Science.gov

Sample records for consortium program completion

  1. Tri-District Arts Consortium Summer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Charlotte O.

    1990-01-01

    The Tri-District Arts Consortium in South Carolina was formed to serve artistically gifted students in grades six-nine. The consortium developed a summer program offering music, dance, theatre, and visual arts instruction through a curriculum of intense training, performing, and hands-on experiences with faculty members and guest artists. (JDD)

  2. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  3. A Consortium-based Research Education Program for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Anne Victoria; Pieper, David; Hammel, Ernest

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a consortium-based research education seminar program developed by the OHEP Center for Medical Education that presents a yearly research forum in which the best research projects from consortium members are presented by the resident-researchers, who compete for recognition and prize money. Of the 128 presentations to date 25 percent…

  4. AACJC International/Intercultural Consortium Summer Study Programs Overseas, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Becky

    Responses are presented to a questionnaire on overseas summer programs that was sent in January 1979 to members of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC) International/Intercultural Consortium (IIC). Program descriptions are listed alphabetically by world region and country. Program information includes: name of program,…

  5. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  6. 77 FR 12041 - Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program AGENCY: Office...: Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program; Notice inviting applications for new... appropriate entities to improve the delivery of services to migrant children whose education is...

  7. Program Costs and Student Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  8. 78 FR 40084 - Proposed Requirement-Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... Register on March 3, 2004 (69 FR 10110) (2004 Notice), and we have used these final requirements for CIG... final priority for the MEP CIG program in the Federal Register on March 12, 2008 (73 FR 13217), in which... CFR Chapter II Proposed Requirement--Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant...

  9. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  10. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  11. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? 287.30 Section 287.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  12. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? 287.30 Section 287.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break...

  13. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium: Inventory of existing programs, Second edition. Appendix 13.11

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-23

    This is the second edition of an inventory of existing educational programs, focused primarily on inner-city youth, in operation in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The first edition was published on 21 August 1992 and can be obtained from the Weston Institute. However, the complete context of the first edition are included in this edition. The purpose of the inventory is to identify existing programs which could be augmented, adapted, or otherwise strengthened to help fulfil the mission of the Department of Energy-sponsored Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium, the mission of which is to recruit and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas and in environmental restoration and waste management. In planning its programs, the Consortium does not want to ``reinvent the wheel`` and all of its members need to learn what others are doing. Each of the 32 participating academic institutions was invited to submit as many program descriptions as they wished. Due to the summer holidays, or because they did not believe than they were carrying out programs relevant to the mission of the Consortium, some institutions did not submit any program descriptions for the first edition. This second edition lists programs of 27 participating institutions. In addition, several industries, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit institutions were invited to submit program descriptions.

  14. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force applied research units and projects, 1992 program. Summary and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    This report contains brief descriptions of projects involved in the urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF). The Consortium is a special network which helps to define urban problems, and commercialize technologies which could help solve those problems. Research and Development priorities within the program are transportation, energy, environment, and economic development and energy efficient facilities. The Consortium has established partnerships with US DOE on energy utilities, alternative vehicle fuels, waste management, and electricity management. A technology transfer committee was established to build a marketing program.

  15. An Evaluation of the Southern Maryland Educational Consortium's Tech Prep Program: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raber, Suzanne M.; Merchlinsky, Suzanne R.

    In the Southern Maryland Educational Consortium's 4 + 2 tech prep program, ninth-grade students develop career plans and follow career pathways in one of three technologies--health and human services, electronics and engineering, or business. The program was evaluated by an independent social science research firm to identify the different…

  16. Effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Mathew; Melancon, Jim; Sneed, Demarcus; Nunning, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Currently, heart disease and diabetes dominate society as the leading cause of death for Americans. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a lifestyle enhancement program on factors related to the development of heart disease. The Wabash Valley Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a community-based lifestyle change program with…

  17. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  18. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium: Inventory of existing programs. Appendix 13.5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-21

    This is the ``first effort`` to prepare an inventory of existing educational programs, focused primarily on inner-city youth, in operation in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The purpose of the inventory is to identify existing programs which could be augmented, adapted, or otherwise strengthened to help fulfil the mission of the Department of Energy-sponsored Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium, the mission of which is to recruit and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas and in environmental restoration and waste management. The Consortium does not want to ``reinvent the wheel`` and all of its members need to learn what others are doing. Each of the 30 participating academic institutions was invited to submit as many program descriptions as they wished. Due to the summer holidays, or because they did not believe than they were carrying out programs relevant to the mission of the Consortium, some institutions did not submit any program descriptions. In addition, several industries, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit institutions were invited to submit program descriptions.

  19. Programs to Increase High School Completion

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Robert A.; Knopf, John A.; Wilson, Sandra Jo; Truman, Benedict I.; Milstein, Bobby; Johnson, Robert L.; Fielding, Jonathan E.; Muntaner, Carles J.M.; Jones, Camara Phyllis; Fullilove, Mindy T.; Moss, Regina Davis; Uefffng, Erin; Hunt, Pete C.

    2015-01-01

    Context High school completion (HSC) is an established predictor of long-term morbidity and mortality. U.S. rates of HSC are substantially lower among students from low-income families and most racial/ethnic minority populations than students from high-income families and the non-Hispanic white population. This systematic review assesses the effectiveness of programs to increase HSC and the potential of these programs to improve lifelong health among at-risk students. Evidence acquisition A search located a meta-analysis (search period 1985–2010/2011) on the effects of programs to increase HSC or General Educational Development (GED) diploma receipt; the meta-analysis was concordant with Community Guide definitions and methodologic standards. Programs were assessed separately for the general student population (152 studies) and students who were parents or pregnant (15 studies). A search for studies published between 2010 and August 2012 located ten more recent studies, which were assessed for consistency with the meta-analysis. Analyses were conducted in 2013. Evidence synthesis The review focused on the meta-analysis. Program effectiveness was measured as the increased rate of HSC (or GED receipt) by the intervention group compared with controls. All assessed program types were effective in increasing HSC in the general student population: vocational training, alternative schooling, social–emotional skills training, college-oriented programming, mentoring and counseling, supplemental academic services, school and class restructuring, multiservice packages, attendance monitoring and contingencies, community service, and case management. For students who had children or were pregnant, attendance monitoring and multiservice packages were effective. Ten studies published after the search period for the meta-analysis were consistent with its findings. Conclusions There is strong evidence that a variety of HSC programs can improve high school or GED completion

  20. Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium. 1994 UCETF Program: Summary and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    The Urban Consortium (UC) is a network of the nation`s largest cities and urban counties by population, brought together by PTI to find solutions to their common concerns. The Consortium provides a unique creative forum where elected and appointed officials and technical managers identify, test, and validate practical ways to improve the provision of public services and, where possible, generate new revenue opportunities. Public Technology, Inc. (PTI) is the nonprofit, research, development, and commercialization arm of the National League of Cities, National Association of Counties and the International City and County Management Association, and an association of local governments. Staffed by PTI, the UC addresses the critical needs of local governments through its three task forces: Energy, Environment, and Telecommunications and Information. The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF) program has, since its inception, acted as a laboratory to develop and test solutions and share the resulting products or management approaches with the wider audience of local governments. It has addressed the overlap between energy and environment and economic development policy issues, and, is the nation`s most extensive cooperative local government program to improve energy management and decision-making through applied research and technology cooperation. Developed to meet both the defined needs of cities and counties as well as national priorities, major topics within the 1993/94 program are (1) Transportation; (2) Utility and Commercial/Government Buildings; and (3) Energy Efficient Buildings and Communities. This summary contains short descriptions of the projects and participants in the 1993/94 UCETF program.

  1. Fifteen Years of Collaborative Innovation and Achievement: NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 15-Year Program Performance and Results Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M. (Editor); Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Avery Shelly; Calamaio, Caprice; Carstenson, Larry; Dugan, James; Farr, Lynne; Farritor, Shane

    2003-01-01

    This 15-year evaluation serves as a summary document highlighting the numerous and complete successes of the Nebraska Space Grant Program. Innovation has been highlighted through significant new endeavors during this 5-year period, such as placement of students and faculty at NASA Centers and the expansion of NSGC Native American Outreach Programs. While the last national program evaluation resulted in Nebraska s ranking as the top Capability Enhancement Consortium, and 5th best overall, Nebraska felt there was room for significant growth and development. This has been validated through the recent competitive attainment of Designated Grant status and has allowed for the exploration of new initiatives, as well as the expansion of already successful programs. A comprehensive strategic planning effort has involved all Nebraska representative entities and has guided Nebraska Space Grant through the evaluation period, providing a basis for continual advancement. Nebraska rigorously employs evaluation techniques to ensure that stated outcomes and metrics are achieved and that weaknesses are identified and corrected. With this coordinated approach, Nebraska expects that the next 5 years will yield new opportunities for significant achievement. Nebraska Space Grant will embrace new national endeavors, including the integration of Pender Public Schools -Nebraska s NASA Explorer School, geospatial initiatives, and the National Student Satellite Program.

