haitao; Gopalakrishnan, Jay

    2014-01-21

    Pericentriolar material (PCM) recruitment to centrioles forms a key step in centrosome biogenesis. Deregulation of this process leads to centrosome aberrations causing disorders, one of which is autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH), a neurodevelopmental disorder where brain size is reduced. During PCM recruitment, the conserved centrosomal protein Sas-4/CPAP/MCPH6, known to play a role in centriole formation, acts as a scaffold for cytoplasmic PCM complexes to bind and then tethers them to centrioles to form functional centrosomes. To understand Sas-4's tethering role, we determined the crystal structure of its T complex protein 10 (TCP) domain displaying a solvent-exposed single-layer of β-sheets fold. This unique feature of the TCP domain suggests that it could provide an "extended surface-like" platform to tether the Sas-4-PCM scaffold to a centriole. Functional studies in Drosophila, human cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells were used to test this hypothesis, where point mutations within the 9-10th β-strands (β9-10 mutants including a MCPH-associated mutation) perturbed PCM tethering while allowing Sas-4/CPAP to scaffold cytoplasmic PCM complexes. Specifically, the Sas-4 β9-10 mutants displayed perturbed interactions with Ana2, a centrosome duplication factor, and Bld-10, a centriole microtubule-binding protein, suggesting a role for the β9-10 surface in mediating protein-protein interactions for efficient Sas-4-PCM scaffold centriole tethering. Hence, we provide possible insights into how centrosomal protein defects result in human MCPH and how Sas-4 proteins act as a vehicle to tether PCM complexes to centrioles independent of its well-known role in centriole duplication.

  7. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  8. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein–protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  9. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2015-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein-protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  10. A conserved hydrophobic surface of the LARG pleckstrin homology domain is critical for RhoA activation in cells

    PubMed Central

    Aittaleb, Mohamed; Gao, Guang; Evelyn, Chris R.; Neubig, Richard R.; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) activates RhoA in response to signals received by specific classes of cell surface receptors. The catalytic core of LARG is a Dbl homology (DH) domain whose activity is modulated by an adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. In this study, we used a transcriptional assay and confocal microscopy to examine the roles of several novel structural features of the LARG DH/PH domains, including a conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the PH domain that mediates protein-protein interactions in crystal structures of LARG and its close homolog PDZ-RhoGEF. Mutation of the hydrophobic patch has no effect on nucleotide exchange activity in vitro, but abolished the ability of LARG to activate RhoA and to induce stress fiber formation in cultured cells. The activity of these mutants could be rescued by fusion with exogenous membrane targeting domains. However, because membrane recruitment by activated Gα13 subunits was not sufficient to rescue activity of a hydrophobic patch mutant, the LARG PH domain cannot solely contribute to membrane targeting. Instead, it seems likely the domain is involved in regulatory interactions with other proteins near the membrane surface. We also show that the hydrophobic patch of the PH domain is likely important for the activity of all Lbc family RhoGEFs. PMID:19560536

  11. Conservation and evolution in and among SRF- and MEF2-type MADS domains and their binding sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenwu; Huang, Xiaotai; Cheng, Jian; Li, Zhenggang; de Folter, Stefan; Huang, Zhuoran; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Pang, Hongxia; Tao, Shiheng

    2011-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) and myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) represent two types of members of the MCM1, AGAMOUS, DEFICIENS, and SRF (MADS)-box transcription factor family present in animals and fungi. Each type has distinct biological functions, which are reflected by the distinct specificities of the proteins bound to their cognate DNA-binding sites and activated by their respective cofactors. However, little is known about the evolution of MADS domains and their DNA-binding sites. Here, we report on the conservation and evolution of the two types of MADS domains with their cognate DNA-binding sites by using phylogenetic analyses. First, there are great similarities between the two types of proteins with amino acid positions highly conserved, which are critical for binding to the DNA sequence and for the maintenance of the 3D structure. Second, in contrast to MEF2-type MADS domains, distinct conserved residues are present at some positions in SRF-type MADS domains, determining specificity and the configuration of the MADS domain bound to DNA sequences. Furthermore, the ancestor sequence of SRF- and MEF2-type MADS domains is more similar to MEF2-type MADS domains than to SRF-type MADS domains. In the case of DNA-binding sites, the MEF2 site has a T-rich core in one DNA sequence and an A-rich core in the reverse sequence as compared with the SRF site, no matter whether where either A or T is present in the two complementary sequences. In addition, comparing SRF sites in the human and the mouse genomes reveals that the evolution rate of CArG-boxes is faster in mouse than in human. Moreover, interestingly, a CArG-like sequence, which is probably functionless, could potentially mutate to a functional CArG-box that can be bound by SRF and vice versa. Together, these results significantly improve our knowledge on the conservation and evolution of the MADS domains and their binding sites to date and provide new insights to investigate the MADS family, which is not

  12. Functional Characterization of Glycoprotein H Chimeras Composed of Conserved Domains of the Pseudorabies Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Sebastian W.; Backovic, Marija; Klupp, Barbara G.; Rey, Felix A.; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane fusion is indispensable for entry of enveloped viruses into host cells. The conserved core fusion machinery of the Herpesviridae consists of glycoprotein B (gB) and the gH/gL complex. Recently, crystal structures of gH/gL of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and Epstein-Barr virus and of a core fragment of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gH identified four structurally conserved gH domains. To investigate functional conservation, chimeric genes encoding combinations of individual domains of PrV and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) gH were expressed in rabbit kidney cells, and their processing and transport to the cell surface, as well as activity in fusion assays including gB, gD, and gL of PrV or HSV-1, were analyzed. Chimeric gH containing domain I of HSV-1 and domains II to IV of PrV exhibited limited fusion activity in the presence of PrV gB and gD and HSV-1 gL, but not of PrV gL. More strikingly, chimeric gH consisting of PrV domains I to III and HSV-1 domain IV exhibited considerable fusion activity together with PrV gB, gD, and gL. Replacing PrV gB with the HSV-1 protein significantly enhanced this activity. A cell line stably expressing this chimeric gH supported replication of gH-deleted PrV. Our results confirm the specificity of domain I for gL binding, demonstrate functional conservation of domain IV in two alphaherpesviruses from different genera, and indicate species-specific interactions of this domain with gB. They also suggest that gH domains II and III might form a structural and functional unit which does not tolerate major substitutions. IMPORTANCE Envelope glycoprotein H (gH) is essential for herpesvirus-induced membrane fusion, which is required for host cell entry and viral spread. Although gH is structurally conserved within the Herpesviridae, its precise role and its interactions with other components of the viral fusion machinery are not fully understood. Chimeric proteins containing domains of gH proteins from different

  13. Functional conservation of cold shock domains in bacteria and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Nakaminami, Kentaro; Karlson, Dale T; Imai, Ryozo

    2006-06-27

    In Escherichia coli, a family of cold shock proteins (CSPs) function as transcription antiterminators or translational enhancers at low temperature by destabilizing RNA secondary structure. A wheat nucleic acid-binding protein (WCSP1) was found to contain a cold shock domain (CSD) bearing high similarity to E. coli cold shock proteins. In the present study, a series of mutations were introduced into WCSP1, and its functionality was investigated by using in vivo and in vitro assays in the context of functional conservation with E. coli CSPs. Constitutive expression of WT WCSP1 in an E. coli cspA, cspB, cspE, cspG quadruple deletion mutant complemented its cold-sensitive phenotype, suggesting that WCSP1 shares a function with E. coli CSPs for cold adaptation. In addition, transcription antitermination activity was demonstrated for WCSP1 by using an E. coli strain that has a hairpin loop upstream of a chloramphenicol resistance gene. In vitro dsDNA melting assays clearly demonstrated that WCSP1 melts dsDNA, an activity that was positively correlated to the ability to bind ssDNA. When mutations were introduced at critical residues within the consensus RNA binding motifs (RNP1 and RNP2) of WCSP1, it failed to melt dsDNA. Studies with WCSP1-GFP fusion proteins documented patterns that are consistent with ER and nuclear localization. In vivo and in vitro functional analyses, coupled with subcellular localization data, suggest that WCSP1 may function as a RNA chaperone to destabilize secondary structure and is involved in the regulation of translation under low temperature.

  14. Structurally conserved erythrocyte-binding domain in Plasmodium provides a versatile scaffold for alternate receptor engagement

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyk, Jakub; Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Arnott, Alicia; He, Wen-Qiang; Nguitragool, Wang; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Mok, Yee-Foong; Murphy, James M.; Smith, Katherine R.; Lee, Stuart; Bahlo, Melanie; Mueller, Ivo; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how malaria parasites gain entry into human red blood cells is essential for developing strategies to stop blood stage infection. Plasmodium vivax preferentially invades reticulocytes, which are immature red blood cells. The organism has two erythrocyte-binding protein families: namely, the Duffy-binding protein (PvDBP) and the reticulocyte-binding protein (PvRBP) families. Several members of the PvRBP family bind reticulocytes, specifically suggesting a role in mediating host cell selectivity of P. vivax. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution crystal structure of an erythrocyte-binding domain from PvRBP2a, solved at 2.12 Å resolution. The monomeric molecule consists of 10 α-helices and one short β-hairpin, and, although the structural fold is similar to that of PfRh5—the essential invasion ligand in Plasmodium falciparum—its surface properties are distinct and provide a possible mechanism for recognition of alternate receptors. Sequence alignments of the crystallized fragment of PvRBP2a with other PvRBPs highlight the conserved placement of disulfide bonds. PvRBP2a binds mature red blood cells through recognition of an erythrocyte receptor that is neuraminidase- and chymotrypsin-resistant but trypsin-sensitive. By examining the patterns of sequence diversity within field isolates, we have identified and mapped polymorphic residues to the PvRBP2a structure. Using mutagenesis, we have also defined the critical residues required for erythrocyte binding. Characterization of the structural features that govern functional erythrocyte binding for the PvRBP family provides a framework for generating new tools that block P. vivax blood stage infection. PMID:26715754

  15. Retention of viral infectivity after extensive mutation of the highly conserved immunodominant domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Pancino, G; Sonigo, P

    1997-01-01

    In lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), the principal immunodominant domain (PID) of the transmembrane glycoprotein elicits a strong humoral response in infected hosts. The PID is marked by the presence of two cysteines that delimit a sequence, composed of five to seven amino acids in different lentiviruses, which is highly conserved among isolates of the same lentiviral species. While the conservation of the sequence suggests the presence of functional constraints, the conservation of the immunodominance among divergent lentiviruses raises the hypothesis of a selective advantage for the infecting virus conferred by the host humoral response against this domain. We and others have previously shown that an appropriate structure of the PID is required for the production of a functional envelope. In the present work, we analyzed virological functions and immune reactivity of the envelope after random mutagenesis of the PID of FIV. We obtained nine mutant envelopes which were correctly processed and retained fusogenic ability. Mutation of the two C-terminal residues of the PID sequence between the cysteines in a molecular clone of FIV abolished infectivity. In contrast, three molecular clones containing extensive mutations in the four N-terminal amino acids were infectious. However, the mutations affected PID reactivity with sera from infected cats. Our results suggest that functional constraints, although existent, are not sufficient to account for PID sequence conservation. Such conservation may also result from positive selection by anti-PID antibodies which enhance infection. PMID:9151822

  16. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1. PMID:23663131

  17. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1.

  18. Functional analysis of conserved aromatic amino acids in the discoidin domain of Paenibacillus β-1,3-glucanase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The 190-kDa Paenibacillus β-1,3-glucanase (LamA) contains a catalytic module of the glycoside hydrolase family 16 (GH16) and several auxiliary domains. Of these, a discoidin domain (DS domain), present in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins with a wide variety of functions, exists at the carboxyl-terminus. To better understand the bacterial DS domain in terms of its structure and function, this domain alone was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. The results indicate that the DS domain binds various polysaccharides and enhances the biological activity of the GH16 module on composite substrates. We also investigated the importance of several conserved aromatic residues in the domain's stability and substrate-binding affinity. Both were affected by mutations of these residues; however, the effect on protein stability was more notable. In particular, the forces contributed by a sandwiched triad (W1688, R1756, and W1729) were critical for the presumable β-sandwich fold. PMID:19930717

  19. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic, Mirjana; Quezada, Cindy M.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2010-06-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella InvA shares homology to a recurring scaffold in the membrane-spanning components of the type II and type III secretion systems. Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  20. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting inmore » a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.« less

  1. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting in a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.

  2. Domains in microbial beta-1, 4-glycanases: sequence conservation, function, and enzyme families.

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, N R; Henrissat, B; Kilburn, D G; Miller, R C; Warren, R A

    1991-01-01

    Several types of domain occur in beta-1, 4-glycanases. The best characterized of these are the catalytic domains and the cellulose-binding domains. The domains may be joined by linker sequences rich in proline or hydroxyamino acids or both. Some of the enzymes contain repeated sequences up to 150 amino acids in length. The enzymes can be grouped into families on the basis of sequence similarities between the catalytic domains. There are sequence similarities between the cellulose-binding domains, of which two types have been identified, and also between some domains of unknown function. The beta-1, 4-glycanases appear to have arisen by the shuffling of a relatively small number of progenitor sequences. PMID:1886523

  3. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  4. Molecular analysis of muskelin identifies a conserved discoidin-like domain that contributes to protein self-association.

    PubMed

    Prag, Soren; Collett, Georgina D M; Adams, Josephine C

    2004-07-15

    Muskelin is an intracellular protein with a C-terminal kelch-repeat domain that was initially characterized as having functional involvement in cell spreading on the extracellular matrix glycoprotein thrombospondin-1. As one approach to understanding the functional properties of muskelin, we have combined bioinformatic and biochemical studies. Through analysis of a new dataset of eight animal muskelins, we showed that the N-terminal region of the polypeptide corresponds to a predicted discoidin-like domain. This domain architecture is conserved in fungal muskelins and reveals a structural parallel between the muskelins and certain extracellular fungal galactose oxidases, although the phylogeny of the two groups appears distinct. In view of the fact that a number of kelch-repeat proteins have been shown to self-associate, co-immunoprecipitation, protein pull-down assays and studies of cellular localization were carried out with wild-type, deletion mutant and point mutant muskelins to investigate the roles of the discoidin-like and kelch-repeat domains. We obtained evidence for cis- and trans-interactions between the two domains. These studies provide evidence that muskelin self-associates through a head-to-tail mechanism involving the discoidin-like domain. PMID:15084145

  5. Molecular analysis of muskelin identifies a conserved discoidin-like domain that contributes to protein self-association

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Muskelin is an intracellular protein with a C-terminal kelch-repeat domain that was initially characterized as having functional involvement in cell spreading on the extracellular matrix glycoprotein thrombospondin-1. As one approach to understanding the functional properties of muskelin, we have combined bioinformatic and biochemical studies. Through analysis of a new dataset of eight animal muskelins, we showed that the N-terminal region of the polypeptide corresponds to a predicted discoidin-like domain. This domain architecture is conserved in fungal muskelins and reveals a structural parallel between the muskelins and certain extracellular fungal galactose oxidases, although the phylogeny of the two groups appears distinct. In view of the fact that a number of kelch-repeat proteins have been shown to self-associate, co-immunoprecipitation, protein pull-down assays and studies of cellular localization were carried out with wild-type, deletion mutant and point mutant muskelins to investigate the roles of the discoidin-like and kelch-repeat domains. We obtained evidence for cis- and trans-interactions between the two domains. These studies provide evidence that muskelin self-associates through a head-to-tail mechanism involving the discoidin-like domain. PMID:15084145

  6. Crystal structure of a conserved domain in the intermembrane space region of the plastid division protein ARC6.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Su, Chih-Chia; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Yu, Edward W

    2016-02-01

    The chloroplast division machinery is composed of numerous proteins that assemble as a large complex to divide double-membraned chloroplasts through binary fission. A key mediator of division-complex formation is ARC6, a chloroplast inner envelope protein and evolutionary descendant of the cyanobacterial cell division protein Ftn2. ARC6 connects stromal and cytosolic contractile rings across the two membranes through interaction with an outer envelope protein within the intermembrane space (IMS). The ARC6 IMS region bears a structurally uncharacterized domain of unknown function, DUF4101, that is highly conserved among ARC6 and Ftn2 proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of this domain from Arabidopsis thaliana ARC6. The domain forms an α/β barrel open towards the outer envelope membrane but closed towards the inner envelope membrane. These findings provide new clues into how ARC6 and its homologs contribute to chloroplast and cyanobacterial cell division.

  7. Crystal structure of a conserved domain in the intermembrane space region of the plastid division protein ARC6.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Su, Chih-Chia; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Yu, Edward W

    2016-02-01

    The chloroplast division machinery is composed of numerous proteins that assemble as a large complex to divide double-membraned chloroplasts through binary fission. A key mediator of division-complex formation is ARC6, a chloroplast inner envelope protein and evolutionary descendant of the cyanobacterial cell division protein Ftn2. ARC6 connects stromal and cytosolic contractile rings across the two membranes through interaction with an outer envelope protein within the intermembrane space (IMS). The ARC6 IMS region bears a structurally uncharacterized domain of unknown function, DUF4101, that is highly conserved among ARC6 and Ftn2 proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of this domain from Arabidopsis thaliana ARC6. The domain forms an α/β barrel open towards the outer envelope membrane but closed towards the inner envelope membrane. These findings provide new clues into how ARC6 and its homologs contribute to chloroplast and cyanobacterial cell division. PMID:26452626

  8. Targeting of the GRIP domain to the trans-Golgi network is conserved from protists to animals.

    PubMed

    McConville, Malcolm J; Ilgoutz, Steven C; Teasdale, Rohan D; Foth, Bernardo J; Matthews, Antony; Mullin, Kylie A; Gleeson, Paul A

    2002-09-01

    The GRIP domain, found in a family of coiled-coil peripheral membrane Golgi proteins, is a specific targeting sequence for the trans-Golgi network of animal cells. In this study we show that a coiled-coil protein with a GRIP domain occurs in the primitive eukaryote, Trypanosoma brucei, and that reporter proteins containing this domain can be used as a marker for the poorly characterized trans Golgi/trans-Golgi network of trypanosomatid parasites. The T. brucei GRIP domain, when fused to the carboxyl terminus of the green fluorescent protein (GFP-TbGRIP), was efficiently localized to the Golgi apparatus of transfected COS cells. Overexpression of GFP-TbGRIP in COS cells displaced the endogenous GRIP protein, GCC1p, from the Golgi apparatus indicating that the trypanosomatid and mammalian GRIP sequences interact with similar membrane determinants. GFP fusion proteins containing either the T. brucei GRIP domain or the human p230 GRIP (p230GRIP) domain were also expressed in the trypanosomatid parasite, Leishmania mexicana, and localized by fluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy to the trans face of the single Golgi apparatus and a short tubule that extended from the Golgi apparatus. Binding of GFP-p230GRIP to Golgi membranes in L. mexicana was abrogated by mutation of a critical tyrosine residue in the p230 GRIP domain. The levels of GFP-GRIP fusion proteins were dramatically reduced in stationary-phase L. mexicana promastigotes, suggesting that specific Golgi trafficking steps may be down-regulated as the promastigotes cease dividing. This study provides a protein marker for the trans-Golgi network of trypanosomatid parasites and suggests that the GRIP domain binds to a membrane component that has been highly conserved in eukaryotic evolution.

  9. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body.

    PubMed

    Lilic, Mirjana; Quezada, Cindy M; Stebbins, C Erec

    2010-06-01

    Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  10. A Conserved Domain in Type III Secretion Links the Cytoplasmic Domain of InvA to Elements of the Basal Body

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic, M.; Quezada, C; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  11. Sequence and domain conservation of the coelacanth Hsp40 and Hsp90 chaperones suggests conservation of function.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Özlem Tastan; Edkins, Adrienne Lesley; Blatch, Gregory Lloyd

    2014-09-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones play an important role in preserving and regulating the active conformational state of cellular proteins. The chaperone complement of the Indonesian Coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis, was elucidated using transcriptomic sequences. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40) chaperones, and associated co-chaperones were focused on, and homologous human sequences were used to search the sequence databases. Coelacanth homologs of the cytosolic, mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of human Hsp90 were identified, as well as all of the major co-chaperones of the cytosolic isoform. Most of the human Hsp40s were found to have coelacanth homologs, and the data suggested that all of the chaperone machinery for protein folding at the ribosome, protein translocation to cellular compartments such as the ER and protein degradation were conserved. Some interesting similarities and differences were identified when interrogating human, mouse, and zebrafish homologs. For example, DnaJB13 is predicted to be a non-functional Hsp40 in humans, mouse, and zebrafish due to a corrupted histidine-proline-aspartic acid (HPD) motif, while the coelacanth homolog has an intact HPD. These and other comparisons enabled important functional and evolutionary questions to be posed for future experimental studies.

  12. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  13. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  14. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the murine 2 P domain potassium channel gene Kcnk8: conservation of gene structure in 2 P domain potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bockenhauer, D; Nimmakayalu, M A; Ward, D C; Goldstein, S A; Gallagher, P G

    2000-12-31

    A 2 P domain potassium channel expressed in eye, lung, and stomach, Kcnk8, has recently been identified. To initiate further biochemical and genetic studies of this channel, we assembled the murine Kcnk8 cDNA sequence, characterized the genomic structure of the Kcnk8 gene, determined its chromosomal localization, and analyzed its activity in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. The composite cDNA has an open reading frame of 1029 bp and encodes a protein of 343 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 36 kDa. Structure analyses predict 2 P domains and four potential transmembrane helices with a potential single EF-hand motif and four potential SH3-binding motifs in the COOH-terminus. Cloning of the Kcnk8 chromosomal gene revealed that it is composed of three exons distributed over 4 kb of genomic DNA. Genome database searching revealed that one of the intron/exon boundaries identified in Kcnk8 is present in other mammalian 2 P domain potassium channels genes and many C. elegans 2P domain potassium channel genes, revealing evolutionary conservation of gene structure. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the murine Kcnk8 gene was mapped to chromosome 19, 2B, the locus of the murine dancer phenotype, and syntenic to 11q11-11q13, the location of the human homologue. No significant currents were generated in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system using the composite Kcnk8 cDNA sequence, suggesting, like many potassium channels, additional channel subunits, modulator substances, or cellular chaperones are required for channel function.

  15. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  16. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5′-NNCCAC-3′ and 5′-GCGMGN′N′-3′ (M:A or C; N and N′ form Watson–Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:23709277

  17. The conserved amino-terminal domain of hSRP1 alpha is essential for nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, K; Ryder, U; Lamond, A I

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear proteins are targeted through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in an energy-dependent reaction. The import reaction is mediated by nuclear localization sequences (NLS) in the substrate which are recognized by heterodimeric cytoplasmic receptors. hSRP1 alpha is an NLS-binding subunit of the human NLS receptor complex and is complexed in vivo with a second subunit of 97 kDa (p97). We show here that a short amino-terminal domain in hSRP1 alpha is necessary and sufficient for its interaction with p97. This domain is conserved in other SRP1-like proteins and its fusion to a cytoplasmic reporter protein is sufficient to promote complete nuclear import, circumventing the usual requirement for an NLS receptor interaction. The same amino-terminal domain inhibits import of NLS-containing proteins when added to an in vitro nuclear transport assay. While full-length hSRP alpha is able to leave the nucleus, the amino-terminal domain alone is not sufficient to promote exit. We conclude that hSRP1 alpha functions as an adaptor to tether NLS-containing substrates to the protein import machinery. Images PMID:8617227

  18. Hevea brasiliensis prohevein possesses a conserved C-terminal domain with amyloid-like properties in vitro.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Bentaleb, Ahmed; Peruch, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Prohevein is a wound-induced protein and a main allergen from latex of Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). This 187 amino-acid protein is cleaved in two fragments: a N-terminal 43 amino-acids called hevein, a lectin bearing a chitin-binding motif with antifungal properties and a C-terminal domain (C-ter) far less characterized. We provide here new insights on the characteristics of prohevein, hevein and C-terminal domain. Using complementary biochemical (ThT/CR/chitin binding, agglutination) and structural (modeling, ATR-FTIR, TEM, WAXS) approaches, we show that this domain clearly displays all the characteristics of an amyloid-like proteins in vitro, that could confer agglutination activity in synergy with its chitin-binding activity. Additionally, this C-ter domain is highly conserved and present in numerous plant prohevein-like proteins or pathogenesis-related (PR and WIN) proteins. This could be the hallmark of the eventual presence of proteins with amyloid properties in plants, that could potentially play a role in defense through aggregation properties. PMID:26805576

  19. Co-operative DNA binding by GAGA transcription factor requires the conserved BTB/POZ domain and reorganizes promoter topology.

    PubMed Central

    Katsani, K R; Hajibagheri, M A; Verrijzer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The POZ domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif present in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodelling and human cancers. Here, we study the role of the POZ domain of the GAGA transcription factor in promoter recognition. Natural target promoters for GAGA typically contain multiple GAGA-binding elements. Our results show that the POZ domain mediates strong co-operative binding to multiple sites but inhibits binding to single sites. Protein cross-linking and gel filtration chromatography experiments established that the POZ domain is required for GAGA oligomerization into higher order complexes. Thus, GAGA oligomerization increases binding specificity by selecting only promoters with multiple sites. Electron microscopy revealed that GAGA binds to multiple sites as a large oligomer and induces bending of the promoter DNA. Our results indicate a novel mode of DNA binding by GAGA, in which a large GAGA complex binds multiple GAGA elements that are spread out over a region of a few hundred base pairs. We suggest a model in which the promoter DNA is wrapped around a GAGA multimer in a conformation that may exclude normal nucleosome formation. PMID:9927429

  20. Characterization of a highly conserved domain within the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein S2 domain with characteristics of a viral fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Madu, Ikenna G; Roth, Shoshannah L; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-08-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of alpha-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae.

  1. Characterization of a Highly Conserved Domain within the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein S2 Domain with Characteristics of a Viral Fusion Peptide▿

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of α-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae. PMID:19439480

  2. High-order entropy stable finite difference schemes for nonlinear conservation laws: Finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference operators including boundary closure stencils, for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A comparison technique is used to derive a new Entropy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (SSWENO) finite difference method, appropriate for simulations of problems with shocks. Viscous terms are approximated using conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference operators. The efficacy of the new discrete operators is demonstrated using both smooth and discontinuous test cases.

  3. A novel zinc binding domain conserved in metalloendopeptidases from bacteria to man

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, A.B.; Ding, L.; Roth, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Protease III, PTR, a metalloendopeptidase from E. Coli, is 46% similar to mammalian insulin degrading enzyme and shares three regions of high homology which are between 54% and 80% identical. One of these regions contains a potential active site domain, HXXEH, which is an inversion of the zinc binding domain described in other metalloendopeptidases, HEXXH. To test if this region represents the active site in PTR, the histidine residues in this domain were mutated to arginine and the glutamate residue to glutamine. The mutant and wildtype enzymes were over-expressed in bacteria and purified to homogeneity using conventional column chromatography. All three mutants were assayed for proteolytic activity towards an exogenous substrate, insulin, and were found to be devoid of activity. The amount and type of metal associated with each protein was then determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Three lines of evidence indicate that the loss of activity in the mutants is not due to distortion of the three-dimensional structure of the protein: (1) the mutants are secreted into the periplasmic space and chromatograph normally; (2) all three mutants are able to cross-link insulin at approximately normal levels; (3) the mutants compete equally with wildtype PTR in a radioimmunoassay.

  4. Microbial community transcriptional networks are conserved in three domains at ocean basin scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylward, Frank O.; Eppley, John M.; Smith, Jason M.; Chavez, Francisco P.; Scholin, Christopher A.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2015-04-01

    Planktonic microbial communities in the ocean are typically dominated by several cosmopolitan clades of Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya characterized by their ribosomal RNA gene phylogenies and genomic features. Although the environments these communities inhabit range from coastal to open ocean waters, how the biological dynamics vary between such disparate habitats is not well known. To gain insight into the differential activities of microbial populations inhabiting different oceanic provinces we compared the daily metatranscriptome profiles of related microbial populations inhabiting surface waters of both a coastal California upwelling region (CC) as well as the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Transcriptional networks revealed that the dominant photoautotrophic microbes in each environment (Ostreococcus in CC, Prochlorococcus in NPSG) were central determinants of overall community transcriptome dynamics. Furthermore, heterotrophic bacterial clades common to both ecosystems (SAR11, SAR116, SAR86, SAR406, and Roseobacter) displayed conserved, genome-wide inter- and intrataxon transcriptional patterns and diel cycles. Populations of SAR11 and SAR86 clades in particular exhibited tightly coordinated transcriptional patterns in both coastal and pelagic ecosystems, suggesting that specific biological interactions between these groups are widespread in nature. Our results identify common diurnally oscillating behaviors among diverse planktonic microbial species regardless of habitat, suggesting that highly conserved temporally phased biotic interactions are ubiquitous among planktonic microbial communities worldwide.

  5. Microbial community transcriptional networks are conserved in three domains at ocean basin scales.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Frank O; Eppley, John M; Smith, Jason M; Chavez, Francisco P; Scholin, Christopher A; DeLong, Edward F

    2015-04-28

    Planktonic microbial communities in the ocean are typically dominated by several cosmopolitan clades of Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya characterized by their ribosomal RNA gene phylogenies and genomic features. Although the environments these communities inhabit range from coastal to open ocean waters, how the biological dynamics vary between such disparate habitats is not well known. To gain insight into the differential activities of microbial populations inhabiting different oceanic provinces we compared the daily metatranscriptome profiles of related microbial populations inhabiting surface waters of both a coastal California upwelling region (CC) as well as the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Transcriptional networks revealed that the dominant photoautotrophic microbes in each environment (Ostreococcus in CC, Prochlorococcus in NPSG) were central determinants of overall community transcriptome dynamics. Furthermore, heterotrophic bacterial clades common to both ecosystems (SAR11, SAR116, SAR86, SAR406, and Roseobacter) displayed conserved, genome-wide inter- and intrataxon transcriptional patterns and diel cycles. Populations of SAR11 and SAR86 clades in particular exhibited tightly coordinated transcriptional patterns in both coastal and pelagic ecosystems, suggesting that specific biological interactions between these groups are widespread in nature. Our results identify common diurnally oscillating behaviors among diverse planktonic microbial species regardless of habitat, suggesting that highly conserved temporally phased biotic interactions are ubiquitous among planktonic microbial communities worldwide. PMID:25775583

  6. Investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey of soil and moisture conservation on public domain lands, 1941-1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, H.V.; Melin, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The passage of the Taylor Grazing Act in 1934 marked the end of an era in the land policies in the United States in that disposal of the public lands by homesteading was terminated except under rigidly prescribed procedures, and the remaining public lands covering about 175 million acres in the western conterminous states were brought under regulatory authority for grazing use. In 1934 the lands were mostly in a severe state of deterioration as a result of overgrazing and drought. In addition to reducing numbers of livestock using the lands, successive programs of conservation practices were established of which the Soil and Moisture Conservation Program of the Department of the Interior is of particular interest here. The services of the Geological Survey, in an investigational and advisory capacity were enlisted in this program. The work of the Geological Survey has consisted of the collection of hydrologic data, investigations of range-water supplies to facilitate management and provide information for design of structures and land-treatment measures. Appraisal of the effects of treatment practices has also been an important activity. Conservation on the public domain involves mainly growing vegetation for forage and reducing erosion. The two elements are intimately related--accomplishment in one is usually reflected by an improvement in the other. Erosion is a serious problem on most of the public domain, but particularly in the Colorado River and Rio Grande basins where, despite low annual water yields, the public domain and similar lands on the Indian reservations contribute the major part of the sediment measured at the downstream gaging stations. In parts of the Missouri River basin also, erosion is obviously very active but the sediment yield contributed by the public domain cannot be as readily isolated. The reasons for the erosion are generally evident--the erodibility of the rock and soils and the sparsity of vegetation as a result of low precipitation

  7. Both the conserved GRAS domain and nuclear localization are required for SHORT-ROOT movement

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kimberly L.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Transcription factor movement is well established in plants. Since the initial report of KNOTTED movement, more than a dozen transcription factors have been shown to move in plants. However, the developmental significance of movement is not known. Using the SHORT-ROOT (SHR) transcription factor as a tool for studying cell-to-cell trafficking, we show that movement of SHR from its site of synthesis is necessary for normal development of the Arabidopsis root. We identify multiple regions of SHR that are required for intra-and intercellular movement of SHR, including a region that is necessary for movement but not activity. We made the surprising discovery that the capacity for intercellular movement may be conserved among other GRAS family proteins. Finally, we provide evidence that movement requires both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization, strongly suggesting a mechanistic link between nuclear transport and cell-to-cell movement. PMID:19000160

  8. Domain decomposition methods for systems of conservation laws: Spectral collocation approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quarteroni, Alfio

    1989-01-01

    Hyperbolic systems of conversation laws are considered which are discretized in space by spectral collocation methods and advanced in time by finite difference schemes. At any time-level a domain deposition method based on an iteration by subdomain procedure was introduced yielding at each step a sequence of independent subproblems (one for each subdomain) that can be solved simultaneously. The method is set for a general nonlinear problem in several space variables. The convergence analysis, however, is carried out only for a linear one-dimensional system with continuous solutions. A precise form of the error reduction factor at each iteration is derived. Although the method is applied here to the case of spectral collocation approximation only, the idea is fairly general and can be used in a different context as well. For instance, its application to space discretization by finite differences is straight forward.

  9. Evolutionarily conserved paired immunoglobulin-like receptor α (PILRα) domain mediates its interaction with diverse sialylated ligands.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonglian; Senger, Kate; Baginski, Tomasz K; Mazloom, Anita; Chinn, Yvonne; Pantua, Homer; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ramani, Sree Ranjani; Luis, Elizabeth; Tom, Irene; Sebrell, Andrew; Quinones, Gabriel; Ma, Yan; Mukhyala, Kiran; Sai, Tao; Ding, Jiabing; Haley, Benjamin; Shadnia, Hooman; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Gonzalez, Lino C; Hass, Philip E; Zarrin, Ali A

    2012-05-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PILR) α is an inhibitory receptor that recognizes several ligands, including mouse CD99, PILR-associating neural protein, and Herpes simplex virus-1 glycoprotein B. The physiological function(s) of interactions between PILRα and its cellular ligands are not well understood, as are the molecular determinants of PILRα/ligand interactions. To address these uncertainties, we sought to identify additional PILRα ligands and further define the molecular basis for PILRα/ligand interactions. Here, we identify two novel PILRα binding partners, neuronal differentiation and proliferation factor-1 (NPDC1), and collectin-12 (COLEC12). We find that sialylated O-glycans on these novel PILRα ligands, and on known PILRα ligands, are compulsory for PILRα binding. Sialylation-dependent ligand recognition is also a property of SIGLEC1, a member of the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectins. SIGLEC1 Ig domain shares ∼22% sequence identity with PILRα, an identity that includes a conserved arginine localized to position 97 in mouse and human SIGLEC1, position 133 in mouse PILRα and position 126 in human PILRα. We observe that PILRα/ligand interactions require conserved PILRα Arg-133 (mouse) and Arg-126 (human), in correspondence with a previously reported requirement for SIGLEC1 Arg-197 in SIGLEC1/ligand interactions. Homology modeling identifies striking similarities between PILRα and SIGLEC1 ligand binding pockets as well as at least one set of distinctive interactions in the galactoxyl-binding site. Binding studies suggest that PILRα recognizes a complex ligand domain involving both sialic acid and protein motif(s). Thus, PILRα is evolved to engage multiple ligands with common molecular determinants to modulate myeloid cell functions in anatomical settings where PILRα ligands are expressed. PMID:22396535

  10. Evolutionarily Conserved Paired Immunoglobulin-like Receptor α (PILRα) Domain Mediates Its Interaction with Diverse Sialylated Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yonglian; Senger, Kate; Baginski, Tomasz K.; Mazloom, Anita; Chinn, Yvonne; Pantua, Homer; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ramani, Sree Ranjani; Luis, Elizabeth; Tom, Irene; Sebrell, Andrew; Quinones, Gabriel; Ma, Yan; Mukhyala, Kiran; Sai, Tao; Ding, Jiabing; Haley, Benjamin; Shadnia, Hooman; Kapadia, Sharookh B.; Gonzalez, Lino C.; Hass, Philip E.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2012-01-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PILR) α is an inhibitory receptor that recognizes several ligands, including mouse CD99, PILR-associating neural protein, and Herpes simplex virus-1 glycoprotein B. The physiological function(s) of interactions between PILRα and its cellular ligands are not well understood, as are the molecular determinants of PILRα/ligand interactions. To address these uncertainties, we sought to identify additional PILRα ligands and further define the molecular basis for PILRα/ligand interactions. Here, we identify two novel PILRα binding partners, neuronal differentiation and proliferation factor-1 (NPDC1), and collectin-12 (COLEC12). We find that sialylated O-glycans on these novel PILRα ligands, and on known PILRα ligands, are compulsory for PILRα binding. Sialylation-dependent ligand recognition is also a property of SIGLEC1, a member of the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectins. SIGLEC1 Ig domain shares ∼22% sequence identity with PILRα, an identity that includes a conserved arginine localized to position 97 in mouse and human SIGLEC1, position 133 in mouse PILRα and position 126 in human PILRα. We observe that PILRα/ligand interactions require conserved PILRα Arg-133 (mouse) and Arg-126 (human), in correspondence with a previously reported requirement for SIGLEC1 Arg-197 in SIGLEC1/ligand interactions. Homology modeling identifies striking similarities between PILRα and SIGLEC1 ligand binding pockets as well as at least one set of distinctive interactions in the galactoxyl-binding site. Binding studies suggest that PILRα recognizes a complex ligand domain involving both sialic acid and protein motif(s). Thus, PILRα is evolved to engage multiple ligands with common molecular determinants to modulate myeloid cell functions in anatomical settings where PILRα ligands are expressed. PMID:22396535

  11. Two distinct domains of the UVR8 photoreceptor interact with COP1 to initiate UV-B signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ruohe; Arongaus, Adriana B; Binkert, Melanie; Ulm, Roman

    2015-01-01

    UV-B photon reception by the Arabidopsis thaliana homodimeric UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) photoreceptor leads to its monomerization and a crucial interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Relay of the subsequent signal regulates UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and stress acclimation. Here, we report that two separate domains of UVR8 interact with COP1: the β-propeller domain of UVR8 mediates UV-B-dependent interaction with the WD40 repeats-based predicted β-propeller domain of COP1, whereas COP1 activity is regulated by interaction through the UVR8 C-terminal C27 domain. We show not only that the C27 domain is required for UVR8 activity but also that chemically induced expression of the C27 domain is sufficient to mimic UV-B signaling. We further show, in contrast with COP1, that the WD40 repeat proteins REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS1 (RUP1) and RUP2 interact only with the UVR8 C27 domain. This coincides with their facilitation of UVR8 reversion to the ground state by redimerization and their potential to interact with UVR8 in a UV-B-independent manner. Collectively, our results provide insight into a key mechanism of photoreceptor-mediated signaling and its negative feedback regulation.

  12. Feedback control of ErbB2 via ERK-mediated phosphorylation of a conserved threonine in the juxtamembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yuki; Sakimura, Ayaka; Park, Chul Min; Tomaru, Rika; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Zhou, Yue; Narita, Kaori; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Sakurai, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase activity of the asymmetric EGFR homodimer is negatively regulated via ERK-mediated phosphorylation of Thr-669 in the juxtamembrane domain. In the present study, we investigated in human breast cancer cells whether a similar mechanism plays a role in the feedback regulation of the ErbB2/ErbB3 heterodimer, the most potent ErbB receptor dimer. Constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of ErbB2 and ErbB3 was significantly decreased in phorbol ester- and growth factor-treated BT-474 and MDA-MB-453 cells. In contrast to the decreased tyrosine phosphorylation, Phos-tag Western blot analysis revealed that TPA induced phosphorylation of ErbB2 in an ERK-dependent manner. The target threonine residue corresponding to EGFR Thr-669 and the surrounding residues are highly conserved in ErbB2, but not in ErbB3. Therefore, we demonstrated ERK-mediated phosphorylation of ErbB2 at Thr-677 by generating phospho-specific monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, treatment with trametinib and SCH772984, inhibitors of the MEK-ERK pathway, and substitution of Thr-677 to alanine impaired the feedback inhibition of ErbB2 and ErbB3. These results demonstrated that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the conserved threonine is a common mechanism for the negative feedback control of active ErbB receptor dimers. PMID:27531070

  13. Characterization of STIP, a multi-domain nuclear protein, highly conserved in metazoans, and essential for embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Qiongmei; Huang, C.-H. . E-mail: chuang@nybloodcenter.org; Peng Jianbin; Hashmi, Sarwar; Ye Tianzhang; Chen Ying

    2007-04-15

    We report here the identification and characterization of STIP, a multi-domain nuclear protein that contains a G-patch, a coiled-coil, and several short tryptophan-tryptophan repeats highly conserved in metazoan species. To analyze their functional role in vivo, we cloned nematode stip-1 genes and determined the spatiotemporal pattern of Caenorhabditis elegans STIP-1 protein. RNA analyses and Western blots revealed that stip-1 mRNA was produced via trans-splicing and translated as a 95-kDa protein. Using reporter constructs, we found STIP-1 to be expressed at all developmental stages and in many tissue/cell types including worm oocyte nuclei. We found that STIP-1 is targeted to the nucleus and forms large polymers with a rod-like shape when expressed in mammalian cells. Using deletion mutants, we mapped the regions of STIP-1 involved in nuclear import and polymer assembly. We further showed that knockdown of C. elegans stip-1 by RNA interference arrested development and resulted in morphologic abnormalities around the 16-cell stage followed by 100% lethality, suggesting its essential role in worm embryogenesis. Importantly, the embryonic lethal phenotype could be faithfully rescued with Drosophila and human genes via transgenic expression. Our data provide the first direct evidence that STIP have a conserved essential nuclear function across metazoans from worms to humans.

