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Sample records for conserved wd40 domain

  1. Structure and function of WD40 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-03-01

    The WD40 domain exhibits a β-propeller architecture, often comprising seven blades. The WD40 domain is one of the most abundant domains and also among the top interacting domains in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we will discuss the identification, definition and architecture of the WD40 domains. WD40 domain proteins are involved in a large variety of cellular processes, in which WD40 domains function as a protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction platform. WD40 domain mediates molecular recognition events mainly through the smaller top surface, but also through the bottom surface and sides. So far, no WD40 domain has been found to display enzymatic activity. We will also discuss the different binding modes exhibited by the large versatile family of WD40 domain proteins. In the last part of this review, we will discuss how post-translational modifications are recognized by WD40 domain proteins.

  2. BmPLA2 containing conserved domain WD40 affects the metabolic functions of fat body tissue in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Orville Singh, Chabungbam; Xin, Hu-Hu; Chen, Rui-Ting; Wang, Mei-Xian; Liang, Shuang; Lu, Yan; Cai, Zi-Zheng; Miao, Yun-Gen

    2016-02-01

    PLA2 enzyme hydrolyzes arachidonic acid, and other polyunsaturated fatty acids, from the sn-2 position to release free arachidonic acid and a lysophospholipid. Previous studies reported that the PLA2 in invertebrate organisms participates in lipid signaling molecules like arachidonic acid release in immune-associated tissues like hemocytes and fat bodies. In the present study, we cloned the BmPLA2 gene from fat body tissue of silkworm Bombyx mori, which has a total sequence of 1.031 kb with a 31.90 kDa protein. In silico results of BmPLA2 indicated that the protein has a putative WD40 conserved domain and its phylogeny tree clustered with Danaus plexippus species. We investigated the transcriptional expression in development stages and tissues. The highest expression of BmPLA2 was screened in fat body among the studied tissues of third day fifth instar larva, with a high expression on third day fifth instar larva followed by a depression of expression in the wandering stage of the fifth instar larva. The expression of BmPLA2 in female pupa was higher than that of male pupa. Our RNAi-mediated gene silencing results showed highest reduction of BmPLA2 expression in post-24 h followed by post-48 and post-72 h. The BmPLA2-RNAi larvae and pupa could be characterized by pharate adult lethality and underdevelopment. The phenotypic characters of fat body cells in RNAi-induced larva implied that BmPLA2 affects the metabolic functions of fat body tissue in silkworm Bombyx mori.

  3. Missense mutations in the WD40 domain of AHI1 cause non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T; Hull, Sarah; Roepman, Ronald; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Oud, Machteld M; de Vrieze, Erik; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Letteboer, Stef J F; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Blokland, Ellen A; Yntema, Helger G; Cremers, Frans P M; van der Zwaag, Paul A; Arno, Gavin; van Wijk, Erwin; Webster, Andrew R; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke

    2017-09-01

    Recent findings suggesting that Abelson helper integration site 1 (AHI1) is involved in non-syndromic retinal disease have been debated, as the functional significance of identified missense variants was uncertain. We assessed whether AHI1 variants cause non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Exome sequencing was performed in three probands with RP. The effects of the identified missense variants in AHI1 were predicted by three-dimensional structure homology modelling. Ciliary parameters were evaluated in patient's fibroblasts, and recombinant mutant proteins were expressed in ciliated retinal pigmented epithelium cells. In the three patients with RP, three sets of compound heterozygous variants were detected in AHI1 (c.2174G>A; p.Trp725* and c.2258A>T; p.Asp753Val, c.660delC; p.Ser221Glnfs*10 and c.2090C>T; p.Pro697Leu, c.2087A>G; p.His696Arg and c.2429C>T; p.Pro810Leu). All four missense variants were present in the conserved WD40 domain of Jouberin, the ciliary protein encoded by AHI1, with variable predicted implications for the domain structure. No significant changes in the percentage of ciliated cells, nor in cilium length or intraflagellar transport were detected. However, expression of mutant recombinant Jouberin in ciliated cells showed a significantly decreased enrichment at the ciliary base. This report confirms that mutations in AHI1 can underlie autosomal recessive RP. Moreover, it structurally and functionally validates the effect of the RP-associated AHI1 variants on protein function, thus proposing a new genotype-phenotype correlation for AHI1 mutation associated retinal ciliopathies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. A conserved WD40 protein binds the Cajal body localization signal of scaRNP particles.

    PubMed

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T; Shu, Mei-Di; Kukoyi, Abiodun; Steitz, Joan A

    2009-04-10

    Small Cajal body (CB)-specific RNPs (scaRNPs) function in posttranscriptional modification of small nuclear (sn)RNAs. An RNA element, the CAB box, facilitates CB localization of H/ACA scaRNPs. Using a related element in Drosophila C/D scaRNAs, we purified a fly WD40 repeat protein that UV crosslinks to RNA in a C/D CAB box-dependent manner and associates with C/D and mixed domain C/D-H/ACA scaRNAs. Its human homolog, WDR79, associates with C/D, H/ACA, and mixed domain scaRNAs, as well as with telomerase RNA. WDR79's binding to human H/ACA and mixed domain scaRNAs is CAB box dependent, and its association with mixed domain RNAs also requires the ACA motif, arguing for additional interactions of WDR79 with H/ACA core proteins. We demonstrate a requirement for WDR79 binding in the CB localization of a scaRNA. This and other recent reports establish WDR79 as a central player in the localization and processing of nuclear RNPs.

  5. The T300A Crohn's disease risk polymorphism impairs function of the WD40 domain of ATG16L1

    PubMed Central

    Boada-Romero, Emilio; Serramito-Gómez, Inmaculada; Sacristán, María P.; Boone, David L.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Pimentel-Muiños, Felipe X.

    2016-01-01

    A coding polymorphism of human ATG16L1 (rs2241880; T300A) increases the risk of Crohn's disease and it has been shown to enhance susceptibility of ATG16L1 to caspase cleavage. Here we show that T300A also alters the ability of the C-terminal WD40-repeat domain of ATG16L1 to interact with an amino acid motif that recognizes this region. Such alteration impairs the unconventional autophagic activity of TMEM59, a transmembrane protein that contains the WD40 domain-binding motif, and disrupts its normal intracellular trafficking and its ability to engage ATG16L1 in response to bacterial infection. TMEM59-induced autophagy is blunted in cells expressing the fragments generated by caspase processing of the ATG16L1-T300A risk allele, whereas canonical autophagy remains unaffected. These results suggest that the T300A polymorphism alters the function of motif-containing molecules that engage ATG16L1 through the WD40 domain, either by influencing this interaction under non-stressful conditions or by inhibiting their downstream autophagic signalling after caspase-mediated cleavage. PMID:27273576

  6. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1WD40). To understand how Apc1WD40 contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1WD40 deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1WD40 abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C–Cdh1 complex with Apc1WD40 deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1WD40 is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C. PMID:27601667

  7. The Elongin BC complex interacts with the conserved SOCS-box motif present in members of the SOCS, ras, WD-40 repeat, and ankyrin repeat families

    PubMed Central

    Kamura, Takumi; Sato, Shigeo; Haque, Dewan; Liu, Li; Kaelin, William G.; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan Weliky

    1998-01-01

    The Elongin BC complex was identified initially as a positive regulator of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation factor Elongin A and subsequently as a component of the multiprotein von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor complex, in which it participates in both tumor suppression and negative regulation of hypoxia-inducible genes. Elongin B is a ubiquitin-like protein, and Elongin C is a Skp1-like protein that binds to a BC-box motif that is present in both Elongin A and VHL and is distinct from the conserved F-box motif recognized by Skp1. In this report, we demonstrate that the Elongin BC complex also binds to a functional BC box present in the SOCS box, a sequence motif identified recently in the suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1) protein, as well as in a collection of additional proteins belonging to the SOCS, ras, WD-40 repeat, SPRY domain, and ankyrin repeat families. In addition, we present evidence (1) that the Elongin BC complex is a component of a multiprotein SOCS-1 complex that attenuates Jak/STAT signaling by binding to Jak2 and inhibiting Jak2 kinase, and (2) that by interacting with the SOCS box, the Elongin BC complex can increase expression of the SOCS-1 protein by inhibiting its degradation. These results suggest that Elongin BC is a multifunctional regulatory complex capable of controlling multiple pathways in the cell through interaction with a short degenerate sequence motif found in many different proteins. PMID:9869640

  8. Unconventional autophagy mediated by the WD40 domain of ATG16L1 is derailed by the T300A Crohn disease risk polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Serramito-Gómez, Inmaculada; Boada-Romero, Emilio; Pimentel-Muiños, Felipe X.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A coding polymorphism of the critical autophagic effector ATG16L1 (T300A) increases the risk of Crohn disease, but how this mutation influences the function of ATG16L1 has remained unclear. In a recent report, we showed that the A300 allele alters the ability of the C-terminal WD40 domain of ATG16L1 to interact with proteins containing a specific amino acid motif able to recognize this region. This defect impairs the capacity of the motif-containing transmembrane molecule TMEM59 to induce the unconventional autophagic labeling of the same single-membrane vesicles where this protein is located. Such alteration derails the intracellular trafficking of TMEM59 and the xenophagic response against bacterial infection. In contrast, canonical autophagy remains unaffected in the presence of ATG16L1T300A. These data argue that the T300A polymorphism impairs the unconventional autophagic activities carried out by the WD40 domain, a region of ATG16L1 whose function has remained poorly understood. PMID:27541200

  9. Unconventional autophagy mediated by the WD40 domain of ATG16L1 is derailed by the T300A Crohn disease risk polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Serramito-Gómez, Inmaculada; Boada-Romero, Emilio; Pimentel-Muiños, Felipe X

    2016-11-01

    A coding polymorphism of the critical autophagic effector ATG16L1 (T300A) increases the risk of Crohn disease, but how this mutation influences the function of ATG16L1 has remained unclear. In a recent report, we showed that the A300 allele alters the ability of the C-terminal WD40 domain of ATG16L1 to interact with proteins containing a specific amino acid motif able to recognize this region. This defect impairs the capacity of the motif-containing transmembrane molecule TMEM59 to induce the unconventional autophagic labeling of the same single-membrane vesicles where this protein is located. Such alteration derails the intracellular trafficking of TMEM59 and the xenophagic response against bacterial infection. In contrast, canonical autophagy remains unaffected in the presence of ATG16L1(T300A). These data argue that the T300A polymorphism impairs the unconventional autophagic activities carried out by the WD40 domain, a region of ATG16L1 whose function has remained poorly understood.

  10. The WD40 Domain Protein MSI1 Functions in a Histone Deacetylase Complex to Fine-Tune Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Saher; Derkacheva, Maria; Ramström, Margareta; Kralemann, Lejon; Bergquist, Jonas; Hennig, Lars

    2016-01-01

    MSI1 belongs to a family of histone binding WD40-repeat proteins. Arabidopsis thaliana contains five genes encoding MSI1-like proteins, but their functions in diverse chromatin-associated complexes are poorly understood. Here, we show that MSI1 is part of a histone deacetylase complex. We copurified HISTONE DEACETYLASE19 (HDA19) with MSI1 and transcriptional regulatory SIN3-like proteins and provide evidence that MSI1 and HDA19 associate into the same complex in vivo. These data suggest that MSI1, HDA19, and HISTONE DEACETYLATION COMPLEX1 protein form a core complex that can integrate various SIN3-like proteins. We found that reduction of MSI1 or HDA19 causes upregulation of abscisic acid (ABA) receptor genes and hypersensitivity of ABA-responsive genes. The MSI1-HDA19 complex fine-tunes ABA signaling by binding to the chromatin of ABA receptor genes and by maintaining low levels of acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 9, thereby affecting the expression levels of ABA receptor genes. Reduced MSI1 or HDA19 levels led to increased tolerance to salt stress corresponding to the increased ABA sensitivity of gene expression. Together, our results reveal the presence of an MSI1-HDA19 complex that fine-tunes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

  11. Novel regulation of Skp1 by the Dictyostelium AgtA α-galactosyltransferase involves the Skp1-binding activity of its WD40 repeat domain.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Christopher M; Sheikh, M Osman; Zhang, Dongmei; West, Christopher M

    2014-03-28

    The role of Skp1 as an adaptor protein that links Cullin-1 to F-box proteins in E3 Skp1/Cullin-1/F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligases is well characterized. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium and probably many other unicellular eukaryotes, Skp1 is modified by a pentasaccharide attached to a hydroxyproline near its C terminus. This modification is important for oxygen-sensing during Dictyostelium development and is mediated by a HIF-α type prolyl 4-hydroxylase and five sequentially acting cytoplasmic glycosyltransferase activities. Gene disruption studies show that AgtA, the enzyme responsible for addition of the final two galactose residues, in α-linkages to the Skp1 core trisaccharide, is unexpectedly critical for oxygen-dependent terminal development. AgtA possesses a WD40 repeat domain C-terminal to its single catalytic domain and, by use of domain deletions, binding studies, and enzyme assays, we find that the WD40 repeats confer a salt-sensitive second-site binding interaction with Skp1 that mediates novel catalytic activation in addition to simple substrate recognition. In addition, AgtA binds similarly well to precursor isoforms of Skp1 by a salt-sensitive mechanism that competes with binding to an F-box protein and recognition by early modification enzymes, and the effect of binding is diminished when AgtA modifies Skp1. Genetic studies show that loss of AgtA is more severe when an earlier glycosylation step is blocked, and overexpressed AgtA is deleterious if catalytically inactivated. Together, the findings suggest that AgtA mediates non-enzymatic control of unmodified and substrate precursor forms of Skp1 by a binding mechanism that is normally relieved by switch-like activation of its glycosylation function.

  12. A Method for WD40 Repeat Detection and Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Jiang, Fan; Zhuo, Zhu; Wu, Xian-Hui; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2013-01-01

    WD40-repeat proteins (WD40s), as one of the largest protein families in eukaryotes, play vital roles in assembling protein-protein/DNA/RNA complexes. WD40s fold into similar β-propeller structures despite diversified sequences. A program WDSP (WD40 repeat protein Structure Predictor) has been developed to accurately identify WD40 repeats and predict their secondary structures. The method is designed specifically for WD40 proteins by incorporating both local residue information and non-local family-specific structural features. It overcomes the problem of highly diversified protein sequences and variable loops. In addition, WDSP achieves a better prediction in identifying multiple WD40-domain proteins by taking the global combination of repeats into consideration. In secondary structure prediction, the average Q3 accuracy of WDSP in jack-knife test reaches 93.7%. A disease related protein LRRK2 was used as a representive example to demonstrate the structure prediction. PMID:23776530

  13. Interaction of the WD40 domain of a myoinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase with SnRK1 links inositol, sugar, and stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Ananieva, Elitsa A; Gillaspy, Glenda E; Ely, Amanda; Burnette, Ryan N; Erickson, F Les

    2008-12-01

    In plants, myoinositol signaling pathways have been associated with several stress, developmental, and physiological processes, but the regulation of these pathways is largely unknown. In our efforts to better understand myoinositol signaling pathways in plants, we have found that the WD40 repeat region of a myoinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase (5PTase13; At1g05630) interacts with the sucrose nonfermenting-1-related kinase (SnRK1.1) in the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro. Plant SnRK1 proteins (also known as AKIN10/11) have been described as central integrators of sugar, metabolic, stress, and developmental signals. Using mutants defective in 5PTase13, we show that 5PTase13 can act as a regulator of SnRK1 activity and that regulation differs with different nutrient availability. Specifically, we show that under low-nutrient or -sugar conditions, 5PTase13 acts as a positive regulator of SnRK1 activity. In contrast, under severe starvation conditions, 5PTase13 acts as a negative regulator of SnRK1 activity. To delineate the regulatory interaction that occurs between 5PTase13 and SnRK1.1, we used a cell-free degradation assay and found that 5PTase13 is required to reduce the amount of SnRK1.1 targeted for proteasomal destruction under low-nutrient conditions. This regulation most likely involves a 5PTase13-SnRK1.1 interaction within the nucleus, as a 5PTase13:green fluorescent protein was localized to the nucleus. We also show that a loss of function in 5PTase13 leads to nutrient level-dependent reduction of root growth, along with abscisic acid (ABA) and sugar insensitivity. 5ptase13 mutants accumulate less inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in response to sugar stress and have alterations in ABA-regulated gene expression, both of which are consistent with the known role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in ABA-mediated signaling. We propose that by forming a protein complex with SnRK1.1 protein, 5PTase13 plays a regulatory role linking inositol, sugar, and stress

  14. Is Asp-His-Ser/Thr-Trp tetrad hydrogen-bond network important to WD40-repeat proteins: a statistical and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-Hui; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2010-04-01

    WD40-repeat proteins are abundant and play important roles in forming protein complexes. The domain usually has seven WD40 repeats, which folds into a seven beta-sheet propeller with each beta-sheet in a four-strand structure. An analysis of 20 available WD40-repeat proteins in Protein Data Bank reveals that each protein has at least one Asp-His-Ser/Thr-Trp (D-H-S/T-W) hydrogen-bonded tetrad, and some proteins have up to six or seven such tetrads. The relative positions of the four residues in the tetrads are also found to be conserved. A sequence alignment analysis of 560 WD40-repeat protein sequences in human reveals very similar features, indicating that such tetrad may be a general feature of WD40-repeat proteins. We carried out density functional theory and found that these tetrads can lead to significant stabilization including hydrogen-bonding cooperativity. The hydrogen bond involving Trp is significant. These results lead us to propose that the tetrads may be critical to the stability and the mechanism of folding of these proteins.

  15. Genome-wide Analysis of WD40 Protein Family in Human

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xu-Dong; Hu, Xue-Jia; Ma, Jing; Li, Tuan; Ye, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The WD40 proteins, often acting as scaffolds to form functional complexes in fundamental cellular processes, are one of the largest families encoded by the eukaryotic genomes. Systematic studies of this family on genome scale are highly required for understanding their detailed functions, but are currently lacking in the animal lineage. Here we present a comprehensive in silico study of the human WD40 family. We have identified 262 non-redundant WD40 proteins, and grouped them into 21 classes according to their domain architectures. Among them, 11 animal-specific domain architectures have been recognized. Sequence alignment indicates the complicated duplication and recombination events in the evolution of this family. Through further phylogenetic analysis, we have revealed that the WD40 family underwent more expansion than the overall average in the evolutionary early stage, and the early emerged WD40 proteins are prone to domain architectures with fundamental cellular roles and more interactions. While most widely and highly expressed human WD40 genes originated early, the tissue-specific ones often have late origin. These results provide a landscape of the human WD40 family concerning their classification, evolution, and expression, serving as a valuable complement to the previous studies in the plant lineage. PMID:27991561

  16. Genome-Wide Investigation and Expression Analyses of WD40 Protein Family in the Model Plant Foxtail Millet (Setaria italica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Awdhesh Kumar; Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Khan, Yusuf; Parida, Swarup Kumar; Prasad, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    WD40 proteins play a crucial role in diverse protein-protein interactions by acting as scaffolding molecules and thus assisting in the proper activity of proteins. Hence, systematic characterization and expression profiling of these WD40 genes in foxtail millet would enable us to understand the networks of WD40 proteins and their biological processes and gene functions. In the present study, a genome-wide survey was conducted and 225 potential WD40 genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis categorized the WD40 proteins into 5 distinct sub-families (I–V). Gene Ontology annotation revealed the biological roles of the WD40 proteins along with its cellular components and molecular functions. In silico comparative mapping with sorghum, maize and rice demonstrated the orthologous relationships and chromosomal rearrangements including duplication, inversion and deletion of WD40 genes. Estimation of synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates revealed its evolutionary significance in terms of gene-duplication and divergence. Expression profiling against abiotic stresses provided novel insights into specific and/or overlapping expression patterns of SiWD40 genes. Homology modeling enabled three-dimensional structure prediction was performed to understand the molecular functions of WD40 proteins. Although, recent findings had shown the importance of WD40 domains in acting as hubs for cellular networks during many biological processes, it has invited a lesser research attention unlike other common domains. Being a most promiscuous interactors, WD40 domains are versatile in mediating critical cellular functions and hence this genome-wide study especially in the model crop foxtail millet would serve as a blue-print for functional characterization of WD40s in millets and bioenergy grass species. In addition, the present analyses would also assist the research community in choosing the candidate WD40s for comprehensive studies towards crop improvement of millets and

  17. Diverse functions of WD40 repeat proteins in histone recognition

    PubMed Central

    Suganuma, Tamaki; Pattenden, Samantha G.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    WD40 repeat proteins have been shown to bind the histone H3 tail at the center of their β-propeller structure. In contrast, in this issue of Genes & Development, Song and colleagues (pp. 1313–1318) demonstrate that the WD40 repeat protein p55 binds a structured region of H4 through a novel binding pocket on the side of β-propeller, illustrating a diversity of histone recognition by WD40 repeat proteins. PMID:18483215

  18. Notchless encodes a novel WD40-repeat-containing protein that modulates Notch signaling activity.

    PubMed Central

    Royet, J; Bouwmeester, T; Cohen, S M

    1998-01-01

    Signaling by Notch family receptors is involved in many cell-fate decisions during development. Several modifiers of Notch activity have been identified, suggesting that regulation of Notch signaling is complex. In a genetic screen for modifiers of Notch activity, we identified a gene encoding a novel WD40-repeat protein. The gene is called Notchless, because loss-of-function mutant alleles dominantly suppress the wing notching caused by certain Notch alleles. Reducing Notchless activity increases Notch activity. Overexpression of Notchless in Xenopus or Drosophila appears to have a dominant-negative effect in that it also increases Notch activity. Biochemical studies show that Notchless binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Notch, suggesting that it serves as a direct regulator of Notch signaling activity. PMID:9857191

  19. X-linked late-onset sensorineural deafness caused by a deletion involving OA1 and a novel gene containing WD-40 repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, M T; Ramesar, R S; Caciotti, B; Winship, I M; De Grandi, A; Riboni, M; Townes, P L; Beighton, P; Ballabio, A; Borsani, G

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a novel gene, transducin (beta)-like 1 (TBL1), in the Xp22.3 genomic region, that shows high homology with members of the WD-40-repeat protein family. The gene contains 18 exons spanning approximately 150 kb of the genomic region adjacent to the ocular albinism gene (OA1) on the telomeric side. However, unlike OA1, TBL1 is transcribed from telomere to centromere. Northern analysis indicates that TBL1 is ubiquitously expressed, with two transcripts of approximately 2.1 kb and 6.0 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 526-amino acid protein, which shows the presence of six beta-transducin repeats (WD-40 motif) in the C-terminal domain. The homology with known beta-subunits of G proteins and other WD-40-repeat containing proteins is restricted to the WD-40 motif. Genomic analysis revealed that the gene is either partly or entirely deleted in patients carrying Xp22.3 terminal deletions. The complexity of the contiguous gene-syndrome phenotype shared by these patients depends on the number of known disease genes involved in the deletions. Interestingly, one patient carrying a microinterstitial deletion involving the 3' portion of both TBL1 and OA1 shows the OA1 phenotype associated with X-linked late-onset sensorineural deafness. We postulate an involvement of TBL1 in the pathogenesis of the ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness phenotype. PMID:10330347

  20. WD40-Repeat Proteins in Plant Cell Wall Formation: Current Evidence and Research Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Ezcurra, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In eukaryotes WD40-repeat (WDR) proteins often function as molecular “hubs” mediating supramolecular interactions. WDR proteins may display a variety of interacting partners and participate in the assembly of complexes involved in distinct cellular functions. In plants, the formation of lignocellulosic biomass involves extensive synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides, a process that requires the assembly of large transmembrane enzyme complexes, intensive vesicle trafficking, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and coordinated gene expression. Because of their function as supramolecular hubs, WDR proteins could participate in each or any of these steps, although to date only few WDR proteins have been linked to the cell wall by experimental evidence. Nevertheless, several potential cell wall-related WDR proteins were recently identified using in silico approaches, such as analyses of co-expression, interactome and conserved gene neighborhood. Notably, some WDR genes are frequently genomic neighbors of genes coding for GT2-family polysaccharide synthases in eukaryotes, and this WDR-GT2 collinear microsynteny is detected in diverse taxa. In angiosperms, two WDR genes are collinear to cellulose synthase genes, CesAs, whereas in ascomycetous fungi several WDR genes are adjacent to chitin synthase genes, chs. In this Perspective we summarize and discuss experimental and in silico studies on the possible involvement of WDR proteins in plant cell wall formation. The prospects of biotechnological engineering for enhanced biomass production are discussed. PMID:26734023

  1. Serine phosphorylation is critical for the activation of ubiquitin-specific protease 1 and its interaction with WD40-repeat protein UAF1

    PubMed Central

    Villamil, Mark A.; Liang, Qin; Chen, Junjun; Choi, Yong Seok; Hou, Shuyu; Lee, Kelvin H.; Zhuang, Zhihao

    2012-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are important for the normal function of a number of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and DNA damage response. The enzymatic activity of DUB is regulated by different mechanisms. DUBs in several different families are post-translationally modified by phosphorylation. Large scale phosphoproteomic studies of human DUBs revealed that a majority of ubiquitin-specific proteases (USPs) are phosphorylated. USP1 is a prototypical DUB that requires a specific interaction with a WD40-repeat protein, UAF1, for its catalytic activity. In this study we show that Ser313 phosphorylation in USP1 is required for its interaction with UAF1 and for the stimulation of USP1’s activity. In contrast, two other known USP1 serine phosphorylations (Ser42 and Ser67) are dispensable with respect to the activity of the USP1/UAF1 complex. An S313D phosphomimetic mutation in USP1 can substitute for Ser313 phosphorylation in promoting the formation of the USP1/UAF1 complex. We further demonstrated that CDK1 is responsible for Ser313 phosphorylation, and protein phosphatase treatment of USP1 can lead to inactivation of USP1/UAF1. An inserted domain in USP1 (amino acids 235-408) was found to interact with UAF1, and this interaction is mediated by Ser313 phosphorylation. Our findings revealed an intriguing mechanism of regulating USP1 activity that combines phosphorylation of a key serine residue in USP1 and the specific interaction of USP1 with a WD40-repeat protein UAF1. The pSer313-dependent formation of USP1/UAF1 complex points to a new approach of inhibiting USP1 activity by disrupting the interaction between the UAF1’s WD40-repeat domain and the Ser313-containing phosphopeptide in USP1. PMID:23116119

  2. Remarkable Evolutionary Conservation of Antiobesity ADIPOSE/WDTC1 Homologs in Animals and Plants.

    PubMed

    Ducos, Eric; Vergès, Valentin; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Blanc, Nathalie; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Dutilleul, Christelle

    2017-09-01

    ASG2 (Altered Seed Germination 2) is a prenylated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana that participates to abscisic acid signaling and is proposed to act as a substrate adaptor for the DDB1 (DNA damage-binding protein 1)-CUL4 (Cullin 4) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. ASG2 harbors WD40 and TetratricoPeptide Repeat (TPR) domains, and resembles the well-conserved animal gene called ADP (antiobesity factor ADIPOSE) in fly and WDTC1 (WD40 and TPR 1) in humans. Loss of function of WDTC1 results in an increase in adipocytes, fat accumulation, and obesity. Antiadipogenic functions of WDTC1 involve regulation of fat-related gene transcription, notably through its binding to histone deacetylases (HDACs). Our sequence and phylogenetic analysis reveals that ASG2 belongs to the ADP/WDTC1 cluster. ASG2 and WDTC1 share a highly conserved organization that encompasses structural and functional motifs: seven WD40 domains and WD40 hotspot-related residues, three TPR protein-protein interaction domains, DDB1-binding elements [H-box and DWD (DDB1-binding WD40 protein)-box], and a prenylatable C-terminus. Furthermore, ASG2 involvement in fat metabolism was confirmed by reverse genetic approaches using asg2 knockout Arabidopsis plants. Under limited irradiance, asg2 mutants produce "obese" seeds characterized by increased weight, oil body density, and higher fatty acid contents. In addition, considering some ASG2- and WDTC1-peculiar properties, we show that the WDTC1 C-terminus is prenylated in vitro and HDAC-binding capability is conserved in ASG2, suggesting that the regulation mechanism and targets of ADP/WDTC1-like proteins may be conserved features. Our findings reveal the remarkable evolutionary conservation of the structure and the physiological role of ADIPOSE homologs in animals and plants. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Subcellular localization of WD40 repeat 1 protein in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Eunju; Chung, Yoon Hee; Mun, Ga Hee; Park, Ji yeong; Lomax, Margaret I; Oh, Seung Ha

    2004-09-09

    The dynamics of actin filament protein is crucial for various physiological processes of the cells. Among the proteins correlating with actin dynamics, a novel 67-kDa WD40 repeat protein 1 (WDR1) was the vertebrate homologue of actin-interacting protein 1 (Aip1). Even though previous studies have provided the clues on the function of WDR1 in specific organs under pathological conditions, the exact subcellular localization of WDR1 is not known. Therefore, in the present study, we undertook to determine the distribution of WDR1 within PC12 pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells) using light and electron microscopic techniques. Double immunocytochemistry clearly showed that WDR1 immunoreactivities (IRs) were co-localized with anti-actin antibody, suggesting the involvement of WDR1 in actin dynamics. WDR1 immunoreactivities (IRs) in PC12 cells showed different distribution patterns as nerve growth factor (NGF) concentrations varied. During active proliferation, the distribution of WDR1 IRs seemed to be similar to those found in cortical actin patches, whereas WDR1 IR was observed in cytoplasmic actin cables after PC12 cells were induced to differentiate by treating with NGF. Though further studies are necessary to determine the function of WDR1, the current data represents a first step towards the in vitro study of WDR1 protein.

  4. Aurora A phosphorylation of WD40-repeat protein 62 in mitotic spindle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Nicholas R.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Quinn, Leonie M.; Ng, Dominic C. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitotic spindle organization is regulated by centrosomal kinases that potentiate recruitment of spindle-associated proteins required for normal mitotic progress including the microcephaly protein WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62). WDR62 functions underlie normal brain development as autosomal recessive mutations and wdr62 loss cause microcephaly. Here we investigate the signaling interactions between WDR62 and the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA) that has been recently shown to cooperate to control brain size in mice. The spindle recruitment of WDR62 is closely correlated with increased levels of AURKA following mitotic entry. We showed that depletion of TPX2 attenuated WDR62 localization at spindle poles indicating that TPX2 co-activation of AURKA is required to recruit WDR62 to the spindle. We demonstrated that AURKA activity contributed to the mitotic phosphorylation of WDR62 residues Ser49 and Thr50 and phosphorylation of WDR62 N-terminal residues was required for spindle organization and metaphase chromosome alignment. Our analysis of several MCPH-associated WDR62 mutants (V65M, R438H and V1314RfsX18) that are mislocalized in mitosis revealed that their interactions and phosphorylation by AURKA was substantially reduced consistent with the notion that AURKA is a key determinant of WDR62 spindle recruitment. Thus, our study highlights the role of AURKA signaling in the spatiotemporal control of WDR62 at spindle poles where it maintains spindle organization. PMID:26713495

  5. CDD: a conserved domain database for interactive domain family analysis.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Anderson, John B; Derbyshire, Myra K; DeWeese-Scott, Carol; Gonzales, Noreen R; Gwadz, Marc; Hao, Luning; He, Siqian; Hurwitz, David I; Jackson, John D; Ke, Zhaoxi; Krylov, Dmitri; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Liebert, Cynthia A; Liu, Chunlei; Lu, Fu; Lu, Shennan; Marchler, Gabriele H; Mullokandov, Mikhail; Song, James S; Thanki, Narmada; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Yin, Jodie J; Zhang, Dachuan; Bryant, Stephen H

    2007-01-01

    The conserved domain database (CDD) is part of NCBI's Entrez database system and serves as a primary resource for the annotation of conserved domain footprints on protein sequences in Entrez. Entrez's global query interface can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Entrez and will search CDD and many other databases. Domain annotation for proteins in Entrez has been pre-computed and is readily available in the form of 'Conserved Domain' links. Novel protein sequences can be scanned against CDD using the CD-Search service; this service searches databases of CDD-derived profile models with protein sequence queries using BLAST heuristics, at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi. Protein query sequences submitted to NCBI's protein BLAST search service are scanned for conserved domain signatures by default. The CDD collection contains models imported from Pfam, SMART and COG, as well as domain models curated at NCBI. NCBI curated models are organized into hierarchies of domains related by common descent. Here we report on the status of the curation effort and present a novel helper application, CDTree, which enables users of the CDD resource to examine curated hierarchies. More importantly, CDD and CDTree used in concert, serve as a powerful tool in protein classification, as they allow users to analyze protein sequences in the context of domain family hierarchies.

  6. Insulin regulation of a novel WD-40 repeat protein in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, B D; Levine, M A; Bernier, M; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C

    2001-02-01

    A 400 bp PCR product generated with degenerate primers derived from the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor was used to screen a rat skeletal muscle cDNA library. The predicted amino acid sequence of the 978 bp open reading frame has a predicted M(r) of 35 804, an estimated isoelectric point (pI) of 5.31 and contains seven WD-40 repeats, which are common to G-protein beta subunits (Gbeta). Although chemically and structurally similar to Gbeta subunits, the predicted amino acid sequence, when compared with the previously cloned Gbeta isoforms, was found to be only 31-41% similar and thus was named Gbeta-like (GbetaL, 'Gable'). Western blotting of whole-cell lysates and immunoprecipitates of membrane and cytosolic fractions of HEK 293 cells stably overexpressing a carboxy-terminal His-tagged GbetaL indicates that the protein is cytosolic and that it migrates at 42 kDa. A 4 kb transcript was detected in all tissues surveyed by northern blotting; however, an additional 2 kb transcript was detected in testis. Expression of GbetaL mRNA was highest in the brain and testis, followed by lung, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, spleen and liver. In addition, reverse transcriptase/PCR showed that several other tissues and cell lines express GbetaL. The ubiquitous nature of the tissue expression pattern of GbetaL is similar to that of the insulin receptor, which suggests that insulin may influence GbetaL expression. Indeed, GbetaL protein and mRNA levels, in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, were upregulated by insulin in a concentration-dependent fashion. These changes were highly sensitive to insulin stimulation, being minimally affected by doses as low as 0.1 nM and maximally elevated by 1 nM doses. These data suggest that insulin regulates GbetaL production and imply that some of the actions of insulin may be mediated, in part, by this novel intracellular protein.

  7. The Role of WD40-Repeat Protein 62 (MCPH2) in Brain Growth: Diverse Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Required for Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Shohayeb, Belal; Lim, Nicholas Rui; Ho, Uda; Xu, Zhiheng; Dottori, Mirella; Quinn, Leonie; Ng, Dominic Chi Hiung

    2017-09-22

    Genetic disruptions of spindle/centrosome-associated WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62) are causative for autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) and a broader range of cortical malformations. Since the identification of WDR62 as encoded by the MCPH2 locus in 2010, recent studies that have deleted/depleted WDR62 in various animal models of cortical development have highlighted conserved functions in brain growth. Here, we provide a timely review of our current understanding of WDR62 contributions in the self-renewal, expansion and fate specification of neural stem and progenitor cells that are critical for neocortical development. Recent studies have revealed multiple functions for WDR62 in the regulation of spindle organization, mitotic progression and the duplication and biased inheritance of centrosomes during asymmetric divisions. We also discuss recently elaborated WDR62 interaction partners that include Aurora and c-Jun N-terminal kinases as part of complex signalling mechanisms that may define its neural functions. These studies provide new insights into the molecular and cellular processes that are required for brain formation and implicated in the genesis of primary microcephaly.

  8. Two novel WD40 domain–containing proteins, Ere1 and Ere2, function in the retromer-mediated endosomal recycling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yufeng; Stefan, Christopher J.; Rue, Sarah M.; Teis, David; Emr, Scott D.

    2011-01-01

    Regulated secretion, nutrient uptake, and responses to extracellular signals depend on cell-surface proteins that are internalized and recycled back to the plasma membrane. However, the underlying mechanisms that govern membrane protein recycling to the cell surface are not fully known. Using a chemical-genetic screen in yeast, we show that the arginine transporter Can1 is recycled back to the cell surface via two independent pathways mediated by the sorting nexins Snx4/41/42 and the retromer complex, respectively. In addition, we identify two novel WD40-domain endosomal recycling proteins, Ere1 and Ere2, that function in the retromer pathway. Ere1 is required for Can1 recycling via the retromer-mediated pathway, but it is not required for the transport of other retromer cargoes, such as Vps10 and Ftr1. Biochemical studies reveal that Ere1 physically interacts with internalized Can1. Ere2 is present in a complex containing Ere1 on endosomes and functions as a regulator of Ere1. Taken together, our results suggest that Snx4/41/42 and the retromer comprise two independent pathways for the recycling of internalized cell-surface proteins. Moreover, a complex containing the two novel proteins Ere1 and Ere2 mediates cargo-specific recognition by the retromer pathway. PMID:21880895

  9. Transcriptional control of flavonoid biosynthesis: fine-tuning of the MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Shutian

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant secondary polyphenolic metabolites and fulfil many vital biological functions, offering a valuable metabolic and genetic model for studying transcriptional control of gene expression. Arabidopsis thaliana mainly accumulates 3 types of flavonoids, including flavonols, anthocyanins, and proanthocyanidins (PAs). Flavonoid biosynthesis involves a multitude of well-characterized enzymatic and regulatory proteins. Three R2R3-MYB proteins (MYB11, MYB12, and MYB111) control flavonol biosynthesis via activating the early biosynthetic steps, whereas the production of anthocyanins and PAs requires the MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) complex to activate the late biosynthetic genes. Additional regulators of flavonoid biosynthesis have recently come to light, which interact with R2R3-MYBs or bHLHs to organize or disrupt the formation of the MBW complex, leading to enhanced or compromised flavonoid production. This mini-review gives an overview of how these novel players modulate flavonoid metabolism and thus plant developmental processes and further proposes a fine-tuning mechanism to complete the complex regulatory network controlling flavonoid biosynthesis.

  10. The LuWD40-1 gene encoding WD repeat protein regulates growth and pollen viability in flax (Linum Usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Jordan, Mark C; Datla, Raju; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    As a crop, flax holds significant commercial value for its omega-3 rich oilseeds and stem fibres. Canada is the largest producer of linseed but there exists scope for significant yield improvements. Implementation of mechanisms such as male sterility can permit the development of hybrids to assist in achieving this goal. Temperature sensitive male sterility has been reported in flax but the leakiness of this system in field conditions limits the production of quality hybrid seeds. Here, we characterized a 2,588 bp transcript differentially expressed in male sterile lines of flax. The twelve intron gene predicted to encode a 368 amino acid protein has five WD40 repeats which, in silico, form a propeller structure with putative nucleic acid and histone binding capabilities. The LuWD40-1 protein localized to the nucleus and its expression increased during the transition and continued through the vegetative stages (seed, etiolated seedling, stem) while the transcript levels declined during reproductive development (ovary, anthers) and embryonic morphogenesis of male fertile plants. Knockout lines for LuWD40-1 in flax failed to develop shoots while overexpression lines showed delayed growth phenotype and were male sterile. The non-viable flowers failed to open and the pollen grains from these flowers were empty. Three independent transgenic lines overexpressing the LuWD40-1 gene had ∼80% non-viable pollen, reduced branching, delayed flowering and maturity compared to male fertile genotypes. The present study provides new insights into a male sterility mechanism present in flax.

  11. The LuWD40-1 Gene Encoding WD Repeat Protein Regulates Growth and Pollen Viability in Flax (Linum Usitatissimum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Jordan, Mark C.; Datla, Raju; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    As a crop, flax holds significant commercial value for its omega-3 rich oilseeds and stem fibres. Canada is the largest producer of linseed but there exists scope for significant yield improvements. Implementation of mechanisms such as male sterility can permit the development of hybrids to assist in achieving this goal. Temperature sensitive male sterility has been reported in flax but the leakiness of this system in field conditions limits the production of quality hybrid seeds. Here, we characterized a 2,588 bp transcript differentially expressed in male sterile lines of flax. The twelve intron gene predicted to encode a 368 amino acid protein has five WD40 repeats which, in silico, form a propeller structure with putative nucleic acid and histone binding capabilities. The LuWD40-1 protein localized to the nucleus and its expression increased during the transition and continued through the vegetative stages (seed, etiolated seedling, stem) while the transcript levels declined during reproductive development (ovary, anthers) and embryonic morphogenesis of male fertile plants. Knockout lines for LuWD40-1 in flax failed to develop shoots while overexpression lines showed delayed growth phenotype and were male sterile. The non-viable flowers failed to open and the pollen grains from these flowers were empty. Three independent transgenic lines overexpressing the LuWD40-1 gene had ∼80% non-viable pollen, reduced branching, delayed flowering and maturity compared to male fertile genotypes. The present study provides new insights into a male sterility mechanism present in flax. PMID:23935935

  12. Mutation of domain III and domain VI in L gene conserved domain of Nipah virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalani, Siti Aishah; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2016-11-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is the etiologic agent responsible for the respiratory illness and causes fatal encephalitis in human. NiV L protein subunit is thought to be responsible for the majority of enzymatic activities involved in viral transcription and replication. The L protein which is the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase has high sequence homology among negative sense RNA viruses. In negative stranded RNA viruses, based on sequence alignment six conserved domain (domain I-IV) have been determined. Each domain is separated on variable regions that suggest the structure to consist concatenated functional domain. To directly address the roles of domains III and VI, site-directed mutations were constructed by the substitution of bases at sequences 2497, 2500, 5528 and 5532. Each mutated L gene can be used in future studies to test the ability for expression on in vitro translation.

  13. The apple WD40 protein MdTTG1 interacts with bHLH but not MYB proteins to regulate anthocyanin accumulation.

    PubMed

    An, Xiu-Hong; Tian, Yi; Chen, Ke-Qin; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2012-05-01

    The abundance of anthocyanins and proanthocyanins in apples is tightly regulated by three classes of regulatory factors, MYB, bHLH and WD40 proteins, only some of which have been previously identified. In this study, we identified an apple WD40 protein (MdTTG1) that promotes the accumulation of anthocyanins. The biosynthetic genes required downstream in the flavonoid pathway were up-regulated when MdTTG1 was over-expressed in Arabidopsis. Consistent with its role as a transcriptional regulator, an MdTTG1-GFP fusion protein was observed only in the nucleus. We assayed the expression patterns of this gene in different organs and found that they were positively correlated with anthocyanin accumulation in the apple. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that MdTTG1 interacted with bHLH transcription factors (TFs) but not MYB protein, whereas bHLH was known to interact with MYB in apples. However, based on a ChIP assay, MdTTG1 does not appear to bind to the promoter of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes MdDFR and MdUFGT. Taken together, these results suggest that the apple WD40 protein MdTTG1 interacts with bHLH but not MYB proteins to regulate anthocyanin accumulation.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel gene containing WD40 repeats from the region deleted in velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome on chromosome 22q11.

    PubMed

    Funke, B; Pandita, R K; Morrow, B E

    2001-05-01

    Three congenital disorders, cat-eye syndrome (CES), der(22) syndrome, and velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), result from tetrasomy, trisomy, and monosomy, respectively, of part of 22q11. They share a 1.5-Mb region of overlap, which contains 24 known genes. Although the region has been sequenced and extensively analyzed, it is expected to contain additional genes, which have thus far escaped identification. To understand completely the molecular etiology of VCFS/DGS, der(22) syndrome, and CES, it is essential to isolate all genes in the interval. We have identified and characterized a novel human gene, located within the 1.5-Mb region deleted in VCFS/DGS, trisomic in der(22) syndrome and tetrasomic in CES. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human gene and its mouse homologue contain several WD40 repeats, but lack homology to known proteins. We termed this gene WDR14 (WD40 repeat-containing gene deleted in VCFS). It is expressed in a variety of human and mouse adult and fetal tissues with substantial expression levels in the adult thymus, an organ hypoplastic in VCFS/DGS.

  15. Evolutionary immune response to conserved domains in parasites and aeroallergens.

    PubMed

    Bielory, Brett Phillip; Mainardi, Timothy; Rottem, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    The immune response based on immunoglobulin E (IgE) evolved as a defense against specific parasitic infections. In the absence of active helminthic infections, the immune system has redirected its IgE epitopes toward innocuous environmental antigens. Helminths and aeroallergens have a similar stereotypical IgE response to unique antigens that can not be explained by chance alone. This study was designed to evaluate potential homology between conserved protein domains embedded in parasitic organisms and aeroallergens. Search and retrieval systems for nucleotide and protein sequences (Entrez, BLAST, and National Center for Biotechnology Information) were searched to identify conserved domains between allergens and certain parasites. A total score was developed that correlated positively with homology between compared sequences. Over 2000 domains were examined. We found matches with a high total score (>100) that signified a strong positive correlation between sequences in allergens (n = 30) and parasites (n = 13). Multiple shared conserved domains were identified between parasites and allergens. Parasite-allergen combinations with the most significant homology (greatest total score) were Plasmodium falciparum enolase and Hev b9 (total score, 612), Schistosoma mansoni albumin and Fel d 2 (total score, 991), Ascaris lumbricoides tropomyosin and Ani s3 (total score, 531), and Wuchereria bancrofti trypsin and Blo t3 (138). Homologous conserved domains exist in specific parasites and allergens, consistent with the theory that the human IgE-eosinophil immune response to common allergens is a direct consequence of stimulation by parasitic organisms.

  16. CDD: a Conserved Domain Database for protein classification.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Anderson, John B; Cherukuri, Praveen F; DeWeese-Scott, Carol; Geer, Lewis Y; Gwadz, Marc; He, Siqian; Hurwitz, David I; Jackson, John D; Ke, Zhaoxi; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Liebert, Cynthia A; Liu, Chunlei; Lu, Fu; Marchler, Gabriele H; Mullokandov, Mikhail; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Simonyan, Vahan; Song, James S; Thiessen, Paul A; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Yin, Jodie J; Zhang, Dachuan; Bryant, Stephen H

    2005-01-01

    The Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is the protein classification component of NCBI's Entrez query and retrieval system. CDD is linked to other Entrez databases such as Proteins, Taxonomy and PubMed, and can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=cdd. CD-Search, which is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi, is a fast, interactive tool to identify conserved domains in new protein sequences. CD-Search results for protein sequences in Entrez are pre-computed to provide links between proteins and domain models, and computational annotation visible upon request. Protein-protein queries submitted to NCBI's BLAST search service at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST are scanned for the presence of conserved domains by default. While CDD started out as essentially a mirror of publicly available domain alignment collections, such as SMART, Pfam and COG, we have continued an effort to update, and in some cases replace these models with domain hierarchies curated at the NCBI. Here, we report on the progress of the curation effort and associated improvements in the functionality of the CDD information retrieval system.

  17. Krüppel-like Factor 11 Regulates the Expression of Metabolic Genes via an Evolutionarily Conserved Protein Interaction Domain Functionally Disrupted in Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young*

    PubMed Central

    Lomberk, Gwen; Grzenda, Adrienne; Mathison, Angela; Escande, Carlos; Zhang, Jin-San; Calvo, Ezequiel; Miller, Laurence J.; Iovanna, Juan; Chini, Eduardo N.; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Urrutia, Raul

    2013-01-01

    The function of Krüppel-like factor 11 (KLF11) in the regulation of metabolic pathways is conserved from flies to human. Alterations in KLF11 function result in maturity onset diabetes of the young 7 (MODY7) and neonatal diabetes; however, the mechanisms underlying the role of this protein in metabolic disorders remain unclear. Here, we investigated how the A347S genetic variant, present in MODY7 patients, modulates KLF11 transcriptional activity. A347S affects a previously identified transcriptional regulatory domain 3 (TRD3) for which co-regulators remain unknown. Structure-oriented sequence analyses described here predicted that the KLF11 TRD3 represents an evolutionarily conserved protein domain. Combined yeast two-hybrid and protein array experiments demonstrated that the TRD3 binds WD40, WWI, WWII, and SH3 domain-containing proteins. Using one of these proteins as a model, guanine nucleotide-binding protein β2 (Gβ2), we investigated the functional consequences of KLF11 coupling to a TRD3 binding partner. Combined immunoprecipitation and biomolecular fluorescence complementation assays confirmed that activation of three different metabolic G protein-coupled receptors (β-adrenergic, secretin, and cholecystokinin) induces translocation of Gβ2 to the nucleus where it directly binds KLF11 in a manner that is disrupted by the MODY7 A347S variant. Using genome-wide expression profiles, we identified metabolic gene networks impacted upon TRD3 disruption. Furthermore, A347S disrupted KLF11-mediated increases in basal insulin levels and promoter activity and blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Thus, this study characterizes a novel protein/protein interaction domain disrupted in a KLF gene variant that associates to MODY7, contributing to our understanding of gene regulation events in complex metabolic diseases. PMID:23589285

  18. Krüppel-like factor 11 regulates the expression of metabolic genes via an evolutionarily conserved protein interaction domain functionally disrupted in maturity onset diabetes of the young.

    PubMed

    Lomberk, Gwen; Grzenda, Adrienne; Mathison, Angela; Escande, Carlos; Zhang, Jin-San; Calvo, Ezequiel; Miller, Laurence J; Iovanna, Juan; Chini, Eduardo N; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Urrutia, Raul

    2013-06-14

    The function of Krüppel-like factor 11 (KLF11) in the regulation of metabolic pathways is conserved from flies to human. Alterations in KLF11 function result in maturity onset diabetes of the young 7 (MODY7) and neonatal diabetes; however, the mechanisms underlying the role of this protein in metabolic disorders remain unclear. Here, we investigated how the A347S genetic variant, present in MODY7 patients, modulates KLF11 transcriptional activity. A347S affects a previously identified transcriptional regulatory domain 3 (TRD3) for which co-regulators remain unknown. Structure-oriented sequence analyses described here predicted that the KLF11 TRD3 represents an evolutionarily conserved protein domain. Combined yeast two-hybrid and protein array experiments demonstrated that the TRD3 binds WD40, WWI, WWII, and SH3 domain-containing proteins. Using one of these proteins as a model, guanine nucleotide-binding protein β2 (Gβ2), we investigated the functional consequences of KLF11 coupling to a TRD3 binding partner. Combined immunoprecipitation and biomolecular fluorescence complementation assays confirmed that activation of three different metabolic G protein-coupled receptors (β-adrenergic, secretin, and cholecystokinin) induces translocation of Gβ2 to the nucleus where it directly binds KLF11 in a manner that is disrupted by the MODY7 A347S variant. Using genome-wide expression profiles, we identified metabolic gene networks impacted upon TRD3 disruption. Furthermore, A347S disrupted KLF11-mediated increases in basal insulin levels and promoter activity and blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Thus, this study characterizes a novel protein/protein interaction domain disrupted in a KLF gene variant that associates to MODY7, contributing to our understanding of gene regulation events in complex metabolic diseases.

  19. Conserved domains and SINE diversity during animal evolution.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Andrea; Mantovani, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Eukaryotic genomes harbour a number of mobile genetic elements (MGEs); moving from one genomic location to another, they are known to impact on the host genome. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are well-represented, non-autonomous retroelements and they are likely the most diversified MGEs. In some instances, sequence domains conserved across unrelated SINEs have been identified; remarkably, one of these, called Nin, has been conserved since the Radiata-Bilateria splitting. Here we report on two new domains: Inv, derived from Nin, identified in insects and in deuterostomes, and Pln, restricted to polyneopteran insects. The identification of Inv and Pln sequences allowed us to retrieve new SINEs, two in insects and one in a hemichordate. The diverse structural combination of the different domains in different SINE families, during metazoan evolution, offers a clearer view of SINE diversity and their frequent de novo emergence through module exchange, possibly underlying the high evolutionary success of SINEs. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Late replication domains are evolutionary conserved in the Drosophila genome.

    PubMed

    Andreyenkova, Natalya G; Kolesnikova, Tatyana D; Makunin, Igor V; Pokholkova, Galina V; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Zykova, Tatyana Yu; Zhimulev, Igor F; Belyaeva, Elena S

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila chromosomes are organized into distinct domains differing in their predominant chromatin composition, replication timing and evolutionary conservation. We show on a genome-wide level that genes whose order has remained unaltered across 9 Drosophila species display late replication timing and frequently map to the regions of repressive chromatin. This observation is consistent with the existence of extensive domains of repressive chromatin that replicate extremely late and have conserved gene order in the Drosophila genome. We suggest that such repressive chromatin domains correspond to a handful of regions that complete replication at the very end of S phase. We further demonstrate that the order of genes in these regions is rarely altered in evolution. Substantial proportion of such regions significantly coincide with large synteny blocks. This indicates that there are evolutionary mechanisms maintaining the integrity of these late-replicating chromatin domains. The synteny blocks corresponding to the extremely late-replicating regions in the D. melanogaster genome consistently display two-fold lower gene density across different Drosophila species.

  1. CORAL: aligning conserved core regions across domain families.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jessica H; Marchler-Bauer, Aron

    2009-08-01

    Homologous protein families share highly conserved sequence and structure regions that are frequent targets for comparative analysis of related proteins and families. Many protein families, such as the curated domain families in the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), exhibit similar structural cores. To improve accuracy in aligning such protein families, we propose a profile-profile method CORAL that aligns individual core regions as gap-free units. CORAL computes optimal local alignment of two profiles with heuristics to preserve continuity within core regions. We benchmarked its performance on curated domains in CDD, which have pre-defined core regions, against COMPASS, HHalign and PSI-BLAST, using structure superpositions and comprehensive curator-optimized alignments as standards of truth. CORAL improves alignment accuracy on core regions over general profile methods, returning a balanced score of 0.57 for over 80% of all domain families in CDD, compared with the highest balanced score of 0.45 from other methods. Further, CORAL provides E-values to aid in detecting homologous protein families and, by respecting block boundaries, produces alignments with improved 'readability' that facilitate manual refinement. CORAL will be included in future versions of the NCBI Cn3D/CDTree software, which can be downloaded at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdtree/cdtree.shtml. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. CORAL: aligning conserved core regions across domain families

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jessica H.; Marchler-Bauer, Aron

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Homologous protein families share highly conserved sequence and structure regions that are frequent targets for comparative analysis of related proteins and families. Many protein families, such as the curated domain families in the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), exhibit similar structural cores. To improve accuracy in aligning such protein families, we propose a profile–profile method CORAL that aligns individual core regions as gap-free units. Results: CORAL computes optimal local alignment of two profiles with heuristics to preserve continuity within core regions. We benchmarked its performance on curated domains in CDD, which have pre-defined core regions, against COMPASS, HHalign and PSI-BLAST, using structure superpositions and comprehensive curator-optimized alignments as standards of truth. CORAL improves alignment accuracy on core regions over general profile methods, returning a balanced score of 0.57 for over 80% of all domain families in CDD, compared with the highest balanced score of 0.45 from other methods. Further, CORAL provides E-values to aid in detecting homologous protein families and, by respecting block boundaries, produces alignments with improved ‘readability’ that facilitate manual refinement. Availability: CORAL will be included in future versions of the NCBI Cn3D/CDTree software, which can be downloaded at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdtree/cdtree.shtml. Contact: fongj@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19470584

  3. Domain conservation in several volvocalean cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Woessner, J P; Molendijk, A J; van Egmond, P; Klis, F M; Goodenough, U W; Haring, M A

    1994-11-01

    Based on our previous work demonstrating that (SerPro)x epitopes are common to extensin-like cell wall proteins in Chlamydomonas' reinhardtii, we looked for similar proteins in the distantly related species C. eugametos. Using a polyclonal antiserum against a (SerPro)10 oligopeptide, we found distinct sets of stage-specific polypeptides immunoprecipitated from in vitro translations of C. eugametos RNA. Screening of a C. eugametos cDNA expression library with the antiserum led to the isolation of a cDNA (WP6) encoding a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. Analysis of a similarly selected cDNA (VSP-3) from a C. reinhardtii cDNA expression library revealed that it also coded for a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. The C-terminal rod domains of VSP-3 and WP6 are highly homologous, while the N-terminal domains are dissimilar; however, the N-terminal domain of VSP-3 is homologous to the globular domain of a cell wall protein from Volvox carteri. Exon shuffling might be responsible for this example of domain conservation over 350 million years of volvocalean cell wall protein evolution.

  4. Saccharomyces SRP RNA secondary structures: a conserved S-domain and extended Alu-domain.

    PubMed

    Van Nues, Rob W; Brown, Jeremy D

    2004-01-01

    The contribution made by the RNA component of signal recognition particle (SRP) to its function in protein targeting is poorly understood. We have generated a complete secondary structure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae SRP RNA, scR1. The structure conforms to that of other eukaryotic SRP RNAs. It is rod-shaped with, at opposite ends, binding sites for proteins required for the SRP functions of signal sequence recognition (S-domain) and translational elongation arrest (Alu-domain). Micrococcal nuclease digestion of purified S. cerevisiae SRP separated the S-domain of the RNA from the Alu-domain as a discrete fragment. The Alu-domain resolved into several stable fragments indicating a compact structure. Comparison of scR1 with SRP RNAs of five yeast species related to S. cerevisiae revealed the S-domain to be the most conserved region of the RNA. Extending data from nuclease digestion with phylogenetic comparison, we built the secondary structure model for scR1. The Alu-domain contains large extensions, including a sequence with hallmarks of an expansion segment. Evolutionarily conserved bases are placed in the Alu- and S-domains as in other SRP RNAs, the exception being an unusual GU(4)A loop closing the helix onto which the signal sequence binding Srp54p assembles (domain IV). Surprisingly, several mutations within the predicted Srp54p binding site failed to disrupt SRP function in vivo. However, the strength of the Srp54p-scR1 and, to a lesser extent, Sec65p-scR1 interaction was decreased in these mutant particles. The availability of a secondary structure for scR1 will facilitate interpretation of data from genetic analysis of the RNA.

  5. The essential WD40 protein Cia1 is involved in a late step of cytosolic and nuclear iron-sulfur protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Balk, Janneke; Aguilar Netz, Daili J; Tepper, Katharina; Pierik, Antonio J; Lill, Roland

    2005-12-01

    The assembly of cytosolic and nuclear iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins in yeast is dependent on the iron-sulfur cluster assembly and export machineries in mitochondria and three recently identified extramitochondrial proteins, the P-loop NTPases Cfd1 and Nbp35 and the hydrogenase-like Nar1. However, the molecular mechanism of Fe/S protein assembly in the cytosol is far from being understood, and more components are anticipated to take part in this process. Here, we have identified and functionally characterized a novel WD40 repeat protein, designated Cia1, as an essential component required for Fe/S cluster assembly in vivo on cytosolic and nuclear, but not mitochondrial, Fe/S proteins. Surprisingly, Nbp35 and Nar1, themselves Fe/S proteins, could assemble their Fe/S clusters in the absence of Cia1, demonstrating that these components act before Cia1. Consequently, Cia1 is involved in a late step of Fe/S cluster incorporation into target proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a specific interaction between Cia1 and Nar1. In contrast to the mostly cytosolic Nar1, Cia1 is preferentially localized to the nucleus, suggesting an additional function of Cia1. Taken together, our results indicate that Cia1 is a new member of the cytosolic Fe/S protein assembly (CIA) machinery participating in a step after Nbp35 and Nar1.

  6. The Essential WD40 Protein Cia1 Is Involved in a Late Step of Cytosolic and Nuclear Iron-Sulfur Protein Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Janneke; Aguilar Netz, Daili J.; Tepper, Katharina; Pierik, Antonio J.; Lill, Roland

    2005-01-01

    The assembly of cytosolic and nuclear iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins in yeast is dependent on the iron-sulfur cluster assembly and export machineries in mitochondria and three recently identified extramitochondrial proteins, the P-loop NTPases Cfd1 and Nbp35 and the hydrogenase-like Nar1. However, the molecular mechanism of Fe/S protein assembly in the cytosol is far from being understood, and more components are anticipated to take part in this process. Here, we have identified and functionally characterized a novel WD40 repeat protein, designated Cia1, as an essential component required for Fe/S cluster assembly in vivo on cytosolic and nuclear, but not mitochondrial, Fe/S proteins. Surprisingly, Nbp35 and Nar1, themselves Fe/S proteins, could assemble their Fe/S clusters in the absence of Cia1, demonstrating that these components act before Cia1. Consequently, Cia1 is involved in a late step of Fe/S cluster incorporation into target proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a specific interaction between Cia1 and Nar1. In contrast to the mostly cytosolic Nar1, Cia1 is preferentially localized to the nucleus, suggesting an additional function of Cia1. Taken together, our results indicate that Cia1 is a new member of the cytosolic Fe/S protein assembly (CIA) machinery participating in a step after Nbp35 and Nar1. PMID:16314508

  7. The WD40 protein Morg1 facilitates Par6-aPKC binding to Crb3 for apical identity in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Junya; Kamakura, Sachiko; Iwakiri, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Izaki, Tomoko; Ito, Takashi; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2013-03-04

    Formation of apico-basal polarity in epithelial cells is crucial for both morphogenesis (e.g., cyst formation) and function (e.g., tight junction development). Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), complexed with Par6, is considered to translocate to the apical membrane and function in epithelial cell polarization. However, the mechanism for translocation of the Par6-aPKC complex has remained largely unknown. Here, we show that the WD40 protein Morg1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase organizer 1) directly binds to Par6 and thus facilitates apical targeting of Par6-aPKC in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells. Morg1 also interacts with the apical transmembrane protein Crumbs3 to promote Par6-aPKC binding to Crumbs3, which is reinforced with the apically localized small GTPase Cdc42. Depletion of Morg1 disrupted both tight junction development in monolayer culture and cyst formation in three-dimensional culture; apico-basal polarity was notably restored by forced targeting of aPKC to the apical surface. Thus, Par6-aPKC recruitment to the premature apical membrane appears to be required for definition of apical identity of epithelial cells.