  2. Motivational Factors in Registered Nurses Completing a Baccalaureate Completion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate what motivates associate degree (AND) and diploma prepared registered nurses (RN) to pursue a baccalaureate degree (BSN) through an RN-to-BSN program. Studies have shown that the educational level of nurses has direct impact on the safety and quality of care provided to patients.…

  3. The National Astronomy Consortium Summer Student Research Program at NRAO-Socorro: Year 2 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Perez, Laura M.; Arancibia, Demian; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    I will present a summary of the program structure used for the second year of hosting a summer student research cohort of the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. The NAC is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. I will describe the research, professional development, and inclusivity goals of the program, and show how these were used to create a weekly syllabus for the summer. I will also highlight several unique aspects of this program, including the recruitment of remote mentors for students to better balance the gender and racial diversity of available role models for the students, as well as the hosting of a contemporaneous series of visiting diversity speakers. Finally, I will discuss structures for continuing to engage, interact with, and mentor students in the academic year following the summer program. A goal of this work going forward is to be able to make instructional and organizational materials from this program available to other sites interested in joining the NAC or hosting similar programs at their own institution.

  4. Undergraduate research studies program at participating institutions of the HBCU Fossil Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Bota, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to expose students in the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Fossil Energy Consortium Institutions to energy and fossil fuels research, to stimulate their interest in the sciences and engineering and to encourage them to pursue graduate studies. This report provides the research accomplishment of the various students who participated in the program. Research results are presented on the following topics: Energy Enhancement and Pollutant Reduction in Coal by Cryogenic Diminution; Competition of NO and SO[sub 2] for OH Generated witin Electrical Aerosol Analyzers; Dispersed Iron Catalysts for Coal Gasification; NQR/NMR Studies of Copper-Cobalt Catalysts for Syngas Concersion; Catalytic gasification of Coal Chars by Potassium Sulfate and Ferrous Sulfate Mixtures; A New Method for Cleaning and Beneficiation of Ultrafine Coal; Characterization Studies of Coal-Derived Liquids; Study of Coal Liquefaction Catalysts and Removal of Certain Toxic Heavy Metal Ions from Coal Conversion Process Wastewaters.

  5. Undergraduate research studies program at participating institutions of the HBCU Fossil Energy Consortium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bota, K.B.

    1991-12-31

    The primary objective of this research program is to expose students in the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Fossil Energy Consortium Institutions to energy and fossil fuels research, to stimulate their interest in the sciences and engineering and to encourage them to pursue graduate studies. This report provides the research accomplishment of the various students who participated in the program. Research results are presented on the following topics: Energy Enhancement and Pollutant Reduction in Coal by Cryogenic Diminution; Competition of NO and SO{sub 2} for OH Generated witin Electrical Aerosol Analyzers; Dispersed Iron Catalysts for Coal Gasification; NQR/NMR Studies of Copper-Cobalt Catalysts for Syngas Concersion; Catalytic gasification of Coal Chars by Potassium Sulfate and Ferrous Sulfate Mixtures; A New Method for Cleaning and Beneficiation of Ultrafine Coal; Characterization Studies of Coal-Derived Liquids; Study of Coal Liquefaction Catalysts and Removal of Certain Toxic Heavy Metal Ions from Coal Conversion Process Wastewaters.

  6. Establishment and Results of a Magnetic Resonance Quality Assurance Program for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Forbes, Peter; Dewey, Kevin; Osganian, Stravoula; Clark, Maureen; Wong, Sharon; Ramamurthy, Uma; Kun, Larry; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2008-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is used to assess brain tumor response to therapies and a MR quality assurance program is necessary for multicenter clinical trials employing imaging. This study was performed to determine overall variability of quantitative image metrics measured with the American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom among 11 sites participating in the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) Neuroimaging Center (NIC) MR quality assurance (MR QA) program. Materials and Methods An MR QA program was implemented among 11 participating PBTC sites and quarterly evaluations of scanner performance for seven imaging metrics defined by the ACR were sought and subject to statistical evaluation over a 4.5 year period. Overall compliance with the QA program, means, standard deviations and coefficients of variation (CV) for the quantitative imaging metrics were evaluated. Results Quantitative measures of the seven imaging metrics were generally within ACR recommended guidelines for all sites. Compliance improved as the study progressed. Inter-site variabilities as gauged by coefficients of variation (CV) for slice thickness and geometric accuracy, imaging parameters that influence size and/or positioning measurements in tumor studies, were on the order of 10 % and 1% respectively. Conclusion Although challenging to establish, MR QA programs within the context of PBTC multi-site clinical trials when based on the ACR MR phantom program can a) indicate sites performing below acceptable image quality levels and b) establish levels of precision through instrumental variabilities that are relevant to quantitative image analyses, e.g. tumor volume changes. PMID:18692750

  7. Improving Undergraduate Research Experiences With An Intentional Mentoring Program: Lessons Learned Through Assessment of Keck Geology Consortium Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, K. R.; Garver, J. I.; Greer, L.; Pollock, M.; Varga, R. J.; Davidson, C. M.; Frey, H. M.; Hubbard, D. K.; Peck, W. H.; Wobus, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Keck Geology Consortium, with support from the National Science Foundation (REU Program) and ExxonMobil, is a collaborative effort by 18 colleges to improve geoscience education through high-quality research experiences. Since its inception in 1987 more than 1350 undergraduate students and 145 faculty have been involved in 189 yearlong research projects. This non-traditional REU model offers exceptional opportunities for students to address research questions at a deep level, to learn and utilize sophisticated analytical methods, and to engage in authentic collaborative research that culminates in an undergraduate research symposium and published abstracts volume. The large numbers of student and faculty participants in Keck projects also affords a unique opportunity to study the impacts of program design on undergraduate research experiences in the geosciences. Students who participate in Keck projects generally report significant gains in personal and professional dimensions, as well as in clarification of educational and career goals. Survey data from student participants, project directors, and campus advisors identify mentoring as one of the most critical and challenging elements of successful undergraduate research experiences. Additional challenges arise from the distributed nature of Keck projects (i.e., participants, project directors, advisors, and other collaborators are at different institutions) and across the span of yearlong projects. In an endeavor to improve student learning about the nature and process of science, and to make mentoring practices more intentional, the Consortium has developed workshops and materials to support both project directors and campus research advisors (e.g., best practices for mentoring, teaching ethical professional conduct, benchmarks for progress, activities to support students during research process). The Consortium continues to evolve its practices to better support students from underrepresented groups.

  8. The Consortium Ethics Program: an approach to establishing a permanent regional ethics network.

    PubMed

    Pinkus, R L; Aumann, G M; Kuczewski, M G; Medsger, A; Meisel, A; Parker, L S; Wicclair, M R

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the first three-year experience of the Consortium Ethics Program (CEP-1) of the University of Pittsburgh Center for Medical Ethics, and also outlines plans for the second three-year phase (CEP-2) of this experiment in continuing ethics education. In existence since 1990, the CEP has the primary goal of creating a cost-effective, permanent ethics resource network, by utilizing the educational resources of a university bioethics center and the practical expertise of a regional hospital council. The CEP's conception and specific components stem from recognition of the need to make each hospital a major focus of educational efforts, and to provide academic support for the in-house activities of the representatives from each institution.

  9. Leading Contributors to the Research Consortium's Annual Program, 1992-2011: High-Visibility Institutions, Researchers, and Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Lee, Hyo

    2013-01-01

    Between 1992-2011, peer-reviewed research on the Research Consortium's annual program has been published in abstract form in the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport". On the basis of frequency, high-visibility institutions, researchers, and sub-disciplinary categories were identified. Data were extracted from each abstract (N = 5,587). On…

  10. Predictors of Successful Completion of a Postincarceration Drug Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, Melinda M.; McGaffigan, Richard P.; Segars, Lance

    2000-01-01

    Study compares the characteristics of 1,763 parolees with substance abuse problems who successfully completed a postincarceration drug treatment program. Those who completed the program were more likely to be women who had not used drugs 30 days before program admission, had fewer prior treatment experiences, remained in the program longer, and…

  11. Scientific ballooning on a shoestring budget: The Montana Space Grant Consortium's BOREALIS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpar, D.; Kirn, S.; Hiscock, W.