  14. Disparate Regulatory Mechanisms Control Fat3 and P75NTR Protein Transport through a Conserved Kif5-Interaction Domain

    PubMed Central

    Birkness, Jacqueline E.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    Directed transport delivers proteins to specific cellular locations and is one mechanism by which cells establish and maintain polarized cellular architectures. The atypical cadherin Fat3 directs the polarized extension of dendrites in retinal amacrine cells by influencing the distribution of cytoskeletal regulators during retinal development, however the mechanisms regulating the distribution of Fat3 remain unclear. We report a novel Kinesin/Kif5 Interaction domain (Kif5-ID) in Fat3 that facilitates Kif5B binding, and determines the distribution of Fat3 cytosolic domain constructs in neurons and MDCK cells. The Kif5-ID sequence is conserved in the neurotrophin receptor P75NTR, which also binds Kif5B, and Kif5-ID mutations similarly result in P75NTR mislocalization. Despite these similarities, Kif5B-mediated protein transport is differentially regulated by these two cargos. For Fat3, the Kif5-ID is regulated by alternative splicing, and the timecourse of splicing suggests that the distribution of Fat3 may switch between early and later stages of retinal development. In contrast, P75NTR binding to Kif5B is enhanced by tyrosine phosphorylation and thus has the potential to be dynamically regulated on a more rapid time scale. PMID:27788242

  15. A Conserved Hydrophobic Patch on Vβ Domains Revealed by TCRβ Chain Crystal Structures: Implications for Pre-TCR Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Chen, Qiang; Mallis, Robert J.; Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Wang, Jia-huai

    2011-01-01

    The αβ T cell receptor (TCR) is a multimeric complex whose β chain plays a crucial role in thymocyte development as well as antigen recognition by mature T lymphocytes. We report here crystal structures of individual β subunits, termed N15β (Vβ5.2Dβ2Jβ2.6Cβ2) and N30β (Vβ13Dβ1Jβ1.1Cβ2), derived from two αβ TCRs specific for the immunodominant vesicular stomatitis virus octapeptide (VSV-8) bound to the murine H-2Kb MHC class I molecule. The crystal packing of the N15β structure reveals a homodimer formed through two Vβ domains. The Vβ/Vβ module is topologically very similar to the Vα/Vβ module in the N15αβ heterodimer. By contrast, in the N30β structure, the Vβ domain’s external hydrophobic CFG face is covered by the neighboring molecule’s Cβ domain. In conjunction with systematic investigation of previously published TCR single-subunit structures, we identified several conserved residues forming a concave hydrophobic patch at the center of the CFG outer face of the Vβ and other V-type Ig-like domains. This hydrophobic patch is shielded from solvent exposure in the crystal packing, implying that it is unlikely to be thermodynamically stable if exposed on the thymocyte surface. Accordingly, we propose a dimeric pre-TCR model distinct from those suggested previously by others and discuss its functional and structural implications. PMID:22566796

  16. Conserved functional domains and a novel tertiary interaction near the pseudoknot drive translational activity of hepatitis C virus and hepatitis C virus-like internal ribosome entry sites

    PubMed Central

    Easton, Laura E.; Locker, Nicolas; Lukavsky, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The translational activity of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and other HCV-like IRES RNAs depends on structured RNA elements in domains II and III, which serve to recruit the ribosomal 40S subunit, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 3 and the ternary eIF2/Met-tRNAiMet/GTP complex and subsequently domain II assists subunit joining. Porcine teschovirus-1 talfan (PTV-1) is a member of the Picornaviridae family, with a predicted HCV-like secondary structure, but only stem-loops IIId and IIIe in the 40S-binding domain display significant sequence conservation with the HCV IRES. Here, we use chemical probing to show that interaction sites with the 40S subunit and eIF3 are conserved between HCV and HCV-like IRESs. In addition, we reveal the functional role of a strictly conserved co-variation between a purine–purine mismatch near the pseudoknot (A–A/G) and the loop sequence of domain IIIe (GAU/CA). These nucleotides are involved in a tertiary interaction, which serves to stabilize the pseudoknot structure and correlates with translational efficiency in both the PTV-1 and HCV IRES. Our data demonstrate conservation of functional domains in HCV and HCV-like IRESs including a more complex structure surrounding the pseudoknot than previously assumed. PMID:19596815

  17. Role of glycine residues highly conserved in the S2-S3 linkers of domains I and II of voltage-gated calcium channel alpha(1) subunits.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jinfeng; Iida, Kazuko; Ito, Masanori; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Kojima, Itaru; Adachi-Akahane, Satomi; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2010-05-01

    The pore-forming component of voltage-gated calcium channels, alpha(1) subunit, contains four structurally conserved domains (I-IV), each of which contains six transmembrane segments (S1-S6). We have shown previously that a Gly residue in the S2-S3 linker of domain III is completely conserved from yeasts to humans and important for channel activity. The Gly residues in the S2-S3 linkers of domains I and II, which correspond positionally to the Gly in the S2-S3 linker of domain III, are also highly conserved. Here, we investigated the role of the Gly residues in the S2-S3 linkers of domains I and II of Ca(v)1.2. Each of the Gly residues was replaced with Glu or Gln to produce mutant Ca(v)1.2s; G182E, G182Q, G579E, G579Q, and the resulting mutants were transfected into BHK6 cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings showed that current-voltage relationships of the four mutants were the same as those of wild-type Ca(v)1.2. However, G182E and G182Q showed significantly smaller current densities because of mislocalization of the mutant proteins, suggesting that Gly(182) in domain I is involved in the membrane trafficking or surface expression of alpha(1) subunit. On the other hand, G579E showed a slower voltage-dependent current inactivation (VDI) compared to Ca(v)1.2, although G579Q showed a normal VDI, implying that Gly(579) in domain II is involved in the regulation of VDI and that the incorporation of a negative charge alters the VDI kinetics. Our findings indicate that the two conserved Gly residues are important for alpha(1) subunit to become functional.

  18. The conserved carboxy-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TFIID is sufficient to support normal cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, D; Schroeder, S; Wang, C K; Yamamoto, T; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G; Weil, P A

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the structure-function relationships of TFIID through in vivo complementation tests. A yeast strain was constructed which lacked the chromosomal copy of SPT15, the gene encoding TFIID, and was therefore dependent on a functional plasmid-borne wild-type copy of this gene for viability. By using the plasmid shuffle technique, the plasmid-borne wild-type TFIID gene was replaced with a family of plasmids containing a series of systematically mutated TFIID genes. These various forms of TFIID were expressed from three different promoter contexts of different strengths, and the ability of each mutant form of TFIID to complement our chromosomal TFIID null allele was assessed. We found that the first 61 amino acid residues of TFIID are totally dispensable for vegetative cell growth, since yeast strains containing this deleted form of TFIID grow at wild-type rates. Amino-terminally deleted TFIID was further shown to be able to function normally in vivo by virtue of its ability both to promote accurate transcription initiation from a large number of different genes and to interact efficiently with the Gal4 protein to activate transcription of GAL1 with essentially wild-type kinetics. Any deletion removing sequences from within the conserved carboxy-terminal region of S. cerevisiae TFIID was lethal. Further, the exact sequence of the conserved carboxy-terminal portion of the molecule is critical for function, since of several heterologous TFIID homologs tested, only the highly related Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene could complement our S. cerevisiae TFIID null mutant. Taken together, these data indicate that all important functional domains of TFIID appear to lie in its carboxy-terminal 179 amino acid residues. The significance of these findings regarding TFIID function are discussed. Images PMID:1922021

  19. Estimating and Modelling Bias of the Hierarchical Partitioning Public-Domain Software: Implications in Environmental Management and Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Olea, Pedro P.; Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; de Frutos, Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Background Hierarchical partitioning (HP) is an analytical method of multiple regression that identifies the most likely causal factors while alleviating multicollinearity problems. Its use is increasing in ecology and conservation by its usefulness for complementing multiple regression analysis. A public-domain software “hier.part package” has been developed for running HP in R software. Its authors highlight a “minor rounding error” for hierarchies constructed from >9 variables, however potential bias by using this module has not yet been examined. Knowing this bias is pivotal because, for example, the ranking obtained in HP is being used as a criterion for establishing priorities of conservation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using numerical simulations and two real examples, we assessed the robustness of this HP module in relation to the order the variables have in the analysis. Results indicated a considerable effect of the variable order on the amount of independent variance explained by predictors for models with >9 explanatory variables. For these models the nominal ranking of importance of the predictors changed with variable order, i.e. predictors declared important by its contribution in explaining the response variable frequently changed to be either most or less important with other variable orders. The probability of changing position of a variable was best explained by the difference in independent explanatory power between that variable and the previous one in the nominal ranking of importance. The lesser is this difference, the more likely is the change of position. Conclusions/Significance HP should be applied with caution when more than 9 explanatory variables are used to know ranking of covariate importance. The explained variance is not a useful parameter to use in models with more than 9 independent variables. The inconsistency in the results obtained by HP should be considered in future studies as well as in those already published

  20. Conservation of apolipoprotein A-I's central domain structural elements upon lipid association on different high-density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    Oda, Michael N; Budamagunta, Madhu S; Geier, Ethan G; Chandradas, Sajiv H; Shao, Baohai; Heinecke, Jay W; Voss, John C; Cavigiolio, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    The antiatherogenic properties of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) are derived, in part, from lipidation-state-dependent structural elements that manifest at different stages of apoA-I's progression from lipid-free protein to spherical high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Previously, we reported the structure of apoA-I's N-terminus on reconstituted HDLs (rHDLs) of different sizes. We have now investigated at the single-residue level the conformational adaptations of three regions in the central domain of apoA-I (residues 119-124, 139-144, and 164-170) upon apoA-I lipid binding and HDL formation. An important function associated with these residues of apoA-I is the activation of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), the enzyme responsible for catalyzing HDL maturation. Structural examination was performed by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence and spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies for both the lipid-free protein and rHDL particles 7.8, 8.4, and 9.6 nm in diameter. The two methods provide complementary information about residue side chain mobility and molecular accessibility, as well as the polarity of the local environment at the targeted positions. The modulation of these biophysical parameters yielded new insight into the importance of structural elements in the central domain of apoA-I. In particular, we determined that the loosely lipid-associated structure of residues 134-145 is conserved in all rHDL particles. Truncation of this region completely abolished LCAT activation but did not significantly affect rHDL size, reaffirming the important role of this structural element in HDL function. PMID:23984834

  1. Manganese toxicity and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mam3p, a member of the ACDP (ancient conserved domain protein) family.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Jensen, Laran T; Gardner, Allison J; Culotta, Valeria C

    2005-03-15

    Manganese is an essential, but potentially toxic, trace metal in biological systems. Overexposure to manganese is known to cause neurological deficits in humans, but the pathways that lead to manganese toxicity are largely unknown. We have employed the bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to identify genes that contribute to manganese-related damage. In a genetic screen for yeast manganese-resistance mutants, we identified S. cerevisiae MAM3 as a gene which, when deleted, would increase cellular tolerance to toxic levels of manganese and also increased the cell's resistance towards cobalt and zinc. By sequence analysis, Mam3p shares strong similarity with the mammalian ACDP (ancient conserved domain protein) family of polypeptides. Mutations in human ACDP1 have been associated with urofacial (Ochoa) syndrome. However, the functions of eukaryotic ACDPs remain unknown. We show here that S. cerevisiae MAM3 encodes an integral membrane protein of the yeast vacuole whose expression levels directly correlate with the degree of manganese toxicity. Surprisingly, Mam3p contributes to manganese toxicity without any obvious changes in vacuolar accumulation of metals. Furthermore, through genetic epistasis studies, we demonstrate that MAM3 operates independently of the well-established manganese-trafficking pathways in yeast, involving the manganese transporters Pmr1p, Smf2p and Pho84p. This is the first report of a eukaryotic ACDP family protein involved in metal homoeostasis. PMID:15498024

  2. Two Distinct Domains of the UVR8 Photoreceptor Interact with COP1 to Initiate UV-B Signaling in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ruohe; Arongaus, Adriana B.; Binkert, Melanie; Ulm, Roman

    2015-01-01

    UV-B photon reception by the Arabidopsis thaliana homodimeric UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) photoreceptor leads to its monomerization and a crucial interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Relay of the subsequent signal regulates UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and stress acclimation. Here, we report that two separate domains of UVR8 interact with COP1: the β-propeller domain of UVR8 mediates UV-B-dependent interaction with the WD40 repeats-based predicted β-propeller domain of COP1, whereas COP1 activity is regulated by interaction through the UVR8 C-terminal C27 domain. We show not only that the C27 domain is required for UVR8 activity but also that chemically induced expression of the C27 domain is sufficient to mimic UV-B signaling. We further show, in contrast with COP1, that the WD40 repeat proteins REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS1 (RUP1) and RUP2 interact only with the UVR8 C27 domain. This coincides with their facilitation of UVR8 reversion to the ground state by redimerization and their potential to interact with UVR8 in a UV-B-independent manner. Collectively, our results provide insight into a key mechanism of photoreceptor-mediated signaling and its negative feedback regulation. PMID:25627067

  3. A conserved domain of the large subunit of replication factor C binds PCNA and acts like a dominant negative inhibitor of DNA replication in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fotedar, R; Mossi, R; Fitzgerald, P; Rousselle, T; Maga, G; Brickner, H; Messier, H; Kasibhatla, S; Hübscher, U; Fotedar, A

    1996-08-15

    Replication factor C (RF-C), a complex of five polypeptides, is essential for cell-free SV40 origin-dependent DNA replication and viability in yeast. The cDNA encoding the large subunit of human RF-C (RF-Cp145) was cloned in a Southwestern screen. Using deletion mutants of RF-Cp145 we have mapped the DNA binding domain of RF-Cp145 to amino acid residues 369-480. This domain is conserved among both prokaryotic DNA ligases and eukaryotic poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and is absent in other subunits of RF-C. The PCNA binding domain maps to amino acid residues 481-728 and is conserved in all five subunits of RF-C. The PCNA binding domain of RF-Cp145 inhibits several functions of RF-C, such as: (i) in vitro DNA replication of SV40 origin-containing DNA; (ii) RF-C-dependent loading of PCNA onto DNA; and (iii) RF-C-dependent DNA elongation. The PCNA binding domain of RF-Cp145 localizes to the nucleus and inhibits DNA synthesis in transfected mammalian cells. In contrast, the DNA binding domain of RF-Cp145 does not inhibit DNA synthesis in vitro or in vivo. We therefore conclude that amino acid residues 481-728 of human RF-Cp145 are critical and act as a dominant negative mutant of RF-C function in DNA replication in vivo.

  4. PhyloPro2.0: a database for the dynamic exploration of phylogenetically conserved proteins and their domain architectures across the Eukarya

    PubMed Central

    Cromar, Graham L.; Zhao, Anthony; Xiong, Xuejian; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Loughran, Noeleen; Song, Hongyan; Parkinson, John

    2016-01-01

    PhyloPro is a database and accompanying web-based application for the construction and exploration of phylogenetic profiles across the Eukarya. In this update article, we present six major new developments in PhyloPro: (i) integration of Pfam-A domain predictions for all proteins; (ii) new summary heatmaps and detailed level views of domain conservation; (iii) an interactive, network-based visualization tool for exploration of domain architectures and their conservation; (iv) ability to browse based on protein functional categories (GOSlim); (v) improvements to the web interface to enhance drill down capability from the heatmap view; and (vi) improved coverage including 164 eukaryotes and 12 reference species. In addition, we provide improved support for downloading data and images in a variety of formats. Among the existing tools available for phylogenetic profiles, PhyloPro provides several innovative domain-based features including a novel domain adjacency visualization tool. These are designed to allow the user to identify and compare proteins with similar domain architectures across species and thus develop hypotheses about the evolution of lineage-specific trajectories. Database URL: http://www.compsysbio.org/phylopro/ PMID:26980519

  5. PhyloPro2.0: a database for the dynamic exploration of phylogenetically conserved proteins and their domain architectures across the Eukarya.

    PubMed

    Cromar, Graham L; Zhao, Anthony; Xiong, Xuejian; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Loughran, Noeleen; Song, Hongyan; Parkinson, John

    2016-01-01

    PhyloPro is a database and accompanying web-based application for the construction and exploration of phylogenetic profiles across the Eukarya. In this update article, we present six major new developments in PhyloPro: (i) integration of Pfam-A domain predictions for all proteins; (ii) new summary heatmaps and detailed level views of domain conservation; (iii) an interactive, network-based visualization tool for exploration of domain architectures and their conservation; (iv) ability to browse based on protein functional categories (GOSlim); (v) improvements to the web interface to enhance drill down capability from the heatmap view; and (vi) improved coverage including 164 eukaryotes and 12 reference species. In addition, we provide improved support for downloading data and images in a variety of formats. Among the existing tools available for phylogenetic profiles, PhyloPro provides several innovative domain-based features including a novel domain adjacency visualization tool. These are designed to allow the user to identify and compare proteins with similar domain architectures across species and thus develop hypotheses about the evolution of lineage-specific trajectories. Database URL: http://www.compsysbio.org/phylopro/.

  6. Conservation of species, volume, and belief in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: the issue of domain-specificity and conceptual impairment

    PubMed Central

    Zaitchik, Deborah; Solomon, Gregg E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Two studies investigated whether patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) suffer high-level and category-specific impairment in the conceptual domain of living things. In Study 1, AD patients and healthy young and healthy elderly controls took part in three tasks: the Conservation of Species, Volume, and Belief. All 3 tasks required tracking an object’s identity in the face of irrelevant but salient transformations. Healthy young and elderly controls performed at or near ceiling on all tasks. AD patients were at or near ceiling on the Volume and Belief tasks, but only about half succeeded on the Species task. Study 2 demonstrated that the results were not due to simple task demands. AD patients’ failure to conserve species indicates that they are impaired in their theoretical understanding of living things, and their success on the Volume and Belief tasks suggests that the impairment is domain-specific. Two hypotheses are put forward to explain the phenomenon: the first, a category-specific account, holds that the intuitive theory of biology undergoes pervasive degradation; the second, a hybrid domain-general/domain-specific account, holds that impairment to domain-general processes such as executive function interacts with core cognition, the primitive elements that are the foundation of domain-specific knowledge. PMID:20043252

  7. A highly conserved family of domains related to the DNA-glycosylase fold helps predict multiple novel pathways for RNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Aravind, L

    2014-01-01

    A protein family including mammalian NEMF, Drosophila caliban, yeast Tae2, and bacterial FpbA-like proteins was first defined over a decade ago and found to be universally distributed across the three domains/superkingdoms of life. Since its initial characterization, this family of proteins has been tantalizingly linked to a wide range of biochemical functions. Tapping the enormous wealth of genome information that has accumulated since the initial characterization of these proteins, we perform a detailed computational analysis of the family, identifying multiple conserved domains. Domains identified include an enzymatic domain related to the formamidopyrimidine (Fpg), MutM, and Nei/EndoVIII family of DNA glycosylases, a novel, predicted RNA-binding domain, and a domain potentially mediating protein–protein interactions. Through this characterization, we predict that the DNA glycosylase-like domain catalytically operates on double-stranded RNA, as part of a hitherto unknown base modification mechanism that probably targets rRNAs. At least in archaea, and possibly eukaryotes, this pathway might additionally include the AMMECR1 family of proteins. The predicted RNA-binding domain associated with this family is also observed in distinct architectural contexts in other proteins across phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes. Here it is predicted to play a key role in a new pathway for tRNA 4-thiouridylation along with TusA-like sulfur transfer proteins. PMID:24646681

  8. Redox factor-1 activates endothelial SIRTUIN1 through reduction of conserved cysteine sulfhydryls in its deacetylase domain.

    PubMed

    Jung, Saet-Byel; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Kim, Young-Rae; Naqvi, Asma; Yamamori, Tohru; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Ajay; Irani, Kaikobad

    2013-01-01

    Apurinic/Apyrmidinic Endonuclease 1/Redox Factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a reductant which is important for vascular homeostasis. SIRTUIN1 (SIRT1) is a lysine deacetylase that also promotes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. We asked if APE1/Ref-1 governs the redox state and activity of SIRT1, and whether SIRT1 mediates the effect of APE1/Ref-1 on endothelium-dependent vascular function. APE1/Ref-1 maintains sulfhydryl (thiol) groups of cysteine residues in SIRT1 in the reduced form and promotes endothelial SIRT1 activity. APE1/Ref-1 stimulates SIRT1 activity by targeting highly conserved vicinal thiols 371 and 374 which form a zinc tetra-thiolate motif in the deacetylase domain of SIRT1. Cysteine residues in the N-terminal redox domain of APE1/Ref-1 are essential for reducing SIRT1 and stimulating its activity. APE1/Ref-1 protects endothelial SIRT1 from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation of sulfhydryls and from inactivation. APE1/Ref-1 also promotes lysine deacetylation of the SIRT1 target endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). SIRT1 mutated at cysteines 371 and 374, which renders it non-reducible by APE1/Ref-1, prevents lysine deacetylation of eNOS by APE1/Ref-1. SIRT1 free thiol (reduced sulfhydryl) content and deacetylase activity are diminished in all examined tissues of APE1/Ref-1(+/-) mice, including the vasculature. Overexpression of SIRT1 in aortas of APE1/Ref-1(+/-) mice restores endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) to levels similar to those observed in wild-type mice. Thus, APE1/Ref-1, by maintaining functionally important cysteine sulfhydryls in SIRT1 in the reduced form, promotes endothelial SIRT1 activity. This reductive activation of endothelial SIRT1 by APE1/Ref-1 mediates the effect of APE1/Ref-1 on eNOS acetylation, promoting endothelium-derived NO and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

  9. The Drosophila tissue-specific factor Grainyhead contains novel DNA-binding and dimerization domains which are conserved in the human protein CP2.

    PubMed Central

    Uv, A E; Thompson, C R; Bray, S J

    1994-01-01

    We have mapped the regions in the Drosophila melanogaster tissue-specific transcription factor Grainyhead that are required for DNA binding and dimerization. These functional domains correspond to regions conserved between Grainyhead and the vertebrate transcription factor CP2, which we show has similar activities. The identified DNA-binding domain is large (263 amino acids) but contains a smaller core that is able to interact with DNA at approximately 400-fold lower affinity. The major dimerization domain is located in a separate region of the protein and is required to stabilize the interactions with DNA. Our data also suggest that Grainyhead activity can be modulated by an N-terminal inhibitory domain. Images PMID:8196641

  10. Structural conservation in the template/pseudoknot domain of vertebrate telomerase RNA from teleost fish to human.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqiang; Yesselman, Joseph D; Zhang, Qi; Kang, Mijeong; Feigon, Juli

    2016-08-30

    Telomerase is an RNA-protein complex that includes a unique reverse transcriptase that catalyzes the addition of single-stranded telomere DNA repeats onto the 3' ends of linear chromosomes using an integral telomerase RNA (TR) template. Vertebrate TR contains the template/pseudoknot (t/PK) and CR4/5 domains required for telomerase activity in vitro. All vertebrate pseudoknots include two subdomains: P2ab (helices P2a and P2b with a 5/6-nt internal loop) and the minimal pseudoknot (P2b-P3 and associated loops). A helical extension of P2a, P2a.1, is specific to mammalian TR. Using NMR, we investigated the structures of the full-length TR pseudoknot and isolated subdomains in Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), which has the smallest vertebrate TR identified to date. We determined the solution NMR structure and studied the dynamics of medaka P2ab, and identified all base pairs and tertiary interactions in the minimal pseudoknot. Despite differences in length and sequence, the structure of medaka P2ab is more similar to human P2ab than predicted, and the medaka minimal pseudoknot has the same tertiary interactions as the human pseudoknot. Significantly, although P2a.1 is not predicted to form in teleost fish, we find that it forms in the full-length pseudoknot via an unexpected hairpin. Model structures of the subdomains are combined to generate a model of t/PK. These results provide evidence that the architecture for the vertebrate t/PK is conserved from teleost fish to human. The organization of the t/PK on telomerase reverse transcriptase for medaka and human is modeled based on the cryoEM structure of Tetrahymena telomerase, providing insight into function. PMID:27531956

  11. Conservation of functional domains involved in RNA binding and protein-protein interactions in human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae pre-mRNA splicing factor SF1.

    PubMed

    Rain, J C; Rafi, Z; Rhani, Z; Legrain, P; Krämer, A

    1998-05-01

    The modular structure of splicing factor SF1 is conserved from yeast to man and SF1 acts at early stages of spliceosome assembly in both organisms. The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain of human (h) SF1 is the major determinant for RNA binding and is essential for the activity of hSF1 in spliceosome assembly, supporting the view that binding of SF1 to RNA is essential for its function. Sequences N-terminal to the KH domain mediate the interaction between hSF1 and U2AF65, which binds to the polypyrimidine tract upstream of the 3' splice site. Moreover, yeast (y) SF1 interacts with Mud2p, the presumptive U2AF65 homologue in yeast, and the interaction domain is conserved in ySF1. The C-terminal degenerate RRMs in U2AF65 and Mud2p mediate the association with hSF1 and ySF1, respectively. Analysis of chimeric constructs of hSF1 and ySF indicates that the KH domain may serve a similar function in both systems, whereas sequences C-terminal to the KH domain are not exchangeable. Thus, these results argue for hSF1 and ySF1, as well as U2AF65 and Mud2p, being functional homologues.

  12. A Highly Conserved Residue of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Important for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Mediated by Anti-cluster A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Veillette, Maxime; Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Scharf, Louise; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ferrari, Guido; Robinson, James E.; Stürzel, Christina; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Lewis, George K.; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from HIV-1-infected individuals contain antibodies able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These antibodies preferentially recognize envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitopes induced upon CD4 binding. Here, we show that a highly conserved tryptophan at position 69 of the gp120 inner domain is important for ADCC mediated by anti-cluster A antibodies and sera from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26637462

  13. Conserved charged residues in the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Ran GTPase activating protein are required for Ran binding and GTPase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, J; Gerke, V

    1999-01-01

    GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for Ran, a Ras-related GTPase participating in nucleocytoplasmic transport, have been identified in different species ranging from yeast to man. All RanGAPs are characterized by a conserved domain consisting of eight leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) interrupted at two positions by so-called separating regions, the latter being unique for RanGAPs within the family of LRR proteins. The cytosolic RanGAP activity is essential for the Ran GTPase cycle which in turn provides directionality in nucleocytoplasmic transport, but the structural basis for the interaction between Ran and its GAP has not been elucidated. In order to gain a better understanding of this interaction we generated a number of mutant RanGAPs carrying amino acid substitutions in the LRR domain and analysed their complex formation with Ran as well as their ability to stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of the G protein. We show that conserved charged residues present in the separating regions of the LRR domain are indispensable for efficient Ran binding and GAP activity. These separating regions contain three conserved arginines which could possibly serve as catalytic residues similar to the arginine fingers identified in GAPs for other small GTPases. However, mutations in two of these arginines do not affect the GAP activity and replacement of the third conserved arginine (Arg91 in human RanGAP) severely interferes not only with GAP activity but also with Ran binding. This indicates that RanGAP-stimulated GTP hydrolysis on Ran does not involve a catalytic arginine residue but requires certain charged residues of the LRR domain of the GAP for mediating the protein-protein interaction. PMID:10527945

  14. Regions outside of conserved PxxPxR motifs drive the high affinity interaction of GRB2 with SH3 domain ligands.

    PubMed

    Bartelt, Rebekah R; Light, Jonathan; Vacaflores, Aldo; Butcher, Alayna; Pandian, Madhana; Nash, Piers; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-10-01

    SH3 domains are evolutionarily conserved protein interaction domains that control nearly all cellular processes in eukaryotes. The current model is that most SH3 domains bind discreet PxxPxR motifs with weak affinity and relatively low selectivity. However, the interactions of full-length SH3 domain-containing proteins with ligands are highly specific and have much stronger affinity. This suggests that regions outside of PxxPxR motifs drive these interactions. In this study, we observed that PxxPxR motifs were required for the binding of the adaptor protein GRB2 to short peptides from its ligand SOS1. Surprisingly, PxxPxR motifs from the proline rich region of SOS1 or CBL were neither necessary nor sufficient for the in vitro or in vivo interaction with full-length GRB2. Together, our findings show that regions outside of the consensus PxxPxR sites drive the high affinity association of GRB2 with SH3 domain ligands, suggesting that the binding mechanism for this and other SH3 domain interactions may be more complex than originally thought.

  15. Structure of the TbBILBO1 Protein N-terminal Domain from Trypanosoma brucei Reveals an Essential Requirement for a Conserved Surface Patch*

    PubMed Central

    Vidilaseris, Keni; Morriswood, Brooke; Kontaxis, Georg; Dong, Gang

    2014-01-01

    TbBILBO1 is the only known component of the flagellar pocket collar, a cytoskeletal barrier element found in trypanosomes. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of TbBILBO1 was found to be dispensable for targeting of the protein in vivo. However, overexpression of constructs lacking the NTD caused complete growth inhibition, implying an essential requirement for this domain. A high resolution structure of the NTD of TbBILBO1 showed that it forms a ubiquitin-like fold with a conserved surface patch. Mutagenesis of this patch recapitulated the phenotypic effects of deleting the entire domain and was found to cause cell death. The surface patch on the NTD of TbBILBO1 is therefore a potential drug target. PMID:24362019

  16. Essential domains of the PRP21 splicing factor are implicated in the binding to PRP9 and PRP11 proteins and are conserved through evolution.

    PubMed

    Rain, J C; Tartakoff, A M; Krämer, A; Legrain, P

    1996-06-01

    The yeast Prp9p, Prp11p, Prp21p proteins form a multimolecular complex identified as the SF3a splicing factor in higher eukaryotes. This factor is required for the assembly of the prespliceosome. Prp21p interacts with both Prp9p and Prp11p, but the molecular basis of these interactions is unknown. Prp21p, its human homologue, and the so-called SWAP proteins share a tandemly repeated motif, the surp module. Given the evolutionary conservation and the role of SWAP proteins as splicing regulators, it has been proposed that surp motifs are essential for interactions between Prp21p and other splicing factors. In order to characterize functional domains of Prp21p and to identify potential additional functions of this protein, we isolated a series of heat-sensitive prp21 mutants. Our results indicate that prp21 heat-sensitive mutations are associated with defects in the interaction with Prp9p, but not with Prp11p. Interestingly, most heat-sensitive point mutants associate a strong splicing defect with a pre-mRNA nuclear export phenotype, as does the prp9-1 heat-sensitive mutant. Deletion analyses led to the definition of domains required for viability. These domains are responsible for the interaction with Prp9p and Prp11p and are conserved through evolution. They do not include the most conserved surp1 module, suggesting that the conservation of this motif in two families of proteins may reflect a still unknown function dispensable in yeast under standard conditions.

  17. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    PubMed

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins. PMID:26492945

  18. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    PubMed

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins.

  19. The Highly Conserved Layer-3 Component of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Critical for CD4-Required Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Désormeaux, Anik; Coutu, Mathieu; Medjahed, Halima; Pacheco, Beatriz; Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Mao, Youdong; Sodroski, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mediates virus entry into host cells. CD4 engagement with the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein subunit represents the first step during HIV-1 entry. CD4-induced conformational changes in the gp120 inner domain involve three potentially flexible topological layers (layers 1, 2, and 3). Structural rearrangements between layer 1 and layer 2 have been shown to facilitate the transition of the envelope glycoprotein trimer from the unliganded to the CD4-bound state and to stabilize gp120-CD4 interaction. However, our understanding of CD4-induced conformational changes in the gp120 inner domain remains incomplete. Here, we report that a highly conserved element of the gp120 inner domain, layer 3, plays a pivot-like role in these allosteric changes. In the unliganded state, layer 3 modulates the association of gp120 with the Env trimer, probably by influencing the relationship of the gp120 inner and outer domains. Importantly, layer 3 governs the efficiency of the initial gp120 interaction with CD4, a function that can also be fulfilled by filling the Phe43 cavity. This work defines the functional importance of layer 3 and completes a picture detailing the role of the gp120 inner domain in CD4-induced conformational transitions in the HIV-1 Env trimer. PMID:23255784

  20. Mutations in the alpha-amanitin conserved domain of the largest subunit of yeast RNA polymerase III affect pausing, RNA cleavage and transcriptional transitions.

    PubMed Central

    Thuillier, V; Brun, I; Sentenac, A; Werner, M

    1996-01-01

    The alpha-amanitin domain or domain f of the largest subunit of RNA polymerases is one of the most conserved of these enzymes. We have found that the C-terminal part of domain f can be swapped between yeast RNA polymerase II and III. An extensive mutagenesis of domain f of C160, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III, was carried out to better define its role and understand the mechanism through which C160 participates in transcription. One mutant enzyme, C160-270, showed much reduced transcription of a non-specific template at low DNA concentrations. Abortive synthesis of trinucleotides in a dinucleotide-primed reaction proceeded at roughly wild-type levels, indicating that the mutation did not affect the formation of the first phosphodiester bond, but rather the transition from abortive initiation to processive elongation. In specific transcription assays, on the SUP4 tRNA gene, pausing was extended but the rate of RNA elongation between pause sites was not affected. Finally, the rate of cleavage of nascent RNA transcripts by halted mutant RNA polymerase was increased approximately 10-fold. We propose that the domain f mutation affects the transition between two transcriptional modes, one being adopted during abortive transcription and at pause sites, the other during elongation between pause sites. Images PMID:8599945

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a conserved domain in plants and prokaryotes from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Linyen; Nakano, Hiroaki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fujimoto, Satoru; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakamura, Shota; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2005-04-01

    A plant- and prokaryote-conserved domain (PPC) has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 3}22. A plant- and prokaryote-conserved domain (PPC) has previously been found in AT-hook motif nuclear localized protein 1 (AHL1) localized in the nuclear matrix of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAHL1). AtAHL1 has a DNA-binding function. Mutation analyses of AtAHL1 has previously revealed that the hydrophobic region of the PPC domain is essential for its nuclear localization. In this study, the PPC of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhPPC) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.69, c = 159.2 Å. Data were obtained at 100 K, with diffraction being observed to a resolution of 1.7 Å. A complete data set from crystals of the SeMet-substituted protein was also obtained.

  2. A Conserved C-Terminal Domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus Developmental Regulator MedA Is Required for Nuclear Localization, Adhesion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Lee, Mark J.; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA346–557, that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA346–557 alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA346–557 domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function. PMID:23185496

  3. The TAF9 C-terminal conserved region domain is required for SAGA and TFIID promoter occupancy to promote transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Saint, Malika; Sawhney, Sonal; Sinha, Ishani; Singh, Rana Pratap; Dahiya, Rashmi; Thakur, Anushikha; Siddharthan, Rahul; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-05-01

    A common function of the TFIID and SAGA complexes, which are recruited by transcriptional activators, is to deliver TBP to promoters to stimulate transcription. Neither the relative contributions of the five shared TBP-associated factor (TAF) subunits in TFIID and SAGA nor the requirement for different domains in shared TAFs for transcriptional activation is well understood. In this study, we uncovered the essential requirement for the highly conserved C-terminal region (CRD) of Taf9, a shared TAF, for transcriptional activation in yeast. Transcriptome profiling performed under Gcn4-activating conditions showed that the Taf9 CRD is required for induced expression of ∼9% of the yeast genome. The CRD was not essential for the Taf9-Taf6 interaction, TFIID or SAGA integrity, or Gcn4 interaction with SAGA in cell extracts. Microarray profiling of a SAGA mutant (spt20Δ) yielded a common set of genes induced by Spt20 and the Taf9 CRD. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that, although the Taf9 CRD mutation did not impair Gcn4 occupancy, the occupancies of TFIID, SAGA, and the preinitiation complex were severely impaired at several promoters. These results suggest a crucial role for the Taf9 CRD in genome-wide transcription and highlight the importance of conserved domains, other than histone fold domains, as a common determinant for TFIID and SAGA functions.

  4. VP22 core domain from Herpes simplex virus 1 reveals a surprising structural conservation in both the Alpha- and Gammaherpesvirinae subfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Kelly; Pan, Lucy Xin; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2015-01-01

    The viral tegument is a layer of proteins between the herpesvirus capsid and its outer envelope. According to phylogenetic studies, only a third of these proteins are conserved amongst the three subfamilies (Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaherpesvirinae) of the family Herpesviridae. Although some of these tegument proteins have been studied in more detail, the structure and function of the majority of them are still poorly characterized. VP22 from Herpes simplex virus 1 (subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae) is a highly interacting tegument protein that has been associated with tegument assembly. We have determined the crystal structure of the conserved core domain of VP22, which reveals an elongated dimer with several potential protein–protein interaction regions and a peptide-binding site. The structure provides us with the structural basics to understand the numerous functional mutagenesis studies of VP22 found in the literature. It also establishes an unexpected structural homology to the tegument protein ORF52 from Murid herpesvirus 68 (subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae). Homologues for both VP22 and ORF52 have been identified in their respective subfamilies. Although there is no obvious sequence overlap in the two subfamilies, this structural conservation provides compelling structural evidence for shared ancestry and functional conservation. PMID:26068188

  5. RapA2 Is a Calcium-binding Lectin Composed of Two Highly Conserved Cadherin-like Domains That Specifically Recognize Rhizobium leguminosarum Acidic Exopolysaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Abdian, Patricia L.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Ausmees, Nora; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2013-01-01

    In silico analyses have revealed a conserved protein domain (CHDL) widely present in bacteria that has significant structural similarity to eukaryotic cadherins. A CHDL domain was shown to be present in RapA, a protein that is involved in autoaggregation of Rhizobium cells, biofilm formation, and adhesion to plant roots as shown by us and others. Structural similarity to cadherins suggested calcium-dependent oligomerization of CHDL domains as a mechanistic basis for RapA action. Here we show by circular dichroism spectroscopy, light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and other methods that RapA2 from Rhizobium leguminosarum indeed exhibits a cadherin-like β-sheet conformation and that its proper folding and stability are dependent on the binding of one calcium ion per protein molecule. By further in silico analysis we also reveal that RapA2 consists of two CHDL domains and expand the range of CHDL-containing proteins in bacteria and archaea. However, light scattering assays at various concentrations of added calcium revealed that RapA2 formed neither homo-oligomers nor hetero-oligomers with RapB (a distinct CHDL protein), indicating that RapA2 does not mediate cellular interactions through a cadherin-like mechanism. Instead, we demonstrate that RapA2 interacts specifically with the acidic exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by R. leguminosarum in a calcium-dependent manner, sustaining a role of these proteins in the development of the biofilm matrix made of EPS. Because EPS binding by RapA2 can only be attributed to its two CHDL domains, we propose that RapA2 is a calcium-dependent lectin and that CHDL domains in various bacterial and archaeal proteins confer carbohydrate binding activity to these proteins. PMID:23235153

  6. Immunological evidence for interactions between the first, second, and fifth conserved domains of the gp120 surface glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Moore, J P; Willey, R L; Lewis, G K; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1994-11-01

    We have used a combination of genetic and immunological techniques to explore how amino acid substitutions in the second conserved (C2) domain of gp120 from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) affect the conformation of the protein. It was reported previously (R. L. Willey, E. K. Ross, A. J. Buckler-White, T. S. Theodore, and M. A. Martin. J. Viol. 63:3595-3600, 1989) that an asparagine-glutamine (N/Q) substitution at C2 residue 267 of HIV-1 NL4/3 reduced virus infectivity, but that infectivity was restored by a compensatory amino acid change (serine-glutamine; S/N) at residue 128 in the C1 domain. Here we show that the 267 N/Q substitution causes the abnormal exposure of a segment of C1 spanning residues 80 to 120, which compromises the integrity of the CD4-binding site. The reversion substitution at residue 128 restores the normal conformation of the C1 domain and recreates a high-affinity CD4-binding site. The gp120 structural perturbation caused by changes in C2 extends also to the C5 domain, and we show by immunological analysis that there is a close association between areas of the C1 and C5 domains. This association might be important for forming a complex binding site for gp41 (E. Helseth, U. Olshevsky, C. Furman, and J. Sodroski. J. Virol. 65:2119-2123, 1991). Segments of the C1 and C2 domains are predicted to form amphipathic alpha helices. We suggest that these helices might be packed together in the core of the folded gp120 molecule, that the 267 N/Q substitution disrupts this interdomain association, and that the 128 S/N reversion substitution restores it. PMID:7933065

  7. A Small Conserved Domain in the Yeast Spa2p Is Necessary and Sufficient for Its Polarized Localization

    PubMed Central

    Arkowitz, Robert A.; Lowe, Nick

    1997-01-01

    SPA2 encodes a yeast protein that is one of the first proteins to localize to sites of polarized growth, such as the shmoo tip and the incipient bud. The dynamics and requirements for Spa2p localization in living cells are examined using Spa2p green fluorescent protein fusions. Spa2p localizes to one edge of unbudded cells and subsequently is observable in the bud tip. Finally, during cytokinesis Spa2p is present as a ring at the mother–daughter bud neck. The bud emergence mutants bem1 and bem2 and mutants defective in the septins do not affect Spa2p localization to the bud tip. Strikingly, a small domain of Spa2p comprised of 150 amino acids is necessary and sufficient for localization to sites of polarized growth. This localization domain and the amino terminus of Spa2p are essential for its function in mating. Searching the yeast genome database revealed a previously uncharacterized protein which we name, Sph1p (Spa2p homolog), with significant homology to the localization domain and amino terminus of Spa2p. This protein also localizes to sites of polarized growth in budding and mating cells. SPH1, which is similar to SPA2, is required for bipolar budding and plays a role in shmoo formation. Overexpression of either Spa2p or Sph1p can block the localization of either protein fused to green fluorescent protein, suggesting that both Spa2p and Sph1p bind to and are localized by the same component. The identification of a 150–amino acid domain necessary and sufficient for localization of Spa2p to sites of polarized growth and the existence of this domain in another yeast protein Sph1p suggest that the early localization of these proteins may be mediated by a receptor that recognizes this small domain. PMID:9214378

  8. The outer-membrane export signal of Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a conserved C-terminal β-sandwich domain

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Koneru, Lahari; Golik, Przemyslaw; Szmigielski, Borys; Nowak, Magdalena; Nowakowska, Zuzanna; Potempa, Barbara; Houston, John A.; Enghild, Jan J.; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Gao, Jinlong; Kwan, Ann H.; Trewhella, Jill; Dubin, Grzegorz; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the recently characterized Type IX Secretion System (T9SS), the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) in secreted proteins functions as an outer membrane translocation signal for export of virulence factors to the cell surface in the Gram-negative Bacteroidetes phylum. In the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, the CTD is cleaved off by PorU sortase in a sequence-independent manner, and anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) is attached to many translocated proteins, thus anchoring them to the bacterial surface. Here, we solved the atomic structure of the CTD of gingipain B (RgpB) from P. gingivalis, alone and together with a preceding immunoglobulin-superfamily domain (IgSF). The CTD was found to possess a typical Ig-like fold encompassing seven antiparallel β-strands organized in two β-sheets, packed into a β-sandwich structure that can spontaneously dimerise through C-terminal strand swapping. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed no fixed orientation of the CTD with respect to the IgSF. By introducing insertion or substitution of residues within the inter-domain linker in the native protein, we were able to show that despite the region being unstructured, it nevertheless is resistant to general proteolysis. These data suggest structural motifs located in the two adjacent Ig-like domains dictate the processing of CTDs by the T9SS secretion pathway. PMID:27005013

  9. Structural Insights into the Interaction of the Evolutionarily Conserved ZPR1 Domain Tandem with Eukaryotic EF1A, Receptors, and SMN Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra,A.; Gangwani, L.; Davis, R.; Lambright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes encode a zinc finger protein (ZPR1) with tandem ZPR1 domains. In response to growth stimuli, ZPR1 assembles into complexes with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) and the survival motor neurons protein. To gain insight into the structural mechanisms underlying the essential function of ZPR1 in diverse organisms, we determined the crystal structure of a ZPR1 domain tandem and characterized the interaction with eEF1A. The ZPR1 domain consists of an elongation initiation factor 2-like zinc finger and a double-stranded {beta} helix with a helical hairpin insertion. ZPR1 binds preferentially to GDP-bound eEF1A but does not directly influence the kinetics of nucleotide exchange or GTP hydrolysis. However, ZPR1 efficiently displaces the exchange factor eEF1B from preformed nucleotide-free complexes, suggesting that it may function as a negative regulator of eEF1A activation. Structure-based mutational and complementation analyses reveal a conserved binding epitope for eEF1A that is required for normal cell growth, proliferation, and cell cycle progression. Structural differences between the ZPR1 domains contribute to the observed functional divergence and provide evidence for distinct modalities of interaction with eEF1A and survival motor neuron complexes.