  8. WD40-repeat protein 62 is a JNK-phosphorylated spindle pole protein required for spindle maintenance and timely mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Qu, Zhengdong; Ngoei, Kevin R.; Yip, Yan Y.; Zhao, Teresa T.; Heng, Julian I.; Ng, Dominic C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The impact of aberrant centrosomes and/or spindles on asymmetric cell division in embryonic development indicates the tight regulation of bipolar spindle formation and positioning that is required for mitotic progression and cell fate determination. WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62) was recently identified as a spindle pole protein linked to the neurodevelopmental defect of microcephaly but its roles in mitosis have not been defined. We report here that the in utero electroporation of neuroprogenitor cells with WDR62 siRNAs induced their cell cycle exit and reduced their proliferative capacity. In cultured cells, we demonstrated cell-cycle-dependent accumulation of WDR62 at the spindle pole during mitotic entry that persisted until metaphase–anaphase transition. Utilizing siRNA depletion, we revealed WDR62 function in stabilizing the mitotic spindle specifically during metaphase. WDR62 loss resulted in spindle orientation defects, decreased the integrity of centrosomes displaced from the spindle pole and delayed mitotic progression. Additionally, we revealed JNK phosphorylation of WDR62 is required for maintaining metaphase spindle organization during mitosis. Our study provides the first functional characterization of WDR62 and has revealed requirements for JNK/WDR62 signaling in mitotic spindle regulation that may be involved in coordinating neurogenesis. PMID:22899712

  9. WD40-repeat protein 62 is a JNK-phosphorylated spindle pole protein required for spindle maintenance and timely mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Bogoyevitch, Marie A; Yeap, Yvonne Y C; Qu, Zhengdong; Ngoei, Kevin R; Yip, Yan Y; Zhao, Teresa T; Heng, Julian I; Ng, Dominic C H

    2012-11-01

    The impact of aberrant centrosomes and/or spindles on asymmetric cell division in embryonic development indicates the tight regulation of bipolar spindle formation and positioning that is required for mitotic progression and cell fate determination. WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62) was recently identified as a spindle pole protein linked to the neurodevelopmental defect of microcephaly but its roles in mitosis have not been defined. We report here that the in utero electroporation of neuroprogenitor cells with WDR62 siRNAs induced their cell cycle exit and reduced their proliferative capacity. In cultured cells, we demonstrated cell-cycle-dependent accumulation of WDR62 at the spindle pole during mitotic entry that persisted until metaphase-anaphase transition. Utilizing siRNA depletion, we revealed WDR62 function in stabilizing the mitotic spindle specifically during metaphase. WDR62 loss resulted in spindle orientation defects, decreased the integrity of centrosomes displaced from the spindle pole and delayed mitotic progression. Additionally, we revealed JNK phosphorylation of WDR62 is required for maintaining metaphase spindle organization during mitosis. Our study provides the first functional characterization of WDR62 and has revealed requirements for JNK/WDR62 signaling in mitotic spindle regulation that may be involved in coordinating neurogenesis.

  10. The rice DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein is required for the assembly of the restoration of fertility complex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojian; Huang, Qi; Xiao, Haijun; Zhang, Qiannan; Ni, Chenzi; Xu, Yanghong; Liu, Gai; Yang, Daichang; Zhu, Yingguo; Hu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and restoration of fertility (Rf) are widely distributed in plant species utilized by humans. RF5 and GRP162 are subunits of the restoration of fertility complex (RFC) in Hong-Lian rice. Despite the fact that the RFC is 400-500 kDa in size, the other proteins or factors in the complex still remain unknown. Here, we identified RFC subunit 3, which encodes a DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein (RFC3) that is present in all tissues but highly expressed in leaves. We established that RFC3 interacts with both RF5 and GRP162 in vitro and in vivo, and is transported into the mitochondria as a membrane protein. Furthermore, CMS RNA (atp6-orfH79) and CMS cytotoxic protein (ORFH79) accumulate when RFC3 is silenced in restorer lines. We presented the analysis with blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that RFC is disrupted in the RNAi line. We concluded that RCF3 is indispensable as a scaffold protein for the assembly of the RFC complex. We unveil a new molecular player of the RFC in the Rf pathway in rice and propose the model of RFC based on these data.

  11. Conserved and variable domains of RNase MRP RNA.

    PubMed

    Dávila López, Marcela; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Samuelsson, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is a eukaryotic ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of one RNA molecule and 7-10 protein subunits. One important function of MRP is to catalyze an endonucleolytic cleavage during processing of rRNA precursors. RNase MRP is evolutionary related to RNase P which is critical for tRNA processing. A large number of MRP RNA sequences that now are available have been used to identify conserved primary and secondary structure features of the molecule. MRP RNA has structural features in common with P RNA such as a conserved catalytic core, but it also has unique features and is characterized by a domain highly variable between species. Information regarding primary and secondary structure features is of interest not only in basic studies of the function of MRP RNA, but also because mutations in the RNA give rise to human genetic diseases such as cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

  12. Identification and characterization of MYB-bHLH-WD40 regulatory complexes controlling proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruits.

    PubMed

    Schaart, Jan G; Dubos, Christian; Romero De La Fuente, Irene; van Houwelingen, Adèle M M L; de Vos, Ric C H; Jonker, Harry H; Xu, Wenjia; Routaboul, Jean-Marc; Lepiniec, Loïc; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruits contain high concentrations of flavonoids. In unripe strawberries, the flavonoids are mainly represented by proanthocyanidins (PAs), while in ripe fruits the red-coloured anthocyanins also accumulate. Most of the structural genes leading to PA biosynthesis in strawberry have been characterized, but no information is available on their transcriptional regulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana the expression of the PA biosynthetic genes is specifically induced by a ternary protein complex, composed of AtTT2 (AtMYB123), AtTT8 (AtbHLH042) and AtTTG1 (WD40-repeat protein). A strategy combining yeast-two-hybrid screening and agglomerative hierarchical clustering of transcriptomic and metabolomic data was undertaken to identify strawberry PA regulators. Among the candidate genes isolated, four were similar to AtTT2, AtTT8 and AtTTG1 (FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1, respectively) and two encode putative negative regulators (FaMYB5 and FabHLH3∆). Interestingly, FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1 were found to complement the tt2-1, tt8-3 and ttg1-1 transparent testa mutants, respectively. In addition, they interacted in yeast and activated the Arabidopsis BANYULS (anthocyanidin reductase) gene promoter when coexpressed in Physcomitrella patens protoplasts. Taken together, these results demonstrated that FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1 are the respective functional homologues of AtTT2, AtTT8 and AtTTG1, providing new tools for modifying PA content and strawberry fruit quality. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells. PMID:27310875

  14. The molecular chaperone TRiC/CCT binds to the Trp-Asp 40 (WD40) repeat protein WDR68 and promotes its folding, protein kinase DYRK1A binding, and nuclear accumulation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Takeshi; Aoshima, Masato; Tsubata, Takuichi; Nishida, Eisuke

    2014-11-28

    Trp-Asp (WD) repeat protein 68 (WDR68) is an evolutionarily conserved WD40 repeat protein that binds to several proteins, including dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase (DYRK1A), MAPK/ERK kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1), and Cullin4-damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1 (CUL4-DDB1). WDR68 affects multiple and diverse physiological functions, such as controlling anthocyanin synthesis in plants, tissue growth in insects, and craniofacial development in vertebrates. However, the biochemical basis and the regulatory mechanism of WDR68 activity remain largely unknown. To better understand the cellular function of WDR68, here we have isolated and identified cellular WDR68 binding partners using a phosphoproteomic approach. More than 200 cellular proteins with wide varieties of biochemical functions were identified as WDR68-binding protein candidates. Eight T-complex protein 1 (TCP1) subunits comprising the molecular chaperone TCP1 ring complex/chaperonin-containing TCP1 (TRiC/CCT) were identified as major WDR68-binding proteins, and phosphorylation sites in both WDR68 and TRiC/CCT were identified. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the binding between TRiC/CCT and WDR68. Computer-aided structural analysis suggested that WDR68 forms a seven-bladed β-propeller ring. Experiments with a series of deletion mutants in combination with the structural modeling showed that three of the seven β-propeller blades of WDR68 are essential and sufficient for TRiC/CCT binding. Knockdown of cellular TRiC/CCT by siRNA caused an abnormal WDR68 structure and led to reduction of its DYRK1A-binding activity. Concomitantly, nuclear accumulation of WDR68 was suppressed by the knockdown of TRiC/CCT, and WDR68 formed cellular aggregates when overexpressed in the TRiC/CCT-deficient cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the molecular chaperone TRiC/CCT is essential for correct protein folding, DYRK1A binding, and nuclear accumulation of WDR68.

  15. Characterization of genomic regulatory domains conserved across the genus Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sahagun, Virginia; Ranz, José M

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrates and insects, the conservation of local gene order among distantly related species (microsynteny) is higher than expected in the presence of highly conserved noncoding elements (HCNEs). Dense clusters of HCNEs, or HCNE peaks, have been proposed to mediate the regulation of sometimes distantly located genes, which are central for the developmental program of the organism. Thus, the regions encompassing HCNE peaks and their targets in different species would form genomic regulatory domains (GRDs), which should presumably enjoy an enhanced stability over evolutionary time. By leveraging genome rearrangement information from nine Drosophila species and using gene functional and phenotypic information, we performed a comprehensive characterization of the organization of microsynteny blocks harboring HCNE peaks and provide a functional portrait of the putative HCNE targets that reside therein. We found that Drosophila HCNE peaks tend to colocalize more often than expected and to be evenly distributed across chromosomal elements. Putative HCNE peak targets are characterized by a tight association with particular promoter motifs, higher incidence of severe mutant phenotypes, and evidence of a more precise regulation of gene expression during important developmental transitions. As for their physical organization, ~65% of these putative targets are separated by a median of two genes from their nearest HCNE peaks. These observations represent the first functional portrait of this euchromatic fraction of the Drosophila genome with distinctive evolutionary dynamics, which will facilitate future experimental studies on the interactions between HCNE peaks and their targets in a genetically tractable system such as Drosophila melanogaster.

  16. CDD: a database of conserved domain alignments with links to domain three-dimensional structure

    PubMed Central

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Panchenko, Anna R.; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Thiessen, Paul A.; Geer, Lewis Y.; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2002-01-01

    The Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is a compilation of multiple sequence alignments representing protein domains conserved in molecular evolution. It has been populated with alignment data from the public collections Pfam and SMART, as well as with contributions from colleagues at NCBI. The current version of CDD (v.1.54) contains 3693 such models. CDD alignments are linked to protein sequence and structure data in Entrez. The molecular structure viewer Cn3D serves as a tool to interactively visualize alignments and three-dimensional structure, and to link three-dimensional residue coordinates to descriptions of evolutionary conservation. CDD can be accessed on the World Wide Web at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml. Protein query sequences may be compared against databases of position-specific score matrices derived from alignments in CDD, using a service named CD-Search, which can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi. CD-Search runs reverse-position-specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST), a variant of the widely used PSI-BLAST algorithm. CD-Search is run by default for protein–protein queries submitted to NCBI’s BLAST service at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST. PMID:11752315

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activator with WD40 repeats (MAWD) and MAWD-binding protein induce cell differentiation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; Zhang, Jun; Xi, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Li, Wenmei; Cui, Jiantao; Xing, Rui; Pan, Yuanmin; Pan, Zemin; Li, Feng; Lu, Youyong

    2015-09-15

    Our previous proteomic analysis revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinase activator with WD40 repeats (MAWD) and MAWD-binding protein (MAWBP) were downregulated in gastric cancer (GC) tissues. These proteins interacted and formed complexes in GC cells. To investigate the role of MAWD and MAWBP in GC differentiation, we analyzed the relationship between MAWD/MAWBP and clinicopathologic characteristics of GC tissues and examined the expression of E-cadherin and pepsinogen C (PGC)-used as gastric mucosa differentiation markers-in MAWD/MAWBP-overexpressing GC cells and xenografts. We measured MAWD, MAWBP, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), E-cadherin, and PGC expression in 223 GC tissues and matched-adjacent normal tissues using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analyses, and correlated these expression levels with clinicopathologic features. MAWD and MAWBP were overexpressed alone or together in SGC7901 cells and then E-cadherin, N-cadherin, PGC, Snail, and p-Smad2 levels were determined using western blotting, semiquantitative RT-PCR, and immunofluorescence analysis. Alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was measured to investigate the differentiation level of various transfected cells, and the transfected cells were used in tumorigenicity assays and for IHC analysis of protein expression in xenografts. MAWD/MAWBP positive staining was significantly lower in GC tissues than in normal samples (P < 0.001), and the expression of these proteins was closely correlated with GC differentiation grade. Kaplan-Meier survival curves indicated that low MAWD and MAWBP expression was associated with poor patient survival (P < 0.05). The differentiation-related proteins E-cadherin and PGC were expressed in GC tissues at a lower level than in normal tissues (P < 0.001), but were upregulated in MAWD/MAWBP-overexpressing cells. N-cadherin and Snail expression was strongr in vector-expressing cells and comparatively weaker in MAWD/MAWBP co

  18. Fold of the conserved DTC domain in deltex proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Walker, John R.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2012-04-30

    Human Deltex 3-like (DTX3L) is a member of the Deltex family of proteins. Initially identified as a B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein, DTX3L is an E3 ligase that regulates subcellular localization of its partner protein, BAL, by a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic trafficking mechanism. Unlike other members of the Deltex family of proteins, DTX3L lacks the highly basic N-terminal motif and the central proline-rich motif present in other Deltex proteins, and instead contains other unique N-terminal domains. The C-terminal domains are, however, homologous with other members of the Deltex family of proteins; these include a RING domain and a previously unidentified C-terminal domain. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of this previously uncharacterized C-terminal domain of human DTX3L, which we term the Deltex C-terminal domain.

  19. EVEREST: a collection of evolutionary conserved protein domains

    PubMed Central

    Portugaly, Elon; Linial, Nathan; Linial, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Protein domains are subunits of proteins that recur throughout the protein world. There are many definitions attempting to capture the essence of a protein domain, and several systems that identify protein domains and classify them into families. EVEREST, recently described in Portugaly et al. (2006) BMC Bioinformatics, 7, 277, is one such system that performs the task automatically, using protein sequence alone. Herein we describe EVEREST release 2.0, consisting of 20 029 families, each defined by one or more HMMs. The current EVEREST database was constructed by scanning UniProt 8.1 and all PDB sequences (total over 3 000 000 sequences) with each of the EVEREST families. EVEREST annotates 64% of all sequences, and covers 59% of all residues. EVEREST is available at . The website provides annotations given by SCOP, CATH, Pfam A and EVEREST. It allows for browsing through the families of each of those sources, graphically visualizing the domain organization of the proteins in the family. The website also provides access to analyzes of relationships between domain families, within and across domain definition systems. Users can upload sequences for analysis by the set of EVEREST families. Finally an advanced search form allows querying for families matching criteria regarding novelty, phylogenetic composition and more. PMID:17099230

  20. EVEREST: a collection of evolutionary conserved protein domains.

    PubMed

    Portugaly, Elon; Linial, Nathan; Linial, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Protein domains are subunits of proteins that recur throughout the protein world. There are many definitions attempting to capture the essence of a protein domain, and several systems that identify protein domains and classify them into families. EVEREST, recently described in Portugaly et al. (2006) BMC Bioinformatics, 7, 277, is one such system that performs the task automatically, using protein sequence alone. Herein we describe EVEREST release 2.0, consisting of 20,029 families, each defined by one or more HMMs. The current EVEREST database was constructed by scanning UniProt 8.1 and all PDB sequences (total over 3,000,000 sequences) with each of the EVEREST families. EVEREST annotates 64% of all sequences, and covers 59% of all residues. EVEREST is available at http://www.everest.cs.huji.ac.il/. The website provides annotations given by SCOP, CATH, Pfam A and EVEREST. It allows for browsing through the families of each of those sources, graphically visualizing the domain organization of the proteins in the family. The website also provides access to analyzes of relationships between domain families, within and across domain definition systems. Users can upload sequences for analysis by the set of EVEREST families. Finally an advanced search form allows querying for families matching criteria regarding novelty, phylogenetic composition and more.

  1. Defining the Domain Arrangement of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex Component Rictor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complexes play a pivotal role in the cell. Raptor and Rictor proteins interact with mTOR to form two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively. While the domain structure of Raptor is known, current bioinformatics tools failed to classify the domains in Rictor. Here we focus on identifying specific domains in Rictor by searching for conserved regions. We scanned the pdb structural database and constructed three protein domain datasets. Next we carried out multiple pairwise sequence alignments of the proteins in the domain dataset. By analyzing the z-scores of Rictor sequence similarity to protein sequences in the dataset, we assigned the structural and functional domains of Rictor. We found that, like Raptor, Rictor also has HEAT and WD40 domains, which could be the common motif binding to mTORC. Rictor may also have pleckstrin homology domains, which mediate cellular localization and transmit signals to downstream targets, as well as a domain that is homologous to 50S protein L17 and human 39S protein L17. This putative ribosome binding domain could mediate mTORC2–ribosome interaction. PMID:26176550

  2. Comparison of CD45 extracellular domain sequences from divergent vertebrate species suggests the conservation of three fibronectin type III domains.

    PubMed

    Okumura, M; Matthews, R J; Robb, B; Litman, G W; Bork, P; Thomas, M L

    1996-08-15

    Mammalian CD45 is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed by all nucleated cells of hematopoietic origin. In lymphocytes, CD45 is required for Ag-induced signal transduction due to its ability to positively regulate Src family members. The mechanisms by which CD45 function is regulated are unknown. Indeed, the interactions of CD45 extracellular domains are largely undefined. To gain insight into potentially important regions of the extracellular domain, we sought to identify conserved features from divergent species. cDNAs encoding the putative CD45 homologue from Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) were isolated. The cDNA sequence predicts a protein of 1200 amino acids that contains a 452-amino acid extracellular domain, a 22-amino acid transmembrane region, and a 703-amino acid cytoplasmic domain. Alignment searches revealed that the Heterodontus cytoplasmic domain sequence was most identical to mammalian CD45 and a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase sequence identified from chickens, ChPTP lambda. A dendrogram with other transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase sequences suggest that the Heterodontus and chicken sequences represents CD45 orthologues for their respective species. Analysis of vertebrate CD45 extracellular domain sequences indicates the conservation of three structural regions: a region containing potential O-linked carbohydrate sites, a cysteine-containing region, and a region containing three fibronectin type III domains. For each vertebrate species, multiple isoforms are generated by alternative splicing of three exons that encode a portion of the region containing potential O-linked glycosylation sites. These studies provide evidence for a conservation in CD45 extracellular domain structure between divergent species and provide a basis for understanding CD45 extracellular domain interactions.

  3. Nonlinear (time domain) and linearized (time and frequency domain) solutions to the compressible Euler equations in conservation law form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreenivas, Kidambi; Whitfield, David L.

    1995-01-01

    Two linearized solvers (time and frequency domain) based on a high resolution numerical scheme are presented. The basic approach is to linearize the flux vector by expressing it as a sum of a mean and a perturbation. This allows the governing equations to be maintained in conservation law form. A key difference between the time and frequency domain computations is that the frequency domain computations require only one grid block irrespective of the interblade phase angle for which the flow is being computed. As a result of this and due to the fact that the governing equations for this case are steady, frequency domain computations are substantially faster than the corresponding time domain computations. The linearized equations are used to compute flows in turbomachinery blade rows (cascades) arising due to blade vibrations. Numerical solutions are compared to linear theory (where available) and to numerical solutions of the nonlinear Euler equations.

  4. The identification of conserved interactions within the SH3 domain by alignment of sequences and structures.

    PubMed Central

    Larson, S. M.; Davidson, A. R.

    2000-01-01

    The SH3 domain, comprised of approximately 60 residues, is found within a wide variety of proteins, and is a mediator of protein-protein interactions. Due to the large number of SH3 domain sequences and structures in the databases, this domain provides one of the best available systems for the examination of sequence and structural conservation within a protein family. In this study, a large and diverse alignment of SH3 domain sequences was constructed, and the pattern of conservation within this alignment was compared to conserved structural features, as deduced from analysis of eighteen different SH3 domain structures. Seventeen SH3 domain structures solved in the presence of bound peptide were also examined to identify positions that are consistently most important in mediating the peptide-binding function of this domain. Although residues at the two most conserved positions in the alignment are directly involved in peptide binding, residues at most other conserved positions play structural roles, such as stabilizing turns or comprising the hydrophobic core. Surprisingly, several highly conserved side-chain to main-chain hydrogen bonds were observed in the functionally crucial RT-Src loop between residues with little direct involvement in peptide binding. These hydrogen bonds may be important for maintaining this region in the precise conformation necessary for specific peptide recognition. In addition, a previously unrecognized yet highly conserved beta-bulge was identified in the second beta-strand of the domain, which appears to provide a necessary kink in this strand, allowing it to hydrogen bond to both sheets comprising the fold. PMID:11152127

  5. Structural conservation of the PIN domain active site across all domains of life.

    PubMed

    Senissar, M; Manav, M C; Brodersen, D E

    2017-08-01

    The PIN (PilT N-terminus) domain is a compact RNA-binding protein domain present in all domains of life. This 120-residue domain consists of a central and parallel β sheet surrounded by α helices, which together organize 4-5 acidic residues in an active site that binds one or more divalent metal ions and in many cases has endoribonuclease activity. In bacteria and archaea, the PIN domain is primarily associated with toxin-antitoxin loci, consisting of a toxin (the PIN domain nuclease) and an antitoxin that inhibits the function of the toxin under normal growth conditions. During nutritional or antibiotic stress, the antitoxin is proteolytically degraded causing activation of the PIN domain toxin leading to a dramatic reprogramming of cellular metabolism to cope with the new situation. In eukaryotes, PIN domains are commonly found as parts of larger proteins and are involved in a range of processes involving RNA cleavage, including ribosomal RNA biogenesis and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the structural characteristics of the PIN domain and compare PIN domains from all domains of life in terms of structure, active site architecture, and activity. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  6. TOPDOM: database of conservatively located domains and motifs in proteins.

    PubMed

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2016-09-01

    The TOPDOM database-originally created as a collection of domains and motifs located consistently on the same side of the membranes in α-helical transmembrane proteins-has been updated and extended by taking into consideration consistently localized domains and motifs in globular proteins, too. By taking advantage of the recently developed CCTOP algorithm to determine the type of a protein and predict topology in case of transmembrane proteins, and by applying a thorough search for domains and motifs as well as utilizing the most up-to-date version of all source databases, we managed to reach a 6-fold increase in the size of the whole database and a 2-fold increase in the number of transmembrane proteins. TOPDOM database is available at http://topdom.enzim.hu The webpage utilizes the common Apache, PHP5 and MySQL software to provide the user interface for accessing and searching the database. The database itself is generated on a high performance computer. tusnady.gabor@ttk.mta.hu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. A novel evolutionarily conserved domain of cell-adhesion GPCRs mediates autoproteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Araç, Demet; Boucard, Antony A; Bolliger, Marc F; Nguyen, Jenna; Soltis, S Michael; Südhof, Thomas C; Brunger, Axel T

    2012-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Proteolysis Site (GPS) of cell-adhesion GPCRs and polycystic kidney disease (PKD) proteins constitutes a highly conserved autoproteolysis sequence, but its catalytic mechanism remains unknown. Here, we show that unexpectedly the ∼40-residue GPS motif represents an integral part of a much larger ∼320-residue domain that we termed GPCR-Autoproteolysis INducing (GAIN) domain. Crystal structures of GAIN domains from two distantly related cell-adhesion GPCRs revealed a conserved novel fold in which the GPS motif forms five β-strands that are tightly integrated into the overall GAIN domain. The GAIN domain is evolutionarily conserved from tetrahymena to mammals, is the only extracellular domain shared by all human cell-adhesion GPCRs and PKD proteins, and is the locus of multiple human disease mutations. Functionally, the GAIN domain is both necessary and sufficient for autoproteolysis, suggesting an autoproteolytic mechanism whereby the overall GAIN domain fine-tunes the chemical environment in the GPS to catalyse peptide bond hydrolysis. Thus, the GAIN domain embodies a unique, evolutionarily ancient and widespread autoproteolytic fold whose function is likely relevant for GPCR signalling and for multiple human diseases. PMID:22333914

  8. A highly conserved pericentromeric domain in human and gorilla chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Pita, M; Gosálvez, J; Gosálvez, A; Nieddu, M; López-Fernández, C; Mezzanotte, R

    2009-01-01

    Significant similarity between human and gorilla genomes has been found in all chromosome arms, but not in centromeres, using whole-comparative genomic hybridization (W-CGH). In human chromosomes, centromeric regions, generally containing highly repetitive DNAs, are characterized by the presence of specific human DNA sequences and an absence of homology with gorilla DNA sequences. The only exception is the pericentromeric area of human chromosome 9, which, in addition to a large block of human DNA, also contains a region of homology with gorilla DNA sequences; the localization of these sequences coincides with that of human satellite III. Since highly repetitive DNAs are known for their high mutation frequency, we hypothesized that the chromosome 9 pericentromeric DNA conserved in human chromosomes and deriving from the gorilla genome may thus play some important functional role.

  9. Structure of a conserved domain common to the transcription factors TFIIS, elongin A, and CRSP70.

    PubMed

    Booth, V; Koth, C M; Edwards, A M; Arrowsmith, C H

    2000-10-06

    TFIIS is a transcription elongation factor that consists of three domains. We have previously solved the structures of domains II and III, which stimulate arrested polymerase II elongation complexes in order to resume transcription. Domain I is conserved in evolution from yeast to human species and is homologous to the transcription factors elongin A and CRSP70. Domain I also interacts with the transcriptionally active RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and therefore, may have a function unrelated to the previously described transcription elongation activity of TFIIS. We have solved the structure of domain I of yeast TFIIS using NMR spectroscopy. Domain I is a compact four-helix bundle that is structurally independent of domains II and III of the TFIIS. Using the yeast structure as a template, we have modeled the homologous domains from elongin A and CRSP70 and identified a conserved positively charged patch on the surface of all three proteins, which may be involved in conserved functional interactions with the transcriptional machinery.

  10. The Dof domain, a zinc finger DNA-binding domain conserved only in higher plants, truly functions as a Cys2/Cys2 Zn finger domain.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Yoshimi; Ishiduka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Rie; Esaka, Muneharu

    2004-03-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are plant transcription factors that have a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, called the Dof domain. The Dof domain, which is composed of 52 amino acid residues, is similar to the Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger DNA-binding domain of GATA1 and steroid hormone receptors, but has a longer putative loop than that in the case of these zinc finger domains. The DNA-binding function of ascorbate oxidase gene binding protein (AOBP), a Dof protein, was investigated by gel retardation analysis. When Cys was replaced by His, the Dof domain could not function as a Cys3/His- or a Cys2/His2-type zinc finger. The characteristic longer loop was essential for DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, heavy metals such as Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the Dof domain. Manganese ion as well as zinc ion was coordinated by the Dof domain in vitro. On the other hand, the analysis using inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed that the Dof domain contained zinc ion but not manganese ion. Thus, the Dof domain was proved to function as a Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger domain.

  11. The zinc finger-associated SCAN box is a conserved oligomerization domain.

    PubMed

    Williams, A J; Blacklow, S C; Collins, T

    1999-12-01

    A number of Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger proteins contain a highly conserved amino-terminal motif termed the SCAN domain. This element is an 80-residue, leucine-rich region that contains three segments strongly predicted to be alpha-helices. In this report, we show that the SCAN motif functions as an oligomerization domain mediating self-association or association with other proteins bearing SCAN domains. These findings suggest that the SCAN domain plays an important role in the assembly and function of this newly defined subclass of transcriptional regulators.

  12. Conserved residues in the HAMP domain define a new family of proposed bipartite energy taxis receptors.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Kathryn T; Zhulin, Igor B; Stuckey, Jeanne A; DiRita, Victor J

    2009-01-01

    HAMP domains, found in many bacterial signal transduction proteins, generally transmit an intramolecular signal between an extracellular sensory domain and an intracellular signaling domain. Studies of HAMP domains in proteins where both the input and output signals occur intracellularly are limited to those of the Aer energy taxis receptor of Escherichia coli, which has both a HAMP domain and a sensory PAS domain. Campylobacter jejuni has an energy taxis system consisting of the domains of Aer divided between two proteins, CetA (HAMP domain containing) and CetB (PAS domain containing). In this study, we found that the CetA HAMP domain differs significantly from that of Aer in the predicted secondary structure. Using similarity searches, we identified 55 pairs of HAMP/PAS proteins encoded by adjacent genes in a diverse group of microorganisms. We propose that these HAMP/PAS pairs form a new family of bipartite energy taxis receptors. Within these proteins, we identified nine residues in the HAMP domain and proximal signaling domain that are highly conserved, at least three of which are required for CetA function. Additionally, we demonstrated that CetA contributes to the invasion of human epithelial cells by C. jejuni, while CetB does not. This finding supports the hypothesis that members of HAMP/PAS pairs possess the capacity to act independently of each other in cellular traits other than energy taxis.

  13. A conservative algorithm for parabolic problems in domains with moving boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Igor L.; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel conservative algorithm for parabolic problems in domains with moving boundaries developed for modeling in cell biology. The spatial discretization is accomplished by applying Voronoi decomposition to a fixed rectangular grid. In the vicinity of the boundary, the procedure generates irregular Voronoi cells that conform to the domain shape and merge seamlessly with regular control volumes in the domain interior. Consequently, our algorithm is free of the CFL stability issue due to moving interfaces and does not involve cell-merging or mass redistribution. Local mass conservation is ensured by finite-volume discretization and natural-neighbor interpolation. Numerical experiments with two-dimensional geometries demonstrate exact mass conservation and indicate an order of convergence in space between one and two. The use of standard meshing techniques makes extension of the method to three dimensions conceptually straightforward. PMID:25067852

  14. RNA polymerase II conserved protein domains as platforms for protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    García-López, M Carmen

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase II establishes many protein-protein interactions with transcriptional regulators to coordinate gene expression, but little is known about protein domains involved in the contact with them. We use a new approach to look for conserved regions of the RNA pol II of S. cerevisiae located at the surface of the structure of the complex, hypothesizing that they might be involved in the interaction with transcriptional regulators. We defined five different conserved domains and demonstrate that all of them make contact with transcriptional regulators. PMID:21922063

  15. Conservation of Domain Structure in a Fast-Evolving Heterochromatic SUUR Protein in Drosophilids

    PubMed Central

    Yurlova, Anna A.; Makunin, Igor V.; Kolesnikova, Tatyana D.; Posukh, Olga V.; Belyaeva, Elena S.; Zhimulev, Igor F.

    2009-01-01

    Different genomic regions replicate at a distinct time during S-phase. The SuUR mutation alters replication timing and the polytenization level of intercalary and pericentric heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland polytene chromosomes. We analyzed SuUR in different insects, identified conserved regions in the protein, substituted conserved amino acid residues, and studied effects of the mutations on SUUR function. SuUR orthologs were identified in all sequenced drosophilids, and a highly divergent ortholog was found in the mosquito genome. We demonstrated that SUUR evolves at very high rate comparable with that of Transformer. Remarkably, upstream ORF within 5′ UTR of the gene is more conserved than SUUR in drosophilids, but it is absent in the mosquito. The domain structure and charge of SUUR are maintained in drosophilids despite the high divergence of the proteins. The N-terminal part of SUUR with similarity to the SNF2/SWI2 proteins displays the highest level of conservation. Mutation of two conserved amino acid residues in this region impairs binding of SUUR to polytene chromosomes and reduces the ability of the protein to cause DNA underreplication. The least conserved middle part of SUUR interacting with HP1 retains positively and negatively charged clusters and nuclear localization signals. The C terminus contains interlacing conserved and variable motifs. Our results suggest that SUUR domains evolve with different rates and patterns but maintain their features. PMID:19596903

  16. A fast finite volume method for conservative space-fractional diffusion equations in convex domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    We develop a fast finite volume method for variable-coefficient, conservative space-fractional diffusion equations in convex domains via a volume-penalization approach. The method has an optimal storage and an almost linear computational complexity. The method retains second-order accuracy without requiring a Richardson extrapolation. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  17. The structure of a conserved piezo channel domain reveals a topologically distinct β sandwich fold.

    PubMed

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens T; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C

    2014-10-07

    Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2,000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a topologically distinct β sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be-identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

  18. Conserved chromosomal positions of dual domains of the ets protooncogene in cats, mice, and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams-Smith, M.J.; Kozak, C.; Reeves, R.; Gearhart, J.; Nunn, M.F.; Nash, W.; Fowle, J.R. III; Duesberg, P.; Papas, T.S.; O'Brien, S.J.

    1986-03-01

    The mammalian protooncogene homologue of the avian v-ets sequence from the E26 retrovirus consists of two sequentially distinct domains located on different chromosomes. Using somatic cell hybrid panels, the authors have mapped the mammalian homologue of the 5' v-ets-domain to chromosome 11 (ETS1) in man, to chromosome 9 (ets-1) in mouse, and to chromosome D1 (ETS1) in the domestic cat. The mammalian homologue of the 3' v-ets domain was similarly mapped to human chromosome 21 (ETS2), to mouse chromosome 16 (Ets-2), and to feline chromosome C2 (ETS2). Both protooncogenes fell in syntenic groups of homologous linked loci that were conserved among the three species. The occurrence of two distinct functional protooncogenes and their conservation of linkage positions in the three mammalian orders indicate that these two genes have been separate since before the evolutionary divergence of mammals.

  19. Protective activity of the CnaBE3 domain conserved among Staphylococcus aureus Sdr proteins.

    PubMed

    Becherelli, Marco; Prachi, Prachi; Viciani, Elisa; Biagini, Massimiliano; Fiaschi, Luigi; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nosari, Sarah; Brettoni, Cecilia; Marchi, Sara; Biancucci, Marco; Fontana, Maria Rita; Montagnani, Francesca; Bagnoli, Fabio; Barocchi, Michèle A; Manetti, Andrea G O

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen, commensal of the human skin and nares, but also responsible for invasive nosocomial as well as community acquired infections. Staphylococcus aureus adheres to the host tissues by means of surface adhesins, such as SdrC, SdrD, and SdrE proteins. The Sdr family of proteins together with a functional A domain, contain respectively two, three or five repeated sequences called B motifs which comprise the CnaB domains. SdrD and SdrE proteins were reported to be protective in animal models against invasive diseases or lethal challenge with human clinical S. aureus isolates. In this study we identified a 126 amino acid sequence containing a CnaB domain, conserved among the three Sdr proteins. The three fragments defined here as CnaBC2, D5 and E3 domains even though belonging to phylogenetically distinct strains, displayed high sequence similarity. Based on the sequence conservation data, we selected the CnaBE3 domain for further analysis and characterization. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant CnaBE3 domain recognized SdrE, SdrC and SdrD proteins of different S. aureus lineages. Moreover, we demonstrated that the CnaBE3 domain was expressed in vivo during S. aureus infections, and that immunization of this domain alone significantly reduces the bacterial load in mice challenged with S. aureus. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of bacteria by CnaBE3 vaccination is due to functional antibodies. Finally, we demonstrated that the region of the SdrE protein containing the CnaBE3 domain was resistant to trypsin digestion, a characteristic often associated with the presence of an isopeptide bond.

  20. Comparison of Saccharomyces cerevisiae F-BAR Domain Structures Reveals a Conserved Inositol Phosphate Binding Site

    DOE PAGES

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Alvarado, Diego; Schmitz, Karl R.; ...

    2015-01-22

    F-BAR domains control membrane interactions in endocytosis, cytokinesis, and cell signaling. Although they are generally thought to bind curved membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, numerous functional studies argue that differences in lipid-binding selectivities of F-BAR domains are functionally important. Here in this paper, we compare membrane-binding properties of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae F-BAR domains in vitro and in vivo. Whereas some F-BAR domains (such as Bzz1p and Hof1p F-BARs) bind equally well to all phospholipids, the F-BAR domain from the RhoGAP Rgd1p preferentially binds phosphoinositides. We determined X-ray crystal structures of F-BAR domains from Hof1p and Rgd1p, the latter bound tomore » an inositol phosphate. The structures explain phospholipid-binding selectivity differences and reveal an F-BAR phosphoinositide binding site that is fully conserved in a mammalian RhoGAP called Gmip and is partly retained in certain other F-BAR domains. In conclusion, our findings reveal previously unappreciated determinants of F-BAR domain lipid-binding specificity and provide a basis for its prediction from sequence.« less

  1. A conserved domain targets exported PHISTb family proteins to the periphery of Plasmodium infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Sarah J.; Moon, Robert W.; Hardege, Iris; Osborne, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    During blood-stage infection, malaria parasites export numerous proteins to the host erythrocyte. The Poly-Helical Interspersed Sub-Telomeric (PHIST) proteins are an exported family that share a common ‘PRESAN’ domain, and include numerous members in Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi. In P. falciparum, PHIST proteins have been implicated in protein trafficking and intercellular communication. A number of PHIST proteins are essential for parasite survival. Here, we identify nine members of the PHISTb sub-class of PHIST proteins, including one protein known to be essential for parasite survival, that localise to the erythrocyte periphery. These proteins have solubility characteristics consistent with their association with the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Together, an extended PRESAN domain, comprising the PRESAN domain and preceding sequence, form a novel targeting-domain that is sufficient to localise a protein to the erythrocyte periphery. We validate the role of this domain in RESA, thus identifying a cytoskeleton-binding domain in RESA that functions independently of its known spectrin-binding domain. Our data suggest that some PHISTb proteins may act as cross-linkers of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. We also show for the first time that peripherally-localised PHISTb proteins are encoded in genomes of P. knowlesi and vivax indicating a conserved role for the extended PRESAN domain of these proteins in targeting to the erythrocyte periphery. PMID:25106850

  2. A conserved G4 DNA binding domain in RecQ family helicases.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michael D; Duquette, Michelle L; Shiels, Jerome C; Maizels, Nancy

    2006-05-12

    RecQ family helicases play important roles at G-rich domains of the genome, including the telomeres, rDNA, and immunoglobulin switch regions. This appears to reflect the unusual ability of enzymes in this family to unwind G4 DNA. How RecQ family helicases recognize this substrate has not been established. Here, we show that G4 DNA is a preferred target for BLM helicase within the context of long DNA molecules. We identify the RQC domain, found only in RecQ family enzymes, as an independent, high affinity and conserved G4 DNA binding domain; and show that binding to Holliday junctions involves both the RQC and the HRDC domains. These results provide mechanistic understanding of differences and redundancies of function and activities among RecQ family helicases, and of how deficiencies in human members of this family may contribute to genomic instability and disease.

  3. Molecular analysis of Drosophila eyes absent mutants reveals features of the conserved Eya domain.

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Q T; Zimmerman, J E; Liu, H; Bonini, N M

    2000-01-01

    The eyes absent (eya) gene is critical to eye formation in Drosophila; upon loss of eya function, eye progenitor cells die by programmed cell death. Moreover, ectopic eya expression directs eye formation, and eya functionally synergizes in vivo and physically interacts in vitro with two other genes of eye development, sine oculis and dachshund. The Eya protein sequence, while highly conserved to vertebrates, is novel. To define amino acids critical to the function of the Eya protein, we have sequenced eya alleles. These mutations have revealed that loss of the entire Eya Domain is null for eya activity, but that alleles with truncations within the Eya Domain display partial function. We then extended the molecular genetic analysis to interactions within the Eya Domain. This analysis has revealed regions of special importance to interaction with Sine Oculis or Dachshund. Select eya missense mutations within the Eya Domain diminished the interactions with Sine Oculis or Dachshund. Taken together, these data suggest that the conserved Eya Domain is critical for eya activity and may have functional subregions within it. PMID:10835393

  4. Transactivation domains are not functionally conserved between vertebrate and invertebrate serum response factors.

    PubMed

    Avila, Sonia; Casero, Marie-Carmen; Fernandez-Cantón, Rocío; Sastre, Leandro

    2002-08-01

    The transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) regulates expression of growth factor-dependent genes and muscle-specific genes in vertebrates. Homologous factors regulate differentiation of some ectodermic tissues in invertebrates. To explore the molecular basis of these different physiological functions, the functionality of human, Drosophila melanogaster and Artemia franciscana SRFs in mammalian cells has been compared in this article. D. melanogaster and, to a lesser extend, A. franciscana SRF co-expression represses the activity of strong SRF-dependent promoters, such as those of the mouse c-fos and A. franciscana actin 403 genes. Domain-exchange experiments showed that these results can be explained by the absence of a transactivation domain, functional in mammalian cells, in D. melanogaster and A. franciscana SRFs. Both invertebrate SRFs can dimerize with endogenous mouse SRF through the conserved DNA-binding and dimerization domain. Co-expression of human and A. franciscana SRFs activate expression of weaker SRF-dependent promoters, such as those of the human cardiac alpha-actin gene or an A. franciscana actin 403 promoter where the SRF-binding site has been mutated. Mapping of A. franciscana SRF domains involved in transcriptional activation has shown that the conserved DNA-binding and dimerization domain is neccessary, but not sufficient, for promoter activation in mammalian cells.

  5. Momentum conservation in Multi-Level Multi-Domain (MLMD) simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Beck, A.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    Momentum conservation and self-forces reduction are challenges for all Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes using spatial discretization schemes which do not fulfill the requirement of translational invariance of the grid Green's function. We comment here on the topic applied to the recently developed Multi-Level Multi-Domain (MLMD) method. The MLMD is a semi-implicit method for PIC plasma simulations. The multi-scale nature of plasma processes is addressed by using grids with different spatial resolutions in different parts of the domain.

  6. SSDP1 gene encodes a protein with a conserved N-terminal FORWARD domain.

    PubMed

    Bayarsaihan, Dashzeveg

    2002-09-23

    I describe the characterization of mouse, human and chicken SSDP1 orthologs that encode a highly conserved protein with over 90% identity at the amino acid level. Structurally, the protein consists of a well-preserved FWD (FORWARD)-domain at the N-terminal end and a proline-, glycine-, methionine- and serine-rich sequence in the central and C-terminal regions. The FORWARD domain, comprised of three alpha-helices, is characterized by the presence of a FWD-box of unknown function conserved not only in vertebrates, but also in nematode, plants, fly and yeast. Human SSDP1 spans about 200 kb on the chromosome 1p31-p32 region and consists of 17 exons. The SSDP1 mRNA transcripts are distributed ubiquitously in adult human and mouse tissues.

  7. The conserved Tarp actin binding domain is important for chlamydial invasion.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Travis J; Miller, Natalie J; Dooley, Cheryl A; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-07-15

    The translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp) is conserved among all pathogenic chlamydial species. Previous reports identified single C. trachomatis Tarp actin binding and proline rich domains required for Tarp mediated actin nucleation. A peptide antiserum specific for the Tarp actin binding domain was generated and inhibited actin polymerization in vitro and C. trachomatis entry in vivo, indicating an essential role for Tarp in chlamydial pathogenesis. Sequence analysis of Tarp orthologs from additional chlamydial species and C. trachomatis serovars indicated multiple putative actin binding sites. In order to determine whether the identified actin binding domains are functionally conserved, GST-Tarp fusions from multiple chlamydial species were examined for their ability to bind and nucleate actin. Chlamydial Tarps harbored variable numbers of actin binding sites and promoted actin nucleation as determined by in vitro polymerization assays. Our findings indicate that Tarp mediated actin binding and nucleation is a conserved feature among diverse chlamydial species and this function plays a critical role in bacterial invasion of host cells.

  8. The Three Domains of Conservation Genetics: Case Histories from Hawaiian Waters.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The scientific field of conservation biology is dominated by 3 specialties: phylogenetics, ecology, and evolution. Under this triad, phylogenetics is oriented towards the past history of biodiversity, conserving the divergent branches in the tree of life. The ecological component is rooted in the present, maintaining the contemporary life support systems for biodiversity. Evolutionary conservation (as defined here) is concerned with preserving the raw materials for generating future biodiversity. All 3 domains can be documented with genetic case histories in the waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago, an isolated chain of volcanic islands with 2 types of biodiversity: colonists, and new species that arose from colonists. This review demonstrates that 1) phylogenetic studies have identified previously unknown branches in the tree of life that are endemic to Hawaiian waters; 2) population genetic surveys define isolated marine ecosystems as management units, and 3) phylogeographic analyses illustrate the pathways of colonization that can enhance future biodiversity. Conventional molecular markers have advanced all 3 domains in conservation biology over the last 3 decades, and recent advances in genomics are especially valuable for understanding the foundations of future evolutionary diversity. © The American Genetic Association. 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Evolutionarily conserved roles of the dicer helicase domain in regulating RNA interference processing.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Chan, Jessica M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-10-10

    The enzyme Dicer generates 21-25 nucleotide RNAs that target specific mRNAs for silencing during RNA interference and related pathways. Although their active sites and RNA binding regions are functionally conserved, the helicase domains have distinct activities in the context of different Dicer enzymes. To examine the evolutionary origins of Dicer helicase functions, we investigated two related Dicer enzymes from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile. RNA cleavage assays showed that S. thermophile Dicer-1 (StDicer-1) can process hairpin precursor microRNAs, whereas StDicer-2 can only cleave linear double-stranded RNAs. Furthermore, only StDicer-2 possesses robust ATP hydrolytic activity in the presence of double-stranded RNA. Deletion of the StDicer-2 helicase domain increases both StDicer-2 cleavage activity and affinity for hairpin RNA. Notably, both StDicer-1 and StDicer-2 could complement the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacking its endogenous Dicer gene but only in their full-length forms, underscoring the importance of the helicase domain. These results suggest an in vivo regulatory function for the helicase domain that may be conserved from fungi to humans.

  10. Conserved Spatial Organization of FG Domains in the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Claire E.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kampmann, Martin; Simon, Sanford M.

    2013-01-01

    Selective transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) requires nucleoporins containing natively unfolded phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains. Several differing models for their dynamics within the pore have been proposed. We characterize the behavior of the FG nucleoporins in vivo using polarized fluorescence microscopy. Using nucleoporins tagged with green fluorescent protein along their FG domains, we show that some of these proteins are ordered, indicating an overall orientational organization within the NPC. This orientational ordering of the FG domains depends on their specific context within the NPC, but is independent of active transport and cargo load. For most nups, behavior does not depend on the FG motifs. These data support a model whereby local geometry constrains the orientational organization of the FG nups. Intriguingly, homologous yeast and mammalian proteins show conserved behavior, suggesting functional relevance. Our findings have implications for mechanistic models of NPC transport. PMID:23332057

  11. Conserved spatial organization of FG domains in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Claire E; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Kampmann, Martin; Simon, Sanford M

    2013-01-08

    Selective transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) requires nucleoporins containing natively unfolded phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains. Several differing models for their dynamics within the pore have been proposed. We characterize the behavior of the FG nucleoporins in vivo using polarized fluorescence microscopy. Using nucleoporins tagged with green fluorescent protein along their FG domains, we show that some of these proteins are ordered, indicating an overall orientational organization within the NPC. This orientational ordering of the FG domains depends on their specific context within the NPC, but is independent of active transport and cargo load. For most nups, behavior does not depend on the FG motifs. These data support a model whereby local geometry constrains the orientational organization of the FG nups. Intriguingly, homologous yeast and mammalian proteins show conserved behavior, suggesting functional relevance. Our findings have implications for mechanistic models of NPC transport. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Conservation of the Human Integrin-Type Beta-Propeller Domain in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Bhanupratap; Denesyuk, Alexander; Heino, Jyrki; Johnson, Mark S.; Denessiouk, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell-surface receptors with key functions in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Integrin α and β subunits are present throughout the metazoans, but it is unclear whether the subunits predate the origin of multicellular organisms. Several component domains have been detected in bacteria, one of which, a specific 7-bladed β-propeller domain, is a unique feature of the integrin α subunits. Here, we describe a structure-derived motif, which incorporates key features of each blade from the X-ray structures of human αIIbβ3 and αVβ3, includes elements of the FG-GAP/Cage and Ca2+-binding motifs, and is specific only for the metazoan integrin domains. Separately, we searched for the metazoan integrin type β-propeller domains among all available sequences from bacteria and unicellular eukaryotic organisms, which must incorporate seven repeats, corresponding to the seven blades of the β-propeller domain, and so that the newly found structure-derived motif would exist in every repeat. As the result, among 47 available genomes of unicellular eukaryotes we could not find a single instance of seven repeats with the motif. Several sequences contained three repeats, a predicted transmembrane segment, and a short cytoplasmic motif associated with some integrins, but otherwise differ from the metazoan integrin α subunits. Among the available bacterial sequences, we found five examples containing seven sequential metazoan integrin-specific motifs within the seven repeats. The motifs differ in having one Ca2+-binding site per repeat, whereas metazoan integrins have three or four sites. The bacterial sequences are more conserved in terms of motif conservation and loop length, suggesting that the structure is more regular and compact than those example structures from human integrins. Although the bacterial examples are not full-length integrins, the full-length metazoan-type 7-bladed β-propeller domains are present, and sometimes two tandem

  13. Domain alternation and active site remodeling are conserved structural features of ubiquitin E1.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zongyang; Yuan, Lingmin; Atkison, James H; Aldana-Masangkay, Grace; Chen, Yuan; Olsen, Shaun K

    2017-07-21

    E1 enzymes for ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers (Ubls) harbor two catalytic activities that are required for Ub/Ubl activation: adenylation and thioester bond formation. Structural studies of the E1 for the Ubl small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) revealed a single active site that is transformed by a conformational switch that toggles its competency for catalysis of these two distinct chemical reactions. Although the mechanisms of adenylation and thioester bond formation revealed by SUMO E1 structures are thought to be conserved in Ub E1, there is currently a lack of structural data supporting this hypothesis. Here, we present a structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Uba1 in which the second catalytic cysteine half-domain (SCCH domain) harboring the catalytic cysteine has undergone a 106° rotation that results in a completely different network of intramolecular interactions between the SCCH and adenylation domains and translocation of the catalytic cysteine 12 Å closer to the Ub C terminus compared with previous Uba1 structures. SCCH domain alternation is accompanied by conformational changes within the Uba1 adenylation domains that effectively disassemble the adenylation active site. Importantly, the structural and biochemical data suggest that domain alternation and remodeling of the adenylation active site are interconnected and are intrinsic structural features of Uba1 and that the overall structural basis for adenylation and thioester bond formation exhibited by SUMO E1 is indeed conserved in Ub E1. Finally, the mechanistic insights provided by the novel conformational snapshot of Uba1 presented in this study may guide efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of this critically important enzyme that is an active target for anticancer therapeutics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. A conserved domain of alkaline phosphatase expression in the Malpighian tubules of dipteran insects.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Pablo; Pollock, Valerie P; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2004-09-01

    Malpighian (renal) tubules are key components of the insect osmoregulatory system and show correspondingly great diversity in both number and length. Recently, the organisation of the Drosophila melanogaster tubule has been elucidated by enhancer trapping, and an array for functional properties has been shown to align with the functional domains. In Drosophila, there is a lower tubule domain, which coincides with expression of alkaline phosphatase and delineates the absorptive region of the tubule. Here, these observations are extended to three dipteran vectors of disease (Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensii and Glossina morsitans) and a non-dipteran out-group, Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera). Despite a huge range in cell number and size, alkaline phosphatase was found on the apical surface of the lower 10% of each of the dipteran tubules but nowhere within the orthopteran tubule. An alkaline phosphatase lower tubule domain is thus conserved among Diptera. Cell counts are also provided for each species. As in Drosophila, stellate cells are not found in the lower tubule domain of Anopheles or Aedes tubules, confirming the unique genetic identity of this domain. As previously reported, we failed to find stellate cells in Schistocerca but, remarkably, also failed to find them in Glossina, the dipteran most closely related to Drosophila. The orthodoxy that stellate cells are unique to, and general among, Diptera may thus require revision.

  15. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    PubMed Central

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S.; Seemann, Stefan E.; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  16. Conserved and variable domains in satellite DNAs of mitotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode species.

    PubMed

    Mestrović, Nevenka; Randig, Onivaldo; Abad, Pierre; Plohl, Miroslav; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe

    2005-12-05

    Two satellite DNAs have been characterized in the mitotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne javanica and M. paranaensis, agriculturally important phytoparasitic species. The satellite repeat variants cloned from M. javanica could not be resolved from those described earlier in M. arenaria [Castagnone-Sereno, P., Leroy, F., Abad, P., 2000. Cloning and characterization of an extremely conserved satellite DNA family from the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria. Genome 43, 346-353] and are therefore classified as a single satellite named MARJA. However, this satellite shows 34.3% sequence divergence in comparison with the MPA1 satellite characterized in M. paranaensis, and monomer variants of both satellites are clearly distinguished by homogenized nucleotide substitutions. Nucleotide variability analysis revealed in one segment of the satellite monomer domains of high and low variability, conserved both within and between monomer variants of the two satellites. Intersatellite conservation of these domains indicates evolution of satellite sequence under different constraints, probably due to some functional interactions. In addition, high intrasatellite homogeneity, presence of ancestral mutations in groups of MARJA monomers in both M. javanica and M. arenaria and highly homogenized divergent positions in comparison with the MPA1 indicate similar sequence dynamics in mitotic parthenogenetic taxa to that observed in amphimictic species.

  17. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-02

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus.

  18. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly

    PubMed Central

    AhYoung, Andrew P.; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Egea, Pascal F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits—the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles. PMID:26056272

  19. Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Tubuliform Spidroin 1 Contributes to Extensibility in Synthetic Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Gnesa, Eric; Hsia, Yang; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Weber, Warner; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff; Tang, Simon; Agari, Kimiko; Vierra, Craig

    2012-05-24

    Spider silk is renowned for its extraordinary mechanical properties, having a balance of high tensile strength and extensibility. To date, the majority of studies have focused on the production of dragline silks from synthetic spider silk gene products. Here we report the first mechanical analysis of synthetic egg case silk fibers spun from the Latrodectus hesperus tubuliform silk proteins, TuSp1 and ECP-2. We provide evidence that recombinant ECP-2 proteins can be spun into fibers that display mechanical properties similar to other synthetic spider silks. We also demonstrate that silks spun from recombinant thioredoxin-TuSp1 fusion proteins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain exhibit increased extensibility and toughness when compared to the identical fibers spun from fusion proteins lacking the C-terminus. Mechanical analyses reveal that the properties of synthetic tubuliform silks can be modulated by altering the postspin draw ratios of the fibers. Fibers subject to increased draw ratios showed elevated tensile strength and decreased extensibility but maintained constant toughness. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies indicate that postdrawn fibers containing the C-terminal domain of TuSp1 have more amorphous content when compared to fibers lacking the C-terminus. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that recombinant tubuliform spidroins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain with embedded protein tags can be effectively spun into fibers, resulting in similar tensile strength but increased extensibility relative to nontagged recombinant dragline silk proteins spun from equivalently sized proteins.

  20. A conserved polybasic domain mediates plasma membrane targeting of Lgl and its regulation by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xuejing; Liu, Weijie; Chen, Yi-jiun; Huang, Juan; Austin, Erin; Celotto, Alicia M.; Jiang, Wendy Z.; Palladino, Michael J.; Jiang, Yu; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2015-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays essential and conserved functions in regulating both cell polarity and tumorigenesis in Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates. It is well recognized that plasma membrane (PM) or cell cortex localization is crucial for Lgl function in vivo, but its membrane-targeting mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that hypoxia acutely and reversibly inhibits Lgl PM targeting through a posttranslational mechanism that is independent of the well-characterized atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) or Aurora kinase–mediated phosphorylations. Instead, we identified an evolutionarily conserved polybasic (PB) domain that targets Lgl to the PM via electrostatic binding to membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. Such PB domain–mediated PM targeting is inhibited by hypoxia, which reduces inositol phospholipid levels on the PM through adenosine triphosphate depletion. Moreover, Lgl PB domain contains all the identified phosphorylation sites of aPKC and Aurora kinases, providing a molecular mechanism by which phosphorylations neutralize the positive charges on the PB domain to inhibit Lgl PM targeting. PMID:26483556

  1. Identification of Conserved MEL-28/ELYS Domains with Essential Roles in Nuclear Assembly and Chromosome Segregation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Saldivar, Georgina; Fernandez, Anita; Hirano, Yasuhiro; Mauro, Michael; Lai, Allison; Ayuso, Cristina; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Piano, Fabio; Askjaer, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Nucleoporins are the constituents of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are essential regulators of nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression and genome stability. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS plays a critical role in post-mitotic NPC reassembly through recruitment of the NUP107-160 subcomplex, and is required for correct segregation of mitotic chromosomes. Here we present a systematic functional and structural analysis of MEL-28 in C. elegans early development and human ELYS in cultured cells. We have identified functional domains responsible for nuclear envelope and kinetochore localization, chromatin binding, mitotic spindle matrix association and chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, we found that perturbations to MEL-28's conserved AT-hook domain do not affect MEL-28 localization although they disrupt MEL-28 function and delay cell cycle progression in a DNA damage checkpoint-dependent manner. Our analyses also uncover a novel meiotic role of MEL-28. Together, these results show that MEL-28 has conserved structural domains that are essential for its fundamental roles in NPC assembly and chromosome segregation.

  2. Identification of Conserved MEL-28/ELYS Domains with Essential Roles in Nuclear Assembly and Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Yasuhiro; Mauro, Michael; Lai, Allison; Ayuso, Cristina; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Piano, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoporins are the constituents of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are essential regulators of nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression and genome stability. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS plays a critical role in post-mitotic NPC reassembly through recruitment of the NUP107-160 subcomplex, and is required for correct segregation of mitotic chromosomes. Here we present a systematic functional and structural analysis of MEL-28 in C. elegans early development and human ELYS in cultured cells. We have identified functional domains responsible for nuclear envelope and kinetochore localization, chromatin binding, mitotic spindle matrix association and chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, we found that perturbations to MEL-28’s conserved AT-hook domain do not affect MEL-28 localization although they disrupt MEL-28 function and delay cell cycle progression in a DNA damage checkpoint-dependent manner. Our analyses also uncover a novel meiotic role of MEL-28. Together, these results show that MEL-28 has conserved structural domains that are essential for its fundamental roles in NPC assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:27341616

  3. The evolutionarily conserved Krueppel-associated box domain defines a subfamily of eukaryotic multifingered proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bellefroid, E.J.; Poncelet, D.A.; Lecocq, P.J.; Revelant, O.; Martial, J.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that the human genome includes hundreds of genes coding for putative factors related to the Krueppel zinc-finger protein, which regulates Drosophila segmentation. They report herein that about one-third of these genes code for proteins that share a very conserved region of about 75 amino acids in their N-terminal nonfinger portion. Homologous regions are found in a number of previously described finger proteins, including mouse Zfp-1 and Xenopus Xfin. They named this region the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB). This domain has the potential to form two amphipathic {alpha}-helices. Southern blot analysis of zoo blots suggests that the Krueppel-associated box is highly conserved during evolution. Northern blot analysis shows that these genes are expressed in most adult tissues and are down-regulated during in vitro terminal differentiation of human myeloid cells.

  4. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Arshan; Naeem, Aisha; Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Nicora, Horacio D Lopez; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-11-08

    The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production). Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain repertoire characteristic of

  5. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Naeem, Aisha; Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio D.; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production). Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain repertoire characteristic of

  6. Multiple Roles of a Conserved GAF Domain Tyrosine Residue in Cyanobacterial and Plant Phytochromes†

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Amanda J.; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Jang, Abigail Y.; Ernst, Lauren A.; Waggoner, Alan S.; Duan, Yong; Lei, Hongxing; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2005-01-01

    The phytochrome family of red/far-red photoreceptors has been optimized to support photochemical isomerization of a bound bilin chromophore, a process that triggers a conformational change and modulates biochemical output from the surrounding protein scaffold. Recent studies have established that the efficiency of this photochemical process is profoundly altered by mutation of a conserved tyrosine residue (Tyr176) within the bilin-binding GAF domain of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 [Fischer, A. J., and Lagarias, J. C. (2004) Harnessing phytochrome’s glowing potential, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 17334–17339]. Here, we show that the equivalent mutation in plant phytochromes behaves similarly, indicating that the function of this tyrosine in the primary photochemical mechanism is conserved. Saturation mutagenesis of Tyr176 in Cph1 establishes that no other residue can support comparably efficient photoisomerization. The spectroscopic consequences of Tyr176 mutations also reveal that Tyr176 regulates the conversion of the porphyrin-like conformation of the bilin precursor to a more extended conformation. The porphyrin-binding ability of the Tyr176Arg mutant protein indicates that Tyr176 also regulates the ligand-binding specificity of apophytochrome. On the basis of the hydrogen-bonding ability of Tyr176 substitutions that support the nonphotochemical C15-Z,syn to C15-Z,anti interconversion, we propose that Tyr176 orients the carboxyl side chain of a conserved acidic residue to stabilize protonation of the bilin chromophore. A homology model of the GAF domain of Cph1 predicts a C5-Z,syn, C10-Z,syn, C15-Z,anti configuration for the chromophore and implicates Glu189 as the proposed acidic residue stabilizing the extended conformation, an interpretation consistent with site-directed mutagenesis of this conserved acidic residue. PMID:16285723

  7. Structural and functional conservation of key domains in InsP[subscript 3] and ryanodine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Min-Duk; Velamakanni, Saroj; Ishiyama, Noboru; Stathopulos, Peter B.; Rossi, Ana M.; Khan, Samir A.; Dale, Philippa; Li, Congmin; Ames, James B.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Taylor, Colin W.

    2012-07-11

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP{sub 3}Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric intracellular Ca{sup 2+} channels. In each of these receptor families, the pore, which is formed by carboxy-terminal transmembrane domains, is regulated by signals that are detected by large cytosolic structures. InsP{sub 3}R gating is initiated by InsP{sub 3} binding to the InsP{sub 3}-binding core (IBC, residues 224-604 of InsP{sub 3}R1) and it requires the suppressor domain (SD, residues 1-223 of InsP{sub 3}R1). Here we present structures of the amino-terminal region (NT, residues 1-604) of rat InsP{sub 3}R1 with (3.6 {angstrom}) and without (3.0 {angstrom}) InsP{sub 3} bound. The arrangement of the three NT domains, SD, IBC-{beta} and IBC-{alpha}, identifies two discrete interfaces ({alpha} and {beta}) between the IBC and SD. Similar interfaces occur between equivalent domains (A, B and C) in RyR1 (ref. 9). The orientations of the three domains when docked into a tetrameric structure of InsP{sub 3}R and of the ABC domains docked into RyR are remarkably similar. The importance of the {alpha}-interface for activation of InsP{sub 3}R and RyR is confirmed by mutagenesis and, for RyR, by disease-causing mutations. Binding of InsP{sub 3} causes partial closure of the clam-like IBC, disrupting the {beta}-interface and pulling the SD towards the IBC. This reorients an exposed SD loop ('hotspot' (HS) loop) that is essential for InsP{sub 3}R activation. The loop is conserved in RyR and includes mutations that are associated with malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. The HS loop interacts with an adjacent NT, suggesting that activation re-arranges inter-subunit interactions. The A domain of RyR functionally replaced the SD in full-length InsP{sub 3}R, and an InsP{sub 3}R in which its C-terminal transmembrane region was replaced by that from RyR1 was gated by InsP{sub 3} and blocked by ryanodine. Activation mechanisms are conserved between InsP{sub 3}R and Ry

  8. Interfacial Partitioning of a Loop Hinge Residue Contributes to Diacylglycerol Affinity of Conserved Region 1 Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela D.; Cole, Taylor R.; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional and novel isoenzymes of PKC are activated by the membrane-embedded second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) through its interactions with the C1 regulatory domain. The affinity of C1 domains to DAG varies considerably among PKCs. To gain insight into the origin of differential DAG affinities, we conducted high-resolution NMR studies of C1B domain from PKCδ (C1Bδ) and its W252Y variant. The W252Y mutation was previously shown to render C1Bδ less responsive to DAG (Dries, D. R., Gallegos, L. L., and Newton, A. C. (2007) A single residue in the C1 domain sensitizes novel protein kinase C isoforms to cellular diacylglycerol production. J. Biol. Chem. 282, 826–830) and thereby emulate the behavior of C1B domains from conventional PKCs that have a conserved Tyr at the equivalent position. Our data revealed that W252Y mutation did not perturb the conformation of C1Bδ in solution but significantly reduced its propensity to partition into a membrane-mimicking environment in the absence of DAG. Using detergent micelles doped with a paramagnetic lipid, we determined that both the residue identity at position 252 and complexation with diacylglycerol influence the geometry of C1Bδ-micelle interactions. In addition, we identified the C-terminal helix α1 of C1Bδ as an interaction site with the head groups of phosphatidylserine, a known activator of PKCδ. Taken together, our studies (i) reveal the identities of C1Bδ residues involved in interactions with membrane-mimicking environment, DAG, and phosphatidylserine, as well as the affinities associated with each event and (ii) suggest that the initial ligand-independent membrane recruitment of C1B domains, which is greatly facilitated by the interfacial partitioning of Trp-252, is responsible, at least in part, for the differential DAG affinities. PMID:25124034

  9. Dual Thermosensitive Hydrogels Assembled from the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Dragline Silk.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Ming-Liang; Song, Wen-Wen; Xia, Xiao-Xia

    2015-11-09

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have great potentials in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Due to the advantages of precise control over molecular weight and being biodegradable, protein-based hydrogels and their applications have been extensively studied. However, protein hydrogels with dual thermosensitive properties are rarely reported. Here we present the first report of dual thermosensitive hydrogels assembled from the conserved C-terminal domain of spider dragline silk. First, we found that recombinant C-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) of the spider Nephila clavipes formed hydrogels when cooled to approximately 2 °C or heated to 65 °C. The conformational changes and self-assembly of the recombinant protein were studied to understand the mechanism of the gelation processes using multiple methods. It was proposed that the gelation in the low-temperature regime was dominated by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction between folded protein molecules, whereas the gelation in the high-temperature regime was due to cross-linking of the exposed hydrophobic patches resulting from partial unfolding of the protein upon heating. More interestingly, genetic fusion of the C-terminal domain to a short repetitive region of N. clavipes MaSp1 resulted in a chimeric protein that formed a hydrogel with significantly improved mechanical properties at low temperatures between 2 and 10 °C. Furthermore, the formation of similar hydrogels was observed for the recombinant C-terminal domains of dragline silk of different spider species, thus demonstrating the conserved ability to form dual thermosensitive hydrogels. These findings may be useful in the design and construction of novel protein hydrogels with tunable multiple thermosensitivity for applications in the future.