    High altitude ballooning using Latex weather balloons provides frequent and low cost opportunities to carry small meaningful scientific payloads to well in excess of 100,000 feet. Maximizing payload scientific capability requires utilization of the newest available miniature, low-power, light-weight technologies to minimize system mass and size. The Balloon Outreach, Research, Exploration And Land Imaging System (BOREALIS) program of the Montana Space Grant Consortium has provided for undergraduate student teams to build payload systems up to 5.4 kg to conduct high altitude flight experiments. In the university setting such a program provides direct experience to students in the fabrication and operation of (near)space flight systems and payloads, and subsequent analysis of the scientific data. Over the course of the past three years 19 successful balloon flights have been conducted, with full payload recovery, reaching altitudes in excess of 110,000 feet, providing rewarding and exciting developmental test flights for satellite subsystems and mini-science missions to the edge of space. Missions have included measurement of Ozone altitude profiles, UV and Cosmic Ray fluxes, and atmospheric temperature and pressure soundings. In addition to providing hands on training at our colleges and universities for future scientists and engineers; by involving the public, a much larger audience is exposed to the scientific research process. In this paper we describe our methodologies and program accomplishments, including the design of a payload support system utilizing commercially available subsystems. More information may be found at http://spacegrant.montana.edu/borealis/index.asp

  12. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Dagher, Habib; Viselli, Anthony; Goupee, Andrew; Thaler, Jeffrey; Brady, Damian; Browne, Peter; Browning, James; Chung, Jade; Coulling, Alexander; Deese, Heather; Fowler, Matthew; Holberton, Rebecca; Anant, Jain; Jalbert, Dustin; Johnson, Theresa; Jonkman, Jason; Karlson, Benjamin; Kimball, Richard; Koo, Bonjun; Lackner, Matthew; Lambrakos, Kostas; Lankowski, Matthew; Leopold, Adrienne; Lim, Ho-Joon; Mangum, Linda; Martin, Heather; Masciola, Marco; Maynard, Melissa; McCleave, James; Mizrahi, Robert; Molta, Paul; Pershing, Andrew; Pettigrew, Neal; Prowell, Ian; Qua, Andrew; Sherwood, Graham; Snape, Thomas; Steneck, Robert; Stewart, Gordon; Stockwell, Jason; Swift, Andrew H. P.; Thomas, Dale; Viselli, Elizabeth; Zydlewski, Gayle

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  13. 78 FR 15377 - Completion of Claims Adjudication Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ..., 2010 (74 FR 12148), and announced the commencement of the Libya II program on July 7, 2009, with a completion date of July 7, 2011 (74 FR 32193). The completion date specified in this Notice supersedes the... (``Commission'') by the Department of State by letters dated December 11, 2008 (the ``Libya I program''),...

  14. Factors associated with the completion of falls prevention program.

    PubMed

    Batra, Anamica; Page, Timothy; Melchior, Michael; Seff, Laura; Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Palmer, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    Falls and fear of falling can affect independence and quality of life of older adults. Falls prevention programs may help avoiding these issues if completed. Understanding factors that are associated with completion of falls prevention programs is important. To reduce fear of falling and increase activity levels, a Matter of Balance (MOB) and un Asunto de Equilibrio (ADE) workshops were offered to 3420 older adults in South Florida between 1 October 2008 and 31 December 2011. Workshops were conducted in English or Spanish over eight, 2-hour sessions. Participants completed a demographic and a pre-post questionnaire. Factors associated with program completion were identified using logistic regression. For MOB, females were more likely to complete the program (OR = 2.076, P = 0.02). For ADE, females, moderate and extreme interference by falls in social activities were found to affect completion (OR = 2.116, P = 0.001; OR = 2.269, P = 0.003 and OR = 4.133, P = 0.008, respectively). Different factors predicted completion of both programs. Awareness of these factors can help lower the attrition rates, increase benefits and cost effectiveness of program. Future research needs to explore why certain groups had a higher likelihood of completing either program.

  15. Geographic applications program: Reports completed and in preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, R. H. (Compiler)

    1969-01-01

    The purpose of the present compilation is to bring together for ready reference a list of all reports, both completed and in preparation, resulting from NASA sponsorship of the geography program. Wherever possible, complete bibliographic citations are given. Since some of the 141 reports listed are not yet completed, citations can not all be in complete form. The reason for including incomplete citations is the sponsor's need for rather rapid feed-back of information so that it can have a bearing on on-going program planning. This should, therefore, be considered a working bibliography.

  16. Head Start, 4 years After Completing the Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Joo

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of the Head Start program on children's achievements in reading and math tests during their first 4 years of schooling after completing the program. Using nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, I found large measurement error in the parental reports of Head Start attendance,…

  17. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from

  18. Program Completion and Recidivism Outcomes among Adult Offenders Ordered to Complete a Community Service Sentence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouffard, Jeffrey A.; Muftic, Lisa R.

    2006-01-01

    Relatively little research has examined the outcomes (either program completion or recidivism) of community service (CS) sentences among adult offenders in the United States, despite the fact that this form of alternative sanction has been employed in the United States for nearly 40 years. What little research exists, primarily from Europe,…

  19. Modeling the complete Otto cycle: Preliminary version. [computer programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the equations and the computer program being developed to model the complete Otto cycle. The program incorporates such important features as: (1) heat transfer, (2) finite combustion rates, (3) complete chemical kinetics in the burned gas, (4) exhaust gas recirculation, and (5) manifold vacuum or supercharging. Changes in thermodynamic, kinetic and transport data as well as model parameters can be made without reprogramming. Preliminary calculations indicate that: (1) chemistry and heat transfer significantly affect composition and performance, (2) there seems to be a strong interaction among model parameters, and (3) a number of cycles must be calculated in order to obtain steady-state conditions.

  20. A survey of degree completion programs in dental hygiene education.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karen M; Rogo, Ellen J; Calley, Kristin H; Cellucci, Leigh W

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify specific information related to U.S. dental hygiene baccalaureate degree completion programs. Learning experiences, assessment methods, and baccalaureate institutional partnerships were assessed. Of the sixty dental hygiene programs that offer a degree completion program, the forty-two that met the inclusion criteria (including having operated for at least three years) were invited to participate in a thirty-eight item online survey. A 62 percent (n=26) response rate was obtained. Learning experiences in responding programs included core dental hygiene courses, general education courses, and elective dental hygiene courses. Emphasis areas offered by various programs were in the specialty areas of education, public or community health, and research. Respondents reported that their graduates were employed in multiple settings (65 percent; n=17), with 19 percent (n=5) reporting employment in the combined grouping of private practice, education, and public health. Institutional partnerships included articulation agreements (88 percent; n=21), community college baccalaureate (8 percent; n=2), and university extension (4 percent; n=1) models. The findings of this study provide a baseline for assessing the educational composition and design of U.S. dental hygiene degree completion programs. However, results of this study showed inconsistencies among learning experiences that might raise concerns when considering students' level of preparation for graduate education and future leadership roles in the profession.

  1. Oncofertility Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    ... September 15, 2016 National Physicians Cooperative Brigid Martz Smith July 21, 2016 Postdoctoral Position in Pediatric Fertility ... 2016 Oncofertility Consortium Clinic/Center Map Brigid Martz Smith June 30, 2016 Zika Virus Concerns Grow as ...

  2. UTSI/CFFF MHD Program Completion and Related Activities.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. A plan for Groundwater Remediation was prepared, coordinated with DOE and forwarded to the State for approval. Actions are underway to dispose spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of six High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported.

  3. UTSI/CFFF MHD PROGRAM COMPLETION AND RELATED ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. Progress is reported on the approved groundwater remediation plan. Actions are underway to dispose of spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of five (5) High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported.