  10. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Brandon L.; Larue, Ross C.; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein–protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins. PMID:26858406

  11. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Brandon L; Larue, Ross C; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P

    2016-02-23

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein-protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins.

  12. Functional role of evolutionarily highly conserved residues, N-glycosylation level and domains of the Leishmania miltefosine transporter-Cdc50 subunit.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Sebastián; Sánchez-Cañete, María P; Gamarro, Francisco; Castanys, Santiago

    2014-04-01

    Cdc50 (cell-cycle control protein 50) is a family of conserved eukaryotic proteins that interact with P4-ATPases (phospholipid translocases). Cdc50 association is essential for the endoplasmic reticulum export of P4-ATPases and proper translocase activity. In the present study, we analysed the role of Leishmania infantum LiRos3, the Cdc50 subunit of the P4-ATPase MLF (miltefosine) transporter [LiMT (L. infantum MLF transporter)], on trafficking and complex functionality using site-directed mutagenesis and domain substitution. We identified 22 invariant residues in the Cdc50 proteins from L. infantum, human and yeast. Seven of these residues are found in the extracellular domain of LiRos3, the conservation of which is critical for ensuring that LiMT arrives at the plasma membrane. The substitution of other invariant residues affects complex trafficking to a lesser extent. Furthermore, invariant residues located in the N-terminal cytosolic domain play a role in the transport activity. Partial N-glycosylation of LiRos3 reduces MLF transport and total N-deglycosylation completely inhibits LiMT trafficking to the plasma membrane. One of the N-glycosylation residues is invariant along the Cdc50 family. The transmembrane and exoplasmic domains are not interchangeable with the other two L. infantum Cdc50 proteins to maintain LiMT interaction. Taken together, these findings indicate that both invariant and N-glycosylated residues of LiRos3 are implicated in LiMT trafficking and transport activity. PMID:24447089

  13. [Detection and analysis of Tetrahymena pyriformis 26S ribosomal DNA domain sequences, differing in degree of evolutionary conservation].

    PubMed

    Mukha, D V; Sidorenko, A P

    1995-01-01

    Domains of different evolutionary conservatism were defined in the 26S rDNA sequence of T. pyriformis. The fragment of studied DNA (1212 bp) showing high evolutionary conservatism was cloned. It was shown this fragment of DNA may be used to a probe for blot-hybridization analysis of the structure of rDNA from various taxa, protists to mammals. Superconservative and hypervariable domains were defined. The first are good for the primers for PCR analysis of rDNA from various taxa, the second--for species specific primers.

  14. Identification of a conserved domain of the HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41 which interacts with cholesteryl groups.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Nadine; Genin, Christian; Malvoisin, Etienne

    2002-12-23

    A soluble form of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp160 devoid of the transmembrane anchor domain was found to bind to cholesteryl-hemisuccinate agarose. The external subunit gp120 failed to bind to the resin, suggesting that the site responsible for the binding to cholesterol was located in the transmembrane protein gp41. We constructed a series of maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins representing overlapping fragments of the gp41 molecule and we studied their capacity to bind to cholesteryl beads. The domain responsible for binding to cholesterol was localised within the residues 668 to 684 immediately adjacent to the membrane spanning domain. We identified a short sequence (LWYIK, aa 678-683) comparable to the cholesterol interaction amino acid consensus pattern published by Li and Papadopoulos [Endocrinology 139 (1998) 4991]. We demonstrated that the sequence LWYIK synthesized fused to the MBP was able to bind to cholesteryl groups. A synthetic peptide containing the sequence LWYIK was found to inhibit the interaction between cholesteryl beads and MBP44, an MBP fusion HIV-1 envelope protein that contains the putative cholesterol binding domain. Human sera obtained from HIV-1 seropositive patients did not react in ELISA to the LWYIK sequence, suggesting that this region is not exposed to the immune system. The biological significance of the interaction between gp41 and cholesterol is discussed.

  15. Regulation of Telomere Length Requires a Conserved N-Terminal Domain of Rif2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kaizer, Hannah; Connelly, Carla J; Bettridge, Kelsey; Viggiani, Christopher; Greider, Carol W

    2015-10-01

    The regulation of telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell growth and survival since critically short telomeres signal DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. While the broad principles of length regulation are well established, the molecular mechanism of how these steps occur is not fully understood. We mutagenized the RIF2 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to understand how this protein blocks excess telomere elongation. We identified an N-terminal domain in Rif2 that is essential for length regulation, which we have termed BAT domain for Blocks Addition of Telomeres. Tethering this BAT domain to Rap1 blocked telomere elongation not only in rif2Δ mutants but also in rif1Δ and rap1C-terminal deletion mutants. Mutation of a single amino acid in the BAT domain, phenylalanine at position 8 to alanine, recapitulated the rif2Δ mutant phenotype. Substitution of F8 with tryptophan mimicked the wild-type phenylalanine, suggesting the aromatic amino acid represents a protein interaction site that is essential for telomere length regulation.

  16. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 E. coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. PMID:25043589

  17. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the conserved region in the middle domain of S. pombe Sin1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Saori; Furuita, Kyoko; Hattori, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2015-04-01

    SAPK-interacting protein 1 (Sin1) is an important component of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). TOR is a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase and forms functionally distinct protein complexes referred to as TORC1 and TORC2. TORC2, conserved from yeast to humans, phosphorylates AGC-family protein kinases and has many cellular functions including the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. The Sin1 subunit of TORC2 is required for the binding of TORC2 to substrates, and the conserved region in the middle (CRIM) domain of Sin1 is important in the substrate recognition of TORC2. Here, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sin1 (amino acids 247-400) (Sin1CRIM), which possesses the CRIM domain. These data contribute toward the structure determination of Sin1CRIM and an understanding of the interactions of Sin1CRIM with substrates of TORC2.

  18. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  19. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Tatjana P.; Maria Cherian, Reeja; Gray, Fiona C.; MacNeill, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural studies. PMID:24723920

  20. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  1. Diversified Structural Basis of a Conserved Molecular Mechanism for pH-Dependent Dimerization in Spider Silk N-Terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Otikovs, Martins; Chen, Gefei; Nordling, Kerstin; Landreh, Michael; Meng, Qing; Jörnvall, Hans; Kronqvist, Nina; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jaudzems, Kristaps

    2015-08-17

    Conversion of spider silk proteins from soluble dope to insoluble fibers involves pH-dependent dimerization of the N-terminal domain (NT). This conversion is tightly regulated to prevent premature precipitation and enable rapid silk formation at the end of the duct. Three glutamic acid residues that mediate this process in the NT from Euprosthenops australis major ampullate spidroin 1 are well conserved among spidroins. However, NTs of minor ampullate spidroins from several species, including Araneus ventricosus ((Av)MiSp NT), lack one of the glutamic acids. Here we investigate the pH-dependent structural changes of (Av)MiSp NT, revealing that it uses the same mechanism but involves a non-conserved glutamic acid residue instead. Homology modeling of the structures of other MiSp NTs suggests that these harbor different compensatory residues. This indicates that, despite sequence variations, the molecular mechanism underlying pH-dependent dimerization of NT is conserved among different silk types. PMID:26033527

  2. Diversified Structural Basis of a Conserved Molecular Mechanism for pH-Dependent Dimerization in Spider Silk N-Terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Otikovs, Martins; Chen, Gefei; Nordling, Kerstin; Landreh, Michael; Meng, Qing; Jörnvall, Hans; Kronqvist, Nina; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jaudzems, Kristaps

    2015-08-17

    Conversion of spider silk proteins from soluble dope to insoluble fibers involves pH-dependent dimerization of the N-terminal domain (NT). This conversion is tightly regulated to prevent premature precipitation and enable rapid silk formation at the end of the duct. Three glutamic acid residues that mediate this process in the NT from Euprosthenops australis major ampullate spidroin 1 are well conserved among spidroins. However, NTs of minor ampullate spidroins from several species, including Araneus ventricosus ((Av)MiSp NT), lack one of the glutamic acids. Here we investigate the pH-dependent structural changes of (Av)MiSp NT, revealing that it uses the same mechanism but involves a non-conserved glutamic acid residue instead. Homology modeling of the structures of other MiSp NTs suggests that these harbor different compensatory residues. This indicates that, despite sequence variations, the molecular mechanism underlying pH-dependent dimerization of NT is conserved among different silk types.

  3. Discovery of an essential nucleotidylating activity associated with a newly delineated conserved domain in the RNA polymerase-containing protein of all nidoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Kathleen C.; Gulyaeva, Anastasia; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Janssen, George M. C.; Ruben, Mark; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Samborskiy, Dmitry V.; Kravchenko, Alexander A.; Leontovich, Andrey M.; Sidorov, Igor A.; Snijder, Eric J.; Posthuma, Clara C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that catalyzes the synthesis of their RNA(s). In the case of positive-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the order Nidovirales, the RdRp resides in a replicase subunit that is unusually large. Bioinformatics analysis of this non-structural protein has now revealed a nidoviral signature domain (genetic marker) that is N-terminally adjacent to the RdRp and has no apparent homologs elsewhere. Based on its conservation profile, this domain is proposed to have nucleotidylation activity. We used recombinant non-structural protein 9 of the arterivirus equine arteritis virus (EAV) and different biochemical assays, including irreversible labeling with a GTP analog followed by a proteomics analysis, to demonstrate the manganese-dependent covalent binding of guanosine and uridine phosphates to a lysine/histidine residue. Most likely this was the invariant lysine of the newly identified domain, named nidovirus RdRp-associated nucleotidyltransferase (NiRAN), whose substitution with alanine severely diminished the described binding. Furthermore, this mutation crippled EAV and prevented the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in cell culture, indicating that NiRAN is essential for nidoviruses. Potential functions supported by NiRAN may include nucleic acid ligation, mRNA capping and protein-primed RNA synthesis, possibilities that remain to be explored in future studies. PMID:26304538

  4. A conserved face of the Jagged/Serrate DSL domain is involved in Notch trans-activation and cis-inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cordle, Jemima; Johnson, Steven; Tay, Joyce Zi Yan; Roversi, Pietro; Wilkin, Marian B; de Madrid, Beatriz Hernández; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Jensen, Sacha; Whiteman, Pat; Jin, Boquan; Redfield, Christina; Baron, Martin; Lea, Susan M; Handford, Penny A

    2008-08-01

    The Notch receptor and its ligands are key components in a core metazoan signaling pathway that regulates the spatial patterning, timing and outcome of many cell-fate decisions. Ligands contain a disulfide-rich Delta/Serrate/LAG-2 (DSL) domain required for Notch trans-activation or cis-inhibition. Here we report the X-ray structure of a receptor binding region of a Notch ligand, the DSL-EGF3 domains of human Jagged-1 (J-1(DSL-EGF3)). The structure reveals a highly conserved face of the DSL domain, and we show, by functional analysis of Drosophila melanogster ligand mutants, that this surface is required for both cis- and trans-regulatory interactions with Notch. We also identify, using NMR, a surface of Notch-1 involved in J-1(DSL-EGF3) binding. Our data imply that cis- and trans-regulation may occur through the formation of structurally distinct complexes that, unexpectedly, involve the same surfaces on both ligand and receptor.

  5. Comparative genomics of Drosophila mtDNA: Novel features of conservation and change across functional domains and lineages.

    PubMed

    Montooth, Kristi L; Abt, Dawn N; Hofmann, Jeffrey W; Rand, David M

    2009-07-01

    To gain insight on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolution, we assembled and analyzed the mitochondrial genomes of Drosophila erecta, D. ananassae, D. persimilis, D. willistoni, D. mojavensis, D. virilis and D. grimshawi together with the sequenced mtDNAs of the melanogaster subgroup. Genomic comparisons across the well-defined Drosophila phylogeny impart power for detecting conserved mtDNA regions that maintain metabolic function and regions that evolve uniquely on lineages. Evolutionary rate varies across intergenic regions of the mtDNA. Rapidly evolving intergenic regions harbor the majority of mitochondrial indel divergence. In contrast, patterns of nearly perfect conservation within intergenic regions reveal a refined set of nucleotides underlying the binding of transcription termination factors. Sequencing of 5' cDNA ends indicates that cytochrome C oxidase I (CoI) has a novel (T/C)CG start codon and that perfectly conserved regions upstream of two NADH dehydrogenase (ND) genes are transcribed and likely extend these protein sequences. Substitutions at synonymous sites in the Drosophila mitochondrial proteomes reflect a mutation process that is biased toward A and T nucleotides and differs between mtDNA strands. Differences in codon usage bias across genes reveal that weak selection at silent sites may offset the mutation bias. The mutation-selection balance at synonymous sites has also diverged between the Drosophila and Sophophora lineages. Rates of evolution are highly heterogeneous across the mitochondrial proteome, with ND accumulating many more amino acid substitutions than CO. These oxidative phosphorylation complex-specific rates of evolution vary across lineages and may reflect physiological and ecological change across the Drosophila phylogeny.

  6. Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Human APOBEC3B and the Critical Structural Role for a Conserved Methionine.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, Sachini U; Guruge, Thisari A; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2015-09-25

    Human APOBEC3B deaminates cytosines in DNA and belongs to the AID/APOBEC family of enzymes. These proteins are involved in innate and adaptive immunity and may cause mutations in a variety of cancers. To characterize its ability to convert cytosines into uracils, we tested several derivatives of APOBEC3B gene for their ability to cause mutations in Escherichia coli. Through this analysis, a methionine residue at the junction of the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) was found to be essential for high mutagenicity. Properties of mutants with substitutions at this position, examination of existing molecular structures of APOBEC3 family members and molecular modeling suggest that this residue is essential for the structural stability of this family of proteins. The APOBEC3B CTD with the highest mutational activity was purified to homogeneity and its kinetic parameters were determined. Size-exclusion chromatography of the CTD monomer showed that it is in equilibrium with its dimeric form and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis of the protein suggested that the dimer may be quite stable. The partially purified NTD did not show intrinsic deamination activity and did not enhance the activity of the CTD in biochemical assays. Finally, APOBEC3B was at least 10-fold less efficient at mutating 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to thymine than APOBEC3A in a genetic assay and was at least 10-fold less efficient at deaminating 5mC compared to C in biochemical assays. These results shed light on the structural organization of APOBEC3B catalytic domain, its substrate specificity and its possible role in causing genome-wide mutations.

  7. Secondary Structure of a Conserved Domain in an Intron of Influenza A M1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus utilizes RNA throughout infection. Little is known, however, about the roles of RNA structures. A previous bioinformatics survey predicted multiple regions of influenza A virus that are likely to generate evolutionarily conserved and stable RNA structures. One predicted conserved structure is in the pre-mRNA coding for essential proteins, M1 and M2. This structure starts 79 nucleotides downstream of the M2 mRNA 5′ splice site. Here, a combination of biochemical structural mapping, mutagenesis, and NMR confirms the predicted three-way multibranch structure of this RNA. Imino proton NMR spectra reveal no change in secondary structure when 80 mM KCl is supplemented with 4 mM MgCl2. Optical melting curves in 1 M NaCl and in 100 mM KCl with 10 mM MgCl2 are very similar, with melting temperatures ∼14 °C higher than that for 100 mM KCl alone. These results provide a firm basis for designing experiments and potential therapeutics to test for function in cell culture. PMID:25026548

  8. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  9. Deletion of a Predicted β-Sheet Domain within the Amino Terminus of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein K Conserved among Alphaherpesviruses Prevents Virus Entry into Neuronal Axons

    PubMed Central

    Jambunathan, Nithya; Charles, Anu-Susan; Subramanian, Ramesh; Saied, Ahmad A.; Naderi, Misagh; Rider, Paul; Brylinski, Michal; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) lacking expression of the entire glycoprotein K (gK) or expressing gK with a 38-amino-acid deletion (gKΔ31–68 mutation) failed to infect ganglionic neurons after ocular infection of mice. We constructed a new model for the predicted three-dimensional structure of gK, revealing that the gKΔ31–68 mutation spans a well-defined β-sheet structure within the amino terminus of gK, which is conserved among alphaherpesviruses. The HSV-1(McKrae) gKΔ31–68 virus was tested for the ability to enter into ganglionic neuronal axons in cell culture of explanted rat ganglia using a novel virus entry proximity ligation assay (VEPLA). In this assay, cell surface-bound virions were detected by the colocalization of gD and its cognate receptor nectin-1 on infected neuronal surfaces. Capsids that have entered into the cytoplasm were detected by the colocalization of the virion tegument protein UL37, with dynein required for loading of virion capsids onto microtubules for retrograde transport to the nucleus. HSV-1(McKrae) gKΔ31–68 attached to cell surfaces of Vero cells and ganglionic axons in cell culture as efficiently as wild-type HSV-1(McKrae). However, unlike the wild-type virus, the mutant virus failed to enter into the axoplasm of ganglionic neurons. This work suggests that the amino terminus of gK is a critical determinant for entry into neuronal axons and may serve similar conserved functions for other alphaherpesviruses. IMPORTANCE Alphaherpesviruses, unlike beta- and gammaherpesviruses, have the unique ability to infect and establish latency in neurons. Glycoprotein K (gK) and the membrane protein UL20 are conserved among all alphaherpesviruses. We show here that a predicted β-sheet domain, which is conserved among alphaherpesviruses, functions in HSV-1 entry into neuronal axons, suggesting that it may serve similar functions for other herpesviruses. These results are in agreement with our

  10. Conserved catalytic residues of the ALDH1L1 aldehyde dehydrogenase domain control binding and discharging of the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2011-07-01

    The C-terminal domain (C(t)-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several C(t)-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP(+), Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP(+) but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type C(t)-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP(+) with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi Binds to Cytokeratin through Conserved Peptide Motifs Found in the Laminin-G-Like Domain of the gp85/Trans-sialidase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Andre Azevedo Reis; de Vasconcelos, Veronica de Cássia Sardinha; Colli, Walter; Alves, Maria Júlia Manso; Giordano, Ricardo José

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas' disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a disease that affects millions of people most of them living in South and Central Americas. There are few treatment options for individuals with Chagas' disease making it important to understand the molecular details of parasite infection, so novel therapeutic alternatives may be developed for these patients. Here, we investigate the interaction between host cell intermediate filament proteins and the T. cruzi gp85 glycoprotein superfamily with hundreds of members that have long been implicated in parasite cell invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings An in silico analysis was utilized to identify peptide motifs shared by the gp85 T. cruzi proteins and, using phage display, these selected peptide motifs were screened for their ability to bind to cells. One peptide, named TS9, showed significant cell binding capacity and was selected for further studies. Affinity chromatography, phage display and invasion assays revealed that peptide TS9 binds to cytokeratins and vimentin, and prevents T. cruzi cell infection. Interestingly, peptide TS9 and a previously identified binding site for intermediate filament proteins are disposed in an antiparallel β-sheet fold, present in a conserved laminin-G-like domain shared by all members of the family. Moreover, peptide TS9 overlaps with an immunodominant T cell epitope. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, the present study reinforces previous results from our group implicating the gp85 superfamily of glycoproteins and the intermediate filament proteins cytokeratin and vimentin in the parasite infection process. It also suggests an important role in parasite biology for the conserved laminin-G-like domain, present in all members of this large family of cell surface proteins. PMID:26398185

  12. In vitro selection of RNase P RNA reveals optimized catalytic activity in a highly conserved structural domain.

    PubMed

    Frank, D N; Ellington, A E; Pace, N R

    1996-12-01

    In vitro selection techniques are useful means of dissecting the functions of both natural and artificial ribozymes. Using a self-cleaving conjugate containing the Escherichia coli ribonuclease P RNA and its substrate, pre-tRNA (Frank DN, Harris ME, Pace NR, 1994, Biochemistry 33:10800-10808), we have devised a method to select for catalytically active variants of the RNase P ribozyme. A selection experiment was performed to probe the structural and sequence constraints that operate on a highly conserved region of RNase P: the J3/4-P4-J2/4 region, which lies within the core of RNase P and is thought to bind catalytically essential magnesium ions (Harris ME et al., 1994, EMBO J 13:3953-3963; Hardt WD et al., 1995, EMBO J 14:2935-2944; Harris ME, Pace NR, 1995, RNA 1:210-218). We sought to determine which, if any, of the nearly invariant nucleotides within J3/4-P4-J2/4 are required for ribozyme-mediated catalysis. Twenty-two residues in the J3/4-P4-J2/4 component of RNase P RNA were randomized and, surprisingly, after only 10 generations, each of the randomized positions returned to the wild-type sequence. This indicates that every position in J3/4-P4-J2/4 contributes to optimal catalytic activity. These results contrast sharply with selections involving other large ribozymes, which evolve improved catalytic function readily in vitro (Chapman KB, Szostak JW, 1994, Curr Opin Struct Biol 4:618-622; Joyce GF, 1994, Curr Opin Struct Biol 4:331-336; Kumar PKR, Ellington AE, 1995, FASEB J 9:1183-1195). The phylogenetic conservation of J3/4-P4-J2/4, coupled with the results reported here, suggests that the contribution of this structure to RNA-mediated catalysis was optimized very early in evolution, before the last common ancestor of all life. PMID:8972768

  13. A conserved domain of previously unknown function in Gap1 mediates protein-protein interaction and is required for biogenesis of a serine-rich streptococcal adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yirong; Chen, Yabing; Huang, Xiang; Zhou, Meixian; Wu, Ren; Dong, Shengli; Pritchard, David G.; Fives-Taylor, Paula; Wu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Summary Fap1-like serine-rich proteins are a new family of bacterial adhesins found in a variety of streptococci and staphylococci that have been implicated in bacterial pathogenesis. A gene cluster encoding glycosyltransferases and accessory Sec components is required for Fap1 glycosylation and biogenesis in Streptococcus parasanguinis. Here we report that the glycosylation-associated protein, Gap1, contributes to glycosylation and biogenesis of Fap1 by interacting with another glycosylation-associated protein, Gap3. Gap1 shares structural homology with glycosyltransferases. The gap1 mutant, like the gap3 mutant, produced an aberrantly-glycosylated Fap1 precursor and failed to produce mature Fap1, suggesting that Gap1 and Gap3 might function in concert in the Fap1 glycosylation and biogenesis. Indeed, Gap1 interacted with Gap3 in vitro and in vivo. A Gap1 amino-terminal motif, within a highly conserved domain of unknown function (DUF1975) identified in many bacterial glycosyltrasnferases, was required for the Gap1-Gap3 interaction. Deletion of one, four, and nine amino acids within the conserved motif gradually inhibited the Gap1-Gap3 interaction and diminished production of mature Fap1 and concurrently increased production of the Fap1 precursor. Consequently, bacterial adhesion to an in vitro tooth model was also reduced. These data demonstrate that the Gap1-Gap3 interaction is required for Fap1 biogenesis and Fap1-dependent bacterial adhesion. PMID:18826412

  14. Essential, completely conserved glycine residue in the domain III S2-S3 linker of voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunits in yeast and mammals.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kazuko; Teng, Jinfeng; Tada, Tomoko; Saka, Ayaka; Tamai, Masumi; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Adachi-Akahane, Satomi; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2007-08-31

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) mediate the influx of Ca2+ that regulates many cellular events, and mutations in VGCC genes cause serious hereditary diseases in mammals. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has only one gene encoding the putative pore-forming alpha1 subunit of VGCC, CCH1. Here, we identify a cch1 allele producing a completely nonfunctional Cch1 protein with a Gly1265 to Glu substitution present in the domain III S2-S3 cytoplasmic linker. Comparison of amino acid sequences of this linker among 58 VGCC alpha1 subunits from 17 species reveals that a Gly residue whose position corresponds to that of the Cch1 Gly1265 is completely conserved from yeasts to humans. Systematic amino acid substitution analysis using 10 amino acids with different chemical and structural properties indicates that the Gly1265 is essential for Cch1 function because of the smallest residue volume. Replacement of the Gly959 residue of a rat brain Cav1.2 alpha1 subunit (rbCII), positionally corresponding to the yeast Cch1 Gly1265, with Glu, Ser, Lys, or Ala results in the loss of Ba2+ currents, as revealed by the patch clamp method. These results suggest that the Gly residue in the domain III S2-S3 linker is functionally indispensable from yeasts to mammals. Because the Gly residue has never been studied in any VGCC, these findings provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of VGCCs.

  15. Regulation of the Expression of Plant Resistance Gene SNC1 by a Protein with a Conserved BAT2 Domain1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzhong; Tessaro, Mark J.; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2010-01-01

    Plant Resistance (R) genes encode immune receptors that recognize pathogens and activate defense responses. Because of fitness costs associated with maintaining R protein-mediated resistance, expression levels of R genes have to be tightly regulated. However, mechanisms on how R-gene expression is regulated are poorly understood. Here we show that MODIFIER OF snc1, 1 (MOS1) regulates the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF npr1-1, CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1), which encodes a Toll/interleukin receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat type of R protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In the mos1 loss-of-function mutant plants, snc1 expression is repressed and constitutive resistance responses mediated by snc1 are lost. The repression of snc1 expression in mos1 is released by knocking out DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION1. In mos1 mutants, DNA methylation in a region upstream of SNC1 is altered. Furthermore, expression of snc1 transgenes using the native promoter does not require MOS1, indicating that regulation of SNC1 expression by MOS1 is at the chromatin level. Map-based cloning of MOS1 revealed that it encodes a novel protein with a HLA-B ASSOCIATED TRANSCRIPT2 (BAT2) domain that is conserved in plants and animals. Our study on MOS1 suggests that BAT2 domain-containing proteins may function in regulation of gene expression at chromatin level. PMID:20439546

  16. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  17. Human ERCC5 cDNA-cosmid complementation for excision repair and bipartite amino acid domains conserved with RAD proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.A.; Dickson, J.A.; Hernandez, R.R.; Lin, G.Y.; Park, M.S.; Schauer, S.; Reynolds, R.J.; Strniste, G.F. ); Learmonth, D. ); Mudgett, J.S. ); Yu, J.Y. )

    1993-10-01

    Several human genes related to DNA excision repair (ER) have been isolated via ER cross-species complementation (ERCC) of UV-sensitive CHO cells. The authors have now isolated and characterized cDNAs for the human ERCC5 gene that complement CHO UV135 cells. The ERCC5 mRNA size is about 4.6 kb. Their available cDNA clones are partial length, and no single clone was active for UV135 complementation. When cDNAs were mixed pairwise with a cosmid clone containing an overlapping 5[prime]-end segment of the ERCC5 gene, DNA transfer produced UV-resistant colonies with 60 to 95% correction of UV resistance relative to either a genomic ERCC5 DNA transformant or the CHO AA8 progenitor cells. cDNA-cosmid transformants regained intermediate levels (20 to 45%) of ER-dependent reactivation of a UV-damaged pSVCATgpt reporter plasmid. Their evidence strongly implicates an in situ recombination mechanism in cDNA-cosmid complementation for ER. The complete deduced amino acid sequence of ERCC5 was reconstructed for several cDNA clones encoding a predicted protein of 1,186 amino acids. The ERCC5 protein has extensive sequence similarities, in bipartite domains A and B, to products of RAD repair genes of two yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad13. Sequence, structural, and functional data taken together indicate that ERCC5 and its relatives are probable functional homologs. A second locus represented by S. cerevisiae YKL510 and S. pombe rad2 genes is structurally distinct from the ERCC5 locus but retains vestigial A and B domain similarities. Their analyses suggest that ERCC5 is a nuclear-localized protein with one or more highly conserved helix-loop-helix segments within domains A and B. 69 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Conserved Negative Charges in the N-terminal Tetramerization Domain Mediate Efficient Assembly of Kv2.1 and Kv2.1/Kv6.4 Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Bocksteins, Elke; Labro, Alain J.; Mayeur, Evy; Bruyns, Tine; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk; Snyders, Dirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are transmembrane tetramers of individual α-subunits. Eight different Shaker-related Kv subfamilies have been identified in which the tetramerization domain T1, located on the intracellular N terminus, facilitates and controls the assembly of both homo- and heterotetrameric channels. Only the Kv2 α-subunits are able to form heterotetramers with members of the silent Kv subfamilies (Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9). The T1 domain contains two subdomains, A and B box, which presumably determine subfamily specificity by preventing incompatible subunits to assemble. In contrast, little is known about the involvement of the A/B linker sequence. Both Kv2 and silent Kv subfamilies contain a fully conserved and negatively charged sequence (CDD) in this linker that is lacking in the other subfamilies. Neutralizing these aspartates in Kv2.1 by mutating them to alanines did not affect the gating properties, but reduced the current density moderately. However, charge reversal arginine substitutions strongly reduced the current density of these homotetrameric mutant Kv2.1 channels and immunocytochemistry confirmed the reduced expression at the plasma membrane. Förster resonance energy transfer measurements using confocal microscopy showed that the latter was not due to impaired trafficking, but to a failure to assemble the tetramer. This was further confirmed with co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The corresponding arginine substitution in Kv6.4 prevented its heterotetrameric interaction with Kv2.1. These results indicate that these aspartates (especially the first one) in the A/B box linker of the T1 domain are required for efficient assembly of both homotetrameric Kv2.1 and heterotetrameric Kv2.1/silent Kv6.4 channels. PMID:19717558

  19. A conserved domain important for association of eukaryotic J-protein co-chaperones Jjj1 and Zuo1 with the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kaschner, Lindsey A; Sharma, Ruchika; Shrestha, Om Kumar; Meyer, Alison E; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2015-05-01

    J-proteins, obligate co-chaperones, provide specialization for Hsp70 function in a variety of cellular processes. Two of the 13 J-proteins of the yeast cytosol/nucleus, Zuo1 and Jjj1, are associated with 60S ribosomal subunits. Abundant Zuo1 facilitates folding of nascent polypeptides; Jjj1, of much lower abundance, functions in ribosome biogenesis. However, overexpression of Jjj1 substantially rescues growth defects of cells lacking Zuo1. We analyzed a region held in common by Zuo1 and Jjj1, outside the signature J-domain found in all J-proteins. This shared "zuotin homology domain" (ZHD) is important for ribosome association of both proteins. An N-terminal segment of Jjj1, containing the J-domain and ZHD, is ribosome-associated and, like full-length Jjj1, is competent to rescue both the cold- and cation-sensitivity of ∆zuo1. However, this fragment, when expressed at normal levels, cannot rescue the cytosolic ribosome biogenesis defect of ∆jjj1. Our results are consistent with a model in which the primary functions of Zuo1 and Jjj1 occur in the cytosol. In addition, our data suggest that Zuo1 and Jjj1 bind overlapping sites on ribosomes due to an interaction via their common ZHDs, but Jjj1 binds primarily to pre-60S particles and Zuo1 to mature subunits. We hypothesize that ZUO1 and JJJ1, which are conserved throughout eukaryotes, arose from an ancient duplication of a progenitor J-protein gene that encoded the ZHD ribosome-binding region; subsequently, specialized roles and additional ribosome interaction sites evolved.

  20. The Respiratory Syncytial Virus G Protein Conserved Domain Induces a Persistent and Protective Antibody Response in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien N.; Power, Ultan F.; Robert, Alain; Haeuw, Jean-François; Helffer, Katia; Perez, Amadeo; Asin, Miguel-Angel; Corvaia, Nathalie; Libon, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of severe upper and lower respiratory disease in infants and in the elderly. There are 2 main RSV subtypes A and B. A recombinant vaccine was designed based on the central domain of the RSV-A attachment G protein which we had previously named G2Na (aa130–230). Here we evaluated immunogenicity, persistence of antibody (Ab) response and protective efficacy induced in rodents by: (i) G2Na fused to DT (Diphtheria toxin) fragments in cotton rats. DT fusion did not potentiate neutralizing Ab responses against RSV-A or cross-reactivity to RSV-B. (ii) G2Nb (aa130–230 of the RSV-B G protein) either fused to, or admixed with G2Na. G2Nb did not induce RSV-B-reactive Ab responses. (iii) G2Na at low doses. Two injections of 3 µg G2Na in Alum were sufficient to induce protective immune responses in mouse lungs, preventing RSV-A and greatly reducing RSV-B infections. In cotton rats, G2Na-induced RSV-reactive Ab and protective immunity against RSV-A challenge that persisted for at least 24 weeks. (iv) injecting RSV primed mice with a single dose of G2Na/Alum or G2Na/PLGA [poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide]. Despite the presence of pre-existing RSV-specific Abs, these formulations effectively boosted anti-RSV Ab titres and increased Ab titres persisted for at least 21 weeks. Affinity maturation of these Abs increased from day 28 to day 148. These data indicate that G2Na has potential as a component of an RSV vaccine formulation. PMID:22479601

  1. Conserved Structural Domains in FoxD4L1, a Neural Forkhead Box Transcription Factor, Are Required to Repress or Activate Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Steven L.; Neilson, Karen M.; Orban, John; Yaklichkin, Sergey; Hoffbauer, Jennifer; Mood, Kathy; Daar, Ira O.; Moody, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    FoxD4L1 is a forkhead transcription factor that expands the neural ectoderm by down-regulating genes that promote the onset of neural differentiation and up-regulating genes that maintain proliferative neural precursors in an immature state. We previously demonstrated that binding of Grg4 to an Eh-1 motif enhances the ability of FoxD4L1 to down-regulate target neural genes but does not account for all of its repressive activity. Herein we analyzed the protein sequence for additional interaction motifs and secondary structure. Eight conserved motifs were identified in the C-terminal region of fish and frog proteins. Extending the analysis to mammals identified a high scoring motif downstream of the Eh-1 domain that contains a tryptophan residue implicated in protein-protein interactions. In addition, secondary structure prediction programs predicted an α-helical structure overlapping with amphibian-specific Motif 6 in Xenopus, and similarly located α-helical structures in other vertebrate FoxD proteins. We tested functionality of this site by inducing a glutamine-to-proline substitution expected to break the predicted α-helical structure; this significantly reduced FoxD4L1’s ability to repress zic3 and irx1. Because this mutation does not interfere with Grg4 binding, these results demonstrate that at least two regions, the Eh-1 motif and a more C-terminal predicted α-helical/Motif 6 site, additively contribute to repression. In the N-terminal region we previously identified a 14 amino acid motif that is required for the up-regulation of target genes. Secondary structure prediction programs predicted a short β-strand separating two acidic domains. Mutant constructs show that the β-strand itself is not required for transcriptional activation. Instead, activation depends upon a glycine residue that is predicted to provide sufficient flexibility to bring the two acidic domains into close proximity. These results identify conserved predicted motifs with secondary

  2. Domain repeats related to innate immunity in the South African abalone, Haliotis midae.

    PubMed

    Picone, Barbara; Rhode, Clint; Roodt-Wilding, Rouvay

    2015-10-01

    Molluscs predominately use the cellular defence system as the primary mechanism of defence against pathogenic infection, in which haemocytes play a pivotal role. Haliotis midae is a commercially important South African species that it is susceptible to bacterial pathogens, fungal and yeast infections in the farming environment. The current study aims to enrich the current knowledge regarding H. midae innate immunity by investigating the presence and evolution of domain repeats. The bioinformatics approach used in this study, detected five repeat families in the H. midae transcriptome. These repeats families include mixed alpha and beta (leucine-rich and ankyrin), spectrin repeats, beta-propellers (WD40) and alfa-structure repeat (TPR-like). The expansion of key gene families related to host defence may be important to abalone adaptation to life in a pathogen-rich environment. PMID:25936498

  3. 3D model for Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A armadillo domain unveils highly conserved protein-protein interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A

    2015-12-01

    Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein, which exerts its cancer-promoting function through interaction with other proteins, for example Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and MYC. The lack of structural information for CIP2A significantly prevents the design of anti-cancer therapeutics targeting this protein. In an attempt to counteract this fact, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain (CIP2A-ArmRP), analyzed key areas and amino acids, and coupled the results to the existing literature. The model reliably shows a stable armadillo repeat fold with a positively charged groove. The fact that this conserved groove highly likely binds peptides is corroborated by the presence of a conserved polar ladder, which is essential for the proper peptide-binding mode of armadillo repeat proteins and, according to our results, several known CIP2A interaction partners appropriately possess an ArmRP-binding consensus motif. Moreover, we show that Arg229Gln, which has been linked to the development of cancer, causes a significant change in charge and surface properties of CIP2A-ArmRP. In conclusion, our results reveal that CIP2A-ArmRP shares the typical fold, protein-protein interaction site and interaction patterns with other natural armadillo proteins and that, presumably, several interaction partners bind into the central groove of the modeled CIP2A-ArmRP. By providing essential structural characteristics of CIP2A, the present study significantly increases our knowledge on how CIP2A interacts with other proteins in cancer progression and how to develop new therapeutics targeting CIP2A. PMID:26393783

  4. CENP-B autoantigen is a conserved protein from humans to higher plants: identification of the aminoterminal domain in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Cisneros, O; Fraire-Velázquez, S; Moreno, J; Herrera-Esparza, R

    1997-06-01

    Centromeres are critical structures in cell division, and CENP-B is the most important protein of the centromeric complex recognized by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma. Our major aim was to demonstrate whether CENP-B is a conserved protein along the phylogenic scale including the higher plants. Vegetal and human cell proteins were extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris and HEp-2 cells and were characterized by PAGE, Western blot, and human autoimmune sera containing anti-CENP-B autoantibodies. The aminoterminus of the gene encoding for CENP-B from HEp-2 cells and Phaseolus vulgaris was isolated by reverse transcriptase-PCR using complementary oligonucleotides to the human CENP-B gene. Also, in situ hybridization was performed on vegetal tissues and HEp-2 cells using human CENP-B box probes. Our main results were as follows: 1) Autoimmune sera were reactive to a vegetal protein of 80 kDa. 2) Affinity-purified anti-CENP-B antibodies recognized a protein from Phaseolus vulgaris with molecular mass similar to that found in human cells. Vegetal and HEp-2 cells CENP-B proteins were immunologically identical. 3) Using RT-PCR, we were able to amplify a cDNA encoding for the aminoterminus domain of CENP-B from Phaseolus vulgaris that had the same molecular behaviour as the cDNA from HEp-2 cells. 4) Complementary oligonucleotides for human CENP-B box hybridized a DNA sequence from Phaseolus vulgaris. In conclusion, CENP-B protein is a conserved protein along the phylogenic scale from humans to higher plants.

  5. Deciphering H3K4me3 broad domains associated with gene-regulatory networks and conserved epigenomic landscapes in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Dincer, A; Gavin, D P; Xu, K; Zhang, B; Dudley, J T; Schadt, E E; Akbarian, S

    2015-01-01

    Regulators of the histone H3-trimethyl lysine-4 (H3K4me3) mark are significantly associated with the genetic risk architecture of common neurodevelopmental disease, including schizophrenia and autism. Typical H3K4me3 is primarily localized in the form of sharp peaks, extending in neuronal chromatin on average only across 500-1500 base pairs mostly in close proximity to annotated transcription start sites. Here, through integrative computational analysis of epigenomic and transcriptomic data based on next-generation sequencing, we investigated H3K4me3 landscapes of sorted neuronal and non-neuronal nuclei in human postmortem, non-human primate and mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC), and blood. To explore whether H3K4me3 peak signals could also extend across much broader domains, we examined broadest domain cell-type-specific H3K4me3 peaks in an unbiased manner with an innovative approach on 41+12 ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets. In PFC neurons, broadest H3K4me3 distribution ranged from 3.9 to 12 kb, with extremely broad peaks (~10 kb or broader) related to synaptic function and GABAergic signaling (DLX1, ELFN1, GAD1, IGSF9B and LINC00966). Broadest neuronal peaks showed distinct motif signatures and were centrally positioned in prefrontal gene-regulatory Bayesian networks and sensitive to defective neurodevelopment. Approximately 120 of the broadest H3K4me3 peaks in human PFC neurons, including many genes related to glutamatergic and dopaminergic signaling, were fully conserved in chimpanzee, macaque and mouse cortical neurons. Exploration of spread and breadth of lysine methylation markings could provide novel insights into epigenetic mechanism involved in neuropsychiatric disease and neuronal genome evolution.