  10. A conserved KASH domain protein associates with telomeres, SUN1, and dynactin during mammalian meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Akihiro; Shibuya, Hiroki; Zhu, Xiaoqiang; Kim, Jihye; Ishiguro, Kei-ichiro; Han, Min

    2012-01-01

    In yeasts and worms, KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne/homology) domain and SUN (Sad-1/UNC-84) domain nuclear envelope (NE) proteins play a crucial role in meiotic chromosome movement and homologue pairing. However, although the vertebrate SUN domain protein SUN1 is involved in these processes, its partner has remained identified. Based on subcellular localization screening in mouse spermatocytes, we identified a novel germ cell–specific protein, KASH5, that localized exclusively at telomeres from the leptotene to diplotene stages in both spermatocytes and oocytes. KASH5 possesses hitherto unknown KASH-related sequences that directly interacted with SUN1 and mediated telomere localization. Thus, KASH5 is a mammalian meiosis-specific KASH domain protein. We show that meiotic chromosome movement depended on microtubules and that KASH5 interacted with the microtubule-associated dynein–dynactin complex. These results suggest that KASH5 connects the telomere-associated SUN1 protein to the cytoplasmic force–generating mechanism involved in meiotic chromosome movement. Our study strongly suggests that the meiotic homologue-pairing mechanism mediated by the SUN–KASH NE bridge is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:22826121

  11. cddApp: a Cytoscape app for accessing the NCBI conserved domain database.

    PubMed

    Morris, John H; Wu, Allan; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    cddApp is a Cytoscape extension that supports the annotation of protein networks with information about domains and specific functional sites from the National Center for Biotechnology Information's conserved domain database (CDD). CDD information is loaded for nodes annotated with NCBI numbers or UniProt identifiers and (optionally) Protein Data Bank structures. cddApp integrates with the Cytoscape apps structureViz2 and enhancedGraphics. Together, these three apps provide powerful tools to annotate nodes with CDD domain and site information and visualize that information in both network and structural contexts. cddApp is written in Java and freely available for download from the Cytoscape app store (http://apps.cytoscape.org). Documentation is provided at http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/cytoscape, and the source is publically available from GitHub http://github.com/RBVI/cddApp. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

    2005-06-13

    Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

  13. The E2 Domains of APP and APLP1 Share a Conserved Mode of Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    S Lee; Y Xue; J Hulbert; Y Wang; X Liu; B Demeler; Y Ha

    2011-12-31

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is genetically linked to Alzheimer's disease. APP is a type I membrane protein, and its oligomeric structure is potentially important because this property may play a role in its function or affect the processing of the precursor by the secretases to generate amyloid {beta}-peptide. Several independent studies have shown that APP can form dimers in the cell, but how it dimerizes remains controversial. At least three regions of the precursor, including a centrally located and conserved domain called E2, have been proposed to contribute to dimerization. Here we report two new crystal structures of E2, one from APP and the other from APLP1, a mammalian APP homologue. Comparison with an earlier APP structure, which was determined in a different space group, shows that the E2 domains share a conserved and antiparallel mode of dimerization. Biophysical measurements in solution show that heparin binding induces E2 dimerization. The 2.1 {angstrom} resolution electron density map also reveals phosphate ions that are bound to the protein surface. Mutational analysis shows that protein residues interacting with the phosphate ions are also involved in heparin binding. The locations of two of these residues, Arg-369 and His-433, at the dimeric interface suggest a mechanism for heparin-induced protein dimerization.

  14. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Radon, Yvonne; Sempou, Emily; Jechow, Katharina; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Málaga-Trillo, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP) deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1) the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2) the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and zebrafish.

  15. A conserved domain is crucial for acceptor substrate binding in a family of glucosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Hui

    2015-02-01

    Serine-rich repeat glycoproteins (SRRPs) are highly conserved in streptococci and staphylococci. Glycosylation of SRRPs is important for bacterial adhesion and pathogenesis. Streptococcus agalactiae is the leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis among newborns. Srr2, an SRRP from S. agalactiae strain COH1, has been implicated in bacterial virulence. Four genes (gtfA, gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD) located downstream of srr2 share significant homology with genes involved in glycosylation of other SRRPs. We have shown previously that gtfA and gtfB encode two glycosyltransferases, GtfA and GtfB, that catalyze the transfer of GlcNAc residues to the Srr2 polypeptide. However, the function of other glycosyltransferases in glycosylation of Srr2 is unknown. In this study, we determined that GtfC catalyzed the direct transfer of glucosyl residues to Srr2-GlcNAc. The GtfC crystal structure was solved at 2.7 Å by molecular replacement. Structural analysis revealed a loop region at the N terminus as a putative acceptor substrate binding domain. Deletion of this domain rendered GtfC unable to bind to its substrate Srr2-GlcNAc, concurrently abolished the glycosyltransferase activity of GtfC, and also altered glycosylation of Srr2. Furthermore, deletion of the corresponding regions from GtfC homologs also abolished their substrate binding and enzymatic activity, indicating that this region is functionally conserved. In summary, we have determined that GtfC is important for the glycosylation of Srr2 and identified a conserved loop region that is crucial for acceptor substrate binding from GtfC homologs in streptococci. These findings shed new mechanistic insight into this family of glycosyltransferases. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Conserved protein domains in a myosin heavy chain gene from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Warrick, H M; De Lozanne, A; Leinwand, L A; Spudich, J A

    1986-01-01

    The 2116-amino acid myosin heavy chain sequence from Dictyostelium discoideum was determined from DNA sequence analysis of the cloned gene. The gene product can be divided into two distinct regions, a globular head region and a long alpha-helical, rod-like tail. In comparisons with nematode and mammalian muscle myosins, specific areas of the head region are highly conserved. These areas presumably reflect conserved functional and structural domains. Certain features that are present in the head region of nematode and mammalian muscle myosins, and that have been assumed to be important for myosin function, are missing in the Dictyostelium myosin sequence. The protein sequence of the Dictyostelium tail region is very poorly conserved with respect to the other myosins but displays the periodicities similar to those of muscle myosins. These periodicities are believed to play a role in filament formation. The 196-residue repeating unit that determines the 14.3-nm repeat seen in muscle thick filaments, the 28-residue charge repeating unit, and the 1,4 hydrophobic repeat previously described for the nematode myosin are all present in the Dictyostelium myosin rod sequence, suggesting that the filament structures of muscle and Dictyostelium myosins must be similar. PMID:3540939

  17. Identifying Potential Recommendation Domains for Conservation Agriculture in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfaye, Kindie; Jaleta, Moti; Jena, Pradyot; Mutenje, Munyaradzi

    2015-02-01

    Conservation agriculture (CA) is being promoted as an option for reducing soil degradation, conserving water, enhancing crop productivity, and maintaining yield stability. However, CA is a knowledge- and technology-intensive practice, and may not be feasible or may not perform better than conventional agriculture under all conditions and farming systems. Using high resolution (≈1 km2) biophysical and socioeconomic geospatial data, this study identified potential recommendation domains (RDs) for CA in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi. The biophysical variables used were soil texture, surface slope, and rainfall while the socioeconomic variables were market access and human and livestock population densities. Based on feasibility and comparative performance of CA over conventional agriculture, the biophysical and socioeconomic factors were first used to classify cultivated areas into three biophysical and three socioeconomic potential domains, respectively. Combinations of biophysical and socioeconomic domains were then used to develop potential RDs for CA based on adoption potential within the cultivated areas. About 39, 12, and 5 % of the cultivated areas showed high biophysical and socioeconomic potential while 50, 39, and 21 % of the cultivated areas showed high biophysical and medium socioeconomic potential for CA in Malawi, Kenya, and Ethiopia, respectively. The results indicate considerable acreages of land with high CA adoption potential in the mixed crop-livestock systems of the studied countries. However, there are large differences among countries depending on biophysical and socio-economic conditions. The information generated in this study could be used for targeting CA and prioritizing CA-related agricultural research and investment priorities in the three countries.

  18. Identifying potential recommendation domains for conservation agriculture in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Kindie; Jaleta, Moti; Jena, Pradyot; Mutenje, Munyaradzi

    2015-02-01

    Conservation agriculture (CA) is being promoted as an option for reducing soil degradation, conserving water, enhancing crop productivity, and maintaining yield stability. However, CA is a knowledge- and technology-intensive practice, and may not be feasible or may not perform better than conventional agriculture under all conditions and farming systems. Using high resolution (≈1 km(2)) biophysical and socioeconomic geospatial data, this study identified potential recommendation domains (RDs) for CA in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi. The biophysical variables used were soil texture, surface slope, and rainfall while the socioeconomic variables were market access and human and livestock population densities. Based on feasibility and comparative performance of CA over conventional agriculture, the biophysical and socioeconomic factors were first used to classify cultivated areas into three biophysical and three socioeconomic potential domains, respectively. Combinations of biophysical and socioeconomic domains were then used to develop potential RDs for CA based on adoption potential within the cultivated areas. About 39, 12, and 5% of the cultivated areas showed high biophysical and socioeconomic potential while 50, 39, and 21% of the cultivated areas showed high biophysical and medium socioeconomic potential for CA in Malawi, Kenya, and Ethiopia, respectively. The results indicate considerable acreages of land with high CA adoption potential in the mixed crop-livestock systems of the studied countries. However, there are large differences among countries depending on biophysical and socio-economic conditions. The information generated in this study could be used for targeting CA and prioritizing CA-related agricultural research and investment priorities in the three countries.

  19. The BID Domain of Type IV Secretion Substrates Forms a Conserved Four-Helix Bundle Topped with a Hook.

    PubMed

    Stanger, Frédéric V; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Dranow, David M; Schirmer, Tilman; Phan, Isabelle; Dehio, Christoph

    2017-01-03

    The BID (Bep intracellular delivery) domain functions as secretion signal in a subfamily of protein substrates of bacterial type IV secretion (T4S) systems. It mediates transfer of (1) relaxases and the attached DNA during bacterial conjugation, and (2) numerous Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) during protein transfer into host cells infected by pathogenic Bartonella species. Furthermore, BID domains of Beps have often evolved secondary effector functions within host cells. Here, we provide crystal structures for three representative BID domains and describe a novel conserved fold characterized by a compact, antiparallel four-helix bundle topped with a hook. The conserved hydrophobic core provides a rigid scaffold to a surface that, despite a few conserved exposed residues and similarities in charge distribution, displays significant variability. We propose that the genuine function of BID domains as T4S signal may primarily depend on their rigid structure, while the plasticity of their surface may facilitate adaptation to secondary effector functions.

  20. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher A; Epperson, Megan L; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I; Fremont, Daved H

    2015-08-28

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection.

  1. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christopher A.; Epperson, Megan L.; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection. PMID:26343707

  2. The Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Erb1 Is a Seven-Bladed ß-Propeller that Binds RNA

    PubMed Central

    Marcin, Wegrecki; Neira, Jose Luis; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Erb1 (Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis 1) protein is essential for the maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed that altogether with Nop7 and Ytm1 it forms a stable subcomplex called PeBoW that is crucial for a correct rRNA processing. The exact function of the protein within the process remains unknown. The N-terminal region of the protein includes a well conserved region shown to be involved in PeBoW complex formation whereas the carboxy-terminal half was predicted to contain seven WD40 repeats. This first structural report on Erb1 from yeast describes the architecture of a seven-bladed β-propeller domain that revealed a characteristic extra motif formed by two α-helices and a β-strand that insert within the second WD repeat. We performed analysis of molecular surface and crystal packing, together with multiple sequence alignment and comparison of the structure with other β-propellers, in order to identify areas that are more likely to mediate protein-protein interactions. The abundance of many positively charged residues on the surface of the domain led us to investigate whether the propeller of Erb1 might be involved in RNA binding. Three independent assays confirmed that the protein interacted in vitro with polyuridilic acid (polyU), thus suggesting a possible role of the domain in rRNA rearrangement during ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25880847

  3. The carboxy-terminal domain of Erb1 is a seven-bladed ß-propeller that binds RNA.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Marcin, Wegrecki; Neira, Jose Luis; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Erb1 (Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis 1) protein is essential for the maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed that altogether with Nop7 and Ytm1 it forms a stable subcomplex called PeBoW that is crucial for a correct rRNA processing. The exact function of the protein within the process remains unknown. The N-terminal region of the protein includes a well conserved region shown to be involved in PeBoW complex formation whereas the carboxy-terminal half was predicted to contain seven WD40 repeats. This first structural report on Erb1 from yeast describes the architecture of a seven-bladed β-propeller domain that revealed a characteristic extra motif formed by two α-helices and a β-strand that insert within the second WD repeat. We performed analysis of molecular surface and crystal packing, together with multiple sequence alignment and comparison of the structure with other β-propellers, in order to identify areas that are more likely to mediate protein-protein interactions. The abundance of many positively charged residues on the surface of the domain led us to investigate whether the propeller of Erb1 might be involved in RNA binding. Three independent assays confirmed that the protein interacted in vitro with polyuridilic acid (polyU), thus suggesting a possible role of the domain in rRNA rearrangement during ribosome biogenesis.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of a Conserved Domain in the Eremophyte H+-PPase Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanqin; Jin, Shuangxia; Wang, Maojun; Zhu, Longfu; Zhang, Xianlong

    2013-01-01

    H+-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatases (H+-PPase) were recognized as the original energy donors in the development of plants. A large number of researchers have shown that H+-PPase could be an early-originated protein that participated in many important biochemical and physiological processes. In this study we cloned 14 novel sequences from 7 eremophytes: Sophora alopecuroid (Sa), Glycyrrhiza uralensis (Gu), Glycyrrhiza inflata (Gi), Suaeda salsa (Ss), Suaeda rigida (Sr), Halostachys caspica (Hc), and Karelinia caspia (Kc). These novel sequences included 6 ORFs and 8 fragments, and they were identified as H+-PPases based on the typical conserved domains. Besides the identified domains, sequence alignment showed that there still were two novel conserved motifs. A phylogenetic tree was constructed, including the 14 novel H+-PPase amino acid sequences and the other 34 identified H+-PPase protein sequences representing plants, algae, protozoans and bacteria. It was shown that these 48 H+-PPases were classified into two groups: type I and type II H+-PPase. The novel 14 eremophyte H+-PPases were classified into the type I H+-PPase. The 3D structures of these H+-PPase proteins were predicted, which suggested that all type I H+-PPases from higher plants and algae were homodimers, while other type I H+-PPases from bacteria and protozoans and all type II H+-PPases were monomers. The 3D structures of these novel H+-PPases were homodimers except for SaVP3, which was a monomer. This regular structure could provide important evidence for the evolutionary origin and study of the relationship between the structure and function among members of the H+-PPase family. PMID:23922918

  5. A conservative, positivity preserving scheme for reactive solute transport problems in moving domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabuza, Sibusiso; Kuzmin, Dmitri; Čanić, Sunčica; Bukač, Martina

    2014-11-01

    We study the mathematical models and numerical schemes for reactive transport of a soluble substance in deformable media. The medium is a channel with compliant adsorbing walls. The solutes are dissolved in the fluid flowing through the channel. The fluid, which carries the solutes, is viscous and incompressible. The reactive process is described as a general physico-chemical process taking place on the compliant channel wall. The problem is modeled by a convection-diffusion adsorption-desorption equation in moving domains. We present a conservative, positivity preserving, high resolution ALE-FCT scheme for this problem in the presence of dominant transport processes and wall reactions on the moving wall. A Patankar type time discretization is presented, which provides conservative treatment of nonlinear reactive terms. We establish CFL-type constraints on the time step, and show the mass conservation of the time discretization scheme. Numerical simulations are performed to show validity of the schemes against effective models under various scenarios including linear adsorption-desorption, irreversible wall reaction, infinite adsorption kinetics, and nonlinear Langmuir kinetics. The grid convergence of the numerical scheme is studied for the case of fixed meshes and moving meshes in fixed domains. Finally, we simulate reactive transport in moving domains under linear and nonlinear chemical reactions at the wall, and show that the motion of the compliant channel wall enhances adsorption of the solute from the fluid to the channel wall. Consequences of this result are significant in the area of, e.g., nano-particle cancer drug delivery. Our result shows that periodic excitation of the cancerous tissue using, e.g., ultrasound, may enhance adsorption of cancer drugs carried by nano-particles via the human vasculature. For Taylor dispersion and for other convection dominated flows, numerical schemes for solute transport may lead to undesirable numerical artefacts. These

  6. Centromere Satellites From Arabidopsis Populations: Maintenance of Conserved and Variable Domains

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sarah E.; Kettler, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

    2003-01-01

    The rapid evolution of centromere sequences between species has led to a debate over whether centromere activity is sequence-dependent. The Arabidopsis thaliana centromere regions contain ∼20,000 copies of a 178-bp satellite repeat. Here, we analyzed satellites from 41 Arabidopsis ecotypes, providing the first broad population survey of satellite variation within a species. We found highly conserved segments and consistent sequence lengths in the Arabidopsis satellites and in the published collection of human α-satellites, supporting models for a functional role. Despite this conservation, polymorphisms are significantly enriched at some sites, yielding variation that could restrict binding proteins to a subset of repeat monomers. Some satellite regions vary considerably; at certain bases, consensus sequences derived from each ecotype diverge significantly from the Arabidopsis consensus, indicating substitutions sweep through a genome in less than 5 million years. Such rapid changes generate more variation within the set of Arabidopsis satellites than in genes from the chromosome arms or from the recombinationally suppressed centromere regions. These studies highlight a balance between the mechanisms that maintain particular satellite domains and the forces that disperse sequence changes throughout the satellite repeats in the genome. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12566397

  7. A Conserved Domain in Escherichia coli Lon Protease Is Involved in Substrate Discriminator Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ebel, Wolfgang; Skinner, Monica M.; Dierksen, Karen P.; Scott, Janelle M.; Trempy, Janine E.

    1999-01-01

    Lon protease of Escherichia coli regulates a diverse set of physiological responses including cell division, capsule production, plasmid stability, and phage replication. Little is known about the mechanism of substrate recognition by Lon. To examine the interaction of Lon with two of its substrates, RcsA and SulA, we generated point mutations in lon which affected its substrate specificity. The most informative lon mutant overproduced capsular polysaccharide (RcsA stabilized) yet was resistant to DNA-damaging agents (SulA degraded). Immunoblots revealed that RcsA protein persisted in this mutant whereas SulA protein was rapidly degraded. The mutant contains a single-base change within lon leading to a single amino acid change of glutamate 240 to lysine. E240 is conserved among all Lon isolates and resides in a charged domain that has a high probability of adopting a coiled-coil conformation. This conformation, implicated in mediating protein-protein interactions, appears to confer substrate discriminator activity on Lon. We propose a model suggesting that this coiled-coil domain represents the discriminator site of Lon. PMID:10094703

  8. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Results Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Conclusion Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for

  9. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserved across SMC types in a wide variety of organisms, including humans.

  10. Tracing the origin of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome: implications for protein evolution at the modular level.

    PubMed

    Pal, Lipika R; Guda, Chittibabu

    2006-11-07

    The functional repertoire of the human proteome is an incremental collection of functions accomplished by protein domains evolved along the Homo sapiens lineage. Therefore, knowledge on the origin of these functionalities provides a better understanding of the domain and protein evolution in human. The lack of proper comprehension about such origin has impelled us to study the evolutionary origin of human proteome in a unique way as detailed in this study. This study reports a unique approach for understanding the evolution of human proteome by tracing the origin of its constituting domains hierarchically, along the Homo sapiens lineage. The uniqueness of this method lies in subtractive searching of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome resulting in higher efficiency of detecting their origins. From these analyses the nature of protein evolution and trends in domain evolution can be observed in the context of the entire human proteome data. The method adopted here also helps delineate the degree of divergence of functional families occurred during the course of evolution. This approach to trace the evolutionary origin of functional domains in the human proteome facilitates better understanding of their functional versatility as well as provides insights into the functionality of hypothetical proteins present in the human proteome. This work elucidates the origin of functional and conserved domains in human proteins, their distribution along the Homo sapiens lineage, occurrence frequency of different domain combinations and proteome-wide patterns of their distribution, providing insights into the evolutionary solution to the increased complexity of the human proteome.

  11. A Highly Conserved gp120 Inner Domain Residue Modulates Env Conformation and Trimer Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Tolbert, William D.; Prévost, Jérémie; Pacheco, Beatriz; Coutu, Mathieu; Debbeche, Olfa; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that highly conserved residues in the inner domain of gp120 are required for HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) transitions to the CD4-bound conformation (A. Finzi, S. H. Xiang, B. Pacheco, L. Wang, J. Haight, et al., Mol Cell 37:656–667, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2010.02.012; A. Desormeaux, M. Coutu, H. Medjahed, B. Pacheco, A. Herschhorn, et al., J Virol 87:2549–2562, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.03104-12). Moreover, W69, a highly conserved residue located at the interface between layer 1 and layer 2 of the inner domain, was recently shown to be important for efficient Env recognition by CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies capable of potent antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (W. D. Tolbert, N. Gohain, M. Veillette, J. P. Chapleau, C. Orlandi, et al., 2016, Structure 24:697–709, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.str.2016.03.005; S. Ding, M. Veillette, M. Coutu, J. Prevost, L. Scharf, et al., 2016, J Virol 90:2127–2134, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02779-15). We evaluated the contribution of the hydrophobicity of W69 to conformational changes of Env by replacing it with a series of residues with aliphatic or aromatic side chains of decreasing chain length. We have found that the hydrophobicity of residue 69 is important for Env processing, CD4 binding, and its transition to the CD4-bound conformation. The most deleterious effect was observed when W69 was replaced with alanine or glycine residues. However, the functions lost due to W69 mutations could be progressively restored with amino acids of increasing aliphatic chain length and fully recovered with residues bearing an aromatic ring. Interestingly, poor CD4 binding of W69A could be fully restored by introducing a compensatory mutation within layer 2 (S115W). Structural studies of HIV-1 gp120 coree W69A/S115W mutant bound to the CD4 peptide mimetic M48U1 and Fab of anti-cluster A antibody N60-i3 revealed no perturbations to the overall structure of the

  12. A Conserved Helical Capping Hydrogen Bond in PAS Domains Controls Signaling Kinetics in the Superfamily Prototype Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kumauchi, Masato; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Philip, Andrew F.; Wycoff, James; Hara, Miwa; Li, Yunxing; Xie, Aihua; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2010-01-01

    PAS domains form a divergent protein superfamily with more than 20,000 members that perform a wide array of sensing and regulatory functions in all three domains of life. Only 9 residues are well-conserved in PAS domains, with an Asn residue at the start of α-helix 3 showing the strongest conservation. The molecular functions of these 9 conserved residues are unknown. We use static and time-resolved visible and FTIR spectroscopy to investigate receptor activation in the photosensor photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a PAS domain prototype. The N43A and N43S mutants allow an investigation of the role of side chain hydrogen bonding at this conserved position. The mutants exhibit a blue-shifted visible absorbance maximum and up-shifted chromophore pKa. Disruption of the hydrogen bonds in N43A PYP causes both a reduction in protein stability and a 3,400-fold increase in the lifetime of the signaling state of this photoreceptor. A significant part of this increase in lifetime can be attributed to the helical capping interaction of Asn43. This extends the known importance of helical capping for protein structure to regulating functional protein kinetics. A model for PYP activation has been proposed in which side chain hydrogen bonding of Asn43 is critical for relaying light-induced conformational changes. However, FTIR spectroscopy shows that both Asn43 mutants retain full allosteric transmission of structural changes. Analysis of 30 available high resolution structures of PAS domains reveals that the side chain hydrogen bonding of residue 43 but not residue identity is highly conserved, and suggests that its helical cap affects signaling kinetics in other PAS domains. PMID:20954744

  13. Conserved TCP domain of Sas-4/CPAP is essential for pericentriolar material tethering during centrosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangdong; Gooi, Li Ming; Wason, Arpit; Gabriel, Elke; Mehrjardi, Narges Zare; Yang, Qian; Zhang, Xingrun; Debec, Alain; Basiri, Marcus L; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Poser, Ina; Saric, Tomo; Hyman, Anthony A; Li, Haitao; Gopalakrishnan, Jay

    2014-01-21

    Pericentriolar material (PCM) recruitment to centrioles forms a key step in centrosome biogenesis. Deregulation of this process leads to centrosome aberrations causing disorders, one of which is autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH), a neurodevelopmental disorder where brain size is reduced. During PCM recruitment, the conserved centrosomal protein Sas-4/CPAP/MCPH6, known to play a role in centriole formation, acts as a scaffold for cytoplasmic PCM complexes to bind and then tethers them to centrioles to form functional centrosomes. To understand Sas-4's tethering role, we determined the crystal structure of its T complex protein 10 (TCP) domain displaying a solvent-exposed single-layer of β-sheets fold. This unique feature of the TCP domain suggests that it could provide an "extended surface-like" platform to tether the Sas-4-PCM scaffold to a centriole. Functional studies in Drosophila, human cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells were used to test this hypothesis, where point mutations within the 9-10th β-strands (β9-10 mutants including a MCPH-associated mutation) perturbed PCM tethering while allowing Sas-4/CPAP to scaffold cytoplasmic PCM complexes. Specifically, the Sas-4 β9-10 mutants displayed perturbed interactions with Ana2, a centrosome duplication factor, and Bld-10, a centriole microtubule-binding protein, suggesting a role for the β9-10 surface in mediating protein-protein interactions for efficient Sas-4-PCM scaffold centriole tethering. Hence, we provide possible insights into how centrosomal protein defects result in human MCPH and how Sas-4 proteins act as a vehicle to tether PCM complexes to centrioles independent of its well-known role in centriole duplication.

  14. Syp1 is a conserved endocytic adaptor that contains domains involved in cargo selection and membrane tubulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reider, Amanda; Barker, Sarah L.; Mishra, Sanjay K.; Im, Young Jun; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Hurley, James H.; Traub, Linton M.; Wendland, Beverly

    2010-10-28

    Internalization of diverse transmembrane cargos from the plasma membrane requires a similarly diverse array of specialized adaptors, yet only a few adaptors have been characterized. We report the identification of the muniscin family of endocytic adaptors that is conserved from yeast to human beings. Solving the structures of yeast muniscin domains confirmed the unique combination of an N-terminal domain homologous to the crescent-shaped membrane-tubulating EFC/F-BAR domains and a C-terminal domain homologous to cargo-binding {mu} homology domains ({mu}HDs). In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed membrane-tubulation activity for muniscin EFC/F-BAR domains. The {mu}HD domain has conserved interactions with the endocytic adaptor/scaffold Ede1/eps15, which influences muniscin localization. The transmembrane protein Mid2, earlier implicated in polarized Rho1 signalling, was identified as a cargo of the yeast adaptor protein. These and other data suggest a model in which the muniscins provide a combined adaptor/membrane-tubulation activity that is important for regulating endocytosis.

  15. The Evolutionarily Conserved Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), Lysin Motif (LysM), Domain Catalytic (TLDc) Domain Is Neuroprotective against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Finelli, Mattéa J; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Liu, Kevin X; Davies, Kay E; Oliver, Peter L

    2016-02-05

    Oxidative stress is a pathological feature of many neurological disorders; therefore, utilizing proteins that are protective against such cellular insults is a potentially valuable therapeutic approach. Oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) has been shown previously to be critical for oxidative stress resistance in neuronal cells; deletion of this gene causes neurodegeneration in mice, yet conversely, overexpression of OXR1 is protective in cellular and mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. OXR1 contains the Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), lysin motif (LysM), domain catalytic (TLDc) domain, a motif present in a family of proteins including TBC1 domain family member 24 (TBC1D24), a protein mutated in a range of disorders characterized by seizures, hearing loss, and neurodegeneration. The TLDc domain is highly conserved across species, although the structure-function relationship is unknown. To understand the role of this domain in the stress response, we carried out systematic analysis of all mammalian TLDc domain-containing proteins, investigating their expression and neuroprotective properties in parallel. In addition, we performed a detailed structural and functional study of this domain in which we identified key residues required for its activity. Finally, we present a new mouse insertional mutant of Oxr1, confirming that specific disruption of the TLDc domain in vivo is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration. Our data demonstrate that the integrity of the TLDc domain is essential for conferring neuroprotection, an important step in understanding the functional significance of all TLDc domain-containing proteins in the cellular stress response and disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Conserved TRAM Domain Functions as an Archaeal Cold Shock Protein via RNA Chaperone Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yue, Lei; Zhou, Liguang; Qi, Lei; Li, Jie; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2017-01-01

    Cold shock proteins (Csps) enable organisms to acclimate to and survive in cold environments and the bacterial CspA family exerts the cold protection via its RNA chaperone activity. However, most Archaea do not contain orthologs to the bacterial csp. TRAM, a conserved domain among RNA modification proteins ubiquitously distributed in organisms, occurs as an individual protein in most archaeal phyla and has a structural similarity to Csp proteins, yet its biological functions remain unknown. Through physiological and biochemical studies on four TRAM proteins from a cold adaptive archaeon Methanolobus psychrophilus R15, this work demonstrated that TRAM is an archaeal Csp and exhibits RNA chaperone activity. Three TRAM encoding genes (Mpsy_0643, Mpsy_3043, and Mpsy_3066) exhibited remarkable cold-shock induced transcription and were preferentially translated at lower temperature (18°C), while the fourth (Mpsy_2002) was constitutively expressed. They were all able to complement the cspABGE mutant of Escherichia coli BX04 that does not grow in cold temperatures and showed transcriptional antitermination. TRAM3066 (gene product of Mpsy_3066) and TRAM2002 (gene product of Mpsy_2002) displayed sequence-non-specific RNA but not DNA binding activity, and TRAM3066 assisted RNases in degradation of structured RNA, thus validating the RNA chaperone activity of TRAMs. Given the chaperone activity, TRAM is predicted to function beyond a Csp.

  17. Functional Information Stored in the Conserved Structural RNA Domains of Flavivirus Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sanlés, Alba; Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The genus Flavivirus comprises a large number of small, positive-sense single-stranded, RNA viruses able to replicate in the cytoplasm of certain arthropod and/or vertebrate host cells. The genus, which has some 70 member species, includes a number of emerging and re-emerging pathogens responsible for outbreaks of human disease around the world, such as the West Nile, dengue, Zika, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. Like other RNA viruses, flaviviruses have a compact RNA genome that efficiently stores all the information required for the completion of the infectious cycle. The efficiency of this storage system is attributable to supracoding elements, i.e., discrete, structural units with essential functions. This information storage system overlaps and complements the protein coding sequence and is highly conserved across the genus. It therefore offers interesting potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies. This review summarizes our knowledge of the features of flavivirus genome functional RNA domains. It also provides a brief overview of the main achievements reported in the design of antiviral nucleic acid-based drugs targeting functional genomic RNA elements. PMID:28421048

  18. Large conserved domains of low DNA methylation maintained by Dnmt3a

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mira; Sun, Deqiang; Luo, Min; Huang, Yun; Challen, Grant A.; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Chavez, Lukas; Wang, Hui; Hannah, Rebecca; Kim, Sang-Bae; Yang, Liubin; Ko, Myunggon; Chen, Rui; Göttgens, Berthold; Lee, Ju-Seog; Gunaratne, Preethi; Godley, Lucy A.; Darlington, Gretchen J.; Rao, Anjana; Li, Wei; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Gains and losses in DNA methylation are prominent features of mammalian cell types. To gain insight into mechanisms that could promote shifts in DNA methylation and contribute to cell fate changes, including malignant transformation, we performed genome-wide mapping of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in purified murine hematopoietic stem cells. We discovered extended regions of low methylation (Canyons) that span conserved domains frequently containing transcription factors and are distinct from CpG islands and shores. The genes in about half of these methylation Canyons are coated with repressive histone marks while the remainder are covered by activating histone marks and are highly expressed in HSCs. Canyon borders are demarked by 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and become eroded in the absence of DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a). Genes dysregulated in human leukemias are enriched for Canyon-associated genes. The novel epigenetic landscape we describe may provide a mechanism for the regulation of hematopoiesis and may contribute to leukemia development. PMID:24270360

  19. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  20. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein–protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  1. Structure of the C-terminal domain of Tup1, a corepressor of transcription in yeast.

    PubMed

    Sprague, E R; Redd, M J; Johnson, A D; Wolberger, C

    2000-06-15

    The Tup1-Ssn6 corepressor complex regulates the expression of several sets of genes, including genes that specify mating type in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Repression of mating-type genes occurs when Tup1-Ssn6 is brought to the DNA by the Matalpha2 DNA-binding protein and assembled upstream of a- and haploid-specific genes. We have determined the 2.3 A X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Tup1 (accesion No. 1ERJ), a 43 kDa fragment that contains seven copies of the WD40 sequence motif and binds to the Matalpha2 protein. Moreover, this portion of the protein can partially substitute for full-length Tup1 in bringing about transcriptional repression. The structure reveals a seven-bladed beta propeller with an N-terminal subdomain that is anchored to the side of the propeller and extends the beta sheet of one of the blades. Point mutations in Tup1 that specifically affect the Tup1-Matalpha2 interaction cluster on one surface of the propeller. We identified regions of Tup1 that are conserved among the fungal Tup1 homologs and may be important in protein-protein interactions with additional components of the Tup1-mediated repression pathways.

  2. A communication network within the cytoplasmic domain of toll-like receptors has remained conserved during evolution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shikha; Pandey, Kalpana; Rathore, Yogendra S; Sagar, Amin; Pattnaik, U Bharat K; Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain, that is, the cytoplasmic domain, in toll-like receptors (TLRs) from different species showed high sequence conservation in stretches spread across the surface as well as the core of the domain. To probe the structure-function significance of these residues, especially those coming from the core of TIR domains, we analyzed molecular dynamics trajectories of sequence similarity based models of human TIR domains. This study brought forth that N-terminal of the TIR domain simultaneously interacts with the flanking residues of the BB loop and central β-sheets. At the same time, residues of the central β-strands form favorable contacts with the DD loop and C-terminal, thus forming a two-way circuit between the N- and C-termini. In this work, the array of intradomain interactions is termed as communication network. Importantly, the "hubs" of this communication network were found to be conserved in all human TLRs. Earlier mutagenesis-function correlation work brought forth that certain mutations in the "core" of the TIR domain of TLR4 (e.g. in IFI767-769AAA and L815A) led to almost complete abrogation of signaling and reasoning for this dramatic loss-of-function has remained unclear, since these sites are not surface exposed. Using MD studies, we show here that this communication network gets disrupted in mutants of human TLR4 which were earlier reported to be functionally compromised. Extension of MD studies to heterodimer of TLR1/2 suggested that this evolutionarily conserved communication network senses the interactions formed upon dimerization and relays it to surfaces which are not involved in direct interdomain contacts.

  3. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  4. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  5. Conservation and evolution in and among SRF- and MEF2-type MADS domains and their binding sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenwu; Huang, Xiaotai; Cheng, Jian; Li, Zhenggang; de Folter, Stefan; Huang, Zhuoran; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Pang, Hongxia; Tao, Shiheng

    2011-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) and myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) represent two types of members of the MCM1, AGAMOUS, DEFICIENS, and SRF (MADS)-box transcription factor family present in animals and fungi. Each type has distinct biological functions, which are reflected by the distinct specificities of the proteins bound to their cognate DNA-binding sites and activated by their respective cofactors. However, little is known about the evolution of MADS domains and their DNA-binding sites. Here, we report on the conservation and evolution of the two types of MADS domains with their cognate DNA-binding sites by using phylogenetic analyses. First, there are great similarities between the two types of proteins with amino acid positions highly conserved, which are critical for binding to the DNA sequence and for the maintenance of the 3D structure. Second, in contrast to MEF2-type MADS domains, distinct conserved residues are present at some positions in SRF-type MADS domains, determining specificity and the configuration of the MADS domain bound to DNA sequences. Furthermore, the ancestor sequence of SRF- and MEF2-type MADS domains is more similar to MEF2-type MADS domains than to SRF-type MADS domains. In the case of DNA-binding sites, the MEF2 site has a T-rich core in one DNA sequence and an A-rich core in the reverse sequence as compared with the SRF site, no matter whether where either A or T is present in the two complementary sequences. In addition, comparing SRF sites in the human and the mouse genomes reveals that the evolution rate of CArG-boxes is faster in mouse than in human. Moreover, interestingly, a CArG-like sequence, which is probably functionless, could potentially mutate to a functional CArG-box that can be bound by SRF and vice versa. Together, these results significantly improve our knowledge on the conservation and evolution of the MADS domains and their binding sites to date and provide new insights to investigate the MADS family, which is not

  6. Structurally conserved erythrocyte-binding domain in Plasmodium provides a versatile scaffold for alternate receptor engagement

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyk, Jakub; Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Arnott, Alicia; He, Wen-Qiang; Nguitragool, Wang; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Mok, Yee-Foong; Murphy, James M.; Smith, Katherine R.; Lee, Stuart; Bahlo, Melanie; Mueller, Ivo; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how malaria parasites gain entry into human red blood cells is essential for developing strategies to stop blood stage infection. Plasmodium vivax preferentially invades reticulocytes, which are immature red blood cells. The organism has two erythrocyte-binding protein families: namely, the Duffy-binding protein (PvDBP) and the reticulocyte-binding protein (PvRBP) families. Several members of the PvRBP family bind reticulocytes, specifically suggesting a role in mediating host cell selectivity of P. vivax. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution crystal structure of an erythrocyte-binding domain from PvRBP2a, solved at 2.12 Å resolution. The monomeric molecule consists of 10 α-helices and one short β-hairpin, and, although the structural fold is similar to that of PfRh5—the essential invasion ligand in Plasmodium falciparum—its surface properties are distinct and provide a possible mechanism for recognition of alternate receptors. Sequence alignments of the crystallized fragment of PvRBP2a with other PvRBPs highlight the conserved placement of disulfide bonds. PvRBP2a binds mature red blood cells through recognition of an erythrocyte receptor that is neuraminidase- and chymotrypsin-resistant but trypsin-sensitive. By examining the patterns of sequence diversity within field isolates, we have identified and mapped polymorphic residues to the PvRBP2a structure. Using mutagenesis, we have also defined the critical residues required for erythrocyte binding. Characterization of the structural features that govern functional erythrocyte binding for the PvRBP family provides a framework for generating new tools that block P. vivax blood stage infection. PMID:26715754

  7. Phylogenetic Relationships within the Opisthokonta Based on Phylogenomic Analyses of Conserved Single-Copy Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Torruella, Guifré; Derelle, Romain; Paps, Jordi; Lang, B. Franz; Roger, Andrew J.; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2012-01-01

    Many of the eukaryotic phylogenomic analyses published to date were based on alignments of hundreds to thousands of genes. Frequently, in such analyses, the most realistic evolutionary models currently available are often used to minimize the impact of systematic error. However, controversy remains over whether or not idiosyncratic gene family dynamics (i.e., gene duplications and losses) and incorrect orthology assignments are always appropriately taken into account. In this paper, we present an innovative strategy for overcoming orthology assignment problems. Rather than identifying and eliminating genes with paralogy problems, we have constructed a data set comprised exclusively of conserved single-copy protein domains that, unlike most of the commonly used phylogenomic data sets, should be less confounded by orthology miss-assignments. To evaluate the power of this approach, we performed maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses to infer the evolutionary relationships within the opisthokonts (which includes Metazoa, Fungi, and related unicellular lineages). We used this approach to test 1) whether Filasterea and Ichthyosporea form a clade, 2) the interrelationships of early-branching metazoans, and 3) the relationships among early-branching fungi. We also assessed the impact of some methods that are known to minimize systematic error, including reducing the distance between the outgroup and ingroup taxa or using the CAT evolutionary model. Overall, our analyses support the Filozoa hypothesis in which Ichthyosporea are the first holozoan lineage to emerge followed by Filasterea, Choanoflagellata, and Metazoa. Blastocladiomycota appears as a lineage separate from Chytridiomycota, although this result is not strongly supported. These results represent independent tests of previous phylogenetic hypotheses, highlighting the importance of sophisticated approaches for orthology assignment in phylogenomic analyses. PMID:21771718

  8. Functional conservation of cold shock domains in bacteria and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Nakaminami, Kentaro; Karlson, Dale T; Imai, Ryozo

    2006-06-27

    In Escherichia coli, a family of cold shock proteins (CSPs) function as transcription antiterminators or translational enhancers at low temperature by destabilizing RNA secondary structure. A wheat nucleic acid-binding protein (WCSP1) was found to contain a cold shock domain (CSD) bearing high similarity to E. coli cold shock proteins. In the present study, a series of mutations were introduced into WCSP1, and its functionality was investigated by using in vivo and in vitro assays in the context of functional conservation with E. coli CSPs. Constitutive expression of WT WCSP1 in an E. coli cspA, cspB, cspE, cspG quadruple deletion mutant complemented its cold-sensitive phenotype, suggesting that WCSP1 shares a function with E. coli CSPs for cold adaptation. In addition, transcription antitermination activity was demonstrated for WCSP1 by using an E. coli strain that has a hairpin loop upstream of a chloramphenicol resistance gene. In vitro dsDNA melting assays clearly demonstrated that WCSP1 melts dsDNA, an activity that was positively correlated to the ability to bind ssDNA. When mutations were introduced at critical residues within the consensus RNA binding motifs (RNP1 and RNP2) of WCSP1, it failed to melt dsDNA. Studies with WCSP1-GFP fusion proteins documented patterns that are consistent with ER and nuclear localization. In vivo and in vitro functional analyses, coupled with subcellular localization data, suggest that WCSP1 may function as a RNA chaperone to destabilize secondary structure and is involved in the regulation of translation under low temperature.

  9. Functional Characterization of Glycoprotein H Chimeras Composed of Conserved Domains of the Pseudorabies Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Sebastian W.; Backovic, Marija; Klupp, Barbara G.; Rey, Felix A.; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane fusion is indispensable for entry of enveloped viruses into host cells. The conserved core fusion machinery of the Herpesviridae consists of glycoprotein B (gB) and the gH/gL complex. Recently, crystal structures of gH/gL of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and Epstein-Barr virus and of a core fragment of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gH identified four structurally conserved gH domains. To investigate functional conservation, chimeric genes encoding combinations of individual domains of PrV and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) gH were expressed in rabbit kidney cells, and their processing and transport to the cell surface, as well as activity in fusion assays including gB, gD, and gL of PrV or HSV-1, were analyzed. Chimeric gH containing domain I of HSV-1 and domains II to IV of PrV exhibited limited fusion activity in the presence of PrV gB and gD and HSV-1 gL, but not of PrV gL. More strikingly, chimeric gH consisting of PrV domains I to III and HSV-1 domain IV exhibited considerable fusion activity together with PrV gB, gD, and gL. Replacing PrV gB with the HSV-1 protein significantly enhanced this activity. A cell line stably expressing this chimeric gH supported replication of gH-deleted PrV. Our results confirm the specificity of domain I for gL binding, demonstrate functional conservation of domain IV in two alphaherpesviruses from different genera, and indicate species-specific interactions of this domain with gB. They also suggest that gH domains II and III might form a structural and functional unit which does not tolerate major substitutions. IMPORTANCE Envelope glycoprotein H (gH) is essential for herpesvirus-induced membrane fusion, which is required for host cell entry and viral spread. Although gH is structurally conserved within the Herpesviridae, its precise role and its interactions with other components of the viral fusion machinery are not fully understood. Chimeric proteins containing domains of gH proteins from different

  10. Functional Characterization of Glycoprotein H Chimeras Composed of Conserved Domains of the Pseudorabies Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Homologs.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Sebastian W; Backovic, Marija; Klupp, Barbara G; Rey, Felix A; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-10-21

    Membrane fusion is indispensable for entry of enveloped viruses into host cells. The conserved core fusion machinery of the Herpesviridae consists of glycoprotein B (gB) and the gH/gL complex. Recently, crystal structures of gH/gL of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and Epstein-Barr virus and of a core fragment of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gH identified four structurally conserved gH domains. To investigate functional conservation, chimeric genes encoding combinations of individual domains of PrV and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) gH were expressed in rabbit kidney cells, and their processing and transport to the cell surface, as well as activity in fusion assays including gB, gD, and gL of PrV or HSV-1, were analyzed. Chimeric gH containing domain I of HSV-1 and domains II to IV of PrV exhibited limited fusion activity in the presence of PrV gB and gD and HSV-1 gL, but not of PrV gL. More strikingly, chimeric gH consisting of PrV domains I to III and HSV-1 domain IV exhibited considerable fusion activity together with PrV gB, gD, and gL. Replacing PrV gB with the HSV-1 protein significantly enhanced this activity. A cell line stably expressing this chimeric gH supported replication of gH-deleted PrV. Our results confirm the specificity of domain I for gL binding, demonstrate functional conservation of domain IV in two alphaherpesviruses from different genera, and indicate species-specific interactions of this domain with gB. They also suggest that gH domains II and III might form a structural and functional unit which does not tolerate major substitutions. Envelope glycoprotein H (gH) is essential for herpesvirus-induced membrane fusion, which is required for host cell entry and viral spread. Although gH is structurally conserved within the Herpesviridae, its precise role and its interactions with other components of the viral fusion machinery are not fully understood. Chimeric proteins containing domains of gH proteins from different herpesviruses can serve as tools

  11. Tracing the origin of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome: implications for protein evolution at the modular level

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Lipika R; Guda, Chittibabu

    2006-01-01

    Background The functional repertoire of the human proteome is an incremental collection of functions accomplished by protein domains evolved along the Homo sapiens lineage. Therefore, knowledge on the origin of these functionalities provides a better understanding of the domain and protein evolution in human. The lack of proper comprehension about such origin has impelled us to study the evolutionary origin of human proteome in a unique way as detailed in this study. Results This study reports a unique approach for understanding the evolution of human proteome by tracing the origin of its constituting domains hierarchically, along the Homo sapiens lineage. The uniqueness of this method lies in subtractive searching of functional and conserved domains in the human proteome resulting in higher efficiency of detecting their origins. From these analyses the nature of protein evolution and trends in domain evolution can be observed in the context of the entire human proteome data. The method adopted here also helps delineate the degree of divergence of functional families occurred during the course of evolution. Conclusion This approach to trace the evolutionary origin of functional domains in the human proteome facilitates better understanding of their functional versatility as well as provides insights into the functionality of hypothetical proteins present in the human proteome. This work elucidates the origin of functional and conserved domains in human proteins, their distribution along the Homo sapiens lineage, occurrence frequency of different domain combinations and proteome-wide patterns of their distribution, providing insights into the evolutionary solution to the increased complexity of the human proteome. PMID:17090320

  12. Nuclear localization and transactivation by Vitis CBF transcription factors are regulated by combinations of conserved amino acid domains.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Chevonne E; Faultless, J Trent; Lee, Christine; Siddiqua, Mahbuba; Edge, Alison; Nassuth, Annette

    2017-09-01

    The highly conserved CBF pathway is crucial in the regulation of plant responses to low temperatures. Extensive analysis of Arabidopsis CBF proteins revealed that their functions rely on several conserved amino acid domains although the exact function of each domain is disputed. The question was what functions similar domains have in CBFs from other, overwintering woody plants such as Vitis, which likely have a more involved regulation than the model plant Arabidopsis. A total of seven CBF genes were cloned and sequenced from V. riparia and the less frost tolerant V. vinifera. The deduced species-specific amino acid sequences differ in only a few amino acids, mostly in non-conserved regions. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed two distinct groups of Vitis CBFs. One group contains CBF1, CBF2, CBF3 and CBF8 and the other group contains CBF4, CBF5 and CBF6. Transient transactivation assays showed that all Vitis CBFs except CBF5 activate via a CRT or DRE promoter element, whereby Vitis CBF3 and 4 prefer a CRT element. The hydrophobic domains in the C-terminal end of VrCBF6 were shown to be important for how well it activates. The putative nuclear localization domain of Vitis CBF1 was shown to be sufficient for nuclear localization, in contrast to previous reports for AtCBF1, and also important for transactivation. The latter highlights the value of careful analysis of domain functions instead of reliance on computer predictions and published data for other related proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus domain V functions in Escherichia coli ribosomes provided a conserved interaction with domain IV is restored.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Tapprich, W E; Munger, C; Dahlberg, A E

    2001-01-01

    Domain V of Escherichia coli 23 S rRNA (residues 2023-2630) was replaced by that from Staphylococcus aureus, thereby introducing 132 changes in the rRNA sequence. The resulting ribosomal mutant was unable to support cell growth. The mutant was rescued, however, by restoring an interaction between domains IV and V (residues 1782 and 2586). Although the importance of this interaction, U/U in E. coli, C/C in S. aureus, is therefore demonstrated, it cannot be the only tertiary interaction important for ribosomal function as the rescued hybrid grew more slowly than the wild type. Additionally, although the single-site mutations U1782C and U2586C in E. coli are viable, the double mutant is lethal. PMID:11497427

  15. Importance of Conserved Residues of the Serine Protease Autotransporter β-Domain in Passenger Domain Processing and β-Barrel Assembly ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yihfen T.; Tsang, Casey; Cameron, Todd A.; Ankrah, Dennis O.; Rodou, Athina; Stathopoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Serine protease autotransporters of the family Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) comprise a family of virulence proteins secreted by enteric Gram-negative bacteria via the autotransporter secretion pathway. A SPATE polypeptide contains a C-terminal translocator domain that inserts into the bacterial outer membrane as a β-barrel structure and mediates secretion of the passenger domain to the extracellular environment. In the present study, we examined the role of conserved residues located in the SPATE β-barrel-forming region in passenger domain secretion. Thirty-nine fully conserved residues in Tsh were mutated by single-residue substitution, and defects in their secretion phenotypes were assessed by cell fractionation and immunochemistry. A total of 22 single mutants exhibited abnormal phenotypes in different cellular compartments. Most mutants affecting secretion are charged residues with side chains pointing into the β-barrel interior. Seven mutants showed notable abnormalities in processing (constructs with the E1231A, E1249A, and R1374A mutations) and β-barrel assembly or insertion into the outer membrane (constructs with the G1158Y, F1360A, Y1375A, and F1377A mutations). The phenotypes of the β-barrel assembly/insertion mutants and the presence of a processed Tsh passenger domain in the periplasm support the possibility that the translocator domain must undergo extensive folding prior to insertion into the outer membrane. Results from double-mutation experiments further demonstrate that F1360 and F1377 affect β-barrel insertion/assembly at different times. In light of these new data, a more refined model for the mechanism of SPATE secretion is presented. PMID:20515934

  16. Functional analysis of conserved aromatic amino acids in the discoidin domain of Paenibacillus β-1,3-glucanase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The 190-kDa Paenibacillus β-1,3-glucanase (LamA) contains a catalytic module of the glycoside hydrolase family 16 (GH16) and several auxiliary domains. Of these, a discoidin domain (DS domain), present in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins with a wide variety of functions, exists at the carboxyl-terminus. To better understand the bacterial DS domain in terms of its structure and function, this domain alone was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. The results indicate that the DS domain binds various polysaccharides and enhances the biological activity of the GH16 module on composite substrates. We also investigated the importance of several conserved aromatic residues in the domain's stability and substrate-binding affinity. Both were affected by mutations of these residues; however, the effect on protein stability was more notable. In particular, the forces contributed by a sandwiched triad (W1688, R1756, and W1729) were critical for the presumable β-sandwich fold. PMID:19930717

  17. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic, Mirjana; Quezada, Cindy M.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2010-06-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella InvA shares homology to a recurring scaffold in the membrane-spanning components of the type II and type III secretion systems. Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  18. Domains in microbial beta-1, 4-glycanases: sequence conservation, function, and enzyme families.

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, N R; Henrissat, B; Kilburn, D G; Miller, R C; Warren, R A

    1991-01-01

    Several types of domain occur in beta-1, 4-glycanases. The best characterized of these are the catalytic domains and the cellulose-binding domains. The domains may be joined by linker sequences rich in proline or hydroxyamino acids or both. Some of the enzymes contain repeated sequences up to 150 amino acids in length. The enzymes can be grouped into families on the basis of sequence similarities between the catalytic domains. There are sequence similarities between the cellulose-binding domains, of which two types have been identified, and also between some domains of unknown function. The beta-1, 4-glycanases appear to have arisen by the shuffling of a relatively small number of progenitor sequences. PMID:1886523

  19. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting in a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.

  20. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting inmore » a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.« less

  1. Conserved gene regulatory function of the carboxy-terminal domain of dictyostelid C-module-binding factor.

    PubMed

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot; Winckler, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution.

  2. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  3. Nephrocystin-conserved domains involved in targeting to epithelial cell-cell junctions, interaction with filamins, and establishing cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, John C; Dise, Rebecca S; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Hanks, Steven K

    2002-08-09

    Nephrocystin is the protein product of the gene mutated in juvenile nephronophthisis, an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease afflicting children and young adults. Because the normal cellular function of nephrocystin is largely unknown, the molecular defects underlying disease pathogenesis remain obscure. Analysis of nephrocystin amino acid sequences from human and other species revealed three distinct conserved domains including Src homology 3 and coil-coil domains in the N-terminal region, as well as a large highly conserved C-terminal region bearing no obvious homology to other proteins and hence referred to as the "nephrocystin homology domain" (NHD). The objective of this study was to gain insight into nephrocystin function by defining functional properties of the conserved domains. We analyzed a series of nephrocystin deletion mutants expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney and COS-7 cells. This analysis revealed previously unrecognized functional attributes of the NHD, including abilities to promote both self-association and epithelial cell-cell junctional targeting. We further observed that Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines stably expressing a nephrocystin mutant with a deletion of the Src homology 3 domain have reduced ability to establish tight junctions as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Finally, from a two-hybrid screen and coimmunoprecipitation studies we identified members of the filamin family of actin-binding proteins as having the capacity to interact with the NHD. These findings support a functional role for nephrocystin as a docking protein involved in organizing a protein complex to regulate the actin cytoskeleton at sites of epithelial cell-cell adhesion and further suggest that these properties are important for establishing epithelial cell polarity.

  4. The conserved carboxyl domain of MorC, an inner membrane protein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is essential for membrane function.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Voogt, R D; Ruiz, T; Mintz, K P

    2016-02-01

    Morphogenesis protein C (MorC) of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is important for maintaining the membrane morphology and integrity of the cell envelope of this oral pathogen. The MorC sequence and operon organization were found to be conserved in Gammaproteobacteria, based on a bioinformatic analysis of 435 sequences from representative organisms. Functional conservation of MorC was investigated using an A. actinomycetemcomitans morC mutant as a model system to express MorC homologs from four phylogenetically diverse representatives of the Gammaproteobacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Moraxella catarrhalis. The A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressing the homologous proteins were assessed for sensitivity to bile salts, leukotoxin secretion, autoaggregation and membrane morphology. MorC from the most closely related organism (H. influenzae) was functionally identical to MorC from A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the genes from more distantly related organisms restored some but not all A. actinomycetemcomitans mutant phenotypes. In addition, deletion mutagenesis indicated that the most conserved portion of the protein, the C-terminus DUF490 domain, was necessary to maintain the integrity of the membrane. Deletion of the last 10 amino acids of this domain of the A. actinomycetemcomitans MorC protein was sufficient to disrupt membrane stability and leukotoxin secretion. The data suggest that the MorC sequence is functionally conserved across Gammaproteobacteria and the C-terminus of the protein is essential for maintaining membrane physiology.

  5. Climate-induced change of environmentally defined floristic domains: A conservation based vulnerability framework

    Treesearch

    Debbie Jewitt; Barend F.N. Erasmus; Peter S. Goodman; Timothy G. O' Connor; William W. Hargrove; Damian M. Maddalena; Ed. T.F. Witkowski

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change is having marked influences on species distributions, phenology and ecosystem composition and raises questions as to the effectiveness of current conservation strategies. Conservation planning has only recently begun to adequately account for dynamic threats such as climate change. We propose a method to incorporate climate-dynamic environmental...

  6. NovelFam3000 – Uncharacterized human protein domains conserved across model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Kemmer, Danielle; Podowski, Raf M; Arenillas, David; Lim, Jonathan; Hodges, Emily; Roth, Peggy; Sonnhammer, Erik LL; Höög, Christer; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite significant efforts from the research community, an extensive portion of the proteins encoded by human genes lack an assigned cellular function. Most metazoan proteins are composed of structural and/or functional domains, of which many appear in multiple proteins. Once a domain is characterized in one protein, the presence of a similar sequence in an uncharacterized protein serves as a basis for inference of function. Thus knowledge of a domain's function, or the protein within which it arises, can facilitate the analysis of an entire set of proteins. Description From the Pfam domain database, we extracted uncharacterized protein domains represented in proteins from humans, worms, and flies. A data centre was created to facilitate the analysis of the uncharacterized domain-containing proteins. The centre both provides researchers with links to dispersed internet resources containing gene-specific experimental data and enables them to post relevant experimental results or comments. For each human gene in the system, a characterization score is posted, allowing users to track the progress of characterization over time or to identify for study uncharacterized domains in well-characterized genes. As a test of the system, a subset of 39 domains was selected for analysis and the experimental results posted to the NovelFam3000 system. For 25 human protein members of these 39 domain families, detailed sub-cellular localizations were determined. Specific observations are presented based on the analysis of the integrated information provided through the online NovelFam3000 system. Conclusion Consistent experimental results between multiple members of a domain family allow for inferences of the domain's functional role. We unite bioinformatics resources and experimental data in order to accelerate the functional characterization of scarcely annotated domain families. PMID:16533400

  7. A conserved inter-domain communication mechanism regulates the ATPase activity of the AAA-protein Drg1

    PubMed Central

    Prattes, Michael; Loibl, Mathias; Zisser, Gertrude; Luschnig, Daniel; Kappel, Lisa; Rössler, Ingrid; Grassegger, Manuela; Hromic, Altijana; Krieger, Elmar; Gruber, Karl; Pertschy, Brigitte; Bergler, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    AAA-ATPases fulfil essential roles in different cellular pathways and often act in form of hexameric complexes. Interaction with pathway-specific substrate and adaptor proteins recruits them to their targets and modulates their catalytic activity. This substrate dependent regulation of ATP hydrolysis in the AAA-domains is mediated by a non-catalytic N-terminal domain. The exact mechanisms that transmit the signal from the N-domain and coordinate the individual AAA-domains in the hexameric complex are still the topic of intensive research. Here, we present the characterization of a novel mutant variant of the eukaryotic AAA-ATPase Drg1 that shows dysregulation of ATPase activity and altered interaction with Rlp24, its substrate in ribosome biogenesis. This defective regulation is the consequence of amino acid exchanges at the interface between the regulatory N-domain and the adjacent D1 AAA-domain. The effects caused by these mutations strongly resemble those of pathological mutations of the AAA-ATPase p97 which cause the hereditary proteinopathy IBMPFD (inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget’s disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia). Our results therefore suggest well conserved mechanisms of regulation between structurally, but not functionally related members of the AAA-family. PMID:28303975

  8. A conserved inter-domain communication mechanism regulates the ATPase activity of the AAA-protein Drg1.

    PubMed

    Prattes, Michael; Loibl, Mathias; Zisser, Gertrude; Luschnig, Daniel; Kappel, Lisa; Rössler, Ingrid; Grassegger, Manuela; Hromic, Altijana; Krieger, Elmar; Gruber, Karl; Pertschy, Brigitte; Bergler, Helmut

    2017-03-17

    AAA-ATPases fulfil essential roles in different cellular pathways and often act in form of hexameric complexes. Interaction with pathway-specific substrate and adaptor proteins recruits them to their targets and modulates their catalytic activity. This substrate dependent regulation of ATP hydrolysis in the AAA-domains is mediated by a non-catalytic N-terminal domain. The exact mechanisms that transmit the signal from the N-domain and coordinate the individual AAA-domains in the hexameric complex are still the topic of intensive research. Here, we present the characterization of a novel mutant variant of the eukaryotic AAA-ATPase Drg1 that shows dysregulation of ATPase activity and altered interaction with Rlp24, its substrate in ribosome biogenesis. This defective regulation is the consequence of amino acid exchanges at the interface between the regulatory N-domain and the adjacent D1 AAA-domain. The effects caused by these mutations strongly resemble those of pathological mutations of the AAA-ATPase p97 which cause the hereditary proteinopathy IBMPFD (inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia). Our results therefore suggest well conserved mechanisms of regulation between structurally, but not functionally related members of the AAA-family.