  4. Persistence of Women in Online Degree-Completion Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Although online courses at postsecondary institutions promise adults access, flexibility, and convenience, many barriers to online learning remain. This article presents findings from a qualitative case study, which explored the phenomenon of undergraduate and graduate women learners' persistence in online degree-completion programs at a college…

  5. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Arbitration Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services and youth psychopathy on Juvenile Diversion program completion for youths involved in a clinical trial, and evaluation of an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management services to youths and their families. The present study examines baseline interview data for…

  6. Characteristics of medical students completing an honors program in pathology.

    PubMed

    Fenderson, B A; Hojat, M; Damjanov, I; Rubin, E

    1999-11-01

    The Honors Program in pathology at Jefferson Medical College provides a voluntary enrichment opportunity for students who have demonstrated a superior ability to cope with the pathology curriculum and who rank in the upper fifth of their class. This study was performed to determine whether honor students possess cognitive and psychosocial attributes that distinguish them from their classmates. Students from five academic years (entering classes 1991 to 1995) were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who completed the Honors Program (n = 85), (2) those in the top 20% of the class who were offered the option but chose not to participate in the Honors Program (n = 128), and (3) students who did not qualify for the program (n = 953). Comparisons between these three groups were made on the basis of selected measures of academic achievement retrieved from the Jefferson Longitudinal Study database and psychosocial data obtained from a questionnaire completed during the first-year orientation. Students who completed the Honors Program in pathology had scored higher on the physical science section of the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and had obtained higher first-year grade point averages than students in both of the other groups. Subsequently, they attained higher second-year grade point averages and scored higher on Step 1 and Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), compared with their peers in the other groups. There were no significant differences in psychosocial measures between honor students and the rest of the cohort (group 3). However, students in the top 20% of the class who declined the invitation to participate in the Honors Program (group 2) showed higher scores on the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Eysenck Emotional Instability (Neuroticism) Scale than did their classmates. Despite these differences, students who completed the Honors Program (group 1) and eligible students who declined participation (group 2) selected

  7. The National Astronomy Consortium: Lessons learned from a program to support underrepresented students in pursuing STEM careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Brisbin, Drew; Boyd, Patricia T.; Benjamin, Robert A.; NAC Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. Students are also given an opportunity to apply for a second year in this program, often at a different site. In addition to providing research and professional experience, the NAC also seeks to strengthen ties between the majority and minority-serving institutions in order to better serve these students throughout their careers. I will report on lessons learned from the second year of hosting a cohort at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. I will discuss the program structure during and after the summer, mentoring challenges, and ways that these challenges were addressed, including organizing a series of guest speakers and connecting students with a broader community of remote mentors.

  8. A Commonwealth Consortium to Develop, Implement and Evaluate a Pilot Program of Computer-Assisted Instruction for Urban High Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitzel, Harold E.; And Others

    The school districts of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, the Department of Education of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and Pennsylvania State University formed the Computer-Assisted Instruction Consortium to develop and evaluate two high school mathematics programs utilizing the medium of computer-assisted instruction. The first 18 months of the…

  9. A quality control program within a clinical trial Consortium for PCR protocols to detect Plasmodium species.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve M; Mayor, Alfredo; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Kenguele, Hilaire M; Ouédraogo, Smaïla; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Mkali, Happy; Mwangoka, Grace; Valecha, Neena; Singh, Jai Prakash Narayan; Clark, Martha A; Verweij, Jaco J; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Macete, Eusebio; Menendez, Clara; Cisteró, Pau; Njie, Fanta; Affara, Muna; Otieno, Kephas; Kariuki, Simon; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Meshnick, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Malaria parasite infections that are only detectable by molecular methods are highly prevalent and represent a potential transmission reservoir. The methods used to detect these infections are not standardized, and their operating characteristics are often unknown. We designed a proficiency panel of Plasmodium spp. in order to compare the accuracy of parasite detection of molecular protocols used by labs in a clinical trial consortium. Ten dried blood spots (DBSs) were assembled that contained P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, and P. ovale; DBSs contained either a single species or a species mixed with P. falciparum. DBS panels were tested in 9 participating laboratories in a masked fashion. Of 90 tests, 68 (75.6%) were correct; there were 20 false-negative results and 2 false positives. The detection rate was 77.8% (49/63) for P. falciparum, 91.7% (11/12) for P. vivax, 83.3% (10/12) for P. malariae, and 70% (7/10) for P. ovale. Most false-negative P. falciparum results were from samples with an estimated ≤ 5 parasites per μl of blood. Between labs, accuracy ranged from 100% to 50%. In one lab, the inability to detect species in mixed-species infections prompted a redesign and improvement of the assay. Most PCR-based protocols were able to detect P. falciparum and P. vivax at higher densities, but these assays may not reliably detect parasites in samples with low P. falciparum densities. Accordingly, formal quality assurance for PCR should be employed whenever this method is used for diagnosis or surveillance. Such efforts will be important if PCR is to be widely employed to assist malaria elimination efforts.

  10. The Idaho Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaird, James H.

    The Idaho Consortium was established by the state board of education to remedy perceived needs involving insufficient certificated teachers, excessive teacher mobility, shortage of teacher candidates, inadequate inservice training, a low level of administrative leadership, and a lack of programs in special education, early childhood education,…

  11. UTSI/CFFF MHD PROGRAM COMPLETION AND RELATED ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Joel W. Muehlhauser

    2004-07-21

    In this final technical report, UTSI summarizes work completed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95PC95231. This work began on the contract effective date, September 15, 1995 and is continuing on a very small basis to complete the groundwater remediation as of this date. The work scope required UTSI to continue to maintain the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility and keep it in readiness for anticipated testing. This effort was terminated in September 1998 by DOE stop-work letter. Work continued on reporting, environmental restoration and on the High Temperature Superconductivity work that was underway. The work included preparing reports on the MHD POC tests that had been completed just prior to this contract initiation under an earlier contract with DOE Chicago. These four reports are summarized herein. This report summarizes the environmental restoration work performed under the contract, including groundwater monitoring and remediation, removal of wastes from the facility, removal of asbestos from the cooling tower and actions in compliance with the license to discharge water into Woods Reservoir. This report covers work in support of the DOE High Temperature Superconductivity program including: (1) Assistance to DOE in preparing a development plan; (2) Cooperation with industry, national laboratories and other universities to promote the commercialization of thin film superconductors (coated conductors); (3) Process Evaluations; (4) Process Diagnostic Development; and (5) Process Economics. The assistance to DOE task included convening an advisory board composed of all the major participants in the DOE program and preparing a draft development plan and Research and Development Roadmap leading to commercialization of the coated conductor technology. Under this program, cooperative agreements and cooperative work was undertaken with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Midwest Superconductivity, Inc., EURUS Technologies, Inc., Westinghouse Electric Company, and others. In the

  12. Delaware State Consortium on Technical Preparation Programs. Policy and Procedure Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Technical and Community Coll., Dover.

    Tech prep is a program of at least 2 years of structured high school training that leads to a postsecondary degree or certificate. Tech prep programs contain a rigorous common core of mathematics, science, communications, and technology at the secondary level that are geared specifically to a technical career path. Based on the Delaware…

  13. 25 CFR 26.25 - What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Job Placement Services § 26.25 What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application? To be complete, a Job Placement Program application must contain all of...

  14. 25 CFR 26.25 - What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Job Placement Services § 26.25 What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application? To be complete, a Job Placement Program application must contain all of...

  15. 25 CFR 26.25 - What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Job Placement Services § 26.25 What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application? To be complete, a Job Placement Program application must contain all of...

  16. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  17. Fifteen Years of Collaborative Innovation and Achievement: NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 15-Year Program Performance and Results Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Avery, Shelly; Carstenson, Larry; Dugan, James; Farritor, Shane; Joyce, James; Rebrovich, Barb

    2003-01-01

    Condensing five years of significant work into a brief narrative fitting PPR requirements gave the affiliates of the Nebraska Space Grant a valuable chance for reflection. Achievements of Space Grant in Nebraska were judiciously chosen for this document that best illustrate the resultant synergism of this consortium, keeping in mind that these examples are only a representation of greater activity throughout the state. Following are highlights of many of the finer and personal achievements for Nebraska Space Grant. The Consortium welcomes inquiries to elaborate on any of these accomplishments.

  18. Health Education Consortium. Articulated Nursing Education Program. Final Report from January 1, 1980 to June 30, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulledge, Earl N.