  6. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans to glycosphingolipid (Asialo-GM1) receptors is achieved by a conserved receptor-binding domain present on their adhesins.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; Lee, K K; Hodges, R S; Paranchych, W; Irvin, R T

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a dimorphic yeast, are evolutionarily distant microorganisms which can utilize filamentous structures termed pili and fimbriae, respectively, to mediate adherence to glycosphingolipids (asialoganglioside-GM1) receptors. The mechanism of adherence to glycosphingolipid receptors was investigated in these studies. By using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against purified pili of P. aeruginosa PAK (PK99H) and monospecific anti-peptide antibodies against the PAK pilin peptides [anti-PAK(128-144) and anti-PAK(134-140)], we demonstrated that these antibodies agglutinated C. albicans whole cells and cross-reacted with C. albicans fimbriae in immunoblots. A control MAb, PKL1, and anti-PAK(75-84) peptide antibodies failed to agglutinate C. albicans whole cells or cross-react with the fimbrial proteins. Conversely, the anti-C. albicans fimbrial MAb Fm16, but not Fm34, agglutinated P. aeruginosa PAK whole cells and Western blots (immunoblots). The interactions between PK99H and Fm16 and their respective homologous antigens were competitively inhibited by heterologous antigens; this demonstrated that the interactions between the antibodies and the heterologous antigens, i.e., PK99H with C. albicans fimbriae and Fm16 with P. aeruginosa pili, were highly specific and suggested that both adhesins share a common antigenic determinant. The immunological cross-reactivity between Fm16 and P. aeruginosa PAK pilin is localized onto the PAK(134-140) region as shown by a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The PAK(134-140) region of PAK pilin contains the epitope recognized by PK99H and also constitutes part of the receptor-binding domain of the pilus adhesin. Thus, the results from these studies suggest that common cell surface receptors are recognized by the P. aeruginosa and C. albicans adhesins because of a conserved receptor-binding domain on the adhesins. Images PMID:7525482

  7. Deciphering H3K4me3 broad domains associated with gene-regulatory networks and conserved epigenomic landscapes in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Dincer, A; Gavin, D P; Xu, K; Zhang, B; Dudley, J T; Schadt, E E; Akbarian, S

    2015-01-01

    Regulators of the histone H3-trimethyl lysine-4 (H3K4me3) mark are significantly associated with the genetic risk architecture of common neurodevelopmental disease, including schizophrenia and autism. Typical H3K4me3 is primarily localized in the form of sharp peaks, extending in neuronal chromatin on average only across 500–1500 base pairs mostly in close proximity to annotated transcription start sites. Here, through integrative computational analysis of epigenomic and transcriptomic data based on next-generation sequencing, we investigated H3K4me3 landscapes of sorted neuronal and non-neuronal nuclei in human postmortem, non-human primate and mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC), and blood. To explore whether H3K4me3 peak signals could also extend across much broader domains, we examined broadest domain cell-type-specific H3K4me3 peaks in an unbiased manner with an innovative approach on 41+12 ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets. In PFC neurons, broadest H3K4me3 distribution ranged from 3.9 to 12 kb, with extremely broad peaks (~10 kb or broader) related to synaptic function and GABAergic signaling (DLX1, ELFN1, GAD1, IGSF9B and LINC00966). Broadest neuronal peaks showed distinct motif signatures and were centrally positioned in prefrontal gene-regulatory Bayesian networks and sensitive to defective neurodevelopment. Approximately 120 of the broadest H3K4me3 peaks in human PFC neurons, including many genes related to glutamatergic and dopaminergic signaling, were fully conserved in chimpanzee, macaque and mouse cortical neurons. Exploration of spread and breadth of lysine methylation markings could provide novel insights into epigenetic mechanism involved in neuropsychiatric disease and neuronal genome evolution. PMID:26575220

  8. CBF mediates adenovirus Ela trans-activation by interaction at the C-terminal promoter targeting domain of conserved region 3.

    PubMed

    Agoff, S N; Wu, B

    1994-12-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence suggest that conserved region 3 (CR3) of the adenovirus Ela polypeptide can provide two distinct and separable functions: an N-terminal transcriptional activation region and a C-terminal promoter targeting region. It is thought that the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 interacts with promoter-specific transcription factors, thereby bringing the activation region of Ela CR3 in proximity of the promoter. Here we report that CBF, a CCAAT-box-binding factor that regulates hsp70 gene expression and mediates Ela trans-activation in vivo, interacts with the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 in vitro. Point mutations in Ela CR3 that are defective in stimulating transcription from the hsp70 promoter are also defective in stimulating transcription directed by a synthetic activator, GAL-CBF, composed of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 fused to CBF. These mutations fall into two classes with respect to their abilities to interact with CBF in vitro. Mutations in the transcriptional activation region of Ela CR3 do not affect binding to CBF, but mutation of the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 prevents association with CBF in vitro.

  9. Role of the semi-conserved histidine residue in the light-sensing domain of LitR, a MerR-type photosensory transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hideaki; Mise, Kou; Maruyama, Takafumi; Hagiwara, Kenta; Ueda, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    The LitR/CarH protein family transcriptional regulator is a new type of photoreceptor based on the function of adenosyl B12 (AdoB12) as a light-sensitive ligand. Here, we studied a semi-conserved histidine residue (His132) in the light-sensing (AdoB12-binding) domain at the C-terminus of LitR from a thermophilic Gram-negative bacterium, Thermus thermophilus HB27. The in vivo mutation of His132 within LitR caused a reduction in the rate of carotenoid production in response to illumination. BIAcore analysis revealed that the illuminated-LitRH132A possesses high DNA-binding activity compared to the wild-type protein. The subunit structure analysis showed that LitRH132A performed an incomplete subunit dissociation. The ability of LitRH132A to associate with AdoB12 was reduced compared with that of the wild-type protein in an equilibration dialysis experiment. Overall, these results suggest that His132 of LitR is involved in the association with AdoB12 as well as the light-sensitive DNA-binding activity based on oligomer dissociation. PMID:27283316

  10. The role of an evolutionarily conserved cis-proline in the thioredoxin-like domain of human class Alpha glutathione transferase A1-1.

    PubMed Central

    Nathaniel, Chris; Wallace, Louise A; Burke, Jonathan; Dirr, Heini W

    2003-01-01

    The thioredoxin-like fold has a betaalphabetaalphabetabetaalpha topology, and most proteins/domains with this fold have a topologically conserved cis -proline residue at the N-terminus of beta-strand 3. This residue plays an important role in the catalytic function and stability of thioredoxin-like proteins, but is reported not to contribute towards the stability of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) [Allocati, Casalone, Masulli, Caccarelli, Carletti, Parker and Di Ilio (1999) FEBS Lett. 445, 347-350]. In order to further address the role of the cis -proline in the structure, function and stability of GSTs, cis -Pro-56 in human GST (hGST) A1-1 was replaced with a glycine, and the properties of the P56G mutant were compared with those of the wild-type protein. Not only was the catalytic function of the mutant dramatically reduced, so was its conformational stability, as indicated by equilibrium unfolding and unfolding kinetics experiments with urea as denaturant. These findings are discussed in the context of other thioredoxin-like proteins. PMID:12573033

  11. Control of MAPK signaling specificity by a conserved residue in the MEK-binding domain of the yeast scaffold protein Ste5.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Monica A; Madhani, Hiten D

    2006-06-01

    The yeast kinase scaffold Ste5 has been proposed to prevent unwanted cross-talk between the pheromone response pathway and other MAPK cascades. Protein fusion experiments have demonstrated that covalently tethering signaling components to each other or to Ste5 can determine the outcome of signaling. However, these do not fully test the role of scaffolds in signaling specificity, since fusing components precludes differential dissociation of subpopulations. We performed a targeted genetic screen on STE5 and repeatedly identified recessive mutations in a conserved residue, E756, in the Ste7/MEK-binding domain that caused erroneous activation of the filamentation MAPK pathway by pheromone signaling. Mutant cells exhibited a shift in the MAPK activation pattern such that the filamentation MAPK Kss1 was predominately activated in response to pheromone. Velocity sedimentation studies showed that the mutant scaffold was defective in binding to a phosphorylated subpopulation of Ste7. Our data suggest that increased dissociation of activated Ste7 kinase from the mutant scaffold may cause the observed shift in MAPK activation from Fus3 to Kss1 and the resulting loss of specificity. Cross-talk in ste5-E756G cells was due to both increased activation of Kss1 and reduced Fus3-dependent degradation of the filamentation pathway transcription factor Tec1. These studies demonstrate a role for an endogenous scaffold in signaling specificity. PMID:16463042

  12. The Evolutionarily Conserved C-terminal Domains in the Mammalian Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Serve as Dual Regulators of Protein Stability and Transcriptional Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Lingnurkar, Raj; Carey, Timothy S.; Pomaville, Monica; Kar, Parimal; Feig, Michael; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.; Arnosti, David N.; Henry, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor and related family of proteins play critical roles in development through their regulation of genes involved in cell fate. Multiple regulatory pathways impact RB function, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system with deregulated RB destruction frequently associated with pathogenesis. With the current study we explored the mechanisms connecting proteasome-mediated turnover of the RB family to the regulation of repressor activity. We find that steady state levels of all RB family members, RB, p107, and p130, were diminished during embryonic stem cell differentiation concomitant with their target gene acquisition. Proteasome-dependent turnover of the RB family is mediated by distinct and autonomously acting instability elements (IE) located in their C-terminal regulatory domains in a process that is sensitive to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) perturbation. The IE regions include motifs that contribute to E2F-DP transcription factor interaction, and consistently, p107 and p130 repressor potency was reduced by IE deletion. The juxtaposition of degron sequences and E2F interaction motifs appears to be a conserved feature across the RB family, suggesting the potential for repressor ubiquitination and specific target gene regulation. These findings establish a mechanistic link between regulation of RB family repressor potency and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25903125

  13. The amino-terminal conserved domain of 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase is critical for its function in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2015-01-01

    4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (HDR), also known as isoprenoid synthesis H (IspH) or lysis-tolerant B (LytB), catalyzes the last step of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway to synthesize isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. The structure and reaction mechanism of IspH have been actively investigated in Escherichia coli but little is known in plants. Compared with the bacterial IspH, cyanobacterial and plant HDRs all contain an extra N-terminal conserved domain (NCD) that is essential for their function. Tyr72 in the NCD and several plant-specific residues around the central active site are critical for Arabidopsis HDR function. These results suggest that the structure and reaction mechanism of HDR/IspH may be different between plants and bacteria. The E. coli IspH is an iron-sulfur protein that is sensitive to oxygen. It is possible that the cyanobacterial HDR may independently evolve from the common ancestor of prokaryotes to obtain the NCD, which may protect the enzyme from high concentration of oxygen during photosynthesis.

  14. Characterization of tobacco expressing functional oat phytochrome. Domains responsible for the rapid degradation of Pfr are conserved between monocots and dicots

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.R.; Vierstra, R.D. ); Hershey, H.P. )

    1991-07-01

    Constitutive expression of a chimeric oat phytochrome gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) results in the accumulation of a functional 124-kilodalton photoreceptor that markedly alters the phenotype of light-grown tobacco. Here, we provide a detailed phenotypic and biochemical characterization of homozygous tobacco expressing high levels of oat phytochrome. Phenotypic changes include a substantial inhibition of stem elongation, decreased apical dominance, increased leaf chlorophyll content, and delayed leaf senescence. Oat phytochrome synthesized in tobacco is indistinguishable from that present in etiolated oats, having photoreversible difference spectrum maxima at 665 and 730 nanometers, exhibiting negligible dark reversion of phytochrome - far red-absorbing from (Pfr) to phytochrome - red-absorbing form (Pr), and existing as a dimer with an apparent size of approximately 300 kilodaltons. Heterodimers between the oat and tobacco chromoproteins were detected. Endogenous tobacco phytochrome and transgenically expressed oat phytochrome are rapidly degraded in vivo upon photoconversion of Pr to Pfr. Breakdown of both oat and tobacco Pfr is associated with the accumulation of ubiquitin-phytochrome conjugates, suggesting that degradation occurs via the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. This result indicates that the factors responsible for selective recognition of Pfr by the ubiquitin pathway are conserved between monocot and dicot phytochromes. More broadly, it demonstrates that the domains(s) within a plant protein responsible for its selective breakdown can be recognized by the degradation machinery of heterologous species.

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CP 47 protein of photosystem II: alteration of conserved charged residues in the domain 364E-444R.

    PubMed

    Putnam-Evans, C; Burnap, R; Wu, J; Whitmarsh, J; Bricker, T M

    1996-04-01

    The intrinsic chlorophyll-protein CP 47 is a component of photosystem II in higher plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. We had shown previously by biochemical methods that the domain 364E-440D of CP 47 interacts with the 33 kDa extrinsic protein of photosystem II [Odom, W. R., & Bricker, T. M. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 5616-5620]. In this study, using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, mutations at 17 conserved charged residues were introduced into the domain 364E-444R of the CP 47 protein. Only mutations introduced at positions 384R and 385R led to a modified PS II phenotype. We previously described a mutation at (RR384385GG) which resulted in a mutant with a defective oxygen-evolving complex [Putnam-Evans, C., & Bricker, T. M. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 11482-11488]. An additional set of mutations, 384R to 384G, 385R to 385G, and 384,385RR to 384,385EE has now been introduced at this site yielding the mutants R384G, R385G, and RR384385EE, respectively. Steady state oxygen evolution measurements and quantum yield measurements demonstrated that these mutants exhibited significant alterations in their ability to evolve oxygen. Total fluorescence yield measurements indicated that all of these mutants contained about 85%-90% of the PS II reaction centers found in the control strain. This decrease was insufficient to explain the oxygen evolution results. Analysis of oxygen flash yield parameters indicated that there was little change in the S-state parameters alpha, beta, gamma, or delta. Measurement of the S2 lifetime, however, demonstrated that the S2 lifetime of the mutants was 2-3 times longer than that of the control. Additionally, examination of the risetime of the oxygen signal indicated that there was a significant retardation (6-7-fold) in the rate of oxygen release, suggesting a retarded S3-[S4]-S0 transition. These data reinforce our hypothesis that the positive charge density at positions 384R and 385R in the large

  16. DIPA-family coiled-coils bind conserved isoform-specific head domain of p120-catenin family: potential roles in hydrocephalus and heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Nicholas O.; Doll, Caleb A.; Dohn, Michael R.; Miller, Rachel K.; Yu, Huapeng; Coffey, Robert J.; McCrea, Pierre D.; Gamse, Joshua T.; Reynolds, Albert B.

    2014-01-01

    p120-catenin (p120) modulates adherens junction (AJ) dynamics by controlling the stability of classical cadherins. Among all p120 isoforms, p120-3A and p120-1A are the most prevalent. Both stabilize cadherins, but p120-3A is preferred in epithelia, whereas p120-1A takes precedence in neurons, fibroblasts, and macrophages. During epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, E- to N-cadherin switching coincides with p120-3A to -1A alternative splicing. These isoforms differ by a 101–amino acid “head domain” comprising the p120-1A N-terminus. Although its exact role is unknown, the head domain likely mediates developmental and cancer-associated events linked to p120-1A expression (e.g., motility, invasion, metastasis). Here we identified delta-interacting protein A (DIPA) as the first head domain–specific binding partner and candidate mediator of isoform 1A activity. DIPA colocalizes with AJs in a p120-1A- but not 3A-dependent manner. Moreover, all DIPA family members (Ccdc85a, Ccdc85b/DIPA, and Ccdc85c) interact reciprocally with p120 family members (p120, δ-catenin, p0071, and ARVCF), suggesting significant functional overlap. During zebrafish neural tube development, both knockdown and overexpression of DIPA phenocopy N-cadherin mutations, an effect bearing functional ties to a reported mouse hydrocephalus phenotype associated with Ccdc85c. These studies identify a novel, highly conserved interaction between two protein families that may participate either individually or collectively in N-cadherin–mediated development. PMID:25009281

  17. The conserved domain CR2 of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen leader protein is responsible not only for nuclear matrix association but also for nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, A; Kawaguchi, Y; Kitabayashi, I; Ohki, M; Hirai, K

    2001-01-20

    There is a growing body of evidence for the importance of the nuclear matrix in various nuclear events including gene expression and DNA replication. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen leader protein (EBNA-LP) is a nuclear matrix-associated protein that has been suggested to play an important role in EBV-induced transformation. To define the biological significance of the association of EBNA-LP with the nuclear matrix, we mapped the domain of EBNA-LP responsible for nuclear matrix association and investigated the functions of the EBNA-LP mutant mutagenized by substitution of alanines for the cluster of arginine residues in the mapped region. The results of the present study were as follows. (i) Transiently expressed EBNA-LP in COS-7 or BOSC23 cells was associated with the nuclear matrix, similarly to that in EBV-infected B cells. (ii) Mutational analysis of EBNA-LP revealed that a 10-amino acid segment of EBNA-LP is critical for nuclear matrix association of the protein. Interestingly, the identified region overlapped with the region CR2 of EBNA-LP conserved among a subset of primate gammaherpesviruses. The identified segment is referred to as EBNA-LP NMTS (nuclear matrix targeting signal). (iii) The EBNA-LP mutant with the arginine to alanine substitutions in NMTS was no longer localized not only to the nuclear matrix but also to the nucleus. (iv) The EBNA-LP mutant lacked its ability to coactivate EBNA-2-dependent transactivation. These results indicated that EBNA-LP needs to be localized in the nucleus and/or associated with the nuclear matrix through CR2 to elicit its function such as the coactivation of the EBNA-2-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:11162796

  18. The helicase-binding domain of Escherichia coli DnaG primase interacts with the highly conserved C-terminal region of single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Naue, Natalie; Beerbaum, Monika; Bogutzki, Andrea; Schmieder, Peter; Curth, Ute

    2013-04-01

    During bacterial DNA replication, DnaG primase and the χ subunit of DNA polymerase III compete for binding to single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), thus facilitating the switch between priming and elongation. SSB proteins play an essential role in DNA metabolism by protecting single-stranded DNA and by mediating several important protein-protein interactions. Although an interaction of SSB with primase has been previously reported, it was unclear which domains of the two proteins are involved. This study identifies the C-terminal helicase-binding domain of DnaG primase (DnaG-C) and the highly conserved C-terminal region of SSB as interaction sites. By ConSurf analysis, it can be shown that an array of conserved amino acids on DnaG-C forms a hydrophobic pocket surrounded by basic residues, reminiscent of known SSB-binding sites on other proteins. Using protein-protein cross-linking, site-directed mutagenesis, analytical ultracentrifugation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we demonstrate that these conserved amino acid residues are involved in the interaction with SSB. Even though the C-terminal domain of DnaG primase also participates in the interaction with DnaB helicase, the respective binding sites on the surface of DnaG-C do not overlap, as SSB binds to the N-terminal subdomain, whereas DnaB interacts with the ultimate C-terminus.

  19. A Conserved Interaction between a C-Terminal Motif in Norovirus VPg and the HEAT-1 Domain of eIF4G Is Essential for Translation Initiation.

    PubMed

    Leen, Eoin N; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Correia, Samantha; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Cannac, Fabien; Pastore, Chiara; Xu, Yingqi; Graham, Stephen C; Matthews, Stephen J; Goodfellow, Ian G; Curry, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Translation initiation is a critical early step in the replication cycle of the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans. Norovirus RNA, which has neither a 5´ m7G cap nor an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), adopts an unusual mechanism to initiate protein synthesis that relies on interactions between the VPg protein covalently attached to the 5´-end of the viral RNA and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) in the host cell. For murine norovirus (MNV) we previously showed that VPg binds to the middle fragment of eIF4G (4GM; residues 652-1132). Here we have used pull-down assays, fluorescence anisotropy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to demonstrate that a stretch of ~20 amino acids at the C terminus of MNV VPg mediates direct and specific binding to the HEAT-1 domain within the 4GM fragment of eIF4G. Our analysis further reveals that the MNV C terminus binds to eIF4G HEAT-1 via a motif that is conserved in all known noroviruses. Fine mutagenic mapping suggests that the MNV VPg C terminus may interact with eIF4G in a helical conformation. NMR spectroscopy was used to define the VPg binding site on eIF4G HEAT-1, which was confirmed by mutagenesis and binding assays. We have found that this site is non-overlapping with the binding site for eIF4A on eIF4G HEAT-1 by demonstrating that norovirus VPg can form ternary VPg-eIF4G-eIF4A complexes. The functional significance of the VPg-eIF4G interaction was shown by the ability of fusion proteins containing the C-terminal peptide of MNV VPg to inhibit in vitro translation of norovirus RNA but not cap- or IRES-dependent translation. These observations define important structural details of a functional interaction between norovirus VPg and eIF4G and reveal a binding interface that might be exploited as a target for antiviral therapy.

  20. A Conserved Interaction between a C-Terminal Motif in Norovirus VPg and the HEAT-1 Domain of eIF4G Is Essential for Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Leen, Eoin N.; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Correia, Samantha; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Cannac, Fabien; Pastore, Chiara; Xu, Yingqi; Graham, Stephen C.; Matthews, Stephen J.; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Curry, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Translation initiation is a critical early step in the replication cycle of the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans. Norovirus RNA, which has neither a 5´ m7G cap nor an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), adopts an unusual mechanism to initiate protein synthesis that relies on interactions between the VPg protein covalently attached to the 5´-end of the viral RNA and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) in the host cell. For murine norovirus (MNV) we previously showed that VPg binds to the middle fragment of eIF4G (4GM; residues 652–1132). Here we have used pull-down assays, fluorescence anisotropy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to demonstrate that a stretch of ~20 amino acids at the C terminus of MNV VPg mediates direct and specific binding to the HEAT-1 domain within the 4GM fragment of eIF4G. Our analysis further reveals that the MNV C terminus binds to eIF4G HEAT-1 via a motif that is conserved in all known noroviruses. Fine mutagenic mapping suggests that the MNV VPg C terminus may interact with eIF4G in a helical conformation. NMR spectroscopy was used to define the VPg binding site on eIF4G HEAT-1, which was confirmed by mutagenesis and binding assays. We have found that this site is non-overlapping with the binding site for eIF4A on eIF4G HEAT-1 by demonstrating that norovirus VPg can form ternary VPg-eIF4G-eIF4A complexes. The functional significance of the VPg-eIF4G interaction was shown by the ability of fusion proteins containing the C-terminal peptide of MNV VPg to inhibit in vitro translation of norovirus RNA but not cap- or IRES-dependent translation. These observations define important structural details of a functional interaction between norovirus VPg and eIF4G and reveal a binding interface that might be exploited as a target for antiviral therapy. PMID:26734730

  1. Transcriptional activation is a conserved feature of the early embryonic factor Zelda that requires a cluster of four zinc fingers for DNA binding and a low-complexity activation domain.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Danielle C; Bondra, Eliana R; Harrison, Melissa M

    2015-02-01

    Delayed transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome is a nearly universal phenomenon in metazoans. Immediately following fertilization, development is controlled by maternally deposited products, and it is not until later stages that widespread activation of the zygotic genome occurs. Although the mechanisms driving this genome activation are currently unknown, the transcriptional activator Zelda (ZLD) has been shown to be instrumental in driving this process in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we define functional domains of ZLD required for both DNA binding and transcriptional activation. We show that the C-terminal cluster of four zinc fingers mediates binding to TAGteam DNA elements in the promoters of early expressed genes. All four zinc fingers are required for this activity, and splice isoforms lacking three of the four zinc fingers fail to activate transcription. These truncated splice isoforms dominantly suppress activation by the full-length, embryonically expressed isoform. We map the transcriptional activation domain of ZLD to a central region characterized by low complexity. Despite relatively little sequence conservation within this domain, ZLD orthologs from Drosophila virilis, Anopheles gambiae, and Nasonia vitripennis activate transcription in D. melanogaster cells. Transcriptional activation by these ZLD orthologs suggests that ZLD functions through conserved interactions with a protein cofactor(s). We have identified distinct DNA-binding and activation domains within the critical transcription factor ZLD that controls the initial activation of the zygotic genome.

  2. Conserved Pro-Glu (PE) and Pro-Pro-Glu (PPE) Protein Domains Target LipY Lipases of Pathogenic Mycobacteria to the Cell Surface via the ESX-5 Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Daleke, Maria H.; Cascioferro, Alessandro; de Punder, Karin; Ummels, Roy; Abdallah, Abdallah M.; van der Wel, Nicole; Peters, Peter J.; Luirink, Joen; Manganelli, Riccardo; Bitter, Wilbert

    2011-01-01

    The type VII secretion system ESX-5 is a major pathway for export of PE and PPE proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria. These mycobacteria-specific protein families are characterized by conserved N-terminal domains of 100 and 180 amino acids, which contain the proline-glutamic acid (PE) and proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) motifs after which they are named. Here we investigated secretion of the triacylglycerol lipase LipY, which in fast-growing mycobacteria contains a signal sequence, but in slow-growing species appears to have replaced the signal peptide with a PE or PPE domain. Selected LipY homologues were expressed in wild-type Mycobacterium marinum and its corresponding ESX-5 mutant, and localization of the proteins was investigated by immunoblotting and electron microscopy. Our study shows that Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE-LipY (LipYtub) and M. marinum PPE-LipY (LipYmar) are both secreted to the bacterial surface in an ESX-5-dependent fashion. After transport, the PE/PPE domains are removed by proteolytic cleavage. In contrast, Mycobacterium gilvum LipY, which has a signal sequence, is not transported to the cell surface. Furthermore, we show that LipYtub and LipYmar require their respective PE and PPE domains for ESX-5-dependent secretion. The role of the PE domain in ESX-5 secretion was confirmed in a whole cell lipase assay, in which wild-type bacteria expressing full-length LipYtub, but not LipYtub lacking its PE domain, were shown to hydrolyze extracellular lipids. In conclusion, both PE and PPE domains contain a signal required for secretion of LipY by the ESX-5 system, and these domains are proteolytically removed upon translocation. PMID:21471225

  3. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    SciTech Connect

    Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Zhang, Xuejun; Kinch, Lisa; Leybourne, Matthew; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong

    2009-01-26

    The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0{angstrom} resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric 'lids' formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The six PII-like domains form two trimeric 'lids' that

  4. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  5. Structural Basis for Substrate Selectivity of the E3 Ligase COP1.

    PubMed

    Uljon, Sacha; Xu, Xiang; Durzynska, Izabela; Stein, Sarah; Adelmant, Guillaume; Marto, Jarrod A; Pear, Warren S; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2016-05-01

    COP1 proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate phototropism in plants and target transcription factors for degradation in mammals. The substrate-binding region of COP1 resides within a WD40-repeat domain that also binds to Trib proteins, which are adaptors for C/EBPα degradation. Here we report structures of the human COP1 WD40 domain in isolation, and complexes of the human and Arabidopsis thaliana COP1 WD40 domains with the binding motif of Trib1. The human and Arabidopsis WD40 domains are seven-bladed β propellers with an inserted loop on the bottom face of the first blade. The Trib1 peptide binds in an extended conformation to a highly conserved surface on the top face of the β propeller, indicating a general mode for recognition of peptide motifs by COP1. Together, these studies identify the structural basis and key interactions for motif recognition by COP1, and hint at how Trib1 autoinhibition is overcome to target C/EBPα for degradation. PMID:27041596

  6. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, TTHA0849 from Thermus thermophilus HB8, at 2.4 Å resolution: a putative member of the StAR-related lipid-transfer (START) domain superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Makoto; Shibata, Naoki; Komori, Hirofumi; Ueda, Yasufumi; Iino, Hitoshi; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2005-12-01

    The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, TTHA0849 from T. thermophilus HB8, has been determined at 2.4 Å resolution. The compact α+β structure shows the typical folding of the steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid-transfer (START) domain. The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, TTHA0849 from Thermus thermophilus HB8, has been determined at 2.4 Å resolution as a part of a structural and functional genomics project on T. thermophilus HB8. The main-chain folding shows a compact α+β motif, forming a hydrophobic cavity in the molecule. A structural similarity search reveals that it resembles those steroidogenic acute regulatory proteins that contain the lipid-transfer (START) domain, even though TTHA0849 shows comparatively weak sequence identity to polyketide cyclases. However, the size of the ligand-binding cavity is distinctly smaller than other START domain-containing proteins, suggesting that it catalyses the transfer of smaller ligand molecules.

  7. Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA formyltransferase: role of amino acids conserved in the linker region and in the C-terminal domain on the specific recognition of the initiator tRNA.

    PubMed

    Gite, S; Li, Y; Ramesh, V; RajBhandary, U L

    2000-03-01

    The formylation of initiator methionyl-tRNA by methionyl-tRNA formyltransferase (MTF) is important for the initiation of protein synthesis in eubacteria. We are studying the molecular mechanisms of recognition of the initiator tRNA by Escherichia coli MTF. MTF from eubacteria contains an approximately 100-amino acid C-terminal extension that is not found in the E. coli glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase, which, like MTF, use N(10)-formyltetrahydrofolate as a formyl group donor. This C-terminal extension, which forms a distinct structural domain, is attached to the N-terminal domain through a linker region. Here, we describe the effect of (i) substitution mutations on some nineteen basic, aromatic and other conserved amino acids in the linker region and in the C-terminal domain of MTF and (ii) deletion mutations from the C-terminus on enzyme activity. We show that the positive charge on two of the lysine residues in the linker region leading to the C-terminal domain are important for enzyme activity. Mutation of some of the basic amino acids in the C-terminal domain to alanine has mostly small effects on the kinetic parameters, whereas mutation to glutamic acid has large effects. However, the deletion of 18, 20, or 80 amino acids from the C-terminus has very large effects on enzyme activity. Overall, our results support the notion that the basic amino acid residues in the C-terminal domain provide a positively charged channel that is used for the nonspecific binding of tRNA, whereas some of the amino acids in the linker region play an important role in activity of MTF.

  8. NMR structure determination of the Escherichia coli DnaJ molecular chaperone: secondary structure and backbone fold of the N-terminal region (residues 2-108) containing the highly conserved J domain.

    PubMed Central

    Szyperski, T; Pellecchia, M; Wall, D; Georgopoulos, C; Wüthrich, K

    1994-01-01

    DnaJ from Escherichia coli is a 376-amino acid protein that functions in conjunction with DnaK and GrpE as a chaperone machine. The N-terminal fragment of residues 2-108, DnaJ-(2-108), retains many of the activities of the full-length protein and contains a structural motif, the J domain of residues 2-72, which is highly conserved in a superfamily of proteins. In this paper, NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the secondary structure and the three-dimensional polypeptide backbone fold of DnaJ-(2-108). By using 13C/15N doubly labeled DnaJ-(2-108), nearly complete sequence-specific assignments were obtained for 1H, 15N, 13C alpha, and 13C beta, and about 40% of the peripheral aliphatic carbon resonances were also assigned. Four alpha-helices in polypeptide segments of residues 6-11, 18-31, 41-55, and 61-68 in the J domain were identified by sequential and medium-range nuclear Overhauser effects. For the J domain, the three-dimensional structure was calculated with the program DIANA from an input of 536 nuclear Overhauser effect upper-distance constraints and 52 spin-spin coupling constants. The polypeptide backbone fold is characterized by the formation of an antiparallel bundle of two long helices, residues 18-31 and 41-55, which is stabilized by a hydrophobic core of side chains that are highly conserved in homologous J domain sequences. The Gly/Phe-rich region from residues 77 to 108 is flexibly disordered in solution. Images PMID:7972061

  9. The C-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and mammals: A conserved structure with an essential function

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, L.A.; Wong, J.K.C.; Fitzpatrick, V.D.; Moyle, M.; Ingles, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Using DNA encoding the largest subunit of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II, the authors isolated the homologous hamster RPO21 gene. Nucleotide sequencing of both the hamster and D. melanogaster RPO21 DNAs confirmed that the RPO21 polypeptides of these two species, like the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPO21 polypeptide, contain both an N-terminal region homologous to the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase subunit ..beta..' and a unique polymerase II-specific C-terminal domain. This C-terminal domain, encoded by separate exons in the D. melanogaster and hamster genes, consists of a tandemly repeated heptapeptide sequence. By constructing a series of deletions in DNA encoding the 26 heptapeptide repeats normally present in the S. cerevisiae RPO21 polypeptide, the authors have established that a minimum of between 9 and 11 repeats is necessary for RPO21 function in yeast cells. Replacement of the yeast RPO21 heptapeptide repeats by the longer hamster repetitive domain resulted in viable yeast cells with no detectable mutant phenotype, while a similar replacement of the yeast repeats by the more divergent D. melanogaster repeats was a recessive lethal mutation. The authors suggest that this novel repetitive domain is essential for proper initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II and that it may mediate the functions of TATA boxes, upstream activating sequences, and enhancers.

  10. A conserved glutamate residue in the C-terminal deaminase domain of pentatricopeptide repeat proteins is required for RNA editing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Dang, Kim N; Diaz, Michael F; Mulligan, R Michael

    2015-04-17

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins include an RNA binding domain that provides site specificity. In addition, many PPR proteins include a C-terminal DYW deaminase domain with characteristic zinc binding motifs (CXXC, HXE) and has recently been shown to bind zinc ions. The glutamate residue of the HXE motif is catalytically required in the reaction catalyzed by cytidine deaminase. In this work, we examine the activity of the DYW deaminase domain through truncation or mutagenesis of the HXE motif. OTP84 is required for editing three chloroplast sites, and transgenes expressing OTP84 with C-terminal truncations were capable of editing only one of the three cognate sites at high efficiency. These results suggest that the deaminase domain of OTP84 is required for editing two of the sites, but another deaminase is able to supply the deamination activity for the third site. OTP84 and CREF7 transgenes were mutagenized to replace the glutamate residue of the HXE motif, and transgenic plants expressing OTP84-E824A and CREF7-E554A were unable to efficiently edit the cognate editing sites for these genes. In addition, plants expressing CREF7-E554A exhibited substantially reduced capacity to edit a non-cognate site, rpoA C200. These results indicate that the DYW deaminase domains of PPR proteins are involved in editing their cognate editing sites, and in some cases may participate in editing additional sites in the chloroplast. PMID:25739442

  11. A highly conserved lysine residue on the head domain of type II keratins is essential for the attachment of keratin intermediate filaments to the cornified cell envelope through isopeptide crosslinking by transglutaminases

    PubMed Central

    Candi, Eleonora; Tarcsa, Edit; Digiovanna, John J.; Compton, John G.; Elias, Peter M.; Marekov, Lyuben N.; Steinert, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    We have addressed the question of how keratin intermediate filaments are associated with the cell envelope at the periphery of cornified epidermal cells. Many peptides from human epidermal cell envelopes containing isopeptide crosslinks inserted by transglutaminases in vivo have been characterized. A major subset involves the type II keratin chains keratin 1, 2e, 5, or 6 crosslinked to several protein partners through a lysine residue located in a conserved region of the V1 subdomain of their head domains. This sequence specificity was confirmed in in vitro crosslinking experiments. Previously the causative mutation in a family with diffuse nonepidermolytic palmar-plantar keratoderma was shown to be the loss in one allele of the same lysine residue of the keratin 1 chain. Ultrastructural studies of affected palm epidermis have revealed abnormalities in the organization of keratin filaments subjacent to the cell envelope and in the shape of the cornified cells. Together, these data suggest a mechanism for the coordination of cornified cell structure by permanent covalent attachment of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton to the cell envelope by transglutaminase crosslinking. Furthermore, these studies identify the essential role of a conserved lysine residue on the head domains of type II keratins in the supramolecular organization of keratin filaments in cells. PMID:9482839

  12. The ectodomains but not the transmembrane domains of the fusion proteins of subtypes A and B avian pneumovirus are conserved to a similar extent as those of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Naylor, C J; Britton, P; Cavanagh, D

    1998-06-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (F(B)) gene of five strains of the B subtype of avian pneumovirus (APV; turkey rhinotracheitis virus) has been sequenced. The length of the F(B) protein was 538 amino acids, identical to that of the F protein of subtype A virus, with which it had 74% and 83% overall nucleotide and deduced amino acid identities, respectively. The F(B) and F(A) ectodomains had 90% amino acid identity, very similar to the 91% identity between the ectodomains of the F proteins of subtype A and B human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). As with HRSV, the F2 polypeptide was less conserved (83% identity) than F1 (94%). In contrast to the ectodomain, the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the two APV subtypes were much less conserved (30% and 48% identity, respectively) than those of HRSV (92% and 87%, respectively). Comparisons within all the genera of the Paramyxoviridae (Pneumovirus, Morbillivirus, Paramyxovirus and Rubullavirus) show that low amino acid identity between F protein transmembrane domains is a feature of different species of virus rather than of strain differences. This may indicate that the two subtypes of APV have evolved in different geographical regions and/or different avian species. This is the first report of an F gene sequence from a subtype B APV.

  13. Structure of the unique SEFIR domain from human interleukin 17 receptor A reveals a composite ligand-binding site containing a conserved α-helix for Act1 binding and IL-17 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen; Han, Yue; Li, Xiaoxia; Deng, Junpeng

    2014-05-01

    Crystal structure of the SEFIR domain from human IL-17 receptor A provides new insights into IL-17 signaling. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) cytokines play a crucial role in mediating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A unique intracellular signaling domain termed SEFIR is found within all IL-17 receptors (IL-17Rs) as well as the key adaptor protein Act1. SEFIR-mediated protein–protein interaction is a crucial step in IL-17 cytokine signaling. Here, the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the SEFIR domain of IL-17RA, the most commonly shared receptor for IL-17 cytokine signaling, is reported. The structure includes the complete SEFIR domain and an additional α-helical C-terminal extension, which pack tightly together to form a compact unit. Structural comparison between the SEFIR domains of IL-17RA and IL-17RB reveals substantial differences in protein topology and folding. The uniquely long insertion between strand βC and helix αC in IL-17RA SEFIR is mostly well ordered, displaying a helix (αCC′{sub ins}) and a flexible loop (CC′). The DD′ loop in the IL-17RA SEFIR structure is much shorter; it rotates nearly 90° with respect to the counterpart in the IL-17RB SEFIR structure and shifts about 12 Å to accommodate the αCC′{sub ins} helix without forming any knots. Helix αC was identified as critical for its interaction with Act1 and IL-17-stimulated gene expression. The data suggest that the heterotypic SEFIR–SEFIR association via helix αC is a conserved and signature mechanism specific for IL-17 signaling. The structure also suggests that the downstream motif of IL-17RA SEFIR together with helix αC could provide a composite ligand-binding surface for recruiting Act1 during IL-17 signaling.

  14. Identification and characterization of a cell surface scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein of Sciaenops ocellatus: bacterial interaction and its dependence on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Reng; Sun, Bo-Guang; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Li

    2013-03-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) proteins are secreted or membrane-bound receptors with one or multiple SRCR domains. Members of the SRCR superfamily are known to have diverse functions that include pathogen recognition and immunoregulation. In teleost, although protein sequences with SRCR structure have been identified in some species, very little functional investigation has been carried out. In this study, we identified and characterized a teleost SRCR protein from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. The protein was named S. ocellatus SRCR1 (SoSRCRP1). SoSRCRP1 is 410-residue in length and was predicted to be a transmembrane protein, with the extracellular region containing a collagen triple helix repeat and a SRCR domain. The SRCR domain has six conserved cysteines, of which, C338 and C399, C351 and C409, and C379 and C389 were predicted to form three disulfide bonds. SoSRCRP1 expression was detected mainly in immune-relevant tissues and upregulated by bacterial and viral infection. In head kidney leukocytes, bacterial infection stimulated the expression of SoSRCRP1, and the expressed SoSRCRP1 was localized on cell surface. Recombinant SoSRCRP1 (rSoSRCRP1) corresponding to the SRCR domain was purified from Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. To examine the structure-function relationship of SoSRCRP1, the mutant proteins SoSRCRP1M1, SoSRCRP1M2, SoSRCRP1M3, and SoSRCRP1M4 were created, which bear C351S and C409S, C338S, C379S, and R325A mutations respectively. Compared to rSoSRCRP1, all mutants were significantly reduced in the ability of bacterial interaction, with the highest reduction observed with SoSRCRP1M4. Taken together, these results indicate that SoSRCRP1 is a cell surface-localized SRCR protein that binds bacterial ligands in a manner that depends on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain. PMID:23291106

  15. The catalytic subunit of shiga-like toxin 1 interacts with ribosomal stalk proteins and is inhibited by their conserved C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Andrew J; Poon, Gregory M K; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Srikumar, Tharan; Jeram, Stanley M; Raught, Brian; Gariépy, Jean

    2008-04-25

    Shiga-like toxin 1 (SLT-1) is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein; its A(1) domain blocks protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells by catalyzing the depurination of a single adenine base in 28 S rRNA. The molecular mechanism leading to this site-specific depurination event is thought to involve interactions with eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. Here, we present evidence that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 binds to the ribosomal proteins P0, P1, and P2. These proteins were identified from a HeLa cell lysate by tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequently confirmed to bind to SLT-1 A(1) chain by yeast-two-hybrid and pull-down experiments using candidate full-length proteins. Moreover, the removal of the last 17 amino acids of either protein P1 or P2 abolishes the interaction with the A(1) chain, whereas P0, lacking this common C terminus, still binds to the A(1) domain. In vitro pull-down experiments using fusion protein-tagged C-terminal peptides corresponding to the common 7, 11, and 17 terminal residues of P1 and P2 confirmed that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 as well as the A chain of ricin bind to this shared C-terminal peptide motif. More importantly, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 17 amino acid C terminus of P1 and P2 was shown to inhibit the ribosome-inactivating function of the A(1) chain of SLT-1 in an in vitro transcription and translation-coupled assay. These results suggest a role for the ribosomal stalk in aiding the A(1) chain of SLT-1 and other type II ribosome-inactivating proteins in localizing its catalytic domain near the site of depurination in the 28 S rRNA. PMID:18358491

  16. Characterization of chicken octamer-binding proteins demonstrates that POU domain-containing homeobox transcription factors have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Petryniak, B.; Postema, C.E.; McCormack, W.T.; Thompson, C.B. ); Staudt, L.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The DNA sequence motif ATTTGCAT (octamer) or its inverse complement has been identified as an evolutionarily conserved element in the promoter region of immunoglobulin genes. Two major DNA-binding proteins that bind in a sequence-specific manner to the octamer DNA sequence have been identified in mammalian species--a ubiquitously expressed protein (Oct-1) and a lymphoid-specific protein (Oct-2). During characterization of the promoter region of the chicken immunoglobulin light chain gene, the authors identified two homologous octamer-binding proteins in chicken B cells. when the cloning of the human gene for Oct-2 revealed it to be a member of a distinct family of homeobox genes, they sought to determine if the human Oct-2 cDNA could be used to identify homologous chicken homeobox genes. Using a human Oct-2 homeobox-specific DNA probe, they were able to identify 6-10 homeobox-containing genes in the chicken genome, demonstrating that the Oct-2-related subfamily of homeobox genes exists in avian species. DNA sequence analysis revealed it to be the chicken homologue of the human Oct-1 gene. Together, the data show that the POU-containing subfamily of homeobox genes have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution, apparently as a result of selection for their DNA-binding and transcriptional regulatory properties.