  9. Sequence and domain conservation of the coelacanth Hsp40 and Hsp90 chaperones suggests conservation of function.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Özlem Tastan; Edkins, Adrienne Lesley; Blatch, Gregory Lloyd

    2014-09-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones play an important role in preserving and regulating the active conformational state of cellular proteins. The chaperone complement of the Indonesian Coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis, was elucidated using transcriptomic sequences. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40) chaperones, and associated co-chaperones were focused on, and homologous human sequences were used to search the sequence databases. Coelacanth homologs of the cytosolic, mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of human Hsp90 were identified, as well as all of the major co-chaperones of the cytosolic isoform. Most of the human Hsp40s were found to have coelacanth homologs, and the data suggested that all of the chaperone machinery for protein folding at the ribosome, protein translocation to cellular compartments such as the ER and protein degradation were conserved. Some interesting similarities and differences were identified when interrogating human, mouse, and zebrafish homologs. For example, DnaJB13 is predicted to be a non-functional Hsp40 in humans, mouse, and zebrafish due to a corrupted histidine-proline-aspartic acid (HPD) motif, while the coelacanth homolog has an intact HPD. These and other comparisons enabled important functional and evolutionary questions to be posed for future experimental studies.

  10. Conserved central domains control the quaternary structure of Type I and Type II Hsp40 molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Carlos H.I.; Oliveira, Cristiano L.P.; Yang-Fan, Chung; Torriani, Iris L.; Cyr, Douglas M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Hsp40s play an essential role in protein metabolism by regulating the polypeptide binding and release cycle of Hsp70. The Hsp40 family is large and specialized family members direct Hsp70 to perform highly specific tasks. Type I and Type II Hsp40s, such as yeast Ydj1 and Sis1, are homodimers that dictate functions of cytosolic Hsp70, but how they do so is unclear. Type I Hsp40s contain a conserved centrally located Cysteine-rich domain that is replaced by a Glycine and Methionine rich region in Type II Hsp40s, but the mechanism by which these unique domains influence Hsp40 structure and function is unknown. This is the case because high-resolution structures of full-length forms of these Hsp40s have not been solved. To fill this void we built low-resolution models of the quaternary structure of Ydj1 and Sis1 with information obtained from biophysical measurements of protein shape, small angle X-ray scattering and ab initio protein modeling. Low resolution models were also calculated for the chimeric Hsp40s YSY and SYS, in which the central domains of Ydj1 and Sis1 were exchanged. Similar to their human homologs, Ydj1 and Sis1 each has a unique shape with major structural differences apparently being the orientation of the J-domains relative to the long axis of the dimers. Central domain swapping in YSY and SYS correlates with the switched ability of YSY and SYS to perform unique functions of Sis1 and Ydj1, respectively. Models for the mechanism by which the conserved Cysteine-rich domain and Glycine and Methionine rich region confer structural and functional specificity to Type I and Type II Hsp40s are discussed. PMID:18723025

  11. Conserved tertiary couplings stabilize elements in the PDZ fold, leading to characteristic patterns of domain conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ho, Bosco K; Agard, David A

    2010-03-01

    Single-domain allostery has been postulated to occur through intramolecular pathways of signaling within a protein structure. We had previously investigated these pathways by introducing a local thermal perturbation and analyzed the anisotropic propagation of structural changes throughout the protein. Here, we develop an improved approach, the Rotamerically Induced Perturbation (RIP), that identifies strong couplings between residues by analyzing the pathways of heat-flow resulting from thermal excitation of rotameric rotations at individual residues. To explore the nature of these couplings, we calculate the complete coupling maps of 5 different PDZ domains. Although the PDZ domain is a well conserved structural fold that serves as a scaffold in many protein-protein complexes, different PDZ domains display unique patterns of conformational flexibility in response to ligand binding: some show a significant shift in a set of alpha-helices, while others do not. Analysis of the coupling maps suggests a simple relationship between the computed couplings and observed conformational flexibility. In domains where the alpha-helices are rigid, we find couplings of the alpha-helices to the body of the protein, whereas in domains having ligand-responsive alpha-helices, no couplings are found. This leads to a model where the alpha-helices are intrinsically dynamic but can be damped if sidechains interact at key tertiary contacts. These tertiary contacts correlate to high covariation contacts as identified by the statistical coupling analysis method. As these dynamic modules are exploited by various allosteric mechanisms, these tertiary contacts have been conserved by evolution.

  12. An adjoint method for a high-order discretization of deforming domain conservation laws for optimization of flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahr, M. J.; Persson, P.-O.

    2016-12-01

    The fully discrete adjoint equations and the corresponding adjoint method are derived for a globally high-order accurate discretization of conservation laws on parametrized, deforming domains. The conservation law on the deforming domain is transformed into one on a fixed reference domain by the introduction of a time-dependent mapping that encapsulates the domain deformation and parametrization, resulting in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian form of the governing equations. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method is used to discretize the transformed equation in space and a high-order diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for the temporal discretization. Quantities of interest that take the form of space-time integrals are discretized in a solver-consistent manner. The corresponding fully discrete adjoint method is used to compute exact gradients of quantities of interest along the manifold of solutions of the fully discrete conservation law. These quantities of interest and their gradients are used in the context of gradient-based PDE-constrained optimization. The adjoint method is used to solve two optimal shape and control problems governed by the isentropic, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The first optimization problem seeks the energetically optimal trajectory of a 2D airfoil given a required initial and final spatial position. The optimization solver, driven by gradients computed via the adjoint method, reduced the total energy required to complete the specified mission nearly an order of magnitude. The second optimization problem seeks the energetically optimal flapping motion and time-morphed geometry of a 2D airfoil given an equality constraint on the x-directed impulse generated on the airfoil. The optimization solver satisfied the impulse constraint to greater than 8 digits of accuracy and reduced the required energy between a factor of 2 and 10, depending on the value of the impulse constraint, as compared to the nominal configuration.

  13. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body.

    PubMed

    Lilic, Mirjana; Quezada, Cindy M; Stebbins, C Erec

    2010-06-01

    Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  14. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body

    PubMed Central

    Lilic, Mirjana; Quezada, Cindy M.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2010-01-01

    Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-­terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events. PMID:20516623

  15. A Conserved Domain in Type III Secretion Links the Cytoplasmic Domain of InvA to Elements of the Basal Body

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic, M.; Quezada, C; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  16. A conserved interaction between the SDI domain of Bre2 and the Dpy-30 domain of Sdc1 is required for histone methylation and gene expression.

    PubMed

    South, Paul F; Fingerman, Ian M; Mersman, Douglas P; Du, Hai-Ning; Briggs, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4) is methylated by the Set1 complex (Set1C or COMPASS). Besides the catalytic Set1 subunit, several proteins that form the Set1C (Swd1, Swd2, Swd3, Spp1, Bre2, and Sdc1) are also needed to mediate proper H3K4 methylation. Until this study, it has been unclear how individual Set1C members interact and how this interaction may impact histone methylation and gene expression. In this study, Bre2 and Sdc1 are shown to directly interact, and it is shown that the association of this heteromeric complex is needed for proper H3K4 methylation and gene expression to occur. Interestingly, mutational and biochemical analysis identified the C terminus of Bre2 as a critical protein-protein interaction domain that binds to the Dpy-30 domain of Sdc1. Using the human homologs of Bre2 and Sdc1, ASH2L and DPY-30, respectively, we demonstrate that the C terminus of ASH2L also interacts with the Dpy-30 domain of DPY-30, suggesting that this protein-protein interaction is maintained from yeast to humans. Because of the functionally conserved nature of the C terminus of Bre2 and ASH2L, this region was named the SDI (Sdc1 Dpy-30 interaction) domain. Finally, we show that the SDI-Dpy-30 domain interaction is physiologically important for the function of Set1 in vivo, because specific disruption of this interaction prevents Bre2 and Sdc1 association with Set1, resulting in H3K4 methylation defects and decreases in gene expression. Overall, these and other mechanistic studies on how H3K4 methyltransferase complexes function will likely provide insights into how human MLL and SET1-like complexes or overexpression of ASH2L leads to oncogenesis.

  17. Towards the definition of a chimpanzee and human conserved CD6 domain 1 epitope recognized by T1 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruby; Huerta, Vivian; de Leon, Joel; Piedra, Patricia; Puchades, Yaquelin; Guirola, Osmany; Chinea, Glay; Montero, Enrique

    2008-08-01

    Scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains are evolutionally conserved modules that display complex structures stabilized by key amino acids, while some other residues have evolved with a relative independence, thus allowing the functional diversity of these receptors. CD6, a highly glycosylated membrane protein predominantly expressed on lymphocytes, contains three SRCR domains. The lack of CD6 domain crystal structure has limited the characterization of the binding sites for the interacting molecules. The interaction between CD6 and its ligand, activated leukocyte-cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM)/CD166, through the membrane-proximal SRCR3 domain, has low affinity and involves conserved sites in both molecules mediating a cross-species binding. The CD6-ALCAM interaction has been involved in cell adhesion, maturation, regulation of activation, and survival processes, suggesting the potential relevance of this target for therapeutic interventions. Several anti-CD6 monoclonal antibodies (MAb) have been described but their affinity and epitope definition remain unclear. We found the murine and humanized T1 MAb versions have similar CD6 recognition profiles and affinity constants of about 6 x 10(8). These antibodies do not block the CD6-ALCAM interaction and recognize a conformational epitope independent of the CD6 N-glycosylation. This epitope was additionally found in the chimpanzee and contains an RXE/Q consensus motif located in the membrane-distal SRCR1. These results, together with the therapeutic evidence previously obtained with these MAbs, suggest a differential contribution of CD6 domains to lymphocyte biology. Potential mechanisms for T1 MAb therapeutic effect different from CD6-CD166 interaction blocking would be dissected.

  18. Conserved themes in target recognition by the PAH1 and PAH2 domains of the Sin3 transcriptional corepressor.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sarata C; Swanson, Kurt A; Kang, Richard S; Huang, Kai; Brubaker, Kurt; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar

    2008-02-01

    The recruitment of chromatin-modifying coregulator complexes by transcription factors to specific sites of the genome constitutes an important step in many eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory pathways. The histone deacetylase-associated Sin3 corepressor complex is recruited by a large and diverse array of transcription factors through direct interactions with the N-terminal PAH domains of Sin3. Here, we describe the solution structures of the mSin3A PAH1 domain in the apo form and when bound to SAP25, a component of the corepressor complex. Unlike the apo-mSin3A PAH2 domain, the apo-PAH1 domain is conformationally pure and is largely, but not completely, folded. Portions of the interacting segments of both mSin3A PAH1 and SAP25 undergo folding upon complex formation. SAP25 binds through an amphipathic helix to a predominantly hydrophobic cleft on the surface of PAH1. Remarkably, the orientation of the helix is reversed compared to that adopted by NRSF, a transcription factor unrelated to SAP25, upon binding to the mSin3B PAH1 domain. The reversal in helical orientations is correlated with a reversal in the underlying PAH1-interaction motifs, echoing a theme previously described for the mSin3A PAH2 domain. The definition of these so-called type I and type II PAH1-interaction motifs has allowed us to predict the precise location of these motifs within previously experimentally characterized PAH1 binders. Finally, we explore the specificity determinants of protein-protein interactions involving the PAH1 and PAH2 domains. These studies reveal that even conservative replacements of PAH2 residues with equivalent PAH1 residues are sufficient to alter the affinity and specificity of these protein-protein interactions dramatically.

  19. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  20. Structure and function of the SWIRM domain, a conserved protein module found in chromatin regulatory complexes.

    PubMed

    Da, Guoping; Lenkart, Jeffrey; Zhao, Kehao; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Cairns, Bradley R; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2006-02-14

    The SWIRM domain is a module found in the Swi3 and Rsc8 subunits of SWI/SNF-family chromatin remodeling complexes, and the Ada2 and BHC110/LSD1 subunits of chromatin modification complexes. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the SWIRM domain from Swi3 and characterize the in vitro and in vivo function of the SWIRM domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi3 and Rsc8. The Swi3 SWIRM forms a four-helix bundle containing a pseudo 2-fold axis and a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. We show that the Swi3 SWIRM binds free DNA and mononucleosomes with high and comparable affinity and that a subset of Swi3 substitution mutants that display growth defects in vivo also show impaired DNA-binding activity in vitro, consistent with a nucleosome targeting function of this domain. Genetic and biochemical studies also reveal that the Rsc8 and Swi3 SWIRM domains are essential for the proper assembly and in vivo functions of their respective complexes. Together, these studies identify the SWIRM domain as an essential multifunctional module for the regulation of gene expression.

  1. Structure and Function of the SWIRM Domain, a Conserved Protein Module Found in Chromatin Regulatory Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Da,G.; Lenkart, J.; Zhao, K.; Shiekhattar, R.; Cairns, B.; Marmorstein, R.

    2006-01-01

    The SWIRM domain is a module found in the Swi3 and Rsc8 subunits of SWI/SNF-family chromatin remodeling complexes, and the Ada2 and BHC110/LSD1 subunits of chromatin modification complexes. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the SWIRM domain from Swi3 and characterize the in vitro and in vivo function of the SWIRM domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi3 and Rsc8. The Swi3 SWIRM forms a four-helix bundle containing a pseudo 2-fold axis and a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. We show that the Swi3 SWIRM binds free DNA and mononucleosomes with high and comparable affinity and that a subset of Swi3 substitution mutants that display growth defects in vivo also show impaired DNA-binding activity in vitro, consistent with a nucleosome targeting function of this domain. Genetic and biochemical studies also reveal that the Rsc8 and Swi3 SWIRM domains are essential for the proper assembly and in vivo functions of their respective complexes. Together, these studies identify the SWIRM domain as an essential multifunctional module for the regulation of gene expression.

  2. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  3. Conserved Lysine Acetylation within the Microtubule-Binding Domain Regulates MAP2/Tau Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Andrew W.; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Friedmann, Dave; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Marmorstein, Ronen; Lee, Virginia M. Y.; Cohen, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM) regulating tau proteins in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule-binding region (MTBR), a region that is highly conserved among tau, MAP2, and MAP4 family members, implying that acetylation could represent a conserved regulatory mechanism for MAPs beyond tau. Here, we combined mass spectrometry, biochemical assays, and cell-based approaches to demonstrate that the tau family members MAP2 and MAP4 are also subject to reversible acetylation. We identify a cluster of lysines in the MAP2 and MAP4 MTBR that undergo CBP-catalyzed acetylation, many of which are conserved in tau. Similar to tau, MAP2 acetylation can occur in a cysteine-dependent auto-regulatory manner in the presence of acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, tubulin reduced MAP2 acetylation, suggesting tubulin binding dictates MAP acetylation status. Taken together, these results uncover a striking conservation of MAP2/Tau family post-translational modifications that could expand our understanding of the dynamic mechanisms regulating microtubules. PMID:28002468

  4. Conserved Lysine Acetylation within the Microtubule-Binding Domain Regulates MAP2/Tau Family Members.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Andrew W; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Friedmann, Dave; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Marmorstein, Ronen; Lee, Virginia M Y; Cohen, Todd J

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM) regulating tau proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule-binding region (MTBR), a region that is highly conserved among tau, MAP2, and MAP4 family members, implying that acetylation could represent a conserved regulatory mechanism for MAPs beyond tau. Here, we combined mass spectrometry, biochemical assays, and cell-based approaches to demonstrate that the tau family members MAP2 and MAP4 are also subject to reversible acetylation. We identify a cluster of lysines in the MAP2 and MAP4 MTBR that undergo CBP-catalyzed acetylation, many of which are conserved in tau. Similar to tau, MAP2 acetylation can occur in a cysteine-dependent auto-regulatory manner in the presence of acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, tubulin reduced MAP2 acetylation, suggesting tubulin binding dictates MAP acetylation status. Taken together, these results uncover a striking conservation of MAP2/Tau family post-translational modifications that could expand our understanding of the dynamic mechanisms regulating microtubules.

  5. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5′-NNCCAC-3′ and 5′-GCGMGN′N′-3′ (M:A or C; N and N′ form Watson–Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:23709277

  6. Staphylococcus aureus protein A activates TNFR1 signaling through conserved IgG binding domains.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Marisa I; O'Seaghdha, Maghnus; Magargee, Mariah; Foster, Timothy J; Prince, Alice S

    2006-07-21

    Staphylococcus aureus continues to be a major cause of infection in normal as well as immunocompromised hosts, and the increasing prevalence of highly virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant strains is a public health concern. A highly expressed surface component of S. aureus, protein A (SpA), contributes to its success as a pathogen by both activating inflammation and by interfering with immune clearance. SpA is known to bind to IgG Fc, which impedes phagocytosis. SpA is also a potent activator of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling, inducing both chemokine expression and TNF-converting enzyme-dependent soluble TNFR1 (sTNFR1) shedding, which has anti-inflammatory consequences, particularly in the lung. Using a collection of glutathione S-transferase fusions to the intact IgG binding region of SpA and to each of the individual binding domains, we found that the SpA IgG binding domains also mediate binding to human airway cells. TNFR1-dependent CXCL8 production could be elicited by any one of the individual SpA IgG binding domains as efficiently as by either the entire SpA or the intact IgG binding region. SpA induction of sTNFR1 shedding required the entire IgG binding region and tolerated fewer substitutions in residues known to interact with IgG. Each of the repeated domains of the IgG binding domain can affect multiple immune responses independently, activating inflammation through TNFR1 and thwarting opsonization by trapping IgG Fc domains, while the intact IgG binding region can limit further signaling through sTNFR1 shedding.

  7. DNA secondary structure formation by DNA shuffling of the conserved domains of the Cry protein of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Efrain H; Sierra, Daniel A; Suarez, Miguel O; Orduz, Sergio; Florez, Alvaro M

    2017-01-01

    The Cry toxins, or δ-endotoxins, are a diverse group of proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis. While DNA secondary structures are biologically relevant, it is unknown if such structures are formed in regions encoding conserved domains of Cry toxins under shuffling conditions. We analyzed 5 holotypes that encode Cry toxins and that grouped into 4 clusters according to their phylogenetic closeness. The mean number of DNA secondary structures that formed and the mean Gibbs free energy [Formula: see text] were determined by an in silico analysis using different experimental DNA shuffling scenarios. In terms of spontaneity, shuffling efficiency was directly proportional to the formation of secondary structures but inversely proportional to ∆G. The results showed a shared thermodynamic pattern for each cluster and relationships among sequences that are phylogenetically close at the protein level. The regions of the cry11Aa, Ba and Bb genes that encode domain I showed more spontaneity and thus a greater tendency to form secondary structures (<∆G). In the region of domain III; this tendency was lower (>∆G) in the cry11Ba and Bb genes. Proteins that are phylogenetically closer to Cry11Ba and Cry11Bb, such as Cry2Aa and Cry18Aa, maintained the same thermodynamic pattern. More distant proteins, such as Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry30Aa and Cry30Ca, featured different thermodynamic patterns in their DNA. These results suggest the presence of thermodynamic variations associated to the formation of secondary structures and an evolutionary relationship with regions that encode highly conserved domains in Cry proteins. The findings of this study may have a role in the in silico design of cry gene assembly by DNA shuffling techniques.

  8. Rapid Degradation of Auxin/Indoleacetic Acid Proteins Requires Conserved Amino Acids of Domain II and Is Proteasome Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jason A.; Zenser, Nathan; Leyser, Ottoline; Callis, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Auxin rapidly induces auxin/indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcription. The proteins encoded are short-lived nucleus-localized transcriptional regulators that share four conserved domains. In a transient assay measuring protein accumulation, an Aux/IAA 13–amino acid domain II consensus sequence was sufficient to target firefly luciferase (LUC) for low protein accumulation equivalent to that observed previously for full-length PSIAA6. Single amino acid substitutions in these 13 amino acids, corresponding to known auxin response mutants, resulted in a sixfold to 20-fold increase in protein accumulation. Naturally occurring variant amino acids had no effect. Residues identified as essential by single alanine substitutions were not sufficient when all flanking amino acids were alanine, indicating the importance of flanking regions. Using direct protein degradation measurements in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings, full-length IAA1, PSIAA6, and the N-terminal 73 PSIAA6 amino acids targeted LUC for rapid degradation with 8-min half-lives. The C-terminal 109 amino acids did not affect LUC half-life. Smaller regions containing domain II also targeted LUC for rapid degradation, but the rates were not equivalent to those of the full-length protein. A single domain II substitution in the context of full-length PSIAA6 increased half-life 30-fold. Proteasome inhibitors affected Aux/IAA::LUC fusion protein accumulation, demonstrating the involvement of the proteasome. PMID:11595806

  9. Conserved interaction between distinct Krüppel-associated box domains and the transcriptional intermediary factor 1 β

    PubMed Central

    Abrink, Magnus; Ortiz, José A.; Mark, Charlotta; Sanchez, Cecilia; Looman, Camilla; Hellman, Lars; Chambon, Pierre; Losson, Régine

    2001-01-01

    The Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain, originally identified as a 75-aa sequence present in numerous Krüppel-type zinc-finger proteins, is a potent DNA-binding-dependent transcriptional repression domain that is believed to function through interaction with the transcriptional intermediary factor 1 (TIF1) β. On the basis of sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, we have recently defined three distinct subfamilies of KRAB domains. In the present study, individual members of each subfamily were tested for transcriptional repression and interaction with TIF1β and two other closely related family members (TIF1α and TIF1γ). All KRAB variants were shown, (i) to repress transcription when targeted to DNA through fusion to a heterologous DNA-binding domain in mammalian cells, and (ii) to interact specifically with TIF1β, but not with TIF1α or TIF1γ. Taken together, these results implicate TIF1β as a common transcriptional corepressor for the three distinct subfamilies of KRAB zinc-finger proteins and suggest a high degree of conservation in the molecular mechanism underlying their transcriptional repression activity. PMID:11171966

  10. Co-operative DNA binding by GAGA transcription factor requires the conserved BTB/POZ domain and reorganizes promoter topology.

    PubMed Central

    Katsani, K R; Hajibagheri, M A; Verrijzer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The POZ domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif present in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodelling and human cancers. Here, we study the role of the POZ domain of the GAGA transcription factor in promoter recognition. Natural target promoters for GAGA typically contain multiple GAGA-binding elements. Our results show that the POZ domain mediates strong co-operative binding to multiple sites but inhibits binding to single sites. Protein cross-linking and gel filtration chromatography experiments established that the POZ domain is required for GAGA oligomerization into higher order complexes. Thus, GAGA oligomerization increases binding specificity by selecting only promoters with multiple sites. Electron microscopy revealed that GAGA binds to multiple sites as a large oligomer and induces bending of the promoter DNA. Our results indicate a novel mode of DNA binding by GAGA, in which a large GAGA complex binds multiple GAGA elements that are spread out over a region of a few hundred base pairs. We suggest a model in which the promoter DNA is wrapped around a GAGA multimer in a conformation that may exclude normal nucleosome formation. PMID:9927429

  11. p23 and HSP20/alpha-crystallin proteins define a conserved sequence domain present in other eukaryotic protein families.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ranea, J A; Mirey, Gladys; Camonis, Jacques; Valencia, Alfonso

    2002-10-09

    We identified families of proteins characterized by the presence of a domain similar to human p23 protein, which include proteins such as Sgt1, involved in the yeast kinetochore assembly; melusin, involved in specific interactions with the cytoplasmic integrin beta1 domain; Rar1, related to pathogenic resistance in plants, and to development in animals; B5+B5R flavo-hemo cytochrome NAD(P)H oxidoreductase type B in humans and mice; and NudC, involved in nucleus migration during mitosis. We also found that p23 and the HSP20/alpha-crystallin family of heat shock proteins, which share the same three-dimensional folding, show a pattern of conserved residues that points to a common origin in the evolution of both protein domains. The p23 and HSP20/alpha-crystallin phylogenetic relationship and their similar role in chaperone activity suggest a common function, probably involving protein-protein interaction, for those proteins containing p23-like domains.

  12. Conserved ETS domain arginines mediate DNA binding, nuclear localization, and a novel mode of bZIP interaction.

    PubMed

    Listman, James A; Wara-aswapati, Nawarat; Race, JoAnne E; Blystone, Lisa W; Walker-Kopp, Nancy; Yang, Zhiyong; Auron, Philip E

    2005-12-16

    The DNA-binding ETS transcription factor Spi-1/PU.1 is of central importance in determining the myeloid-erythroid developmental switch and is required for monocyte and osteoclast differentiation. Many monocyte genes are dependent upon this factor, including the gene that codes for interleukin-1beta. It has long been known that the conserved ETS DNA-binding domain of Spi-1/PU.1 functionally cooperates via direct association with a diverse collection of DNA-binding proteins, including members of the basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) family. However, the molecular basis for this interaction has long been elusive. Using a combination of approaches, we have mapped a single residue on the surface of the ETS domain critical for protein tethering by the C/EBPbeta carboxyl-terminal bZIP domain. This residue is also important for nuclear localization and DNA binding. In addition, dependence upon the leucine zipper suggests a novel mode for both protein-DNA interaction and functional cooperativity.

  13. The conserved amino-terminal domain of hSRP1 alpha is essential for nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, K; Ryder, U; Lamond, A I

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear proteins are targeted through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in an energy-dependent reaction. The import reaction is mediated by nuclear localization sequences (NLS) in the substrate which are recognized by heterodimeric cytoplasmic receptors. hSRP1 alpha is an NLS-binding subunit of the human NLS receptor complex and is complexed in vivo with a second subunit of 97 kDa (p97). We show here that a short amino-terminal domain in hSRP1 alpha is necessary and sufficient for its interaction with p97. This domain is conserved in other SRP1-like proteins and its fusion to a cytoplasmic reporter protein is sufficient to promote complete nuclear import, circumventing the usual requirement for an NLS receptor interaction. The same amino-terminal domain inhibits import of NLS-containing proteins when added to an in vitro nuclear transport assay. While full-length hSRP alpha is able to leave the nucleus, the amino-terminal domain alone is not sufficient to promote exit. We conclude that hSRP1 alpha functions as an adaptor to tether NLS-containing substrates to the protein import machinery. Images PMID:8617227

  14. Conserved Receptor-Binding Domains of Lake Victoria Marburgvirus and Zaire Ebolavirus Bind a Shared Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-14

    murine leukemia virus; PBS, phos- phate-buffered saline; RBD, receptor-binding domain; SARS, severe acute respiratory syndrome; VSV, vesicular stomatitis ...domain-deletedGP1,2 of ZEBOV-May (ZEBOV/MLV), or with theG pro- tein of vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSV/MLV). Vero E6 cells were incubated with...virion, because of the functional importance of and limited variation in this region (44, 45). In some cases, such as murine and feline leukemia viruses

  15. Identification of conserved, centrosome-targeting ASH domains in TRAPPII complex subunits and TRAPPC8

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Assembly of primary cilia relies on vesicular trafficking towards the cilium base and intraflagellar transport (IFT) between the base and distal tip of the cilium. Recent studies have identified several key regulators of these processes, including Rab GTPases such as Rab8 and Rab11, the Rab8 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabin8, and the transport protein particle (TRAPP) components TRAPPC3, -C9, and -C10, which physically interact with each other and function together with Bardet Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins in ciliary membrane biogenesis. However, despite recent advances, the exact molecular mechanisms by which these proteins interact and target to the basal body to promote ciliogenesis are not fully understood. Results We surveyed the human proteome for novel ASPM, SPD-2, Hydin (ASH) domain-containing proteins. We identified the TRAPP complex subunits TRAPPC8, -9, -10, -11, and -13 as novel ASH domain-containing proteins. In addition to a C-terminal ASH domain region, we predict that the N-terminus of TRAPPC8, -9, -10, and -11, as well as their yeast counterparts, consists of an α-solenoid bearing stretches of multiple tetratricopeptide (TPR) repeats. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis of cultured mammalian cells revealed that exogenously expressed ASH domains, as well as endogenous TRAPPC8, localize to the centrosome/basal body. Further, depletion of TRAPPC8 impaired ciliogenesis and GFP-Rabin8 centrosome targeting. Conclusions Our results suggest that ASH domains confer targeting to the centrosome and cilia, and that TRAPPC8 has cilia-related functions. Further, we propose that the yeast TRAPPII complex and its mammalian counterpart are evolutionarily related to the bacterial periplasmic trafficking chaperone PapD of the usher pili assembly machinery. PMID:25018876

  16. The Conserved Foot Domain of RNA Pol II Associates with Proteins Involved in Transcriptional Initiation and/or Early Elongation

    PubMed Central

    García-López, M. Carmen; Pelechano, Vicent; Mirón-García, M. Carmen; Garrido-Godino, Ana I.; García, Alicia; Calvo, Olga; Werner, Michel; Pérez-Ortín, José E.; Navarro, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) II establishes many protein–protein interactions with transcriptional regulators to coordinate different steps of transcription. Although some of these interactions have been well described, little is known about the existence of RNA pol II regions involved in contact with transcriptional regulators. We hypothesize that conserved regions on the surface of RNA pol II contact transcriptional regulators. We identified such an RNA pol II conserved region that includes the majority of the “foot” domain and identified interactions of this region with Mvp1, a protein required for sorting proteins to the vacuole, and Spo14, a phospholipase D. Deletion of MVP1 and SPO14 affects the transcription of their target genes and increases phosphorylation of Ser5 in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). Genetic, phenotypic, and functional analyses point to a role for these proteins in transcriptional initiation and/or early elongation, consistent with their genetic interactions with CEG1, a guanylyltransferase subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae capping enzyme. PMID:21954159

  17. Function of the conserved FHIPEP domain of the flagellar type III export apparatus, protein FlhA.

    PubMed

    Barker, Clive S; Inoue, Tomoharu; Meshcheryakova, Irina V; Kitanobo, Seiya; Samatey, Fadel A

    2016-04-01

    The Type III flagellar protein export apparatus of bacteria consists of five or six membrane proteins, notably FlhA, which controls the export of other proteins and is homologous to the large family of FHIPEP export proteins. FHIPEP proteins contain a highly-conserved cytoplasmic domain. We mutagenized the cloned Salmonella flhA gene for the 692 amino acid FlhA, changing a single, conserved amino acid in the 68-amino acid FHIPEP region. Fifty-two mutations at 30 positions mostly led to loss of motility and total disappearance of microscopically visible flagella, also Western blot protein/protein hybridization showed no detectable export of hook protein and flagellin. There were two exceptions: a D199A mutant strain, which produced short-stubby flagella; and a V151L mutant strain, which did not produce flagella and excreted mainly un-polymerized hook protein. The V151L mutant strain also exported a reduced amount of hook-cap protein FlgD, but when grown with exogenous FlgD it produced polyhooks and polyhook-filaments. A suppressor mutant in the cytoplasmic domain of the export apparatus membrane protein FlhB rescued export of hook-length control protein FliK and facilitated growth of full-length flagella. These results suggested that the FHIPEP region is part of the gate regulating substrate entry into the export apparatus pore.

  18. A novel zinc binding domain conserved in metalloendopeptidases from bacteria to man

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, A.B.; Ding, L.; Roth, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Protease III, PTR, a metalloendopeptidase from E. Coli, is 46% similar to mammalian insulin degrading enzyme and shares three regions of high homology which are between 54% and 80% identical. One of these regions contains a potential active site domain, HXXEH, which is an inversion of the zinc binding domain described in other metalloendopeptidases, HEXXH. To test if this region represents the active site in PTR, the histidine residues in this domain were mutated to arginine and the glutamate residue to glutamine. The mutant and wildtype enzymes were over-expressed in bacteria and purified to homogeneity using conventional column chromatography. All three mutants were assayed for proteolytic activity towards an exogenous substrate, insulin, and were found to be devoid of activity. The amount and type of metal associated with each protein was then determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Three lines of evidence indicate that the loss of activity in the mutants is not due to distortion of the three-dimensional structure of the protein: (1) the mutants are secreted into the periplasmic space and chromatograph normally; (2) all three mutants are able to cross-link insulin at approximately normal levels; (3) the mutants compete equally with wildtype PTR in a radioimmunoassay.

  19. Evolution of a domain conserved in microtubule-associated proteins of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Rajangam, Alex S; Yang, Hongqian; Teeri, Tuula T; Arvestad, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The microtubule network, the major organelle of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, is involved in cell division and differentiation but also with many other cellular functions. In plants, microtubules seem to be involved in the ordered deposition of cellulose microfibrils by a so far unknown mechanism. Microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) typically contain various domains targeting or binding proteins with different functions to microtubules. Here we have investigated a proposed microtubule-targeting domain, TPX2, first identified in the Kinesin-like protein 2 in Xenopus. A TPX2 containing microtubule binding protein, PttMAP20, has been recently identified in poplar tissues undergoing xylogenesis. Furthermore, the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB), which is a known inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, was shown to bind specifically to PttMAP20. It is thus possible that PttMAP20 may have a role in coupling cellulose biosynthesis and the microtubular networks in poplar secondary cell walls. In order to get more insight into the occurrence, evolution and potential functions of TPX2-containing proteins we have carried out bioinformatic analysis for all genes so far found to encode TPX2 domains with special reference to poplar PttMAP20 and its putative orthologs in other plants. PMID:21918606

  20. Structure of Trypanosoma brucei glutathione synthetase: Domain and loop alterations in the catalytic cycle of a highly conserved enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Paul K.; Alphey, Magnus S.; Hunter, William N.

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase catalyses the synthesis of the low molecular mass thiol glutathione from l-γ-glutamyl-l-cysteine and glycine. We report the crystal structure of the dimeric enzyme from Trypanosoma brucei in complex with the product glutathione. The enzyme belongs to the ATP-grasp family, a group of enzymes known to undergo conformational changes upon ligand binding. The T. brucei enzyme crystal structure presents two dimers in the asymmetric unit. The structure reveals variability in the order and position of a small domain, which forms a lid for the active site and serves to capture conformations likely to exist during the catalytic cycle. Comparisons with orthologous enzymes, in particular from Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisae, indicate a high degree of sequence and structure conservation in part of the active site. Structural differences that are observed between the orthologous enzymes are assigned to different ligand binding states since key residues are conserved. This suggests that the molecular determinants of ligand recognition and reactivity are highly conserved across species. We conclude that it would be difficult to target the parasite enzyme in preference to the host enzyme and therefore glutathione synthetase may not be a suitable target for antiparasitic drug discovery. PMID:20045436

  1. Conserved helicase domain of human RecQ4 is required for strand annealing-independent DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marie L; Ghosh, Avik K; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2010-07-01

    Humans have five members of the well conserved RecQ helicase family: RecQ1, Bloom syndrome protein (BLM), Werner syndrome protein (WRN), RecQ4, and RecQ5, which are all known for their roles in maintaining genome stability. BLM, WRN, and RecQ4 are associated with premature aging and cancer predisposition. Of the three, RecQ4's biological and cellular roles have been least thoroughly characterized. Here we tested the helicase activity of purified human RecQ4 on various substrates. Consistent with recent results, we detected ATP-dependent RecQ4 unwinding of forked duplexes. However, our results provide the first evidence that human RecQ4's unwinding is independent of strand annealing, and that it does not require the presence of excess ssDNA. Moreover, we demonstrate that a point mutation of the conserved lysine in the Walker A motif abolished helicase activity, implying that not the N-terminal portion, but the helicase domain is solely responsible for the enzyme's unwinding activity. In addition, we demonstrate a novel stimulation of RecQ4's helicase activity by replication protein A, similar to that of RecQ1, BLM, WRN, and RecQ5. Together, these data indicate that specific biochemical activities and protein partners of RecQ4 are conserved with those of the other RecQ helicases.

  2. HnRNP A1 Alters the Structure of a Conserved Enterovirus IRES Domain to Stimulate Viral Translation.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Michele; Morgan, Christopher E; Pollum, Marvin; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E; Li, Mei-Ling; Brewer, Gary; Tolbert, Blanton S

    2017-09-15

    Enteroviruses use a type I Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) structure to facilitate protein synthesis and promote genome replication. Type I IRES elements require auxiliary host proteins to organize RNA structure for 40S ribosomal subunit assembly. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 stimulates enterovirus 71 (EV71) translation in part through specific interactions with its stem loop II (SLII) IRES domain. Here, we determined a conjoined NMR-small angle x-ray scattering structure of the EV71 SLII domain and a mutant that significantly attenuates viral replication by abrogating hnRNP A1 interactions. Native SLII adopts a locally compact structure wherein stacking interactions in a conserved 5'-AUAGC-3' bulge preorganize the adjacent helices at nearly orthogonal orientations. Mutating the bulge sequence to 5'-ACCCC-3' ablates base stacking in the loop and globally reorients the SLII structure. Biophysical titrations reveal that the 5'-AUAGC-3' bulge undergoes a conformational change to assemble a functional hnRNP A1-RNA complex. Importantly, IRES mutations that delete the bulge impair viral translation and completely inhibit replication. Thus, this work provides key details into how an EV71 IRES structure adapts to hijack a cellular protein, and it suggests that the SLII domain is a potential target for antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Arabidopsis BELL1 and KNOX TALE homeodomain proteins interact through a domain conserved between plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Bellaoui, M; Pidkowich, M S; Samach, A; Kushalappa, K; Kohalmi, S E; Modrusan, Z; Crosby, W L; Haughn, G W

    2001-11-01

    Interactions between TALE (three-amino acid loop extension) homeodomain proteins play important roles in the development of both fungi and animals. Although in plants, two different subclasses of TALE proteins include important developmental regulators, the existence of interactions between plant TALE proteins has remained unexplored. We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to demonstrate that the Arabidopsis BELL1 (BEL1) homeodomain protein can selectively heterodimerize with specific KNAT homeodomain proteins. Interaction is mediated by BEL1 sequences N terminal to the homeodomain and KNAT sequences including the MEINOX domain. These findings validate the hypothesis that the MEINOX domain has been conserved between plants and animals as an interaction domain for developmental regulators. In yeast, BEL1 and KNAT proteins can activate transcription only as a heterodimeric complex, suggesting a role for such complexes in planta. Finally, overlapping patterns of BEL1 and SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) expression within the inflorescence meristem suggest a role for the BEL1-STM complex in maintaining the indeterminacy of the inflorescence meristem.

  4. Microbial community transcriptional networks are conserved in three domains at ocean basin scales.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Frank O; Eppley, John M; Smith, Jason M; Chavez, Francisco P; Scholin, Christopher A; DeLong, Edward F

    2015-04-28

    Planktonic microbial communities in the ocean are typically dominated by several cosmopolitan clades of Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya characterized by their ribosomal RNA gene phylogenies and genomic features. Although the environments these communities inhabit range from coastal to open ocean waters, how the biological dynamics vary between such disparate habitats is not well known. To gain insight into the differential activities of microbial populations inhabiting different oceanic provinces we compared the daily metatranscriptome profiles of related microbial populations inhabiting surface waters of both a coastal California upwelling region (CC) as well as the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Transcriptional networks revealed that the dominant photoautotrophic microbes in each environment (Ostreococcus in CC, Prochlorococcus in NPSG) were central determinants of overall community transcriptome dynamics. Furthermore, heterotrophic bacterial clades common to both ecosystems (SAR11, SAR116, SAR86, SAR406, and Roseobacter) displayed conserved, genome-wide inter- and intrataxon transcriptional patterns and diel cycles. Populations of SAR11 and SAR86 clades in particular exhibited tightly coordinated transcriptional patterns in both coastal and pelagic ecosystems, suggesting that specific biological interactions between these groups are widespread in nature. Our results identify common diurnally oscillating behaviors among diverse planktonic microbial species regardless of habitat, suggesting that highly conserved temporally phased biotic interactions are ubiquitous among planktonic microbial communities worldwide.

  5. Microbial community transcriptional networks are conserved in three domains at ocean basin scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylward, Frank O.; Eppley, John M.; Smith, Jason M.; Chavez, Francisco P.; Scholin, Christopher A.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2015-04-01

    Planktonic microbial communities in the ocean are typically dominated by several cosmopolitan clades of Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya characterized by their ribosomal RNA gene phylogenies and genomic features. Although the environments these communities inhabit range from coastal to open ocean waters, how the biological dynamics vary between such disparate habitats is not well known. To gain insight into the differential activities of microbial populations inhabiting different oceanic provinces we compared the daily metatranscriptome profiles of related microbial populations inhabiting surface waters of both a coastal California upwelling region (CC) as well as the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Transcriptional networks revealed that the dominant photoautotrophic microbes in each environment (Ostreococcus in CC, Prochlorococcus in NPSG) were central determinants of overall community transcriptome dynamics. Furthermore, heterotrophic bacterial clades common to both ecosystems (SAR11, SAR116, SAR86, SAR406, and Roseobacter) displayed conserved, genome-wide inter- and intrataxon transcriptional patterns and diel cycles. Populations of SAR11 and SAR86 clades in particular exhibited tightly coordinated transcriptional patterns in both coastal and pelagic ecosystems, suggesting that specific biological interactions between these groups are widespread in nature. Our results identify common diurnally oscillating behaviors among diverse planktonic microbial species regardless of habitat, suggesting that highly conserved temporally phased biotic interactions are ubiquitous among planktonic microbial communities worldwide.

  6. Investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey of soil and moisture conservation on public domain lands, 1941-1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, H.V.; Melin, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The passage of the Taylor Grazing Act in 1934 marked the end of an era in the land policies in the United States in that disposal of the public lands by homesteading was terminated except under rigidly prescribed procedures, and the remaining public lands covering about 175 million acres in the western conterminous states were brought under regulatory authority for grazing use. In 1934 the lands were mostly in a severe state of deterioration as a result of overgrazing and drought. In addition to reducing numbers of livestock using the lands, successive programs of conservation practices were established of which the Soil and Moisture Conservation Program of the Department of the Interior is of particular interest here. The services of the Geological Survey, in an investigational and advisory capacity were enlisted in this program. The work of the Geological Survey has consisted of the collection of hydrologic data, investigations of range-water supplies to facilitate management and provide information for design of structures and land-treatment measures. Appraisal of the effects of treatment practices has also been an important activity. Conservation on the public domain involves mainly growing vegetation for forage and reducing erosion. The two elements are intimately related--accomplishment in one is usually reflected by an improvement in the other. Erosion is a serious problem on most of the public domain, but particularly in the Colorado River and Rio Grande basins where, despite low annual water yields, the public domain and similar lands on the Indian reservations contribute the major part of the sediment measured at the downstream gaging stations. In parts of the Missouri River basin also, erosion is obviously very active but the sediment yield contributed by the public domain cannot be as readily isolated. The reasons for the erosion are generally evident--the erodibility of the rock and soils and the sparsity of vegetation as a result of low precipitation

  7. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Pinja; Overmyer, Kirk; Wrzaczek, Michael; Vainonen, Julia P; Blomster, Tiina; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Reddy, Ramesha A; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2010-03-12

    The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE) are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4) domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918) but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11). We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PS51059) domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation.

  8. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE) are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4) domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918) but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11). We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PS51059) domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation. PMID:20226034

  9. Domain decomposition methods for systems of conservation laws: Spectral collocation approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quarteroni, Alfio

    1989-01-01

    Hyperbolic systems of conversation laws are considered which are discretized in space by spectral collocation methods and advanced in time by finite difference schemes. At any time-level a domain deposition method based on an iteration by subdomain procedure was introduced yielding at each step a sequence of independent subproblems (one for each subdomain) that can be solved simultaneously. The method is set for a general nonlinear problem in several space variables. The convergence analysis, however, is carried out only for a linear one-dimensional system with continuous solutions. A precise form of the error reduction factor at each iteration is derived. Although the method is applied here to the case of spectral collocation approximation only, the idea is fairly general and can be used in a different context as well. For instance, its application to space discretization by finite differences is straight forward.

  10. The structure of Zika virus NS5 reveals a conserved domain conformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Boxiao; Tan, Xiao-Feng; Thurmond, Stephanie; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Lin, Asher; Hai, Rong; Song, Jikui

    2017-03-27

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has imposed a serious threat to public health. Here we report the crystal structure of the ZIKV NS5 protein in complex with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, in which the tandem methyltransferase (MTase) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains stack into one of the two alternative conformations of flavivirus NS5 proteins. The activity of this NS5 protein is verified through a de novo RdRp assay on a subgenomic ZIKV RNA template. Importantly, our structural analysis leads to the identification of a potential drug-binding site of ZIKV NS5, which might facilitate the development of novel antivirals for ZIKV.

  11. The structure of Zika virus NS5 reveals a conserved domain conformation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Boxiao; Tan, Xiao -Feng; Thurmond, Stephanie; ...

    2017-03-27

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has imposed a serious threat to public health. Here we report the crystal structure of the ZIKV NS5 protein in complex with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, in which the tandem methyltransferase (MTase) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains stack into one of the two alternative conformations of flavivirus NS5 proteins. In conclusion, the activity of this NS5 protein is verified through a de novo RdRp assay on a subgenomic ZIKV RNA template. Importantly, our structural analysis leads to the identification of a potential drug-binding site of ZIKV NS5, which might facilitate the development of novel antiviralsmore » for ZIKV.« less

  12. The structure of Zika virus NS5 reveals a conserved domain conformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Boxiao; Tan, Xiao-Feng; Thurmond, Stephanie; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Lin, Asher; Hai, Rong; Song, Jikui

    2017-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has imposed a serious threat to public health. Here we report the crystal structure of the ZIKV NS5 protein in complex with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, in which the tandem methyltransferase (MTase) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains stack into one of the two alternative conformations of flavivirus NS5 proteins. The activity of this NS5 protein is verified through a de novo RdRp assay on a subgenomic ZIKV RNA template. Importantly, our structural analysis leads to the identification of a potential drug-binding site of ZIKV NS5, which might facilitate the development of novel antivirals for ZIKV. PMID:28345600

  13. The LOTUS domain is a conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase regulator essential for the recruitment of Vasa to the germ plasm and nuage

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Mandy; Müller, Christoph W.; Ephrussi, Anne

    2017-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases play important roles in a wide range of metabolic processes. Regulatory proteins can stimulate or block the activity of DEAD-box helicases. Here, we show that LOTUS (Limkain, Oskar, and Tudor containing proteins 5 and 7) domains present in the germline proteins Oskar, TDRD5 (Tudor domain-containing 5), and TDRD7 bind and stimulate the germline-specific DEAD-box RNA helicase Vasa. Our crystal structure of the LOTUS domain of Oskar in complex with the C-terminal RecA-like domain of Vasa reveals that the LOTUS domain occupies a surface on a DEAD-box helicase not implicated previously in the regulation of the enzyme's activity. We show that, in vivo, the localization of Drosophila Vasa to the nuage and germ plasm depends on its interaction with LOTUS domain proteins. The binding and stimulation of Vasa DEAD-box helicases by LOTUS domains are widely conserved. PMID:28536148

  14. Mutations in a Conserved Domain of E. coli MscS to the Most Conserved Superfamily Residue Leads to Kinetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Hannah R.; Blount, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli (E. coli) the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, MscS, gates in response to membrane tension created from acute external hypoosmotic shock, thus rescuing the bacterium from cell lysis. E. coli MscS is the most well studied member of the MscS superfamily of channels, whose members are found throughout the bacterial and plant kingdoms. Homology to the pore lining helix and upper vestibule domain of E. coli MscS is required for inclusion into the superfamily. Although highly conserved, in the second half of the pore lining helix (TM3B), E. coli MscS has five residues significantly different from other members of the superfamily. In superfamilies such as this, it remains unclear why variations within such a homologous region occur: is it tolerance of alternate residues, or does it define functional variance within the superfamily? Point mutations (S114I/T, L118F, A120S, L123F, F127E/K/T) and patch clamp electrophysiology were used to study the effect of changing these residues in E. coli MscS on sensitivity and gating. The data indicate that variation at these locations do not consistently lead to wildtype channel phenotypes, nor do they define large changes in mechanosensation, but often appear to effect changes in the E. coli MscS channel gating kinetics. PMID:26340270

  15. Mutations in a Conserved Domain of E. coli MscS to the Most Conserved Superfamily Residue Leads to Kinetic Changes.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Hannah R; Blount, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli (E. coli) the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, MscS, gates in response to membrane tension created from acute external hypoosmotic shock, thus rescuing the bacterium from cell lysis. E. coli MscS is the most well studied member of the MscS superfamily of channels, whose members are found throughout the bacterial and plant kingdoms. Homology to the pore lining helix and upper vestibule domain of E. coli MscS is required for inclusion into the superfamily. Although highly conserved, in the second half of the pore lining helix (TM3B), E. coli MscS has five residues significantly different from other members of the superfamily. In superfamilies such as this, it remains unclear why variations within such a homologous region occur: is it tolerance of alternate residues, or does it define functional variance within the superfamily? Point mutations (S114I/T, L118F, A120S, L123F, F127E/K/T) and patch clamp electrophysiology were used to study the effect of changing these residues in E. coli MscS on sensitivity and gating. The data indicate that variation at these locations do not consistently lead to wildtype channel phenotypes, nor do they define large changes in mechanosensation, but often appear to effect changes in the E. coli MscS channel gating kinetics.

  16. The Drosophila tissue-specific factor Grainyhead contains novel DNA-binding and dimerization domains which are conserved in the human protein CP2.

    PubMed

    Uv, A E; Thompson, C R; Bray, S J

    1994-06-01

    We have mapped the regions in the Drosophila melanogaster tissue-specific transcription factor Grainyhead that are required for DNA binding and dimerization. These functional domains correspond to regions conserved between Grainyhead and the vertebrate transcription factor CP2, which we show has similar activities. The identified DNA-binding domain is large (263 amino acids) but contains a smaller core that is able to interact with DNA at approximately 400-fold lower affinity. The major dimerization domain is located in a separate region of the protein and is required to stabilize the interactions with DNA. Our data also suggest that Grainyhead activity can be modulated by an N-terminal inhibitory domain.

  17. Conservation of nif- and species-specific domains within repeated promoter sequences from fast-growing Rhizobium species.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, P R; Watson, J M

    1985-01-01

    In the fast-growing Rhizobium species, repeated DNA sequences, which include the promoter region of the nif HDK operon have been described. These repeated sequences are promoters which specifically activate transcription in the endosymbiotic state. Hybridization analysis of these sequences from R. trifolii has revealed that they may be involved in the species-specific activation of the various genes whose transcription they promote. Comparative analysis of various copies of these repeated sequences, from R. trifolii (the clover symbiont) and R. meliloti (the alfalfa symbiont), reveals the presence of domains of intra- and interspecific conservation within the promoter regions. We suggest that these promoter elements represent sites which are involved in the species-specific and general, nif-specific activation of Rhizobium symbiotic genes. PMID:3892479

  18. Evolutionarily Conserved Paired Immunoglobulin-like Receptor α (PILRα) Domain Mediates Its Interaction with Diverse Sialylated Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yonglian; Senger, Kate; Baginski, Tomasz K.; Mazloom, Anita; Chinn, Yvonne; Pantua, Homer; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ramani, Sree Ranjani; Luis, Elizabeth; Tom, Irene; Sebrell, Andrew; Quinones, Gabriel; Ma, Yan; Mukhyala, Kiran; Sai, Tao; Ding, Jiabing; Haley, Benjamin; Shadnia, Hooman; Kapadia, Sharookh B.; Gonzalez, Lino C.; Hass, Philip E.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2012-01-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PILR) α is an inhibitory receptor that recognizes several ligands, including mouse CD99, PILR-associating neural protein, and Herpes simplex virus-1 glycoprotein B. The physiological function(s) of interactions between PILRα and its cellular ligands are not well understood, as are the molecular determinants of PILRα/ligand interactions. To address these uncertainties, we sought to identify additional PILRα ligands and further define the molecular basis for PILRα/ligand interactions. Here, we identify two novel PILRα binding partners, neuronal differentiation and proliferation factor-1 (NPDC1), and collectin-12 (COLEC12). We find that sialylated O-glycans on these novel PILRα ligands, and on known PILRα ligands, are compulsory for PILRα binding. Sialylation-dependent ligand recognition is also a property of SIGLEC1, a member of the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectins. SIGLEC1 Ig domain shares ∼22% sequence identity with PILRα, an identity that includes a conserved arginine localized to position 97 in mouse and human SIGLEC1, position 133 in mouse PILRα and position 126 in human PILRα. We observe that PILRα/ligand interactions require conserved PILRα Arg-133 (mouse) and Arg-126 (human), in correspondence with a previously reported requirement for SIGLEC1 Arg-197 in SIGLEC1/ligand interactions. Homology modeling identifies striking similarities between PILRα and SIGLEC1 ligand binding pockets as well as at least one set of distinctive interactions in the galactoxyl-binding site. Binding studies suggest that PILRα recognizes a complex ligand domain involving both sialic acid and protein motif(s). Thus, PILRα is evolved to engage multiple ligands with common molecular determinants to modulate myeloid cell functions in anatomical settings where PILRα ligands are expressed. PMID:22396535

  19. Structure and thermodynamics of a conserved U2 snRNA domain from yeast and human.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Venditti, Vincenzo; Angers, Cortney G; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Butcher, Samuel E

    2007-03-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex responsible for the removal of intron sequences from pre-messenger RNA. The highly conserved 5' end of the U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) makes key base-pairing interactions with the intron branch point sequence and U6 snRNA. U2 stem I, a stem-loop located in the 5' region of U2, has been implicated in spliceosome assembly and may modulate the folding of the U2 and U6 snRNAs in the spliceosome active site. Here we present the NMR structures of U2 stem I from human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These sequences represent the two major classes of U2 stem I, distinguished by the identity of tandem wobble pairs (UU/UU in yeast and CA/GU in human) and the presence of post-transcriptional modifications (four 2'-O-methyl groups and two pseudouracils in human). The structures reveal that the UU/UU and CA/GU tandem wobble pairs are nearly isosteric. The tandem wobble pairs separate two thermodynamically distinct regions of Watson-Crick base pairs, with the modified nucleotides in human stem I conferring a significant increase in stability. We hypothesize that the separate thermodynamic stabilities of U2 stem I exist to allow the structure to transition through different folded conformations during spliceosome assembly and catalysis.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Genome and Epigenome in Closely Related Medaka Species Identifies Conserved Sequence Preferences for DNA Hypomethylated Domains.

    PubMed

    Uno, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryohei; Tsukahara, Tatsuya; Qu, Wei; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Morishita, Shinichi; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of vertebrates are globally methylated, but a small portion of genomic regions are known to be hypomethylated. Although hypomethylated domains (HMDs) have been implicated in transcriptional regulation in various ways, how a HMD is determined in a particular genomic region remains elusive. To search for DNA motifs essential for the formation of HMDs, we performed the genome-wide comparative analysis of genome and DNA methylation patterns of the two medaka inbred lines, Hd-rRII1 and HNI-II, which are derived from northern and southern subpopulations of Japan and exhibit high levels of genetic variations (SNP, ∼ 3%). We successfully mapped > 70% of HMDs in both genomes and found that the majority of those mapped HMDs are conserved between the two lines (common HMDs). Unexpectedly, the average genetic variations are similar in the common HMD and other genome regions. However, we identified short well-conserved motifs that are specifically enriched in HMDs, suggesting that they may play roles in the establishment of HMDs in the medaka genome.

  1. Characterization of STIP, a multi-domain nuclear protein, highly conserved in metazoans, and essential for embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Qiongmei; Huang, C.-H. . E-mail: chuang@nybloodcenter.org; Peng Jianbin; Hashmi, Sarwar; Ye Tianzhang; Chen Ying

    2007-04-15

    We report here the identification and characterization of STIP, a multi-domain nuclear protein that contains a G-patch, a coiled-coil, and several short tryptophan-tryptophan repeats highly conserved in metazoan species. To analyze their functional role in vivo, we cloned nematode stip-1 genes and determined the spatiotemporal pattern of Caenorhabditis elegans STIP-1 protein. RNA analyses and Western blots revealed that stip-1 mRNA was produced via trans-splicing and translated as a 95-kDa protein. Using reporter constructs, we found STIP-1 to be expressed at all developmental stages and in many tissue/cell types including worm oocyte nuclei. We found that STIP-1 is targeted to the nucleus and forms large polymers with a rod-like shape when expressed in mammalian cells. Using deletion mutants, we mapped the regions of STIP-1 involved in nuclear import and polymer assembly. We further showed that knockdown of C. elegans stip-1 by RNA interference arrested development and resulted in morphologic abnormalities around the 16-cell stage followed by 100% lethality, suggesting its essential role in worm embryogenesis. Importantly, the embryonic lethal phenotype could be faithfully rescued with Drosophila and human genes via transgenic expression. Our data provide the first direct evidence that STIP have a conserved essential nuclear function across metazoans from worms to humans.

  2. Multiple isoforms of Arabidopsis casein kinase I combine conserved catalytic domains with variable carboxyl-terminal extensions.

    PubMed Central

    Klimczak, L J; Farini, D; Lin, C; Ponti, D; Cashmore, A R; Giuliano, G

    1995-01-01

    Three cDNA clones encoding isoforms of casein kinase I (CKI) were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. One full-length clone, designated CKI1, contained an open reading frame of 1371 bp encoding a protein of 51,949 D with an isoelectric point of 9.7. In addition to the highly conserved catalytic domain (of about 300 amino acids), the Arabidopsis CKI isoforms contain 150 to 180 amino acid carboxyl-terminal extensions, which show among themselves a lower level of sequence conservation. These extensions do not show any sequence similarity to nonplant CKI isoforms, such as rat testis CKI delta, which is their closest isolated homolog, or to yeast CKI isoforms. Three additional isoforms of Arabidopsis CKI were found in the data bases of expressed sequence tags and/or were isolated serendipitously in nonspecific screening procedures by others. One of them also shows a carboxyl-terminal extension, but of only 80 amino acids. Casein kinase activity was detected in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli strains expressing the CKI1 protein. This activity showed the crucial properties of CKI, including the ability to phosphorylate the D4 peptide, a specific substrate of CKI, and inhibition by N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-chloroisoquinoline-8-sulfonamide, a specific CKI inhibitor. Like several recombinant CKI isoforms from yeast, CKI1 was able to phosphorylate tyrosine-containing acidic polymers. PMID:7480353

  3. Antibacterial small molecules targeting the conserved TOPRIM domain of DNA gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Labroli, Marc; Painter, Ronald E.; Wiltsie, Judyann; Sherborne, Brad; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mann, Paul; Zuck, Paul; Garlisi, Charles G.; Su, Jing; Kargman, Stacia; Xiao, Li; Scapin, Giovanna; Salowe, Scott; Devito, Kristine; Sheth, Payal; Buist, Nichole; Tan, Christopher M.; Black, Todd A.; Roemer, Terry

    2017-01-01

    To combat the threat of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, novel agents that circumvent established resistance mechanisms are urgently needed. Our approach was to focus first on identifying bioactive small molecules followed by chemical lead prioritization and target identification. Within this annotated library of bioactives, we identified a small molecule with activity against efflux-deficient Escherichia coli and other sensitized Gram-negatives. Further studies suggested that this compound inhibited DNA replication and selection for resistance identified mutations in a subunit of E. coli DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase. Our initial compound demonstrated weak inhibition of DNA gyrase activity while optimized compounds demonstrated significantly improved inhibition of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase and caused cleaved complex stabilization, a hallmark of certain bactericidal DNA gyrase inhibitors. Amino acid substitutions conferring resistance to this new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors reside exclusively in the TOPRIM domain of GyrB and are not associated with resistance to the fluoroquinolones, suggesting a novel binding site for a gyrase inhibitor. PMID:28700746

  4. Antibacterial small molecules targeting the conserved TOPRIM domain of DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Walker, Scott S; Labroli, Marc; Painter, Ronald E; Wiltsie, Judyann; Sherborne, Brad; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mann, Paul; Zuck, Paul; Garlisi, Charles G; Su, Jing; Kargman, Stacia; Xiao, Li; Scapin, Giovanna; Salowe, Scott; Devito, Kristine; Sheth, Payal; Buist, Nichole; Tan, Christopher M; Black, Todd A; Roemer, Terry

    2017-01-01

    To combat the threat of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, novel agents that circumvent established resistance mechanisms are urgently needed. Our approach was to focus first on identifying bioactive small molecules followed by chemical lead prioritization and target identification. Within this annotated library of bioactives, we identified a small molecule with activity against efflux-deficient Escherichia coli and other sensitized Gram-negatives. Further studies suggested that this compound inhibited DNA replication and selection for resistance identified mutations in a subunit of E. coli DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase. Our initial compound demonstrated weak inhibition of DNA gyrase activity while optimized compounds demonstrated significantly improved inhibition of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase and caused cleaved complex stabilization, a hallmark of certain bactericidal DNA gyrase inhibitors. Amino acid substitutions conferring resistance to this new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors reside exclusively in the TOPRIM domain of GyrB and are not associated with resistance to the fluoroquinolones, suggesting a novel binding site for a gyrase inhibitor.

  5. Disparate Regulatory Mechanisms Control Fat3 and P75NTR Protein Transport through a Conserved Kif5-Interaction Domain

    PubMed Central

    Birkness, Jacqueline E.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    Directed transport delivers proteins to specific cellular locations and is one mechanism by which cells establish and maintain polarized cellular architectures. The atypical cadherin Fat3 directs the polarized extension of dendrites in retinal amacrine cells by influencing the distribution of cytoskeletal regulators during retinal development, however the mechanisms regulating the distribution of Fat3 remain unclear. We report a novel Kinesin/Kif5 Interaction domain (Kif5-ID) in Fat3 that facilitates Kif5B binding, and determines the distribution of Fat3 cytosolic domain constructs in neurons and MDCK cells. The Kif5-ID sequence is conserved in the neurotrophin receptor P75NTR, which also binds Kif5B, and Kif5-ID mutations similarly result in P75NTR mislocalization. Despite these similarities, Kif5B-mediated protein transport is differentially regulated by these two cargos. For Fat3, the Kif5-ID is regulated by alternative splicing, and the timecourse of splicing suggests that the distribution of Fat3 may switch between early and later stages of retinal development. In contrast, P75NTR binding to Kif5B is enhanced by tyrosine phosphorylation and thus has the potential to be dynamically regulated on a more rapid time scale. PMID:27788242

  6. Substitutions in the conserved C2C domain of otoferlin cause DFNB9, a form of nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness.

    PubMed

    Mirghomizadeh, F; Pfister, M; Apaydin, F; Petit, C; Kupka, S; Pusch, C M; Zenner, H P; Blin, N

    2002-07-01

    DFNB, the nonsyndromic hearing loss with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance constitutes the majority of severe to profound prelingual forms of hearing impairment, usually leading to inability of speech acquisition. We analyzed a consanguineous family with autosomal recessive deafness which has been shown to segregate within chromosomal region 2p23.1 (DFNB9; MIM 601071). By SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing of the 48 exons of the DFNB9 gene, coding for otoferlin, previously reported mutations in OTOF were excluded. Next to a frequent T > C single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 8, two novel mutations linked in exon 15 of the OTOF long splice form were identified comprising substitutions at positions 490 (Pro > Gln) and 515 (Ile > Thr), both located in the conserved Ca(2+) binding C2C domain of this peptide. Comparisons of homology using human and mice otoferlins and closely related peptides and computer simulation analyses suggest that changes in the mutated segment's secondary structure affect the Ca(2+) binding capacity of the C2C domain in otoferlin.

  7. Correlation of the exon/intron organization to the conserved domains of the mouse transcriptional corepressor TIF1beta.