    A project entitled the Health Education Consortium was initiated to develop an articulated nursing educational route that would meet the educational needs of all types of nursing personnel from nurses aides through and including nurses with master of science degrees. Included among the major activities of the project were the following:…

  19. Shape memory alloy consortium (SMAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacot, A. Dean

    1999-07-01

    The application of smart structures to helicopter rotors has received widespread study in recent years. This is one of the major thrusts of the Shape Memory Alloy Consortium (SMAC) program. SMAC includes 3 companies and 4 Universities in a cost sharing consortium funded under DARPA Smart Materials and Structures program. This paper describes the objective of the SMAC effort, and its relationship to a previous DARPA smart structure rotorcraft program from which it originated. The SMAC program includes NiTinol fatigue/characterization studies, SMA actuator development, and ferromagnetic SMA material development. The paper summarizes the SMAC effort, and includes background and details on Boeing's development of a SMA torsional actuator for rotorcraft applications. SMA actuation is used to retwist the rotorcraft blade in flight, and result in a significant payload increase for either helicopters or tiltrotors. This paper is also augmented by several other papers in this conference with specific results from other SMAC consortium members.

  20. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  1. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  2. The Workplace Literacy Program of the Central Labor Council and the Consortium for Worker Education. Summary of Activities between January 1, 1988 and August 1, 1988. Evaluation Report. Technical Report #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riessman, Frank; And Others

    A report on the New York City Central Labor Council-Consortium for Worker Education Workplace Literacy Program documents 15 workplace literacy program activities undertaken by 16 unions. The report has five sections. The first section covers the history and socioeconomic context in which the state-funded program emerged, and the roles of the two…

  3. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for

  4. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLGOY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-23

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for

  5. 49 CFR 240.213 - Procedures for making the determination on completion of training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the testing and evaluation procedures of that training program; and (3) A qualified Designated... completion of training program. 240.213 Section 240.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on completion of training program. (a) Each railroad, prior to the...

  6. 49 CFR 240.213 - Procedures for making the determination on completion of training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the testing and evaluation procedures of that training program; and (3) A qualified Designated... completion of training program. 240.213 Section 240.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on completion of training program. (a) Each railroad, prior to the...

  7. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Non-Completers in Online Doctor of Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Bernadette Marie

    2012-01-01

    The chance of an individual completing a traditional doctorate program is 50% (Bowen & Rudenstine, 1992; Council of Graduate Schools Ph.D. Completion Project, 2008; Ivankova & Stick, 2007). Student attrition in online programs is 10% to 20% greater than that of traditional, residential programs (Allen & Seaman, 2010; Carr, 2000; Diaz,…

  8. 40 CFR 86.1817-05 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in clean-fuel vehicles as specified in 40 CFR part 88 are not eligible for this program..., trading, and banking program. 86.1817-05 Section 86.1817-05 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program. (a) General. (1) Complete...

  9. The Nature Specialist: A Complete Guide to Program and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lenore Hendler

    This manual contains a collection of approaches and activities for nature specialists at residential or day camps. It is organized so that the novice may use it to maximize the effectiveness of a camp program. The book is full of descriptions of various field experiments in which children can participate. Comments in section 1, "Getting Started,"…

  10. Who Completes Child Maltreatment Prevention Programs? Data Trends #153

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" describes child maltreatment prevention programs designed to increase protective factors and decrease risk factors in families who may otherwise succumb to child abuse and…

  11. Consumer Evaluation of Educational Programs: Using Questionnaires Completed by Alumni.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, H. L.; Hewson, M.; Weiker, G.

    This paper describes a method used to evaluate 48 medical residency programs at one institution. It presents the background rationale, logistics, and results obtained by surveying alumni, in the context of their current practice, for relevant data on the value of their training experience. Surveys were sent for 3 years to all alumni of Cleveland…

  12. Black Women in Nursing Education Completion Programs: Issues Affecting Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lolita Chappel; Cervero, Ronald M.; Johnson-Bailey, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 10 black women enrolled in or graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs identified intrapersonal and cultural factors encouraging their participation. Hindrances were classified as the experience of being the "other" and the culture of racism. Findings show that individual and institutional racism is a barrier in registered…

  13. UTSI/CFFF MHD program completion and related activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Joel W. Muehlhauser; Dr. James N. Chapman

    1999-07-30

    Maintenance work on the DOE CFFF facility and other related government property remained in suspension in accordance with the stop work order issued by DOE. Environmental remediation and preservation of the facility continued. Final actions were completed to dispose of the soil that was contaminated by diesel oil. Actions are underway to dispose of other wastes. Progress is reported on the 5 high temperature superconductivity projects under Task 6. Results are reported for various techniques for annealing cold rolled nickel tapes and applying buffer layer by the Sol-Gel process. Included in the annealing/coating work is one case that involved oxidizing the nickel to nickel oxide which is textured before application of the buffer layer. Work under the Optimum Coated Conductor included issuing a topical report describing the work on grain boundary grooving in nickel substrates as a function of annealing temperature and time. Also, the work to evaluate the mutual effects of adjacent superconductors. In the cost/performance analysis project, completion of a study on the economics of production of coated conductors by the MOCVD process is reported. In the diagnostics for real time process control project, a topical report that outlines the requirements for control of promising manufacturing processes was submitted, additional work is reported on using absorption spectroscopy as the basis for control of the stoichiometry for the MOCVD process and the work on scatterometry for measuring uniformity of surfaces is summarized.

  14. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  15. Program Completion and Re-Arrest in a Batterer Intervention System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Larry W.; Stoops, Charles; Call, Christine; Flett, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the effects of batterer intervention program (BIP) completion on domestic violence re-arrest in an urban system of 30 BIPs with a common set of state standards, common program completion criteria, and centralized criminal justice supervision. Method: 899 men arrested for domestic violence were assessed and completed…

  16. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

  17. A Case Study of English Language Learners Who Have Successfully Completed a Healthcare Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloud Smith, Theresa Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if English Language Learners (ELLs), who had successfully completed a healthcare education program, identified support services as having an impact on their academic success, and to identify what support services were critical to their successful completion of the healthcare education program. The…

  18. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  19. 25 CFR 26.32 - What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application? 26.32 Section 26.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.32 What constitutes a complete Job...

  20. 25 CFR 26.32 - What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application? 26.32 Section 26.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.32 What constitutes a complete Job...

  1. Results From the John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium. A Success Story for NASA and Northeast Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Barna, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium was established by NASA in 2002 to formulate and implement an integrated, interdisciplinary research program to address risks faced by astronauts during long-duration space missions. The consortium is comprised of a preeminent team of Northeast Ohio institutions that include Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, The National Center for Space Exploration Research, and the NASA Glenn Research Center. The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium research is focused on fluid physics and sensor technology that addresses the critical risks to crew health, safety, and performance. Effectively utilizing the unique skills, capabilities and facilities of the consortium members is also of prime importance. Research efforts were initiated with a general call for proposals to the consortium members. The top proposals were selected for funding through a rigorous, peer review process. The review included participation from NASA's Johnson Space Center, which has programmatic responsibility for NASA's Human Research Program. The projects range in scope from delivery of prototype hardware to applied research that enables future development of advanced technology devices. All of the projects selected for funding have been completed and the results are summarized. Because of the success of the consortium, the member institutions have extended the original agreement to continue this highly effective research collaboration through 2011.

  2. The complete sequence of a heterochromatic island from a higher eukaryote. The Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Washington University Genome Sequencing Center, and PE Biosystems Arabidopsis Sequencing Consortium.

    PubMed

    2000-02-01

    Heterochromatin, constitutively condensed chromosomal material, is widespread among eukaryotes but incompletely characterized at the nucleotide level. We have sequenced and analyzed 2.1 megabases (Mb) of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 4 that includes 0.5-0.7 Mb of isolated heterochromatin that resembles the chromosomal knobs described by Barbara McClintock in maize. This isolated region has a low density of expressed genes, low levels of recombination and a low incidence of genetrap insertion. Satellite repeats were absent, but tandem arrays of long repeats and many transposons were found. Methylation of these sequences was dependent on chromatin remodeling. Clustered repeats were associated with condensed chromosomal domains elsewhere. The complete sequence of a heterochromatic island provides an opportunity to study sequence determinants of chromosome condensation. PMID:10676819

  3. The complete sequence of a heterochromatic island from a higher eukaryote. The Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Washington University Genome Sequencing Center, and PE Biosystems Arabidopsis Sequencing Consortium.