  17. The complex NOD-like receptor repertoire of the coral Acropora digitifera includes novel domain combinations.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mayuko; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Kawashima, Takeshi; Miller, David J; Satoh, Nori

    2013-01-01

    Innate immunity in corals is of special interest not only in the context of self-defense but also in relation to the establishment and collapse of their obligate symbiosis with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. In innate immunity system of vertebrates, approximately 20 tripartite nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor proteins that are defined by the presence of a NAIP, CIIA, HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) domain, a C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, and one of three types of N-terminal effector domain, are known to function as the primary intracellular pattern recognition molecules. Surveying the coral genome revealed not only a larger number of NACHT- and related domain nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4 (NB-ARC)-encoding loci (~500) than in other metazoans but also surprising diversity of domain combinations among the coral NACHT/NB-ARC-containing proteins; N-terminal effector domains included the apoptosis-related domains caspase recruitment domain (CARD), death effector domain (DED), and Death, and C-terminal repeat domains included LRRs, tetratricopeptide repeats, ankyrin repeats, and WD40 repeats. Many of the predicted coral proteins that contain a NACHT/NB-ARC domain also contain a glycosyl transferase group 1 domain, a novel domain combination first found in metazoans. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the NACHT/NB-ARC domain inventories of various metazoan lineages, including corals, are largely products of lineage-specific expansions. Many of the NACHT/NB-ARC loci are organized in pairs or triplets in the Acropora genome, suggesting that the large coral NACHT/NB-ARC repertoire has been generated at least in part by tandem duplication. In addition, shuffling of N-terminal effector domains may have occurred after expansions of specific NACHT/NB-ARC-repeat domain types. These results illustrate the extraordinary complexity of the innate immune repertoire of corals, which may in part reflect adaptive

  18. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for Escherichia coli ytfP, a member of the broadly conserved UPF0131 protein domain family

    SciTech Connect

    Aramini, James M.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Huang, Yuanpeng; Rajan, Paranji K.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    Protein ytfP from Escherichia coli (Swiss-Prot ID: YTFP-ECOLI; NESG target ID: ER111; Wunderlich et al., 2004) is a 113-residue member of the UPF0131 protein family (Pfam ID: PF03674) of unknown function. This domain family is found in organisms from all three kingdoms, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 97% of backbone and 91% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a mixed a/b topology,????????. BMRB deposit with Accession No. 6448. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  19. RpkA, a Highly Conserved GPCR with a Lipid Kinase Domain, Has a Role in Phagocytosis and Anti-Bacterial Defense

    PubMed Central

    Riyahi, Tanja Y.; Frese, Frederike; Steinert, Michael; Omosigho, Napoleon N.; Glöckner, Gernot; Eichinger, Ludwig; Orabi, Benoit; Williams, Robin S. B.; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2011-01-01

    RpkA (Receptor phosphatidylinositol kinase A) is an unusual seven-helix transmembrane protein of Dictyostelium discoideum with a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signature and a C-terminal lipid kinase domain (GPCR-PIPK) predicted as a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. RpkA-homologs are present in all so far sequenced Dictyostelidae as well as in several other lower eukaryotes like the oomycete Phytophthora, and in the Legionella host Acanthamoeba castellani. Here we show by immunofluorescence that RpkA localizes to endosomal membranes and is specifically recruited to phagosomes. RpkA interacts with the phagosomal protein complex V-ATPase as proteins of this complex co-precipitate with RpkA-GFP as well as with the GST-tagged PIPK domain of RpkA. Loss of RpkA leads to a defect in phagocytosis as measured by yeast particle uptake. The uptake of the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila was however unaltered whereas its intra-cellular replication was significantly enhanced in rpkA-. The difference between wild type and rpkA- was even more prominent when L. hackeliae was used. When we investigated the reason for the enhanced susceptibility for L. pneumophila of rpkA- we could not detect a difference in endosomal pH but rpkA- showed depletion of phosphoinositides (PIP and PIP2) when we compared metabolically labeled phosphoinositides from wild type and rpkA-. Furthermore rpkA- exhibited reduced nitrogen starvation tolerance, an indicator for a reduced autophagy rate. Our results indicate that RpkA is a component of the defense system of D. discoideum as well as other lower eukaryotes. PMID:22073313

  20. Atomic-Resolution Structures of the APC/C Subunits Apc4 and the Apc5 N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Nora B.; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Kulkarni, Kiran; Chang, Leifu; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Barford, David

    2015-01-01

    Many essential biological processes are mediated by complex molecular machines comprising multiple subunits. Knowledge on the architecture of individual subunits and their positions within the overall multimeric complex is key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of macromolecular assemblies. The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multisubunit complex that regulates cell cycle progression by ubiquitinating cell cycle proteins for proteolysis by the proteasome. The holo-complex is composed of 15 different proteins that assemble to generate a complex of 20 subunits. Here, we describe the crystal structures of Apc4 and the N-terminal domain of Apc5 (Apc5N). Apc4 comprises a WD40 domain split by a long α-helical domain, whereas Apc5N has an α-helical fold. In a separate study, we had fitted these atomic models to a 3.6-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy map of the APC/C. We describe how, in the context of the APC/C, regions of Apc4 disordered in the crystal assume order through contacts to Apc5, whereas Apc5N shows small conformational changes relative to its crystal structure. We discuss the complementary approaches of high-resolution electron microscopy and protein crystallography to the structure determination of subunits of multimeric complexes. PMID:26343760

  1. Phenotypic consequences of mutations in the conserved motifs of the putative helicase domain of the human Cockayne syndrome group B gene.

    PubMed

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Selzer, Rebecca; Tuo, Jingsheng; Brosh, Robert M; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2002-01-23

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human genetic disorder characterized by several neurological and developmental abnormalities. Two genetic complementation groups, CS-A and CS-B, have been identified. The CSB protein belongs to helicase superfamily 2, and to the SWI/SNF family of proteins. The CSB protein is implicated in transcription-coupled repair (TCR), basal transcription and chromatin remodeling. In addition, CS cells undergo UV-induced apoptosis at much lower doses than normal cells. However, the molecular function of the CSB protein in these biological pathways has remained unclear. Evidence indicates that the integrity of the Walker A and B boxes (motifs I and II) are important for CSB function, but the functional significance of the helicase motifs Ia, III--IV has not been previously examined. In this study, single amino acid changes in highly conserved residues of helicase motifs Ia, III, V, VI and a second putative nucleotide-binding motif (NTB) of the CSB protein were generated by site-directed mutagenesis to analyze the genetic function of the CSB protein in survival, RNA synthesis recovery and apoptosis after UV treatment. The survival analysis of these CS-B mutant cell lines was also performed after treatment with the chemical carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). The lesions induced by UV light, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, are known to be repaired by TCR whereas the lesions induced by 4-NQO are repaired by global genome repair. The results of this study demonstrate that the point mutations in highly conserved residues of helicase motifs Ia, III, V and VI abolished the genetic function of the CSB protein in survival, RNA synthesis recovery and apoptosis after UV treatment. Similarly, the same mutants failed to complement the sensitivity toward 4-NQO. Thus, the integrity of these helicase motifs is important for the biological function of the CSB protein. On the contrary, a point mutation in a C-terminal, second, NTB motif of the CSB protein

  2. Mutating a Conserved Proline Residue within the Trimerization Domain Modifies Na+ Binding to Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters and Associated Conformational Changes*

    PubMed Central

    Hotzy, Jasmin; Schneider, Nicole; Kovermann, Peter; Fahlke, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are crucial for glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian central nervous system. They are not only secondary active glutamate transporters but also function as anion channels, and different EAATs vary considerably in glutamate transport rates and associated anion current amplitudes. A naturally occurring mutation, which was identified in a patient with episodic ataxia type 6 and that predicts the substitution of a highly conserved proline at position 290 by arginine (P290R), was recently shown to reduce glutamate uptake and to increase anion conduction by hEAAT1. We here used voltage clamp fluorometry to define how the homologous P259R mutation modifies the functional properties of hEAAT3. P259R inverts the voltage dependence, changes the sodium dependence, and alters the time dependence of hEAAT3 fluorescence signals. Kinetic analysis of fluorescence signals indicate that P259R decelerates a conformational change associated with sodium binding to the glutamate-free mutant transporters. This alteration in the glutamate uptake cycle accounts for the experimentally observed changes in glutamate transport and anion conduction by P259R hEAAT3. PMID:24214974

  3. Identification of novel host factors via conserved domain search: Cns1 cochaperone is a novel restriction factor of tombusvirus replication in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Nagy, Peter D

    2013-12-01

    A large number of host-encoded proteins affect the replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses by acting as susceptibility factors. Many other cellular proteins are known to function as restriction factors of viral infections. Previous studies with tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) in a yeast model host have revealed the inhibitory function of TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain-containing cyclophilins, which are members of the large family of host prolyl isomerases, in TBSV replication. In this paper, we tested additional TPR-containing yeast proteins in a cell-free TBSV replication assay and identified the Cns1p cochaperone for heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Hsp90 chaperones as a strong inhibitor of TBSV replication. Cns1p interacted with the viral replication proteins and inhibited the assembly of the viral replicase complex and viral RNA synthesis in vitro. Overexpression of Cns1p inhibited TBSV replication in yeast. The use of a temperature-sensitive (TS) mutant of Cns1p in yeast revealed that at a semipermissive temperature, TS Cns1p could not inhibit TBSV replication. Interestingly, Cns1p and the TPR-containing Cpr7p cyclophilin have similar inhibitory functions during TBSV replication, although some of the details of their viral restriction mechanisms are different. Our observations indicate that TPR-containing cellular proteins could act as virus restriction factors. PMID:24027337

  4. Peptide Triazole Inactivators of HIV-1 Utilize a Conserved Two-Cavity Binding Site at the Junction of the Inner and Outer Domains of Env gp120

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Rachna; Rashad, Adel A.; Li, Huiyuan; Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat Kalyana; Duffy, Caitlin; Bailey, Lauren D.; Chaiken, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    We used coordinated mutagenesis, synthetic design, and flexible docking to investigate the structural mechanism of Env gp120 encounter by peptide triazole (PT) inactivators of HIV-1. Prior results demonstrated that the PT class of inhibitors suppresses binding at both CD4 and coreceptor sites on Env and triggers gp120 shedding, leading to cell-independent irreversible virus inactivation. Despite these enticing anti-HIV-1 phenotypes, structural understanding of the PT–gp120 binding mechanism has been incomplete. Here we found that PT engages two inhibitor ring moieties at the junction between the inner and outer domains of the gp120 protein. The results demonstrate how combined occupancy of two gp120 cavities can coordinately suppress both receptor and coreceptor binding and conformationally entrap the protein in a destabilized state. The two-cavity model has common features with small molecule gp120 inhibitor binding sites and provides a guide for further design of peptidomimetic HIV-1 inactivators based on the PT pharmacophore. PMID:25860784

  5. Staufen1 dimerizes through a conserved motif and a degenerate dsRNA-binding domain to promote mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Michael L; Gong, Chenguang; Kielkopf, Clara L; Maquat, Lynne E

    2013-04-01

    Staufen1 (STAU1)-mediated mRNA decay (SMD) degrades mammalian-cell mRNAs that bind the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein STAU1 in their 3' untranslated region. We report a new motif, which typifies STAU homologs from all vertebrate classes, that is responsible for human STAU1 (hSTAU1) homodimerization. Our crystal structure and mutagenesis analyses reveal that this motif, which we named the Staufen-swapping motif (SSM), and the dsRNA-binding domain 5 ('RBD'5) mediate protein dimerization: the two SSM α-helices of one molecule interact primarily through a hydrophobic patch with the two 'RBD'5 α-helices of a second molecule. 'RBD'5 adopts the canonical α-β-β-β-α fold of a functional RBD, but it lacks residues and features required to bind duplex RNA. In cells, SSM-mediated hSTAU1 dimerization increases the efficiency of SMD by augmenting hSTAU1 binding to the ATP-dependent RNA helicase hUPF1. Dimerization regulates keratinocyte-mediated wound healing and many other cellular processes.

  6. Staufen1 dimerizes through a conserved motif and a degenerate dsRNA-binding domain to promote mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Michael L; Gong, Chenguang; Kielkopf, Clara L; Maquat, Lynne E

    2013-04-01

    Staufen1 (STAU1)-mediated mRNA decay (SMD) degrades mammalian-cell mRNAs that bind the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein STAU1 in their 3' untranslated region. We report a new motif, which typifies STAU homologs from all vertebrate classes, that is responsible for human STAU1 (hSTAU1) homodimerization. Our crystal structure and mutagenesis analyses reveal that this motif, which we named the Staufen-swapping motif (SSM), and the dsRNA-binding domain 5 ('RBD'5) mediate protein dimerization: the two SSM α-helices of one molecule interact primarily through a hydrophobic patch with the two 'RBD'5 α-helices of a second molecule. 'RBD'5 adopts the canonical α-β-β-β-α fold of a functional RBD, but it lacks residues and features required to bind duplex RNA. In cells, SSM-mediated hSTAU1 dimerization increases the efficiency of SMD by augmenting hSTAU1 binding to the ATP-dependent RNA helicase hUPF1. Dimerization regulates keratinocyte-mediated wound healing and many other cellular processes. PMID:23524536

  7. A conserved carboxy-terminal domain in the major tegument structural protein VP22 facilitates virion packaging of a chimeric protein during productive herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Elisabeth F.M.; Blaho, John A.

    2009-05-10

    Recombinant virus HSV-1(RF177) was previously generated to examine tegument protein VP22 function by inserting the GFP gene into the gene encoding VP22. During a detailed analysis of this virus, we discovered that RF177 produces a novel fusion protein between the last 15 amino acids of VP22 and GFP, termed GCT-VP22. Thus, the VP22 carboxy-terminal specific antibody 22-3 and two anti-GFP antibodies reacted with an approximately 28 kDa protein from RF177-infected Vero cells. GCT-VP22 was detected at 1 and 3 hpi. Examination of purified virions indicated that GCT-VP22 was incorporated into RF177 virus particles. These observations imply that at least a portion of the information required for virion targeting is located in this domain of VP22. Indirect immunofluorescence analyses showed that GCT-VP22 also localized to areas of marginalized chromatin during RF177 infection. These results indicate that the last fifteen amino acids of VP22 participate in virion targeting during HSV-1 infection.

  8. A second conserved GAF domain cysteine is required for the blue/green photoreversibility of cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Njuguna, Stephanie Lane; Roberts, Laurel; Castillo, Elenor; Parson, Victoria L.; Dwojak, Sunshine; Lagarias, J. Clark; Spiller, Susan C.

    2008-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely occurring red/far-red photoreceptors that utilize a linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore covalently bound within a knotted PAS-GAF domain pair. Cyanobacteria also contain more distant relatives of phytochromes that lack this knot, such as the phytochrome-related cyanobacteriochromes implicated to function as blue/green switchable photoreceptors. In this study, we characterize the cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Full-length Tlr0924 exhibits blue/green photoconversion across a broad range of temperatures, including physiologically relevant temperatures for this organism. Spectroscopic characterization of Tlr0924 demonstrates that its green-absorbing state is in equilibrium with a labile, spectrally distinct blue-absorbing species. The photochemically generated blue-absorbing state is in equilibrium with another species absorbing at longer wavelengths, giving a total of 4 states. Cys499 is essential for this behavior, because mutagenesis of this residue results in red-absorbing mutant biliproteins. Characterization of the C499D mutant protein by absorbance and CD spectroscopy supports the conclusion that its bilin chromophore adopts a similar conformation to the red-light-absorbing Pr form of phytochrome. We propose a model photocycle in which Z/E photoisomerization of the 15/16 bond modulates formation of a reversible thioether linkage between Cys499 and C10 of the chromophore, providing the basis for the blue/green switching of cyanobacteriochromes. PMID:18549244

  9. The Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene involved in gastrulation and muscle degeneration encodes gelsolin-like and leucine-rich repeat domains and is conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, H D; Schimansky, T; Claudianos, C; Ozsarac, N; Kasprzak, A B; Cotsell, J N; Young, I G; de Couet, H G; Miklos, G L

    1993-01-01

    Mutations at the flightless-I locus (fliI) of Drosophila melanogaster cause flightlessness or, when severe, incomplete cellularization during early embryogenesis, with subsequent abnormalities in mesoderm invagination and in gastrulation. After chromosome walking, deficiency mapping, and transgenic analysis, we have isolated and characterized flightless-I cDNAs, enabling prediction of the complete amino acid sequence of the 1256-residue protein. Data base searches revealed a homologous gene in Caenorhabditis elegans, and we have isolated and characterized corresponding cDNAs. By using the polymerase chain reaction with nested sets of degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster proteins, we have cloned a homologous human cDNA. The predicted C. elegans and human proteins are, respectively, 49% and 58% identical to the D. melanogaster protein. The predicted proteins have significant sequence similarity to the actin-binding protein gelsolin and related proteins and, in addition, have an N-terminal domain consisting of a repetitive amphipathic leucine-rich motif. This repeat is found in D. melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and mammalian proteins known to be involved in cell adhesion and in binding to other proteins. The structure of the maternally expressed flightless-I protein suggests that it may play a key role in embryonic cellularization by interacting with both the cytoskeleton and other cellular components. The presence of a highly conserved homologue in nematodes, flies, and humans is indicative of a fundamental role for this protein in many metazoans. PMID:8248259

  10. Unusual features of fibrillarin cDNA and gene structure in Euglena gracilis: evolutionary conservation of core proteins and structural predictions for methylation-guide box C/D snoRNPs throughout the domain Eucarya.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony G; Watanabe, Yoh-ichi; Charette, J Michael; Gray, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Box C/D ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles mediate O2'-methylation of rRNA and other cellular RNA species. In higher eukaryotic taxa, these RNPs are more complex than their archaeal counterparts, containing four core protein components (Snu13p, Nop56p, Nop58p and fibrillarin) compared with three in Archaea. This increase in complexity raises questions about the evolutionary emergence of the eukaryote-specific proteins and structural conservation in these RNPs throughout the eukaryotic domain. In protists, the primarily unicellular organisms comprising the bulk of eukaryotic diversity, the protein composition of box C/D RNPs has not yet been extensively explored. This study describes the complete gene, cDNA and protein sequences of the fibrillarin homolog from the protozoon Euglena gracilis, the first such information to be obtained for a nucleolus-localized protein in this organism. The E.gracilis fibrillarin gene contains a mixture of intron types exhibiting markedly different sizes. In contrast to most other E.gracilis mRNAs characterized to date, the fibrillarin mRNA lacks a spliced leader (SL) sequence. The predicted fibrillarin protein sequence itself is unusual in that it contains a glycine-lysine (GK)-rich domain at its N-terminus rather than the glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) domain found in most other eukaryotic fibrillarins. In an evolutionarily diverse collection of protists that includes E.gracilis, we have also identified putative homologs of the other core protein components of box C/D RNPs, thereby providing evidence that the protein composition seen in the higher eukaryotic complexes was established very early in eukaryotic cell evolution.

  11. A unique feature of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor protein is partially responsible for lipopolysaccharide insensitivity in zebrafish with a highly conserved function of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhui; Li, Mengzhen; Fan, Shan; Lin, Yiqun; Lin, Bin; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Chenxu; Chen, Shangwu; Li, Yingqiu; Xu, Anlong

    2010-09-15

    MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) are required for the TLR4 response to LPS stimulation in mammals, but the functions of the two adaptors and their involvement in zebrafish insensitivity to LPS remains unknown. We present a functional analysis of zebrafish Myd88 and Tirap and suggest that Myd88 is more important than Tirap for the activation of Tlr-mediated NF-kappaB, which may be a novel mechanism of Myd88-dependent TLR signaling in teleosts. Zebrafish Tirap lacks the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding motif required for human TIRAP location and has leucine at position 233 rather than the conserved proline of human TIRAP, as well as 105 additional aa at the N terminus. Overexpression of zebrafish Tirap in HEK293T cells did not activate NF-kappaB and IFN-beta, but slightly activated NF-kappaB in carp leukocyte cells. Zebrafish Myd88 alone strongly induced the activation of NF-kappaB and IFN-beta both in HEK293T and carp leukocyte cells. The function of Myd88 was dependent on its cellular location and the proline in the Toll/IL-1R domain. Although zebrafish Tirap was distributed throughout the cell rather than localized to the cytoplasmic membrane, its impaired ability to activate downstream Tlr molecules was unlikely to be related to its location because chimera TIRAP with a human TIRAP N terminus and membrane-binding domain also did not activate NF-kappaB. However, the mutation of leucine to proline increased the ability of Tirap to activate NF-kappaB. We suggest that the zebrafish Tirap needs a longer N terminus to perform its function and could be partially responsible for the resistance to LPS in zebrafish.

  12. The molecular basis for species-specific activation of human TRPA1 protein by protons involves poorly conserved residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    de la Roche, Jeanne; Eberhardt, Mirjam J; Klinger, Alexandra B; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Wegner, Florian; Koppert, Wolfgang; Reeh, Peter W; Lampert, Angelika; Fischer, Michael J M; Leffler, Andreas

    2013-07-12

    The surveillance of acid-base homeostasis is concerted by diverse mechanisms, including an activation of sensory afferents. Proton-evoked activation of rodent sensory neurons is mainly mediated by the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels. In this study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidosis activates and sensitizes the human irritant receptor TRPA1 (hTRPA1). Proton-evoked membrane currents and calcium influx through hTRPA1 occurred at physiological acidic pH values, were concentration-dependent, and were blocked by the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC030031. Both rodent and rhesus monkey TRPA1 failed to respond to extracellular acidosis, and protons even inhibited rodent TRPA1. Accordingly, mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking TRPV1 only responded to protons when hTRPA1 was expressed heterologously. This species-specific activation of hTRPA1 by protons was reversed in both mouse and rhesus monkey TRPA1 by exchange of distinct residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Furthermore, protons seem to interact with an extracellular interaction site to gate TRPA1 and not via a modification of intracellular N-terminal cysteines known as important interaction sites for electrophilic TRPA1 agonists. Our data suggest that hTRPA1 acts as a sensor for extracellular acidosis in human sensory neurons and should thus be taken into account as a yet unrecognized transduction molecule for proton-evoked pain and inflammation. The species specificity of this property is unique among known endogenous TRPA1 agonists, possibly indicating that evolutionary pressure enforced TRPA1 to inherit the role as an acid sensor in human sensory neurons.

  13. The Molecular Basis for Species-specific Activation of Human TRPA1 Protein by Protons Involves Poorly Conserved Residues within Transmembrane Domains 5 and 6*

    PubMed Central

    de la Roche, Jeanne; Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Wegner, Florian; Koppert, Wolfgang; Reeh, Peter W.; Lampert, Angelika; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Leffler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of acid-base homeostasis is concerted by diverse mechanisms, including an activation of sensory afferents. Proton-evoked activation of rodent sensory neurons is mainly mediated by the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels. In this study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidosis activates and sensitizes the human irritant receptor TRPA1 (hTRPA1). Proton-evoked membrane currents and calcium influx through hTRPA1 occurred at physiological acidic pH values, were concentration-dependent, and were blocked by the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC030031. Both rodent and rhesus monkey TRPA1 failed to respond to extracellular acidosis, and protons even inhibited rodent TRPA1. Accordingly, mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking TRPV1 only responded to protons when hTRPA1 was expressed heterologously. This species-specific activation of hTRPA1 by protons was reversed in both mouse and rhesus monkey TRPA1 by exchange of distinct residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Furthermore, protons seem to interact with an extracellular interaction site to gate TRPA1 and not via a modification of intracellular N-terminal cysteines known as important interaction sites for electrophilic TRPA1 agonists. Our data suggest that hTRPA1 acts as a sensor for extracellular acidosis in human sensory neurons and should thus be taken into account as a yet unrecognized transduction molecule for proton-evoked pain and inflammation. The species specificity of this property is unique among known endogenous TRPA1 agonists, possibly indicating that evolutionary pressure enforced TRPA1 to inherit the role as an acid sensor in human sensory neurons. PMID:23709225

  14. Wdr5, a WD-40 protein, regulates osteoblast differentiation during embryonic bone development.

    PubMed

    Gori, Francesca; Friedman, Lauren G; Demay, Marie B

    2006-07-15

    Wdr5 accelerates osteoblast and chondrocyte differentiation in vitro, and is developmentally expressed in osteoblasts as well as in proliferating and hypertrophic chondrocytes. To investigate the role of Wdr5 during endochondral bone development, transgenic mice overexpressing Wdr5 under the control of the 2.3-kb fragment of the mouse alpha(1) I collagen promoter were generated. The transgene was specifically expressed in the osteoblasts of transgene positive mice and was absent in the growth plate. Histological analyses at embryonic day 14.5 demonstrated that the humeri of transgene positive embryos were longer than those isolated from wild-type littermates largely due to an expansion of the hypertrophic chondrocyte layer. Acceleration of osteoblast differentiation was observed with greater and more extensive expression of type I collagen and more extensive mineral deposition in the bone collar of transgene positive embryos. Acceleration of vascular invasion was also observed in transgene positive mice. Postnatal analyses of transgenic mice confirmed persistent acceleration of osteoblast differentiation. Targeted expression of Wdr5 to osteoblasts resulted in earlier activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in the bone collar as well as in primary calvarial osteoblast cultures. In addition, overexpression of Wdr5 increased the expression of OPG, a target of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Overall, our findings suggest that Wdr5 accelerates osteoblast differentiation in association with activation of the canonical Wnt pathway.

  15. Experiential Learning Laboratories in Business Schools: The WD-40® for Curriculum Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boroff, Karen E.; Riley, Elven

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a case analysis of how a business school brought about curriculum innovation. The school used something borrowed, specifically experiential learning laboratories, and something new to attain measureable curriculum change, with only modest investments. The authors urge that the nimbleness of a medium-size school committed to…

  16. Characterization and developmental expression of the amphioxus homolog of Notch (AmphiNotch): evolutionary conservation of multiple expression domains in amphioxus and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Holland, L Z; Rached, L A; Tamme, R; Holland, N D; Kortschak, D; Inoko, H; Shiina, T; Burgtorf, C; Lardelli, M

    2001-04-15

    Notch encodes a transmembrane protein that functions in intercellular signaling. Although there is one Notch gene in Drosophila, vertebrates have three or more with overlapping patterns of embryonic expression. We cloned the entire 7575-bp coding region of an amphioxus Notch gene (AmphiNotch), encoding 2524 amino acids, and obtained the exon/intron organization from a genomic cosmid clone. Southern blot and PCR data indicate that AmphiNotch is the only Notch gene in amphioxus. AmphiNotch, like Drosophila Notch and vertebrate Notch1 and Notch2, has 36 EGF repeats, 3 Notch/lin-12 repeats, a transmembrane region, and 6 ankyrin repeats. Phylogenetic analysis places it at the base of all the vertebrate genes, suggesting it is similar to the ancestral gene from which the vertebrate Notch family genes evolved. AmphiNotch is expressed in all three embryonic germ layers in spatiotemporal patterns strikingly similar to those of all the vertebrate homologs combined. In the developing nerve cord, AmphiNotch is first expressed in the posteriormost part of the neural plate, then it becomes more broadly expressed and later is localized dorsally in the anteriormost part of the nerve cord corresponding to the diencephalon. In late embryos and larvae, AmphiNotch is also expressed in parts of the pharyngeal endoderm, in the anterior gut diverticulum, and, like AmphiPax2/5/8, in the rudiment of Hatschek's kidney. A comparison with Notch1 and Pax5 and Pax8 expression in the embryonic mouse kidney helps support homology of the amphioxus and vertebrate kidneys. AmphiNotch is also an early marker for presumptive mesoderm, transcripts first being detectable at the gastrula stage in a ring of mesendoderm just inside the blastopore and subsequently in the posterior mesoderm, notochord, and somites. As in sea urchins and vertebrates, these domains of AmphiNotch expression overlap with those of several Wnt genes and brachyury. These relationships suggest that amphioxus shares with other

  17. Amino acid substitutions of conserved residues in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the [alpha]I(X) chain of type X collagen occur in two unrelated families with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, G.A.; Rash, B.; Sweetman, W.A.; Thomas, J.T.; Grant, M.E.; Boot-Handford, R.P. ); Super, M. ); Evans, G. )

    1994-02-01

    Type X collagen is a homotrimeric, short-chain, nonfibrillar extracellular-matrix component that is specifically and transiently synthesized by hypertrophic chondrocytes at the site of endochondral ossification. The precise function of type X collagen is not known, but its specific pattern of expression suggests that mutations within the encoding gene (COL10A1) that alter the structure or synthesis of the protein may cause heritable forms of chondrodysplasia. The authors used the PCR and the SSCP techniques to analyze the coding and upstream promoter regions of the COL10A1 gene in a number of individuals with forms of chondrodysplasia. Using this approach, they identified two individuals with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid (MCDS) with SSCP changes in the region of the gene encoding the carboxyl-terminal domain. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the individuals were heterozygous for two unique single-base-pair transitions that led to the substitution of the highly conserved amino acid residue tyrosine at position 598 by aspartic acid in one person and of leucine at position 614 by proline in the other. The substitution at residue 598 segregated with the phenotype in a family of eight (five affected and three unaffected) related persons. The substitutions at residue 614 occurred in a sporadically affected individual but not in her unaffected mother and brother. Additional members of this family were not available for further study. These results suggest that certain amino acid substitutions within the carboxyl-terminal domain of the chains of the type X collagen molecule cause MCDS. These amino acid substitutions are likely to alter either chain recognition or assembly of the type X collagen molecule, thereby depleting the amount of normal type X collagen deposited in the extracellular matrix, with consequent aberrations in bone growth and development. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Domain Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  19. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed.

  20. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:27367684

  1. Characterization of Ambra1 in asexual cycle of a non-vertebrate chordate, the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri, and phylogenetic analysis of the protein group in Bilateria.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Fabio; Skobo, Tatjana; Benato, Francesca; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Carnevali, Oliana; Manni, Lucia; Dalla Valle, Luisa

    2016-02-01

    Ambra1 is a positive regulator of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradative process involved both in physiological and pathological conditions. Nowadays, Ambra1 has been characterized only in mammals and zebrafish. Through bioinformatics searches and targeted cloning, we report the identification of the complete Ambra1 transcript in a non-vertebrate chordate, the tunicate Botryllus schlosseri. Tunicata is the sister group of Vertebrata and the only chordate group possessing species that reproduce also by blastogenesis (asexual reproduction). B. schlosseri Ambra1 deduced amino acid sequence is shorter than vertebrate homologues but still contains the typical WD40 domain. qPCR analyses revealed that the level of B. schlosseri Ambra1 transcription is temporally regulated along the colonial blastogenetic cycle. By means of similarity searches we identified Wdr5 and Katnb1 as proteins evolutionarily associated to Ambra1. Phylogenetic analyses on Bilateria indicate that: (i) Wdr5 is the most related to Ambra1, so that they may derive from an ancestral gene, (ii) Ambra1 forms a group of ancient genes evolved before the radiation of the taxon, (iii) these orthologous Ambra1 share the two conserved WD40/YVTN repeat-like-containing domains, and (iv) they are characterized by ancient duplications of WD40 repeats within the N-terminal domain. PMID:26611831

  2. Characterization of Ambra1 in asexual cycle of a non-vertebrate chordate, the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri, and phylogenetic analysis of the protein group in Bilateria.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Fabio; Skobo, Tatjana; Benato, Francesca; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Carnevali, Oliana; Manni, Lucia; Dalla Valle, Luisa

    2016-02-01

    Ambra1 is a positive regulator of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradative process involved both in physiological and pathological conditions. Nowadays, Ambra1 has been characterized only in mammals and zebrafish. Through bioinformatics searches and targeted cloning, we report the identification of the complete Ambra1 transcript in a non-vertebrate chordate, the tunicate Botryllus schlosseri. Tunicata is the sister group of Vertebrata and the only chordate group possessing species that reproduce also by blastogenesis (asexual reproduction). B. schlosseri Ambra1 deduced amino acid sequence is shorter than vertebrate homologues but still contains the typical WD40 domain. qPCR analyses revealed that the level of B. schlosseri Ambra1 transcription is temporally regulated along the colonial blastogenetic cycle. By means of similarity searches we identified Wdr5 and Katnb1 as proteins evolutionarily associated to Ambra1. Phylogenetic analyses on Bilateria indicate that: (i) Wdr5 is the most related to Ambra1, so that they may derive from an ancestral gene, (ii) Ambra1 forms a group of ancient genes evolved before the radiation of the taxon, (iii) these orthologous Ambra1 share the two conserved WD40/YVTN repeat-like-containing domains, and (iv) they are characterized by ancient duplications of WD40 repeats within the N-terminal domain.

  3. Conservative management.

    PubMed

    Kruis, W; Leifeld, L; Pfützer, R

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of diverticulitis comprises at least two options: conservative or surgical management. There is a recent trend to limit surgical treatment of acute diverticulitis and to favor conservative management. This review addresses general aspects of conservative patient care with special focus on the treatment of patients with a first attack of diverticulitis. The presentation does not include a discussion of specific drugs which is given in other sections of this issue.

  4. STAS Domain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alok K.; Rigby, Alan C.; Alper, Seth L.

    2011-01-01

    Pendrin shares with nearly all SLC26/SulP anion transporters a carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic segment organized around a Sulfate Transporter and Anti-Sigma factor antagonist (STAS) domain. STAS domains of divergent amino acid sequence exhibit a conserved fold of 4 β strands interspersed among 5 α helices. The first STAS domain proteins studied were single-domain anti-sigma factor antagonists (anti-anti-σ). These anti-anti-σ indirectly stimulate bacterial RNA polymerase by inactivating inhibitory anti-σ kinases, liberating σ factors to direct specific transcription of target genes or operons. Some STAS domains are nucleotide-binding phosphoproteins or nucleotidases. Others are interaction/transduction modules within multidomain sensors of light, oxygen and other gasotransmitters, cyclic nucleotides, inositol phosphates, and G proteins. Additional multidomain STAS protein sequences suggest functions in sensing, metabolism, or transport of nutrients such as sugars, amino acids, lipids, anions, vitamins, or hydrocarbons. Still other multidomain STAS polypeptides include histidine and serine/threonine kinase domains and ligand-activated transcription factor domains. SulP/SLC26 STAS domains and adjacent sequences interact with other transporters, cytoskeletal scaffolds, and with enzymes metabolizing transported anion substrates, forming putative metabolons. STAS domains are central to membrane targeting of many SulP/SLC26 anion transporters, and STAS domain mutations are associated with at least three human recessive diseases. This review summarizes STAS domain structure and function. PMID:22116355

  5. The Conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 Stress Response Pathway Regulates Synaptic Function in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Staab, Trisha A.; Griffen, Trevor C.; Corcoran, Connor; Evgrafov, Oleg; Knowles, James A.; Sieburth, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The Nrf family of transcription factors plays a critical role in mediating adaptive responses to cellular stress and defends against neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Here, we report a novel role for the Caenorhabditis elegans Nrf homolog SKN-1 in regulating synaptic transmission at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Activation of SKN-1, either by acute pharmacological treatment with the mitochondrial toxin sodium arsenite or by mutations that cause constitutive SKN-1 activation, results in defects in neuromuscular function. Additionally, elimination of the conserved WD40 repeat protein WDR-23, a principal negative regulator of SKN-1, results in impaired locomotion and synaptic vesicle and neuropeptide release from cholinergic motor axons. Mutations that abolish skn-1 activity restore normal neuromuscular function to wdr-23 mutants and animals treated with toxin. We show that negative regulation of SKN-1 by WDR-23 in the intestine, but not at neuromuscular junctions, is necessary and sufficient for proper neuromuscular function. WDR-23 isoforms differentially localize to the outer membranes of mitochondria and to nuclei, and the effects of WDR-23 on neuromuscular function are dependent on its interaction with cullin E3 ubiquitin ligase. Finally, whole-transcriptome RNA sequencing of wdr-23 mutants reveals an increase in the expression of known SKN-1/Nrf2-regulated stress-response genes, as well as neurotransmission genes not previously implicated in SKN-1/Nrf2 responses. Together, our results indicate that SKN-1/Nrf2 activation may be a mechanism through which cellular stress, detected in one tissue, affects cellular function of a distal tissue through endocrine signaling. These results provide insight into how SKN-1/Nrf2 might protect the nervous system from damage in response to oxidative stress. PMID:23555279

  6. Conservation Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students teach about the importance of recycling and conservation by presenting demonstrations. Includes demonstrations on water, plastic, and other recycling products such as steel. (YDS)

  7. Value basis for conservation policy

    SciTech Connect

    Leiss, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a case study in attempting to apply a particular value (caring) to the domain of social policy, specifically resource conservation policy. The argument is that our consumer society erodes the social basis for the development by individuals of a sense of well-being and personal identity, and that a conservation ethic based on the concept of caring could provide a foundation in practical morality and public policy for a viable sense of well-being. Conservation, then, goes beyond eliminating wasteful consumption to encompass a public commitment that can further economic and social goals. 11 references.

  8. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  9. The conserved H1 domain of the type II keratin 1 chain plays an essential role in the alignment of nearest neighbor molecules in mouse and human keratin 1/keratin 10 intermediate filaments at the two- to four-molecule level of structure.

    PubMed

    Steinert, P M; Parry, D A

    1993-02-01

    A number of fundamental questions pertaining to the registration and packing of the constituent coiled-coil molecules in keratin intermediate filaments, and to the regions of the sequences that are responsible for these levels of organization, remain to be elucidated. In this study, small assembly-competent oligomers of mouse and human keratin 1/keratin 10 keratin filaments were cross-linked by the formation of disulfide bonds catalyzed by the copper-phenanthroline reaction. By isolation and characterization of cross-linked peptides, it has been possible to establish two major modes of molecule alignment: an antiparallel arrangement of half-staggered molecules with their 2B segments overlapping and an antiparallel arrangement of molecules in close axial registration. These data confirm earlier models based on theoretical considerations (Crewther, W. G., Dowling, L. M., Steinert, P. M., and Parry, D. A. D. (1983) Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 5, 267-274). Interestingly, these models place the conserved H1 and H2 end domain segments, which flank the ends of the rod domains of the type II keratin 1 chain, in alignment with either the ends of the rod domains and/or with the L2 segment near the center of the rod domains, of the nearest neighbor molecules. Competition experiments with synthetic peptides suggest that the conserved H1 (and possibly H2) subdomain sequences unique to type II keratin chains play pivotal roles in the registration of neighboring molecules in keratin filaments. The data thus afford a molecular explanation for why keratin filaments require a type II chain for assembly in vivo and in vitro. PMID:7679103

  10. Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Amy A.

    This selection of class activities involves a sequence of 10 class sessions. The goal of the collection is to aid students in learning the concepts of energy conservation and to put this knowledge into practice. Attention is also given to the development of alternate energy sources. Each lesson includes an activity title, motivational hints,…

  11. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  12. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  13. Colorful Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Some people only think about conservation on Earth Day. Being in the "art business" however, this author is always conscious of the many products she thinks get wasted when they could be reused, recycled, and restored--especially in a school building and art room. In this article, she describes an art lesson that allows students to paint…

  14. Heron conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kushlan, J.A.; Hafner, H.

    2000-01-01

    Herons are large, popular and, in many cases, spectacular birds found in wetlands world-wide, both tropical and temperate, natural and man-made. Some populations are very small and localized, some have decreased, some have expanded their ranges, and a few are pests of human activities. In the fifteen years since the publication of the latest monographic treatment of the family, The Herons Handbook, there has been a tremendous increase in our knowledge of heron status and conservation requirements, set against a backdrop of increasing concern about the future of the world?s wetland habitats. This book provides a comprehensive update following two distinct threads. The status and conservation needs of herons are first presented on a regional basis, in a series of chapters set at a continental or subcontinental scale. Over 200 biologists and heron conservationists have contributed to the data summarized here, and the very latest census and survey results provide the most up-to-date and detailed picture of heron populations currently available. Chapters discussing several critical issues in heron conservation follow, tending to focus on the international nature of the problems.

  15. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Herbert L.; Das, Debanu; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2_DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfito­bacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23_SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63_THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2_DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63_THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23_SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23_SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure of Q9HJ63_THEAC is atypical for a treble-cleft zinc finger in that three Cys side chains and an Asp side chain are within coordination distance of the zinc. PMID:20944230

  16. Activation function 2 (AF-2) of retinoic acid receptor and 9-cis retinoic acid receptor: presence of a conserved autonomous constitutive activating domain and influence of the nature of the response element on AF-2 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, B; Saunders, M; Gaudon, C; Roy, B; Losson, R; Chambon, P

    1994-01-01

    A motif essential for the transcriptional activation function 2 (AF-2) present in the E region of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha and 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) alpha has been characterized as an amphipathic alpha-helix whose main features are conserved between transcriptionally active members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This conserved motif, which can activate autonomously in the absence of ligand in animal and yeast cells, can be swapped between nuclear receptors without affecting the ligand dependency for activation of transcription, thus indicating that a ligand-dependent conformational change is necessary to reveal the AF-2 activation potential within the E region of the nuclear receptor. Interestingly, we show that the precise nature of the direct repeat response element to which RAR/RXR heterodimers are bound can affect the activity of the AF-2s of the heterodimeric partners, as well as the relative efficiency with which all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acids activate the RAR partner. Images PMID:7957103

  17. Energy Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, P.

    1995-06-01

    There are two fundamental reasons or motivations for energy conservation: (1) economics; and (2) consideration of energy - its sources and availability. Economics speaks for itself and needs little explanation: a project is undertaken, the cost is recovered in a given period of time (we hope) and our company realizes cost savings thereafter. We study and propose a project; we estimate the payback. If approved, we implement the project. Then, we eagerly watch for its effectiveness - for the proposed payback. The second consideration in regard to energy conservation might - in the foreseeable future - become by far the most important - that of availability. Very knowledgeable persons have stated that this - in reality - is the most serious problem facing our nation today. Readily available, reasonably priced energy has given to the US the high form of living experienced today. An interruption in this flow could catapult our nation in an awesome catastrophe. The energy shortage of the late 70`s might be a forerunner of such an experience.