    PubMed

    Cammas, F; Garnier, J; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    2000-08-08

    TIF1beta, a member of the transcriptional intermediary factor 1 family, has been reported to function as a corepressor for the large class of KRAB domain-containing zinc finger proteins of the Krüppel type. In this study, we report the genomic organization and nucleotide sequence of the mouse TIF1beta gene. This gene comprises 17 coding exons located within 7 kb of genomic DNA. Exon sizes vary from 37 bp (exon 10) to 901 bp (exon 1), and intron sizes range from 71 bp to 1843 bp. All introns have the conserved GT and AG dinucleotides present at the donor and acceptor sites, respectively. The functional/homology regions of the TIF1beta protein are encoded by distinct exons. The amino-terminal RING finger is encoded by two exons interrupted by a small intron. The B boxes lie within individual exons. Similarly to the RING finger, the PHD finger is encoded by two exons. Three exons constitute the carboxy-terminal bromodomain, and their position correlates well with the secondary structure elements of the domain as predicted by computer modeling. Taken together, these results will facilitate the genetic manipulation of TIF1beta for future in vivo structure-function studies.

  8. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    PubMed Central

    Yatsenko, AS; Kucherenko, MM; Pantoja, M; Fischer, KA; Madeoy, J; Deng, W-M; Schneider, M; Baumgartner, S; Akey, J; Shcherbata, HR; Ruohola-Baker, H

    2009-01-01

    Background Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C-terminal PPXY motif has been established as a binding site for Dystrophin (Dys) WW-domain. However, our previous studies indicate that both Dystroglycan PPXY motives, WWbsI and WWbsII can bind Dystrophin protein in vitro. Results We now find that both WW binding sites are important for maintaining full Dg function in the establishment of oocyte polarity in Drosophila. If either WW binding site is mutated, the Dg protein can still be active. However, simultaneous mutations in both WW binding sites abolish the Dg activities in both overexpression and loss-of-function oocyte polarity assays in vivo. Additionally, sequence comparisons of WW binding sites in 12 species of Drosophila, as well as in humans, reveal a high level of conservation. This preservation throughout evolution supports the idea that both WW binding sites are functionally required. Conclusion Based on the obtained results we propose that the presence of the two WW binding sites in Dystroglycan secures the essential interaction between Dg and Dys and might further provide additional regulation for the cytoskeletal interactions of this complex. PMID:19250553

  9. Conserved Glycine 33 Residue in Flexible Domain I of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Is Critical for Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Allan G. N.; Loquet, Antoine; Stack, Séamus J.; Dalrymple, David; Gatherer, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus core protein forms the viral nucleocapsid and plays a critical role in the formation of infectious particles. In this study, we demonstrate that the highly conserved residue G33, located within domain 1 of the core protein, is important for the production of cell culture-infectious virus (HCVcc). Alanine substitution at this position in the JFH1 genome did not alter viral RNA replication but reduced infectivity by ∼2 logs. Virus production by this core mutant could be rescued by compensatory mutations located immediately upstream and downstream of the original G33A mutation. The examination of the helix-loop-helix motif observed in the core protein structure (residues 15 to 41; Protein Data Bank entry 1CWX) indicated that the residues G33 and F24 are in close contact with each other, and that the G33A mutation induces a steric clash with F24. Molecular simulations revealed that the compensatory mutations increase the helix-loop-helix flexibility, allowing rescue of the core active conformation required for efficient virus production. Taken together, these data highlight the plasticity of core domain 1 conformation and illustrate the relationship between its structural tolerance to mutations and virus infectivity. PMID:22072760

  10. Function of conserved domains of hnRNP A1 and other hnRNP A/B proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Mayeda, A; Munroe, S H; Cáceres, J F; Krainer, A R

    1994-01-01

    hnRNP A1 is a pre-mRNA binding protein that antagonizes the alternative splicing activity of splicing factors SF2/ASF or SC35, causing activation of distal 5' splice sites. The structural requirements for hnRNP A1 function were determined by mutagenesis of recombinant human hnRNP A1. Two conserved Phe residues in the RNP-1 submotif of each of two RNA recognition motifs appear to be involved in specific RNA-protein interactions and are essential for modulating alternative splicing. These residues are not required for general pre-mRNA binding or RNA annealing activity. The C-terminal Gly-rich domain is necessary for alternative splicing activity, for stable RNA binding and for optimal RNA annealing activity. hnRNP A1B, which is an alternatively spliced isoform of hnRNP A1 with a longer Gly-rich domain, binds more strongly to pre-mRNA but has only limited alternative splicing activity. In contrast, hnRNP A2 and B1, which have 68% amino acid identity with hnRNP A1, bind more weakly to pre-mRNA and have stronger splice site switching activities than hnRNP A1. We propose that specific combinations of antagonistic hnRNP A/B and SR proteins are involved in regulating alternative splicing of distinct subsets of cellular premRNAs. Images PMID:7957114

  11. Structure of a highly conserved domain of Rock1 required for Shroom-mediated regulation of cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Swarna; Das, Debamitra; Bauer, Robert J; Heroux, Annie; Zalewski, Jenna K; Heber, Simone; Dosunmu-Ogunbi, Atinuke M; Trakselis, Michael A; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D; Vandemark, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Rho-associated coiled coil containing protein kinase (Rho-kinase or Rock) is a well-defined determinant of actin organization and dynamics in most animal cells characterized to date. One of the primary effectors of Rock is non-muscle myosin II. Activation of Rock results in increased contractility of myosin II and subsequent changes in actin architecture and cell morphology. The regulation of Rock is thought to occur via autoinhibition of the kinase domain via intramolecular interactions between the N-terminus and the C-terminus of the kinase. This autoinhibited state can be relieved via proteolytic cleavage, binding of lipids to a Pleckstrin Homology domain near the C-terminus, or binding of GTP-bound RhoA to the central coiled-coil region of Rock. Recent work has identified the Shroom family of proteins as an additional regulator of Rock either at the level of cellular distribution or catalytic activity or both. The Shroom-Rock complex is conserved in most animals and is essential for the formation of the neural tube, eye, and gut in vertebrates. To address the mechanism by which Shroom and Rock interact, we have solved the structure of the coiled-coil region of Rock that binds to Shroom proteins. Consistent with other observations, the Shroom binding domain is a parallel coiled-coil dimer. Using biochemical approaches, we have identified a large patch of residues that contribute to Shrm binding. Their orientation suggests that there may be two independent Shrm binding sites on opposing faces of the coiled-coil region of Rock. Finally, we show that the binding surface is essential for Rock colocalization with Shroom and for Shroom-mediated changes in cell morphology.

  12. Development of natural product-derived receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors based on conservation of protein domain fold.

    PubMed

    Kissau, Lars; Stahl, Petra; Mazitschek, Ralph; Giannis, Athannasios; Waldmann, Herbert

    2003-07-03

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as Tie-2, IGF1R, Her-2/Neu, EGFR, and VEGFR1-3 play crucial roles in the control of cell growth and differentiation. Inhibition of such RTKs has become a major focus of current anticancer drug development, and therefore the discovery of new classes of inhibitors for these signal-transducing proteins is of prime importance. We have recently proposed a novel concept for improving the hit-finding process by employing natural products as biologically validated starting points in structural space for compound library development. In this concept, natural products are regarded as evolutionary chosen ligands for protein domains which are structurally conserved yet genetically mobile. Here we report on the discovery of novel and highly selective VEGFR-2 and -3, Tie-2, and IGF1R inhibitors derived from the naturally occurring Her-2/Neu kinase inhibitor nakijiquinone C and developed on the basis of this concept. Based on the structure of the natural product, a small library (74 members) was synthesized and investigated for inhibition of kinases with highly similar ATP-binding domains. The library yielded inhibitors with IC(50)s in the low micromolar range with high frequency (7 out of 74). In particular, four inhibitors of Tie-2 were found, a kinase critically involved in the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones (angiogenesis) and believed to be a new promising target in antitumor therapy. These results support the "domain concept". To advance the development of improved inhibitors, extensive molecular modeling studies were undertaken, including the construction of new homology models for VEGFR-2 and Tie-2. These studies revealed residues in the kinase structure which are crucial to the development of tailor-made receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  13. Evolutionary relationships among group II intron-encoded proteins and identification of a conserved domain that may be related to maturase function.

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, G; Perlman, P S; Lambowitz, A M

    1993-01-01

    Many group II introns encode reverse transcriptase-like proteins that potentially function in intron mobility and RNA splicing. We compared 34 intron-encoded open reading frames and four related open reading frames that are not encoded in introns. Many of these open reading frames have a reverse transcriptase-like domain, followed by an additional conserved domain X, and a Zn(2+)-finger-like region. Some open reading frames have lost conserved sequence blocks or key amino acids characteristic of functional reverse transcriptases, and some lack the Zn(2+)-finger-like region. The open reading frames encoded by the chloroplast tRNA(Lys) genes and the related Epifagus virginiana matK open reading frame lack a Zn(2+)-finger-like region and have only remnants of a reverse transcriptase-like domain, but retain a readily identifiable domain X. Several findings lead us to speculate that domain X may function in binding of the intron RNA during reverse transcription and RNA splicing. Overall, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that all of the known group II intron open reading frames evolved from an ancestral open reading frame, which contained reverse transcriptase, X, and Zn(2+)-finger-like domains, and that the reverse transcriptase and Zn(2+)-finger-like domains were lost in some cases. The retention of domain X in most proteins may reflect an essential function in RNA splicing, which is independent of the reverse transcriptase activity of these proteins. PMID:8255751

  14. Evolutionary relationships among group II intron-encoded proteins and identification of a conserved domain that may be related to maturase function.

    PubMed

    Mohr, G; Perlman, P S; Lambowitz, A M

    1993-11-11

    Many group II introns encode reverse transcriptase-like proteins that potentially function in intron mobility and RNA splicing. We compared 34 intron-encoded open reading frames and four related open reading frames that are not encoded in introns. Many of these open reading frames have a reverse transcriptase-like domain, followed by an additional conserved domain X, and a Zn(2+)-finger-like region. Some open reading frames have lost conserved sequence blocks or key amino acids characteristic of functional reverse transcriptases, and some lack the Zn(2+)-finger-like region. The open reading frames encoded by the chloroplast tRNA(Lys) genes and the related Epifagus virginiana matK open reading frame lack a Zn(2+)-finger-like region and have only remnants of a reverse transcriptase-like domain, but retain a readily identifiable domain X. Several findings lead us to speculate that domain X may function in binding of the intron RNA during reverse transcription and RNA splicing. Overall, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that all of the known group II intron open reading frames evolved from an ancestral open reading frame, which contained reverse transcriptase, X, and Zn(2+)-finger-like domains, and that the reverse transcriptase and Zn(2+)-finger-like domains were lost in some cases. The retention of domain X in most proteins may reflect an essential function in RNA splicing, which is independent of the reverse transcriptase activity of these proteins.

  15. Phospho-Ser/Thr-binding domains: navigating the cell cycle and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, H Christian; Yaffe, Michael B

    2013-09-01

    Coordinated progression through the cell cycle is a complex challenge for eukaryotic cells. Following genotoxic stress, diverse molecular signals must be integrated to establish checkpoints specific for each cell cycle stage, allowing time for various types of DNA repair. Phospho-Ser/Thr-binding domains have emerged as crucial regulators of cell cycle progression and DNA damage signalling. Such domains include 14-3-3 proteins, WW domains, Polo-box domains (in PLK1), WD40 repeats (including those in the E3 ligase SCF(βTrCP)), BRCT domains (including those in BRCA1) and FHA domains (such as in CHK2 and MDC1). Progress has been made in our understanding of the motif (or motifs) that these phospho-Ser/Thr-binding domains connect with on their targets and how these interactions influence the cell cycle and DNA damage response.

  16. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C). The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6 ~ 7 kDa fragments. Thus

  17. Analysis of LRRK2 accessory repeat domains: prediction of repeat length, number and sites of Parkinson's disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Mills, Ryan D; Mulhern, Terrence D; Cheng, Heung-Chin; Culvenor, Janetta G

    2012-10-01

    Various investigators have identified the major domain organization of LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2), which includes a GTPase ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain followed by a COR (C-terminal of ROC) domain and a protein kinase domain. In addition, there are four domains composed of structural repeat motifs likely to be involved in regulation and localization of this complex protein. In the present paper, we report our bioinformatic analyses of the human LRRK2 amino acid sequence to predict the repeat size, number and likely boundaries for the armadillo repeat, ankyrin repeat, the leucine-rich repeat and WD40 repeat regions of LRRK2. Homology modelling using known protein structures with similar domains was used to predict structures, exposed residues and location of mutations for these repeat regions. We predict that the armadillo repeats, ankyrin repeats and leucine-rich repeats together form an extended N-terminal flexible 'solenoid'-like structure composed of tandem repeat modules likely to be important in anchoring to the membrane and cytoskeletal structures as well as binding to other protein ligands. Near the C-terminus of LRRK2, the WD40 repeat region is predicted to form a closed propeller structure that is important for protein complex formation.

  18. Conservation of apolipoprotein A-I's central domain structural elements upon lipid association on different high-density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    Oda, Michael N; Budamagunta, Madhu S; Geier, Ethan G; Chandradas, Sajiv H; Shao, Baohai; Heinecke, Jay W; Voss, John C; Cavigiolio, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    The antiatherogenic properties of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) are derived, in part, from lipidation-state-dependent structural elements that manifest at different stages of apoA-I's progression from lipid-free protein to spherical high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Previously, we reported the structure of apoA-I's N-terminus on reconstituted HDLs (rHDLs) of different sizes. We have now investigated at the single-residue level the conformational adaptations of three regions in the central domain of apoA-I (residues 119-124, 139-144, and 164-170) upon apoA-I lipid binding and HDL formation. An important function associated with these residues of apoA-I is the activation of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), the enzyme responsible for catalyzing HDL maturation. Structural examination was performed by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence and spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies for both the lipid-free protein and rHDL particles 7.8, 8.4, and 9.6 nm in diameter. The two methods provide complementary information about residue side chain mobility and molecular accessibility, as well as the polarity of the local environment at the targeted positions. The modulation of these biophysical parameters yielded new insight into the importance of structural elements in the central domain of apoA-I. In particular, we determined that the loosely lipid-associated structure of residues 134-145 is conserved in all rHDL particles. Truncation of this region completely abolished LCAT activation but did not significantly affect rHDL size, reaffirming the important role of this structural element in HDL function.

  19. Conserved hydrophobic residues in the CARP/β-sheet domain of cyclase-associated protein are involved in actin monomer regulation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2017-09-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a multidomain protein that promotes actin filament dynamics. The C-terminal region of CAP contains a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 protein (CARP) domain (or a β-sheet domain), which binds to actin monomer and is essential for enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. However, how the CARP domain binds to actin is not clearly understood. Here, we report that conserved hydrophobic residues in the CARP domain play important roles in the function of CAP to regulate actin dynamics. Single mutations of three conserved surface-exposed hydrophobic residues in the CARP domain of CAS-2, a Caenorhabditis elegans CAP, significantly reduce its binding to actin monomers and suppress its nucleotide exchange activity on actin. As a result, these mutants are weaker than wild-type to compete with ADF/cofilin to promote recycling of actin monomers for polymerization. A double mutation (V367A/I373A) eliminates these actin-regulatory functions of CAS-2. These hydrophobic residues and previously identified functional residues are scattered on a concave β-sheet of the CARP domain, suggesting that a wide area of the β-sheet is involved in binding to actin. These observations suggest that the CARP domain of CAP binds to actin in a distinct manner from other known actin-binding proteins. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Identification of a noncatalytic cGMP-binding domain conserved in both the cGMP-stimulated and photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, H; Prusti, R K; LeTrong, H; Sonnenburg, W K; Mullaney, P J; Walsh, K A; Beavo, J A

    1990-01-01

    Partial amino acid sequence has been determined for the cone, alpha' subunit of the bovine photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) and deduced from nucleotide sequences of a partial cDNA clone. These sequences identify the alpha' subunit as the product of a gene that is distinct from those encoding the alpha or beta subunits of the membrane-associated rod photoreceptor PDE. Comparisons between the recently determined cGMP-stimulated-PDE sequence and those of the alpha and alpha' photoreceptor PDE subunits reveal an unexpected sequence similarity. In addition to the catalytic domain conserved in eukaryotic PDEs, all three PDEs possess a second conserved segment of approximately 340 residues that contains two internally homologous repeats. Limited proteolysis and direct photolabeling studies indicate that the noncatalytic, cGMP-binding site(s) in the cGMP-stimulated PDE is located within this conserved domain, suggesting that it also may serve this function in the photoreceptor PDEs. Moreover, other PDEs that do not bind cGMP at noncatalytic sites do not contain this conserved domain. The function of the conserved segment in the photoreceptor PDEs is not known, but the homology to allosteric sites of the cGMP-stimulated PDE suggests a role in cGMP binding and modulation of enzyme activity. Images PMID:2153290

  1. Explorations of linked editosome domains leading to the discovery of motifs defining conserved pockets in editosome OB-folds.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Jun; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-11-01

    Trypanosomatids form a group of protozoa which contain parasites of human, animals and plants. Several of these species cause major human diseases, including Trypanosoma brucei which is the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, also called sleeping sickness. These organisms have many highly unusual features including a unique U-insertion/deletion RNA editing process in the single mitochondrion. A key multi-protein complex, called the ∼20S editosome, or editosome, carries out a cascade of essential RNA-modifying reactions and contains a core of 12 different proteins of which six are the interaction proteins A1 to A6. Each of these interaction proteins comprises a C-terminal OB-fold and the smallest interaction protein A6 has been shown to interact with four other editosome OB-folds. Here we report the results of a "linked OB-fold" approach to obtain a view of how multiple OB-folds might interact in the core of the editosome. Constructs with variants of linked domains in 25 expression and co-expression experiments resulted in 13 soluble multi-OB-fold complexes. In several instances, these complexes were more homogeneous in size than those obtained from corresponding unlinked OB-folds. The crystal structure of A3(OB) linked to A6 could be elucidated and confirmed the tight interaction between these two OB domains as seen also in our recent complex of A3(OB) and A6 with nanobodies. In the current crystal structure of A3(OB) linked to A6, hydrophobic side chains reside in well-defined pockets of neighboring OB-fold domains. When analyzing the available crystal structures of editosome OB-folds, it appears that in five instances "Pocket 1" of A1(OB), A3(OB) and A6 is occupied by a hydrophobic side chain from a neighboring protein. In these three different OB-folds, Pocket 1 is formed by two conserved sequence motifs and an invariant arginine. These pockets might play a key role in the assembly or mechanism of the editosome by interacting with hydrophobic

  2. The conserved bromo-adjacent homology domain of yeast Orc1 functions in the selection of DNA replication origins within chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Philipp; Park, Sookhee; Shor, Erika; Huebert, Dana J.; Warren, Christopher L.; Ansari, Aseem Z.; Weinreich, Michael; Eaton, Matthew L.; MacAlpine, David M.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds to the specific positions on chromosomes that serve as DNA replication origins. Although ORC is conserved from yeast to humans, the DNA sequence elements that specify ORC binding are not. In particular, metazoan ORC shows no obvious DNA sequence specificity, whereas yeast ORC binds to a specific DNA sequence within all yeast origins. Thus, whereas chromatin must play an important role in metazoan ORC's ability to recognize origins, it is unclear whether chromatin plays a role in yeast ORC's recognition of origins. This study focused on the role of the conserved N-terminal bromo-adjacent homology domain of yeast Orc1 (Orc1BAH). Recent studies indicate that BAH domains are chromatin-binding modules. We show that the Orc1BAH domain was necessary for ORC's stable association with yeast chromosomes, and was physiologically relevant to DNA replication in vivo. This replication role was separable from the Orc1BAH domain's previously defined role in transcriptional silencing. Genome-wide analyses of ORC binding in ORC1 and orc1bahΔ cells revealed that the Orc1BAH domain contributed to ORC's association with most yeast origins, including a class of origins highly dependent on the Orc1BAH domain for ORC association (orc1bahΔ-sensitive origins). Orc1bahΔ-sensitive origins required the Orc1BAH domain for normal activity on chromosomes and plasmids, and were associated with a distinct local nucleosome structure. These data provide molecular insights into how the Orc1BAH domain contributes to ORC's selection of replication origins, as well as new tools for examining conserved mechanisms governing ORC's selection of origins within eukaryotic chromosomes. PMID:20595233

  3. A domain of TEL conserved in a subset of ETS proteins defines a specific oligomerization interface essential to the mitogenic properties of the TEL-PDGFR beta oncoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Jousset, C; Carron, C; Boureux, A; Quang, C T; Oury, C; Dusanter-Fourt, I; Charon, M; Levin, J; Bernard, O; Ghysdael, J

    1997-01-01

    TEL is a novel member of the ETS family of transcriptional regulators which is frequently involved in human leukemias as the result of specific chromosomal translocations. We show here by co-immunoprecipitation and GST chromatography analyses that TEL and TEL-derived fusion proteins form homotypic oligomers in vitro and in vivo. Deletion mutagenesis identifies the TEL oligomerization domain as a 65 amino acid region which is conserved in a subset of the ETS proteins including ETS-1, ETS-2, FLI-1, ERG-2 and GABP alpha in vertebrates and PNTP2, YAN and ELG in Drosophila. TEL-induced oligomerization is shown to be essential for the constitutive activation of the protein kinase activity and mitogenic properties of TEL-platelet derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFR beta), a fusion oncoprotein characteristic of the leukemic cells of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia harboring a t(5;12) chromosomal translocation. Swapping experiments in which the TEL oligomerization domain was exchanged by the homologous domains of representative vertebrate ETS proteins including ETS-1, ERG-2 and GABP alpha show that oligomerization is a specific property of the TEL amino-terminal conserved domain. These results indicate that the amino-terminal domain conserved in a subset of the ETS proteins has evolved to generate a specialized protein-protein interaction interface which is likely to be an important determinant of their specificity as transcriptional regulators. PMID:9009269

  4. A conserved acidic patch in the Myb domain is required for activation of an endogenous target gene and for chromatin binding

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Emily Ray; Ko, Dennis; Chen, Carolyn; Lipsick, Joseph S

    2008-01-01

    The c-Myb protein is a transcriptional regulator initially identified by homology to the v-Myb oncoprotein, and has since been implicated in human cancer. The most highly conserved portion of the c-Myb protein is the DNA-binding domain which consists of three imperfect repeats. Many other proteins contain one or more Myb-related domains, including a number of proteins that do not bind directly to DNA. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of diverse classes of Myb-related domains and discovered a highly conserved patch of acidic residues common to all Myb-related domains. These acidic residues are positioned in the first of three alpha-helices within each of the three repeats that comprise the c-Myb DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, these conserved acidic residues are present on a surface of the protein which is distinct from that which binds to DNA. Alanine mutagenesis revealed that the acidic patch of the third c-Myb repeat is essential for transcriptional activity, but neither for nuclear localization nor DNA-binding. Instead, these acidic residues are required for efficient chromatin binding and interaction with the histone H4 N-terminal tail. PMID:18840288

  5. A Conserved Glycine Residue of Trimeric Autotransporter Domains Plays a Key Role in Yersinia Adhesin A Autotransport▿

    PubMed Central

    Grosskinsky, Ulrike; Schütz, Monika; Fritz, Michaela; Schmid, Yvonne; Lamparter, Marina C.; Szczesny, Pawel; Lupas, Andrei N.; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Linke, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    The Yersinia adhesin A (YadA) is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of enteric yersiniae. It consists of three major domains: a head mediating adherence to host cells, a stalk involved in serum resistance, and an anchor that forms a membrane pore and is responsible for the autotransport function. The anchor contains a glycine residue, nearly invariant throughout trimeric autotransporter adhesins, that faces the pore lumen. To address the role of this glycine, we replaced it with polar amino acids of increasing side chain size and expressed wild-type and mutant YadA in Escherichia coli. The mutations did not impair the YadA-mediated adhesion to collagen and to host cells or the host cell cytokine production, but they decreased the expression levels and stability of YadA trimers with increasing side chain size. Likewise, autoagglutination and resistance to serum were decreased in these mutants. We found that the periplasmic protease DegP is involved in the degradation of YadA and that in an E. coli degP deletion strain, mutant versions of YadA were expressed almost to wild-type levels. We conclude that the conserved glycine residue affects both the export and the stability of YadA and consequently some of its putative functions in pathogenesis. PMID:17921300

  6. Manganese toxicity and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mam3p, a member of the ACDP (ancient conserved domain protein) family.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Jensen, Laran T; Gardner, Allison J; Culotta, Valeria C

    2005-03-15

    Manganese is an essential, but potentially toxic, trace metal in biological systems. Overexposure to manganese is known to cause neurological deficits in humans, but the pathways that lead to manganese toxicity are largely unknown. We have employed the bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to identify genes that contribute to manganese-related damage. In a genetic screen for yeast manganese-resistance mutants, we identified S. cerevisiae MAM3 as a gene which, when deleted, would increase cellular tolerance to toxic levels of manganese and also increased the cell's resistance towards cobalt and zinc. By sequence analysis, Mam3p shares strong similarity with the mammalian ACDP (ancient conserved domain protein) family of polypeptides. Mutations in human ACDP1 have been associated with urofacial (Ochoa) syndrome. However, the functions of eukaryotic ACDPs remain unknown. We show here that S. cerevisiae MAM3 encodes an integral membrane protein of the yeast vacuole whose expression levels directly correlate with the degree of manganese toxicity. Surprisingly, Mam3p contributes to manganese toxicity without any obvious changes in vacuolar accumulation of metals. Furthermore, through genetic epistasis studies, we demonstrate that MAM3 operates independently of the well-established manganese-trafficking pathways in yeast, involving the manganese transporters Pmr1p, Smf2p and Pho84p. This is the first report of a eukaryotic ACDP family protein involved in metal homoeostasis.

  7. PhyloPro2.0: a database for the dynamic exploration of phylogenetically conserved proteins and their domain architectures across the Eukarya

    PubMed Central

    Cromar, Graham L.; Zhao, Anthony; Xiong, Xuejian; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Loughran, Noeleen; Song, Hongyan; Parkinson, John

    2016-01-01

    PhyloPro is a database and accompanying web-based application for the construction and exploration of phylogenetic profiles across the Eukarya. In this update article, we present six major new developments in PhyloPro: (i) integration of Pfam-A domain predictions for all proteins; (ii) new summary heatmaps and detailed level views of domain conservation; (iii) an interactive, network-based visualization tool for exploration of domain architectures and their conservation; (iv) ability to browse based on protein functional categories (GOSlim); (v) improvements to the web interface to enhance drill down capability from the heatmap view; and (vi) improved coverage including 164 eukaryotes and 12 reference species. In addition, we provide improved support for downloading data and images in a variety of formats. Among the existing tools available for phylogenetic profiles, PhyloPro provides several innovative domain-based features including a novel domain adjacency visualization tool. These are designed to allow the user to identify and compare proteins with similar domain architectures across species and thus develop hypotheses about the evolution of lineage-specific trajectories. Database URL: http://www.compsysbio.org/phylopro/ PMID:26980519

  8. Structure-function analysis of the heat shock factor-binding protein reveals a protein composed solely of a highly conserved and dynamic coiled-coil trimerization domain.

    PubMed

    Tai, Li-Jung; McFall, Sally M; Huang, Kai; Demeler, Borries; Fox, Sue G; Brubaker, Kurt; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar; Morimoto, Richard I

    2002-01-04

    Heat shock factor-binding protein (HSBP) 1 is a small, evolutionarily conserved protein originally identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using the trimerization domain of heat shock factor (HSF) 1 as the bait. Similar in size to HSF1 trimerization domain, human HSBP1 contains two arrays of hydrophobic heptad repeats (designated HR-N and HR-C) characteristic of coiled-coil proteins. Proteins of the HSBP family are relatively small (<100 residues), comprising solely a putative coiled-coil oligomerization domain without any other readily recognizable structural or functional motif. Our biophysical and biochemical characterization of human HSBP1 reveals a cooperatively folded protein with high alpha-helical content and moderate stability. NMR analyses reveal a single continuous helix encompassing both HR-N and HR-C in the highly conserved central region, whereas the less conserved carboxyl terminus is unstructured and accessible to proteases. Unlike previously characterized coiled-coils, backbone 15N relaxation measurements implicate motional processes on the millisecond time scale in the coiled-coil region. Analytical ultracentrifugation and native PAGE studies indicate that HSBP1 is predominantly trimeric over a wide concentration range. NMR analyses suggest a rotationally symmetric trimer. Because the highly conserved hydrophobic heptad repeats extend over 60% of HSBP1, we propose that HSBP most likely regulates the function of other proteins through coiled-coil interactions.

  9. The interdomain linker of AAV-2 Rep68 is an integral part of its oligomerization domain: role of a conserved SF3 helicase residue in oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Bardelli, Martino; Burgner, John W; Villamil-Jarauta, Maria; Das, Kanni; Kekilli, Demet; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Linden, R Michael; Escalante, Carlos R

    2012-01-01

    The four Rep proteins of adeno-associated virus (AAV) orchestrate all aspects of its viral life cycle, including transcription regulation, DNA replication, virus assembly, and site-specific integration of the viral genome into the human chromosome 19. All Rep proteins share a central SF3 superfamily helicase domain. In other SF3 members this domain is sufficient to induce oligomerization. However, the helicase domain in AAV Rep proteins (i.e. Rep40/Rep52) as shown by its monomeric characteristic, is not able to mediate stable oligomerization. This observation led us to hypothesize the existence of an as yet undefined structural determinant that regulates Rep oligomerization. In this document, we described a detailed structural comparison between the helicase domains of AAV-2 Rep proteins and those of the other SF3 members. This analysis shows a major structural difference residing in the small oligomerization sub-domain (OD) of Rep helicase domain. In addition, secondary structure prediction of the linker connecting the helicase domain to the origin-binding domain (OBD) indicates the potential to form α-helices. We demonstrate that mutant Rep40 constructs containing different lengths of the linker are able to form dimers, and in the presence of ATP/ADP, larger oligomers. We further identified an aromatic linker residue (Y224) that is critical for oligomerization, establishing it as a conserved signature motif in SF3 helicases. Mutation of this residue critically affects oligomerization as well as completely abolishes the ability to produce infectious virus. Taken together, our data support a model where the linker residues preceding the helicase domain fold into an α-helix that becomes an integral part of the helicase domain and is critical for the oligomerization and function of Rep68/78 proteins through cooperative interaction with the OBD and helicase domains.

  10. Evaluation of tetravalent and conserved synthetic peptides vaccines derived from Dengue virus Envelope domain I and II.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Raissa Prado; Livonesi, Márcia Cristina; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Rodrigues, Naiara Ferreira; da Costa, Lauro César Felipe; Dos Santos, Michelle Cristina Silva Gomes; de Oliveira Rocha, Eliseu Soares; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2014-08-08

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus (DENV) serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients experiencing a secondary infection with a different serotype progress to the severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. In this study, the vaccine potential of three tetravalent and conserved synthetic peptides derived from DENV envelope domain I (named Pep01) and II (named Pep02 and Pep03) was evaluated. Human dengue IgM/IgG positive serum (n=16) showed reactivity against Pep01, Pep02 and Pep03 in different degrees. Mice immunization experiments showed that these peptides were able to induce a humoral response characterized by antibodies with low neutralizing activity. The spleen cells derived from mice immunized with the peptides showed a significant cytotoxic activity (only for Pep02 and Pep03), a high expression of IL-10 (P<0.01) and a reduced expression of TNF-α and IFN-gamma (P<0.001) compared to DENV-1 infected splenocytes. Thus these peptides, and specially the Pep03, can induce a humoral response characterized by antibodies with low neutralizing activities and probably a T cell response that could be beneficial to induce an effective immune response against all DENV serotypes and do not contributed to the immunopathogenesis. However, further studies in peptide sequence will be required to induce the production of neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes and also to improve immunogenicity of these peptides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural conservation in the template/pseudoknot domain of vertebrate telomerase RNA from teleost fish to human

    PubMed Central

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Zhang, Qi; Kang, Mijeong; Feigon, Juli

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is an RNA–protein complex that includes a unique reverse transcriptase that catalyzes the addition of single-stranded telomere DNA repeats onto the 3′ ends of linear chromosomes using an integral telomerase RNA (TR) template. Vertebrate TR contains the template/pseudoknot (t/PK) and CR4/5 domains required for telomerase activity in vitro. All vertebrate pseudoknots include two subdomains: P2ab (helices P2a and P2b with a 5/6-nt internal loop) and the minimal pseudoknot (P2b–P3 and associated loops). A helical extension of P2a, P2a.1, is specific to mammalian TR. Using NMR, we investigated the structures of the full-length TR pseudoknot and isolated subdomains in Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), which has the smallest vertebrate TR identified to date. We determined the solution NMR structure and studied the dynamics of medaka P2ab, and identified all base pairs and tertiary interactions in the minimal pseudoknot. Despite differences in length and sequence, the structure of medaka P2ab is more similar to human P2ab than predicted, and the medaka minimal pseudoknot has the same tertiary interactions as the human pseudoknot. Significantly, although P2a.1 is not predicted to form in teleost fish, we find that it forms in the full-length pseudoknot via an unexpected hairpin. Model structures of the subdomains are combined to generate a model of t/PK. These results provide evidence that the architecture for the vertebrate t/PK is conserved from teleost fish to human. The organization of the t/PK on telomerase reverse transcriptase for medaka and human is modeled based on the cryoEM structure of Tetrahymena telomerase, providing insight into function. PMID:27531956

  12. A conserved isoleucine in the LOV1 domain of a novel phototropin from the marine alga Ostreococcus tauri modulates the dark state recovery of the domain.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Mittal, Chitvan; Ranjan, Peeyush; Kateriya, Suneel

    2011-07-01

    Phototropins are UV-A/blue light receptor proteins with two LOV (Light-Oxygen-Voltage) sensor domains at their N terminus and a kinase domain at the C-terminus in photoautotrophic organisms. This is the first research report of a canonical phototropin from marine algae Ostreococcus tauri. We synthesized core LOV1 (OtLOV1) domain-encoding portion of the phototropin gene of O. tauri, the domain was heterologously expressed, purified and assessed for its spectral properties and dark recovery kinetics by UV-Visible, fluorescence spectroscopy and mutational studies. Quaternary structure characteristics were studied by SEC and glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The absorption spectrum of OtLOV1 lacks the characteristic 361nm peak shown by other LOV1 domains. It undergoes a photocycle with a dark state recovery time of approximately 30min (τ=300.35s). Native OtLOV1 stayed as dimer in aqueous solution and the dimer formation was light and concentration independent. Mutating isoleucine at 43rd position to valine accelerated the dark recovery time by more than 10-fold. Mutating it to serine reduced sensitivity to blue light, but the dark recovery time remained unaltered. I43S mutation also destabilized the FMN binding to a great extent. The OtLOV1 domain of the newly identified OtPhot is functional and the isoleucine at position 43 of OtLOV1 is the key residue responsible for fine-tuning the domain properties. This is the first characterized LOV1 domain of a canonical phototropin from a marine alga and spectral properties of the domain are similar to that of the LOV1 domain of higher plants. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional Evidence for the Critical Amino-Terminal Conserved Domain and Key Amino Acids of Arabidopsis 4-HYDROXY-3-METHYLBUT-2-ENYL DIPHOSPHATE REDUCTASE1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Wang, Hsin-Tzu; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2014-01-01

    The plant 4-HYDROXY-3-METHYLBUT-2-ENYL DIPHOSPHATE REDUCTASE (HDR) catalyzes the last step of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway to synthesize isopentenyl diphosphate and its allyl isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate, which are common precursors for the synthesis of plastid isoprenoids. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genomic HDR transgene-induced gene-silencing lines are albino, variegated, or pale green, confirming that HDR is essential for plants. We used Escherichia coli isoprenoid synthesis H (Protein Data Bank code 3F7T) as a template for homology modeling to identify key amino acids of Arabidopsis HDR. The predicted model reveals that cysteine (Cys)-122, Cys-213, and Cys-350 are involved in iron-sulfur cluster formation and that histidine (His)-152, His-241, glutamate (Glu)-242, Glu-243, threonine (Thr)-244, Thr-312, serine-379, and asparagine-381 are related to substrate binding or catalysis. Glu-242 and Thr-244 are conserved only in cyanobacteria, green algae, and land plants, whereas the other key amino acids are absolutely conserved from bacteria to plants. We used site-directed mutagenesis and complementation assay to confirm that these amino acids, except His-152 and His-241, were critical for Arabidopsis HDR function. Furthermore, the Arabidopsis HDR contains an extra amino-terminal domain following the transit peptide that is highly conserved from cyanobacteria, and green algae to land plants but not existing in the other bacteria. We demonstrated that the amino-terminal conserved domain was essential for Arabidopsis and cyanobacterial HDR function. Further analysis of conserved amino acids in the amino-terminal conserved domain revealed that the tyrosine-72 residue was critical for Arabidopsis HDR. These results suggest that the structure and reaction mechanism of HDR evolution have become specific for oxygen-evolving photosynthesis organisms and that HDR probably evolved independently in cyanobacteria versus other prokaryotes. PMID:25037211

  14. Sequence-conserved and antibody-accessible sites in the V1V2 domain of HIV-1 gp120 envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Shmelkov, Evgeny; Grigoryan, Arsen; Krachmarov, Chavdar; Abagyan, Ruben; Cardozo, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    The immune-correlates analysis of the RV144 trial suggested that epitopes targeted by protective antibodies (Abs) reside in the V1V2 domain of gp120. We mapped V1V2 positional sequence variation onto the conserved V1V2 structural fold and showed that while most of the solvent-accessible V1V2 amino acids vary between strains, there are two accessible molecular surface regions that are conserved and also naturally antigenic. These sites may contain epitopes targeted by broadly cross-reactive anti-V1V2 antibodies.

  15. Archaeal DnaG contains a conserved N-terminal RNA-binding domain and enables tailing of rRNA by the exosome.

    PubMed

    Hou, Linlin; Klug, Gabriele; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2014-11-10

    The archaeal exosome is a phosphorolytic 3'-5' exoribonuclease complex. In a reverse reaction it synthesizes A-rich RNA tails. Its RNA-binding cap comprises the eukaryotic orthologs Rrp4 and Csl4, and an archaea-specific subunit annotated as DnaG. In Sulfolobus solfataricus DnaG and Rrp4 but not Csl4 show preference for poly(rA). Archaeal DnaG contains N- and C-terminal domains (NTD and CTD) of unknown function flanking a TOPRIM domain. We found that the NT and TOPRIM domains have comparable, high conservation in all archaea, while the CTD conservation correlates with the presence of exosome. We show that the NTD is a novel RNA-binding domain with poly(rA)-preference cooperating with the TOPRIM domain in binding of RNA. Consistently, a fusion protein containing full-length Csl4 and NTD of DnaG led to enhanced degradation of A-rich RNA by the exosome. We also found that DnaG strongly binds native and in vitro transcribed rRNA and enables its polynucleotidylation by the exosome. Furthermore, rRNA-derived transcripts with heteropolymeric tails were degraded faster by the exosome than their non-tailed variants. Based on our data, we propose that archaeal DnaG is an RNA-binding protein, which, in the context of the exosome, is involved in targeting of stable RNA for degradation.

  16. Archaeal DnaG contains a conserved N-terminal RNA-binding domain and enables tailing of rRNA by the exosome

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Linlin; Klug, Gabriele; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The archaeal exosome is a phosphorolytic 3′–5′ exoribonuclease complex. In a reverse reaction it synthesizes A-rich RNA tails. Its RNA-binding cap comprises the eukaryotic orthologs Rrp4 and Csl4, and an archaea-specific subunit annotated as DnaG. In Sulfolobus solfataricus DnaG and Rrp4 but not Csl4 show preference for poly(rA). Archaeal DnaG contains N- and C-terminal domains (NTD and CTD) of unknown function flanking a TOPRIM domain. We found that the NT and TOPRIM domains have comparable, high conservation in all archaea, while the CTD conservation correlates with the presence of exosome. We show that the NTD is a novel RNA-binding domain with poly(rA)-preference cooperating with the TOPRIM domain in binding of RNA. Consistently, a fusion protein containing full-length Csl4 and NTD of DnaG led to enhanced degradation of A-rich RNA by the exosome. We also found that DnaG strongly binds native and in vitro transcribed rRNA and enables its polynucleotidylation by the exosome. Furthermore, rRNA-derived transcripts with heteropolymeric tails were degraded faster by the exosome than their non-tailed variants. Based on our data, we propose that archaeal DnaG is an RNA-binding protein, which, in the context of the exosome, is involved in targeting of stable RNA for degradation. PMID:25326320

  17. The Highly Conserved β-Hairpin of the Paired DNA-Binding Domain Is Required for Assembly of Pax-Ets Ternary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, William; Fitzsimmons, Daniel; Lennox, Heidi; Krautkramer, Susan R.; Gentile, Lisa N.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Hagman, James

    1999-01-01

    Pax family transcription factors bind DNA through the paired domain. This domain, which is comprised of two helix-turn-helix motifs and a β-hairpin structure, is a target of mutations in congenital disorders of mice and humans. Previously, we showed that Pax-5 (B-cell-specific activator protein) recruits proteins of the Ets proto-oncogene family to bind a composite DNA site that is essential for efficient transcription of the early-B-cell-specific mb-1 promoter. Here, evidence is provided for specific interactions between Ets-1 and the amino-terminal subdomains of Pax proteins. By tethering deletion fragments of Pax-5 to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, we show that 73 amino acids (amino acids 12 to 84) of its amino-terminal subdomain can recruit the ETS domain of Ets-1 to bind the composite site. Furthermore, an amino acid (Gln22) within the highly conserved β-hairpin motif of Pax-5 is essential for efficient recruitment of Ets-1. The ability to recruit Ets proteins to bind DNA is a shared property of Pax proteins, as demonstrated by cooperative DNA binding of Ets-1 with sequences derived from the paired domains of Pax-2 and Pax-3. The strict conservation of sequences required for recruitment of Ets proteins suggests that Pax-Ets interactions are important for regulating transcription in diverse tissues during cellular differentiation. PMID:10022910

  18. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  19. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin. PMID:8552082

  20. Highly conserved residues in the helical domain of dengue virus type 1 precursor membrane protein are involved in assembly, precursor membrane (prM) protein cleavage, and entry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Szu-Chia; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Zou, Gang; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Shi, Pei-Yong; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2014-11-28

    The envelope and precursor membrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) are present on the surface of immature virions. During maturation, prM protein is cleaved by furin protease into pr peptide and membrane (M) protein. Although previous studies mainly focusing on the pr region have identified several residues important for DENV replication, the functional role of M protein, particularly the α-helical domain (MH), which is predicted to undergo a large conformational change during maturation, remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nine highly conserved MH domain residues in the replication cycle of DENV by site-directed mutagenesis in a DENV1 prME expression construct and found that alanine substitutions introduced to four highly conserved residues at the C terminus and one at the N terminus of the MH domain greatly affect the production of both virus-like particles and replicon particles. Eight of the nine alanine mutants affected the entry of replicon particles, which correlated with the impairment in prM cleavage. Moreover, seven mutants were found to have reduced prM-E interaction at low pH, which may inhibit the formation of smooth immature particles and exposure of prM cleavage site during maturation, thus contributing to inefficient prM cleavage. Taken together, these results are the first report showing that highly conserved MH domain residues, located at 20-38 amino acids downstream from the prM cleavage site, can modulate the prM cleavage, maturation of particles, and virus entry. The highly conserved nature of these residues suggests potential targets of antiviral strategy.

  1. A Highly Conserved Residue of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Important for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Mediated by Anti-cluster A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Veillette, Maxime; Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Scharf, Louise; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ferrari, Guido; Robinson, James E.; Stürzel, Christina; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Lewis, George K.; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from HIV-1-infected individuals contain antibodies able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These antibodies preferentially recognize envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitopes induced upon CD4 binding. Here, we show that a highly conserved tryptophan at position 69 of the gp120 inner domain is important for ADCC mediated by anti-cluster A antibodies and sera from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26637462

  2. Structural analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) intracellular domain reveals a conserved interaction epitope.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christina; Slater, Leanne; Erat, Michele C; Konrat, Robert; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2012-03-02

    Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells adhere to endothelial cells, thereby obstructing the microvasculature. Erythrocyte adherence is directly associated with severe malaria and increased disease lethality, and it is mediated by the PfEMP1 family. PfEMP1 clustering in knob-like protrusions on the erythrocyte membrane is critical for cytoadherence, however the molecular mechanisms behind this system remain elusive. Here, we show that the intracellular domains of the PfEMP1 family (ATS) share a unique molecular architecture, which comprises a minimal folded core and extensive flexible elements. A conserved flexible segment at the ATS center is minimally restrained by the folded core. Yeast-two-hybrid data and a novel sequence analysis method suggest that this central segment contains a conserved protein interaction epitope. Interestingly, ATS in solution fails to bind the parasite knob-associated histidine-rich protein (KAHRP), an essential cytoadherence component. Instead, we demonstrate that ATS associates with PFI1780w, a member of the Plasmodium helical interspersed sub-telomeric (PHIST) family. PHIST domains are widespread in exported parasite proteins, however this is the first specific molecular function assigned to any variant of this family. We propose that PHIST domains facilitate protein interactions, and that the conserved ATS epitope may be targeted to disrupt the parasite cytoadherence system.

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Tristram's Bunting, Emberiza tristrami (Aves: Passeriformes): the first representative of the family Emberizidae with six boxes in the central conserved domain II of control region.

    PubMed

    Kan, Xianzhao; Yuan, Jian; Zhang, Liqin; Li, Xifeng; Yu, Lei; Chen, Lei; Guo, Zhichun; Yang, Jianke

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial genome has proven to be a powerful tool for phylogenetic inference, phylogeography, and molecular evolution. In this study, we determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Emberiza tristrami (Passeriformes: Emberizidae) for use in future phylogenetic analyses. This circular mitochondrial genome is 16,789 bp in length and composed of 13 typical protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 putative control region (CR). One extra nucleotide "C" of nad3 is not detected in the mitogenome of E. tristrami. The CR of E. tristrami can be divided into three domains: ETAS (extended termination-associated sequence) domain I (nt 1-431), central conserved domain II (nt 432-847), and CSB (conserved sequence block) domain III (nt 848-1217). Six conserved sequence boxes in the central conserved domain II were identified as boxes F, E, D, C, b, and B.

  4. Differentially conserved staphylococcal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domains confer increased staphylolytic and streptolytic activity to a streptococcal prophage endolysin domain.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Staphylococcal peptidoglycan hydrolases are a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown for some to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic activity, properti...

  5. Interactions between the S-Domain Receptor Kinases and AtPUB-ARM E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Suggest a Conserved Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Marcus A.; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Salt, Jennifer N.; Delmas, Frédéric; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Chilelli, Andrea; Goring, Daphne R.

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome encompasses multiple receptor kinase families with highly variable extracellular domains. Despite their large numbers, the various ligands and the downstream interacting partners for these kinases have been deciphered only for a few members. One such member, the S-receptor kinase, is known to mediate the self-incompatibility (SI) response in Brassica. S-receptor kinase has been shown to interact and phosphorylate a U-box/ARM-repeat-containing E3 ligase, ARC1, which, in turn, acts as a positive regulator of the SI response. In an effort to identify conserved signaling pathways in Arabidopsis, we performed yeast two-hybrid analyses of various S-domain receptor kinase family members with representative Arabidopsis plant U-box/ARM-repeat (AtPUB-ARM) E3 ligases. The kinase domains from S-domain receptor kinases were found to interact with ARM-repeat domains from AtPUB-ARM proteins. These kinase domains, along with M-locus protein kinase, a positive regulator of SI response, were also able to phosphorylate the ARM-repeat domains in in vitro phosphorylation assays. Subcellular localization patterns were investigated using transient expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells and changes were detected in the presence of interacting kinases. Finally, potential links to the involvement of these interacting modules to the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) were investigated. Interestingly, AtPUB9 displayed redistribution to the plasma membrane of BY-2 cells when either treated with ABA or coexpressed with the active kinase domain of ARK1. As well, T-DNA insertion mutants for ARK1 and AtPUB9 lines were altered in their ABA sensitivity during germination and acted at or upstream of ABI3, indicating potential involvement of these proteins in ABA responses. PMID:18552232

  6. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    PubMed

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Human and mouse ZFY genes produce a conserved testis-specific transcript encoding a zinc finger protein with a short acidic domain and modified transactivation potential.

    PubMed

    Decarpentrie, Fanny; Vernet, Nadège; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Longepied, Guy; Streichemberger, Eric; Aknin-Seifer, Isabelle; Ojarikre, Obah A; Burgoyne, Paul S; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine; Mitchell, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    Mammalian ZFY genes are located on the Y chromosome, and code putative transcription factors with 12-13 zinc fingers preceded by a large acidic (activating) domain. In mice, there are two genes, Zfy1 and Zfy2, which are expressed mainly in the testis. Their transcription increases in germ cells as they enter meiosis, both are silenced by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during pachytene, and Zfy2 is strongly reactivated later in spermatids. Recently, we have shown that mouse Zfy2, but not Zfy1, is involved in triggering the apoptotic elimination of specific types of sex chromosomally aberrant spermatocytes. In humans, there is a single widely transcribed ZFY gene, and there is no evidence for a specific role in the testis. Here, we characterize ZFY transcription during spermatogenesis in mice and humans. In mice, we define a variety of Zfy transcripts, among which is a Zfy2 transcript that predominates in spermatids, and a Zfy1 transcript, lacking an exon encoding approximately half of the acidic domain, which predominates prior to MSCI. In humans, we have identified a major testis-specific ZFY transcript that encodes a protein with the same short acidic domain. This represents the first evidence that ZFY has a conserved function during human spermatogenesis. We further show that, in contrast to the full acidic domain, the short domain does not activate transcription in yeast, and we hypothesize that this explains the functional difference observed between Zfy1 and Zfy2 during mouse meiosis.

  8. The Caenorhabditis elegans Iodotyrosine Deiodinase Ortholog SUP-18 Functions through a Conserved Channel SC-Box to Regulate the Muscle Two-Pore Domain Potassium Channel SUP-9

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, Ignacio Perez; Ma, Long; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene sup-18 suppress the defects in muscle contraction conferred by a gain-of-function mutation in SUP-10, a presumptive regulatory subunit of the SUP-9 two-pore domain K+ channel associated with muscle membranes. We cloned sup-18 and found that it encodes the C. elegans ortholog of mammalian iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD), an NADH oxidase/flavin reductase that functions in iodine recycling and is important for the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones that regulate metabolism. The FMN-binding site of mammalian IYD is conserved in SUP-18, which appears to require catalytic activity to function. Genetic analyses suggest that SUP-10 can function with SUP-18 to activate SUP-9 through a pathway that is independent of the presumptive SUP-9 regulatory subunit UNC-93. We identified a novel evolutionarily conserved serine-cysteine-rich region in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of SUP-9 required for its specific activation by SUP-10 and SUP-18 but not by UNC-93. Since two-pore domain K+ channels regulate the resting membrane potentials of numerous cell types, we suggest that the SUP-18 IYD regulates the activity of the SUP-9 channel using NADH as a coenzyme and thus couples the metabolic state of muscle cells to muscle membrane excitability. PMID:24586202

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a conserved domain in plants and prokaryotes from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Linyen; Nakano, Hiroaki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fujimoto, Satoru; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakamura, Shota; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2005-04-01

    A plant- and prokaryote-conserved domain (PPC) has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 3}22. A plant- and prokaryote-conserved domain (PPC) has previously been found in AT-hook motif nuclear localized protein 1 (AHL1) localized in the nuclear matrix of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAHL1). AtAHL1 has a DNA-binding function. Mutation analyses of AtAHL1 has previously revealed that the hydrophobic region of the PPC domain is essential for its nuclear localization. In this study, the PPC of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhPPC) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.69, c = 159.2 Å. Data were obtained at 100 K, with diffraction being observed to a resolution of 1.7 Å. A complete data set from crystals of the SeMet-substituted protein was also obtained.

  10. A conserved C-terminal domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus developmental regulator MedA is required for nuclear localization, adhesion and virulence.

    PubMed

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Lee, Mark J; Sheppard, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA(346-557), that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA(346-557) alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA(346-557) domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function.

  11. A Conserved C-Terminal Domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus Developmental Regulator MedA Is Required for Nuclear Localization, Adhesion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Lee, Mark J.; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA346–557, that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA346–557 alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA346–557 domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function. PMID:23185496

  12. Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Highly Conserved HR1 and HR2 Domains of the SARS-CoV Spike Protein Are More Broadly Neutralizing

    PubMed Central

    Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Coughlin, Melissa M.; Baker, Susan C.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2012-01-01

    Immune sera from convalescent patients have been shown to be effective in the treatment of patients infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Virus (SARS-CoV) making passive immune therapy with human monoclonal antibodies an attractive treatment strategy for SARS. Previously, using Xenomouse (Amgen British Columbia Inc), we produced a panel of neutralizing Human monoclonal antibodies (HmAbs) that could specifically bind to the ectodomain of the SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein. Some of the HmAbs were S1 domain specific, while some were not. In this study, we describe non-S1 binding neutralizing HmAbs that can specifically bind to the conserved S2 domain of the S protein. However, unlike the S1 specific HmAbs, the S2 specific HmAbs can neutralize pseudotyped viruses expressing different S proteins containing receptor binding domain sequences of various clinical isolates. These data indicate that HmAbs which bind to conserved regions of the S protein are more suitable for conferring protection against a wide range of SARS-CoV variants and have implications for generating therapeutic antibodies or subunit vaccines against other enveloped viruses. PMID:23185609

  13. Human monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved HR1 and HR2 domains of the SARS-CoV spike protein are more broadly neutralizing.

    PubMed

    Elshabrawy, Hatem A; Coughlin, Melissa M; Baker, Susan C; Prabhakar, Bellur S

    2012-01-01

    Immune sera from convalescent patients have been shown to be effective in the treatment of patients infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Virus (SARS-CoV) making passive immune therapy with human monoclonal antibodies an attractive treatment strategy for SARS. Previously, using Xenomouse (Amgen British Columbia Inc), we produced a panel of neutralizing Human monoclonal antibodies (HmAbs) that could specifically bind to the ectodomain of the SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein. Some of the HmAbs were S1 domain specific, while some were not. In this study, we describe non-S1 binding neutralizing HmAbs that can specifically bind to the conserved S2 domain of the S protein. However, unlike the S1 specific HmAbs, the S2 specific HmAbs can neutralize pseudotyped viruses expressing different S proteins containing receptor binding domain sequences of various clinical isolates. These data indicate that HmAbs which bind to conserved regions of the S protein are more suitable for conferring protection against a wide range of SARS-CoV variants and have implications for generating therapeutic antibodies or subunit vaccines against other enveloped viruses.

  14. The Conserved Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing C-Terminal Domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa FimV Is Required for Its Cyclic AMP-Dependent and -Independent Functions

    PubMed Central

    Buensuceso, Ryan N. C.; Nguyen, Ylan; Zhang, Kun; Daniel-Ivad, Martin; Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N.; Fleetwood, Aaron D.; Junop, Murray S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FimV is a Pseudomonas aeruginosa inner membrane protein that regulates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels—and thus type IV pilus (T4P)-mediated twitching motility and type II secretion (T2S)—by activating the adenylate cyclase CyaB. Its cytoplasmic domain contains three predicted tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs separated by an unstructured region: two proximal to the inner membrane and one within the “FimV C-terminal domain,” which is highly conserved across diverse homologs. Here, we present the crystal structure of the FimV C terminus, FimV861–919, containing a TPR motif decorated with solvent-exposed, charged side chains, plus a C-terminal capping helix. FimV689, a truncated form lacking this C-terminal motif, did not restore wild-type levels of twitching or surface piliation compared to the full-length protein. FimV689 failed to restore wild-type levels of the T4P motor ATPase PilU or T2S, suggesting that it was unable to activate cAMP synthesis. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis showed that TPR3 interacts directly with the CyaB activator, FimL. However, FimV689 failed to restore wild-type motility in a fimV mutant expressing a constitutively active CyaB (fimV cyaB-R456L), suggesting that the C-terminal motif is also involved in cAMP-independent functions of FimV. The data show that the highly conserved TPR-containing C-terminal domain of FimV is critical for its cAMP-dependent and -independent functions. IMPORTANCE FimV is important for twitching motility and cAMP-dependent virulence gene expression in P. aeruginosa. FimV homologs have been identified in several human pathogens, and their functions are not limited to T4P expression. The C terminus of FimV is remarkably conserved among otherwise very diverse family members, but its role is unknown. We provide here biological evidence for the importance of the C-terminal domain in both cAMP-dependent (through FimL) and -independent functions of FimV. We present X-ray crystal structures

  15. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  16. Structures of the Sgt2/SGTA dimerization domain with the Get5/UBL4A UBL domain reveal a novel interaction that forms a conserved dynamic interface

    PubMed Central

    Chartron, Justin W.; VanderVelde, David G.; Clemons, William M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In the cytoplasm, the correct delivery of membrane proteins is an essential and highly regulated process. The post-translational targeting of the important tail-anchor membrane (TA) proteins has recently been under intense investigation. A specialized pathway, called the GET pathway in yeast and the TRC pathway in vertebrates, recognizes ER targeted TA proteins and delivers them through a complex series of handoffs. An early step is the formation of a complex between Sgt2/SGTA, a co-chaperone with a presumed ubiquitin-like-binding domain (UBD), and Get5/UBL4A, a ubiquitin-like domain (UBL) containing protein. We structurally characterize this novel UBD/UBL interaction for both the yeast and human proteins. This is supported by biophysical studies that demonstrate that complex formation is mediated by electrostatics generating an interface that has high-affinity with rapid kinetics. In total, this work provides a refined model of the interplay of Sgt2 homologs in TA targeting. PMID:23142665

  17. Structurally Conserved Nop56/58 N-terminal Domain Facilitates Archaeal Box C/D Ribonucleoprotein-guided Methyltransferase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Biswas, Shyamasri; Zhang, Xinxin; Brown, Bernard A.; Wollenzien, Paul; Mattos, Carla; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Box C/D RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) guide the 2′-O-methylation of nucleotides in both archaeal and eukaryotic ribosomal RNAs. The archaeal box C/D and C′/D′ RNP subcomplexes are each assembled with three sRNP core proteins. The archaeal Nop56/58 core protein mediates crucial protein-protein interactions required for both sRNP assembly and the methyltransferase reaction by bridging the L7Ae and fibrillarin core proteins. The interaction of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mj) Nop56/58 with the methyltransferase fibrillarin has been investigated using site-directed mutagenesis of specific amino acids in the N-terminal domain of Nop56/58 that interacts with fibrillarin. Extensive mutagenesis revealed an unusually strong Nop56/58-fibrillarin interaction. Only deletion of the NTD itself prevented dimerization with fibrillarin. The extreme stability of the Nop56/58-fibrillarin heterodimer was confirmed in both chemical and thermal denaturation analyses. However, mutations that did not affect Nop56/58 binding to fibrillarin or sRNP assembly nevertheless disrupted sRNP-guided nucleotide modification, revealing a role for Nop56/58 in methyltransferase activity. This conclusion was supported with the cross-linking of Nop56/58 to the target RNA substrate. The Mj Nop56/58 NTD was further characterized by solving its three-dimensional crystal structure to a resolution of 1.7 Å. Despite low primary sequence conservation among the archaeal Nop56/58 homologs, the overall structure of the archaeal NTD domain is very well conserved. In conclusion, the archaeal Nop56/58 NTD exhibits a conserved domain structure whose exceptionally stable interaction with fibrillarin plays a role in both RNP assembly and methyltransferase activity. PMID:22496443

  18. Pub1p C-terminal RRM domain interacts with Tif4631p through a conserved region neighbouring the Pab1p binding site.

    PubMed

    Santiveri, Clara M; Mirassou, Yasmina; Rico-Lastres, Palma; Martínez-Lumbreras, Santiago; Pérez-Cañadillas, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Pub1p, a highly abundant poly(A)+ mRNA binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, influences the stability and translational control of many cellular transcripts, particularly under some types of environmental stresses. We have studied the structure, RNA and protein recognition modes of different Pub1p constructs by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the C-terminal RRM domain (RRM3) shows a non-canonical N-terminal helix that packs against the canonical RRM fold in an original fashion. This structural trait is conserved in Pub1p metazoan homologues, the TIA-1 family, defining a new class of RRM-type domains that we propose to name TRRM (TIA-1 C-terminal domain-like RRM). Pub1p TRRM and the N-terminal RRM1-RRM2 tandem bind RNA with high selectivity for U-rich sequences, with TRRM showing additional preference for UA-rich ones. RNA-mediated chemical shift changes map to β-sheet and protein loops in the three RRMs. Additionally, NMR titration and biochemical in vitro cross-linking experiments determined that Pub1p TRRM interacts specifically with the N-terminal region (1-402) of yeast eIF4G1 (Tif4631p), very likely through the conserved Box1, a short sequence motif neighbouring the Pab1p binding site in Tif4631p. The interaction involves conserved residues of Pub1p TRRM, which define a protein interface that mirrors the Pab1p-Tif4631p binding mode. Neither protein nor RNA recognition involves the novel N-terminal helix, whose functional role remains unclear. By integrating these new results with the current knowledge about Pub1p, we proposed different mechanisms of Pub1p recruitment to the mRNPs and Pub1p-mediated mRNA stabilization in which the Pub1p/Tif4631p interaction would play an important role.

  19. The conserved LIM domain-containing focal adhesion protein ZYX-1 regulates synapse maintenance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuo; Schaefer, Anneliese M.; Dour, Scott; Nonet, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the identification of zyxin as a regulator of synapse maintenance in mechanosensory neurons in C. elegans. zyx-1 mutants lacked PLM mechanosensory synapses as adult animals. However, most PLM synapses initially formed during development but were subsequently lost as the animals developed. Vertebrate zyxin regulates cytoskeletal responses to mechanical stress in culture. Our work provides in vivo evidence in support of such a role for zyxin. In particular, zyx-1 mutant synaptogenesis phenotypes were suppressed by disrupting locomotion of the mutant animals, suggesting that zyx-1 protects mechanosensory synapses from locomotion-induced forces. In cultured cells, zyxin is recruited to focal adhesions and stress fibers via C-terminal LIM domains and modulates cytoskeletal organization via the N-terminal domain. The synapse-stabilizing activity was mediated by a short isoform of ZYX-1 containing only the LIM domains. Consistent with this notion, PLM synaptogenesis was independent of α-actinin and ENA-VASP, both of which bind to the N-terminal domain of zyxin. Our results demonstrate that the LIM domain moiety of zyxin functions autonomously to mediate responses to mechanical stress and provide in vivo evidence for a role of zyxin in neuronal development. PMID:25252943

  20. The conserved LIM domain-containing focal adhesion protein ZYX-1 regulates synapse maintenance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuo; Schaefer, Anneliese M; Dour, Scott; Nonet, Michael L

    2014-10-01

    We describe the identification of zyxin as a regulator of synapse maintenance in mechanosensory neurons in C. elegans. zyx-1 mutants lacked PLM mechanosensory synapses as adult animals. However, most PLM synapses initially formed during development but were subsequently lost as the animals developed. Vertebrate zyxin regulates cytoskeletal responses to mechanical stress in culture. Our work provides in vivo evidence in support of such a role for zyxin. In particular, zyx-1 mutant synaptogenesis phenotypes were suppressed by disrupting locomotion of the mutant animals, suggesting that zyx-1 protects mechanosensory synapses from locomotion-induced forces. In cultured cells, zyxin is recruited to focal adhesions and stress fibers via C-terminal LIM domains and modulates cytoskeletal organization via the N-terminal domain. The synapse-stabilizing activity was mediated by a short isoform of ZYX-1 containing only the LIM domains. Consistent with this notion, PLM synaptogenesis was independent of α-actinin and ENA-VASP, both of which bind to the N-terminal domain of zyxin. Our results demonstrate that the LIM domain moiety of zyxin functions autonomously to mediate responses to mechanical stress and provide in vivo evidence for a role of zyxin in neuronal development.