    PubMed

    2000-02-01

    Heterochromatin, constitutively condensed chromosomal material, is widespread among eukaryotes but incompletely characterized at the nucleotide level. We have sequenced and analyzed 2.1 megabases (Mb) of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 4 that includes 0.5-0.7 Mb of isolated heterochromatin that resembles the chromosomal knobs described by Barbara McClintock in maize. This isolated region has a low density of expressed genes, low levels of recombination and a low incidence of genetrap insertion. Satellite repeats were absent, but tandem arrays of long repeats and many transposons were found. Methylation of these sequences was dependent on chromatin remodeling. Clustered repeats were associated with condensed chromosomal domains elsewhere. The complete sequence of a heterochromatic island provides an opportunity to study sequence determinants of chromosome condensation.

  4. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  5. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  6. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  7. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  8. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-04-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  9. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., trading, and banking program. 86.1817-08 Section 86.1817-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program. Section 86.1817-08 includes text that...-cycle vehicles may participate in an NMHC averaging, banking and trading program to show compliance...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., trading, and banking program. 86.1817-08 Section 86.1817-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program. Section 86.1817-08 includes text that...-cycle vehicles may participate in an NMHC averaging, banking and trading program to show compliance...

  11. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., trading, and banking program. 86.1817-08 Section 86.1817-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program. Section 86.1817-08 includes text that...-cycle vehicles may participate in an NMHC averaging, banking and trading program to show compliance...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., trading, and banking program. 86.1817-08 Section 86.1817-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program. Section 86.1817-08 includes text that...-cycle vehicles may participate in an NMHC averaging, banking and trading program to show compliance...

  13. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing

  14. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with

  15. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  16. Radiogenomics Consortium (RGC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiogenomics Consortium's hypothesis is that a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity to radiation therapy is influenced by common genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  17. Differences between Lab Completion and Non-Completion on Student Performance in an Online Undergraduate Environmental Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, Gianluca

    2011-12-01

    Web-based technology has revolutionized the way education is delivered. Although the advantages of online learning appeal to large numbers of students, some concerns arise. One major concern in online science education is the value that participation in labs has on student performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between lab completion and student academic success as measured by test grades, scientific self-confidence, scientific skills, and concept mastery. A random sample of 114 volunteer undergraduate students, from an online Environmental Science program at the American Public University System, was tested. The study followed a quantitative, non-experimental research design. Paired sample t-tests were used for statistical comparison between pre-lab and post-lab test grades, two scientific skills quizzes, and two scientific self-confidence surveys administered at the beginning and at the end of the course. The results of the paired sample t-tests revealed statistically significant improvements on all post-lab test scores: Air Pollution lab, t(112) = 6.759, p < .001; Home Chemicals lab t(114) = 8.585, p < .001; Water Use lab, t(116) = 6.657, p < .001; Trees and Carbon lab, t(113) = 9.921, p < .001; Stratospheric Ozone lab, t(112) =12.974, p < .001; Renewable Energy lab, t(115) = 7.369, p < .001. The end of the course Scientific Skills quiz revealed statistically significant improvements, t(112) = 8.221, p < .001. The results of the two surveys showed a statistically significant improvement on student Scientific Self-Confidence because of lab completion, t(114) = 3.015, p < .05. Because age and gender were available, regression models were developed. The results indicated weak multiple correlation coefficients and were not statistically significant at alpha = .05. Evidence suggests that labs play a positive role in a student's academic success. It is recommended that lab experiences be included in all online Environmental Science

  18. Third Grade Effects of the Mother-Child Home Program. Developmental Continuity Consortium Follow-Up Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    This followup study of the effects of the Mother-Child Home Program developed by the Verbal Interaction Project (VIP) measures the school performance of nine groups of 162 third grade children from low income families. The program of 92 home sessions spaced over two school years focused on the mother and child as a socially interactive dyad, and…

  19. A Post Release Follow-Up of Correctional Education Program Completers Released in 1990-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, H. David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Follow-up of 169 offenders paroled from Maryland prisons obtained data on 120. Those with higher levels of educational attainment in prison were more likely to be employed after release (77% of those who completed adult basic education/General Educational Development, vocational, or college programs). However, nonwhite completers were less likely…

  20. What We Know about Guided Pathways: Helping Students to Complete Programs Faster. Research Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Thomas; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Jenkins, Davis

    2015-01-01

    The idea behind guided pathways is straightforward. College students are more likely to complete a degree in a timely fashion if they choose a program and develop an academic plan early on, have a clear road map of the courses they need to take to complete a credential, and receive guidance and support to help them stay on plan. However, most…

  1. Enhancing Program Completion Rates among Two-Year College Students of Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opp, Ronald D.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a study of 573 two-year colleges, which analyzed significant indicators of program completion for students of color. Finds that percentages of faculty and administrators of color and the amount of contact student affairs officers have with students of color were the strongest predictors of completion. (Contains 54 references.) (NB)

  2. Follow-Up of JCCC Career Program Completers: Class of 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This paper presents the results of a follow-up study of students who completed a Johnson County Community College (JCCC) (Kansas) career program. Of 699 students on a list of completers, 465 returned surveys for an adjusted response rate of 67%. Of 176 potential respondents who were employers of students, 124 returned surveys for an adjusted…

  3. Assessing the Effect of Adult High School Completion Programs on Graduate Placement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Moines Area Community Coll., Ankeny, IA.

    Three thousand eight hundred ninety-eight adults who had received a High School Equivalency Diploma (HSED) during 1976 in Iowa were surveyed to assess the impact of finishing a high school completion program on their placement after completion. Three hundred Iowa employers were also surveyed to analyze existing personnel policies and practices…

  4. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  5. Predicting Completion vs. Defection in a Community-Based Reintegration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Melinda A.

    2004-01-01

    The current study provides empirical data associated with successful program completion by examining the differing characteristics between clients who graduated from a community-based reintegration program operating in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and those who left prior to graduation. Substance dependence risk, level of education, employment or…

  6. Enhancing Doctoral Completion in Women: Evidence from a Qualitative Study of a Unique Federally Funded Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sandra P.; Drake-Clark, Donna; Grasso, Maureen; Banta, Trudy

    2014-01-01

    In an era where campus environments were often unwelcoming to women, and there were few women role models, an innovative program funded by the National Institute of Education produced 100% completion by female and minority doctoral students. At a 25-year reunion, the graduates reflected on their program experiences and careers. Reflections were…

  7. 77 FR 59648 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The San Francisco State... associated funerary objects may contact the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program. Repatriation...

  8. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Program Completion among Adult Basic Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batiste, Mildred M.

    2014-01-01

    Program completion among adult learners attending adult basic education programs has been found to be an area of struggle. Cognitive ability has always been the primary factor for determining an individual's ability. However, non-cognitive ability has been proposed as a significant factor in academic success. Many attrition models have been…

  9. Completion rates of clients discharged from drug and alcohol treatment programs in Washington State.

    PubMed Central

    Wickizer, T; Maynard, C; Atherly, A; Frederick, M; Koepsell, T; Krupski, A; Stark, K

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The primary goal of this study was to analyze completion rates of clients in drug and alcohol abuse treatment programs in Washington State and to assess the factors associated with treatment completion. A secondary goal was to examine the utility of a state information system as a source of evaluative data. METHODS. Analyses were conducted of 5827 client records contained in the Washington State Substance Abuse Monitoring System, representing a census of public clients discharged during the last quarter of 1990 from all state-funded alcohol and drug treatment programs in four treatment modalities. Logistic regression was performed to determine the independent predictors of treatment completion. RESULTS. Completion rates were highest for intensive inpatient alcohol treatment (75%) and lowest for intensive outpatient drug programs (18%). Factors associated with treatment completion included screening at a referral assessment center, education, age, ethnicity, and existence of a secondary drug problem. CONCLUSIONS. The fit between clients and treatment programs may be an important factor explaining why some clients complete treatment and others drop out. State client information systems are an important source of data for analyzing treatment completion and other outcomes. PMID:8296943

  10. Consortium Proves Adage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Kim

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Minnesota Preparatory Schools, a secondary-level consortium formed by Cotter High School, Saint Mary's University, the Minnesota Academy of Mathematics and Science, De La Salle Language Institute, and the Minnesota Conservatory for the Arts. Indicates that the consortium provides students with flexible schedules geared toward their…

  11. Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugo, John E.

    The state of Minnesota has established the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) to coordinate the state's educational computing activities. The Consortium is governed by a board of directors representing the State Department of Education, the State Junior Colleges, the State Colleges, the State University and the public and is…

  12. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host

  13. Effect of Type Opportunity Technological Programs on the Completion Rate of Opportunity Program Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinard, Roscoe C.