  18. Conservative Remapper

    2006-03-31

    Conservative Remapper (CORE) is a C++ language software library for remapping cell masses and cell-averaged densities on unstructured two dimensional grids, maintaining conservation of total mass in the process. CORE contains implementation of two remapping algorithms: a new, efficient "swept region" algorithm, and a more traditional algorithm basedon the computation of cell intersections. Grids may be Cartesian or cylindrical, and cells may have three or more vertices, with no upper limit. CORE can run inmore » serial and in parallel, but in order to achieve wide applicability, CORE used no particular parallel communication library. Instead it achieves parallel communication through strategically placed, user defined callbacks. Users can also provide callbacks to redefine different parts or subcomponents of the remapping process. CORE allows the use of different data types, e.g. single-, double-, and quadruple- precision floating-point numbers, through the use of C++ templates. Using CORE is simple, and requires no configuration scripts or makefiles.« less

  19. Functional studies of an evolutionarily conserved, cytochrome b5 domain protein reveal a specific role in axonemal organisation and the general phenomenon of post-division axonemal growth in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Farr, Helen; Gull, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are highly conserved structures composed of a canonical 9+2 microtubule axoneme. Several recent proteomic studies of cilia and flagella have been published, including a proteome of the flagellum of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Comparing proteomes reveals many novel proteins that appear to be widely conserved in evolution. Amongst these, we found a previously uncharacterised protein which localised to the axoneme in T. brucei, and therefore named it Trypanosome Axonemal protein (TAX)-2. Ablation of the protein using RNA interference in the procyclic form of the parasite has no effect on growth but causes a reduction in motility. Using transmission electron microscopy, various structural defects were seen in some axonemes, most frequently with microtubule doublets missing from the 9+2 arrangement. RNAi knockdown of TAX-2 expression in the bloodstream form of the parasite caused defects in growth and cytokinesis, a further example of the effects caused by loss of flagellar function in bloodstream form T. brucei. In procyclic cells we used a new set of vectors to ablate protein expression in cells expressing a GFP:TAX-2 fusion protein, which enabled us to easily quantify protein reduction and visualise axonemes made before and after RNAi induction. This establishes a useful generic technique but also revealed a specific observation that the new flagellum on the daughter trypanosome continues growth after cytokinesis. Our results provide evidence for TAX-2 function within the axoneme, where we suggest that it is involved in processes linking the outer doublet microtubules and the central pair. PMID:19009637

  20. A Conserved Glycan in the C2 Domain of HIV-1 Envelope Acts as a Molecular Switch to Control X4 Utilization by Clonal Variants with Identical V3 Loops

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Thomas; Sobrera, Edwin R.; Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all persons newly infected with HIV-1 harbor exclusively CCR5-using virus. CXCR4-using variants eventually arise in up to 50% of patients infected with subtypes B or D. This transition to efficient CXCR4 utilization is often co-incident with progression to AIDS. The basis for HIV-1’s initial dependence on CCR5, the selective force(s) that drive CXCR4-utilization, and the evolutionary pathways by which it occurs are incompletely understood. Greater knowledge of these processes will inform interventions at all stages, from vaccination to cure. The determinants of co-receptor use map primarily, though not exclusively, to the V3 loop of gp120. In this study, we describe five clonal variants with identical V3 loops but divergent CXCR4 use. Mutagenesis revealed two residues controlling this phenotypic switch: a rare polymorphism in C1 and a highly conserved N-glycan in C2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of co-receptor usage regulated by the N-glycan at position 262. PMID:26083631

  1. A Conserved KIN17 Curved DNA-Binding Domain Protein Assembles with SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 to Adapt Arabidopsis Growth and Development to Limiting Copper Availability[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Xing, Shuping; Huijser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Proper copper (Cu) homeostasis is required by living organisms to maintain essential cellular functions. In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 (SPL7) transcription factor participates in reprogramming global gene expression during Cu insufficiency in order to improve the metal uptake and prioritize its distribution to Cu proteins of major importance. As a consequence, spl7 null mutants show morphological and physiological disorders during Cu-limited growth, resulting in lower fresh weight, reduced root elongation, and chlorosis. On the other hand, the Arabidopsis KIN17 homolog belongs to a well-conserved family of essential eukaryotic nuclear proteins known to be stress activated and involved in DNA and possibly RNA metabolism in mammals. In the study presented here, we uncovered that Arabidopsis KIN17 participates in promoting the Cu deficiency response by means of a direct interaction with SPL7. Moreover, the double mutant kin17-1 spl7-2 displays an enhanced Cu-dependent phenotype involving growth arrest, oxidative stress, floral bud abortion, and pollen inviability. Taken together, the data presented here provide evidence for SPL7 and KIN17 protein interaction as a point of convergence in response to both Cu deficiency and oxidative stress. PMID:24335506

  2. Conserved cis-regulatory elements for DNA-binding-with-one-finger and homeo-domain-leucine-zipper transcription factors regulate companion cell-specific expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Schneidereit, Alexander; Imlau, Astrid; Sauer, Norbert

    2008-09-01

    The transition from young carbon-importing sink leaves of higher plants to mature carbon-exporting source leaves is paralleled by a complete reversal of phloem function. While sink-leaf phloem mediates the influx of reduced carbon from older source leaves and the release of this imported carbon to the sink-leaf mesophyll, source-leaf phloem catalyzes the uptake of photoassimilates into companion cells (CCs) and sieve elements (SEs) and the net carbon export from the leaf. Phloem loading in source leaves with sucrose, the main or exclusive transport form for fixed carbon in most higher plants, is catalyzed by plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporters. Consistent with the described physiological switch from sink to source, the promoter of the Arabidopsis AtSUC2 gene is active only in source-leaf CCs of Arabidopsis or of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). For the identification of regulatory elements involved in this companion cell-specific and source-specific gene expression, we performed detailed analyses of the AtSUC2 promoter by truncation and mutagenesis. A 126-bp promoter fragment was identified, which seems to contain these fragments and which drives AtSUC2-typical expression when combined with a 35S minimal promoter. Within this fragment, linker-scanning analyses revealed two cis-regulatory elements that were further characterized as putative binding sites for transcription factors of the DNA-binding-with-one-finger or the homeo-domain-leucine-zipper families. Similar or identical binding sites are found in other genes and in different plant species, suggesting an ancient regulatory mechanism for this important physiological switch. PMID:18551303

  3. Distinct domains of hTAFII100 are required for functional interaction with transcription factor TFIIF beta (RAP30) and incorporation into the TFIID complex.

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovskaya, V; Lavigne, A C; Davidson, I; Acker, J; Staub, A; Tora, L

    1996-01-01

    TFIID is the DNA binding component of the RNA polymerase II transcriptional machinery and is composed of the TATA binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFIIs). Here we report the characterization of a new human TAF, hTAFII100, which is the human homologue of Drosophila TAFII80 and yeast TAFII90. hTAFII100 interacts strongly with hTAFII250, hTAFII55 and hTAFII28, less with hTAFII20 and hTAFII18, weakly with TBP and not at all with delta NTAFII135 and hTAFII30. Deletion analysis revealed that the C-terminal half of hTAFII100, which contains six WD-40 repeats, is not required for incorporation into the TFIID complex. Our results suggest that hTAFII100 can be divided into two domains, the N-terminal region responsible for interactions within the TFIID complex and the C-terminal WD repeat-containing half responsible for interactions between hTAFII100 and other factors. An anti-hTAFII100 antibody, raised against a C-terminal epitope, selectively inhibited basal TFIID-dependent in vitro transcription and the specific interaction between hTAFII100 and the 30 kDa subunit of TFIIF (RAP30). We demonstrate that the hTAFII100-TFIIF interaction supports pre-initiation complex formation in the presence of TFIID. Thus, this is the first demonstration that a TAFII functionally interacts with a basal transcription factor in vitro. Images PMID:8758937

  4. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  5. J domain independent functions of J proteins.

    PubMed

    Ajit Tamadaddi, Chetana; Sahi, Chandan

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock proteins of 40 kDa (Hsp40s), also called J proteins, are obligate partners of Hsp70s. Via their highly conserved and functionally critical J domain, J proteins interact and modulate the activity of their Hsp70 partners. Mutations in the critical residues in the J domain often result in the null phenotype for the J protein in question. However, as more J proteins have been characterized, it is becoming increasingly clear that a significant number of J proteins do not "completely" rely on their J domains to carry out their cellular functions, as previously thought. In some cases, regions outside the highly conserved J domain have become more important making the J domain dispensable for some, if not for all functions of a J protein. This has profound effects on the evolution of such J proteins. Here we present selected examples of J proteins that perform J domain independent functions and discuss this in the context of evolution of J proteins with dispensable J domains and J-like proteins in eukaryotes.

  6. A domain dictionary of trimeric autotransporter adhesins.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Jens; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte; Hartmann, Marcus D; Lupas, Andrei N

    2015-02-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are modular, highly repetitive outer membrane proteins that mediate adhesion to external surfaces in many Gram-negative bacteria. In recent years, several TAAs have been investigated in considerable detail, also at the structural level. However, in their vast majority, putative TAAs in prokaryotic genomes remain poorly annotated, due to their sequence diversity and changeable domain architecture. In order to achieve an automated annotation of these proteins that is both detailed and accurate we have taken a domain dictionary approach, in which we identify recurrent domains by sequence comparisons, produce bioinformatic descriptors for each domain type, and connect these to structural information where available. We implemented this approach in a web-based platform, daTAA, in 2008 and demonstrated its applicability by reconstructing the complete fiber structure of a TAA conserved in enterobacteria. Here we review current knowledge on the domain structure of TAAs.

  7. The Conservation/Solution Element (STE) Method for Linear Potential Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeyeye, John O.; Attia, Naguib F.; Jackson, Joy; Hunter, Timothy

    1996-01-01

    The potential equation is discretized on rectangular domains using the Conservation/Solution Element Method (STE) approach. Computational examples with a discussion of numerical experience gained are given.

  8. Protein domain architectures.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Nicola J

    2010-01-01

    Proteins are composed of functional units, or domains, that can be found alone or in combination with other domains. Analysis of protein domain architectures and the movement of protein domains within and across different genomes provide clues about the evolution of protein function. The classification of proteins into families and domains is provided through publicly available tools and databases that use known protein domains to predict other members in new proteins sequences. Currently at least 80% of the main protein sequence databases can be classified using these tools, thus providing a large data set to work from for analyzing protein domain architectures. Each of the protein domain databases provide intuitive web interfaces for viewing and analyzing their domain classifications and provide their data freely for downloading. Some of the main protein family and domain databases are described here, along with their Web-based tools for analyzing domain architectures.

  9. Understanding the Public Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carrie

    2003-01-01

    This overview of the public domain covers: defining the public domain; figuring out if a work is protected by copyright; being sure a work is in the public domain; asserting the copyright protection and term; the Creative Commons initiative; building the Information Commons; when permission is needed for using a public domain work; and special…

  10. Conservation Biology and real-world conservation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, John G

    2006-06-01

    In the 20 years since Conservation Biology was launched with the aim of disseminating scientific knowledge to help conserve biodiversity and the natural world, our discipline has hugely influenced the practice of conservation. But we have had less impact outside the profession itself and we have not transformed that practice into an enterprise large enough to achieve our conservation goals. As we look to the next 20 years, we need to become more relevant and important to the societies in which we live. To do so, the discipline of conservation biology must generate answers even when full scientific knowledge is lacking, structure scientific research around polices and debates that influence what we value as conservationists, go beyond the certitude of the biological sciences into the more contextual debates of the social sciences, engage scientifically with human-dominated landscapes, and address the question of how conservation can contribute to the improvement of human livelihoods and the quality of human life.

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of Brassica rapa MATH-Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liming; Huang, Yong; Hu, Yan; He, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenhui; Liu, Chunlin; Ruan, Ying

    2013-05-01

    The MATH (meprin and TRAF-C homology) domain is a fold of seven anti-parallel β-helices involved in protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification and characterization of 90 MATH-domain proteins from the Brassica rapa genome. By sequence analysis together with MATH-domain proteins from other species, the B. rapa MATH-domain proteins can be grouped into 6 classes. Class-I protein has one or several MATH domains without any other recognizable domain; Class-II protein contains a MATH domain together with a conserved BTB (Broad Complex, Tramtrack, and Bric-a-Brac ) domain; Class-III protein belongs to the MATH/Filament domain family; Class-IV protein contains a MATH domain frequently combined with some other domains; Class-V protein has a relative long sequence but contains only one MATH domain; Class-VI protein is characterized by the presence of Peptidase and UBQ (Ubiquitinylation) domains together with one MATH domain. As part of our study regarding seed development of B. rapa, six genes are screened by SSH (Suppression Subtractive Hybridization) and their expression levels are analyzed in combination with seed developmental stages, and expression patterns suggested that Bra001786, Bra03578 and Bra036572 may be seed development specific genes, while Bra001787, Bra020541 and Bra040904 may be involved in seed and flower organ development. This study provides the first characterization of the MATH domain proteins in B. rapa.

  12. Structure and Function of CW Domain Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Liu, Shasha; Zhang, Xinxin; Liang, Xiao; Zahid, Kashif Rafiq; Liu, Ke; Liu, Jinlin; Deng, Lingfu; Yang, Jihong; Qi, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The CW domain is a zinc binding domain, composed of approximately 50- 60 amino acid residues with four conserved cysteine (C) and two to four conserved tryptophan (W) residues. The members of the superfamily of CW domain containing proteins, comprised of 12 different eukaryotic nuclear protein families, are extensively expressed in vertebrates, vertebrate-infecting parasites and higher plants, where they are often involved in chromatin remodeling, methylation recognition, epigenetic regulation and early embryonic development. Since the first CW domain structure was determined 5 years ago, structures of five CW domains have been solved so far. In this review, we will discuss these recent advances in understanding the identification, definition, structure, and functions of the CW domain containing proteins. PMID:26806410

  13. Conservation Education Today & Tomorrow: Resource Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Conservation, Springfield.

    This kit was developed by the Illinois Department of Conservation's Education Program with assistance from the State Board of Education, as a teaching tool which can be used to promote conservation awareness of young people. It is designed to enable educators to help students in grades 7-10 learn about Illinois' renewable natural resources through…

  14. Purification and Structural Analysis of LEM-Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Isaline; Bourgeois, Benjamin; Samson, Camille; Buendia, Brigitte; Worman, Howard J; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    LAP2-emerin-MAN1 (LEM)-domain proteins are modular proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved motif of about 50 residues. Most LEM-domain proteins localize at the inner nuclear membrane, but some are also found in the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear interior. Their architecture has been analyzed by predicting the limits of their globular domains, determining the 3D structure of these domains and in a few cases calculating the 3D structure of specific domains bound to biological targets. The LEM domain adopts an α-helical fold also found in SAP and HeH domains of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. The LEM domain binds to BAF (barrier-to-autointegration factor; BANF1), which interacts with DNA and tethers chromatin to the nuclear envelope. LAP2 isoforms also share an N-terminal LEM-like domain, which binds DNA. The structure and function of other globular domains that distinguish LEM-domain proteins from each other have been characterized, including the C-terminal dimerization domain of LAP2α and C-terminal WH and UHM domains of MAN1. LEM-domain proteins also have large intrinsically disordered regions that are involved in intra- and intermolecular interactions and are highly regulated by posttranslational modifications in vivo.

  15. From conservation genetics to conservation genomics.

    PubMed

    Primmer, Craig R

    2009-04-01

    Although the application of population and evolutionary genetic theory and methods to address issues of conservation relevance has a long history, the formalization of conservation genetics as a research field is still relatively recent. One of the periodic catalysts for increased research effort in the field has been advances in molecular technologies, leading to an increasingly wider variety of molecular markers for application in conservation genetic studies. To date, genetic methods have been applied in conservation biology primarily as selectively neutral molecular tools for resolving questions of conservation relevance. However, there has been renewed interest in complementing the analysis of neutral markers with the assessment of loci that may be directly involved in responses to processes such as environmental change, with a view to identifying the genes involved in them. These kinds of studies are now possible due to the increase in availability of genomic resources for nonmodel organisms, and there will likely be an even more rapid increase in the near future due to the advent of new ultrahigh throughput-sequencing technologies. This review considers the implications of the most recent developments in genomic technologies and their potential for contributing to the conservation of populations and species. Three "conservation genomics" case studies are presented (Atlantic salmon, Salmo sala; the butterfly, Melitaea cinxia; and the California condor, Gymnogyps californianus) in order to demonstrate the diversity of applications now possible. While it is clear that genomics approaches in conservation will not replace other tried-and-true methods, these recent developments open up an exciting new range of possibilities that will enable further diversification of the application of genomics in conservation biology. PMID:19432656

  16. Meeting global conservation challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-10-01

    Hot on the heels of last year's Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement, representatives from the global conservation community met to set the conservation agenda that will help to implement these targets.

  17. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  18. Building robust conservation plans.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Piero; Joppa, Lucas

    2015-04-01

    Systematic conservation planning optimizes trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and human activities by accounting for socioeconomic costs while aiming to achieve prescribed conservation objectives. However, the most cost-efficient conservation plan can be very dissimilar to any other plan achieving the set of conservation objectives. This is problematic under conditions of implementation uncertainty (e.g., if all or part of the plan becomes unattainable). We determined through simulations of parallel implementation of conservation plans and habitat loss the conditions under which optimal plans have limited chances of implementation and where implementation attempts would fail to meet objectives. We then devised a new, flexible method for identifying conservation priorities and scheduling conservation actions. This method entails generating a number of alternative plans, calculating the similarity in site composition among all plans, and selecting the plan with the highest density of neighboring plans in similarity space. We compared our method with the classic method that maximizes cost efficiency with synthetic and real data sets. When implementation was uncertain--a common reality--our method provided higher likelihood of achieving conservation targets. We found that χ, a measure of the shortfall in objectives achieved by a conservation plan if the plan could not be implemented entirely, was the main factor determining the relative performance of a flexibility enhanced approach to conservation prioritization. Our findings should help planning authorities prioritize conservation efforts in the face of uncertainty about future condition and availability of sites.

  19. Conservation in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the physical concept of conservation as it is framed within the laws of conservation of mass, of momentum, and of energy. The derivation of Ohm's Law as a generalization of the relationship between the observed measurements of voltage and current serves as the exemplar of how conservation theories are formed. (JJK)

  20. Emerging Roles of JmjC Domain-Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Accari, Sandra L; Fisher, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins are a diverse superfamily of proteins containing a characteristic, evolutionarily conserved β-barrel structure that normally contains binding sites for Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate. In the best studied JmjC-domain proteins, the JmjC barrel has a histone demethylase catalytic activity. Histones are evolutionarily conserved proteins intimately involved in the packaging of DNA within the nucleus of eukaryotic organisms. The N-termini ("tails") of the histone proteins are subject to a diverse array of posttranslational modifications including methylation. Unlike many of the other histone modifications which are transient, methylation was thought to be permanent, until the relatively recent identification of the first demethylases. Jumonji C domain-containing proteins were first identified with a role in the modulation of histone methylation marks. This family of proteins is broken up into seven distinct subgroups based on domain architecture and their ability to antagonize specific histone methylation marks. Their biological functions derive from their ability to regulate gene expression and include roles in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation, and stress responses. However, one subgroup remains, the largest, in which the JmjC domain has no known biochemical function. These proteins belong to the JmjC-domain-only subgroup and as their name suggests, the only bioinformatically recognizable domain they contain is the highly conserved JmjC domain. PMID:26404469

  1. Exactly conservation integrators

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Bowman, J.C.; Morrison, P.J.

    1999-03-01

    Traditional explicit numerical discretizations of conservative systems generically predict artificial secular drifts of any nonlinear invariants. In this work the authors present a general approach for developing explicit nontraditional algorithms that conserve such invariants exactly. They illustrate the method by applying it to the three-wave truncation of the Euler equations, the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model, and the Kepler problem. The ideas are discussed in the context of symplectic (phase-space-conserving) integration methods as well as nonsymplectic conservative methods. They comment on the application of the method to general conservative systems.

  2. Conservation: Toward firmer ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of energy conservation were reviewed in order to place the problems in proper perspective: history and goals, conservation accounting-criteria, and a method to overcome obstacles. The effect of changing prices and available supplies of energy sources and their causes on consumption levels during the last few decades were described. Some examples of attainable conservation goals were listed and justified. A number of specific criteria applicable to conservation accounting were given. Finally, a discussion was presented to relate together the following aspects of energy conservation: widespread impact, involvement of government, industry, politics, moral and ethical aspects, urgency and time element.

  3. Exactly conservative integrators

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Bowman, J.C.; Morrison, P.J.

    1995-07-19

    Traditional numerical discretizations of conservative systems generically yield an artificial secular drift of any nonlinear invariants. In this work we present an explicit nontraditional algorithm that exactly conserves invariants. We illustrate the general method by applying it to the Three-Wave truncation of the Euler equations, the Volterra-Lotka predator-prey model, and the Kepler problem. We discuss our method in the context of symplectic (phase space conserving) integration methods as well as nonsymplectic conservative methods. We comment on the application of our method to general conservative systems.

  4. Conservation and diversification of Msx protein in metazoan evolution.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Kamiya, Akiko; Ishiguro, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi C; Saitou, Naruya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Msx (/msh) family genes encode homeodomain (HD) proteins that control ontogeny in many animal species. We compared the structures of Msx genes from a wide range of Metazoa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Nematoda, Arthropoda, Tardigrada, Platyhelminthes, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Annelida, Echiura, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata) to gain an understanding of the role of these genes in phylogeny. Exon-intron boundary analysis suggested that the position of the intron located N-terminally to the HDs was widely conserved in all the genes examined, including those of cnidarians. Amino acid (aa) sequence comparison revealed 3 new evolutionarily conserved domains, as well as very strong conservation of the HDs. Two of the three domains were associated with Groucho-like protein binding in both a vertebrate and a cnidarian Msx homolog, suggesting that the interaction between Groucho-like proteins and Msx proteins was established in eumetazoan ancestors. Pairwise comparison among the collected HDs and their C-flanking aa sequences revealed that the degree of sequence conservation varied depending on the animal taxa from which the sequences were derived. Highly conserved Msx genes were identified in the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, Hemichordata, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, and Anthozoa. The wide distribution of the conserved sequences in the animal phylogenetic tree suggested that metazoan ancestors had already acquired a set of conserved domains of the current Msx family genes. Interestingly, although strongly conserved sequences were recovered from the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, and Anthozoa, the sequences from the Urochordata and Hydrozoa showed weak conservation. Because the Vertebrata-Cephalochordata-Urochordata and Anthozoa-Hydrozoa represent sister groups in the Chordata and Cnidaria, respectively, Msx sequence diversification may have occurred differentially in the course of evolution. We speculate that selective loss of the conserved domains in Msx family

  5. Conservation and diversification of Msx protein in metazoan evolution.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Kamiya, Akiko; Ishiguro, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi C; Saitou, Naruya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Msx (/msh) family genes encode homeodomain (HD) proteins that control ontogeny in many animal species. We compared the structures of Msx genes from a wide range of Metazoa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Nematoda, Arthropoda, Tardigrada, Platyhelminthes, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Annelida, Echiura, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata) to gain an understanding of the role of these genes in phylogeny. Exon-intron boundary analysis suggested that the position of the intron located N-terminally to the HDs was widely conserved in all the genes examined, including those of cnidarians. Amino acid (aa) sequence comparison revealed 3 new evolutionarily conserved domains, as well as very strong conservation of the HDs. Two of the three domains were associated with Groucho-like protein binding in both a vertebrate and a cnidarian Msx homolog, suggesting that the interaction between Groucho-like proteins and Msx proteins was established in eumetazoan ancestors. Pairwise comparison among the collected HDs and their C-flanking aa sequences revealed that the degree of sequence conservation varied depending on the animal taxa from which the sequences were derived. Highly conserved Msx genes were identified in the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, Hemichordata, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, and Anthozoa. The wide distribution of the conserved sequences in the animal phylogenetic tree suggested that metazoan ancestors had already acquired a set of conserved domains of the current Msx family genes. Interestingly, although strongly conserved sequences were recovered from the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, and Anthozoa, the sequences from the Urochordata and Hydrozoa showed weak conservation. Because the Vertebrata-Cephalochordata-Urochordata and Anthozoa-Hydrozoa represent sister groups in the Chordata and Cnidaria, respectively, Msx sequence diversification may have occurred differentially in the course of evolution. We speculate that selective loss of the conserved domains in Msx family

  6. Evolution of the SH3 Domain Specificity Landscape in Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Erik; Spiess, Matthias; Gkourtsa, Areti; Avula, Teja; Landgraf, Christiane; Mancilla, Victor Tapia; Huber, Aline; Volkmer, Rudolf; Winsor, Barbara; Serrano, Luis; Hochstenbach, Frans; Distel, Ben

    2015-01-01

    To explore the conservation of Src homology 3 (SH3) domain-mediated networks in evolution, we compared the specificity landscape of these domains among four yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ashbya gossypii, Candida albicans, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, encompassing 400 million years of evolution. We first aligned and catalogued the families of SH3-containing proteins in these four species to determine the relationships between homologous domains. Then, we tagged and purified all soluble SH3 domains (82 in total) to perform a quantitative peptide assay (SPOT) for each SH3 domain. All SPOT readouts were hierarchically clustered and we observed that the organization of the SH3 specificity landscape in three distinct profile classes remains conserved across these four yeast species. We also produced a specificity profile for each SH3 domain from manually aligned top SPOT hits and compared the within-family binding motif consensus. This analysis revealed a striking example of binding motif divergence in a C. albicans Rvs167 paralog, which cannot be explained by overall SH3 sequence or interface residue divergence, and we validated this specificity change with a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay. In addition, we show that position-weighted matrices (PWM) compiled from SPOT assays can be used for binding motif screening in potential binding partners and present cases where motifs are either conserved or lost among homologous SH3 interacting proteins. Finally, by comparing pairwise SH3 sequence identity to binding profile correlation we show that for ~75% of all analyzed families the SH3 specificity profile was remarkably conserved over a large evolutionary distance. Thus, a high sequence identity within an SH3 domain family predicts conserved binding specificity, whereas divergence in sequence identity often coincided with a change in binding specificity within this family. As such, our results are important for future studies aimed at unraveling complex specificity

  7. Domains and Naive Theories

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.; Noles, Nicholaus S.

    2013-01-01

    Human cognition entails domain-specific cognitive processes that influence memory, attention, categorization, problem-solving, reasoning, and knowledge organization. This review examines domain-specific causal theories, which are of particular interest for permitting an examination of how knowledge structures change over time. We first describe the properties of commonsense theories, and how commonsense theories differ from scientific theories, illustrating with children’s classification of biological and non-biological kinds. We next consider the implications of domain-specificity for broader issues regarding cognitive development and conceptual change. We then examine the extent to which domain-specific theories interact, and how people reconcile competing causal frameworks. Future directions for research include examining how different content domains interact, the nature of theory change, the role of context (including culture, language, and social interaction) in inducing different frameworks, and the neural bases for domain-specific reasoning. PMID:24187603

  8. Learning and Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Yishay

    Domain adaptation is a fundamental learning problem where one wishes to use labeled data from one or several source domains to learn a hypothesis performing well on a different, yet related, domain for which no labeled data is available. This generalization across domains is a very significant challenge for many machine learning applications and arises in a variety of natural settings, including NLP tasks (document classification, sentiment analysis, etc.), speech recognition (speakers and noise or environment adaptation) and face recognition (different lighting conditions, different population composition).

  9. Conservation: Toward firmer ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of energy conservation were discussed: conservation history and goals, conservation modes, conservation accounting-criteria, and a method to overcome obstacles. The conservation modes tested fall into one of the following categories: reduced energy consumption, increased efficiency of energy utilization, or substitution of one or more forms of energy for another which is in shorter supply or in some sense thought to be of more value. The conservation accounting criteria include net energy reduction, economic, and technical criteria. A method to overcome obstacles includes (approaches such as: direct personal impact (life style, income, security, aspiration), an element of crisis, large scale involvement of environmental, safety, and health issues, connections to big government, big business, big politics, involvement of known and speculative science and technology, appeal to moral and ethical standards, the transient nature of opportunities to correct the system.

  10. Chromatin Domains: The Unit of Chromosome Organization.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jesse R; Gorkin, David U; Ren, Bing

    2016-06-01

    How eukaryotic chromosomes fold inside the nucleus is an age-old question that remains unanswered today. Early biochemical and microscopic studies revealed the existence of chromatin domains and loops as a pervasive feature of interphase chromosomes, but the biological implications of such organizational features were obscure. Genome-wide analysis of pair-wise chromatin interactions using chromatin conformation capture (3C)-based techniques has shed new light on the organization of chromosomes in interphase nuclei. Particularly, the finding of cell-type invariant, evolutionarily conserved topologically associating domains (TADs) in a broad spectrum of cell types has provided a new molecular framework for the study of animal development and human diseases. Here, we review recent progress in characterization of such chromatin domains and delineation of mechanisms of their formation in animal cells. PMID:27259200

  11. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  12. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, M.; Moore, S. A.; Fedor, J.; Ciocys, S. T.; Karapetrov, G.; Pearson, J.; Novosad, V.; Bader, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application. PMID:25164004

  13. Conservation and behavioral neuroendocrinology.

    PubMed

    Cockrem, J F

    2005-11-01

    The total number of threatened species of vertebrates is likely to be more than 10,000, with approximately one quarter of the world's mammal species, one eighth of the birds and one third of the amphibians threatened with extinction. The rate of loss of animal species and hence of biodiversity is increasing and may become even greater as ecosystems become affected by climate change due to global warming. Behavioral neuroendocrinology, which considers interactions between behavior and neuroendocrine function in animals from all vertebrate taxa, can contribute to animal conservation. Research with laboratory animals can address questions in basic biology relevant to conservation and develop methods for use with threatened animals. Field work with free-living animals considers the basic biology of new species and the use of endocrine tools to assess the susceptibility of species to threats. Non-invasive measurements of hormone concentrations, especially fecal steroids, are extensively used to assess reproductive function and the stress status of animals in captive breeding programs and in the wild. Biodiversity and natural selection both depend on individual variation, and conservation programs often work with animals on an individual basis. The consideration of data from individuals is essential in conservation endocrinology. Direct contributions to conservation programs are challenging as study situations are determined by practical conservation concerns. Indirect contributions such as the provision of scientific input to conservation plans and participation in public education programs offer significant benefits for conservation programs. Directly and indirectly, there are many opportunities for behavioral neuroendocrinologists to contribute to conservation.

  14. Biodiversity Conservation and Conservation Biotechnology Tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue is dedicated to the in vitro tools and methods used to conserve the genetic diversity of rare and threatened species from around the world. Species that are on the brink of extinction, due to the rapid loss of genetic diversity and habitat, come mainly from resource poor areas the...

  15. Causal Learning Across Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Laura E.; Gopnik, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Five studies investigated (a) children's ability to use the dependent and independent probabilities of events to make causal inferences and (b) the interaction between such inferences and domain-specific knowledge. In Experiment 1, preschoolers used patterns of dependence and independence to make accurate causal inferences in the domains of…

  16. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  17. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  18. Ballistic rectification of vortex domain wall chirality at nanowire corners

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, K.; Bradley, R. C.; Broomhall, T. J.; Hodges, M. P. P.; Hayward, T. J.; Rosamond, M. C.; Linfield, E. H.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2015-11-30

    The interactions of vortex domain walls with corners in planar magnetic nanowires are probed using magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy. We show that when the domain walls are propagated into sharp corners using applied magnetic fields above a critical value, their chiralities are rectified to either clockwise or anticlockwise circulation depending on whether the corners turn left or right. Single-shot focused magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements are then used to demonstrate how, when combined with modes of domain propagation that conserve vortex chirality, this allows us to dramatically reduce the stochasticity of domain pinning at artificial defect sites. Our results provide a tool for controlling domain wall chirality and pinning behavior both in further experimental studies and in future domain wall-based memory, logic and sensor technologies.

  19. Biological Diversity and Molecular Plasticity of FIC Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Harms, Alexander; Stanger, Frédéric V; Dehio, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    The ubiquitous proteins with FIC (filamentation induced by cyclic AMP) domains use a conserved enzymatic machinery to modulate the activity of various target proteins by posttranslational modification, typically AMPylation. Following intensive study of the general properties of FIC domain catalysis, diverse molecular activities and biological functions of these remarkably versatile proteins are now being revealed. Here, we review the biological diversity of FIC domain proteins and summarize the underlying structure-function relationships. The original and most abundant genuine bacterial FIC domain proteins are toxins that use diverse molecular activities to interfere with bacterial physiology in various, yet ill-defined, biological contexts. Host-targeted virulence factors have evolved repeatedly out of this pool by exaptation of the enzymatic FIC domain machinery for the manipulation of host cell signaling in favor of bacterial pathogens. The single human FIC domain protein HypE (FICD) has a specific function in the regulation of protein stress responses. PMID:27482742

  20. The evolutionary analysis reveals domain fusion of proteins with Frizzled-like CRD domain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Jia, Haibo; Ma, Zhaowu; Ye, Huashan; Zhou, Mi; Su, Li; Liu, Jianfeng; Guo, An-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Frizzleds (FZDs) are transmembrane receptors in the Wnt signaling pathway and they play pivotal roles in developments. The Frizzled-like extracellular Cysteine-rich domain (Fz-CRD) has been identified in FZDs and other proteins. The origin and evolution of these proteins with Fz-CRD is the main interest of this study. We found that the Fz-CRD exists in FZD, SFRP, RTK, MFRP, CPZ, CORIN, COL18A1 and other proteins. Our systematic analysis revealed that the Fz-CRD domain might have originated in protists and then fused with the Frizzled-like seven-transmembrane domain (7TM) to form the FZD receptors, which duplicated and diversified into about 11 members in Vertebrates. The SFRPs and RTKs with the Fz-CRD were found in sponge and expanded in Vertebrates. Other proteins with Fz-CRD may have emerged during Vertebrate evolution through domain fusion. Moreover, we found a glycosylation site and several conserved motifs in FZDs, which may be related to Wnt interaction. Based on these results, we proposed a model showing that the domain fusion and expansion of Fz-CRD genes occurred in Metazoa and Vertebrates. Our study may help to pave the way for further research on the conservation and diversification of Wnt signaling functions during evolution.

  1. The Syntax of Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, Charles H.

    This paper outlines the syntactic structures which represent a stage in the cognitive development of children, and focusses on an aspect of cognitive development known as conservation. The cognitive components of conservation are presented as the primordial base for the set of syntactic structures which map or mirror them. Piaget proposed four…

  2. Conservation: Threatened by Luxury.

    PubMed

    Webb, Thomas J

    2016-06-20

    When animals are traded in lucrative international luxury markets, individuals really do matter to conservation. Identifying the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that make some species especially vulnerable to this kind of threat helps set guidelines for more effective conservation. PMID:27326710

  3. Teaching Teachers Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, N. L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a two-week summer course for elementary and secondary teachers on soil and water conservation taught in Wisconsin. Discusses the efforts to recruit teachers for the course, the course content, the field trips, and the evaluation procedures. Stresses the cooperation between educators and conservation agencies in developing the course. (TW)

  4. Introducing conservation of momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-09-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton’s laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered for the case of a car hitting a child.

  5. Home Energy Conservation Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, V. William; And Others

    This guide was prepared to support a program of training for community specialists in contemporary and practical techniques of home energy conservation. It is designed to assist professionals in efficient operation of energy conservation programs and to provide ideas for expanding education operations. Eight major sections are presented: (1)…

  6. Conservation--Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Conservation Foundation, Parkville, Victoria.

    Developed by the Australian Conservation Foundation to meet the need for a general conservation bibliography, this booklet offers resources for a wide spectrum of possible users. Material selected is that which is relevant and helpful for conservationists in their various fields of activity and what is likely to be in print and obtainable without…

  7. Conservation and Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backus, Mary Giafagleone

    In this study it was hypothesized that those students classified as conservers would score significantly higher on cloze passages related to the concepts of number, quantity, and volume than would those students classified as non-conservers. The subjects consisted of a group of 42 sixth grade urban public school students judged to be of low socio…

  8. Water Conservation Resource List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

  9. Conservation Tools for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Included are suggestions for integrating conservation concepts into the general curriculum, coordinating outdoor work with indoor activities, and for planning and implementing a sequential conservation curriculum. Guidelines given for training of teachers include sample workshop schedules. Minimum requirements for outdoor school sites are listed.…

  10. Creative Soil Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Take plant lessons outdoors with this engaging and inquiry-based activity in which third-grade students learn how to apply soil conservation methods to growing plants. They also collect data and draw conclusions about the effectiveness of their method of soil conservation. An added benefit to this activity is that the third-grade students played…

  11. Conservation in perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, A.; Goldsmith, F.B.; Goldsmith, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book reflects the changes that have taken place in the nature conservation movement over the last decade. It includes essays on issues of nature conservation itself, rather than on environmental issues. Habitats, elements of the ecosystem, and some of the political and organizational activity currently of interest are covered.

  12. Cultivating a conservation ethic

    SciTech Connect

    Edgar, G.R.; McKellar, B.J.; Harmelink, S.

    1995-11-01

    This article is review of the efforts of Wisconsin Public Power`s programmatic efforts in energy conservation. The design and implementation of the conservation program is discussed, and the residential, industrial, and commercial aspects of the program are noted. Results to date are mentioned.

  13. Energy: the conservation revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, J.H.; Chandler, W.U.

    1981-01-01

    This analysis of the energy conservation ethic and related government policy examines the contrasting approaches of administration policy. The basic thrust of the book is that energy conservation is a fundamentally important approach that is presently being ignored in favor of a more production-oriented philosophy.

  14. Youth Conservation Corps Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This document provides guidelines for operating Youth Conservation Corps programs under both the Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Park Service. The guide contains 11 units that cover the following topics: (1) enrollees; (2) enrollee payroll; (3) enrollee problems; (4) Youth Conservation Corps staff; (5) accounting; (6) operations; (7)…

  15. Conservation in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-30

    A nationwide examination was made of grassroots energy conservation programs related to transportation. Information compiled from civic groups, trade associations, and corporations is included on driver awareness/mass transit; travel; and ride sharing. It is concluded that a willingness by the public to cooperate in transportation energy conservation exists and should be exploited. (LCL)

  16. On exactly conservative integrators

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.C.; Shadwick, B.A.; Morrison, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    Traditional explicit numerical discretizations of conservative systems generically predict artificial secular drifts of nonlinear invariants. These algorithms are based on polynomial functions of the time step. The authors discuss a general approach for developing explicit algorithms that conserve such invariants exactly. They illustrate the method by applying it to the truncated two-dimensional Euler equations.

  17. Introducing Conservation of Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton's laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered…

  18. Resource Conservation Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    This glossary is a composite of terms selected from 13 technologies, and is the expanded revision of the original 1952 edition of "The Soil and Water Conservation Glossary." The terms were selected from these areas: agronomy, biology, conservation, ecology, economics, engineering, forestry, geology, hydrology, range, recreation, soils, and…

  19. Setting conservation priorities.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kerrie A; Carwardine, Josie; Possingham, Hugh P

    2009-04-01

    A generic framework for setting conservation priorities based on the principles of classic decision theory is provided. This framework encapsulates the key elements of any problem, including the objective, the constraints, and knowledge of the system. Within the context of this framework the broad array of approaches for setting conservation priorities are reviewed. While some approaches prioritize assets or locations for conservation investment, it is concluded here that prioritization is incomplete without consideration of the conservation actions required to conserve the assets at particular locations. The challenges associated with prioritizing investments through time in the face of threats (and also spatially and temporally heterogeneous costs) can be aided by proper problem definition. Using the authors' general framework for setting conservation priorities, multiple criteria can be rationally integrated and where, how, and when to invest conservation resources can be scheduled. Trade-offs are unavoidable in priority setting when there are multiple considerations, and budgets are almost always finite. The authors discuss how trade-offs, risks, uncertainty, feedbacks, and learning can be explicitly evaluated within their generic framework for setting conservation priorities. Finally, they suggest ways that current priority-setting approaches may be improved.

  20. Conservative mastectomies: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Maurizio Bruno; Catanuto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomies provide removal of the entire breast parenchyma, saving the outer covering of the mammary gland with the possibility of performing an immediate reconstruction preserving women body image. We rationalised and systematically organized our reconstructive algorythms giving a new different light to mastectomies, the so-called “conservative mastectomies”, an oxymoron indicating skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM), nipple-areola complex-sparing mastectomies (NSM) and skin-reducing mastectomies (SRM). Eventhough randomized controlled trials comparing conservative mastectomies with traditional mastectomy and breast conserving surgery would be auspicable in order to achieve higher levels of evidence, we could confidently conclude that conservative mastectomies offer the psychological advantages of good cosmesis and maintenance of woman body image without compromising the oncological safety of mastectomy. PMID:26645000

  1. Residential conservation service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. M.

    The Residential Conservation Services Program is a result of the 1978 National Energy Conservation Policy Act, Public Law 95-619 passed by congress to address the need for energy conservation in the residential sector. Large utility companies and fuel suppliers will be offering audits of their customers' homes to relay technical and economic data about conservation, solar, and wind measures. The impact on utility companies as a result of this program is to offer low cost audits ($15.00 charge for an audit costing approximately $100.00) and to assist their customers in reducing their consumption of electricity, gas, and oil through the use of conservation and renewables. The impact of RCS on wind turbine manufacturers and dealers is an opportunity to participate in a program which provides potential customers.

  2. The RED domain of Paired is specifically required for Drosophila accessory gland maturation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Li, Ping; Xue, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved paired domain consists of the N-terminal PAI and the C-terminal RED domains, each containing a helix–turn–helix motif capable of binding DNA. Despite its conserved sequence, the physiological functions of the RED domain remain elusive. Here, we constructed a prd transgene expressing a truncated Paired (Prd) protein without the RED domain, and examined its rescue ability in prd mutants. We found that the RED domain is specifically required for the expression of Acp26Aa and sex peptide in male accessory glands, and the induction of female post-mating response. Our data thus identified an important physiological function for the evolutionarily conserved RED domain. PMID:25694546

  3. The RED domain of Paired is specifically required for Drosophila accessory gland maturation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Ping; Xue, Lei

    2015-02-01

    The evolutionarily conserved paired domain consists of the N-terminal PAI and the C-terminal RED domains, each containing a helix-turn-helix motif capable of binding DNA. Despite its conserved sequence, the physiological functions of the RED domain remain elusive. Here, we constructed a prd transgene expressing a truncated Paired (Prd) protein without the RED domain, and examined its rescue ability in prd mutants. We found that the RED domain is specifically required for the expression of Acp26Aa and sex peptide in male accessory glands, and the induction of female post-mating response. Our data thus identified an important physiological function for the evolutionarily conserved RED domain.

  4. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  5. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  6. Parallel CE/SE Computations via Domain Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himansu, Ananda; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the parallelization strategy and achieved parallel efficiency of an explicit time-marching algorithm for solving conservation laws. The Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) algorithm for solving the 2D and 3D Euler equations is parallelized with the aid of domain decomposition. The parallel efficiency of the resultant algorithm on a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 parallel computer is checked.

  7. Urban Water Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moomaw, Ronald L.

    According to its abstract, this book attempts ‘an assessment of various water conservation measures aimed at reducing residential water usage.’ Its intent is to develop a research program whose ‘ultimate goal is to engender a conservation ethic among water users and managers and develop a predictable array of conservation methodologies. …’ Professor Flack indeed has presented an excellent assessment of conservation methodologies, but I believe that the proposed research program is too limited.Following a brief introductory chapter, chapter II presents an extensive review of the water conservation literature published in the 1970's and earlier. It and chapter III, which describes Flack's systematic comparison of the technical, economic, and political aspects of each conservation methodology, are the heart of the book. Chapter IV is a brief discussion and analysis of conservation programs (with examples) that a water utility might adopt. Chapter V is essentially a pilot study of methods of assessing political and social feasibility. Finally, a set of recommendations is presented in chapter VI. All in all, this book is a nice blend of literature review and original research that deals with an important issue.

  8. Response, stability and conservation laws for the sleeping top problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, L. Y.