  1. Analysis of the binding of the N-terminal conserved domain of yeast Cbf5p to a box H/ACA snoRNA.

    PubMed

    Normand, Christophe; Capeyrou, Regine; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Mougin, Annie; Henry, Yves; Caizergues-Ferrer, Michele

    2006-10-01

    During ribosome biogenesis, the RNA precursor to mature rRNAs undergoes numerous post-transcriptional chemical modifications of bases, including conversions of uridines to pseudouridines. In archaea and eukaryotes, these conversions are performed by box H/ACA small ribonucleoprotein particles (box H/ACA RNPs), which contain a small guide RNA responsible for the selection of substrate uridines and four proteins, including the pseudouridine synthase, Cbf5p. So far, no in vitro reconstitution of eukaryotic box H/ACA RNPs from purified components has been achieved, principally due to difficulties in purifying recombinant eukaryotic Cbf5p. In this study, we present the purification of a truncated derivative of yeast Cbf5p (Cbf5(Delta)p) that retains the highly conserved TRUB and PUA domains. We have used band retardation assays to show that Cbf5(Delta)p on its own binds to box H/ACA small nucleolar (sno)RNAs. We demonstrate that the conserved H and ACA boxes enhance the affinity of the protein for the snoRNA. Furthermore, like its archaeal homologs, Cbf5(Delta)p can bind to a single stem-loop-box ACA RNA. Finally, we report the first enzymatic footprinting analysis of a Cbf5-RNA complex. Our results are compatible with the view that two molecules of Cbf5p interact with a binding platform constituted by the 5' end of the RNA, the single-stranded hinge domain containing the conserved H box, and the 3' end of the molecule, including the conserved ACA box.

  2. Specific Residues of a Conserved Domain in the N Terminus of the Human Cytomegalovirus pUL50 Protein Determine Its Intranuclear Interaction with pUL53*

    PubMed Central

    Milbradt, Jens; Auerochs, Sabrina; Sevvana, Madhumati; Muller, Yves A.; Sticht, Heinrich; Marschall, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Herpesviral capsids are assembled in the host cell nucleus and are subsequently translocated to the cytoplasm. During this process it has been demonstrated that the human cytomegalovirus proteins pUL50 and pUL53 interact and form, together with other viral and cellular proteins, the nuclear egress complex at the nuclear envelope. In this study we provide evidence that specific residues of a conserved N-terminal region of pUL50 determine its intranuclear interaction with pUL53. In silico evaluation and biophysical analyses suggested that the conserved region forms a regular secondary structure adopting a globular fold. Importantly, site-directed replacement of individual amino acids by alanine indicated a strong functional influence of specific residues inside this globular domain. In particular, mutation of the widely conserved residues Glu-56 or Tyr-57 led to a loss of interaction with pUL53. Consistent with the loss of binding properties, mutants E56A and Y57A showed a defective function in the recruitment of pUL53 to the nuclear envelope in expression plasmid-transfected and human cytomegalovirus-infected cells. In addition, in silico analysis suggested that residues 3–20 form an amphipathic α-helix that appears to be conserved among Herpesviridae. Point mutants revealed a structural role of this N-terminal α-helix for pUL50 stability rather than a direct role in the binding of pUL53. In contrast, the central part of the globular domain including Glu-56 and Tyr-57 is directly responsible for the functional interaction with pUL53 and thus determines formation of the basic nuclear egress complex. PMID:22589554

  3. Conserved cell cycle regulatory properties within the amino terminal domain of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Nikhil; Knight, Jason S.; Robertson, Erle S. . E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-03-15

    The gammaherpesviruses Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are closely related phylogenetically. Rhesus LCV efficiently immortalizes Rhesus B cells in vitro. However, despite a high degree of conservation between the Rhesus LCV and EBV genomes, Rhesus LCV fails to immortalize human B cells in vitro. This species restriction may, at least in part, be linked to the EBV nuclear antigens (EBNAs) and latent membrane proteins (LMPs), known to be essential for B cell transformation. We compared specific properties of EBNA3C, a well-characterized and essential EBV protein, with its Rhesus counterpart to determine whether EBNA3C phenotypes which contribute to cell cycle regulation are conserved in the Rhesus LCV. We show that both EBNA3C and Rhesus EBNA3C bind to a conserved region of mammalian cyclins, regulate pRb stability, and modulate SCF{sup Skp2}-dependent ubiquitination. These results suggest that Rhesus LCV restriction from human B cell immortalization is independent of the conserved cell cycle regulatory functions of the EBNA3C protein.

  4. Novel cellulose-binding domains, NodB homologues and conserved modular architecture in xylanases from the aerobic soil bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and Cellvibrio mixtus.

    PubMed Central

    Millward-Sadler, S J; Davidson, K; Hazlewood, G P; Black, G W; Gilbert, H J; Clarke, J H

    1995-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that selective pressure has led to the retention of cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) by hemicellulase enzymes from aerobic bacteria, four new xylanase (xyn) genes from two cellulolytic soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and Cellvibrio mixtus, have been isolated and sequenced. Pseudomonas genes xynE and xynF encoded modular xylanases (XYLE and XYLF) with predicted M(r) values of 68,600 and 65000 respectively. XYLE contained a glycosyl hydrolase family 11 catalytic domain at its N-terminus, followed by three other domains; the second of these exhibited sequence identity with NodB from rhizobia. The C-terminal domain (40 residues) exhibited significant sequence identity with a non-catalytic domain of previously unknown function, conserved in all the cellulases and one of the hemicellulases previously characterized from the pseudomonad, and was shown to function as a CBD when fused to the reporter protein glutathione-S-transferase. XYLF contained a C-terminal glycosyl hydrolase family 10 catalytic domain and a novel CBD at its N-terminus. C. mixtus genes xynA and xynB exhibited substantial sequence identity with xynE and xynF respectively, and encoded modular xylanases with the same molecular architecture and, by inference, the same functional properties. In the absence of extensive cross-hybridization between other multiple cel (cellulase) and xyn genes from P. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and genomic DNA from C. mixtus, similarity between the two pairs of xylanases may indicate a recent transfer of genes between the two bacteria. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7492333

  5. RapA2 Is a Calcium-binding Lectin Composed of Two Highly Conserved Cadherin-like Domains That Specifically Recognize Rhizobium leguminosarum Acidic Exopolysaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Abdian, Patricia L.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Ausmees, Nora; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2013-01-01

    In silico analyses have revealed a conserved protein domain (CHDL) widely present in bacteria that has significant structural similarity to eukaryotic cadherins. A CHDL domain was shown to be present in RapA, a protein that is involved in autoaggregation of Rhizobium cells, biofilm formation, and adhesion to plant roots as shown by us and others. Structural similarity to cadherins suggested calcium-dependent oligomerization of CHDL domains as a mechanistic basis for RapA action. Here we show by circular dichroism spectroscopy, light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and other methods that RapA2 from Rhizobium leguminosarum indeed exhibits a cadherin-like β-sheet conformation and that its proper folding and stability are dependent on the binding of one calcium ion per protein molecule. By further in silico analysis we also reveal that RapA2 consists of two CHDL domains and expand the range of CHDL-containing proteins in bacteria and archaea. However, light scattering assays at various concentrations of added calcium revealed that RapA2 formed neither homo-oligomers nor hetero-oligomers with RapB (a distinct CHDL protein), indicating that RapA2 does not mediate cellular interactions through a cadherin-like mechanism. Instead, we demonstrate that RapA2 interacts specifically with the acidic exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by R. leguminosarum in a calcium-dependent manner, sustaining a role of these proteins in the development of the biofilm matrix made of EPS. Because EPS binding by RapA2 can only be attributed to its two CHDL domains, we propose that RapA2 is a calcium-dependent lectin and that CHDL domains in various bacterial and archaeal proteins confer carbohydrate binding activity to these proteins. PMID:23235153

  6. A Small Conserved Domain in the Yeast Spa2p Is Necessary and Sufficient for Its Polarized Localization

    PubMed Central

    Arkowitz, Robert A.; Lowe, Nick

    1997-01-01

    SPA2 encodes a yeast protein that is one of the first proteins to localize to sites of polarized growth, such as the shmoo tip and the incipient bud. The dynamics and requirements for Spa2p localization in living cells are examined using Spa2p green fluorescent protein fusions. Spa2p localizes to one edge of unbudded cells and subsequently is observable in the bud tip. Finally, during cytokinesis Spa2p is present as a ring at the mother–daughter bud neck. The bud emergence mutants bem1 and bem2 and mutants defective in the septins do not affect Spa2p localization to the bud tip. Strikingly, a small domain of Spa2p comprised of 150 amino acids is necessary and sufficient for localization to sites of polarized growth. This localization domain and the amino terminus of Spa2p are essential for its function in mating. Searching the yeast genome database revealed a previously uncharacterized protein which we name, Sph1p (Spa2p homolog), with significant homology to the localization domain and amino terminus of Spa2p. This protein also localizes to sites of polarized growth in budding and mating cells. SPH1, which is similar to SPA2, is required for bipolar budding and plays a role in shmoo formation. Overexpression of either Spa2p or Sph1p can block the localization of either protein fused to green fluorescent protein, suggesting that both Spa2p and Sph1p bind to and are localized by the same component. The identification of a 150–amino acid domain necessary and sufficient for localization of Spa2p to sites of polarized growth and the existence of this domain in another yeast protein Sph1p suggest that the early localization of these proteins may be mediated by a receptor that recognizes this small domain. PMID:9214378

  7. The sequence and antiapoptotic functional domains of the human cytomegalovirus UL37 exon 1 immediate early protein are conserved in multiple primary strains.

    PubMed

    Hayajneh, W A; Colberg-Poley, A M; Skaletskaya, A; Bartle, L M; Lesperance, M M; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D G; Kedersha, N L; Goldmacher, V S

    2001-01-05

    The human cytomegalovirus UL37 exon 1 gene encodes the immediate early protein pUL37x1 that has antiapoptotic and regulatory activities. Deletion mutagenesis analysis of the open reading frame of UL37x1 identified two domains that are necessary and sufficient for its antiapoptotic activity. These domains are confined within the segments between amino acids 5 to 34, and 118 to 147, respectively. The first domain provides the targeting of the protein to mitochondria. Direct PCR sequencing of UL37 exon 1 amplified from 26 primary strains of human cytomegalovirus demonstrated that the promoter, polyadenylation signal, and the two segments of pUL37x1 required for its antiapoptotic function were invariant in all sequenced strains and identical to those in AD169 pUL37x1. In total, UL37 exon 1 varies between 0.0 and 1.6% at the nucleotide level from strain AD169. Only 11 amino acids were found to vary in one or more viral strains, and these variations occurred only in the domains of pUL37x1 dispensable for its antiapoptotic function. We infer from this remarkable conservation of pUL37x1 in primary strains that this protein and, probably, its antiapoptotic function are required for productive replication of human cytomegalovirus in humans.

  8. Structural Insights into the Interaction of the Evolutionarily Conserved ZPR1 Domain Tandem with Eukaryotic EF1A, Receptors, and SMN Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra,A.; Gangwani, L.; Davis, R.; Lambright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes encode a zinc finger protein (ZPR1) with tandem ZPR1 domains. In response to growth stimuli, ZPR1 assembles into complexes with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) and the survival motor neurons protein. To gain insight into the structural mechanisms underlying the essential function of ZPR1 in diverse organisms, we determined the crystal structure of a ZPR1 domain tandem and characterized the interaction with eEF1A. The ZPR1 domain consists of an elongation initiation factor 2-like zinc finger and a double-stranded {beta} helix with a helical hairpin insertion. ZPR1 binds preferentially to GDP-bound eEF1A but does not directly influence the kinetics of nucleotide exchange or GTP hydrolysis. However, ZPR1 efficiently displaces the exchange factor eEF1B from preformed nucleotide-free complexes, suggesting that it may function as a negative regulator of eEF1A activation. Structure-based mutational and complementation analyses reveal a conserved binding epitope for eEF1A that is required for normal cell growth, proliferation, and cell cycle progression. Structural differences between the ZPR1 domains contribute to the observed functional divergence and provide evidence for distinct modalities of interaction with eEF1A and survival motor neuron complexes.

  9. The outer-membrane export signal of Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a conserved C-terminal β-sandwich domain

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Koneru, Lahari; Golik, Przemyslaw; Szmigielski, Borys; Nowak, Magdalena; Nowakowska, Zuzanna; Potempa, Barbara; Houston, John A.; Enghild, Jan J.; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Gao, Jinlong; Kwan, Ann H.; Trewhella, Jill; Dubin, Grzegorz; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the recently characterized Type IX Secretion System (T9SS), the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) in secreted proteins functions as an outer membrane translocation signal for export of virulence factors to the cell surface in the Gram-negative Bacteroidetes phylum. In the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, the CTD is cleaved off by PorU sortase in a sequence-independent manner, and anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) is attached to many translocated proteins, thus anchoring them to the bacterial surface. Here, we solved the atomic structure of the CTD of gingipain B (RgpB) from P. gingivalis, alone and together with a preceding immunoglobulin-superfamily domain (IgSF). The CTD was found to possess a typical Ig-like fold encompassing seven antiparallel β-strands organized in two β-sheets, packed into a β-sandwich structure that can spontaneously dimerise through C-terminal strand swapping. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed no fixed orientation of the CTD with respect to the IgSF. By introducing insertion or substitution of residues within the inter-domain linker in the native protein, we were able to show that despite the region being unstructured, it nevertheless is resistant to general proteolysis. These data suggest structural motifs located in the two adjacent Ig-like domains dictate the processing of CTDs by the T9SS secretion pathway. PMID:27005013

  10. The outer-membrane export signal of Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a conserved C-terminal β-sandwich domain.

    PubMed

    de Diego, Iñaki; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Koneru, Lahari; Golik, Przemyslaw; Szmigielski, Borys; Nowak, Magdalena; Nowakowska, Zuzanna; Potempa, Barbara; Houston, John A; Enghild, Jan J; Thøgersen, Ida B; Gao, Jinlong; Kwan, Ann H; Trewhella, Jill; Dubin, Grzegorz; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2016-03-23

    In the recently characterized Type IX Secretion System (T9SS), the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) in secreted proteins functions as an outer membrane translocation signal for export of virulence factors to the cell surface in the Gram-negative Bacteroidetes phylum. In the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, the CTD is cleaved off by PorU sortase in a sequence-independent manner, and anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) is attached to many translocated proteins, thus anchoring them to the bacterial surface. Here, we solved the atomic structure of the CTD of gingipain B (RgpB) from P. gingivalis, alone and together with a preceding immunoglobulin-superfamily domain (IgSF). The CTD was found to possess a typical Ig-like fold encompassing seven antiparallel β-strands organized in two β-sheets, packed into a β-sandwich structure that can spontaneously dimerise through C-terminal strand swapping. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed no fixed orientation of the CTD with respect to the IgSF. By introducing insertion or substitution of residues within the inter-domain linker in the native protein, we were able to show that despite the region being unstructured, it nevertheless is resistant to general proteolysis. These data suggest structural motifs located in the two adjacent Ig-like domains dictate the processing of CTDs by the T9SS secretion pathway.

  11. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Brandon L; Larue, Ross C; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P

    2016-02-23

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein-protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins.

  12. Regulation of Telomere Length Requires a Conserved N-Terminal Domain of Rif2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaizer, Hannah; Connelly, Carla J.; Bettridge, Kelsey; Viggiani, Christopher; Greider, Carol W.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell growth and survival since critically short telomeres signal DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. While the broad principles of length regulation are well established, the molecular mechanism of how these steps occur is not fully understood. We mutagenized the RIF2 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to understand how this protein blocks excess telomere elongation. We identified an N-terminal domain in Rif2 that is essential for length regulation, which we have termed BAT domain for Blocks Addition of Telomeres. Tethering this BAT domain to Rap1 blocked telomere elongation not only in rif2Δ mutants but also in rif1Δ and rap1C-terminal deletion mutants. Mutation of a single amino acid in the BAT domain, phenylalanine at position 8 to alanine, recapitulated the rif2Δ mutant phenotype. Substitution of F8 with tryptophan mimicked the wild-type phenylalanine, suggesting the aromatic amino acid represents a protein interaction site that is essential for telomere length regulation. PMID:26294668

  13. Sequence, structure and function relationships in flaviviruses as assessed by evolutive aspects of its conserved non-structural protein domains.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Néli José; Lima Afonso, Marcelo Querino; Pedersolli, Natan Gonçalves; de Oliveira, Lucas Carrijo; Andrade, Dhiego Souto; Bleicher, Lucas

    2017-01-11

    Flaviviruses are responsible for serious diseases such as dengue, yellow fever, and zika fever. Their genomes encode a polyprotein which, after cleavage, results in three structural and seven non-structural proteins. Homologous proteins can be studied by conservation and coevolution analysis as detected in multiple sequence alignments, usually reporting positions which are strictly necessary for the structure and/or function of all members in a protein family or which are involved in a specific sub-class feature requiring the coevolution of residue sets. This study provides a complete conservation and coevolution analysis on all flaviviruses non-structural proteins, with results mapped on all well-annotated available sequences. A literature review on the residues found in the analysis enabled us to compile available information on their roles and distribution among different flaviviruses. Also, we provide the mapping of conserved and coevolved residues for all sequences currently in SwissProt as a supplementary material, so that particularities in different viruses can be easily analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among RecA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r.

    PubMed

    Knight, K L; Hess, R M; McEntee, K

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N3ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the [alpha-32P]8N3ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T31 of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N3ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10(7) years.

  15. A conserved type IV pilin signal peptide H-domain is critical for the post-translational regulation of flagella-dependent motility.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Rianne N; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2014-08-01

    In many bacteria and archaea, type IV pili facilitate surface adhesion, the initial step in biofilm formation. Haloferax volcanii has a specific set of adhesion pilins (PilA1-A6) that, although diverse, contain an absolutely conserved signal peptide hydrophobic (H) domain. Data presented here demonstrate that these pilins (PilA1-A6) also play an important role in regulating flagella-dependent motility, which allows cells to rapidly transition between planktonic and sessile states. Cells lacking adhesion pilins exhibit a severe motility defect, however, expression of any one of the adhesion pilins in trans can rescue the motility and adhesion. Conversely, while deleting pilB3-C3, genes required for PilA pilus biosynthesis, results in cells lacking pili and having an adhesion defect, it does not affect motility, indicating that motility regulation requires the presence of pilins, but not assembled pili. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the pilin-dependent motility regulatory mechanism does not require the diverse C-terminal region of the PilA pilins but specifically involves the conserved H-domain. This novel post-translational regulatory mechanism, which employs components that promote biofilm formation to inhibit motility, can provide a rapid response to changing environmental conditions. A model for this regulatory mechanism, which may also be present in other prokaryotes, is discussed.

  16. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  17. IAPs contain an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin-binding domain that regulates NF-kappaB as well as cell survival and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Darding, Maurice; Miasari, Maria; Santoro, Massimo M; Zender, Lars; Xue, Wen; Tenev, Tencho; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Zvelebil, Marketa; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Lowe, Scott; Silke, John; Meier, Pascal

    2008-11-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to target proteins influences various cellular processes, including DNA repair, NF-kappaB signalling and cell survival. The most common mode of regulation by ubiquitin-conjugation involves specialized ubiquitin-binding proteins that bind to ubiquitylated proteins and link them to downstream biochemical processes. Unravelling how the ubiquitin-message is recognized is essential because aberrant ubiquitin-mediated signalling contributes to tumour formation. Recent evidence indicates that inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins are frequently overexpressed in cancer and their expression level is implicated in contributing to tumorigenesis, chemoresistance, disease progression and poor patient-survival. Here, we have identified an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain in IAPs, which enables them to bind to Lys 63-linked polyubiquitin. We found that the UBA domain is essential for the oncogenic potential of cIAP1, to maintain endothelial cell survival and to protect cells from TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the UBA domain is required for XIAP and cIAP2-MALT1 to activate NF-kappaB. Our data suggest that the UBA domain of cIAP2-MALT1 stimulates NF-kappaB signalling by binding to polyubiquitylated NEMO. Significantly, 98% of all cIAP2-MALT1 fusion proteins retain the UBA domain, suggesting that ubiquitin-binding contributes to the oncogenic potential of cIAP2-MALT1 in MALT lymphoma. Our data identify IAPs as ubiquitin-binding proteins that contribute to ubiquitin-mediated cell survival, NF-kappaB signalling and oncogenesis.

  18. A conserved motif in the ITK PH-domain is required for phosphoinositide binding and TCR signaling but dispensable for adaptor protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hirve, Nupura; Levytskyy, Roman M; Rigaud, Stephanie; Guimond, David M; Zal, Tomasz; Sauer, Karsten; Tsoukas, Constantine D

    2012-01-01

    Binding of the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain of the Tec family protein tyrosine kinase, Inducible T cell Kinase (ITK), is critical for the recruitment of the kinase to the plasma membrane and its co-localization with the TCR-CD3 molecular complex. Three aromatic residues, termed the FYF motif, located in the inner walls of the phospholipid-binding pocket of the ITK PH domain, are conserved in the PH domains of all Tec kinases, but not in other PH-domain containing proteins, suggesting an important function of the FYF motif in the Tec kinase family. However, the biological significance of the FYF amino acid motif in the ITK-PH domain is unknown. To elucidate it, we have tested the effects of a FYF triple mutant (F26S, Y90F, F92S), henceforth termed FYF-ITK mutant, on ITK function. We found that FYF triple mutation inhibits the TCR-induced production of IL-4 by impairing ITK binding to PIP(3), reducing ITK membrane recruitment, inducing conformational changes at the T cell-APC contact site, and compromising phosphorylation of ITK and subsequent phosphorylation of PLCγ(1). Interestingly, however, the FYF motif is dispensable for the interaction of ITK with two of its signaling partners, SLP-76 and LAT. Thus, the FYF mutation uncouples PIP(3)-mediated ITK membrane recruitment from the interactions of the kinase with key components of the TCR signalosome and abrogates ITK function in T cells.

  19. A Conserved Motif in the ITK PH-Domain Is Required for Phosphoinositide Binding and TCR Signaling but Dispensable for Adaptor Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rigaud, Stephanie; Guimond, David M.; Zal, Tomasz; Sauer, Karsten; Tsoukas, Constantine D.

    2012-01-01

    Binding of the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain of the Tec family protein tyrosine kinase, Inducible T cell Kinase (ITK), is critical for the recruitment of the kinase to the plasma membrane and its co-localization with the TCR-CD3 molecular complex. Three aromatic residues, termed the FYF motif, located in the inner walls of the phospholipid-binding pocket of the ITK PH domain, are conserved in the PH domains of all Tec kinases, but not in other PH-domain containing proteins, suggesting an important function of the FYF motif in the Tec kinase family. However, the biological significance of the FYF amino acid motif in the ITK-PH domain is unknown. To elucidate it, we have tested the effects of a FYF triple mutant (F26S, Y90F, F92S), henceforth termed FYF-ITK mutant, on ITK function. We found that FYF triple mutation inhibits the TCR-induced production of IL-4 by impairing ITK binding to PIP3, reducing ITK membrane recruitment, inducing conformational changes at the T cell-APC contact site, and compromising phosphorylation of ITK and subsequent phosphorylation of PLCγ1. Interestingly, however, the FYF motif is dispensable for the interaction of ITK with two of its signaling partners, SLP-76 and LAT. Thus, the FYF mutation uncouples PIP3-mediated ITK membrane recruitment from the interactions of the kinase with key components of the TCR signalosome and abrogates ITK function in T cells. PMID:23028816

  20. Conservation of a portion of the S. cerevisiae Ure2p prion domain that interacts with the full-length protein

    PubMed Central

    Edskes, Herman K.; Wickner, Reed B.

    2002-01-01

    The [URE3] prion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a self-propagating inactive amyloid form of the Ure2 protein. Ure2p residues 1–65 constitute the prion domain, and the remaining C-terminal portion regulates nitrogen catabolism. We have examined the URE2 genes of wild-type isolates of S. cerevisiae and those of several pathogenic yeasts and a filamentous fungus. We find that the normal function of the S. cerevisiae Ure2p in nitrogen regulation is fully complemented by the Ure2p of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida kefyr, Candida maltosa, Saccharomyces bayanus, and Saccharomyces paradoxus, all of which have high homology in the C-terminal nitrogen regulation domain. However, there is considerable divergence of their N-terminal domains from that of Ure2p of S. cerevisiae. [URE3Sc] showed efficient transmission into S. cerevisiae ure2Δ cells if expressing a Ure2p of species within Saccharomyces. However, [URE3Sc] did not seed self-propagating inactivation of the Ure2p's from the other yeasts. When overexpressed as a fusion with green fluorescent protein, residues 5–47 of the S. cerevisiae prion domain are necessary for curing the [URE3] prion. Residues 11–39 are necessary for an inactivating interaction with the full-length Ure2p. A nearly identical region is highly conserved among many of the yeasts examined in this study, despite the wide divergence of sequences found in other parts of the N-terminal domains. PMID:12177423

  1. Modulation of Werner syndrome protein function by a single mutation in the conserved RecQ domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Wan; Kusumoto, Rika; Doherty, Kevin M; Lin, Guang-Xin; Zeng, Wangyong; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; von Kobbe, Cayetano; Brosh, Robert M; Hu, Jin-Shan; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2005-11-25

    Naturally occurring mutations in the human RECQ3 gene result in truncated Werner protein (WRN) and manifest as a rare premature aging disorder, Werner syndrome. Cellular and biochemical studies suggest a multifaceted role of WRN in DNA replication, DNA repair, recombination, and telomere maintenance. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN was determined previously to be the major site of interaction for DNA and proteins. By using site-directed mutagenesis in the WRN RQC domain, we determined which amino acids might be playing a critical role in WRN function. A site-directed mutation at Lys-1016 significantly decreased WRN binding to fork or bubble DNA substrates. Moreover, the Lys-1016 mutation markedly reduced WRN helicase activity on fork, D-loop, and Holliday junction substrates in addition to reducing significantly the ability of WRN to stimulate FEN-1 incision activities. Thus, DNA binding mediated by the RQC domain is crucial for WRN helicase and its coordinated functions. Our nuclear magnetic resonance data on the three-dimensional structure of the wild-type RQC and Lys-1016 mutant proteins display a remarkable similarity in their structures.

  2. Poxvirus tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-like T2 proteins contain a conserved preligand assembly domain that inhibits cellular TNFR1-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Sedger, Lisa M; Osvath, Sarah R; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Grace; Chan, Francis K-M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2006-09-01

    The poxvirus tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue T2 has immunomodulatory properties; secreted myxoma virus T2 (M-T2) protein binds and inhibits rabbit TNF-alpha, while intracellular M-T2 blocks virus-induced lymphocyte apoptosis. Here, we define the antiapoptotic function as inhibition of TNFR-mediated death via a highly conserved viral preligand assembly domain (vPLAD). Jurkat cell lines constitutively expressing M-T2 were generated and shown to be resistant to UV irradiation-, etoposide-, and cycloheximide-induced death. These cells were also resistant to human TNF-alpha, but M-T2 expression did not alter surface expression levels of TNFRs. Previous studies indicated that T2's antiapoptotic function was conferred by the N-terminal region of the protein, and further examination of this region revealed a highly conserved N-terminal vPLAD, which is present in all poxvirus T2-like molecules. In cellular TNFRs and TNF-alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors (TRAILRs), PLAD controls receptor signaling competency prior to ligand binding. Here, we show that M-T2 potently inhibits TNFR1-induced death in a manner requiring the M-T2 vPLAD. Furthermore, we demonstrate that M-T2 physically associates with and colocalizes with human TNFRs but does not prevent human TNF-alpha binding to cellular receptors. Thus, M-T2 vPLAD is a species-nonspecific dominant-negative inhibitor of cellular TNFR1 function. Given that the PLAD is conserved in all known poxvirus T2-like molecules, we predict that it plays an important function in each of these proteins. Moreover, that the vPLAD confers an important antiapoptotic function confirms this domain as a potential target in the development of the next generation of TNF-alpha/TNFR therapeutics.

  3. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  4. Diversified Structural Basis of a Conserved Molecular Mechanism for pH-Dependent Dimerization in Spider Silk N-Terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Otikovs, Martins; Chen, Gefei; Nordling, Kerstin; Landreh, Michael; Meng, Qing; Jörnvall, Hans; Kronqvist, Nina; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jaudzems, Kristaps

    2015-08-17

    Conversion of spider silk proteins from soluble dope to insoluble fibers involves pH-dependent dimerization of the N-terminal domain (NT). This conversion is tightly regulated to prevent premature precipitation and enable rapid silk formation at the end of the duct. Three glutamic acid residues that mediate this process in the NT from Euprosthenops australis major ampullate spidroin 1 are well conserved among spidroins. However, NTs of minor ampullate spidroins from several species, including Araneus ventricosus ((Av)MiSp NT), lack one of the glutamic acids. Here we investigate the pH-dependent structural changes of (Av)MiSp NT, revealing that it uses the same mechanism but involves a non-conserved glutamic acid residue instead. Homology modeling of the structures of other MiSp NTs suggests that these harbor different compensatory residues. This indicates that, despite sequence variations, the molecular mechanism underlying pH-dependent dimerization of NT is conserved among different silk types.

  5. Association of Arabidopsis type-II ROPs with the plasma membrane requires a conserved C-terminal sequence motif and a proximal polybasic domain.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Meirav; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2006-06-01

    Plant ROPs (or RACs) are soluble Ras-related small GTPases that are attached to cell membranes by virtue of the post-translational lipid modifications of prenylation and S-acylation. ROPs (RACs) are subdivided into two major subgroups called type-I and type-II. Whereas type-I ROPs terminate with a conserved CaaL box and undergo prenylation, type-II ROPs undergo S-acylation on two or three C-terminal cysteines. In the present work we determined the sequence requirement for association of Arabidopsis type-II ROPs with the plasma membrane. We identified a conserved sequence motif, designated the GC-CG box, in which the modified cysteines are flanked by glycines. The GC-CG box cysteines are separated by five to six mostly non-polar residues. Deletion of this sequence or the introduction of mutations that change its nature disrupted the association of ROPs with the membrane. Mutations that changed the GC-CG box glycines to alanines also interfered with membrane association. Deletion of a polybasic domain proximal to the GC-CG box disrupted the plasma membrane association of AtROP10. A green fluorescent protein fusion protein containing the C-terminal 25 residues of AtROP10, including its polybasic domain and GC-CG box, was primarily associated with the plasma membrane but a similar fusion protein lacking the polybasic domain was exclusively localized in the soluble fraction. These data provide evidence for the minimal sequence required for plasma membrane association of type-II ROPs in Arabidopsis and other plant species.

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Soybean JmjC Domain-Containing Proteins Suggests Evolutionary Conservation Following Whole-Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yapeng; Li, Xiangyong; Cheng, Lin; Liu, Yanchun; Wang, Hui; Ke, Danxia; Yuan, Hongyu; Zhang, Liangsheng; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Histone modifications, such as methylation and demethylation, play an important role in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression. The JmjC domain-containing proteins, an important family of histone lysine demethylases (KDMs), play a key role in maintaining homeostasis of histone methylation in vivo. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the jumonji C (JmjC) gene family in the soybean genome and identified 48 JmjC genes (GmJMJs) distributed unevenly across 18 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these JmjC domain-containing genes can be divided into eight groups. GmJMJs within the same phylogenetic group share similar exon/intron organization and domain composition. In addition, 16 duplicated gene pairs were formed by a Glycine-specific whole-genome duplication (WGD) event approximately 13 million years ago (Mya). By investigating the expression profiles of these gene pairs in various tissues, we showed that the expression pattern is conserved in the polyploidy-derived JmjC duplicates, demonstrating that the majority of GmJMJs were preferentially retained after the most recent WGD event and suggesting important roles for demethylase duplications in soybean evolution. These results shed light on the evolutionary history of this family in soybean and provide insights into the JmjCs which will be helpful to reveal their functions in controlling soybean development. PMID:27994610

  7. Discovery of an essential nucleotidylating activity associated with a newly delineated conserved domain in the RNA polymerase-containing protein of all nidoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Kathleen C.; Gulyaeva, Anastasia; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Janssen, George M. C.; Ruben, Mark; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Samborskiy, Dmitry V.; Kravchenko, Alexander A.; Leontovich, Andrey M.; Sidorov, Igor A.; Snijder, Eric J.; Posthuma, Clara C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that catalyzes the synthesis of their RNA(s). In the case of positive-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the order Nidovirales, the RdRp resides in a replicase subunit that is unusually large. Bioinformatics analysis of this non-structural protein has now revealed a nidoviral signature domain (genetic marker) that is N-terminally adjacent to the RdRp and has no apparent homologs elsewhere. Based on its conservation profile, this domain is proposed to have nucleotidylation activity. We used recombinant non-structural protein 9 of the arterivirus equine arteritis virus (EAV) and different biochemical assays, including irreversible labeling with a GTP analog followed by a proteomics analysis, to demonstrate the manganese-dependent covalent binding of guanosine and uridine phosphates to a lysine/histidine residue. Most likely this was the invariant lysine of the newly identified domain, named nidovirus RdRp-associated nucleotidyltransferase (NiRAN), whose substitution with alanine severely diminished the described binding. Furthermore, this mutation crippled EAV and prevented the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in cell culture, indicating that NiRAN is essential for nidoviruses. Potential functions supported by NiRAN may include nucleic acid ligation, mRNA capping and protein-primed RNA synthesis, possibilities that remain to be explored in future studies. PMID:26304538

  8. Inhibition of HER3 activation and tumor growth with a human antibody binding to a conserved epitope formed by domain III and IV.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Lisa C; Rau, Alexander; Seifert, Oliver; Honer, Jonas; Hutt, Meike; Schmid, Simone; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan; Olayioye, Monilola A; Kontermann, Roland E

    2017-07-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3, also known as ErbB3) has emerged as relevant target for antibody-mediated tumor therapy. Here, we describe a novel human antibody, IgG 3-43, recognizing a unique epitope formed by domain III and parts of domain IV of the extracellular region of HER3, conserved between HER3 and mouse ErbB3. An affinity of 11 nM was determined for the monovalent interaction. In the IgG format, the antibody bound recombinant bivalent HER3 with subnanomolar affinity (KD = 220 pM) and HER3-expressing tumor cells with EC50 values in the low picomolar range (27 - 83 pM). The antibody competed with binding of heregulin to HER3-expressing cells, efficiently inhibited phosphorylation of HER3 as well as downstream signaling, and induced receptor internalization and degradation. Furthermore, IgG 3-43 inhibited heregulin-dependent proliferation of several HER3-positive cancer cell lines and heregulin-independent colony formation of HER2-overexpressing tumor cell lines. Importantly, inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival was demonstrated in a FaDu xenograft tumor model in SCID mice. These findings demonstrate that by binding to the membrane-proximal domains III and IV involved in ligand binding and receptor dimerization, IgG 3-43 efficiently inhibits activation of HER3, thereby blocking tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. A Conserved Face of the Jagged/Serrate DSL Domain is Involved in Notch Trans-Activation and Cis-Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cordle, Jemima; Johnson, Steven; Tay, Joyce Zi Yan; Roversi, Pietro; Wilkin, Marian; Hernandez-Diaz, Beatriz; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Jensen, Sacha; Whiteman, Pat; Jin, Boquan; Redfield, Christina; Baron, Martin; Lea, Susan M.; Handford, Penny A.

    2009-01-01

    The Notch receptor and its ligands are key components in a core metazoan signalling pathway which regulates the spatial patterning, timing and outcome of many cell-fate decisions. Ligands contain a disulphide-rich Delta/Serrate/LAG-2 (DSL) domain required for Notch trans-activation or cis-inhibition. Here we report the first X-ray structure of a functional fragment of a Notch ligand, the DSL-EGF3 domains of human Jagged-1 (J-1DSL-EGF3). The structure identifies a highly conserved face of the DSL domain and we show, by functional analysis of Drosophila ligand mutants, that this surface is required for both cis- and trans-regulatory interactions with Notch. We also identify, using NMR, a surface of Notch-1 involved in J-1DSL-EGF3 binding. Our data imply that cis- and trans-regulation may occur through formation of structurally distinct complexes which, unexpectedly, involve the same surfaces on both ligand and receptor. PMID:18660822

  10. A conserved face of the Jagged/Serrate DSL domain is involved in Notch trans-activation and cis-inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cordle, Jemima; Johnson, Steven; Tay, Joyce Zi Yan; Roversi, Pietro; Wilkin, Marian B; de Madrid, Beatriz Hernández; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Jensen, Sacha; Whiteman, Pat; Jin, Boquan; Redfield, Christina; Baron, Martin; Lea, Susan M; Handford, Penny A

    2008-08-01

    The Notch receptor and its ligands are key components in a core metazoan signaling pathway that regulates the spatial patterning, timing and outcome of many cell-fate decisions. Ligands contain a disulfide-rich Delta/Serrate/LAG-2 (DSL) domain required for Notch trans-activation or cis-inhibition. Here we report the X-ray structure of a receptor binding region of a Notch ligand, the DSL-EGF3 domains of human Jagged-1 (J-1(DSL-EGF3)). The structure reveals a highly conserved face of the DSL domain, and we show, by functional analysis of Drosophila melanogster ligand mutants, that this surface is required for both cis- and trans-regulatory interactions with Notch. We also identify, using NMR, a surface of Notch-1 involved in J-1(DSL-EGF3) binding. Our data imply that cis- and trans-regulation may occur through the formation of structurally distinct complexes that, unexpectedly, involve the same surfaces on both ligand and receptor.

  11. Specific intermolecular interactions of conserved water molecules with amino acids in the Galectin-1 carbohydrate recognition domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lella, Santiago; Petruk, Ariel A.; Armiño, Diego J. Alonso de; Álvarez, Rosa M. S.

    2010-08-01

    Water molecules, rigidly associated to protein surfaces, play a key role in stabilizing biomolecules and participating in their biological functions. Recent studies on the solvation properties of the carbohydrate recognition domain of Galectin-1 by means of molecular dynamic simulations have revealed the existence of several water sites which were well correlated to both the bound water molecules observed in the crystal structure of the protein in the free state and to some of the hydroxyl groups of the carbohydrate ligand observed in the crystal structure of the complexed protein. In this work, we present a study using quantum mechanical methods (B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3dp)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) to determine the energy involved in the binding of these water molecules to specific amino acids in the carbohydrate recognition domain of the protein. By modeling the hydroxyl groups of the carbohydrate by methanol, the energies associated to the local interactions between the ligand and the protein have been evaluated by replacing specific water molecules with methanol. The values of the binding energies have been compared to those previously obtained by the molecular dynamic method.

  12. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  13. Deletion of a Predicted β-Sheet Domain within the Amino Terminus of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein K Conserved among Alphaherpesviruses Prevents Virus Entry into Neuronal Axons

    PubMed Central

    Jambunathan, Nithya; Charles, Anu-Susan; Subramanian, Ramesh; Saied, Ahmad A.; Naderi, Misagh; Rider, Paul; Brylinski, Michal; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) lacking expression of the entire glycoprotein K (gK) or expressing gK with a 38-amino-acid deletion (gKΔ31–68 mutation) failed to infect ganglionic neurons after ocular infection of mice. We constructed a new model for the predicted three-dimensional structure of gK, revealing that the gKΔ31–68 mutation spans a well-defined β-sheet structure within the amino terminus of gK, which is conserved among alphaherpesviruses. The HSV-1(McKrae) gKΔ31–68 virus was tested for the ability to enter into ganglionic neuronal axons in cell culture of explanted rat ganglia using a novel virus entry proximity ligation assay (VEPLA). In this assay, cell surface-bound virions were detected by the colocalization of gD and its cognate receptor nectin-1 on infected neuronal surfaces. Capsids that have entered into the cytoplasm were detected by the colocalization of the virion tegument protein UL37, with dynein required for loading of virion capsids onto microtubules for retrograde transport to the nucleus. HSV-1(McKrae) gKΔ31–68 attached to cell surfaces of Vero cells and ganglionic axons in cell culture as efficiently as wild-type HSV-1(McKrae). However, unlike the wild-type virus, the mutant virus failed to enter into the axoplasm of ganglionic neurons. This work suggests that the amino terminus of gK is a critical determinant for entry into neuronal axons and may serve similar conserved functions for other alphaherpesviruses. IMPORTANCE Alphaherpesviruses, unlike beta- and gammaherpesviruses, have the unique ability to infect and establish latency in neurons. Glycoprotein K (gK) and the membrane protein UL20 are conserved among all alphaherpesviruses. We show here that a predicted β-sheet domain, which is conserved among alphaherpesviruses, functions in HSV-1 entry into neuronal axons, suggesting that it may serve similar functions for other herpesviruses. These results are in agreement with our

  14. Conserved catalytic residues of the ALDH1L1 aldehyde dehydrogenase domain control binding and discharging of the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2011-07-01

    The C-terminal domain (C(t)-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several C(t)-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP(+), Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP(+) but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type C(t)-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP(+) with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication.

  15. Conserved Catalytic Residues of the ALDH1L1 Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Domain Control Binding and Discharging of the Coenzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A.

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (Ct-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP+-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several Ct-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP+, Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP+ but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type Ct-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP+ with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication. PMID:21540484

  16. Rafoxanide and Closantel Inhibit SPAK and OSR1 Kinases by Binding to a Highly Conserved Allosteric Site on Their C-terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    AlAmri, Mubarak A; Kadri, Hachemi; Alderwick, Luke J; Simpkins, Nigel S; Mehellou, Youcef

    2017-05-09

    SPAK and OSR1 are two protein kinases that have emerged as attractive targets in the discovery of novel antihypertensive agents due to their role in regulating electrolyte balance in vivo. Herein we report the identification of an allosteric pocket on the highly conserved C-terminal domains of these two kinases, which influences their activity. We also show that some known WNK signaling inhibitors bind to this allosteric site. Using in silico screening, we identified the antiparasitic agent rafoxanide as a novel allosteric inhibitor of SPAK and OSR1. Collectively, this work will facilitate the rational design of novel SPAK and OSR1 kinase inhibitors that could be useful antihypertensive agents. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi Binds to Cytokeratin through Conserved Peptide Motifs Found in the Laminin-G-Like Domain of the gp85/Trans-sialidase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Andre Azevedo Reis; de Vasconcelos, Veronica de Cássia Sardinha; Colli, Walter; Alves, Maria Júlia Manso; Giordano, Ricardo José

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas' disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a disease that affects millions of people most of them living in South and Central Americas. There are few treatment options for individuals with Chagas' disease making it important to understand the molecular details of parasite infection, so novel therapeutic alternatives may be developed for these patients. Here, we investigate the interaction between host cell intermediate filament proteins and the T. cruzi gp85 glycoprotein superfamily with hundreds of members that have long been implicated in parasite cell invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings An in silico analysis was utilized to identify peptide motifs shared by the gp85 T. cruzi proteins and, using phage display, these selected peptide motifs were screened for their ability to bind to cells. One peptide, named TS9, showed significant cell binding capacity and was selected for further studies. Affinity chromatography, phage display and invasion assays revealed that peptide TS9 binds to cytokeratins and vimentin, and prevents T. cruzi cell infection. Interestingly, peptide TS9 and a previously identified binding site for intermediate filament proteins are disposed in an antiparallel β-sheet fold, present in a conserved laminin-G-like domain shared by all members of the family. Moreover, peptide TS9 overlaps with an immunodominant T cell epitope. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, the present study reinforces previous results from our group implicating the gp85 superfamily of glycoproteins and the intermediate filament proteins cytokeratin and vimentin in the parasite infection process. It also suggests an important role in parasite biology for the conserved laminin-G-like domain, present in all members of this large family of cell surface proteins. PMID:26398185

  18. Replication factor C from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi does not need ATP hydrolysis for clamp-loading and contains a functionally conserved RFC PCNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Henneke, Ghislaine; Gueguen, Yannick; Flament, Didier; Azam, Philippe; Querellou, Joël; Dietrich, Jacques; Hübscher, Ulrich; Raffin, Jean-Paul

    2002-11-08

    The molecular organization of the replication complex in archaea is similar to that in eukaryotes. Only two proteins homologous to subunits of eukaryotic replication factor C (RFC) have been detected in Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab). The genes encoding these two proteins are arranged in tandem. We cloned these two genes and co-expressed the corresponding recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Two inteins present in the gene encoding the small subunit (PabRFC-small) were removed during cloning. The recombinant protein complex was purified by anion-exchange and hydroxyapatite chromatography. Also, the PabRFC-small subunit could be purified, while the large subunit (PabRFC-large) alone was completely insoluble. The highly purified PabRFC complex possessed an ATPase activity, which was not enhanced by DNA. The Pab proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) activated the PabRFC complex in a DNA-dependent manner, but the PabRFC-small ATPase activity was neither DNA-dependent nor PCNA-dependent. The PabRFC complex was able to stimulate PabPCNA-dependent DNA synthesis by the Pabfamily D heterodimeric DNA polymerase. Finally, (i) the PabRFC-large fraction cross-reacted with anti-human-RFC PCNA-binding domain antibody, corroborating the conservation of the protein sequence, (ii) the human PCNA stimulated the PabRFC complex ATPase activity in a DNA-dependent way and (iii) the PabRFC complex could load human PCNA onto primed single-stranded circular DNA, suggesting that the PCNA-binding domain of RFC has been functionally conserved during evolution. In addition, ATP hydrolysis was not required either for DNA polymerase stimulation or PCNA-loading in vitro.

  19. Basal body stability and ciliogenesis requires the conserved component Poc1

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Daniel P.S.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Beales, Philip L.; Winey, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Centrioles are the foundation for centrosome and cilia formation. The biogenesis of centrioles is initiated by an assembly mechanism that first synthesizes the ninefold symmetrical cartwheel and subsequently leads to a stable cylindrical microtubule scaffold that is capable of withstanding microtubule-based forces generated by centrosomes and cilia. We report that the conserved WD40 repeat domain–containing cartwheel protein Poc1 is required for the structural maintenance of centrioles in Tetrahymena thermophila. Furthermore, human Poc1B is required for primary ciliogenesis, and in zebrafish, DrPoc1B knockdown causes ciliary defects and morphological phenotypes consistent with human ciliopathies. T. thermophila Poc1 exhibits a protein incorporation profile commonly associated with structural centriole components in which the majority of Poc1 is stably incorporated during new centriole assembly. A second dynamic population assembles throughout the cell cycle. Our experiments identify novel roles for Poc1 in centriole stability and ciliogenesis. PMID:20008567

  20. The structure of an Iws1/Spt6 complex reveals an interaction domain conserved in TFIIS, Elongin A and Med26

    PubMed Central

    Diebold, Marie-Laure; Koch, Michael; Loeliger, Erin; Cura, Vincent; Winston, Fred; Cavarelli, Jean; Romier, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Binding of elongation factor Spt6 to Iws1 provides an effective means for coupling eukaryotic mRNA synthesis, chromatin remodelling and mRNA export. We show that an N-terminal region of Spt6 (Spt6N) is responsible for interaction with Iws1. The crystallographic structures of Encephalitozoon cuniculi Iws1 and the Iws1/Spt6N complex reveal two conserved binding subdomains in Iws1. The first subdomain (one HEAT repeat; HEAT subdomain) is a putative phosphoprotein-binding site most likely involved in an Spt6-independent function of Iws1. The second subdomain (two ARM repeats; ARM subdomain) specifically recognizes a bipartite N-terminal region of Spt6. Mutations that alter this region of Spt6 cause severe phenotypes in vivo. Importantly, the ARM subdomain of Iws1 is conserved in several transcription factors, including TFIIS, Elongin A and Med26. We show that the homologous region in yeast TFIIS enables this factor to interact with SAGA and the Mediator subunits Spt8 and Med13, suggesting the molecular basis for TFIIS recruitment at promoters. Taken together, our results provide new structural information about the Iws1/Spt6 complex and reveal a novel interaction domain used for the formation of transcription networks. PMID:21057455

  1. Roles of conserved residues within the pre-NH2-terminal domain of herpes simplex virus 1 DNA polymerase in replication and latency in mice.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Shariya L; Pesola, Jean M; Coen, Donald M

    2014-04-01

    The catalytic subunit of the herpes simplex virus 1 DNA polymerase (HSV-1 Pol) is essential for viral DNA synthesis and production of infectious virus in cell culture. While mutations that affect 5'-3' polymerase activity have been evaluated in animal models of HSV-1 infection, mutations that affect other functions of HSV-1 Pol have not. In a previous report, we utilized bacterial artificial chromosome technology to generate defined HSV-1 pol mutants with lesions in the previously uncharacterized pre-NH2-terminal domain. We found that the extreme N-terminal 42 residues (deletion mutant polΔN43) were dispensable for replication in cell culture, while residues 44-49 (alanine-substitution mutant polA6) were required for efficient viral DNA synthesis and production of infectious virus. In this study, we sought to address the importance of these conserved elements in viral replication in a mouse corneal infection model. Mutant virus polΔN43 exhibited no meaningful defect in acute or latent infection despite strong conservation of residues 1-42 with HSV-2 Pol. The polA6 mutation caused a modest defect in replication at the site of inoculation, and was severely impaired for ganglionic replication, even at high inocula that permitted efficient corneal replication. Additionally, the polA6 mutation resulted in reduced latency establishment and subsequent reactivation. Moreover, we found that the polA6 replication defect in cultured cells was exacerbated in resting cells as compared to dividing cells. These results reveal an important role for the conserved motif at residues 44-49 of HSV-1 Pol for ganglionic viral replication.

  2. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of Cell Wall and NAC Domain Transcription Factor Genes during Elaeis guineensis Fruit Ripening: Evidence for Widespread Conservation within Monocot and Eudicot Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Tranbarger, Timothy J.; Fooyontphanich, Kim; Roongsattham, Peerapat; Pizot, Maxime; Collin, Myriam; Jantasuriyarat, Chatchawan; Suraninpong, Potjamarn; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Dussert, Stéphane; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Morcillo, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), a monocotyledonous species in the family Arecaceae, has an extraordinarily oil rich fleshy mesocarp, and presents an original model to examine the ripening processes and regulation in this particular monocot fruit. Histochemical analysis and cell parameter measurements revealed cell wall and middle lamella expansion and degradation during ripening and in response to ethylene. Cell wall related transcript profiles suggest a transition from synthesis to degradation is under transcriptional control during ripening, in particular a switch from cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin synthesis to hydrolysis and degradation. The data provide evidence for the transcriptional activation of expansin, polygalacturonase, mannosidase, beta-galactosidase, and xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase proteins in the ripening oil palm mesocarp, suggesting widespread conservation of these activities during ripening for monocotyledonous and eudicotyledonous fruit types. Profiling of the most abundant oil palm polygalacturonase (EgPG4) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) transcripts during development and in response to ethylene demonstrated both are sensitive markers of ethylene production and inducible gene expression during mesocarp ripening, and provide evidence for a conserved regulatory module between ethylene and cell wall pectin degradation. A comprehensive analysis of NAC transcription factors confirmed at least 10 transcripts from diverse NAC domain clades are expressed in the mesocarp during ripening, four of which are induced by ethylene treatment, with the two most inducible (EgNAC6 and EgNAC7) phylogenetically similar to the tomato NAC-NOR master-ripening regulator. Overall, the results provide evidence that despite the phylogenetic distance of the oil palm within the family Arecaceae from the most extensively studied monocot banana fruit, it appears ripening of divergent monocot and eudicot fruit lineages are

  4. Transcriptome Analysis of Cell Wall and NAC Domain Transcription Factor Genes during Elaeis guineensis Fruit Ripening: Evidence for Widespread Conservation within Monocot and Eudicot Lineages.

    PubMed

    Tranbarger, Timothy J; Fooyontphanich, Kim; Roongsattham, Peerapat; Pizot, Maxime; Collin, Myriam; Jantasuriyarat, Chatchawan; Suraninpong, Potjamarn; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Dussert, Stéphane; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Morcillo, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), a monocotyledonous species in the family Arecaceae, has an extraordinarily oil rich fleshy mesocarp, and presents an original model to examine the ripening processes and regulation in this particular monocot fruit. Histochemical analysis and cell parameter measurements revealed cell wall and middle lamella expansion and degradation during ripening and in response to ethylene. Cell wall related transcript profiles suggest a transition from synthesis to degradation is under transcriptional control during ripening, in particular a switch from cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin synthesis to hydrolysis and degradation. The data provide evidence for the transcriptional activation of expansin, polygalacturonase, mannosidase, beta-galactosidase, and xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase proteins in the ripening oil palm mesocarp, suggesting widespread conservation of these activities during ripening for monocotyledonous and eudicotyledonous fruit types. Profiling of the most abundant oil palm polygalacturonase (EgPG4) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) transcripts during development and in response to ethylene demonstrated both are sensitive markers of ethylene production and inducible gene expression during mesocarp ripening, and provide evidence for a conserved regulatory module between ethylene and cell wall pectin degradation. A comprehensive analysis of NAC transcription factors confirmed at least 10 transcripts from diverse NAC domain clades are expressed in the mesocarp during ripening, four of which are induced by ethylene treatment, with the two most inducible (EgNAC6 and EgNAC7) phylogenetically similar to the tomato NAC-NOR master-ripening regulator. Overall, the results provide evidence that despite the phylogenetic distance of the oil palm within the family Arecaceae from the most extensively studied monocot banana fruit, it appears ripening of divergent monocot and eudicot fruit lineages are

  5. A conserved lysine in the estrogen receptor DNA binding domain regulates ligand activation profiles at AP-1 sites, possibly by controlling interactions with a modulating repressor

    PubMed Central

    Uht, Rosalie M; Webb, Paul; Nguyen, Phuong; Price Jr, Richard H; Valentine, Cathleen; Favre, Helene; Kushner, Peter J

    2004-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα and ERβ) differentially activate genes with AP-1 elements. ERα activates AP-1 targets via activation functions with estrogens (the AF-dependent pathway), whereas ERβ, and a short version of ERα (ERα DBD-LBD) activate only with anti-estrogens (AF-independent pathway). The DNA binding domain (DBD) plays an important role in both pathways, even though neither pathway requires ERE recognition. Results Mutations of a highly conserved DBD lysine (ERα.K206A/G), lead to super-activation of AP-1 through activation function dependent pathways, up to 200 fold. This super-activity can be elicited either through ER AFs 1 or 2, or that of a heterologous activation function (VP16). The homologous substitution in ERβ, K170A, or in ERα DBD-LBD leads to estrogen-dependent AP-1 activation and loss of the usually potent anti-estrogen effects. Each of numerous K206 substitutions in ERα, except K206R, eliminates anti-estrogen activation and this loss correlates perfectly with a loss of ability to titrate a repressive function from the RU486 bound progesterone receptor. Conclusion We conclude that ER DBDs contain a complex regulatory function that influences ligand activation profiles at AP-1. This function, which requires the integrity of the conserved lysine, both allows for activation at AP-1 with anti-estrogens (with ERβ and ERα DBD-LBD), and prevents ERα from becoming superactive at AP-1 with estrogens. We discuss the possibility that a repressor interaction with the DBD both mediates the AF-independent pathway and dampens the AF dependent pathway. Mutations in the conserved lysine might, by this model, disrupt the binding or function of the repressor. PMID:15132742

  6. Human ERCC5 cDNA-cosmid complementation for excision repair and bipartite amino acid domains conserved with RAD proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    MacInnes, M A; Dickson, J A; Hernandez, R R; Learmonth, D; Lin, G Y; Mudgett, J S; Park, M S; Schauer, S; Reynolds, R J; Strniste, G F

    1993-01-01

    Several human genes related to DNA excision repair (ER) have been isolated via ER cross-species complementation (ERCC) of UV-sensitive CHO cells. We have now isolated and characterized cDNAs for the human ERCC5 gene that complement CHO UV135 cells. The ERCC5 mRNA size is about 4.6 kb. Our available cDNA clones are partial length, and no single clone was active for UV135 complementation. When cDNAs were mixed pairwise with a cosmid clone containing an overlapping 5'-end segment of the ERCC5 gene, DNA transfer produced UV-resistant colonies with 60 to 95% correction of UV resistance relative to either a genomic ERCC5 DNA transformant or the CHO AA8 progenitor cells. cDNA-cosmid transformants regained intermediate levels (20 to 45%) of ER-dependent reactivation of a UV-damaged pSVCATgpt reporter plasmid. Our evidence strongly implicates an in situ recombination mechanism in cDNA-cosmid complementation for ER. The complete deduced amino acid sequence of ERCC5 was reconstructed from several cDNA clones encoding a predicted protein of 1,186 amino acids. The ERCC5 protein has extensive sequence similarities, in bipartite domains A and B, to products of RAD repair genes of two yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad13. Sequence, structural, and functional data taken together indicate that ERCC5 and its relatives are probable functional homologs. A second locus represented by S. cerevisiae YKL510 and S. pombe rad2 genes is structurally distinct from the ERCC5 locus but retains vestigial A and B domain similarities. Our analyses suggest that ERCC5 is a nuclear-localized protein with one or more highly conserved helix-loop-helix segments within domains A and B. Images PMID:8413238

  7. Human ERCC5 cDNA-cosmid complementation for excision repair and bipartite amino acid domains conserved with RAD proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.A.; Dickson, J.A.; Hernandez, R.R.; Lin, G.Y.; Park, M.S.; Schauer, S.; Reynolds, R.J.; Strniste, G.F. ); Learmonth, D. ); Mudgett, J.S. ); Yu, J.Y. )

    1993-10-01

    Several human genes related to DNA excision repair (ER) have been isolated via ER cross-species complementation (ERCC) of UV-sensitive CHO cells. The authors have now isolated and characterized cDNAs for the human ERCC5 gene that complement CHO UV135 cells. The ERCC5 mRNA size is about 4.6 kb. Their available cDNA clones are partial length, and no single clone was active for UV135 complementation. When cDNAs were mixed pairwise with a cosmid clone containing an overlapping 5[prime]-end segment of the ERCC5 gene, DNA transfer produced UV-resistant colonies with 60 to 95% correction of UV resistance relative to either a genomic ERCC5 DNA transformant or the CHO AA8 progenitor cells. cDNA-cosmid transformants regained intermediate levels (20 to 45%) of ER-dependent reactivation of a UV-damaged pSVCATgpt reporter plasmid. Their evidence strongly implicates an in situ recombination mechanism in cDNA-cosmid complementation for ER. The complete deduced amino acid sequence of ERCC5 was reconstructed for several cDNA clones encoding a predicted protein of 1,186 amino acids. The ERCC5 protein has extensive sequence similarities, in bipartite domains A and B, to products of RAD repair genes of two yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad13. Sequence, structural, and functional data taken together indicate that ERCC5 and its relatives are probable functional homologs. A second locus represented by S. cerevisiae YKL510 and S. pombe rad2 genes is structurally distinct from the ERCC5 locus but retains vestigial A and B domain similarities. Their analyses suggest that ERCC5 is a nuclear-localized protein with one or more highly conserved helix-loop-helix segments within domains A and B. 69 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Conserved Negative Charges in the N-terminal Tetramerization Domain Mediate Efficient Assembly of Kv2.1 and Kv2.1/Kv6.4 Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Bocksteins, Elke; Labro, Alain J.; Mayeur, Evy; Bruyns, Tine; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk; Snyders, Dirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are transmembrane tetramers of individual α-subunits. Eight different Shaker-related Kv subfamilies have been identified in which the tetramerization domain T1, located on the intracellular N terminus, facilitates and controls the assembly of both homo- and heterotetrameric channels. Only the Kv2 α-subunits are able to form heterotetramers with members of the silent Kv subfamilies (Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9). The T1 domain contains two subdomains, A and B box, which presumably determine subfamily specificity by preventing incompatible subunits to assemble. In contrast, little is known about the involvement of the A/B linker sequence. Both Kv2 and silent Kv subfamilies contain a fully conserved and negatively charged sequence (CDD) in this linker that is lacking in the other subfamilies. Neutralizing these aspartates in Kv2.1 by mutating them to alanines did not affect the gating properties, but reduced the current density moderately. However, charge reversal arginine substitutions strongly reduced the current density of these homotetrameric mutant Kv2.1 channels and immunocytochemistry confirmed the reduced expression at the plasma membrane. Förster resonance energy transfer measurements using confocal microscopy showed that the latter was not due to impaired trafficking, but to a failure to assemble the tetramer. This was further confirmed with co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The corresponding arginine substitution in Kv6.4 prevented its heterotetrameric interaction with Kv2.1. These results indicate that these aspartates (especially the first one) in the A/B box linker of the T1 domain are required for efficient assembly of both homotetrameric Kv2.1 and heterotetrameric Kv2.1/silent Kv6.4 channels. PMID:19717558

  9. The Respiratory Syncytial Virus G Protein Conserved Domain Induces a Persistent and Protective Antibody Response in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien N.; Power, Ultan F.; Robert, Alain; Haeuw, Jean-François; Helffer, Katia; Perez, Amadeo; Asin, Miguel-Angel; Corvaia, Nathalie; Libon, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of severe upper and lower respiratory disease in infants and in the elderly. There are 2 main RSV subtypes A and B. A recombinant vaccine was designed based on the central domain of the RSV-A attachment G protein which we had previously named G2Na (aa130–230). Here we evaluated immunogenicity, persistence of antibody (Ab) response and protective efficacy induced in rodents by: (i) G2Na fused to DT (Diphtheria toxin) fragments in cotton rats. DT fusion did not potentiate neutralizing Ab responses against RSV-A or cross-reactivity to RSV-B. (ii) G2Nb (aa130–230 of the RSV-B G protein) either fused to, or admixed with G2Na. G2Nb did not induce RSV-B-reactive Ab responses. (iii) G2Na at low doses. Two injections of 3 µg G2Na in Alum were sufficient to induce protective immune responses in mouse lungs, preventing RSV-A and greatly reducing RSV-B infections. In cotton rats, G2Na-induced RSV-reactive Ab and protective immunity against RSV-A challenge that persisted for at least 24 weeks. (iv) injecting RSV primed mice with a single dose of G2Na/Alum or G2Na/PLGA [poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide]. Despite the presence of pre-existing RSV-specific Abs, these formulations effectively boosted anti-RSV Ab titres and increased Ab titres persisted for at least 21 weeks. Affinity maturation of these Abs increased from day 28 to day 148. These data indicate that G2Na has potential as a component of an RSV vaccine formulation. PMID:22479601

  10. CARMIL is a potent capping protein antagonist: identification of a conserved CARMIL domain that inhibits the activity of capping protein and uncaps capped actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Takehito; Remmert, Kirsten; Hammer, John A

    2006-04-14

    Acanthamoeba CARMIL was previously shown to co-purify with capping protein (CP) and to bind pure CP. Here we show that this interaction inhibits the barbed end-capping activity of CP. Even more strikingly, this interaction drives the uncapping of actin filaments previously capped with CP. These activities are CP-specific; CARMIL does not inhibit the capping activities of either gelsolin or CapG and does not uncap gelsolin-capped filaments. Although full-length (FL) CARMIL (residues 1-1121) possesses both anti-CP activities, C-terminal fragments like glutathione S-transferase (GST)-P (940-1121) that contain the CARMIL CP binding site are at least 10 times more active. We localized the full activities of GST-P to its C-terminal 51 residues (1071-1121). This sequence contains a stretch of 25 residues that is highly conserved in CARMIL proteins from protozoa, flies, worms, and vertebrates (CARMIL Homology domain 3; CAH3). Point mutations showed that the majority of the most highly conserved residues within CAH3 are critical for the anti-CP activity of GST-AP (862-1121). Finally, we found that GST-AP binds CP approximately 20-fold more tightly than does FL-CARMIL. This observation together with the elevated activities of C-terminal fragments relative to FL-CARMIL suggests that FL-CARMIL might exist primarily in an autoinhibited state. Consistent with this idea, proteolytic cleavage of FL-CARMIL with thrombin generated an approximately 14-kDa C-terminal fragment that expresses full anti-CP activities. We propose that, after some type of physiological activation event, FL-CARMIL could function in vivo as a potent CP antagonist. Given the pivotal role that CP plays in determining the global actin phenotype of cells, our results suggest that CARMIL may play an important role in the physiological regulation of actin assembly.