    The Opportunities Program is a collaboration between the Illinois state welfare program and the City Colleges of Chicago to educate/train welfare recipients in short-term programs. A review of the research identified these effective student retention strategies: student support, high quality instruction, and remediation. A review of research on…

  14. Program Planning about World Affairs. A Complete "How To" Guide: from Program Ideas to Audience Applause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Carol Edler

    This guide is designed for persons who need to plan education programs in world affairs for presentation to an organization. Such a person might be a program chair of a local League of Women Voters or a community Rotary Club. The guide is organized in five sections, each of which presents information on one of five steps to program planning. The…

  15. Developmental Education in Higher Education. Advanced Institutional Development Program (AIDP) Two-year College Consortium, Vol. II, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Johnnie Ruth; And Others

    This monograph, consisting of four sections, focuses on developmental education in the higher education setting. The first section, by Johnnie Ruth Clarke, provides an overall perspective on learning through developmental programs. Included are discussions of the developmental approach, developmental students and instructional activities, and…

  16. NEXus: evaluation of an innovative educational consortium for doctoral education in nursing.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Marie L; Haas, Barbara K; Clark, Michele C; McNeil, Paula A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the evaluation of the Nursing Education Xchange (NEXus), a national consortium of doctor of philosophy in nursing (PhD) and doctor of nursing practice programs, administered by the Western Institute of Nursing, which offers courses on-line. An external evaluator surveyed and interviewed faculty and staff coordinators, students, and the Western Institute of Nursing Board Members about their experiences with NEXus. Overall, individuals' perceptions of the NEXus program were positive. Some challenges in registering at other universities were addressed. The program helped PhD in nursing students complete their programs of study on time. Expansion of the program was recommended to offer more opportunities for students to take courses with experts in their areas of interest. Challenges and successes are discussed to assist others contemplating a consortium approach.

  17. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes General-All Grants... Environmental General Assistance Program Act, in accordance with § 35.540, if the Consortium demonstrates...

  18. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes General-All Grants... Environmental General Assistance Program Act, in accordance with § 35.540, if the Consortium demonstrates...

  19. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes General-All Grants... Environmental General Assistance Program Act, in accordance with § 35.540, if the Consortium demonstrates...

  20. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology

  1. Factors associated with completion of a drug treatment court diversion program.

    PubMed

    Butzin, Clifford A; Saum, Christine A; Scarpitti, Frank R

    2002-01-01

    Factors related to successful completion of a first offender diversion program were examined from initial data of a longitudinal study of drug treatment court outcomes in Delaware. The strongest predictors of success were factors associated with social stakeholder values, especially those involving employment. Other factors associated with program completion included race, education, and frequency of drug use. While the overall success of drug treatment courts continues to be documented, these data suggest success varies with individual characteristics. The continuing study will explore whether these characteristics are also related to subsequent outcomes, especially drug use relapse and criminal recidivism, over a 24-month post-treatment period.

  2. Education and Outreach Programs Offered by the Center for High Pressure Research and the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, G. A.

    2003-12-01

    Major research facilities and organizations provide an effective venue for developing partnerships with educational organizations in order to offer a wide variety of educational programs, because they constitute a base where the culture of scientific investigation can flourish. The Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) conducts education and outreach programs through the Earth Science Educational Resource Center (ESERC), in partnership with other groups that offer research and education programs. ESERC initiated its development of education programs in 1994 under the administration of the Center for High Pressure Research (CHiPR), which was funded as a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center from 1991 to 2002. Programs developed during ESERC's association with CHiPR and COMPRES have targeted a wide range of audiences, including pre-K, K-12 students and teachers, undergraduates, and graduate students. Since 1995, ESERC has offered inquiry-based programs to Project WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) students at a high school and undergraduate level. Activities have included projects that investigated earthquakes, high pressure mineral physics, and local geology. Through a practicum known as Project Java, undergraduate computer science students have developed interactive instructional tools for several of these activities. For K-12 teachers, a course on Long Island geology is offered each fall, which includes an examination of the role that processes in the Earth's interior have played in the geologic history of the region. ESERC has worked with Stony Brook's Department of Geosciences faculty to offer courses on natural hazards, computer modeling, and field geology to undergraduate students, and on computer programming for graduate students. Each summer, a four-week residential college-level environmental geology course is offered to rising tenth graders from the Brentwood, New York schools in partnership with

  3. California Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, John; Berger, Wolfgang; Wiskerchen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The organizational and administrative structure of the CaSGC has the Consortium Headquarters Office (Principal Investigator - Dr. John Kosmatka, California Statewide Director - Dr. Michael Wiskerchen) at UC San Diego. Each affiliate member institution has a campus director and an scholarship/fellowship selection committee. Each affiliate campus director also serves on the CaSGC Advisory Council and coordinates CMIS data collection and submission. The CaSGC strives to maintain a balance between expanded affiliate membership and continued high quality in targeted program areas of aerospace research, education, workforce development, and public outreach. Associate members are encouraged to participate on a project-by-project basis that meets the needs of California and the goals and objectives of the CaSGC. Associate members have responsibilities relating only to the CaSGC projects they are directly engaged in. Each year, as part of the CaSGC Improvement Plan, the CaSGC Advisory Council evaluates the performance of the affiliate and associate membership in terms of contributions to the CaSGC Strategic Plan, These CaSGC membership evaluations provide a constructive means for elevating productive members and removing non-performing members. This Program Improvement and Results (PIR) report will document CaSGC program improvement results and impacts that directly respond to the specific needs of California in the area of aerospace-related education and human capital development and the Congressional mandate to "increase the understanding, assessment, development and utilization of space resources by promoting a strong education base, responsive research and training activities, and broad and prompt dissemination of knowledge and technology".

  4. Hanford Long Term Stewardship Program and Transition [Preparing for Environmental Management Cleanup Completion

    SciTech Connect

    DAILY, J.L.

    2003-08-01

    Long-term stewardship (LTS) at the Hanford Site begins at the completion of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission and is the management of the risks (human health and environmental) associated with any residual contamination and the management of the Site's cultural, biological, and natural resources that remain after the Site is reduced to its post-cleanup-mission size. This document describes the anticipated post-cleanup LTS program, the preparations planned to facilitate the safe and timely transition from the completion of the cleanup program to a future LTS program, and when LTS is complete. Although the completion of cleanup remains several decades away, actions are being taken now to ensure the following: DOE's commitment to meet its long-term, post-cleanup obligations is reaffirmed and that its planning efforts to comply with those obligations are visible; The interface between the cleanup program and the LTS program will be clearly defined; Cleanup decisions will include careful and well-documented consideration of their long-term ramifications (e.g., long-term effectiveness and costs) and Potential impediments to a safe and timely turnover from cleanup to LTS are anticipated and a risk management approach is developed and implemented.

  5. Optoelectronic technology consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs-Brenner, Mary

    1992-12-01

    The Optoelectronics Technology Consortium has been established to position U.S. industry as the world leader in optical interconnect technology by developing, fabricating, intergrating and demonstrating the producibility of optoelectronic components for high-density/high-data-rate processors and accelerating the insertion of this technology into military and commercial applications. This objective will be accomplished by a program focused in three areas. (1) Demonstrated performance: OETC will demonstrate an aggregate data transfer rate of 16 Gbit/s between single transmitter and receiver packages, as well as the expandability of this technology by combing four links in parallel to achieve a 64 Gbit/s link. (2) Accelerated development: By collaborating during precompetitive technology development stage, OTEC will advance the development of optical components and produce links for a multiboard processor testbed demonstration; and (3) Producibility: OETC's technology will achieve this performance by using components that are affordable, and reliable, with a line BER less than 10(exp -15) and MTTF greater than 10(exp 6) hours.

  6. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  7. The National University Consortium: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehnel, Richard A.

    1982-01-01

    The Off-Campus Degree Program at Linfield College (Oregon) provides quality coursework to a group of part-time adult students who would not otherwise have access to a four-year degree program. In 1980, Linfield joined six other institutions to form the National University Consortium (NUC), the first national organization of colleges and…

  8. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  9. Technical Progress Report for UTSI/CFFF MDH Program Completion and Related Activity

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. A plan for Groundwater Remediation was prepared, coordinated with DOE and approved by the State of Tennessee. Actions are underway to dispose of spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of five (5) High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported.