    1992-10-01

    Application of the notion of separability and commutativity of some parameter matrices, to equations of motion of a gyroscopic system, illustrated by the "sleeping top" problem, can be reformulated in a transformed domain in which they are uncoupled. The new uncoupled equations lead to a simple formulation of the response, stability, and the establishment of a complete set of conservation laws. Their counterparts in the original physical variables are recovered by the utilization of the rotation matrix which connects the two domains.

  9. Response, stability, and conservation laws for the sleeping top problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Leon Y.

    By using the notion of separability and commutativity of some of the parameter matrices, the equations of motion of a gyroscopic system represented by the 'sleeping top' problem can be reformulated in a transformed domain in which they are uncoupled. The new uncoupled equations lead to a simple formulation of the response, stability, and the establishment of a complete set of conservation laws; whose counterparts in the original physical variables are recovered by utilizing the rotation matrix which connects the two domains.

  10. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  11. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  12. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jian -Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-10-13

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. Lastly, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose.

  13. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Jian -Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-10-13

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1more » in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. Lastly, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose.« less

  14. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. In conclusion, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose. PMID:26528314

  15. ASG2 is a farnesylated DWD protein that acts as ABA negative regulator in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Ribeiro, Iliana; Blanc, Nathalie; Nezames, Cynthia D; Deng, Xing Wang; Zglobicki, Piotr; Palacio Barrera, Ana María; Atehortùa, Lucia; Courtois, Martine; Labas, Valérie; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Ducos, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The tagging-via-substrate approach designed for the capture of mammal prenylated proteins was adapted to Arabidopsis cell culture. In this way, proteins are in vivo tagged with an azide-modified farnesyl moiety and captured thanks to biotin alkyne Click-iT® chemistry with further streptavidin-affinity chromatography. Mass spectrometry analyses identified four small GTPases and ASG2 (ALTERED SEED GERMINATION 2), a protein previously associated to the seed germination gene network. ASG2 is a conserved protein in plants and displays a unique feature that associates WD40 domains and tetratricopeptide repeats. Additionally, we show that ASG2 has a C-terminal CaaX-box that is farnesylated in vitro. Protoplast transfections using CaaX prenyltransferase mutants show that farnesylation provokes ASG2 nucleus exclusion. Moreover, ASG2 interacts with DDB1 (DAMAGE DNA BINDING protein 1), and the subcellular localization of this complex depends on ASG2 farnesylation status. Finally, germination and root elongation experiments reveal that asg2 and the farnesyltransferase mutant era1 (ENHANCED RESPONSE TO ABSCISIC ACID (ABA) 1) behave in similar manners when exposed to ABA or salt stress. To our knowledge, ASG2 is the first farnesylated DWD (DDB1 binding WD40) protein related to ABA response in Arabidopsis that may be linked to era1 phenotypes. PMID:26147561

  16. Evaluating, comparing, and interpreting protein domain hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Neuwald, Andrew F

    2014-04-01

    Arranging protein domain sequences hierarchically into evolutionarily divergent subgroups is important for investigating evolutionary history, for speeding up web-based similarity searches, for identifying sequence determinants of protein function, and for genome annotation. However, whether or not a particular hierarchy is optimal is often unclear, and independently constructed hierarchies for the same domain can often differ significantly. This article describes methods for statistically evaluating specific aspects of a hierarchy, for probing the criteria underlying its construction and for direct comparisons between hierarchies. Information theoretical notions are used to quantify the contributions of specific hierarchical features to the underlying statistical model. Such features include subhierarchies, sequence subgroups, individual sequences, and subgroup-associated signature patterns. Underlying properties are graphically displayed in plots of each specific feature's contributions, in heat maps of pattern residue conservation, in "contrast alignments," and through cross-mapping of subgroups between hierarchies. Together, these approaches provide a deeper understanding of protein domain functional divergence, reveal uncertainties caused by inconsistent patterns of sequence conservation, and help resolve conflicts between competing hierarchies.

  17. Kansas urban conservation handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The contents are: the problem in Kansas; policies and procedures; urban conservation planning; stormwater management, erosion, and sediment control; control measure characteristics; site planning process; determine erosion and sedimentation control measures; procedure for input process of subdivision plans.

  18. Conservation among Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughston, George A.; Protinsky, Howard O.

    1979-01-01

    The majority of 63 elderly women were able to pass tests in the conservation of mass (98 percent), volume (100 percent), and surface area (65 percent). These results conflict with previous research about Piagetian abilities of elderly people. (RL)

  19. Conservation of wading birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kushlan, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The conservation and management of wading birds has received considerable attention over the past twenty years, through research, population monitoring, habitat protection, and through activities of specialist groups devoted to all three groups, the herons, ibises and allies, and flamingos. While populations are best known in North America, greatest advances in knowledge may have come in Australasia. The status of most species and many populations is now sufficiently known to allow assessment of risk. Conservation and management techniques allow creation of global and regional action plans for conservation of many species. Global action plans are being developed, but few regional plans have been undertaken. Management of nesting sites is now particularly well appreciated. Although known in broad stroke, much remains to be learned about managing feeding habitat. Problems related to disturbance, conflict with humans, habitat loss, contaminants and other environmental stresses remain for some species and many populations. New challenges lie in creating conservation action that account for genetic stocks.

  20. Fine Tuning Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1983

    1983-01-01

    An energy conservation program at a Massachusetts vocational technical high school uses a school-based time switch to program part of the heating system. In addition, some phases of the program provided practical experience for students. (MLF)

  1. Energy: Conservation, Energy Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive energy conservation program at College of the Holy Cross has saved nearly one-third of the fuel oil and one-fifth of the electricity used at the college; briefs on boilers, lights, design. (Author/MLF)

  2. The Librarian as Conservator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, James W.; Krupp, Robert G.

    1970-01-01

    Guideposts for the librarian who seeks to establish a total conservation program: organizing the program and management in selection, screening, maintenance, treatment, personnel, costs, and cooperation. (Author/JS)

  3. Monitoring for conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Williams, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    Human-mediated environmental changes have resulted in appropriate concern for the conservation of ecological systems and have led to the development of many ecological monitoring programs worldwide. Many programs that are identified with the purpose of `surveillance? represent an inefficient use of conservation funds and effort. Here, we revisit the 1964 paper by Platt and argue that his recommendations about the conduct of science are equally relevant to the conduct of ecological monitoring programs. In particular, we argue that monitoring should not be viewed as a stand-alone activity, but instead as a component of a larger process of either conservation-oriented science or management. Corresponding changes in monitoring focus and design would lead to substantial increases in the efficiency and usefulness of monitoring results in conservation.

  4. IUCN Conservation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budowski, Gerardo

    1972-01-01

    Brief, but comprehensive, description of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), a non-governmental organization located in Morges, Switzerland. Presents its objectives, broad purpose and describes the specific activities of the organization. (LK)

  5. Reasons to Conserve Nature.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Richard G

    2016-05-01

    Is it sufficient to base arguments for conservation on the intrinsic value of nature, regardless of the services and economic benefits that biodiversity provides for humans? This question underlies much recent debate that has been at times acrimonious and has led to calls for a more inclusive approach to conservation. Yet melding different ideologies within a unified conceptual framework has proven difficult. Here I describe an approach that recognizes the importance of the level of biological organization and spatial extent in determining the strength of alternative arguments for why we should conserve nature. I argue that the framework helps reconcile contrasting viewpoints and brings clarity to when different conservation management approaches (for instance, regulation versus monetary valuation) are most appropriate. PMID:26936225

  6. Potential conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzinger, Michael; Popovych, Roman O.

    2008-10-15

    We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman et al. [J. Math. Phys. 47, 113505 (2006)]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings, and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of these results is given. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

  7. Conservation Kickstart- Catalyzing Conservation Initiatives Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treinish, G.

    2014-12-01

    Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) is a nonprofit organization that collects environmental data to catalyze conservation initiatives worldwide. Adventure athletes have the skills and motivation to reach the most remote corners of the world. ASC utilizes those skills to provide the scientific community with data while providing the outdoor community with purpose beyond the personal high of reaching a summit or rowing across an ocean. We carefully select projects, choosing partnerships that will maximize the impact of ASC volunteers. Each project must have a clear path to a tangible conservation outcome and demonstrate a clear need for our brand of volunteers. We partner with government agencies, universities, and independant reseachers to kickstart data collection efforts around the world. Last year, through a partnership with the Olympic National Forest, 20 volunteers from the Seattle area set up and monitored camera traps in an effort to survey for costal Pacific marten. Our work led to the species' listing as "critically imperiled" with NatureServe. A partnership with the inaugural Great Pacific Race, engaging trans-Pacific rowing teams, searched for microplastics in the Pacific Ocean as part of our ongoing microplastics campaign. In a multi-year partnership with the American Prairie Reserve (APR), ASC volunteer crews live and work on the Reserve collecting wildlife data year round. The data we obtain directly informs the Reserve's wildlife management decisions. On this project, our crews have safely and effectively navigated temperature extremes from -30 degrees to 100+ degrees while traveling in a remote location. We are currently scouting projects in the Okavango Delta of Botswana and the rainforest of Suriname where we will be able to cover large amounts of area in a short periord of time. ASC is at the crossroads of the adventure and coservation science communities. Our approach of answering specific questions by using highly skilled and

  8. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  9. Crystal structure of the human GGA1 GAT domain.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, G.; Zhai, P.; He, X.; Terzyan, S.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Tang, J.; Zhang, X. C.; Biosciences Division; Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation; Oklahoma Univ. Medical Center

    2003-06-03

    GGAs are a family of vesicle-coating regulatory proteins that function in intracellular protein transport. A GGA molecule contains four domains, each mediating interaction with other proteins in carrying out intracellular transport. The GAT domain of GGAs has been identified as the structural entity that binds membrane-bound ARF, a molecular switch regulating vesicle-coat assembly. It also directly interacts with rabaptin5, an essential component of endosome fusion. A 2.8 A resolution crystal structure of the human GGA1 GAT domain is reported here. The GAT domain contains four helices and has an elongated shape with the longest dimension exceeding 80 A. Its longest helix is involved in two structural motifs: an N-terminal helix-loop-helix motif and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. The N-terminal motif harbors the most conservative amino acid sequence in the GGA GAT domains. Within this conserved region, a cluster of residues previously implicated in ARF binding forms a hydrophobic surface patch, which is likely to be the ARF-binding site. In addition, a structure-based mutagenesis-biochemical analysis demonstrates that the C-terminal three-helix bundle of this GAT domain is responsible for the rabaptin5 binding. These structural characteristics are consistent with a model supporting multiple functional roles for the GAT domain.

  10. Evolution of SH2 domains and phosphotyrosine signalling networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bernard A.; Nash, Piers D.

    2012-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains mediate selective protein–protein interactions with tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, and in doing so define specificity of phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signalling networks. SH2 domains and protein-tyrosine phosphatases expand alongside protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) to coordinate cellular and organismal complexity in the evolution of the unikont branch of the eukaryotes. Examination of conserved families of PTKs and SH2 domain proteins provides fiduciary marks that trace the evolutionary landscape for the development of complex cellular systems in the proto-metazoan and metazoan lineages. The evolutionary provenance of conserved SH2 and PTK families reveals the mechanisms by which diversity is achieved through adaptations in tissue-specific gene transcription, altered ligand binding, insertions of linear motifs and the gain or loss of domains following gene duplication. We discuss mechanisms by which pTyr-mediated signalling networks evolve through the development of novel and expanded families of SH2 domain proteins and the elaboration of connections between pTyr-signalling proteins. These changes underlie the variety of general and specific signalling networks that give rise to tissue-specific functions and increasingly complex developmental programmes. Examination of SH2 domains from an evolutionary perspective provides insight into the process by which evolutionary expansion and modification of molecular protein interaction domain proteins permits the development of novel protein-interaction networks and accommodates adaptation of signalling networks. PMID:22889907

  11. Just how versatile are domains?

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Creating new protein domain arrangements is a frequent mechanism of evolutionary innovation. While some domains always form the same combinations, others form many different arrangements. This ability, which is often referred to as versatility or promiscuity of domains, its a random evolutionary model in which a domain's promiscuity is based on its relative frequency of domains. Results We show that there is a clear relationship across genomes between the promiscuity of a given domain and its frequency. However, the strength of this relationship differs for different domains. We thus redefine domain promiscuity by defining a new index, DV I ("domain versatility index"), which eliminates the effect of domain frequency. We explore links between a domain's versatility, when unlinked from abundance, and its biological properties. Conclusion Our results indicate that domains occurring as single domain proteins and domains appearing frequently at protein termini have a higher DV I. This is consistent with previous observations that the evolution of domain re-arrangements is primarily driven by fusion of pre-existing arrangements and single domains as well as loss of domains at protein termini. Furthermore, we studied the link between domain age, defined as the first appearance of a domain in the species tree, and the DV I. Contrary to previous studies based on domain promiscuity, it seems as if the DV I is age independent. Finally, we find that contrary to previously reported findings, versatility is lower in Eukaryotes. In summary, our measure of domain versatility indicates that a random attachment process is sufficient to explain the observed distribution of domain arrangements and that several views on domain promiscuity need to be revised. PMID:18854028

  12. Physiology in conservation translocations.

    PubMed

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R; Munn, Adam J

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining 'success' as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall under a

  13. Physiology in conservation translocations

    PubMed Central

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  14. Structures of heterodimeric POZ domains of Miz1/BCL6 and Miz1/NAC1.

    PubMed

    Stead, Mark Alexander; Wright, Stephanie Claire

    2014-12-01

    The POZ domain is an evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction domain that is found in approximately 40 mammalian transcription factors. POZ domains mediate both homodimerization and the heteromeric interactions of different POZ-domain transcription factors with each other. Miz1 is a POZ-domain transcription factor that regulates cell-cycle arrest and DNA-damage responses. The activities of Miz1 are altered by its interaction with the POZ-domain transcriptional repressors BCL6 and NAC1, and these interactions have been implicated in tumourigenesis in B-cell lymphomas and in ovarian serous carcinomas that overexpress BCL6 and NAC1, respectively. A strategy for the purification of tethered POZ domains that form forced heterodimers is described, and crystal structures of the heterodimeric POZ domains of Miz1/BCL6 and of Miz1/NAC1 are reported. These structures will be relevant for the design of therapeutics that target POZ-domain interaction interfaces.

  15. LOB Domain Proteins: Beyond Lateral Organ Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changzheng; Luo, Feng; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) proteins defined by a conserved LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB) domain are key regulators of plant organ development. Recent studies have expanded their functional diversity beyond the definition of lateral organ boundaries to pollen development, plant regeneration, photomorphogenesis, pathogen response, and specific developmental functions in non-model plants, such as poplar and legumes. The identification of a range of upstream regulators, protein partners, and downstream targets of LBD family members has unraveled the molecular networks of LBD-dependent processes. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that LBD proteins have essential roles in integrating developmental changes in response to phytohormone signaling or environmental cues. As we discuss here, these novel discoveries of LBD functions and their molecular contexts promote a better understanding of this plant-specific transcription factor family. PMID:26616195

  16. Myosin flexibility: structural domains and collective vibrations.

    PubMed

    Navizet, Isabelle; Lavery, Richard; Jernigan, Robert L

    2004-02-15

    The movement of the myosin motor along an actin filament involves a directed conformational change within the cross-bridge formed between the protein and the filament. Despite the structural data that has been obtained on this system, little is known of the mechanics of this conformational change. We have used existing crystallographic structures of three conformations of the myosin head, containing the motor domain and the lever arm, for structural comparisons and mechanical studies with a coarse-grained elastic network model. The results enable us to define structurally conserved domains within the protein and to better understand myosin flexibility. Notably they point to the role of the light chains in rigidifying the lever arm and to changes in flexibility as a consequence of nucleotide binding.

  17. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  18. Crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 reveals a three-helical domain architecture.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Anu; Solanki, Vipul; Parkesh, Raman; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-10-01

    Human SIRT7 is an NAD(+) dependent deacetylase, which belongs to sirtuin family of proteins. SIRT7, like other sirtuins has conserved catalytic domain and is flanked by N- and C-terminal domains reported to play vital functional roles. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 (SIRT7(NTD) ) at 2.3 Å resolution as MBP-SIRT7(NTD) fusion protein. SIRT7(NTD) adopts three-helical domain architecture and comparative structural analyses suggest similarities to some DNA binding motifs and transcription regulators. We also report here the importance of N- and C-terminal domains in soluble expression of SIRT7. Proteins 2016; 84:1558-1563. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 reveals a three-helical domain architecture.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Anu; Solanki, Vipul; Parkesh, Raman; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-10-01

    Human SIRT7 is an NAD(+) dependent deacetylase, which belongs to sirtuin family of proteins. SIRT7, like other sirtuins has conserved catalytic domain and is flanked by N- and C-terminal domains reported to play vital functional roles. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 (SIRT7(NTD) ) at 2.3 Å resolution as MBP-SIRT7(NTD) fusion protein. SIRT7(NTD) adopts three-helical domain architecture and comparative structural analyses suggest similarities to some DNA binding motifs and transcription regulators. We also report here the importance of N- and C-terminal domains in soluble expression of SIRT7. Proteins 2016; 84:1558-1563. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27287224

  20. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  1. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  2. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  3. The Data Conservancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, S.; Duerr, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    NSF's Sustainable Digital Data Preservation and Access Network Partners program is an ambitious attempt to integrate a wide variety of expertise and infrastructure into a network for providing "reliable digital preservation, access, integration, and analysis capabilities for science." One of the first two DataNet award recipients, the Data Conservancy, is itself a network of widely diverse partners led by the libraries at the Johns Hopkins University. The Data Conservancy is built on existing exemplar scientific projects, communities, and virtual organizations that have deep engagement with their user communities, and extensive experience with large-scale distributed system development. Data Conservancy members embrace a shared vision that data curation is not an end, but rather a means to collect, organize, validate, and preserve data needed to address the grand research challenges that face society. Data Conservancy members holdings encompass the entire range of earth, life, and space science data. New to the Data Conservancy is the concept that University libraries will be part of the distributed network of data centers and that data science will become a path in the library and information science curricula. As noted by Winston Tabb (JHU Dean of Libraries) "Data Centers are the new library stacks."

  4. Creative Conservation Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Jason

    2015-04-01

    I am a fellow with the International League of Conservation photographers (iLCP) and have been focused on photographing conservation dynamics at the intersection of social and environmental issues for a decade. Subjects have included traditional concerns such as deforestation, water conservation, endangered species, and fisheries. However, I rarely make photographs of the traditional nature, wildlife, landscapes, or environmental atrocities that most people think of when they think about environmentalism. Instead, I photograph people and how they live on the planet, as I believe passionately that without also considering social and cultural concerns, we will not be able to effectively and sustainably do conservation work or achieve positive environmental change. My presentation will share recent photography projects on forest conservation in Indonesian Borneo and fisheries management in Central America where I used a 'stakeholder profile-based' process to broadly survey the complexity of the issues while also making personal connections for these projects' diverse audiences. Through these case studies I will explore the opportunities and challenges of combining the authenticity, accuracy, and scientific validity of journalistic and documentary work with the emotional impact of the conventions of art and storytelling.

  5. fork head domain genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Odenthal, J; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1998-07-01

    Nine members of the fork head domain gene family (fkd1-fkd9) were isolated from early cDNA libraries in the zebrafish. They show unique expression patterns in whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization during the first 24 h of embryonic development. These fkd genes fall into three of ten classes, based on sequence similarities within the DNA-binding domain, whereas members for the other seven classes described in other vertebrates were not found. In addition to conserved residues at certain positions in the fork head domain, characteristic transcription activation domains as well as similarities in expression patterns were found for members of the different classes. Members of class I (fkd1/axial, fkd2/Zffkh1, fkd4 and fkd7) are differentially transcribed in unsegmented dorsal axial structures such as the floor plate, the notochord, the hypochord and, in addition, the endoderm. Transcripts of fkd3 and fkd5 (class II) are mainly detected in the cells of the ectoderm which form neural tissues, as is the case for genes of this class in other species. RNAs of the three members of class V (fkd6, fkd8 and fkd9) are expressed in the paraxial mesoderm and transiently in the neuroectoderm. fkd6 is strongly expressed in neural crest cells from early stages on, whereas fkd2 and fkd7 are transcribed in individual neural crest cells in the pharyngula period.

  6. Network Evolution: Rewiring and Signatures of Conservation in Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Kim, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of network evolution has been hampered by limited availability of protein interaction data for different organisms. In this study, we investigate evolutionary mechanisms in Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain and kinase interaction networks using high-resolution specificity profiles. We constructed and examined networks for 23 fungal species ranging from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We quantify rates of different rewiring mechanisms and show that interaction change through binding site evolution is faster than through gene gain or loss. We found that SH3 interactions evolve swiftly, at rates similar to those found in phosphoregulation evolution. Importantly, we show that interaction changes are sufficiently rapid to exhibit saturation phenomena at the observed timescales. Finally, focusing on the SH3 interaction network, we observe extensive clustering of binding sites on target proteins by SH3 domains and a strong correlation between the number of domains that bind a target protein (target in-degree) and interaction conservation. The relationship between in-degree and interaction conservation is driven by two different effects, namely the number of clusters that correspond to interaction interfaces and the number of domains that bind to each cluster leads to sequence specific conservation, which in turn results in interaction conservation. In summary, we uncover several network evolution mechanisms likely to generalize across peptide recognition modules. PMID:22438796

  7. A Water Conservation Digital Library Using Ontologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Lukasz; Cornejo, Camilo; Beck, Howard

    New technologies are emerging that assist in organizing and retrieving knowledge stored in a variety of forms (books, papers, models, decision support systems, databases), but they can only be evaluated through real world applications. Ontology has been used to manage the Water Conservation Digital Library holding a growing collection of various types of digital resources in the domain of urban water conservation in Florida, USA. The ontology based back-end powers a fully operational web interface, available at http://library.conservefloridawater.org . The system has already demonstrated numerous benefits of the ontology application, including: easier and more precise finding of resources, information sharing and reuse, and proved to effectively facilitate information management.

  8. The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Korn, D.; Wang, T.S.F. )

    1988-08-25

    The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase {alpha} was assessed by immunological and molecular genetic approaches. Four anti-human KB cell DNA polymerase {alpha} monoclonal antibodies were tested for their ability to recognize a phylogenetically broad array of eukaryotic DNA polymerases. While the single non-neutralizing antibody used in this study recognizes higher mammalian (human, simian, canine, and bovine) polymerases only, three neutralizing antibodies exhibit greater, but variable, extents of cross-reactivity among vertebrate species. Genomic Southern hybridization studies with the cDNA of the human DNA polymerase {alpha} catalytic polypeptide identify the existence of many consensus DNA sequences within the DNA polymerase genes of vertebrate, invertebrate, plant and unicellular organisms. These findings illustrate the differential evolutionary conservation of four unique epitopes on DNA sequences, presumably reflective of critical functional domains, in the DNA polymerase genes from a broad diversity of living forms.

  9. Energy conservation in distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, T. W.; Dweck, J. S.; Weinberg, M.; Armstrong, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    An audit of major industrial and processes and key colums in each major process indicated that approximately twoquads of energy were consumed for distillation in the US in 1976. Energy usage by industry is included: petroleum refineries, 66% chemical (including petrochemical) industry, 29% natural gas liquids processing, 5%. Techniques and current practices for conserving distillation energy are reviewed, and guidelines indicating those process conditons which favor the use of each energy conserving technique are enumerated. Expressions for payout time for tray and control retrofit options are developed based on energy savings and increased throughput. Calculations for industrial colums suggested that both types of retrofits would frequently have short (,6 months) payout times based on either criterion. Extractive distillation is also discussed, and criteria enabling the estimation of the energy which may be conserved using this technique are developed. Good housekeeping practices and field techniques for checking the energy efficiency of industrial distillations are also discussed.

  10. Diversity of the DNA replication system in the Archaea domain.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Long, Feng; Cann, Isaac; Whitman, William B

    2014-01-01

    The precise and timely duplication of the genome is essential for cellular life. It is achieved by DNA replication, a complex process that is conserved among the three domains of life. Even though the cellular structure of archaea closely resembles that of bacteria, the information processing machinery of archaea is evolutionarily more closely related to the eukaryotic system, especially for the proteins involved in the DNA replication process. While the general DNA replication mechanism is conserved among the different domains of life, modifications in functionality and in some of the specialized replication proteins are observed. Indeed, Archaea possess specific features unique to this domain. Moreover, even though the general pattern of the replicative system is the same in all archaea, a great deal of variation exists between specific groups.

  11. Conservation reaches new heights.

    PubMed

    Pepall, J; Khanal, P

    1992-10-01

    The conservation program with the management assistance of the Woodlands Mountain Institute in 2 contiguous parks, the Mount Everest National Park in Nepal and the Qomolangma Nature Reserve in China, in 2 countries is described. The focus is on conservation of the complex ecosystem with sustainable development by showing local people how to benefit from the park without environmental damage. Cultural diversity is as important as biological diversity. The area has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site with the "last pure ecological seed" of the Himalayas. The regional geography and culture are presented. Population growth has impacted natural resources through overgrazing, cultivation of marginal land, and deforestation; future plans to build a dam and road bordering the nature reserve pose other threats. Proposed management plans for the Makalu-Barun Nature Park (established in November 1991) and Conservation Area include a division of the park into nature reserve areas free of human activity, protected areas which permit traditional land use, and special sites and trail for tourists and religious pilgrims. The conservation area will act as a buffer for the park and provide economic opportunities; further subdivisions include land use for biodiversity protection, community forest and pasture, agroforestry, and agriculture and settlement. Efforts will be made to increase the welfare of women and local people; proposed projects include the introduction of higher milk-producing animals for stall feeding. Also proposed is a cultural and natural history museum. 70% of the project's resources will be directed to local community participation in consultation and park maintenance. The project is a model of how conservation and protection of natural resources can coexist with local economic development and participation; an integration of preservation of biological diversity, mountain wisdom, and the value of local people as resources for conservation.

  12. Conservation reaches new heights.

    PubMed

    Pepall, J; Khanal, P

    1992-10-01

    The conservation program with the management assistance of the Woodlands Mountain Institute in 2 contiguous parks, the Mount Everest National Park in Nepal and the Qomolangma Nature Reserve in China, in 2 countries is described. The focus is on conservation of the complex ecosystem with sustainable development by showing local people how to benefit from the park without environmental damage. Cultural diversity is as important as biological diversity. The area has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site with the "last pure ecological seed" of the Himalayas. The regional geography and culture are presented. Population growth has impacted natural resources through overgrazing, cultivation of marginal land, and deforestation; future plans to build a dam and road bordering the nature reserve pose other threats. Proposed management plans for the Makalu-Barun Nature Park (established in November 1991) and Conservation Area include a division of the park into nature reserve areas free of human activity, protected areas which permit traditional land use, and special sites and trail for tourists and religious pilgrims. The conservation area will act as a buffer for the park and provide economic opportunities; further subdivisions include land use for biodiversity protection, community forest and pasture, agroforestry, and agriculture and settlement. Efforts will be made to increase the welfare of women and local people; proposed projects include the introduction of higher milk-producing animals for stall feeding. Also proposed is a cultural and natural history museum. 70% of the project's resources will be directed to local community participation in consultation and park maintenance. The project is a model of how conservation and protection of natural resources can coexist with local economic development and participation; an integration of preservation of biological diversity, mountain wisdom, and the value of local people as resources for conservation. PMID

  13. Conservation of tidal marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Daiber, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the first attempt to examine collectively the various uses and the consequences of marsh conservation efforts. Author Franklin Daiber emphasizes tidal marsh conservation from a holistic perspective rather than from the perspective of a single purpose or special economic interest. He addresses a topic receiving increasing attention, namely the concept of open marsh management as a means of controlling mosquito production without harmful effects on other marsh organisms. Topics considered include: water management; dikes, impoundments, ponds and ditches; reclaimed land and impoundments; ditching and ponding for mosquito control; sewage disposal and waste treatment; dredge material for wetland restoration; insecticides; oil pollution; and petroleum hydrocarbon interactions.

  14. Formin homology 2 domains occur in multiple contexts in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Cvrčková, Fatima; Novotný, Marian; Pícková, Denisa; Žárský, Viktor

    2004-01-01

    Background Involvement of conservative molecular modules and cellular mechanisms in the widely diversified processes of eukaryotic cell morphogenesis leads to the intriguing question: how do similar proteins contribute to dissimilar morphogenetic outputs. Formins (FH2 proteins) play a central part in the control of actin organization and dynamics, providing a good example of evolutionarily versatile use of a conserved protein domain in the context of a variety of lineage-specific structural and signalling interactions. Results In order to identify possible plant-specific sequence features within the FH2 protein family, we performed a detailed analysis of angiosperm formin-related sequences available in public databases, with particular focus on the complete Arabidopsis genome and the nearly finished rice genome sequence. This has led to revision of the current annotation of half of the 22 Arabidopsis formin-related genes. Comparative analysis of the two plant genomes revealed a good conservation of the previously described two subfamilies of plant formins (Class I and Class II), as well as several subfamilies within them that appear to predate the separation of monocot and dicot plants. Moreover, a number of plant Class II formins share an additional conserved domain, related to the protein phosphatase/tensin/auxilin fold. However, considerable inter-species variability sets limits to generalization of any functional conclusions reached on a single species such as Arabidopsis. Conclusions The plant-specific domain context of the conserved FH2 domain, as well as plant-specific features of the domain itself, may reflect distinct functional requirements in plant cells. The variability of formin structures found in plants far exceeds that known from both fungi and metazoans, suggesting a possible contribution of FH2 proteins in the evolution of the plant type of multicellularity. PMID:15256004

  15. Two Centuries of Soil Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    Narrates U.S. soil conservation history since the late eighteenth century. Discusses early practices such as contour plowing. Profiles individuals who promoted soil conservation and were largely responsible for the creation of the Soil Conservation Service. Explains the causes of erosion and how soil conservation districts help farmers prevent…

  16. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  17. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. A bacterial collagen-binding domain with novel calcium-binding motif controls domain orientation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Matsushita, Osamu; Okabe, Akinobu; Sakon, Joshua

    2003-01-01

    The crystal structure of a collagen-binding domain (CBD) with an N-terminal domain linker from Clostridium histolyticum class I collagenase was determined at 1.00 Å resolution in the absence of calcium (1NQJ) and at 1.65 Å resolution in the presence of calcium (1NQD). The mature enzyme is composed of four domains: a metalloprotease domain, a spacing domain and two CBDs. A 12-residue-long linker is found at the N-terminus of each CBD. In the absence of calcium, the CBD reveals a β-sheet sandwich fold with the linker adopting an α-helix. The addition of calcium unwinds the linker and anchors it to the distal side of the sandwich as a new β-strand. The conformational change of the linker upon calcium binding is confirmed by changes in the Stokes and hydrodynamic radii as measured by size exclusion chromatography and by dynamic light scattering with and without calcium. Furthermore, extensive mutagenesis of conserved surface residues and collagen-binding studies allow us to identify the collagen-binding surface of the protein and propose likely collagen–protein binding models. PMID:12682007

  19. Conservation Is Job One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatzai, Glen

    1998-01-01

    The University of Michigan, winner of a federal award for its campus energy conservation, has developed a building automation system that uses direct-digital-control technology to manage energy use. The project, undertaken in partnership with an energy management company, has saved over $10 million since its inception, and includes a revolving…

  20. Hearing Conservation Medical Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on hearing impairment is presented including causes and criteria for safe noise levels. The purpose of the Hearing Conservation Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Hearing Impairment at LeRC are discussed.

  1. Conservation Directory, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, William E., Ed.

    The 1974 Conservation Directory is the 19th edition of a national comprehensive listing of organizations, agencies, and officials concerned with natural resources. It includes entries for about 1,400 organizations and over 7,000 individuals. Sections listing members of Congress, congressional committees, federal agencies, international, national,…

  2. Conservative Public Interest Litigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pell, Terence J.

    2007-01-01

    The idea that lawsuits can move a public as well as a legal agenda is not new. In recent years, conservatives have brought high profile lawsuits designed both to vindicate the rights of an individual plaintiff and to educate the public about an important issue. For example, lawsuits filed nearly 10 years ago against the University of Michigan's…

  3. Energy Conservation Simplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The standard formulation of energy conservation involves the subsidiary ideas of kinetic energy ("KE"), work ("W"), thermal energy, internal energy, and a half-dozen different kinds of potential energy ("PE"): elastic, chemical, nuclear, gravitational, and so forth. These quantities came to be recognized during the centuries over which the…

  4. Diversifying the Conservation Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Lisa K.

    1996-01-01

    Among 47 nonprofit conservation organizations surveyed, 40% indicated that 76-100% of their staff were from diverse populations and another 30% indicated that 51-75% of their staff were women, people of color, or physically challenged. However, few respondents indicated that top management positions were held by women or people of color. (LP)

  5. Conservation of Library Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Libraries, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Twelve articles cover books as artifacts; workstations for conservation of library materials; care of scrapbooks, albums, and photographs; map preservation; library environment; flood recovery; disaster prevention and preparedness; incorporating preservation into library organization; and bibliography of Chester Public Library (Illinois) First…

  6. Foundry energy conservation workbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses methods for promoting energy conservation in foundries. Use of electric power, natural gas, and coke are evaluated. Waste heat recovery systems are considered. Energy consumption in the specific processes of electric melting, natural gas melting, heat treatments, ladle melting, and coke fuel melting is described. An example energy analysis is included. (GHH)

  7. Foundry energy conservation workbook

    SciTech Connect

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses methods for promoting energy conservation in foundries. Use of electric power, natural gas, and coke are evaluated. Waste heat recovery systems are considered. Energy consumption in the specific processes of electric melting, natural gas melting, heat treatments, ladle melting, and coke fuel melting is described. An example energy analysis is included. (GHH)

  8. Communities, Cameras, and Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Communities, Cameras, and Conservation (CCC) is the most exciting and valuable program the author has seen in her 30 years of teaching field science courses. In this citizen science project, students and community volunteers collect data on mountain lions ("Puma concolor") at four natural areas and public parks along the Front Range of Colorado.…

  9. Conservation and gene banking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant conservation has several objectives the main ones include safeguarding our food supply, preserving crop wild relatives for breeding and selection of new cultivars, providing material for industrial and pharmaceutical uses and preserving the beauty and diversity of our flora for generations to ...

  10. Conservation Awareness Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rosa County Board of Public Instruction, Milton, FL.

    Recommendations for incorporating conservation education into the K-5 curriculum comprise this teacher's guide. Examined are eight natural resources: air, energy, forests and plant life, human resources, minerals, soil, water, and wildlife. Each of these topics is considered in two ways: (1) a chart depicts concepts basic to understanding the…

  11. Transportation energy conservation fairs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An energy conservation fair sponsored by the Department of Transportation was described. It demonstrated how average drivers can save transportation dollars by changing driving habits at little or no cost. Exhibitors are listed. Methods for disseminating information and recommendations on how to set up such fairs are discussed. (MCW)

  12. Conservation of fern spores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferns are a diverse and important group of plants, but diversity of species and populations are at risk from increasing social pressures, loss of habitat and climate change. Ex situ conservation is a useful strategy to limit decline in genetic diversity and requires technologies to preserve fern ger...

  13. Analysis of the Linker Region Joining the Adenylation and Carrier Protein Domains of the Modular Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bradley R.; Sundlov, Jesse A.; Drake, Eric J.; Makin, Thomas A.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPSs) are multi-modular proteins capable of producing important peptide natural products. Using an assembly-line process the amino acid substrate and peptide intermediates are passed between the active sites of different catalytic domains of the NRPS while bound covalently to a peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domain. Examination of the linker sequences that join the NRPS adenylation and PCP domains identified several conserved proline residues that are not found in standalone adenylation domains. We examined the roles of these proline residues and neighboring conserved sequences through mutagenesis and biochemical analysis of the reaction catalyzed by the adenylation domain and the fully reconstituted NRPS pathway. In particular, we identified a conserved LPxP motif at the start of the adenylation-PCP linker. The LPxP motif interacts with a region on the adenylation domain to stabilize a critical catalytic lysine residue belonging to the A10 motif that immediately precedes the linker. Further, this interaction with the C-terminal sub-domain of the adenylation domain may coordinate movement of the PCP with the conformational change of the adenylation domain. Through this work, we extend the conserved A10 motif of the adenylation domain and identify residues that enable proper adenylation domain function. PMID:24975514

  14. Production of Slit2 LRR domains in mammalian cells for structural studies and the structure of human Slit2 domain 3.

    PubMed

    Morlot, Cecile; Hemrika, Wieger; Romijn, Roland A; Gros, Piet; Cusack, Stephen; McCarthy, Andrew A

    2007-09-01

    Slit2 and Roundabout 1 (Robo1) provide a key ligand-receptor interaction for the navigation of commissural neurons during the development of the central nervous system. Slit2 is a large multidomain protein containing an unusual domain organization of four tandem leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains at its N-terminus. These domains are well known to mediate protein-protein interactions; indeed, the Robo1-binding region has been mapped to the concave face of the second LRR domain. It has also been shown that the fourth LRR domain may mediate Slit dimerization and that both the first and second domains can bind heparin. Thus, while roles have been ascribed for three of the LRR domains, there is still no known role for the third domain. Each of the four LRR domains from human Slit2 have now been successfully expressed in milligram quantities using expression in mammalian cells. Here, the crystallization of the second and third LRR domains and the structure of the third LRR domain are presented. This is the first structure of an LRR domain from human Slit2, which has an extra repeat compared with the Drosophila homologue. It is proposed that a highly conserved patch of surface residues on the concave face may mediate any protein-protein interactions involving this LRR domain, a result that will be useful in guiding further studies on Slit2.

  15. Application of Wavelet Transform for PDZ Domain Classification

    PubMed Central

    Daqrouq, Khaled; Alhmouz, Rami; Balamesh, Ahmed; Memic, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains have been identified as part of an array of signaling proteins that are often unrelated, except for the well-conserved structural PDZ domain they contain. These domains have been linked to many disease processes including common Avian influenza, as well as very rare conditions such as Fraser and Usher syndromes. Historically, based on the interactions and the nature of bonds they form, PDZ domains have most often been classified into one of three classes (class I, class II and others - class III), that is directly dependent on their binding partner. In this study, we report on three unique feature extraction approaches based on the bigram and trigram occurrence and existence rearrangements within the domain's primary amino acid sequences in assisting PDZ domain classification. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) and Shannon entropy denoted by wavelet entropy (WE) feature extraction methods were proposed. Using 115 unique human and mouse PDZ domains, the existence rearrangement approach yielded a high recognition rate (78.34%), which outperformed our occurrence rearrangements based method. The recognition rate was (81.41%) with validation technique. The method reported for PDZ domain classification from primary sequences proved to be an encouraging approach for obtaining consistent classification results. We anticipate that by increasing the database size, we can further improve feature extraction and correct classification. PMID:25860375

  16. Molecular and Evolutionary Analysis of NEAr-Iron Transporter (NEAT) Domains

    PubMed Central

    Honsa, Erin S.; Maresso, Anthony W.; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for bacterial survival, being required for numerous biological processes. NEAr-iron Transporter (NEAT) domains have been studied in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria to understand how their proteins obtain heme as an iron source during infection. While a 2002 study initially discovered and annotated the NEAT domain encoded by the genomes of several Gram-positive bacteria, there remains a scarcity of information regarding the conservation and distribution of NEAT domains throughout the bacterial kingdom, and whether these domains are restricted to pathogenic bacteria. This study aims to expand upon initial bioinformatics analysis of predicted NEAT domains, by exploring their evolution and conserved function. This information was used to identify new candidate domains in both pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms. We also searched metagenomic datasets, specifically sequence from the Human Microbiome Project. Here, we report a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of 343 NEAT domains, encoded by Gram-positive bacteria, mostly within the phylum Firmicutes, with the exception of Eggerthella sp. (Actinobacteria) and an unclassified Mollicutes bacterium (Tenericutes). No new NEAT sequences were identified in the HMP dataset. We detected specific groups of NEAT domains based on phylogeny of protein sequences, including a cluster of novel clostridial NEAT domains. We also identified environmental and soil organisms that encode putative NEAT proteins. Biochemical analysis of heme binding by a NEAT domain from a protein encoded by the soil-dwelling organism Paenibacillus polymyxa demonstrated that the domain is homologous in function to NEAT domains encoded by pathogenic bacteria. Together, this study provides the first global bioinformatics analysis and phylogenetic evidence that NEAT domains have a strong conservation of function, despite group-specific differences at the amino acid level. These findings will provide information useful for future projects

  17. REvolver: modeling sequence evolution under domain constraints.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Tina; von Haeseler, Arndt; Ebersberger, Ingo

    2012-09-01

    Simulating the change of protein sequences over time in a biologically realistic way is fundamental for a broad range of studies with a focus on evolution. It is, thus, problematic that typically simulators evolve individual sites of a sequence identically and independently. More realistic simulations are possible; however, they are often prohibited by limited knowledge concerning site-specific evolutionary constraints or functional dependencies between amino acids. As a consequence, a protein's functional and structural characteristics are rapidly lost in the course of simulated evolution. Here, we present REvolver (www.cibiv.at/software/revolver), a program that simulates protein sequence alteration such that evolutionarily stable sequence characteristics, like functional domains, are maintained. For this purpose, REvolver recruits profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs) for parameterizing site-specific models of sequence evolution in an automated fashion. pHMMs derived from alignments of homologous proteins or protein domains capture information regarding which sequence sites remained conserved over time and where in a sequence insertions or deletions are more likely to occur. Thus, they describe constraints on the evolutionary process acting on these sequences. To demonstrate the performance of REvolver as well as its applicability in large-scale simulation studies, we evolved the entire human proteome up to 1.5 expected substitutions per site. Simultaneously, we analyzed the preservation of Pfam and SMART domains in the simulated sequences over time. REvolver preserved 92% of the Pfam domains originally present in the human sequences. This value drops to 15% when traditional models of amino acid sequence evolution are used. Thus, REvolver represents a significant advance toward a realistic simulation of protein sequence evolution on a proteome-wide scale. Further, REvolver facilitates the simulation of a protein family with a user-defined domain architecture at

  18. ECOD: An Evolutionary Classification of Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Kinch, Lisa N.; Pei, Jimin; Shi, Shuoyong; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of a protein, including both close and distant relationships, often reveals insight into its structure and function. Fast and easy access to such up-to-date information facilitates research. We have developed a hierarchical evolutionary classification of all proteins with experimentally determined spatial structures, and presented it as an interactive and updatable online database. ECOD (Evolutionary Classification of protein Domains) is distinct from other structural classifications in that it groups domains primarily by evolutionary relationships (homology), rather than topology (or “fold”). This distinction highlights cases of homology between domains of differing topology to aid in understanding of protein structure evolution. ECOD uniquely emphasizes distantly related homologs that are difficult to detect, and thus catalogs the largest number of evolutionary links among structural domain classifications. Placing distant homologs together underscores the ancestral similarities of these proteins and draws attention to the most important regions of sequence and structure, as well as conserved functional sites. ECOD also recognizes closer sequence-based relationships between protein domains. Currently, approximately 100,000 protein structures are classified in ECOD into 9,000 sequence families clustered into close to 2,000 evolutionary groups. The classification is assisted by an automated pipeline that quickly and consistently classifies weekly releases of PDB structures and allows for continual updates. This synchronization with PDB uniquely distinguishes ECOD among all protein classifications. Finally, we present several case studies of homologous proteins not recorded in other classifications, illustrating the potential of how ECOD can be used to further biological and evolutionary studies. PMID:25474468

  19. FIST: a sensory domain for diverse signal transduction pathways in prokaryotes and ubiquitin signaling in eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Borziak, Kirill; Jouline, Igor B

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Sensory domains that are conserved among Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya are important detectors of common signals detected by living cells. Due to their high sequence divergence, sensory domains are difficult to identify. We systematically look for novel sensory domains using sensitive profile-based searches initi-ated with regions of signal transduction proteins where no known domains can be identified by current domain models. Results: Using profile searches followed by multiple sequence alignment, structure prediction, and domain architecture analysis, we have identified a novel sensory domain termed FIST, which is present in signal transduction proteins from Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya. Remote similarity to a known ligand-binding fold and chromosomal proximity of FIST-encoding genes to those coding for proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and transport suggest that FIST domains bind small ligands, such as amino acids.