  11. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  12. 3D model for Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A armadillo domain unveils highly conserved protein-protein interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A

    2015-12-07

    Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein, which exerts its cancer-promoting function through interaction with other proteins, for example Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and MYC. The lack of structural information for CIP2A significantly prevents the design of anti-cancer therapeutics targeting this protein. In an attempt to counteract this fact, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain (CIP2A-ArmRP), analyzed key areas and amino acids, and coupled the results to the existing literature. The model reliably shows a stable armadillo repeat fold with a positively charged groove. The fact that this conserved groove highly likely binds peptides is corroborated by the presence of a conserved polar ladder, which is essential for the proper peptide-binding mode of armadillo repeat proteins and, according to our results, several known CIP2A interaction partners appropriately possess an ArmRP-binding consensus motif. Moreover, we show that Arg229Gln, which has been linked to the development of cancer, causes a significant change in charge and surface properties of CIP2A-ArmRP. In conclusion, our results reveal that CIP2A-ArmRP shares the typical fold, protein-protein interaction site and interaction patterns with other natural armadillo proteins and that, presumably, several interaction partners bind into the central groove of the modeled CIP2A-ArmRP. By providing essential structural characteristics of CIP2A, the present study significantly increases our knowledge on how CIP2A interacts with other proteins in cancer progression and how to develop new therapeutics targeting CIP2A.

  13. Proteins with CHADs (Conserved Histidine α-Helical Domains) Are Attached to Polyphosphate Granules In Vivo and Constitute a Novel Family of Polyphosphate-Associated Proteins (Phosins)

    PubMed Central

    Tumlirsch, Tony

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT On the basis of bioinformatic evidence, we suspected that proteins with a CYTH (CyaB thiamine triphosphatase) domain and/or a CHAD (conserved histidine α-helical domain) motif might represent polyphosphate (polyP) granule-associated proteins. We found no evidence of polyP targeting by proteins with CYTH domains. In contrast, two CHAD motif-containing proteins from Ralstonia eutropha H16 (A0104 and B1017) that were expressed as fusions with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) colocalized with polyP granules. While the expression of B1017 was not detectable, the A0104 protein was specifically identified in an isolated polyP granule fraction by proteome analysis. Moreover, eYFP fusions with the CHAD motif-containing proteins MGMSRV2-1987 from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and PP2307 from Pseudomonas putida also colocalized with polyP granules in a transspecies-specific manner. These data indicated that CHAD-containing proteins are generally attached to polyP granules. Together with the findings from four previously polyP-attached proteins (polyP kinases), the results of this study raised the number of polyP-associated proteins in R. eutropha to six. We suggest designating polyP granule-bound proteins with CHAD motifs as phosins (phosphate), analogous to phasins and oleosins that are specifically bound to the surface of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules in PHA-accumulating bacteria and to oil droplets in oil seed plants, respectively. IMPORTANCE The importance of polyphosphate (polyP) for life is evident from the ubiquitous presence of polyP in all species on earth. In unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms, polyP is located in specific membrane-enclosed organelles, called acidocalcisomes. However, in most prokaryotes, polyP is present as insoluble granules that have been designated previously as volutin granules. Almost nothing is known regarding the macromolecular composition of polyP granules. Particularly, the absence or presence of cellular

  14. Proteins with CHADs (Conserved Histidine α-Helical Domains) Are Attached to Polyphosphate Granules In Vivo and Constitute a Novel Family of Polyphosphate-Associated Proteins (Phosins).

    PubMed

    Tumlirsch, Tony; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of bioinformatic evidence, we suspected that proteins with a CYTH (CyaB thiamine triphosphatase) domain and/or a CHAD (conserved histidine α-helical domain) motif might represent polyphosphate (polyP) granule-associated proteins. We found no evidence of polyP targeting by proteins with CYTH domains. In contrast, two CHAD motif-containing proteins from Ralstonia eutropha H16 (A0104 and B1017) that were expressed as fusions with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) colocalized with polyP granules. While the expression of B1017 was not detectable, the A0104 protein was specifically identified in an isolated polyP granule fraction by proteome analysis. Moreover, eYFP fusions with the CHAD motif-containing proteins MGMSRV2-1987 from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and PP2307 from Pseudomonas putida also colocalized with polyP granules in a transspecies-specific manner. These data indicated that CHAD-containing proteins are generally attached to polyP granules. Together with the findings from four previously polyP-attached proteins (polyP kinases), the results of this study raised the number of polyP-associated proteins in R. eutropha to six. We suggest designating polyP granule-bound proteins with CHAD motifs as phosins (phosphate), analogous to phasins and oleosins that are specifically bound to the surface of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules in PHA-accumulating bacteria and to oil droplets in oil seed plants, respectively.IMPORTANCE The importance of polyphosphate (polyP) for life is evident from the ubiquitous presence of polyP in all species on earth. In unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms, polyP is located in specific membrane-enclosed organelles, called acidocalcisomes. However, in most prokaryotes, polyP is present as insoluble granules that have been designated previously as volutin granules. Almost nothing is known regarding the macromolecular composition of polyP granules. Particularly, the absence or presence of cellular compounds on

  15. Deciphering H3K4me3 broad domains associated with gene-regulatory networks and conserved epigenomic landscapes in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Dincer, A; Gavin, D P; Xu, K; Zhang, B; Dudley, J T; Schadt, E E; Akbarian, S

    2015-11-17

    Regulators of the histone H3-trimethyl lysine-4 (H3K4me3) mark are significantly associated with the genetic risk architecture of common neurodevelopmental disease, including schizophrenia and autism. Typical H3K4me3 is primarily localized in the form of sharp peaks, extending in neuronal chromatin on average only across 500-1500 base pairs mostly in close proximity to annotated transcription start sites. Here, through integrative computational analysis of epigenomic and transcriptomic data based on next-generation sequencing, we investigated H3K4me3 landscapes of sorted neuronal and non-neuronal nuclei in human postmortem, non-human primate and mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC), and blood. To explore whether H3K4me3 peak signals could also extend across much broader domains, we examined broadest domain cell-type-specific H3K4me3 peaks in an unbiased manner with an innovative approach on 41+12 ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets. In PFC neurons, broadest H3K4me3 distribution ranged from 3.9 to 12 kb, with extremely broad peaks (~10 kb or broader) related to synaptic function and GABAergic signaling (DLX1, ELFN1, GAD1, IGSF9B and LINC00966). Broadest neuronal peaks showed distinct motif signatures and were centrally positioned in prefrontal gene-regulatory Bayesian networks and sensitive to defective neurodevelopment. Approximately 120 of the broadest H3K4me3 peaks in human PFC neurons, including many genes related to glutamatergic and dopaminergic signaling, were fully conserved in chimpanzee, macaque and mouse cortical neurons. Exploration of spread and breadth of lysine methylation markings could provide novel insights into epigenetic mechanism involved in neuropsychiatric disease and neuronal genome evolution.

  16. Uncharacterized conserved motifs outside the HD-Zip domain in HD-Zip subfamily I transcription factors; a potential source of functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant HD-Zip transcription factors are modular proteins in which a homeodomain is associated to a leucine zipper. Of the four subfamilies in which they are divided, the tested members from subfamily I bind in vitro the same pseudopalindromic sequence CAAT(A/T)ATTG and among them, several exhibit similar expression patterns. However, most experiments in which HD-Zip I proteins were over or ectopically expressed under the control of the constitutive promoter 35S CaMV resulted in transgenic plants with clearly different phenotypes. Aiming to elucidate the structural mechanisms underlying such observation and taking advantage of the increasing information in databases of sequences from diverse plant species, an in silico analysis was performed. In addition, some of the results were also experimentally supported. Results A phylogenetic tree of 178 HD-Zip I proteins together with the sequence conservation presented outside the HD-Zip domains allowed the distinction of six groups of proteins. A motif-discovery approach enabled the recognition of an activation domain in the carboxy-terminal regions (CTRs) and some putative regulatory mechanisms acting in the amino-terminal regions (NTRs) and CTRs involving sumoylation and phosphorylation. A yeast one-hybrid experiment demonstrated that the activation activity of ATHB1, a member of one of the groups, is located in its CTR. Chimerical constructs were performed combining the HD-Zip domain of one member with the CTR of another and transgenic plants were obtained with these constructs. The phenotype of the chimerical transgenic plants was similar to the observed in transgenic plants bearing the CTR of the donor protein, revealing the importance of this module inside the whole protein. Conclusions The bioinformatical results and the experiments conducted in yeast and transgenic plants strongly suggest that the previously poorly analyzed NTRs and CTRs of HD-Zip I proteins play an important role in their function, hence

  17. The siRNA suppressor RTL1 is redox-regulated through glutathionylation of a conserved cysteine in the double-stranded-RNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Charbonnel, Cyril; Niazi, Adnan K; Elvira-Matelot, Emilie; Nowak, Elzbieta; Zytnicki, Matthias; de Bures, Anne; Jobet, Edouard; Opsomer, Alisson; Shamandi, Nahid; Nowotny, Marcin; Carapito, Christine; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Vaucheret, Hervé; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2017-09-15

    RNase III enzymes cleave double stranded (ds)RNA. This is an essential step for regulating the processing of mRNA, rRNA, snoRNA and other small RNAs, including siRNA and miRNA. Arabidopsis thaliana encodes nine RNase III: four DICER-LIKE (DCL) and five RNASE THREE LIKE (RTL). To better understand the molecular functions of RNase III in plants we developed a biochemical assay using RTL1 as a model. We show that RTL1 does not degrade dsRNA randomly, but recognizes specific duplex sequences to direct accurate cleavage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RNase III and dsRNA binding domains (dsRBD) are both required for dsRNA cleavage. Interestingly, the four DCL and the three RTL that carry dsRBD share a conserved cysteine (C230 in Arabidopsis RTL1) in their dsRBD. C230 is essential for RTL1 and DCL1 activities and is subjected to post-transcriptional modification. Indeed, under oxidizing conditions, glutathionylation of C230 inhibits RTL1 cleavage activity in a reversible manner involving glutaredoxins. We conclude that the redox state of the dsRBD ensures a fine-tune regulation of dsRNA processing by plant RNase III. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Expression, purification, and crystallography of the conserved methionine-rich domain of human signal recognition particle 54 kDa protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, K.; Clemons, W. M.; Zwieb, C.; Black, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    Protein SRP54 is an essential component of eukaryotic signal recognition particle (SRP). The methionine-rich M-domain (SRP54M or 54M) interacts with the SRP RNA and is also involved in the binding to signal peptides of secretory proteins during their targeting to cellular membranes. To gain insight into the molecular details of SRP-mediated protein targeting, we studied the human 54M polypeptide. The recombinant human protein was expressed successfully in Escherichia coli and was purified to homogeneity. Our studies determined the sites that were susceptible to limited proteolysis, with the goal to design smaller functional mutant derivatives that lacked nonessential amino acid residues from both termini. Of the four polypeptides produced by V8 protease or chymotrypsin, 54MM-2 was the shortest (120 residues; Mr = 13,584.8), but still contained the conserved amino acids suggested to associate with the signal peptide or the SRP RNA. 54MM-2 was cloned, expressed, purified to homogeneity, and was shown to bind human SRP RNA in the presence of protein SRP19, indicating that it was functional. Highly reproducible conditions for the crystallization of 54MM-2 were established. Examination of the crystals by X-ray diffraction showed an orthorhombic unit cell of dimensions a = 29.127 A, b = 63.693 A, and c = 129.601 A, in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with reflections extending to at least 2.0 A. PMID:10338025

  19. Characterization of tobacco expressing functional oat phytochrome. Domains responsible for the rapid degradation of Pfr are conserved between monocots and dicots

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.R.; Vierstra, R.D. ); Hershey, H.P. )

    1991-07-01

    Constitutive expression of a chimeric oat phytochrome gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) results in the accumulation of a functional 124-kilodalton photoreceptor that markedly alters the phenotype of light-grown tobacco. Here, we provide a detailed phenotypic and biochemical characterization of homozygous tobacco expressing high levels of oat phytochrome. Phenotypic changes include a substantial inhibition of stem elongation, decreased apical dominance, increased leaf chlorophyll content, and delayed leaf senescence. Oat phytochrome synthesized in tobacco is indistinguishable from that present in etiolated oats, having photoreversible difference spectrum maxima at 665 and 730 nanometers, exhibiting negligible dark reversion of phytochrome - far red-absorbing from (Pfr) to phytochrome - red-absorbing form (Pr), and existing as a dimer with an apparent size of approximately 300 kilodaltons. Heterodimers between the oat and tobacco chromoproteins were detected. Endogenous tobacco phytochrome and transgenically expressed oat phytochrome are rapidly degraded in vivo upon photoconversion of Pr to Pfr. Breakdown of both oat and tobacco Pfr is associated with the accumulation of ubiquitin-phytochrome conjugates, suggesting that degradation occurs via the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. This result indicates that the factors responsible for selective recognition of Pfr by the ubiquitin pathway are conserved between monocot and dicot phytochromes. More broadly, it demonstrates that the domains(s) within a plant protein responsible for its selective breakdown can be recognized by the degradation machinery of heterologous species.

  20. The amino-terminal conserved domain of 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase is critical for its function in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2015-01-01

    4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (HDR), also known as isoprenoid synthesis H (IspH) or lysis-tolerant B (LytB), catalyzes the last step of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway to synthesize isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. The structure and reaction mechanism of IspH have been actively investigated in Escherichia coli but little is known in plants. Compared with the bacterial IspH, cyanobacterial and plant HDRs all contain an extra N-terminal conserved domain (NCD) that is essential for their function. Tyr72 in the NCD and several plant-specific residues around the central active site are critical for Arabidopsis HDR function. These results suggest that the structure and reaction mechanism of HDR/IspH may be different between plants and bacteria. The E. coli IspH is an iron-sulfur protein that is sensitive to oxygen. It is possible that the cyanobacterial HDR may independently evolve from the common ancestor of prokaryotes to obtain the NCD, which may protect the enzyme from high concentration of oxygen during photosynthesis. PMID:25723575

  1. The Evolutionarily Conserved C-terminal Domains in the Mammalian Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Serve as Dual Regulators of Protein Stability and Transcriptional Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Lingnurkar, Raj; Carey, Timothy S.; Pomaville, Monica; Kar, Parimal; Feig, Michael; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.; Arnosti, David N.; Henry, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor and related family of proteins play critical roles in development through their regulation of genes involved in cell fate. Multiple regulatory pathways impact RB function, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system with deregulated RB destruction frequently associated with pathogenesis. With the current study we explored the mechanisms connecting proteasome-mediated turnover of the RB family to the regulation of repressor activity. We find that steady state levels of all RB family members, RB, p107, and p130, were diminished during embryonic stem cell differentiation concomitant with their target gene acquisition. Proteasome-dependent turnover of the RB family is mediated by distinct and autonomously acting instability elements (IE) located in their C-terminal regulatory domains in a process that is sensitive to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) perturbation. The IE regions include motifs that contribute to E2F-DP transcription factor interaction, and consistently, p107 and p130 repressor potency was reduced by IE deletion. The juxtaposition of degron sequences and E2F interaction motifs appears to be a conserved feature across the RB family, suggesting the potential for repressor ubiquitination and specific target gene regulation. These findings establish a mechanistic link between regulation of RB family repressor potency and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25903125

  2. Differential conservation of transcriptional domains of mammalian Prophet of Pit-1 proteins revealed by structural studies of the bovine gene and comparative functional analysis of the protein.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Aaron D; Smith, Timothy P L; Bennett, Gary L; Sloop, Kyle W; Whitsett, Julie A; Rhodes, Simon J

    2002-05-29

    The Prophet of Pit-1 (PROP1) gene encodes a paired class homeodomain transcription factor that is exclusively expressed in the developing mammalian pituitary gland. PROP1 function is essential for anterior pituitary organogenesis, and heritable mutations in the gene are associated with combined pituitary hormone deficiency in human patients and animals. By cloning the bovine PROP1 gene and by comparative analysis, we demonstrate that the homeodomains and carboxyl termini of mammalian PROP1 proteins are highly conserved while the amino termini are diverged. Whereas the carboxyl termini of the human and bovine PROP1 proteins contain potent transcriptional activation domains, the amino termini and homeodomains have repressive activities. The bovine PROP1 gene has four exons and three introns and maps to a region of chromosome seven carrying a quantitative trait locus affecting ovulation rate. Two alleles of the bovine gene were found that encode distinct protein products with different DNA binding and transcriptional activities. These experiments demonstrate that mammalian PROP1 genes encode proteins with complex regulatory capacities and that modest changes in protein sequence can significantly alter the activity of this pituitary developmental transcription factor.

  3. Structure and function of the yeast listerin (Ltn1) conserved N-terminal domain in binding to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Doamekpor, Selom K; Lee, Joong-Won; Hepowit, Nathaniel L; Wu, Cheng; Charenton, Clement; Leonard, Marilyn; Bengtson, Mario H; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Sachs, Matthew S; Lima, Christopher D; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2016-07-19

    The Ltn1 E3 ligase (listerin in mammals) has emerged as a paradigm for understanding ribosome-associated ubiquitylation. Ltn1 binds to 60S ribosomal subunits to ubiquitylate nascent polypeptides that become stalled during synthesis; among Ltn1's substrates are aberrant products of mRNA lacking stop codons [nonstop translation products (NSPs)]. Here, we report the reconstitution of NSP ubiquitylation in Neurospora crassa cell extracts. Upon translation in vitro, ribosome-stalled NSPs were ubiquitylated in an Ltn1-dependent manner, while still ribosome-associated. Furthermore, we provide biochemical evidence that the conserved N-terminal domain (NTD) plays a significant role in the binding of Ltn1 to 60S ribosomal subunits and that NTD mutations causing defective 60S binding also lead to defective NSP ubiquitylation, without affecting Ltn1's intrinsic E3 ligase activity. Finally, we report the crystal structure of the Ltn1 NTD at 2.4-Å resolution. The structure, combined with additional mutational studies, provides insight to NTD's role in binding stalled 60S subunits. Our findings show that Neurospora extracts can be used as a tool to dissect mechanisms underlying ribosome-associated protein quality control and are consistent with a model in which Ltn1 uses 60S subunits as adapters, at least in part via its NTD, to target stalled NSPs for ubiquitylation.

  4. Structure and function of the yeast listerin (Ltn1) conserved N-terminal domain in binding to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Doamekpor, Selom K.; Lee, Joong-Won; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Wu, Cheng; Charenton, Clement; Leonard, Marilyn; Bengtson, Mario H.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Lima, Christopher D.; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ltn1 E3 ligase (listerin in mammals) has emerged as a paradigm for understanding ribosome-associated ubiquitylation. Ltn1 binds to 60S ribosomal subunits to ubiquitylate nascent polypeptides that become stalled during synthesis; among Ltn1’s substrates are aberrant products of mRNA lacking stop codons [nonstop translation products (NSPs)]. Here, we report the reconstitution of NSP ubiquitylation in Neurospora crassa cell extracts. Upon translation in vitro, ribosome-stalled NSPs were ubiquitylated in an Ltn1-dependent manner, while still ribosome-associated. Furthermore, we provide biochemical evidence that the conserved N-terminal domain (NTD) plays a significant role in the binding of Ltn1 to 60S ribosomal subunits and that NTD mutations causing defective 60S binding also lead to defective NSP ubiquitylation, without affecting Ltn1’s intrinsic E3 ligase activity. Finally, we report the crystal structure of the Ltn1 NTD at 2.4-Å resolution. The structure, combined with additional mutational studies, provides insight to NTD’s role in binding stalled 60S subunits. Our findings show that Neurospora extracts can be used as a tool to dissect mechanisms underlying ribosome-associated protein quality control and are consistent with a model in which Ltn1 uses 60S subunits as adapters, at least in part via its NTD, to target stalled NSPs for ubiquitylation. PMID:27385828

  5. A missense mutation in the conserved C2B domain of otoferlin causes deafness in a new mouse model of DFNB9.

    PubMed

    Longo-Guess, Chantal; Gagnon, Leona H; Bergstrom, David E; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2007-12-01

    Mutations of the otoferlin gene have been shown to underlie deafness disorders in humans and mice. Analyses of genetically engineered mice lacking otoferlin have demonstrated an essential role for this protein in vesicle exocytosis at the inner hair cell afferent synapse. Here, we report on the molecular and phenotypic characterization of a new ENU-induced missense mutation of the mouse otoferlin gene designated Otof(deaf5Jcs). The mutation is a single T to A base substitution in exon 10 of Otof that causes a non-conservative amino acid change of isoleucine to asparagine in the C2B domain of the protein. Although strong immunoreactivity with an otoferlin-specific antibody was detected in cochlear hair cells of wildtype mice, no expression was detected in mutant mice, indicating that the missense mutation has a severe effect on the stability of the protein and potentially its localization. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) analysis demonstrated that mice homozygous for the missense mutation are profoundly deaf, consistent with an essential role for otoferlin in inner hair cell neurotransmission. Vestibular-evoked potentials (VsEPs) of mutant mice, however, were equivalent to those of wildtype mice, indicating that otoferlin is unnecessary for vestibular function even though it is highly expressed in both vestibular and cochlear hair cells.

  6. X-ray Structural and Functional Studies of the Three Tandemly Linked Domains of Non-structural Protein 3 (nsp3) from Murine Hepatitis Virus Reveal Conserved Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yafang; Savinov, Sergey N.; Mielech, Anna M.; Cao, Thu; Baker, Susan C.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine hepatitis virus (MHV) has long served as a model system for the study of coronaviruses. Non-structural protein 3 (nsp3) is the largest nsp in the coronavirus genome, and it contains multiple functional domains that are required for coronavirus replication. Despite the numerous functional studies on MHV and its nsp3 domain, the structure of only one domain in nsp3, the small ubiquitin-like domain 1 (Ubl1), has been determined. We report here the x-ray structure of three tandemly linked domains of MHV nsp3, including the papain-like protease 2 (PLP2) catalytic domain, the ubiquitin-like domain 2 (Ubl2), and a third domain that we call the DPUP (domain preceding Ubl2 and PLP2) domain. DPUP has close structural similarity to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus unique domain C (SUD-C), suggesting that this domain may not be unique to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. The PLP2 catalytic domain was found to have both deubiquitinating and deISGylating isopeptidase activities in addition to proteolytic activity. A computationally derived model of MHV PLP2 bound to ubiquitin was generated, and the potential interactions between ubiquitin and PLP2 were probed by site-directed mutagenesis. These studies extend substantially our structural knowledge of MHV nsp3, providing a platform for further investigation of the role of nsp3 domains in MHV viral replication. PMID:26296883

  7. A conserved motif in the linker domain of STAT1 transcription factor is required for both recognition and release from high-affinity DNA-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hüntelmann, Bettina; Staab, Julia; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Binding to specific palindromic sequences termed gamma-activated sites (GAS) is a hallmark of gene activation by members of the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) family of cytokine-inducible transcription factors. However, the precise molecular mechanisms involved in the signal-dependent finding of target genes by STAT dimers have not yet been very well studied. In this study, we have characterized a sequence motif in the STAT1 linker domain which is highly conserved among the seven human STAT proteins and includes surface-exposed residues in close proximity to the bound DNA. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that a lysine residue in position 567 of the full-length molecule is required for GAS recognition. The substitution of alanine for this residue completely abolished both binding to high-affinity GAS elements and transcriptional activation of endogenous target genes in cells stimulated with interferon-γ (IFNγ), while the time course of transient nuclear accumulation and tyrosine phosphorylation were virtually unchanged. In contrast, two glutamic acid residues (E559 and E563) on each monomer are important for the dissociation of dimeric STAT1 from DNA and, when mutated to alanine, result in elevated levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 as well as prolonged IFNγ-stimulated nuclear accumulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that the kinetics of signal-dependent GAS binding is determined by an array of glutamic acid residues located at the interior surface of the STAT1 dimer. These negatively charged residues appear to align the long axis of the STAT1 dimer in a position perpendicular to the DNA, thereby facilitating the interaction between lysine 567 and the phosphodiester backbone of a bound GAS element, which is a prerequisite for transient gene induction.

  8. A thermophilic mini-chaperonin contains a conserved polypeptide-binding surface: combined crystallographic and NMR studies of the GroEL Apical Domain with implications for substrate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Q. X. H.; Dementieva, I. S. D.; Walsh, M. A. W.; Hallenga, K. H.; Weiss, M. A. W.; Joachimiak, A. J.; Biosciences Division; Case Western Reserve Univ.; IRBM P. Angeletti; Purdue Univ.

    2001-02-23

    A homologue of the Escherichia coli GroEL apical domain was obtained from thermophilic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus. The domains share 70 % sequence identity (101 out of 145 residues). The thermal stability of the T. thermophilus apical domain (T{sub m}>100{sup o}C as evaluated by circular dichroism) is at least 35{sup o}C greater than that of the E. coli apical domain (T{sub m}=65{sup o}C). The crystal structure of a selenomethione-substituted apical domain from T. thermophilus was determined to a resolution of 1.78 {angstrom} using multiwavelength-anomalous-diffraction phasing. The structure is similar to that of the E. coli apical domain (root-mean-square deviation 0.45 {angstrom} based on main-chain atoms). The thermophilic structure contains seven additional salt bridges of which four contain charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds. Only one of the additional salt bridges would face the 'Anfinsen cage' in GroEL. High temperatures were exploited to map sites of interactions between the apical domain and molten globules. NMR footprints of apical domain-protein complexes were obtained at elevated temperature using {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H correlation spectra of {sup 15}N-labeled apical domain. Footprints employing two polypeptides unrelated in sequence or structure (an insulin monomer and the SRY high-mobility-group box, each partially unfolded at 50{sup o}C) are essentially the same and consistent with the peptide-binding surface previously defined in E. coli GroEL and its apical domain-peptide complexes. An additional part of this surface comprising a short N-terminal {alpha}-helix is observed. The extended footprint rationalizes mutagenesis studies of intact GroEL in which point mutations affecting substrate binding were found outside the 'classical' peptide-binding site. Our results demonstrate structural conservation of the apical domain among GroEL homologues and conservation of an extended non-polar surface recognizing diverse polypeptides.

  9. A Conserved Interaction between a C-Terminal Motif in Norovirus VPg and the HEAT-1 Domain of eIF4G Is Essential for Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Leen, Eoin N.; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Correia, Samantha; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Cannac, Fabien; Pastore, Chiara; Xu, Yingqi; Graham, Stephen C.; Matthews, Stephen J.; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Curry, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Translation initiation is a critical early step in the replication cycle of the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans. Norovirus RNA, which has neither a 5´ m7G cap nor an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), adopts an unusual mechanism to initiate protein synthesis that relies on interactions between the VPg protein covalently attached to the 5´-end of the viral RNA and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) in the host cell. For murine norovirus (MNV) we previously showed that VPg binds to the middle fragment of eIF4G (4GM; residues 652–1132). Here we have used pull-down assays, fluorescence anisotropy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to demonstrate that a stretch of ~20 amino acids at the C terminus of MNV VPg mediates direct and specific binding to the HEAT-1 domain within the 4GM fragment of eIF4G. Our analysis further reveals that the MNV C terminus binds to eIF4G HEAT-1 via a motif that is conserved in all known noroviruses. Fine mutagenic mapping suggests that the MNV VPg C terminus may interact with eIF4G in a helical conformation. NMR spectroscopy was used to define the VPg binding site on eIF4G HEAT-1, which was confirmed by mutagenesis and binding assays. We have found that this site is non-overlapping with the binding site for eIF4A on eIF4G HEAT-1 by demonstrating that norovirus VPg can form ternary VPg-eIF4G-eIF4A complexes. The functional significance of the VPg-eIF4G interaction was shown by the ability of fusion proteins containing the C-terminal peptide of MNV VPg to inhibit in vitro translation of norovirus RNA but not cap- or IRES-dependent translation. These observations define important structural details of a functional interaction between norovirus VPg and eIF4G and reveal a binding interface that might be exploited as a target for antiviral therapy. PMID:26734730

  10. A novel abi5 allele reveals the importance of the conserved Ala in the C3 domain for regulation of downstream genes and salt tolerance during germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Kenji; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Sakata, Yoichi

    2013-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction during Arabidopsis seed development and germination requires a Group A bZIP transcription factor encoded by ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5). In addition to the basic leucine zipper DNA binding domain, Group A bZIPs are characterized by three N-terminal conserved regions (C1, C2 and C3) and one C-terminal conserved region (C4). These conserved regions are considered to play roles in ABI5 functions; however, except for the phosphorylation site, the importance of the highly conserved amino acids is unclear. Here, we report a novel abi5 recessive allele (abi5-9) that encodes an intact ABI5 protein with one amino acid substitution (A214G) in the C3 domain. The abi5-9 plants showed ABA insensitivity during germination and could germinate on medium containing 175 mM NaCl or 500 mM mannitol. Em1 and Em6--both encoding late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins and directly targeted by ABI5 regulation--were expressed at very low levels in abi5-9 plants compared with the wild type. In yeast, the abi5-9 protein exhibited greatly reduced interaction with ABI3 compared with ABI5. These data suggest that Ala214 in ABI5 contributes to the function of ABI5 via its interaction with ABI3.

  11. Unique functional properties of conserved arginine residues in the lentivirus lytic peptide domains of the C-terminal tail of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Anne-Sophie; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Craigo, Jodi K; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2014-03-14

    A previous study from our laboratory reported a preferential conservation of arginine relative to lysine in the C-terminal tail (CTT) of HIV-1 envelope (Env). Despite substantial overall sequence variation in the CTT, specific arginines are highly conserved in the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP) motifs and are scarcely substituted by lysines, in contrast to gp120 and the ectodomain of gp41. However, to date, no explanation has been provided to explain the selective incorporation and conservation of arginines over lysines in these motifs. Herein, we address the functions in virus replication of the most conserved arginines by performing conservative mutations of arginine to lysine in the LLP1 and LLP2 motifs. The presence of lysine in place of arginine in the LLP1 motif resulted in significant impairment of Env expression and consequently virus replication kinetics, Env fusogenicity, and incorporation. By contrast, lysine exchanges in LLP2 only affected the level of Env incorporation and fusogenicity. Our findings demonstrate that the conservative lysine substitutions significantly affect Env functional properties indicating a unique functional role for the highly conserved arginines in the LLP motifs. These results provide for the first time a functional explanation to the preferred incorporation of arginine, relative to lysine, in the CTT of HIV-1 Env. We propose that these arginines may provide unique functions for Env interaction with viral or cellular cofactors that then influence overall Env functional properties.

  12. Type-specific and cross-reactive antibodies and T cell responses in norovirus VLP immunized mice are targeted both to conserved and variable domains of capsid VP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-10-01

    Norovirus (NoV)-specific antibodies, which block binding of the virus-like particles (VLPs) to the cell receptors are conformation dependent and directed towards the most exposed domain of the NoV capsid VP1 protein, the P2 domain. Limited data are available on the antibodies directed to other domains of the VP1, and even less on the NoV VP1-specific T cell epitopes. In here, BALB/c mice were immunized with six VLPs derived from NoV GII.4-1999, GII.4-2009 (New Orleans), GII.4-2012 (Sydney), GII.12, GI.1, and G1.3. Serum immunoglobulin G binding antibodies, histo-blood group antigen blocking antibodies and T cell responses using type-specific and heterologous NoV VLPs, P-dimers and 76 overlapping synthetic peptides, spanning the entire 539 amino acid sequence of GII.4 VP1, were determined. The results showed that at least half of the total antibody content is directed towards conserved S domain of the VP1. Only a small fraction (<1%) of the VP1 binding antibodies were blocking/neutralizing. With the use of matrix peptide pools and individual peptides, seven CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell restricted epitopes were mapped, two located in S domain, four in P2 domain and one in P1 domain of NoV VP1. The epitopes were GII.4 strain-specific but also common GII.4 genotype-specific T cell epitopes were identified. More importantly, the results suggest a 9-amino acids long sequence ((318)PAPLGTPDF(326)) in P2 domain of VP1 as a universal NoV genogroup II-specific CD8(+) T cell epitope. Distribution of the T cell epitopes alongside the capsid VP1 indicates the need of the complete protein for high immunogenicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Conserved Pro-Glu (PE) and Pro-Pro-Glu (PPE) protein domains target LipY lipases of pathogenic mycobacteria to the cell surface via the ESX-5 pathway.

    PubMed

    Daleke, Maria H; Cascioferro, Alessandro; de Punder, Karin; Ummels, Roy; Abdallah, Abdallah M; van der Wel, Nicole; Peters, Peter J; Luirink, Joen; Manganelli, Riccardo; Bitter, Wilbert

    2011-05-27

    The type VII secretion system ESX-5 is a major pathway for export of PE and PPE proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria. These mycobacteria-specific protein families are characterized by conserved N-terminal domains of 100 and 180 amino acids, which contain the proline-glutamic acid (PE) and proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) motifs after which they are named. Here we investigated secretion of the triacylglycerol lipase LipY, which in fast-growing mycobacteria contains a signal sequence, but in slow-growing species appears to have replaced the signal peptide with a PE or PPE domain. Selected LipY homologues were expressed in wild-type Mycobacterium marinum and its corresponding ESX-5 mutant, and localization of the proteins was investigated by immunoblotting and electron microscopy. Our study shows that Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE-LipY (LipY(tub)) and M. marinum PPE-LipY (LipY(mar)) are both secreted to the bacterial surface in an ESX-5-dependent fashion. After transport, the PE/PPE domains are removed by proteolytic cleavage. In contrast, Mycobacterium gilvum LipY, which has a signal sequence, is not transported to the cell surface. Furthermore, we show that LipY(tub) and LipY(mar) require their respective PE and PPE domains for ESX-5-dependent secretion. The role of the PE domain in ESX-5 secretion was confirmed in a whole cell lipase assay, in which wild-type bacteria expressing full-length LipY(tub), but not LipY(tub) lacking its PE domain, were shown to hydrolyze extracellular lipids. In conclusion, both PE and PPE domains contain a signal required for secretion of LipY by the ESX-5 system, and these domains are proteolytically removed upon translocation.

  14. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    SciTech Connect

    Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Zhang, Xuejun; Kinch, Lisa; Leybourne, Matthew; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong

    2009-01-26

    The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0{angstrom} resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric 'lids' formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The six PII-like domains form two trimeric 'lids' that

  15. Detection of protein-protein interactions in plants using the transrepressive activity of the EAR motif repression domain.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kyoko; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2010-02-01

    The activities of many regulatory factors involve interactions with other proteins. We demonstrate here that the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif repression domain (SRDX) can convert a transcriptional complex into a repressor via transrepression that is mediated by protein-protein interactions and show that transrepressive activity of SRDX can be used to detect such protein-protein interactions. When we fused a protein that interacts with a transcription factor with SRDX and co-expressed the product with the transcription factor in plant cells, the expression of genes that are targets of the transcription factor was suppressed by transrepression. We demonstrated the transrepressive activity of SRDX using FOS and JUN as a model system and used two MADS box plant proteins, PISTILLATA and APETALA3, which are known to form heterodimers. Furthermore, the transgenic plants that expressed TTG1, which is a WD40 protein and interacts with bHLH transcription factors, fused to SRDX exhibited a phenotype similar to ttg1 mutants by transrepression and the regions of TTG1 required for interaction to the bHLH protein were detected using our system. We also used this system to analyse a protein factor that might be incorporated into a transcriptional complex and identified an Arabidopsis WD40 protein PWP2 (AtPWP2) interacting with AtTBP1 through comparison of phenotypes induced by 35S:AtPWP2-SRDX with that induced by the chimeric repressor. Our results indicate that the transrepression mediated by SRDX can be used to detect and confirm protein-protein interactions in plants and should be useful in identifying factors that form transcriptional protein complexes.

  16. Multiple conserved domains of the nucleoporin Nup124p and its orthologs Nup1p and Nup153 are critical for nuclear import and activity of the fission yeast Tf1 retrotransposon.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Srivani; Pang, Junxiong Vincent; Wang, Cui Xia; Balasundaram, David

    2007-09-01

    The nucleoporin Nup124p is a host protein required for the nuclear import of both, retrotransposon Tf1-Gag as well as the retroviral HIV-1 Vpr in fission yeast. The human nucleoporin Nup153 and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup1p were identified as orthologs of Nup124p. In this study, we show that all three nucleoporins share a large FG/FXFG-repeat domain and a C-terminal peptide sequence, GRKIxxxxxRRKx, that are absolutely essential for Tf1 retrotransposition. Though the FXFG domain was essential, the FXFG repeats themselves could be eliminated without loss of retrotransposon activity, suggesting the existence of a common element unrelated to FG/FXFG motifs. The Nup124p C-terminal peptide, GRKIAVPRSRRKR, was extremely sensitive to certain single amino acid changes within stretches of the basic residues. On the basis of our comparative study of Nup124p, Nup1p, and Nup153 domains, we have developed peptides that specifically knockdown retrotransposon activity by disengaging the Tf1-Gag from its host nuclear transport machinery without any harmful consequence to the host itself. Our results imply that those domains challenged a specific pathway affecting Tf1 transposition. Although full-length Nup1p or Nup153 does not complement Nup124p, the functionality of their conserved domains with reference to Tf1 activity suggests that these three proteins evolved from a common ancestor.

  17. Multiple Conserved Domains of the Nucleoporin Nup124p and Its Orthologs Nup1p and Nup153 Are Critical for Nuclear Import and Activity of the Fission Yeast Tf1 Retrotransposon

    PubMed Central

    Sistla, Srivani; Pang, Junxiong Vincent; Wang, Cui Xia

    2007-01-01

    The nucleoporin Nup124p is a host protein required for the nuclear import of both, retrotransposon Tf1-Gag as well as the retroviral HIV-1 Vpr in fission yeast. The human nucleoporin Nup153 and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup1p were identified as orthologs of Nup124p. In this study, we show that all three nucleoporins share a large FG/FXFG-repeat domain and a C-terminal peptide sequence, GRKIxxxxxRRKx, that are absolutely essential for Tf1 retrotransposition. Though the FXFG domain was essential, the FXFG repeats themselves could be eliminated without loss of retrotransposon activity, suggesting the existence of a common element unrelated to FG/FXFG motifs. The Nup124p C-terminal peptide, GRKIAVPRSRRKR, was extremely sensitive to certain single amino acid changes within stretches of the basic residues. On the basis of our comparative study of Nup124p, Nup1p, and Nup153 domains, we have developed peptides that specifically knockdown retrotransposon activity by disengaging the Tf1-Gag from its host nuclear transport machinery without any harmful consequence to the host itself. Our results imply that those domains challenged a specific pathway affecting Tf1 transposition. Although full-length Nup1p or Nup153 does not complement Nup124p, the functionality of their conserved domains with reference to Tf1 activity suggests that these three proteins evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:17615301

  18. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  19. Recognition of Histone H3 Lysine-4 Methylation by the Double Tudor Domain of JMJD2A

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,Y.; Fang, J.; Bedford, M.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    Biological responses to histone methylation critically depend on the faithful readout and transduction of the methyl-lysine signal by 'effector' proteins, yet our understanding of methyl-lysine recognition has so far been limited to the study of histone binding by chromodomain and WD40-repeat proteins. The double tudor domain of JMJD2A, a Jmjc domain-containing histone demethylase, binds methylated histone H3-K4 and H4-K20. We found that the double tudor domain has an interdigitated structure, and the unusual fold is required for its ability to bind methylated histone tails. The cocrystal structure of the JMJD2A double tudor domain with a trimethylated H3-K4 peptide reveals that the trimethyl-K4 is bound in a cage of three aromatic residues, two of which are from the tudor-2 motif, whereas the binding specificity is determined by side-chain interactions involving amino acids from the tudor-1 motif. Our study provides mechanistic insights into recognition of methylated histone tails by tudor domains and reveals the structural intricacy of methyl-lysine recognition by two closely spaced effector domains.

  20. A conserved motif N-terminal to the DNA-binding domains of myogenic bHLH transcription factors mediates cooperative DNA binding with pbx-Meis1/Prep1.

    PubMed

    Knoepfler, P S; Bergstrom, D A; Uetsuki, T; Dac-Korytko, I; Sun, Y H; Wright, W E; Tapscott, S J; Kamps, M P

    1999-09-15

    The t(1;19) chromosomal translocation of pediatric pre-B cell leukemia produces chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1, which contains the N-terminal transactivation domain of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, E2a, joined to the majority of the homeodomain protein, Pbx1. There are three Pbx family members, which bind DNA as heterodimers with both broadly expressed Meis/Prep1 homeo-domain proteins and specifically expressed Hox homeodomain proteins. These Pbx heterodimers can augment the function of transcriptional activators bound to adjacent elements. In heterodimers, a conserved tryptophan motif in Hox proteins binds a pocket on the surface of the Pbx homeodomain, while Meis/Prep1 proteins bind an N-terminal Pbx domain, raising the possibility that the tryptophan-interaction pocket of the Pbx component of a Pbx-Meis/Prep1 complex is still available to bind trypto-phan motifs of other transcription factors bound to flanking elements. Here, we report that Pbx-Meis1/Prep1 binds DNA cooperatively with heterodimers of E2a and MyoD, myogenin, Mrf-4 or Myf-5. As with Hox proteins, a highly conserved tryptophan motif N-terminal to the DNA-binding domains of each myogenic bHLH family protein is required for cooperative DNA binding with Pbx-Meis1/Prep1. In vivo, MyoD requires this tryptophan motif to evoke chromatin remodeling in the Myogenin promoter and to activate Myogenin transcription. Pbx-Meis/Prep1 complexes, therefore, have the potential to cooperate with the myogenic bHLH proteins in regulating gene transcription.

  1. Experiential Learning Laboratories in Business Schools: The WD-40® for Curriculum Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boroff, Karen E.; Riley, Elven

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a case analysis of how a business school brought about curriculum innovation. The school used something borrowed, specifically experiential learning laboratories, and something new to attain measureable curriculum change, with only modest investments. The authors urge that the nimbleness of a medium-size school committed to…

  2. A lipopolysaccharide-binding domain of the Campylobacter fetus S-layer protein resides within the conserved N terminus of a family of silent and divergent homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, J; Tummuru, M K; Blaser, M J

    1995-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus cells can produce multiple S-layer proteins ranging from 97 to 149 kDa, with a single form predominating in cultured cells. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli a sapA homolog, sapA2, which encodes a full-length 1,109-amino-acid (112-kDa) S-layer protein. Comparison with the two previously cloned sapA homologs has demonstrated two regions of identity, approximately 70 bp before the open reading frame (ORF) and proceeding 550 bp into the ORF and immediately downstream of the ORF. The entire genome contains eight copies of each of these conserved regions. Southern analyses has demonstrated that sapA2 existed as a complete copy within the genome in all strains examined, although Northern (RNA) analysis has demonstrated that sapA2 was not expressed in the C. fetus strain from which it was cloned. Further Southern analyses revealed increasing sapA diversity as probes increasingly 3' within the ORF were used. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and then Southern blotting with the conserved N-terminal region of the sapA homologs as a probe showed that these genes were tightly clustered on the chromosome. Deletion mutagenesis revealed that the S-layer protein bound serospecifically to the C. fetus lipopolysaccharide via its conserved N-terminal region. These data indicated that the S-layer proteins shared functional activity in the conserved N terminus but diverged in a semiconservative manner for the remainder of the molecule. Variation in S-layer protein expression may involve rearrangement of complete gene copies from a single large locus containing multiple sapA homologs. PMID:7896695

  3. Complex structure of the fission yeast SREBP-SCAP binding domains reveals an oligomeric organization

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin; Qian, Hongwu; Shao, Wei; Li, Jingxian; Wu, Jianping; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Wenqi; Wang, Hong-Wei; Espenshade, Peter; Yan, Nieng

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors are master regulators of cellular lipid homeostasis in mammals and oxygen-responsive regulators of hypoxic adaptation in fungi. SREBP C-terminus binds to the WD40 domain of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which confers sterol regulation by controlling the ER-to-Golgi transport of the SREBP-SCAP complex and access to the activating proteases in the Golgi. Here, we biochemically and structurally show that the carboxyl terminal domains (CTD) of Sre1 and Scp1, the fission yeast SREBP and SCAP, form a functional 4:4 oligomer and Sre1-CTD forms a dimer of dimers. The crystal structure of Sre1-CTD at 3.5 Å and cryo-EM structure of the complex at 5.4 Å together with in vitro biochemical evidence elucidate three distinct regions in Sre1-CTD required for Scp1 binding, Sre1-CTD dimerization and tetrameric formation. Finally, these structurally identified domains are validated in a cellular context, demonstrating that the proper 4:4 oligomeric complex formation is required for Sre1 activation. PMID:27811944

  4. Structure of the unique SEFIR domain from human interleukin 17 receptor A reveals a composite ligand-binding site containing a conserved α-helix for Act1 binding and IL-17 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen; Han, Yue; Li, Xiaoxia; Deng, Junpeng

    2014-05-01

    Crystal structure of the SEFIR domain from human IL-17 receptor A provides new insights into IL-17 signaling. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) cytokines play a crucial role in mediating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A unique intracellular signaling domain termed SEFIR is found within all IL-17 receptors (IL-17Rs) as well as the key adaptor protein Act1. SEFIR-mediated protein–protein interaction is a crucial step in IL-17 cytokine signaling. Here, the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the SEFIR domain of IL-17RA, the most commonly shared receptor for IL-17 cytokine signaling, is reported. The structure includes the complete SEFIR domain and an additional α-helical C-terminal extension, which pack tightly together to form a compact unit. Structural comparison between the SEFIR domains of IL-17RA and IL-17RB reveals substantial differences in protein topology and folding. The uniquely long insertion between strand βC and helix αC in IL-17RA SEFIR is mostly well ordered, displaying a helix (αCC′{sub ins}) and a flexible loop (CC′). The DD′ loop in the IL-17RA SEFIR structure is much shorter; it rotates nearly 90° with respect to the counterpart in the IL-17RB SEFIR structure and shifts about 12 Å to accommodate the αCC′{sub ins} helix without forming any knots. Helix αC was identified as critical for its interaction with Act1 and IL-17-stimulated gene expression. The data suggest that the heterotypic SEFIR–SEFIR association via helix αC is a conserved and signature mechanism specific for IL-17 signaling. The structure also suggests that the downstream motif of IL-17RA SEFIR together with helix αC could provide a composite ligand-binding surface for recruiting Act1 during IL-17 signaling.

  5. Three cdg Operons Control Cellular Turnover of Cyclic Di-GMP in Acetobacter xylinum: Genetic Organization and Occurrence of Conserved Domains in Isoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Rony; Wong, Hing C.; Calhoon, Roger; Gelfand, David; Fear, Anna Lisa; Volman, Gail; Mayer, Raphael; Ross, Peter; Amikam, Dorit; Weinhouse, Haim; Cohen, Avital; Sapir, Shai; Ohana, Patricia; Benziman, Moshe

    1998-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is the specific nucleotide regulator of β-1,4-glucan (cellulose) synthase in Acetobacter xylinum. The enzymes controlling turnover of c-di-GMP are diguanylate cyclase (DGC), which catalyzes its formation, and phosphodiesterase A (PDEA), which catalyzes its degradation. Following biochemical purification of DGC and PDEA, genes encoding isoforms of these enzymes have been isolated and found to be located on three distinct yet highly homologous operons for cyclic diguanylate, cdg1, cdg2, and cdg3. Within each cdg operon, a pdeA gene lies upstream of a dgc gene. cdg1 contains two additional flanking genes, cdg1a and cdg1d. cdg1a encodes a putative transcriptional activator, similar to AadR of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and FixK proteins of rhizobia. The deduced DGC and PDEA proteins have an identical motif structure of two lengthy domains in their C-terminal regions. These domains are also present in numerous bacterial proteins of undefined function. The N termini of the DGC and PDEA deduced proteins contain putative oxygen-sensing domains, based on similarity to domains on bacterial NifL and FixL proteins, respectively. Genetic disruption analyses demonstrated a physiological hierarchy among the cdg operons, such that cdg1 contributes 80% of cellular DGC and PDEA activities and cdg2 and cdg3 contribute 15 and 5%, respectively. Disruption of dgc genes markedly reduced in vivo cellulose production, demonstrating that c-di-GMP controls this process. PMID:9721278

  6. Three cdg operons control cellular turnover of cyclic di-GMP in Acetobacter xylinum: genetic organization and occurrence of conserved domains in isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Tal, R; Wong, H C; Calhoon, R; Gelfand, D; Fear, A L; Volman, G; Mayer, R; Ross, P; Amikam, D; Weinhouse, H; Cohen, A; Sapir, S; Ohana, P; Benziman, M

    1998-09-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is the specific nucleotide regulator of beta-1,4-glucan (cellulose) synthase in Acetobacter xylinum. The enzymes controlling turnover of c-di-GMP are diguanylate cyclase (DGC), which catalyzes its formation, and phosphodiesterase A (PDEA), which catalyzes its degradation. Following biochemical purification of DGC and PDEA, genes encoding isoforms of these enzymes have been isolated and found to be located on three distinct yet highly homologous operons for cyclic diguanylate, cdg1, cdg2, and cdg3. Within each cdg operon, a pdeA gene lies upstream of a dgc gene. cdg1 contains two additional flanking genes, cdg1a and cdg1d. cdg1a encodes a putative transcriptional activator, similar to AadR of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and FixK proteins of rhizobia. The deduced DGC and PDEA proteins have an identical motif structure of two lengthy domains in their C-terminal regions. These domains are also present in numerous bacterial proteins of undefined function. The N termini of the DGC and PDEA deduced proteins contain putative oxygen-sensing domains, based on similarity to domains on bacterial NifL and FixL proteins, respectively. Genetic disruption analyses demonstrated a physiological hierarchy among the cdg operons, such that cdg1 contributes 80% of cellular DGC and PDEA activities and cdg2 and cdg3 contribute 15 and 5%, respectively. Disruption of dgc genes markedly reduced in vivo cellulose production, demonstrating that c-di-GMP controls this process.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to von Willebrand factor A1 domain is mediated by conserved IgG binding regions.

    PubMed

    O'Seaghdha, Maghnus; van Schooten, Carina J; Kerrigan, Steven W; Emsley, Jonas; Silverman, Gregg J; Cox, Dermot; Lenting, Peter J; Foster, Timothy J

    2006-11-01

    Protein A (Spa) is a surface-associated protein of Staphylococcus aureus best known for its ability to bind to the Fc region of IgG. Spa also binds strongly to the Fab region of the immunoglobulins bearing V(H)3 heavy chains and to von Willebrand factor (vWF). Previous studies have suggested that the protein A-vWF interaction is important in S. aureus adherence to platelets under conditions of shear stress. We demonstrate that Spa expression is sufficient for adherence of bacteria to immobilized vWF under low fluid shear. The full length recombinant Ig-binding region of protein A, Spa-EDABC, fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST), bound recombinant vWF in a dose-dependent and saturable fashion with half maximal binding of about 30 nm in immunosorbent assays. Full length-Spa did not bind recombinant vWF A3 domain but displayed binding to recombinant vWF domains A1 and D'-D3 (half maximal binding at 100 nm and 250 nm, respectively). Each recombinant protein A Ig-binding domain bound to the A1 domain in a similar manner to the full length-Spa molecule (half maximal binding 100 nm). Amino acid substitutions were introduced in the GST-SpaD protein at sites known to be involved in IgG Fc or in V(H)3 Fab binding. Mutants altered in residues that recognized IgG Fc but not those that recognized V(H)3 Fab had reduced binding to vWF A1 and D'-D3. This indicated that both vWF regions recognized a region on helices I and II that overlapped the IgG Fc binding site.

  8. Direct binding of the PDZ domain of Dishevelled to a conserved internal sequence in the C-terminal region of Frizzled.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hing-C; Bourdelas, Audrey; Krauss, Anke; Lee, Ho-Jin; Shao, Youming; Wu, Dianqing; Mlodzik, Marek; Shi, De-Li; Zheng, Jie

    2003-11-01

    The cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dvl) and the associated membrane-bound receptor Frizzled (Fz) are essential in canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this signaling are not well understood. By using NMR spectroscopy, we determined that an internal sequence of Fz binds to the conventional peptide binding site in the PDZ domain of Dvl; this type of site typically binds to C-terminal binding motifs. The C-terminal region of the Dvl inhibitor Dapper (Dpr) and Frodo bound to the same site. In Xenopus, Dvl binding peptides of Fz and Dpr/Frodo inhibited canonical Wnt signaling and blocked Wnt-induced secondary axis formation in a dose-dependent manner, but did not block noncanonical Wnt signaling mediated by the DEP domain. Together, our results identify a missing molecular connection within the Wnt pathway. Differences in the binding affinity of the Dvl PDZ domain and its binding partners may be important in regulating signal transduction by Dvl.

  9. Direct Binding of the PDZ Domain of Dishevelled to a Conserved Internal Sequence in the C-Terminal Region of Frizzled

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hing-C.; Bourdelas, Audrey; Krauss, Anke; Lee, Ho-Jin; Shao, Youming; Wu, Dianqing; Mlodzik, Marek; Shi, De-Li; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dvl) and the associated membrane-bound receptor Frizzled (Fz) are essential in canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this signaling are not well understood. By using NMR spectroscopy, we determined that an internal sequence of Fz binds to the conventional peptide binding site in the PDZ domain of Dvl; this type of site typically binds to C-terminal binding motifs. The C-terminal region of the Dvl inhibitor Dapper (Dpr) and Frodo bound to the same site. In Xenopus, Dvl binding peptides of Fz and Dpr/Frodo inhibited canonical Wnt signaling and blocked Wnt-induced secondary axis formation in a dose-dependent manner, but did not block noncanonical Wnt signaling mediated by the DEP domain. Together, our results identify a missing molecular connection within the Wnt pathway. Differences in the binding affinity of the Dvl PDZ domain and its binding partners may be important in regulating signal transduction by Dvl. PMID:14636582

  10. Structure/Function Analysis of Recurrent Mutations in SETD2 Protein Reveals a Critical and Conserved Role for a SET Domain Residue in Maintaining Protein Stability and Histone H3 Lys-36 Trimethylation.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Kathryn E; Fahey, Catherine C; Shinsky, Stephen A; Chiang, Yun-Chen J; DiFiore, Julia V; Jha, Deepak Kumar; Vo, Andy H; Shavit, Jordan A; Davis, Ian J; Strahl, Brian D; Rathmell, W Kimryn

    2016-09-30

    The yeast Set2 histone methyltransferase is a critical enzyme that plays a number of key roles in gene transcription and DNA repair. Recently, the human homologue, SETD2, was found to be recurrently mutated in a significant percentage of renal cell carcinomas, raising the possibility that the activity of SETD2 is tumor-suppressive. Using budding yeast and human cell line model systems, we examined the functional significance of two evolutionarily conserved residues in SETD2 that are recurrently mutated in human cancers. Whereas one of these mutations (R2510H), located in the Set2 Rpb1 interaction domain, did not result in an observable defect in SETD2 enzymatic function, a second mutation in the catalytic domain of this enzyme (R1625C) resulted in a complete loss of histone H3 Lys-36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). This mutant showed unchanged thermal stability as compared with the wild type protein but diminished binding to the histone H3 tail. Surprisingly, mutation of the conserved residue in Set2 (R195C) similarly resulted in a complete loss of H3K36me3 but did not affect dimethylated histone H3 Lys-36 (H3K36me2) or functions associated with H3K36me2 in yeast. Collectively, these data imply a critical role for Arg-1625 in maintaining the protein interaction with H3 and specific H3K36me3 function of this enzyme, which is conserved from yeast to humans. They also may provide a refined biochemical explanation for how H3K36me3 loss leads to genomic instability and cancer. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Structure and Characterisation of a Key Epitope in the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of the Malaria Vaccine Candidate MSP2.

    PubMed

    Seow, Jeffrey; Morales, Rodrigo A V; MacRaild, Christopher A; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; McGowan, Sheena; Dingjan, Tamir; Jaipuria, Garima; Rouet, Romain; Wilde, Karyn L; Atreya, Hanudatta S; Richards, Jack S; Anders, Robin F; Christ, Daniel; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Norton, Raymond S

    2017-03-24

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) is an intrinsically disordered antigen that is abundant on the surface of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The two allelic families of MSP2, 3D7 and FC27, differ in their central variable regions, which are flanked by highly conserved C-terminal and N-terminal regions. In a vaccine trial, full-length 3D7 MSP2 induced a strain-specific protective immune response despite the detectable presence of conserved region antibodies. This work focuses on the conserved C-terminal region of MSP2, which includes the only disulphide bond in the protein and encompasses key epitopes recognised by the mouse monoclonal antibodies 4D11 and 9H4. Although the 4D11 and 9H4 epitopes are overlapping, immunofluorescence assays have shown that the mouse monoclonal antibody 4D11 binds to MSP2 on the merozoite surface with a much stronger signal than 9H4. Understanding the structural basis for this antigenic difference between these antibodies will help direct the design of a broad-spectrum and MSP2-based malaria vaccine. 4D11 and 9H4 were reengineered into antibody fragments [variable region fragment (Fv) and single-chain Fv (scFv)] and were validated as suitable models for their full-sized IgG counterparts by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. An alanine scan of the 13-residue epitope 3D7-MSP2207-222 identified the minimal binding epitope of 4D11 and the key residues involved in binding. A 2.2-Å crystal structure of 4D11 Fv bound to the eight-residue epitope NKENCGAA provided valuable insight into the possible conformation of the C-terminal region of MSP2 on the parasite. This work underpins continued efforts to optimise recombinant MSP2 constructs for evaluation as potential vaccine candidates.

  12. Identification and characterization of a cell surface scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein of Sciaenops ocellatus: bacterial interaction and its dependence on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Reng; Sun, Bo-Guang; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Li

    2013-03-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) proteins are secreted or membrane-bound receptors with one or multiple SRCR domains. Members of the SRCR superfamily are known to have diverse functions that include pathogen recognition and immunoregulation. In teleost, although protein sequences with SRCR structure have been identified in some species, very little functional investigation has been carried out. In this study, we identified and characterized a teleost SRCR protein from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. The protein was named S. ocellatus SRCR1 (SoSRCRP1). SoSRCRP1 is 410-residue in length and was predicted to be a transmembrane protein, with the extracellular region containing a collagen triple helix repeat and a SRCR domain. The SRCR domain has six conserved cysteines, of which, C338 and C399, C351 and C409, and C379 and C389 were predicted to form three disulfide bonds. SoSRCRP1 expression was detected mainly in immune-relevant tissues and upregulated by bacterial and viral infection. In head kidney leukocytes, bacterial infection stimulated the expression of SoSRCRP1, and the expressed SoSRCRP1 was localized on cell surface. Recombinant SoSRCRP1 (rSoSRCRP1) corresponding to the SRCR domain was purified from Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. To examine the structure-function relationship of SoSRCRP1, the mutant proteins SoSRCRP1M1, SoSRCRP1M2, SoSRCRP1M3, and SoSRCRP1M4 were created, which bear C351S and C409S, C338S, C379S, and R325A mutations respectively. Compared to rSoSRCRP1, all mutants were significantly reduced in the ability of bacterial interaction, with the highest reduction observed with SoSRCRP1M4. Taken together, these results indicate that SoSRCRP1 is a cell surface-localized SRCR protein that binds bacterial ligands in a manner that depends on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain.

  13. Sequence Relationships, Conserved Domains, and Expression Patterns for Maize Homologs of the Polycomb Group Genes E(z), esc, and E(Pc)1

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Nathan M.; Danilevskaya, Olga N.; Hermon, Pedro; Helentjaris, Tim G.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Kaeppler, Heidi F.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.

    2002-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play an important role in developmental and epigenetic regulation of gene expression in fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and mammals. Recent evidence has shown that Arabidopsis homologs of PcG proteins are also important for the regulation of plant development. The objective of this study was to characterize the PcG homologs in maize (Zea mays). The 11 cloned PcG proteins from fruit fly and the Enhancer of zeste [E(z)], extra sex combs (esc), and Enhancer of Polycomb [E(Pc)] homologs from Arabidopsis were used as queries to perform TBLASTN searches against the public maize expressed sequence tag database and the Pioneer Hi-Bred database. Maize homologs were found for E(z), esc, and E(Pc), but not for Polycomb, pleiohomeotic, Posterior sex combs, Polycomblike, Additional sex combs, Sex combs on midleg, polyhometoic, or multi sex combs. Transcripts of the three maize Enhancer of zeste-like genes, Mez1, Mez2, and Mez3, were detected in all tissues tested, and the Mez2 transcript is alternatively spliced in a tissue-dependent pattern. Zea mays fertilization independent endosperm1 (ZmFie1) expression was limited to developing embryos and endosperms, whereas ZmFie2 expression was found throughout plant development. The conservation of E(z) and esc homologs across kingdoms indicates that these genes likely play a conserved role in repressing gene expression. PMID:11950982

  14. Processing of cell-surface signalling anti-sigma factors prior to signal recognition is a conserved autoproteolytic mechanism that produces two functional domains.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Karlijn C; Otero-Asman, Joaquín R; Luirink, Joen; Bitter, Wilbert; Llamas, María A

    2015-09-01

    Cell-surface signalling (CSS) enables Gram-negative bacteria to transduce an environmental signal into a cytosolic response. This regulatory cascade involves an outer membrane receptor that transmits the signal to an anti-sigma factor in the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the activation of an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor. Recent studies have demonstrated that RseP-mediated proteolysis of the anti-sigma factors is key to σ(ECF) activation. Using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa FoxR anti-sigma factor, we show here that RseP is responsible for the generation of an N-terminal tail that likely contains pro-sigma activity. Furthermore, it has been reported previously that this anti-sigma factor is processed in two separate domains prior to signal recognition. Here, we demonstrate that this process is common in these types of proteins and that the processing event is probably due to autoproteolytic activity. The resulting domains interact and function together to transduce the CSS signal. However, our results also indicate that this processing event is not essential for activity. In fact, we have identified functional CSS anti-sigma factors that are not cleaved prior to signal perception. Together, our results indicate that CSS regulation can occur through both complete and initially processed anti-sigma factors.