  20. FIST: a sensory domain for diverse signal transduction pathways in prokaryotes and ubiquitin signaling in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Borziak, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Sensory domains that are conserved among Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya are important detectors of common signals detected by living cells. Due to their high sequence divergence, sensory domains are difficult to identify. We systematically look for novel sensory domains using sensitive profile-based searches initiated with regions of signal transduction proteins where no known domains can be identified by current domain models. Results Using profile searches followed by multiple sequence alignment, structure prediction and domain architecture analysis, we have identified a novel sensory domain termed FIST, which is present in signal transduction proteins from Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya. Chromosomal proximity of FIST-encoding genes to those coding for proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and transport suggest that FIST domains bind small ligands, such as amino acids. PMID:17855421

  1. The Transmembrane Domain C of AMPA Receptors is Critically Involved in Receptor Function and Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Terhag, Jan; Gottschling, Kevin; Hollmann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are major players in synaptic transmission and are critically involved in many cognitive events. Although receptors of different subfamilies serve different functions, they all show a conserved domain topology. For most of these domains, structure–function relationships have been established and are well understood. However, up to date the role of the transmembrane domain C in receptor function has been investigated only poorly. We have constructed a series of receptor chimeras and point mutants designed to shed light on the structural and/or functional importance of this domain. We here present evidence that the role of transmembrane domain C exceeds that of a mere scaffolding domain and that several amino acid residues located within the domain are crucial for receptor gating and desensitization. Furthermore, our data suggest that the domain may be involved in receptor interaction with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins. PMID:21206529

  2. Evolutionary versatility of eukaryotic protein domains revealed by their bigram networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein domains are globular structures of independently folded polypeptides that exert catalytic or binding activities. Their sequences are recognized as evolutionary units that, through genome recombination, constitute protein repertoires of linkage patterns. Via mutations, domains acquire modified functions that contribute to the fitness of cells and organisms. Recent studies have addressed the evolutionary selection that may have shaped the functions of individual domains and the emergence of particular domain combinations, which led to new cellular functions in multi-cellular animals. This study focuses on modeling domain linkage globally and investigates evolutionary implications that may be revealed by novel computational analysis. Results A survey of 77 completely sequenced eukaryotic genomes implies a potential hierarchical and modular organization of biological functions in most living organisms. Domains in a genome or multiple genomes are modeled as a network of hetero-duplex covalent linkages, termed bigrams. A novel computational technique is introduced to decompose such networks, whereby the notion of domain "networking versatility" is derived and measured. The most and least "versatile" domains (termed "core domains" and "peripheral domains" respectively) are examined both computationally via sequence conservation measures and experimentally using selected domains. Our study suggests that such a versatility measure extracted from the bigram networks correlates with the adaptivity of domains during evolution, where the network core domains are highly adaptive, significantly contrasting the network peripheral domains. Conclusions Domain recombination has played a major part in the evolution of eukaryotes attributing to genome complexity. From a system point of view, as the results of selection and constant refinement, networks of domain linkage are structured in a hierarchical modular fashion. Domains with high degree of networking

  3. THUMP--a predicted RNA-binding domain shared by 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine synthases and RNA methylases.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    2001-04-01

    Sequence profile searches were used to identify an ancient domain in ThiI-like thiouridine synthases, conserved RNA methylases, archaeal pseudouridine synthases and several uncharacterized proteins. We predict that this domain is an RNA-binding domain that adopts an alpha/beta fold similar to that found in the C-terminal domain of translation initiation factor 3 and ribosomal protein S8.

  4. Energy-conservation indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.B.

    1982-06-01

    A series of Energy Conservation Indicators were developed for the Department of Energy to assist in the evaluation of current and proposed conservation strategies. As descriptive statistics that signify current conditions and trends related to efficiency of energy use, indicators provide a way of measuring, monitoring, or inferring actual responses by consumers in markets for energy services. Related sets of indicators are presented in some 30 one-page indicator summaries. Indicators are shown graphically, followed by several paragraphs that explain their derivation and highlight key findings. Indicators are classified according to broad end-use sectors: Aggregate (economy), Residential, Commercial, Industrial, and transportation. In most cases annual time series information is presented covering the period 1960 through 1981.

  5. Three strategies for conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The three strategies considered as energy conservation oriented were given: national energy conservation, electrification, and diversification. The first one applies to the near term period (now-1985), the second one to the mid term (1985-2000), and the third one to the far term (2000- ). The rest of this section was focussed on the near term period. The following proposed actions were considered: (1) roll back the price of newly discovered oil, (2) force conversion of many power plants from gas and oil to coal, (3) freeze gasoline production for three years at 1972 levels, (4) mandate automobile mileage requirements, (5) require industry to improve energy efficiency, and (6) require manufacture of household appliances with greater efficiency. Each of these six actions was described and discussed in more detail.

  6. Conservative entropic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2011-10-01

    Entropic forces have recently attracted considerable attention as ways to reformulate, retrodict, and perhaps even "explain" classical Newtonian gravity from a rather specific thermodynamic perspective. In this article I point out that if one wishes to reformulate classical Newtonian gravity in terms of an entropic force, then the fact that Newtonian gravity is described by a conservative force places significant constraints on the form of the entropy and temperature functions. (These constraints also apply to entropic reinterpretations of electromagnetism, and indeed to any conservative force derivable from a potential.) The constraints I will establish are sufficient to present real and significant problems for any reasonable variant of Verlinde's entropic gravity proposal, though for technical reasons the constraints established herein do not directly impact on either Jacobson'sor Padmanabhan's versions of entropic gravity. In an attempt to resolve these issues, I will extend the usual notion of entropic force to multiple heat baths with multiple "temperatures" and multiple "entropies".

  7. The SAM domain of polyhomeotic forms a helical polymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chongwoo A; Gingery, Mari; Pilpa, Rosemarie M; Bowie, James U

    2002-06-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are important in the maintenance of stable repression patterns during development. Several PcG members contain a protein protein interaction module called a SAM domain (also known as SPM, PNT and HLH). Here we report the high-resolution structure of the SAM domain of polyhomeotic (Ph). Ph-SAM forms a helical polymer structure, providing a likely mechanism for the extension of PcG complexes. The structure of the polymer resembles that formed by the SAM domain of another transcriptional repressor, TEL. The formation of these polymer structures by SAM domains in two divergent repressors suggests a conserved mode of repression involving a higher order chromatin structure.

  8. Structure of the kinase domain of Gilgamesh from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Han, Ni; Chen, CuiCui; Shi, Zhubing; Cheng, Dianlin

    2014-04-01

    The CK1 family kinases regulate multiple cellular aspects and play important roles in Wnt/Wingless and Hedgehog signalling. The kinase domain of Drosophila Gilgamesh isoform I (Gilgamesh-I), a homologue of human CK1-γ, was purified and crystallized. Crystals of methylated Gilgamesh-I kinase domain with a D210A mutation diffracted to 2.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.025, c = 291.727 Å. The structure of Gilgamesh-I kinase domain, which was determined by molecular replacement, has conserved catalytic elements and an active conformation. Structural comparison indicates that an extended loop between the α1 helix and the β4 strand exists in the Gilgamesh-I kinase domain. This extended loop may regulate the activity and function of Gilgamesh-I. PMID:24699734

  9. Structure of the kinase domain of Gilgamesh from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ni; Chen, CuiCui; Shi, Zhubing; Cheng, Dianlin

    2014-01-01

    The CK1 family kinases regulate multiple cellular aspects and play important roles in Wnt/Wingless and Hedgehog signalling. The kinase domain of Drosophila Gilgamesh isoform I (Gilgamesh-I), a homologue of human CK1-γ, was purified and crystallized. Crystals of methylated Gilgamesh-I kinase domain with a D210A mutation diffracted to 2.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.025, c = 291.727 Å. The structure of Gilgamesh-I kinase domain, which was determined by molecular replacement, has conserved catalytic elements and an active conformation. Structural comparison indicates that an extended loop between the α1 helix and the β4 strand exists in the Gilgamesh-I kinase domain. This extended loop may regulate the activity and function of Gilgamesh-I. PMID:24699734

  10. Laser conservation paleontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    2001-10-01

    Just as lasers have found countless applications in science, industry, medicine, and entertainment, an array of real and potential uses for lasers in art-conservation analytes and practice have been investigated over the past thirty years. These include holographic recording, holographic recording, holographic nondestructive testing, laser-induced ultrasonic imaging, laser-scattering surface characterization, atomic and molecular analyses, photoacoustic spectroscopy, surface modification, as well as surface divestment and cleaning. The initial endeavors in exploring and assessing the utility of these tools for art conservation are recounted for investigations involving ruby, glass, ion, YAG, carbon dioxide, dye, and excimer lasers as well as high-intensity nonlaser light generators such as xenon flashlamps and argon pinchlamps. Initially, laser divestment/cleaning was, by general consensus, the least plausible laser application in art conservation. In the past ten years it has emerged to dominate all the other applications noted above. Today, at least a dozen firms supply user-friendly laser systems optimized for a range of art-conservation divestment applications. The first-generation laser-cleaning tools are essentially a laser, a beam-delivery device, and a debris- collection accessory. Advanced developmental work has turned in large measure to ancillary subsystems for more sophisticated process control. Of particular importance are acoustic, optical, spectral, EMP, and electronic-vision process control. Beam direction may be via manual, translational-scanner, or robotic beam positioning implemented by means of fiber optics, minors, or prisms and computer control. Substrate thermal alteration and debris redeposition may be minimized or avoided through the incorporation of a gas jet, fluid or fluid jet, or dry-ice blast.

  11. Motor Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple motor inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: High Efficiency Motor retrofit and Cogged V-belts retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  12. Comparison of the domain and frequency domain state feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we present explicitly the equivalence of the time domain and frequency domain state feedbacks, as well as the dynamic state feedback and a modified frequency domain state feedback, from the closed-loop transfer function point of view. The difference of the two approaches is also shown.

  13. Domain Specific vs Domain General: Implications for Dynamic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaniel, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    The article responds to the need for evidence-based dynamic assessment. The article is divided into two sections: In Part 1 we examine the scientific answer to the question of how far human mental activities and capabilities are domain general (DG) / domain specific (DS). A highly complex answer emerges from the literature review of domains such…

  14. Poynting Flux-Conserving Boundary Conditions for Global MHD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, S.; Lotko, W.; Zhang, B.; Brambles, O.; Lyon, J.; Merkin, V. G.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Poynting Flux-conserving boundary conditions that conserve low-frequency, magnetic field-aligned, electromagnetic energy flux across the low-altitude (or inner) boundary in global magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models is presented. This method involves the mapping of both the potential from the ionosphere and the perpendicular magnetic field from the inner magnetosphere to the ghost cells of the computational domain. The single fluid Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) model is used to verify this method. The comparisons of simulations using the standard hardwall boundary conditions of the LFM model and the flux-conserving boundary conditions show that the method reported here improves the transparency of the boundary for the flow of low-frequency (essentially DC) electromagnetic energy flux along field lines. As a consequence, the field-aligned DC Poynting flux just above the boundary is very nearly equal to the ionospheric Joule heating, as it should be if electromagnetic energy is conserved.

  15. Conserved methionines in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Sundby, Cecilia; Härndahl, Ulrika; Gustavsson, Niklas; Ahrman, Emma; Murphy, Denis J

    2005-01-17

    Heat shock proteins counteract heat and oxidative stress. In chloroplasts, a small heat shock protein (Hsp21) contains a set of conserved methionines, which date back to early in the emergence of terrestrial plants. Methionines M49, M52, M55, M59, M62, M67 are located on one side of an amphipathic helix, which may fold back over two other conserved methionines (M97 and M101), to form a binding groove lined with methionines, for sequence-independent recognition of peptides with an overall hydrophobic character. The sHsps protect other proteins from aggregation by binding to their hydrophobic surfaces, which become exposed under stress. Data are presented showing that keeping the conserved methionines in Hsp21 in a reduced form is a prerequisite to maintain such binding. The chloroplast generates reactive oxygen species under both stress and unstressed conditions, but this organelle is also a highly reducing cellular compartment. Chloroplasts contain a specialized isoform of the enzyme, peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, the expression of which is light-induced. Recombinant proteins were used to measure that this reductase can restore Hsp21 methionines after sulfoxidation. This paper also describes how methionine sulfoxidation-reduction can be directly assessed by mass spectrometry, how methionine-to-leucine substitution affects Hsp21, and discusses the possible role for an Hsp21 methionine sulfoxidation-reduction cycle in quenching reactive oxygen species. PMID:15680227

  16. Conservation businesses and conservation planning in a biological diversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Di Minin, Enrico; Macmillan, Douglas Craig; Goodman, Peter Styan; Escott, Boyd; Slotow, Rob; Moilanen, Atte

    2013-08-01

    The allocation of land to biological diversity conservation competes with other land uses and the needs of society for development, food, and extraction of natural resources. Trade-offs between biological diversity conservation and alternative land uses are unavoidable, given the realities of limited conservation resources and the competing demands of society. We developed a conservation-planning assessment for the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal, which forms the central component of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany biological diversity hotspot. Our objective was to enhance biological diversity protection while promoting sustainable development and providing spatial guidance in the resolution of potential policy conflicts over priority areas for conservation at risk of transformation. The conservation-planning assessment combined spatial-distribution models for 646 conservation features, spatial economic-return models for 28 alternative land uses, and spatial maps for 4 threats. Nature-based tourism businesses were competitive with other land uses and could provide revenues of >US$60 million/year to local stakeholders and simultaneously help meeting conservation goals for almost half the conservation features in the planning region. Accounting for opportunity costs substantially decreased conflicts between biological diversity, agricultural use, commercial forestry, and mining. Accounting for economic benefits arising from conservation and reducing potential policy conflicts with alternative plans for development can provide opportunities for successful strategies that combine conservation and sustainable development and facilitate conservation action. PMID:23565917

  17. Conservation businesses and conservation planning in a biological diversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Di Minin, Enrico; Macmillan, Douglas Craig; Goodman, Peter Styan; Escott, Boyd; Slotow, Rob; Moilanen, Atte

    2013-08-01

    The allocation of land to biological diversity conservation competes with other land uses and the needs of society for development, food, and extraction of natural resources. Trade-offs between biological diversity conservation and alternative land uses are unavoidable, given the realities of limited conservation resources and the competing demands of society. We developed a conservation-planning assessment for the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal, which forms the central component of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany biological diversity hotspot. Our objective was to enhance biological diversity protection while promoting sustainable development and providing spatial guidance in the resolution of potential policy conflicts over priority areas for conservation at risk of transformation. The conservation-planning assessment combined spatial-distribution models for 646 conservation features, spatial economic-return models for 28 alternative land uses, and spatial maps for 4 threats. Nature-based tourism businesses were competitive with other land uses and could provide revenues of >US$60 million/year to local stakeholders and simultaneously help meeting conservation goals for almost half the conservation features in the planning region. Accounting for opportunity costs substantially decreased conflicts between biological diversity, agricultural use, commercial forestry, and mining. Accounting for economic benefits arising from conservation and reducing potential policy conflicts with alternative plans for development can provide opportunities for successful strategies that combine conservation and sustainable development and facilitate conservation action.

  18. Conservation and Education in Murchison Falls Conservation Area, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordahl, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis forms the foundation for a conservation education training manual to help guides in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda, communicate to foreign visitors about conservation issues. For background information I used a combination of text-based research and interviews to examine the application of community conservation and…

  19. Motor Domain Phosphorylation Modulates Kinesin-1 Transport*

    PubMed Central

    DeBerg, Hannah A.; Blehm, Benjamin H.; Sheung, Janet; Thompson, Andrew R.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Torabi, Seyed F.; Schroer, Trina A.; Berger, Christopher L.; Lu, Yi; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Selvin, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Disruptions in microtubule motor transport are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Post-translational modification of the cargo-binding domain of the light and heavy chains of kinesin has been shown to regulate transport, but less is known about how modifications of the motor domain affect transport. Here we report on the effects of phosphorylation of a mammalian kinesin motor domain by the kinase JNK3 at a conserved serine residue (Ser-175 in the B isoform and Ser-176 in the A and C isoforms). Phosphorylation of this residue has been implicated in Huntington disease, but the mechanism by which Ser-175 phosphorylation affects transport is unclear. The ATPase, microtubule-binding affinity, and processivity are unchanged between a phosphomimetic S175D and a nonphosphorylatable S175A construct. However, we find that application of force differentiates between the two. Placement of negative charge at Ser-175, through phosphorylation or mutation, leads to a lower stall force and decreased velocity under a load of 1 piconewton or greater. Sedimentation velocity experiments also show that addition of a negative charge at Ser-175 favors the autoinhibited conformation of kinesin. These observations imply that when cargo is transported by both dynein and phosphorylated kinesin, a common occurrence in the cell, there may be a bias that favors motion toward the minus-end of microtubules. Such bias could be used to tune transport in healthy cells when properly regulated but contribute to a disease state when misregulated. PMID:24072715

  20. Conservation Level and Category Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, C. Rayfield; Kulhavy, Raymond W.

    1976-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that category recall is related to the quantity conservation of mass, weight, and volume. The predicted association between conservation level and category recall was observed. (JMB)

  1. Reversibility and Discrimination in Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jeffrey P.

    1974-01-01

    Five-year-old children who failed pretests of conservation of Number, Length, Mass, and Liquid Amount, but who possessed counting ability and knowledge of the terms "same" and "different" underwent Training and Conservation Posttests. (Author/CS)

  2. Adaptation: Conservation for any budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, Joshua J.

    2011-10-01

    Deciding where and how to allocate scarce funding to conserve plants and animals in a changing and uncertain climate is a thorny issue. Numerical modelling identifies the most effective mix of conservation measures based on the level of expenditure available.

  3. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  4. On Probability Domains III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frič, Roman; Papčo, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Domains of generalized probability have been introduced in order to provide a general construction of random events, observables and states. It is based on the notion of a cogenerator and the properties of product. We continue our previous study and show how some other quantum structures fit our categorical approach. We discuss how various epireflections implicitly used in the classical probability theory are related to the transition to fuzzy probability theory and describe the latter probability theory as a genuine categorical extension of the former. We show that the IF-probability can be studied via the fuzzy probability theory. We outline a "tensor modification" of the fuzzy probability theory.

  5. Sequence and structural analysis of BTB domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J; Downs, Gregory S; Jauhal, Jimmy JS; Nandra, Sukhjeen K; Privé, Gilbert G

    2005-01-01

    Background The BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a versatile protein-protein interaction motif that participates in a wide range of cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cytoskeleton dynamics, ion channel assembly and gating, and targeting proteins for ubiquitination. Several BTB domain structures have been experimentally determined, revealing a highly conserved core structure. Results We surveyed the protein architecture, genomic distribution and sequence conservation of BTB domain proteins in 17 fully sequenced eukaryotes. The BTB domain is typically found as a single copy in proteins that contain only one or two other types of domain, and this defines the BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF), BTB-BACK-kelch (BBK), voltage-gated potassium channel T1 (T1-Kv), MATH-BTB, BTB-NPH3 and BTB-BACK-PHR (BBP) families of proteins, among others. In contrast, the Skp1 and ElonginC proteins consist almost exclusively of the core BTB fold. There are numerous lineage-specific expansions of BTB proteins, as seen by the relatively large number of BTB-ZF and BBK proteins in vertebrates, MATH-BTB proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans, and BTB-NPH3 proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the structural homology between Skp1 and the PLZF BTB homodimer, we present a model of a BTB-Cul3 SCF-like E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that shows that the BTB dimer or the T1 tetramer is compatible in this complex. Conclusion Despite widely divergent sequences, the BTB fold is structurally well conserved. The fold has adapted to several different modes of self-association and interactions with non-BTB proteins. PMID:16207353

  6. Transfer of high domain knowledge to a similar domain.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Ryan K

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have widely examined domain knowledge yet rarely investigate the transfer of knowledge from one domain to another. This study sought to fill in the literature gap concerning the impact of domain knowledge on memory in a similar situation. Specifically, this study examined whether high knowledge of baseball could enhance memory for the similar yet unknown domain of cricket, using a 2 (knowledge) x 2 (prime) design. An interaction occurred, indicating that when primed, baseball knowledge improves memory for cricket events in participants with high baseball knowledge but reduces memory in their low-knowledge counterparts. These results suggest that extensive knowledge in one domain allows it to serve as an organizational framework for incoming information in a similar domain; conversely, priming poorly understood domain knowledge results in negative transfer.

  7. Transfer of high domain knowledge to a similar domain.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Ryan K

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have widely examined domain knowledge yet rarely investigate the transfer of knowledge from one domain to another. This study sought to fill in the literature gap concerning the impact of domain knowledge on memory in a similar situation. Specifically, this study examined whether high knowledge of baseball could enhance memory for the similar yet unknown domain of cricket, using a 2 (knowledge) x 2 (prime) design. An interaction occurred, indicating that when primed, baseball knowledge improves memory for cricket events in participants with high baseball knowledge but reduces memory in their low-knowledge counterparts. These results suggest that extensive knowledge in one domain allows it to serve as an organizational framework for incoming information in a similar domain; conversely, priming poorly understood domain knowledge results in negative transfer. PMID:19353932

  8. Approved Practices in Soil Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Albert B.

    This book is written for individuals who wish to apply conservation practices, especially those of soil and water conservation, without technical assistance, to meet one's own conditions, and within his own capability to apply them. To meet these needs, the book includes a discussion and description of soil and water conservation methods for the…

  9. Water Savings Through Conservation Tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through a partnership with the University of Georgia – College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, USDA-Agricultural Research Service, USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Service, Soil and Water Conservation Society and Resource Conservation and Development Councils to name a few, research and...

  10. Teaching Conservation in Developing Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brace, Judith; And Others

    This manual is designed to provide Peace Corps volunteers and other field workers with ideas, activities, and resources for incorporating conservation education into their day-to-day community activities. It begins with a chapter dealing with a self-contained conservation center. Other chapters tell of ways in which a conservation education…

  11. Saving Money Through Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presley, Michael H.; And Others

    This publication is an introduction to personal energy conservation. The first chapter presents a rationale for conserving energy and points out that private citizens control about one third of this country's energy consumption. Chapters two and three show how to save money by saving energy. Chapter two discusses energy conservation methods in the…

  12. Conservation Education: A Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    The Soil Conservation Society of America's (SCSA) aim is to advance the science and art of good land and water use. Conservation education has a significant role in achieving the wise use of these resources. In this report, perspectives are offered on: (1) the requirements for effective conservation education programs; (2) rationale for…

  13. Conservation systems in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation describes how conservation systems that include non-inversion tillage and cover crops, a key component of conservation systems, are managed in the Southeast to maximize benefits. Benefits include weed suppression, moisture conservation, and increased organic matter contents. Mana...

  14. Conservation of tropical plant species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is designed to provide a review of the methods and current status of conservation of many tropical plant species. Future perspectives of conservation of tropical species will also be discussed. The section on methods covers the range of conservation techniques, in situ, seed banking, in vi...

  15. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  16. Coordinated Activities of Human Dicer Domains in Regulatory RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Enbo; Zhou, Kaihong; Kidwell, Mary Anne; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The conserved ribonuclease Dicer generates microRNAs and short interfering RNAs that guide gene silencing in eukaryotes. The specific contributions of human Dicer's structural domains to RNA product length and substrate preference are incompletely understood, due in part to the difficulties of Dicer purification. Here we show that active forms of human Dicer can be assembled from recombinant polypeptides expressed in bacteria. Using this system, we find that three distinct modes of RNA recognition give rise to Dicer's fidelity and product length specificity. The first involves anchoring one end of a dsRNA helix within the PAZ domain, which can assemble in trans with Dicer's catalytic domains to reconstitute an accurate but non-substrate-selective dicing activity. The second entails non-specific RNA binding by the double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD), an interaction that is essential for substrate recruitment in the absence of the PAZ domain. The third mode of recognition involves hairpin RNA loop recognition by the helicase domain, which ensures efficient processing of specific substrates. These results reveal distinct interactions of each Dicer domain with different RNA structural features, and provide a facile system for investigating the molecular mechanisms of human miRNA biogenesis. PMID:22727743

  17. Energy conservation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Courtright, H.A.

    1993-12-31

    The conservation of energy through the efficiency improvement of existing end-uses and the development of new technologies to replace less efficient systems is an important component of the overall effort to reduce greenhouse gases which may contribute to global climate change. Even though uncertainties exist on the degree and causes of global warming, efficiency improvements in end-use applications remain in the best interest of utilities, their customers and society because efficiency improvements not only reduce environmental exposures but also contribute to industrial productivity, business cost reductions and consumer savings in energy costs.

  18. Plug Loads Conservation Measures

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple plug loads inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Vending Machine Misers, Delamp Vending Machine, Desktop to Laptop retrofit, CRT to LCD monitors retrofit, Computer Power Management Settings, and Energy Star Refrigerator retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings tomore » investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  19. On integrable conservation laws

    PubMed Central

    Arsie, Alessandro; Lorenzoni, Paolo; Moro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We study normal forms of scalar integrable dispersive (not necessarily Hamiltonian) conservation laws, via the Dubrovin–Zhang perturbative scheme. Our computations support the conjecture that such normal forms are parametrized by infinitely many arbitrary functions that can be identified with the coefficients of the quasi-linear part of the equation. Moreover, in general, we conjecture that two scalar integrable evolutionary partial differential equations having the same quasi-linear part are Miura equivalent. This conjecture is also consistent with the tensorial behaviour of these coefficients under general Miura transformations. PMID:25568614

  20. Integrating Agriculture and Conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandever, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    The USGS produces the needed science-based information to guide management actions and policy decisions that support wildlife habitat and other environmental services compatible with USDA conservation goals and farm operations. The Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) has conducted research involving a national landowner survey and numerous short- and long-term evaluations regarding vegetation responses to land management practices. This research helps land and resource managers to make informed decisions and resolve resource management conflicts.

  1. Plug Loads Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple plug loads inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Vending Machine Misers, Delamp Vending Machine, Desktop to Laptop retrofit, CRT to LCD monitors retrofit, Computer Power Management Settings, and Energy Star Refrigerator retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  2. Water Conservation Measures

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple water fixture inventory information and calculates the water/energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes water conservation measures for: Low-flow Toilets, Low-flow Urinals, Low-flow Faucets, and Low-flow Showheads. This tool calculates water savings, energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits ofmore » a project.« less

  3. Biodiversity conservation in local planning.

    PubMed

    Miller, James R; Groom, Martha; Hess, George R; Steelman, Toddi; Stokes, David L; Thompson, Jan; Bowman, Troy; Fricke, Laura; King, Brandon; Marquardt, Ryan

    2009-02-01

    Local land-use policy is increasingly being recognized as fundamental to biodiversity conservation in the United States. Many planners and conservation scientists have called for broader use of planning and regulatory tools to support the conservation of biodiversity at local scales. Yet little is known about the pervasiveness of these practices. We conducted an on-line survey of county, municipal, and tribal planning directors (n =116) in 3 geographic regions of the United States: metropolitan Seattle, Washington; metropolitan Des Moines, Iowa; and the Research Triangle, North Carolina. Our objectives were to gauge the extent to which local planning departments address biodiversity conservation and to identify factors that facilitate or hinder conservation actions in local planning. We found that biodiversity conservation was seldom a major consideration in these departments. Staff time was mainly devoted to development mandates and little time was spent on biodiversity conservation. Regulations requiring conservation actions that might benefit biodiversity were uncommon, with the exception of rules governing water quality in all 3 regions and the protection of threatened and endangered species in the Seattle region. Planning tools that could enhance habitat conservation were used infrequently. Collaboration across jurisdictions was widespread, but rarely focused on conservation. Departments with a conservation specialist on staff tended to be associated with higher levels of conservation actions. Jurisdictions in the Seattle region also reported higher levels of conservation action, largely driven by state and federal mandates. Increased funding was most frequently cited as a factor that would facilitate greater consideration of biodiversity in local planning. There are numerous opportunities for conservation biologists to play a role in improving conservation planning at local scales.

  4. Putting people on the map through an approach that integrates social data in conservation planning.

    PubMed

    Stephanson, Sheri L; Mascia, Michael B

    2014-10-01

    Conservation planning is integral to strategic and effective operations of conservation organizations. Drawing upon biological sciences, conservation planning has historically made limited use of social data. We offer an approach for integrating data on social well-being into conservation planning that captures and places into context the spatial patterns and trends in human needs and capacities. This hierarchical approach provides a nested framework for characterizing and mapping data on social well-being in 5 domains: economic well-being, health, political empowerment, education, and culture. These 5 domains each have multiple attributes; each attribute may be characterized by one or more indicators. Through existing or novel data that display spatial and temporal heterogeneity in social well-being, conservation scientists, planners, and decision makers may measure, benchmark, map, and integrate these data within conservation planning processes. Selecting indicators and integrating these data into conservation planning is an iterative, participatory process tailored to the local context and planning goals. Social well-being data complement biophysical and threat-oriented social data within conservation planning processes to inform decisions regarding where and how to conserve biodiversity, provide a structure for exploring socioecological relationships, and to foster adaptive management. Building upon existing conservation planning methods and insights from multiple disciplines, this approach to putting people on the map can readily merge with current planning practices to facilitate more rigorous decision making. PMID:25102957

  5. Putting people on the map through an approach that integrates social data in conservation planning.

    PubMed

    Stephanson, Sheri L; Mascia, Michael B

    2014-10-01

    Conservation planning is integral to strategic and effective operations of conservation organizations. Drawing upon biological sciences, conservation planning has historically made limited use of social data. We offer an approach for integrating data on social well-being into conservation planning that captures and places into context the spatial patterns and trends in human needs and capacities. This hierarchical approach provides a nested framework for characterizing and mapping data on social well-being in 5 domains: economic well-being, health, political empowerment, education, and culture. These 5 domains each have multiple attributes; each attribute may be characterized by one or more indicators. Through existing or novel data that display spatial and temporal heterogeneity in social well-being, conservation scientists, planners, and decision makers may measure, benchmark, map, and integrate these data within conservation planning processes. Selecting indicators and integrating these data into conservation planning is an iterative, participatory process tailored to the local context and planning goals. Social well-being data complement biophysical and threat-oriented social data within conservation planning processes to inform decisions regarding where and how to conserve biodiversity, provide a structure for exploring socioecological relationships, and to foster adaptive management. Building upon existing conservation planning methods and insights from multiple disciplines, this approach to putting people on the map can readily merge with current planning practices to facilitate more rigorous decision making.

  6. The MLLE Domain of the Ubiquitin Ligase UBR5 Binds to Its Catalytic Domain to Regulate Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity. PMID:26224628

  7. The MLLE domain of the ubiquitin ligase UBR5 binds to its catalytic domain to regulate substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-09-11

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity.

  8. Crystal Structure of the SPOC Domain of the Arabidopsis Flowering Regulator FPA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinglu; Rataj, Katarzyna; Simpson, Gordon G; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein FPA controls flowering time by regulating the alternative 3'-end processing of the FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC) antisense RNA. FPA belongs to the split ends (SPEN) family of proteins, which contain N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a SPEN paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain. The SPOC domain is highly conserved among FPA homologs in plants, but the conservation with the domain in other SPEN proteins is much lower. We have determined the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana FPA SPOC domain at 2.7 Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of the SPOC domain in human SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), although there are also substantial conformational differences between them. Structural and sequence analyses identify a surface patch that is conserved among plant FPA homologs. Mutations of two residues in this surface patch did not disrupt FPA functions, suggesting that either the SPOC domain is not required for the role of FPA in regulating RNA 3'-end formation or the functions of the FPA SPOC domain cannot be disrupted by the combination of mutations, in contrast to observations with the SHARP SPOC domain. PMID:27513867

  9. Crystal Structure of the SPOC Domain of the Arabidopsis Flowering Regulator FPA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinglu; Rataj, Katarzyna; Simpson, Gordon G.; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein FPA controls flowering time by regulating the alternative 3′-end processing of the FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC) antisense RNA. FPA belongs to the split ends (SPEN) family of proteins, which contain N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a SPEN paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain. The SPOC domain is highly conserved among FPA homologs in plants, but the conservation with the domain in other SPEN proteins is much lower. We have determined the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana FPA SPOC domain at 2.7 Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of the SPOC domain in human SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), although there are also substantial conformational differences between them. Structural and sequence analyses identify a surface patch that is conserved among plant FPA homologs. Mutations of two residues in this surface patch did not disrupt FPA functions, suggesting that either the SPOC domain is not required for the role of FPA in regulating RNA 3′-end formation or the functions of the FPA SPOC domain cannot be disrupted by the combination of mutations, in contrast to observations with the SHARP SPOC domain. PMID:27513867

  10. Functional Equivalence of an Evolutionarily Conserved RNA Binding Module*

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Melissa L.; Hicks, Stephanie N.; Perera, Lalith; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of proteins participate in the regulation of mRNA turnover after initially binding to AU-rich elements in target mRNAs. Related proteins from most groups of eukaryotes contain a conserved tandem zinc finger (TZF) domain consisting of two closely spaced, similar CCCH zinc fingers that form the primary RNA binding domain. There is considerable sequence variation within the TZF domains from different family members within a single organism and from different organisms, raising questions about sequence-specific effects on RNA binding and decay promotion. We hypothesized that TZF domains from evolutionarily distant species are functionally interchangeable. The single family member expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, promotes the turnover of several dozen transcripts, some of which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Using knockin techniques, we replaced the TZF domain of S. pombe Zfs1 with the equivalent domains from human TTP and the single family member proteins expressed in the silkworm Bombyx mori, the pathogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii, and the plant Chromolaena odorata. We found that the TZF domains from these widely disparate species could completely substitute for the native S. pombe TZF domain, as determined by measurement of target transcript levels and the flocculation phenotype characteristic of Zfs1 deletion. Recombinant TZF domain peptides from several of these species bound to an AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide with comparably high affinity. We conclude that the TZF domains from TTP family members in these evolutionarily widely divergent species are functionally interchangeable in mRNA binding and decay. PMID:26292216

  11. Functional equivalence of an evolutionarily conserved RNA binding module.

    PubMed

    Wells, Melissa L; Hicks, Stephanie N; Perera, Lalith; Blackshear, Perry J

    2015-10-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of proteins participate in the regulation of mRNA turnover after initially binding to AU-rich elements in target mRNAs. Related proteins from most groups of eukaryotes contain a conserved tandem zinc finger (TZF) domain consisting of two closely spaced, similar CCCH zinc fingers that form the primary RNA binding domain. There is considerable sequence variation within the TZF domains from different family members within a single organism and from different organisms, raising questions about sequence-specific effects on RNA binding and decay promotion. We hypothesized that TZF domains from evolutionarily distant species are functionally interchangeable. The single family member expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, promotes the turnover of several dozen transcripts, some of which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Using knockin techniques, we replaced the TZF domain of S. pombe Zfs1 with the equivalent domains from human TTP and the single family member proteins expressed in the silkworm Bombyx mori, the pathogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii, and the plant Chromolaena odorata. We found that the TZF domains from these widely disparate species could completely substitute for the native S. pombe TZF domain, as determined by measurement of target transcript levels and the flocculation phenotype characteristic of Zfs1 deletion. Recombinant TZF domain peptides from several of these species bound to an AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide with comparably high affinity. We conclude that the TZF domains from TTP family members in these evolutionarily widely divergent species are functionally interchangeable in mRNA binding and decay.

  12. Functional equivalence of an evolutionarily conserved RNA binding module.

    PubMed

    Wells, Melissa L; Hicks, Stephanie N; Perera, Lalith; Blackshear, Perry J

    2015-10-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of proteins participate in the regulation of mRNA turnover after initially binding to AU-rich elements in target mRNAs. Related proteins from most groups of eukaryotes contain a conserved tandem zinc finger (TZF) domain consisting of two closely spaced, similar CCCH zinc fingers that form the primary RNA binding domain. There is considerable sequence variation within the TZF domains from different family members within a single organism and from different organisms, raising questions about sequence-specific effects on RNA binding and decay promotion. We hypothesized that TZF domains from evolutionarily distant species are functionally interchangeable. The single family member expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, promotes the turnover of several dozen transcripts, some of which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Using knockin techniques, we replaced the TZF domain of S. pombe Zfs1 with the equivalent domains from human TTP and the single family member proteins expressed in the silkworm Bombyx mori, the pathogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii, and the plant Chromolaena odorata. We found that the TZF domains from these widely disparate species could completely substitute for the native S. pombe TZF domain, as determined by measurement of target transcript levels and the flocculation phenotype characteristic of Zfs1 deletion. Recombinant TZF domain peptides from several of these species bound to an AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide with comparably high affinity. We conclude that the TZF domains from TTP family members in these evolutionarily widely divergent species are functionally interchangeable in mRNA binding and decay. PMID:26292216

  13. Beyond conservation agriculture.

    PubMed

    Giller, Ken E; Andersson, Jens A; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture.

  14. Beyond conservation agriculture.

    PubMed

    Giller, Ken E; Andersson, Jens A; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture. PMID:26579139

  15. Selling energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1995-01-01

    This article concerns the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) crisis and its impact on energy efficiency measures in the US. In 1985, when the OPEC collapsed, the US government had avoided the need to construct 350 gigawatts of new electric capacity. The most successful efficiency improvements, especially in household appliances and equipment, lighting and tightened energy efficiency standards in new buildings, resulted from the OPEC event. The real innovation of that time was the change in profit rules for utilities. This revolution and the way some US utilities view energy have not caught on elsewhere. Despite the initiative toward improving energy efficiency in homes, offices and industries, the change has been slow. Partly to blame are the big development banks, which pointed out that short-term conservation and efficiency measures could save at least 15% of the total energy demand without the need for major investment. The benefits of energy conservation was shown during the oil shock when per capita energy consumption fell by 5% in the member states of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, while the per capita gross domestic product grew by a third. There has been a decrease in energy expenditure worldwide, and the scope for further energy savings is enormous, but governments need to recognize and seize the opportunity. PMID:12295818

  16. Energy conservation in museums

    SciTech Connect

    Ucar, M.; Doering, G.C.

    1980-07-01

    An overall assessment of energy conservation in museums in New York is made in view of the special environmental considerations involved. The special relative humidity, temperature, and lighting requirements of museums were studied extensively. An energy consumption data base was formed with actual energy use data obtained from over fifty institutions across the state. The computerized energy consumption data base compiled covers an extremely wide range of energy usage levels. On-site energy consumption ranged from approximately 20,000 to 400,000 Btu/ft/sup 2/ year. The data base includes small rural institutions and large metropolitan museums, historic and modern structures, seasonal and year-round museums, single buildings and collections of buildings, single-story buildings and multiple-story buildings, an aquarium, and a zoo. Thus, it is difficult to identify trends in the energy consumption data and to make correlations with such parameters as age, type, size, etc. Walk-through or mini energy audits were performed on ten museums located in various parts of New York State. This project also included a thorough study of all potential funding sources to which museums can apply for financing energy conservation measures. Sources of technical assistance and information were also identified. (MCW)

  17. Beyond conservation agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Giller, Ken E.; Andersson, Jens A.; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture. PMID:26579139

  18. Lyme disease and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  19. Molecular contributions to conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have opened a new chapter in species conservation efforts, as well as population biology. DNA sequencing, MHC (major histocompatibility complex), minisatellite, microsatellite, and RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) procedures allow for identification of parentage, more distant relatives, founders to new populations, unidentified individuals, population structure, effective population size, population-specific markers, etc. PCR (polymerase chain reaction) amplification of mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, ribosomal DNA, chloroplast DNA, and other systems provide for more sophisticated analyses of metapopulation structure, hybridization events, and delineation of species, subspecies, and races, all of which aid in setting species recovery priorities. Each technique can be powerful in its own right but is most credible when used in conjunction with other molecular techniques and, most importantly, with ecological and demographic data collected from the field. Surprisingly few taxa of concern have been assayed with any molecular technique. Thus, rather than showcasing exhaustive details from a few well-known examples, this paper attempts to present a broad range of cases in which molecular techniques have been used to provide insight into conservation efforts.

  20. Focusing ecological research for conservation.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Bogdan; Boyce, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    Ecologists are increasingly actively involved in conservation. We identify five key topics from a broad sweep of ecology that merit research attention to meet conservation needs. We examine questions from landscape ecology, behavioral ecology, ecosystem dynamics, community ecology, and nutrient cycling related to key topics. Based on literature review and publication trend assessment, consultation with colleagues, and roundtable discussions at the 24th International Congress for Conservation Biology, focused research on the following topics could benefit conservation while advancing ecological understanding: 1. Carbon sequestration, requiring increased linkages to biodiversity conservation; 2. Ecological invasiveness, challenging our ability to find solutions to ecological aliens; 3. Individual variation, having applications in the conservation of rare species; 4. Movement of organisms, integrating ecological processes across landscapes and scales and addressing habitat fragmentation; and 5. Trophic-level interactions, driving ecological dynamics at the ecosystem-level. Addressing these will require cross-disciplinary research under the overarching framework of conservation ecology.