  15. A conserved sequence extending motif III of the motor domain in the Snf2-family DNA translocase Rad54 is critical for ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Janke, Ryan; Kingsley, James; Luo, Jerry; Fasching, Clare; Ehmsen, Kirk T; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Rad54 is a dsDNA-dependent ATPase that translocates on duplex DNA. Its ATPase function is essential for homologous recombination, a pathway critical for meiotic chromosome segregation, repair of complex DNA damage, and recovery of stalled or broken replication forks. In recombination, Rad54 cooperates with Rad51 protein and is required to dissociate Rad51 from heteroduplex DNA to allow access by DNA polymerases for recombination-associated DNA synthesis. Sequence analysis revealed that Rad54 contains a perfect match to the consensus PIP box sequence, a widely spread PCNA interaction motif. Indeed, Rad54 interacts directly with PCNA, but this interaction is not mediated by the Rad54 PIP box-like sequence. This sequence is located as an extension of motif III of the Rad54 motor domain and is essential for full Rad54 ATPase activity. Mutations in this motif render Rad54 non-functional in vivo and severely compromise its activities in vitro. Further analysis demonstrated that such mutations affect dsDNA binding, consistent with the location of this sequence motif on the surface of the cleft formed by two RecA-like domains, which likely forms the dsDNA binding site of Rad54. Our study identified a novel sequence motif critical for Rad54 function and showed that even perfect matches to the PIP box consensus may not necessarily identify PCNA interaction sites.

  16. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for Escherichia coli ytfP, a member of the broadly conserved UPF0131 protein domain family

    SciTech Connect

    Aramini, James M.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Huang, Yuanpeng; Rajan, Paranji K.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    Protein ytfP from Escherichia coli (Swiss-Prot ID: YTFP-ECOLI; NESG target ID: ER111; Wunderlich et al., 2004) is a 113-residue member of the UPF0131 protein family (Pfam ID: PF03674) of unknown function. This domain family is found in organisms from all three kingdoms, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 97% of backbone and 91% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a mixed a/b topology,????????. BMRB deposit with Accession No. 6448. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  17. A novel mutation causing nephronophthisis in the Lewis polycystic kidney rat localises to a conserved RCC1 domain in Nek8

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nephronophthisis (NPHP) as a cause of cystic kidney disease is the most common genetic cause of progressive renal failure in children and young adults. NPHP is characterized by abnormal and/or loss of function of proteins associated with primary cilia. Previously, we characterized an autosomal recessive phenotype of cystic kidney disease in the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat. Results In this study, quantitative trait locus analysis was used to define a ~1.6Mbp region on rat chromosome 10q25 harbouring the lpk mutation. Targeted genome capture and next-generation sequencing of this region identified a non-synonymous mutation R650C in the NIMA (never in mitosis gene a)- related kinase 8 ( Nek8) gene. This is a novel Nek8 mutation that occurs within the regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1)-like region of the protein. Specifically, the R650C substitution is located within a G[QRC]LG repeat motif of the predicted seven bladed beta-propeller structure of the RCC1 domain. The rat Nek8 gene is located in a region syntenic to portions of human chromosome 17 and mouse 11. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed abnormally long cilia on LPK kidney epithelial cells, and fluorescence immunohistochemistry for Nek8 protein revealed altered cilia localisation. Conclusions When assessed relative to other Nek8 NPHP mutations, our results indicate the whole propeller structure of the RCC1 domain is important, as the different mutations cause comparable phenotypes. This study establishes the LPK rat as a novel model system for NPHP and further consolidates the link between cystic kidney disease and cilia proteins. PMID:22899815

  18. Conserved Asp327 of Walker B motif in the N-terminal Nucleotide Binding Domain (NBD-1) of Cdr1p of Candida albicans has acquired a new role in ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Versha; Gaur, Manisha; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Shukla, Suneet; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Prasad, Rajendra

    2008-01-01

    The Walker A and B motifs of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Cdr1p though almost identical to all ABC transporters, has unique substitutions. We have in the past shown that Trp326 of Walker B and Cys193 of Walker A motifs of N-terminal NBD of Cdr1p have distinct roles in ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. In the present study, we have examined the role of a well conserved Asp327 in the Walker B motif of the N-terminal NBD which is preceded (Trp326) and followed (Asn328) by atypical amino acid substitutions and compared it with its equivalent well conserved Asp1026 of the C-terminal NBD of Cdr1p. We observed that the removal of the negative charge by D327N, D327A, D1026N, D1026A and D327N/D1026N substitutions, resulted in Cdr1p mutant variants that were severely impaired in ATPase activity and drug efflux. Importantly, all the mutant variants showed characteristics similar to those of wild type with respect to cell surface expression and photoaffinity drug analogue [125I] IAAP and [3H] azidopine labeling. While Cdr1p D327N mutant variant showed comparable binding with [α-32P] 8-azido ATP, Cdr1p D1026N and Cdr1p D327N/D1026N mutant variants were crippled in nucleotide binding. That the two conserved carboxylate residues Asp327 and Asp1026 are functionally different was further evident from the pH profile of ATPase activity. Cdr1p D327N mutant variant showed ∼40% enhancement of its residual ATPase activity at acidic pH while no such pH effect was seen with Cdr1p D1026N mutant variant. Our experimental data suggest that Asp327 of N-terminal NBD has acquired a new role to act as a catalytic base in ATP hydrolysis, a role normally conserved for Glu present adjacent to the conserved Asp in the Walker B motif of all the non-fungal transporters. PMID:17144665

  19. A sequence dimorphism in a conserved domain of human 28S rRNA. Uneven distribution of variant genes among individuals. Differential expression in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Qu, L H; Nicoloso, M; Bachellerie, J P

    1991-01-01

    In humans, cellular 28S rRNA displays a sequence dimorphism within an evolutionarily conserved motif, with the presence, at position +60, of either a A (like the metazoan consensus) or a G. The relative abundance of the two forms of variant genes in the genome exhibit large differences among individuals. The two variant forms are generally represented in cellular 28S rRNA in proportion of their relative abundance in the genome, at least for leucocytes. However, in some cases, one form of variant may be markedly underexpressed as compared to the other. Thus, in HeLa cells, A-form genes contribute to only 1% of the cellular content in mature 28S rRNA although amounting to 15% of the ribosomal genes. The differential expression seems to result from different transcriptional activities rather than from differences in pre-rRNA processing efficiency or in stabilities of mature rRNAs. G-form ribosomal genes were not detected in other mammals, including chimpanzee, which suggests that the fixation of this variant type is a rather recent event in primate evolution. Images PMID:2020541

  20. Chicken T-cell receptor beta-chain diversity: an evolutionarily conserved D beta-encoded glycine turn within the hypervariable CDR3 domain.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, W T; Tjoelker, L W; Stella, G; Postema, C E; Thompson, C B

    1991-01-01

    Unlike mammals, chickens generate an immunoglobulin (Ig) repertoire by a developmentally regulated process of intrachromosomal gene conversion, which results in nucleotide substitutions throughout the variable regions of the Ig heavy- and light-chain genes. In contrast to chicken Ig genes, we show in this report that diversity of the rearranged chicken T-cell receptor (TCR) beta-chain gene is generated by junctional heterogeneity, as observed in rearranged mammalian TCR genes. This junctional diversity increases during chicken development as a result of an increasing base-pair addition at the V beta-D beta and D beta-J beta joints (where V, D, and J are the variable, diversity, and joining gene segments). Despite the junctional hypervariability, however, almost all functional V beta-D beta-J beta junctions appear to encode a glycine-containing beta-turn. Such a turn may serve to position the amino acid side chains of a hypervariable TCR beta-chain loop with respect to the antigen-binding groove of the major histocompatibility complex molecule. Consistent with this hypothesis, the germ-line D beta nucleotide sequences of chickens, mice, rabbits, and humans have been highly conserved and encode a glycine in all three reading frames. Images PMID:1652759

  1. Drosophila model of Meier-Gorlin syndrome based on the mutation in a conserved C-Terminal domain of Orc6.

    PubMed

    Balasov, Maxim; Akhmetova, Katarina; Chesnokov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microtia, primordial dwarfism, small ears, and skeletal abnormalities. Patients with MGS often carry mutations in the genes encoding the components of the pre-replicative complex such as Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) subunits Orc1, Orc4, Orc6, and helicase loaders Cdt1 and Cdc6. Orc6 is an important component of ORC and has functions in both DNA replication and cytokinesis. Mutation in conserved C-terminal motif of Orc6 associated with MGS impedes the interaction of Orc6 with core ORC. In order to study the effects of MGS mutation in an animal model system we introduced MGS mutation in Orc6 and established Drosophila model of MGS. Mutant flies die at third instar larval stage with abnormal chromosomes and DNA replication defects. The lethality can be rescued by elevated expression of mutant Orc6 protein. Rescued MGS flies are unable to fly and display multiple planar cell polarity defects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A second conserved GAF domain cysteine is required for the blue/green photoreversibility of cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Njuguna, Stephanie Lane; Roberts, Laurel; Castillo, Elenor; Parson, Victoria L.; Dwojak, Sunshine; Lagarias, J. Clark; Spiller, Susan C.

    2008-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely occurring red/far-red photoreceptors that utilize a linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore covalently bound within a knotted PAS-GAF domain pair. Cyanobacteria also contain more distant relatives of phytochromes that lack this knot, such as the phytochrome-related cyanobacteriochromes implicated to function as blue/green switchable photoreceptors. In this study, we characterize the cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Full-length Tlr0924 exhibits blue/green photoconversion across a broad range of temperatures, including physiologically relevant temperatures for this organism. Spectroscopic characterization of Tlr0924 demonstrates that its green-absorbing state is in equilibrium with a labile, spectrally distinct blue-absorbing species. The photochemically generated blue-absorbing state is in equilibrium with another species absorbing at longer wavelengths, giving a total of 4 states. Cys499 is essential for this behavior, because mutagenesis of this residue results in red-absorbing mutant biliproteins. Characterization of the C499D mutant protein by absorbance and CD spectroscopy supports the conclusion that its bilin chromophore adopts a similar conformation to the red-light-absorbing Pr form of phytochrome. We propose a model photocycle in which Z/E photoisomerization of the 15/16 bond modulates formation of a reversible thioether linkage between Cys499 and C10 of the chromophore, providing the basis for the blue/green switching of cyanobacteriochromes. PMID:18549244

  3. The conserved core domain of the human TATA binding protein is sufficient to assemble the multisubunit RNA polymerase I-specific transcription factor SL1.

    PubMed Central

    Rudloff, U; Eberhard, D; Grummt, I

    1994-01-01

    The human ribosomal RNA polymerase (Pol) I promoter selectivity factor SL1 is a complex consisting of the TATA binding protein (TBP) and three TBP-associated factors (TAFs). We have investigated which elements of TBP are involved in the assembly of Pol I-specific TBP-TAF complexes by comparing SL1 isolated from two human cell lines, one expressing epitope-tagged full-length TBP and another expressing a deletion of nearly the entire N-terminal domain (e delta NTBP). We have immunopurified epitope-tagged full-length TBP- and e delta NTBP-TAF complexes and show that e delta NTBP reconstitutes SL1 activity almost as well as full-length TBP. Moreover, e delta NTBP is shown to be associated with all three Pol I-specific TAFs. Thus, the core of TBP alone is sufficient for the correct assembly of the Pol I-specific TBP-TAF complex, and the variable N-terminal region of human TBP is not required for transcriptional activity. We also demonstrate by an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay that TBP directly interacts with the smallest TAF, TAFI48. Images PMID:8058785

  4. Peptide Triazole Inactivators of HIV-1 Utilize a Conserved Two-Cavity Binding Site at the Junction of the Inner and Outer Domains of Env gp120

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Rachna; Rashad, Adel A.; Li, Huiyuan; Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat Kalyana; Duffy, Caitlin; Bailey, Lauren D.; Chaiken, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    We used coordinated mutagenesis, synthetic design, and flexible docking to investigate the structural mechanism of Env gp120 encounter by peptide triazole (PT) inactivators of HIV-1. Prior results demonstrated that the PT class of inhibitors suppresses binding at both CD4 and coreceptor sites on Env and triggers gp120 shedding, leading to cell-independent irreversible virus inactivation. Despite these enticing anti-HIV-1 phenotypes, structural understanding of the PT–gp120 binding mechanism has been incomplete. Here we found that PT engages two inhibitor ring moieties at the junction between the inner and outer domains of the gp120 protein. The results demonstrate how combined occupancy of two gp120 cavities can coordinately suppress both receptor and coreceptor binding and conformationally entrap the protein in a destabilized state. The two-cavity model has common features with small molecule gp120 inhibitor binding sites and provides a guide for further design of peptidomimetic HIV-1 inactivators based on the PT pharmacophore. PMID:25860784

  5. Straightforward selection of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies targeting the conserved CD4 and coreceptor binding sites of HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Matz, Julie; Kessler, Pascal; Bouchet, Jérôme; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Barin, Francis; Baty, Daniel; Martin, Loïc; Benichou, Serge; Chames, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Few broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting determinants of the HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120) involved in sequential binding to host CD4 and chemokine receptors have been characterized. While these epitopes show low diversity among various isolates, HIV-1 employs many strategies to evade humoral immune response toward these sensitive sites, including a carbohydrate shield, low accessibility to these buried cavities, and conformational masking. Using trimeric gp140, free or bound to a CD4 mimic, as immunogens in llamas, we selected a panel of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) that bind to either the CD4 or the coreceptor binding site (CD4BS and CoRBS, respectively). When analyzed as monomers or as homo- or heteromultimers, the best sdAb candidates could not only neutralize viruses carrying subtype B envelopes, corresponding to the Env molecule used for immunization and selection, but were also efficient in neutralizing a broad panel of envelopes from subtypes A, C, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG, including tier 3 viruses. Interestingly, sdAb multimers exhibited a broader neutralizing activity spectrum than the parental sdAb monomers. The extreme stability and high recombinant production yield combined with their broad neutralization capacity make these sdAbs new potential microbicide candidates for HIV-1 transmission prevention.

  6. A conserved carboxy-terminal domain in the major tegument structural protein VP22 facilitates virion packaging of a chimeric protein during productive herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Elisabeth F.M.; Blaho, John A.

    2009-05-10

    Recombinant virus HSV-1(RF177) was previously generated to examine tegument protein VP22 function by inserting the GFP gene into the gene encoding VP22. During a detailed analysis of this virus, we discovered that RF177 produces a novel fusion protein between the last 15 amino acids of VP22 and GFP, termed GCT-VP22. Thus, the VP22 carboxy-terminal specific antibody 22-3 and two anti-GFP antibodies reacted with an approximately 28 kDa protein from RF177-infected Vero cells. GCT-VP22 was detected at 1 and 3 hpi. Examination of purified virions indicated that GCT-VP22 was incorporated into RF177 virus particles. These observations imply that at least a portion of the information required for virion targeting is located in this domain of VP22. Indirect immunofluorescence analyses showed that GCT-VP22 also localized to areas of marginalized chromatin during RF177 infection. These results indicate that the last fifteen amino acids of VP22 participate in virion targeting during HSV-1 infection.

  7. Processing, fusogenicity, virion incorporation and CXCR4-binding activity of a feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein lacking the two conserved N-glycosylation sites at the C-terminus of the V3 domain.

    PubMed

    González, Silvia A; Affranchino, José L

    2016-07-01

    The process of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) entry into its target cells is initiated by the association of the surface (SU) subunit of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) with the cellular receptors CD134 and CXCR4. This event is followed by the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes, which is mediated by the transmembrane (TM) subunit of Env. We and others have previously demonstrated that the V3 domain of the SU subunit of Env is essential for CXCR4 binding. Of note, there are two contiguous and highly conserved potential N-glycosylation sites ((418)NST(420) and (422)NLT(424)) located at the C-terminal side of the V3 domain. We therefore decided to study the relevance for Env functions of these N-glycosylation motifs and found that disruption of both of them by introducing the N418Q/N422Q double amino acid substitution drastically impairs Env processing into the SU and TM subunits. Moreover, the simultaneous mutation of these N-glycosylation sites prevents Env incorporation into virions and Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Notably, a recombinant soluble version of the SU glycoprotein carrying the double amino acid replacement N418Q/N422Q at the V3 C-terminal side binds to CXCR4 with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type SU.

  8. The amino-terminal fusion domain peptide of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 inserts into the sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle primarily as a helix with a conserved glycine at the micelle-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, D K; Cheng, S F; Chien, W J

    1997-01-01

    A peptide based on the N-terminal fusion domain of gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and its tryptophan analog were synthesized to examine the secondary structure in the micellar environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism and electron paramagnetic resonance experiments indicated that the gp41 fusion peptide inserted into the micelle primarily as a helix (59%), with substantial beta-structure (26.7%). Deep penetration of the peptide into the apolar hydrocarbon core was supported by the results of fluorescence experiments in which the tryptophan analog exhibited a blue shift of about 30 nm in the presence of a sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle, in 1,2-dimyristoyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine vesicular solutions. The results of spin label-attenuated 1H resonance experiments show that the region C-terminal to G16, which contains a turn structure, exhibited substantial interaction with the micelle, suggesting that it lies on the surface of micelle. Molecular simulation based on data from NMR experiments revealed a flexible hinge at residues 15 and 16 (alanine and glycine, respectively) from the N terminus of the peptide located at the micelle-solution interface. The highly conserved A15-G16 dipeptide may play a role in the function of fusion domain of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. PMID:9261381

  9. Recovery of paramyxovirus simian virus 5 with a V protein lacking the conserved cysteine-rich domain: the multifunctional V protein blocks both interferon-beta induction and interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Paterson, Reay G; Stock, Nicola; Durbin, Joan E; Durbin, Russell K; Goodbourn, Stephen; Randall, Richard E; Lamb, Robert A

    2002-11-10

    The V protein of the Paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) is a multifunctional protein containing an N-terminal 164 residue domain that is shared with the P protein and a distinct C-terminal domain that is cysteine-rich and which is highly conserved among Paramyxoviruses. We report the recovery from Vero cells [interferon (IFN) nonproducing cells] of a recombinant SV5 (rSV5) that lacks the V protein C-terminal specific domain (rSV5VDeltaC). In Vero cells rSV5VDeltaC forms large plaques and grows at a rate and titer similar to those of rSV5. In BHK or CV-1 cells rSV5VDeltaC forms small plaques and grows poorly. However, even when grown in Vero cells rSV5VDeltaC reverts to pseudo-wild-type virus in four to five passages, indicating the importance of the V protein for successful replication of SV5. Whereas rSV5 grows in many cell types with minimal cytopathic effect (CPE), rSV5VDeltaC causes extensive CPE in the same cell types. To overcome the antiviral state induced by IFN, many viruses have evolved mechanisms to counteract the effects of IFN by blocking the production of IFN and abrogating IFN signaling. Whereas rSV5 blocks IFN signaling by mediating the degradation of STAT1, rSV5VDeltaC does not cause the degradation of STAT1 and IFN signaling occurs through formation of the ISGF3 transcription complex. Furthermore, we find that rSV5 infection of cells prevents production of IFN-beta. The transcription factor IRF-3 which is required for transcription of the IFN-beta gene is not translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in rSV5-infected cells. In contrast, in rSV5VDeltaC-infected cells IRF-3 is localized predominantly in the nucleus and IFN-beta is produced. By using ectopic expression of IRF-3, it was shown that after dsRNA treatment and expression of the V protein IRF-3 remained in the cytoplasm, whereas after dsRNA treatment and expression of the P protein (which lacks the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain) IRF-3 was localized predominantly in the nucleus. Thus

  10. The molecular basis for species-specific activation of human TRPA1 protein by protons involves poorly conserved residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    de la Roche, Jeanne; Eberhardt, Mirjam J; Klinger, Alexandra B; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Wegner, Florian; Koppert, Wolfgang; Reeh, Peter W; Lampert, Angelika; Fischer, Michael J M; Leffler, Andreas

    2013-07-12

    The surveillance of acid-base homeostasis is concerted by diverse mechanisms, including an activation of sensory afferents. Proton-evoked activation of rodent sensory neurons is mainly mediated by the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels. In this study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidosis activates and sensitizes the human irritant receptor TRPA1 (hTRPA1). Proton-evoked membrane currents and calcium influx through hTRPA1 occurred at physiological acidic pH values, were concentration-dependent, and were blocked by the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC030031. Both rodent and rhesus monkey TRPA1 failed to respond to extracellular acidosis, and protons even inhibited rodent TRPA1. Accordingly, mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking TRPV1 only responded to protons when hTRPA1 was expressed heterologously. This species-specific activation of hTRPA1 by protons was reversed in both mouse and rhesus monkey TRPA1 by exchange of distinct residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Furthermore, protons seem to interact with an extracellular interaction site to gate TRPA1 and not via a modification of intracellular N-terminal cysteines known as important interaction sites for electrophilic TRPA1 agonists. Our data suggest that hTRPA1 acts as a sensor for extracellular acidosis in human sensory neurons and should thus be taken into account as a yet unrecognized transduction molecule for proton-evoked pain and inflammation. The species specificity of this property is unique among known endogenous TRPA1 agonists, possibly indicating that evolutionary pressure enforced TRPA1 to inherit the role as an acid sensor in human sensory neurons.

  11. The Molecular Basis for Species-specific Activation of Human TRPA1 Protein by Protons Involves Poorly Conserved Residues within Transmembrane Domains 5 and 6*

    PubMed Central

    de la Roche, Jeanne; Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Wegner, Florian; Koppert, Wolfgang; Reeh, Peter W.; Lampert, Angelika; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Leffler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of acid-base homeostasis is concerted by diverse mechanisms, including an activation of sensory afferents. Proton-evoked activation of rodent sensory neurons is mainly mediated by the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels. In this study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidosis activates and sensitizes the human irritant receptor TRPA1 (hTRPA1). Proton-evoked membrane currents and calcium influx through hTRPA1 occurred at physiological acidic pH values, were concentration-dependent, and were blocked by the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC030031. Both rodent and rhesus monkey TRPA1 failed to respond to extracellular acidosis, and protons even inhibited rodent TRPA1. Accordingly, mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking TRPV1 only responded to protons when hTRPA1 was expressed heterologously. This species-specific activation of hTRPA1 by protons was reversed in both mouse and rhesus monkey TRPA1 by exchange of distinct residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Furthermore, protons seem to interact with an extracellular interaction site to gate TRPA1 and not via a modification of intracellular N-terminal cysteines known as important interaction sites for electrophilic TRPA1 agonists. Our data suggest that hTRPA1 acts as a sensor for extracellular acidosis in human sensory neurons and should thus be taken into account as a yet unrecognized transduction molecule for proton-evoked pain and inflammation. The species specificity of this property is unique among known endogenous TRPA1 agonists, possibly indicating that evolutionary pressure enforced TRPA1 to inherit the role as an acid sensor in human sensory neurons. PMID:23709225

  12. The WD-repeat protein superfamily in Arabidopsis: conservation and divergence in structure and function

    PubMed Central

    van Nocker, Steven; Ludwig, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Background The WD motif (also known as the Trp-Asp or WD40 motif) is found in a multitude of eukaryotic proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes. Where studied, repeated WD motifs act as a site for protein-protein interaction, and proteins containing WD repeats (WDRs) are known to serve as platforms for the assembly of protein complexes or mediators of transient interplay among other proteins. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, members of this superfamily are increasingly being recognized as key regulators of plant-specific developmental events. Results We analyzed the predicted complement of WDR proteins from Arabidopsis, and compared this to those from budding yeast, fruit fly and human to illustrate both conservation and divergence in structure and function. This analysis identified 237 potential Arabidopsis proteins containing four or more recognizable copies of the motif. These were classified into 143 distinct families, 49 of which contained more than one Arabidopsis member. Approximately 113 of these families or individual proteins showed clear homology with WDR proteins from the other eukaryotes analyzed. Where conservation was found, it often extended across all of these organisms, suggesting that many of these proteins are linked to basic cellular mechanisms. The functional characterization of conserved WDR proteins in Arabidopsis reveals that these proteins help adapt basic mechanisms for plant-specific processes. Conclusions Our results show that most Arabidopsis WDR proteins are strongly conserved across eukaryotes, including those that have been found to play key roles in plant-specific processes, with diversity in function conferred at least in part by divergence in upstream signaling pathways, downstream regulatory targets and /or structure outside of the WDR regions. PMID:14672542

  13. Genome cartography through domain annotation

    PubMed Central

    Ponting, Chris P; Dickens, Nicholas J

    2001-01-01

    The evolutionary history of eukaryotic proteins involves rapid sequence divergence, addition and deletion of domains, and fusion and fission of genes. Although the protein repertoires of distantly related species differ greatly, their domain repertoires do not. To account for the great diversity of domain contexts and an unexpected paucity of ortholog conservation, we must categorize the coding regions of completely sequenced genomes into domain families, as well as protein families.

  14. A PALB2-interacting domain in RNF168 couples homologous recombination to DNA break-induced chromatin ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Typas, Dimitris; Caron, Marie-Christine; Wiegant, Wouter W; van den Heuvel, Diana; Boonen, Rick A; Couturier, Anthony M; Mullenders, Leon H; Masson, Jean-Yves; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) elicit a ubiquitylation cascade that controls DNA repair pathway choice. This cascade involves the ubiquitylation of histone H2A by the RNF168 ligase and the subsequent recruitment of RIF1, which suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in G1 cells. The RIF1-dependent suppression is relieved in S/G2 cells, allowing PALB2-driven HR to occur. With the inhibitory impact of RIF1 relieved, it remains unclear how RNF168-induced ubiquitylation influences HR. Here, we uncover that RNF168 links the HR machinery to H2A ubiquitylation in S/G2 cells. We show that PALB2 indirectly recognizes histone ubiquitylation by physically associating with ubiquitin-bound RNF168. This direct interaction is mediated by the newly identified PALB2-interacting domain (PID) in RNF168 and the WD40 domain in PALB2, and drives DNA repair by facilitating the assembly of PALB2-containing HR complexes at DSBs. Our findings demonstrate that RNF168 couples PALB2-dependent HR to H2A ubiquitylation to promote DNA repair and preserve genome integrity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20922.001 PMID:28240985

  15. Collections Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, Robert

    Collections conservation is an approach to the preservation treatment of books and book-like materials that is conceptualized and organized in terms of large groups of materials. This guide is intended to enable a library to evaluate its current collections conservation activities. The introduction describes collections conservation and gives…

  16. A role for the Fizzy/Cdc20 family of proteins in activation of the APC/C distinct from substrate recruitment.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yuu; Baxter, Joanne E; Fry, Andrew M; Yamano, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-21

    The Fizzy/Cdc20 family of proteins are essential activators of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a multisubunit E3 ubiquitin ligase. However, apart from the well-established role of the C-terminal WD40 domain in substrate recognition, the precise roles of the activators remain elusive. Here we show that Nek2A, which directly binds the APC/C, can be ubiquitylated and destroyed in Fizzy/Cdc20-depleted Xenopus egg extracts when only the N-terminal domain of Fizzy/Cdc20 (N-Cdc20) is added. This activity is dependent upon the C box and is conserved in the alternative activator, Fizzy-related/Cdh1. In contrast, canonical substrates such as cyclin B and securin require both the N-terminal and WD40 domains, unless N-Cdc20 is fused to substrates when the WD40 domain becomes dispensable. Furthermore, in Cdc20-depleted cells, N-Cdc20 can facilitate Nek2A destruction in a C box-dependent manner. Our results reveal a role for the N-terminal domain of the Fizzy/Cdc20 family of activators in triggering substrate ubiquitylation by the APC/C.

  17. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:27367684

  18. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-06-29

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed.

  19. Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt, Bryce; Christensen, Steven M.

    In the case of the free particle, we interpreted various components of the energy-momentum-stress density as fluxes of energy and momentum. This interpretation can obviously be extended also to particle ensembles and gases. When we speak of fluxes we usually think of quantities that are conserved. In special relativity, energy and momentum are conserved. In general relativity, they are no longer generally conserved, at least if we do not include the energy and momentum of the gravitational field itself. Nevertheless, their densities and fluxes satisfy a covariant generalization of a true conservation law, which is quite easy to obtain.

  20. Conservation Tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Maurice R.; Daniel, Tommy C.; Schweizer, Edward E.; Allmaras, Raymond R.

    1985-11-01

    Conservation production systems combine tillage and planting practices to reduce soil erosion and loss of water from farmland. Successful conservation tillage practices depend on the ability of farm managers to integrate sound crop production practices with effective pest management systems. More scientific information is needed to determine the relations between tillage practices and physical, chemical, and biological soil factors that affect plant and pest ecology. There is a need to devise improved pest management strategies for conservation tillage and to better understand the impact of conservation tillage on water quality, especially as it is related to use of agricultural chemicals. While savings in fuel, labor, and soil have induced many farmers to adopt conservation tillage, improved methods and equipment should increase adoption even more.

  1. Characterization of Ambra1 in asexual cycle of a non-vertebrate chordate, the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri, and phylogenetic analysis of the protein group in Bilateria.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Fabio; Skobo, Tatjana; Benato, Francesca; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Carnevali, Oliana; Manni, Lucia; Dalla Valle, Luisa

    2016-02-01

    Ambra1 is a positive regulator of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradative process involved both in physiological and pathological conditions. Nowadays, Ambra1 has been characterized only in mammals and zebrafish. Through bioinformatics searches and targeted cloning, we report the identification of the complete Ambra1 transcript in a non-vertebrate chordate, the tunicate Botryllus schlosseri. Tunicata is the sister group of Vertebrata and the only chordate group possessing species that reproduce also by blastogenesis (asexual reproduction). B. schlosseri Ambra1 deduced amino acid sequence is shorter than vertebrate homologues but still contains the typical WD40 domain. qPCR analyses revealed that the level of B. schlosseri Ambra1 transcription is temporally regulated along the colonial blastogenetic cycle. By means of similarity searches we identified Wdr5 and Katnb1 as proteins evolutionarily associated to Ambra1. Phylogenetic analyses on Bilateria indicate that: (i) Wdr5 is the most related to Ambra1, so that they may derive from an ancestral gene, (ii) Ambra1 forms a group of ancient genes evolved before the radiation of the taxon, (iii) these orthologous Ambra1 share the two conserved WD40/YVTN repeat-like-containing domains, and (iv) they are characterized by ancient duplications of WD40 repeats within the N-terminal domain.

  2. Conservation Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students teach about the importance of recycling and conservation by presenting demonstrations. Includes demonstrations on water, plastic, and other recycling products such as steel. (YDS)

  3. Energy Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelson, Philip H.

    1972-01-01

    Comments on The Potential for Energy Conservation,'' a study by the Office of Emergency Preparedness, emphasizing the coming dependence on foreign oil, and presses for government influence to encourage development of more efficient cars. (AL)

  4. The conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 stress response pathway regulates synaptic function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Staab, Trisha A; Griffen, Trevor C; Corcoran, Connor; Evgrafov, Oleg; Knowles, James A; Sieburth, Derek

    2013-03-01

    The Nrf family of transcription factors plays a critical role in mediating adaptive responses to cellular stress and defends against neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Here, we report a novel role for the Caenorhabditis elegans Nrf homolog SKN-1 in regulating synaptic transmission at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Activation of SKN-1, either by acute pharmacological treatment with the mitochondrial toxin sodium arsenite or by mutations that cause constitutive SKN-1 activation, results in defects in neuromuscular function. Additionally, elimination of the conserved WD40 repeat protein WDR-23, a principal negative regulator of SKN-1, results in impaired locomotion and synaptic vesicle and neuropeptide release from cholinergic motor axons. Mutations that abolish skn-1 activity restore normal neuromuscular function to wdr-23 mutants and animals treated with toxin. We show that negative regulation of SKN-1 by WDR-23 in the intestine, but not at neuromuscular junctions, is necessary and sufficient for proper neuromuscular function. WDR-23 isoforms differentially localize to the outer membranes of mitochondria and to nuclei, and the effects of WDR-23 on neuromuscular function are dependent on its interaction with cullin E3 ubiquitin ligase. Finally, whole-transcriptome RNA sequencing of wdr-23 mutants reveals an increase in the expression of known SKN-1/Nrf2-regulated stress-response genes, as well as neurotransmission genes not previously implicated in SKN-1/Nrf2 responses. Together, our results indicate that SKN-1/Nrf2 activation may be a mechanism through which cellular stress, detected in one tissue, affects cellular function of a distal tissue through endocrine signaling. These results provide insight into how SKN-1/Nrf2 might protect the nervous system from damage in response to oxidative stress.

  5. Conservation endocrinology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, Stephen; Romero, L. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Endocrinologists can make significant contributions to conservation biology by helping to understand the mechanisms by which organisms cope with changing environments. Field endocrine techniques have advanced rapidly in recent years and can provide substantial information on the growth, stress, and reproductive status of individual animals, thereby providing insight into current and future responses of populations to changes in the environment. Environmental stressors and reproductive status can be detected nonlethally by measuring a number of endocrine-related endpoints, including steroids in plasma, living and nonliving tissue, urine, and feces. Information on the environmental or endocrine requirements of individual species for normal growth, development, and reproduction will provide critical information for species and ecosystem conservation. For many taxa, basic information on endocrinology is lacking, and advances in conservation endocrinology will require approaches that are both “basic” and “applied” and include integration of laboratory and field approaches.

  6. The Essential Gene wda Encodes a WD40 Repeat Subunit of Drosophila SAGA Required for Histone H3 Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Guelman, Sebastián; Suganuma, Tamaki; Florens, Laurence; Weake, Vikki; Swanson, Selene K.; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2006-01-01

    Histone acetylation provides a switch between transcriptionally repressive and permissive chromatin. By regulating the chromatin structure at specific promoters, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) carry out important functions during differentiation and development of higher eukaryotes. HAT complexes are present in organisms as diverse as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, humans, and flies. For example, the well-studied yeast SAGA is related to three mammalian complexes. We previously identified Drosophila melanogaster orthologues of yeast SAGA components Ada2, Ada3, Spt3, and Tra1 and demonstrated that they associate with dGcn5 in a high-molecular-weight complex. To better understand the function of Drosophila SAGA (dSAGA), we sought to affinity purify and characterize this complex in more detail. A proteomic approach led to the identification of an orthologue of the yeast protein Ada1 and the novel protein encoded by CG4448, referred to as WDA (will decrease acetylation). Embryos lacking both alleles of the wda gene exhibited reduced levels of histone H3 acetylation and could not develop into adult flies. Our results point to a critical function of dSAGA and histone acetylation during Drosophila development. PMID:16980620

  7. The scaffold protein WRAP53β orchestrates the ubiquitin response critical for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Sofia; Rassoolzadeh, Hanif; Hedström, Elisabeth; Coucoravas, Christos; Julner, Alexander; Goldstein, Michael; Imreh, Gabriela; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Kastan, Michael B.; Helleday, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WD40 domain-containing protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA antisense to p53; also referred to as WDR79/TCAB1) controls trafficking of splicing factors and the telomerase enzyme to Cajal bodies, and its functional loss has been linked to carcinogenesis, premature aging, and neurodegeneration. Here, we identify WRAP53β as an essential regulator of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. WRAP53β rapidly localizes to DSBs in an ATM-, H2AX-, and MDC1-dependent manner. We show that WRAP53β targets the E3 ligase RNF8 to DNA lesions by facilitating the interaction between RNF8 and its upstream partner, MDC1, in response to DNA damage. Simultaneous binding of MDC1 and RNF8 to the highly conserved WD40 scaffold domain of WRAP53β facilitates their interaction and accumulation of RNF8 at DSBs. In this manner, WRAP53β controls proper ubiquitylation at DNA damage sites and the downstream assembly of 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAD51. Furthermore, we reveal that knockdown of WRAP53β impairs DSB repair by both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), causes accumulation of spontaneous DNA breaks, and delays recovery from radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a novel regulator of DSB repair by providing a scaffold for DNA repair factors. PMID:25512560

  8. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  9. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  10. Marketing Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, William B.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986, Northeast Utilities began helping shool administrators combat school building energy wastage through a program called Energy Alliance. The typical school can reduce its energy bill by 30 percent by adopting a wide range of conservation measures, including cogeneration, relamping, and energy audits. (MLH)

  11. Lighting Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Frank D.

    1975-01-01

    With the energy crisis has come an awareness of wasteful consumption practices. One area where research is being done is in lighting conservation. Information in this article is concerned with finding more effective and efficient lighting designs which include daylight utilization, task-oriented lighting, and lighting controls. (MA)

  12. Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Amy A.

    This selection of class activities involves a sequence of 10 class sessions. The goal of the collection is to aid students in learning the concepts of energy conservation and to put this knowledge into practice. Attention is also given to the development of alternate energy sources. Each lesson includes an activity title, motivational hints,…

  13. Colorful Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Some people only think about conservation on Earth Day. Being in the "art business" however, this author is always conscious of the many products she thinks get wasted when they could be reused, recycled, and restored--especially in a school building and art room. In this article, she describes an art lesson that allows students to paint…

  14. Colorful Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Some people only think about conservation on Earth Day. Being in the "art business" however, this author is always conscious of the many products she thinks get wasted when they could be reused, recycled, and restored--especially in a school building and art room. In this article, she describes an art lesson that allows students to paint…

  15. Activation of Membrane Fusion by Murine Leukemia Viruses Is Controlled in cis or in trans by Interactions between the Receptor-Binding Domain and a Conserved Disulfide Loop of the Carboxy Terminus of the Surface Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Boson, Bertrand; Russell, Stephen J.; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2001-01-01

    Cell entry of retroviruses is initiated by the recognition of cellular receptors and the subsequent membrane fusion between viral and cellular membranes. These two steps are mediated by the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein (Env), respectively. Determinants regulating membrane fusion have been described throughout SU and TM, but the processes coupling receptor recognition to fusion are still elusive. Here we establish that a critical interaction is formed between the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and the major disulfide loop of the carboxy-terminal domain (C domain) of the murine leukemia virus SU. Receptor binding causes an alteration of this interaction and, in turn, promotes further events of Env fusion activation. We characterize mutations which, by lowering this interaction and reducing the compatibility between the RBD and C domains of Env glycoprotein chimeras, affect both Env fusogenicity and sensitivity to receptor interference. Additionally, we demonstrate that suboptimal interactions in such mutant Env proteins can be compensated in trans by soluble RBDs in a manner that depends on their compatibility with the C domain. Our results therefore indicate that RBD/C domain interactions may occur in cis, via the proper RBD of the viral Env itself, or in trans, via a distinct RBD expressed by virion-free Env glycoproteins expressed endogenously by the infected cells or provided by neighboring Env trimers. PMID:11264358

  16. Energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    Under the Warner Amendment, oil overcharge funds are designated for states' use in certain authorized energy conservation and assistance programs. During FY 1982-87 Warner funds accounted for $200 million of the $3.3 billion states received from the oil overcharge escrow account. The $3.3 billion was in addition to the $13.3 billion that the Congress appropriated for the conservation and assistance programs. More than 4 years after their distribution, states had not used all the Warner funds. This report provides the status of all oil overcharge funds; the use of Warner funds and the time it is taking to spend the funds in Arizona, California, and Illinois.

  17. Heron conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kushlan, J.A.; Hafner, H.

    2000-01-01

    Herons are large, popular and, in many cases, spectacular birds found in wetlands world-wide, both tropical and temperate, natural and man-made. Some populations are very small and localized, some have decreased, some have expanded their ranges, and a few are pests of human activities. In the fifteen years since the publication of the latest monographic treatment of the family, The Herons Handbook, there has been a tremendous increase in our knowledge of heron status and conservation requirements, set against a backdrop of increasing concern about the future of the world?s wetland habitats. This book provides a comprehensive update following two distinct threads. The status and conservation needs of herons are first presented on a regional basis, in a series of chapters set at a continental or subcontinental scale. Over 200 biologists and heron conservationists have contributed to the data summarized here, and the very latest census and survey results provide the most up-to-date and detailed picture of heron populations currently available. Chapters discussing several critical issues in heron conservation follow, tending to focus on the international nature of the problems.

  18. A conserved C-terminal domain in PBX increases DNA binding by the PBX homeodomain and is not a primary site of contact for the YPWM motif of HOXA1.

    PubMed

    Green, N C; Rambaldi, I; Teakles, J; Featherstone, M S

    1998-05-22

    HOX proteins are dependent upon cofactors of the PBX family for specificity of DNA binding. Two regions that have been implicated in HOX/PBX cooperative interactions are the YPWM motif, found N-terminal to the HOX homeodomain, and the GKFQ domain (also known as the Hox cooperativity motif) immediately C-terminal to the PBX homeodomain. Using derivatives of the E2A-PBX oncoprotein, we find that the GKFQ domain is not essential for cooperative interaction with HOXA1 but contributes to the stability of the complex. By contrast, the YPWM motif is strictly required for cooperative interactions in vitro and in vivo, even with mutants of E2A-PBX lacking the GKFQ domain. Using truncated PBX proteins, we show that the YPWM motif contacts the PBX homeodomain. The presence of the GKFQ domain increases monomer binding by the PBX homeodomain 5-fold, and the stability of the HOXA1.E2A-PBX complex 2-fold. These data suggest that the GKFQ domain acts mainly to increase DNA binding by PBX, rather than providing a primary contact site for the YPWM motif of HOXA1. We have identified 2 residues, Glu-301 and Tyr-305, required for GKFQ function and suggest that this is dependent on alpha-helical character.

  19. Energy Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, P.

    1995-06-01

    There are two fundamental reasons or motivations for energy conservation: (1) economics; and (2) consideration of energy - its sources and availability. Economics speaks for itself and needs little explanation: a project is undertaken, the cost is recovered in a given period of time (we hope) and our company realizes cost savings thereafter. We study and propose a project; we estimate the payback. If approved, we implement the project. Then, we eagerly watch for its effectiveness - for the proposed payback. The second consideration in regard to energy conservation might - in the foreseeable future - become by far the most important - that of availability. Very knowledgeable persons have stated that this - in reality - is the most serious problem facing our nation today. Readily available, reasonably priced energy has given to the US the high form of living experienced today. An interruption in this flow could catapult our nation in an awesome catastrophe. The energy shortage of the late 70`s might be a forerunner of such an experience.

  20. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  1. Microbial starch-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, Norma; Sánchez, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    Glucosidic bonds from different non-soluble polysaccharides such as starch, cellulose and xylan are hydrolyzed by amylases, cellulases and xylanases, respectively. These enzymes are produced by microorganisms. They have a modular structure that is composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. Starch-binding modules are present in microbial enzymes that are involved in starch metabolism; these are classified into several different families on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. Such binding domains promote attachment to the substrate and increase its concentration at the active site of the enzyme, which allows microorganisms to degrade non-soluble starch. Fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to notice two evolutionary clusters of microbial starch-binding domains. These domains have enormous potential as tags for protein immobilization, as well as for the tailoring of enzymes that play a part in polysaccharide metabolism.

  2. AIDA: ab initio domain assembly server.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Li, Zhanwen; Godzik, Adam

    2014-07-01

    AIDA: ab initio domain assembly server, available at http://ffas.burnham.org/AIDA/ is a tool that can identify domains in multi-domain proteins and then predict their 3D structures and relative spatial arrangements. The server is free and open to all users, and there is an option for a user to provide an e-mail to get the link to result page. Domains are evolutionary conserved and often functionally independent units in proteins. Most proteins, especially eukaryotic ones, consist of multiple domains while at the same time, most experimentally determined protein structures contain only one or two domains. As a result, often structures of individual domains in multi-domain proteins can be accurately predicted, but the mutual arrangement of different domains remains unknown. To address this issue we have developed AIDA program, which combines steps of identifying individual domains, predicting (separately) their structures and assembling them into multiple domain complexes using an ab initio folding potential to describe domain-domain interactions. AIDA server not only supports the assembly of a large number of continuous domains, but also allows the assembly of domains inserted into other domains. Users can also provide distance restraints to guide the AIDA energy minimization. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Activation function 2 (AF-2) of retinoic acid receptor and 9-cis retinoic acid receptor: presence of a conserved autonomous constitutive activating domain and influence of the nature of the response element on AF-2 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, B; Saunders, M; Gaudon, C; Roy, B; Losson, R; Chambon, P

    1994-01-01

    A motif essential for the transcriptional activation function 2 (AF-2) present in the E region of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha and 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) alpha has been characterized as an amphipathic alpha-helix whose main features are conserved between transcriptionally active members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This conserved motif, which can activate autonomously in the absence of ligand in animal and yeast cells, can be swapped between nuclear receptors without affecting the ligand dependency for activation of transcription, thus indicating that a ligand-dependent conformational change is necessary to reveal the AF-2 activation potential within the E region of the nuclear receptor. Interestingly, we show that the precise nature of the direct repeat response element to which RAR/RXR heterodimers are bound can affect the activity of the AF-2s of the heterodimeric partners, as well as the relative efficiency with which all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acids activate the RAR partner. Images PMID:7957103

  4. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Herbert L.; Das, Debanu; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2_DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfito­bacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23_SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63_THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2_DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63_THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23_SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23_SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure of Q9HJ63_THEAC is atypical for a treble-cleft zinc finger in that three Cys side chains and an Asp side chain are within coordination distance of the zinc. PMID:20944230

  5. The conserved DNA-binding domains encoded by the herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP4, pseudorabies virus IE180, and varicella-zoster virus ORF62 genes recognize similar sites in the corresponding promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C L; Wilcox, K W

    1991-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), pseudorabies virus (PRV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) are all classified as Alphaherpesvirinae. Each of these five viruses encodes an essential immediate-early (IE) regulatory protein referred to as HSV-1 ICP4, HSV-2 ICP4, PRV IE180, VZV ORF62 protein, and EHV-1 IE1, respectively. These five proteins share extensive homology with each other in domains referred to as regions 2 and 4. The HSV-1 ICP4 region 2 domain contains residues that are required for the DNA-binding capability of ICP4. In this report, we describe the expression of region 2 domains from the ICP4, IE180, and ORF62 genes as fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. DNA-binding assays revealed that each of these region 2 fusion proteins binds to a sequence that overlaps the transcription start site in the promoter for the gene encoding the corresponding protein. Each of the sites with high affinity for one or more of these fusion proteins contains the sequence 5'-ATCGT-3'. This sequence spans the mRNA cap site in the HSV-2 ICP4 gene promoter and is immediately upstream from the transcription start site in the EHV-1 IE1 gene. These results suggest that formation of a specific complex between an IE protein and its own gene promoter may be a common mechanism used by Alphaherpesvirinae to autoregulate transcription of an essential IE gene. Images PMID:1847444

  6. Fibroin-modulator-binding protein-1 (FMBP-1) contains a novel DNA-binding domain, repeats of the score and three amino acid peptide (STP), conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans.

    PubMed

    Takiya, Shigeharu; Ishikawa, Tetsurou; Ohtsuka, Katsuya; Nishita, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The predicted transcriptional regulatory factor for the fibroin gene of the silkworm Bombyx mori, fibroin-modulator-binding protein-1 (FMBP-1), was purified by sequential DNA affinity column chromatography, and cDNA clones corresponding to FMBP-1 were isolated from a library. The N-terminal half of FMBP-1 has a weak similarity to the DNA-binding domain of several transcriptional regulatory factors in higher plants. The C-terminal half contains four tandem repeats of a novel 23 amino acid motif, which we named the score and three amino acid peptide (STP). Other genes containing STP repeats were found in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. Mutational analysis of FMBP-1 showed that the STP repeats form a novel DNA-binding domain. Sequences flanking STP repeats modulated DNA-binding activity. The FMBP-1 gene was expressed during the fourth to fifth instar. FMBP-1 activity appeared to be regulated at the transcriptional level and by the post-transcriptional modification.

  7. The crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of vIRF-1 from the oncogenic KSHV reveals a conserved fold for DNA binding and reinforces its role as a transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Kelly; Venkatachalam, Rajakannan; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Lim, Bee Ting; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes four viral homologues to cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), where the most studied is vIRF-1. Even though vIRF-1 shows sequence homology to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD) of human IRFs, a specific role for this domain in vIRF-1’s function has remained uncertain. To provide insights into the function of the vIRF-1 DBD, we have determined the crystal structure of it in complex with DNA and in its apo-form. Using a thermal stability shift assay (TSSA), we show that the vIRF-1 DBD binds DNA, whereas full-length vIRF-1 does not, suggesting a cis-acting regulatory mechanism in similarity to human IRFs. The complex structure of vIRF-1 DBD reveals interactions with the DNA backbone and the positioning of two arginines for specific recognition in the major grove. A superimposition with human IRF-3 reveals a similar positioning of the two specificity-determining arginines, and additional TSSAs indicate binding of vIRF-1 to an IRF-3 operator consensus sequence. The results from this study, therefore, provide support that vIRF-1 has evolved to bind DNA and plays a role in DNA binding in the context of transcriptional regulation and might act on some of the many operator sequences controlled by human IRF-3. PMID:23435230

  8. FHA domains: Phosphopeptide binding and beyond.

    PubMed

    Almawi, Ahmad W; Matthews, Lindsay A; Guarné, Alba

    2016-12-08

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are small phosphopeptide recognition modules found in eubacterial and eukaryotic, but not archeal, genomes. Although they were originally found in forkhead-type transcription factors, they have now been identified in many other signaling proteins. FHA domains share a remarkably conserved fold despite very low sequence conservation. They only have five conserved amino acids that are important for binding to phosphorylated epitopes. Recent work from several laboratories has demonstrated that FHA domains can mediate many interactions that do not depend on their ability to recognize a phosphorylated threonine. In this review, we present structural and biochemical work that has unveiled novel interaction interfaces on FHA domains. We discuss how these non-canonical interactions modulate the recognition of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated substrates, as well as protein oligomerization - events that collectively determine FHA function.

  9. A Conserved Glycan in the C2 Domain of HIV-1 Envelope Acts as a Molecular Switch to Control X4 Utilization by Clonal Variants with Identical V3 Loops

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Thomas; Sobrera, Edwin R.; Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all persons newly infected with HIV-1 harbor exclusively CCR5-using virus. CXCR4-using variants eventually arise in up to 50% of patients infected with subtypes B or D. This transition to efficient CXCR4 utilization is often co-incident with progression to AIDS. The basis for HIV-1’s initial dependence on CCR5, the selective force(s) that drive CXCR4-utilization, and the evolutionary pathways by which it occurs are incompletely understood. Greater knowledge of these processes will inform interventions at all stages, from vaccination to cure. The determinants of co-receptor use map primarily, though not exclusively, to the V3 loop of gp120. In this study, we describe five clonal variants with identical V3 loops but divergent CXCR4 use. Mutagenesis revealed two residues controlling this phenotypic switch: a rare polymorphism in C1 and a highly conserved N-glycan in C2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of co-receptor usage regulated by the N-glycan at position 262. PMID:26083631

  10. A conserved KIN17 curved DNA-binding domain protein assembles with SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 to adapt Arabidopsis growth and development to limiting copper availability.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Xing, Shuping; Huijser, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Proper copper (Cu) homeostasis is required by living organisms to maintain essential cellular functions. In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 (SPL7) transcription factor participates in reprogramming global gene expression during Cu insufficiency in order to improve the metal uptake and prioritize its distribution to Cu proteins of major importance. As a consequence, spl7 null mutants show morphological and physiological disorders during Cu-limited growth, resulting in lower fresh weight, reduced root elongation, and chlorosis. On the other hand, the Arabidopsis KIN17 homolog belongs to a well-conserved family of essential eukaryotic nuclear proteins known to be stress activated and involved in DNA and possibly RNA metabolism in mammals. In the study presented here, we uncovered that Arabidopsis KIN17 participates in promoting the Cu deficiency response by means of a direct interaction with SPL7. Moreover, the double mutant kin17-1 spl7-2 displays an enhanced Cu-dependent phenotype involving growth arrest, oxidative stress, floral bud abortion, and pollen inviability. Taken together, the data presented here provide evidence for SPL7 and KIN17 protein interaction as a point of convergence in response to both Cu deficiency and oxidative stress.

  11. Single-channel analysis of a point mutation of a conserved serine residue in the S2 ligand-binding domain of the NR2A NMDA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Wyllie, David J A; Johnston, Alexander R; Lipscombe, Diane; Chen, Philip E

    2006-07-15

    We have examined the function of a conserved serine residue (Ser670) in the S2 ligand-binding region of the NR2A N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit, using recombinant NR1/NR2A receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Mutation of Ser670 to glycine (S670G) in NR2A reduced the potency of glutamate by 124-fold. Single-channel conductance and the duration of apparent open periods of NR2A(S670G) receptor mutants were, however, indistinguishable from wild-type NMDA receptors. NR1/NR2A(S670G) shut-time distributions were best described by a mixture of six exponential components, and the four shortest shut intervals of each distribution were considered to occur within a channel activation (burst). Bursts of single-channel openings were fitted with a mixture of four exponential components. The longest two components carried the majority of the charge transfer and had mean durations of 9.6 +/- 0.5 and 29.6 +/- 1.5 ms. The overall channel open probability during a burst was high (mean, 0.83 +/- 0.06). Consistent with a shortening of NMDA receptor-channel burst lengths was the observation of an increased deactivation rate of macroscopic currents evoked by brief applications of glutamate to outside-out membrane patches. Correlations between shut times and adjacent open times were observed in all data records. Noticeably, shorter than average openings tended to occur next to long closed periods, whereas longer than average openings tended to occur next to short closings. Our single-channel data, together with modelling using a kinetic scheme to describe channel activations, support our hypothesis that the S670G point mutation reduces the dwell time of glutamate in its binding site.

  12. The Conservation/Solution Element (STE) Method for Linear Potential Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeyeye, John O.; Attia, Naguib F.; Jackson, Joy; Hunter, Timothy

    1996-01-01

    The potential equation is discretized on rectangular domains using the Conservation/Solution Element Method (STE) approach. Computational examples with a discussion of numerical experience gained are given.

  13. Conservation potential of agricultural water conservation subsidies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffaker, Ray

    2008-07-01

    A current policy subsidizes farmers to invest in improved on-farm irrigation efficiency, expecting water to be conserved off farm. Contrary to expectation, water has been increasingly depleted in some regions after such improvements. This paper investigates the policy's failure to conserve water consistently by (1) formulating an economic model of irrigated crop production to determine a profit-maximizing irrigator's range of responses to a subsidy and (2) embedding these responses into hypothetical streamflow diagrams to ascertain their potential to conserve water under various hydrologic regimes. Testable hypotheses are developed to predict the conservation potential of a subsidy in real-world application.

  14. Fourier Analysis of Conservation Patterns in Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Ashok; Jakobsson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Residue conservation is a common observation in alignments of protein families, underscoring positions important in protein structure and function. Though many methods measure the level of conservation of particular residue positions, currently we do not have a way to study spatial oscillations occurring in protein conservation patterns. It is known that hydrophobicity shows spatial oscillations in proteins, which is characterized by computing the hydrophobic moment of the protein domains. Here, we advance the study of moments of conservation of protein families to know whether there might exist spatial asymmetry in the conservation patterns of regular secondary structures. Analogous to the hydrophobic moment, the conservation moment is defined as the modulus of the Fourier transform of the conservation function of an alignment of related protein, where the conservation function is the vector of conservation values at each column of the alignment. The profile of the conservation moment is useful in ascertaining any periodicity of conservation, which might correlate with the period of the secondary structure. To demonstrate the concept, conservation in the family of potassium ion channel proteins was analyzed using moments. It was shown that the pore helix of the potassium channel showed oscillations in the moment of conservation matching the period of the α-helix. This implied that one side of the pore helix was evolutionarily conserved in contrast to its opposite side. In addition, the method of conservation moments correctly identified the disposition of the voltage sensor of voltage-gated potassium channels to form a 310 helix in the membrane.

  15. The BAH domain of Rsc2 is a histone H3 binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Anna L.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Oliver, Antony W.; Downs, Jessica A.

    2013-01-01

    Bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) domains are commonly found in chromatin-associated proteins and fall into two classes; Remodels the Structure of Chromatin (RSC)-like or Sir3-like. Although Sir3-like BAH domains bind nucleosomes, the binding partners of RSC-like BAH domains are currently unknown. The Rsc2 subunit of the RSC chromatin remodeling complex contains an RSC-like BAH domain and, like the Sir3-like BAH domains, we find Rsc2 BAH also interacts with nucleosomes. However, unlike Sir3-like BAH domains, we find that Rsc2 BAH can bind to recombinant purified H3 in vitro, suggesting that the mechanism of nucleosome binding is not conserved. To gain insight into the Rsc2 BAH domain, we determined its crystal structure at 2.4 Å resolution. We find that it differs substantially from Sir3-like BAH domains and lacks the motifs in these domains known to be critical for making contacts with histones. We then go on to identify a novel motif in Rsc2 BAH that is critical for efficient H3 binding in vitro and show that mutation of this motif results in defective Rsc2 function in vivo. Moreover, we find this interaction is conserved across Rsc2-related proteins. These data uncover a binding target of the Rsc2 family of BAH domains and identify a novel motif that mediates this interaction. PMID:23907388

  16. Conservation Education Today & Tomorrow: Resource Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Conservation, Springfield.

    This kit was developed by the Illinois Department of Conservation's Education Program with assistance from the State Board of Education, as a teaching tool which can be used to promote conservation awareness of young people. It is designed to enable educators to help students in grades 7-10 learn about Illinois' renewable natural resources through…

  17. A novel cysteine-rich sequence-specific DNA-binding protein interacts with the conserved X-box motif of the human major histocompatibility complex class II genes via a repeated Cys-His domain and functions as a transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules function in the presentation of processed peptides to helper T cells. As most mammalian cells can endocytose and process foreign antigen, the critical determinant of an antigen-presenting cell is its ability to express class II MHC molecules. Expression of these molecules is usually restricted to cells of the immune system and dysregulated expression is hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and certain autoimmune diseases. Human complementary DNA clones encoding a newly identified, cysteine-rich transcription factor, NF-X1, which binds to the conserved X-box motif of class II MHC genes, were obtained, and the primary amino acid sequence deduced. The major open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 1,104 amino acids with a symmetrical organization. A central cysteine-rich portion encodes the DNA-binding domain, and is subdivided into seven repeated motifs. This motif is similar to but distinct from the LIM domain and the RING finger family, and is reminiscent of known metal-binding regions. The unique arrangement of cysteines indicates that the consensus sequence CX3CXL-XCGX1- 5HXCX3CHXGXC represents a novel cysteine-rich motif. Two lines of evidence indicate that the polypeptide encodes a potent and biologically relevant repressor of HLA-DRA transcription: (a) overexpression of NF-X1 from a retroviral construct strongly decreases transcription from the HLA-DRA promoter; and (b) the NF-X1 transcript is markedly induced late after induction with interferon gamma (IFN- gamma), coinciding with postinduction attenuation of HLA-DRA transcription. The NF-X1 protein may therefore play an important role in regulating the duration of an inflammatory response by limiting the period in which class II MHC molecules are induced by IFN-gamma. PMID:7964459

  18. Building robust conservation plans.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Piero; Joppa, Lucas

    2015-04-01

    Systematic conservation planning optimizes trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and human activities by accounting for socioeconomic costs while aiming to achieve prescribed conservation objectives. However, the most cost-efficient conservation plan can be very dissimilar to any other plan achieving the set of conservation objectives. This is problematic under conditions of implementation uncertainty (e.g., if all or part of the plan becomes unattainable). We determined through simulations of parallel implementation of conservation plans and habitat loss the conditions under which optimal plans have limited chances of implementation and where implementation attempts would fail to meet objectives. We then devised a new, flexible method for identifying conservation priorities and scheduling conservation actions. This method entails generating a number of alternative plans, calculating the similarity in site composition among all plans, and selecting the plan with the highest density of neighboring plans in similarity space. We compared our method with the classic method that maximizes cost efficiency with synthetic and real data sets. When implementation was uncertain--a common reality--our method provided higher likelihood of achieving conservation targets. We found that χ, a measure of the shortfall in objectives achieved by a conservation plan if the plan could not be implemented entirely, was the main factor determining the relative performance of a flexibility enhanced approach to conservation prioritization. Our findings should help planning authorities prioritize conservation efforts in the face of uncertainty about future condition and availability of sites. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. From conservation genetics to conservation genomics.

    PubMed

    Primmer, Craig R

    2009-04-01

    Although the application of population and evolutionary genetic theory and methods to address issues of conservation relevance has a long history, the formalization of conservation genetics as a research field is still relatively recent. One of the periodic catalysts for increased research effort in the field has been advances in molecular technologies, leading to an increasingly wider variety of molecular markers for application in conservation genetic studies. To date, genetic methods have been applied in conservation biology primarily as selectively neutral molecular tools for resolving questions of conservation relevance. However, there has been renewed interest in complementing the analysis of neutral markers with the assessment of loci that may be directly involved in responses to processes such as environmental change, with a view to identifying the genes involved in them. These kinds of studies are now possible due to the increase in availability of genomic resources for nonmodel organisms, and there will likely be an even more rapid increase in the near future due to the advent of new ultrahigh throughput-sequencing technologies. This review considers the implications of the most recent developments in genomic technologies and their potential for contributing to the conservation of populations and species. Three "conservation genomics" case studies are presented (Atlantic salmon, Salmo sala; the butterfly, Melitaea cinxia; and the California condor, Gymnogyps californianus) in order to demonstrate the diversity of applications now possible. While it is clear that genomics approaches in conservation will not replace other tried-and-true methods, these recent developments open up an exciting new range of possibilities that will enable further diversification of the application of genomics in conservation biology.

  20. Meeting global conservation challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-10-01

    Hot on the heels of last year's Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement, representatives from the global conservation community met to set the conservation agenda that will help to implement these targets.

  1. Conservation and Reading Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, Beverly W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Conservation is positively correlated with reading readiness and intelligence. Suggests that conservation is worthy of attention by primary teachers as a predictor of the child's readiness for learning to read. (ST)

  2. Structure and function of KH domains.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Roberto; Edwards, Laura; Regan, Lynne

    2008-06-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and