  10. Why We Complete a Teacher Education Program: Credentialed Teachers, a Critical Incident Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alastuey, Lisa; Justice, Madeline; Weeks, Sandy; Hardy, James

    2005-01-01

    This study focused on the initial reasons individuals enter and complete the teacher education program, and pass the state test. These same individuals do not enter the public school classroom. This study identified meaningful categories for incidents reported as effective or helpful to successfully facilitating their decision to enter and…

  11. Explaining Long-Term Exercise Adherence in Women Who Complete a Structured Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ransdell, Lynda B.; Sidman, Cara; Flohr, Judith A.; Shultz, Barry; Grosshans, Onie; Durrant, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine factors related to physical activity adherence to understand why women continue to participate in long-term exercise after completing a structured exercise program. Data were collected from focus groups, interviews, and e-mails, and analysis used grounded theory. The central category related…

  12. 40 CFR 86.1817-05 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and the applicable factors for the specific test group. (iv)(A) Determine and state the source of the... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program. 86.1817-05 Section 86.1817-05 Protection of Environment...

  13. An Examination of the Navy's Associate Degree Completion Program; A Research Report Submitted to the Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornsley, John T.

    The present Associate Degree Completion Program (ADCOP), which enrolls approximately 2,700 senior enlisted personnel in 14 junior colleges for full-time vocational/technical study at Navy expense, is costly and of little tangible benefit to the Navy. The ADCOP was designed in 1966 as a method of retraining career enlisted personnel and encouraging…

  14. Teachers' Longitudinal NOS Understanding after Having Completed a Science Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Benjamin C.; Clough, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The study reported here investigated experienced teachers' views on several nature of science (NOS) issues 2 to 5 years after they completed a demanding secondary science teacher education program in which the NOS was an extensive and recurring component. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed to determine study…

  15. An Intervention Designed to Increase Participation and Completion Rates of Community College Students in Nontraditional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straight, Carli A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the missions of California Community Colleges (CCCs) is to provide career and technical education (CTE) to students that will prepare them for the workforce. Major funding for CTE programs comes from grant monies that are tied to the condition that institutions must demonstrate an effort to increase the participation and completion rates of…

  16. Resiliency in Physics: The Lived Experiences of African-American Women Who Completed Doctoral Physics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnette, Samara Fleming

    2013-01-01

    Currently, little is known about African-American women with doctoral degrees in physics. This study examined the lived experiences of African-American women who completed doctoral programs in physics. Due to factors of race and gender, African-American women automatically enter a double-bind in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  17. Accelerated Degree Completion Programs: The Effects of Core Professors in Nontraditional Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadd, Dale Fredrick

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional Accelerated Degree Completion Programs (ADCPs) became popular in the 1980s at many private, higher education institutions, and involved cohort groups facilitated by core or major professors. There has been little research addressing the effectiveness of a core-professor or multiple-professor approach within ADCPs, or research on how…

  18. When Mothers Return to School: A Study of Women Completing an MSW Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Esther; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Existing literature on anticipated role problems by mothers who reenter higher education after marriage and child rearing is examined, and data from a study of the characteristics, role difficulties, and role satisfactions of a group of women with children who recently completed an MSW program is presented. (Author/MLW)

  19. Government-Funded Program Completions 2014. Preliminary. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides data on Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) programs completed from 2010 to 2014 in Australia's government-funded vocational education and training (VET) system (broadly defined as all activity delivered by government providers and government-funded activity delivered by community education and other registered…

  20. 78 FR 34123 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The San Francisco State... control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the...

  1. A Long-Term Follow-Up Study of 1994-95 Career Program Completers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This report presents the 1999 major findings about long-term career program completers who left Kansas' Johnson County Community College in 1994-95. The report summarizes data on utilization of community college preparation, experiences with their full-time related job, hourly wage and satisfaction with their full-time related job, community…

  2. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  3. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  4. Characteristics of START assessments completed in mental health jail diversion programs.

    PubMed

    Desmarais, Sarah L; Van Dorn, Richard A; Telford, Robin P; Petrila, John; Coffey, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Many different instruments have been developed to assist in the assessment of risk for violence and other criminal behavior. However, there is limited evidence regarding how these instruments work in the 'real world'. Even less is known about how these instruments might work for assessing risk in jail diversion populations, whether in research or practice. To address these knowledge gaps, the present study examined the characteristics of risk assessments completed by program staff (n=10) on 96 mental health jail diversion clients (72 men and 24 women) using the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START). The findings provide preliminary support for the reliability and validity of START assessments completed in jail diversion programs, the first evidence of the transportability of START outside psychiatric settings, and further evidence regarding the reliability and validity of START assessments completed in the field. They additionally support the consideration of an eighth, general offending risk domain in START assessments. PMID:22807034

  5. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research program is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry- defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. It is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation; it is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. This update reviews the AGTSR triad, which consists of university/industry R&D activities, technology transfer programs, and trial student programs.

  6. The Financing of the Michigan Library Consortium. Paper No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Library Consortium, Detroit.

    Since the formal organization of the Michigan Library Consortium, its financial support has come through membership fees and a grant from the Michigan State Library from Title III funds. The financing of the consortium is already a complex operation and will become even more complex as new programs are undertaken, since funds have been accepted…

  7. The Alaska State Writing Consortium: The First Five Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parson, Gail

    This booklet documents the first 5 years of the Alaska State Writing Consortium, an association made up of 45 Alaska school districts, the Alaska Department of Education, and the University of Alaska. The Consortium, which oversees the organization and implementation of teacher training programs in writing and the teaching of writing, has five…

  8. Urban energy management today: Ten year compendium of UCETF programs. Products and expertise of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, 1979--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The reports listed in this Overview summarize projects conducted through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force by local government staff who have defined and implemented many of the energy strategies described above. Reports from their projects illustrate effective approaches to plan and implement these strategies, as well as software tools, surveys, and technical instruments valuable to other local government officials conducting similar projects.

  9. Exploring the relationship between criminogenic risk assessment and mental health court program completion.

    PubMed

    Bonfine, Natalie; Ritter, Christian; Munetz, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The two primary goals of mental health courts are to engage individuals with severe mental illness in the criminal justice system with clinical mental health services and to prevent future involvement with the criminal justice system. An important factor in helping to achieve both goals is to identify participants' level of clinical needs and criminogenic risk/needs. This study seeks to better understand how criminogenic risk affects outcomes in a mental health court. Specifically, we explore if high criminogenic risk is associated with failure to complete mental health court. Our subjects are participants of a municipal mental health court (MHC) who completed the Level of Services Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) upon entry to the program (N=146). We used binary logistic regression to determine the association between termination from the program with the total LSI-R. Our findings suggest that, net of prior criminal history, time in the program and clinical services received, high criminogenic risk/need is associated with failure to complete mental health court. In addition to providing clinical services, our findings suggest the need for MHCs to include criminogenic risk assessment to identify criminogenic risk. For participants to succeed in MHCs, both their clinical and criminogenic needs should be addressed. PMID:26968092

  10. Exploring the relationship between criminogenic risk assessment and mental health court program completion.

    PubMed

    Bonfine, Natalie; Ritter, Christian; Munetz, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The two primary goals of mental health courts are to engage individuals with severe mental illness in the criminal justice system with clinical mental health services and to prevent future involvement with the criminal justice system. An important factor in helping to achieve both goals is to identify participants' level of clinical needs and criminogenic risk/needs. This study seeks to better understand how criminogenic risk affects outcomes in a mental health court. Specifically, we explore if high criminogenic risk is associated with failure to complete mental health court. Our subjects are participants of a municipal mental health court (MHC) who completed the Level of Services Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) upon entry to the program (N=146). We used binary logistic regression to determine the association between termination from the program with the total LSI-R. Our findings suggest that, net of prior criminal history, time in the program and clinical services received, high criminogenic risk/need is associated with failure to complete mental health court. In addition to providing clinical services, our findings suggest the need for MHCs to include criminogenic risk assessment to identify criminogenic risk. For participants to succeed in MHCs, both their clinical and criminogenic needs should be addressed.

  11. Effect of complete decongestive therapy and a home program for patients with post mastectomy lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Buragadda, Syamala; Alhusaini, Adel A; Melam, Ganeswara Rao; Arora, Nisha

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Post mastectomy lymphedema is common among breast cancer survivors. It leads to physical discomfort and functional impairment. Rehabilitation forms the mainstay of treatment and is multidisciplinary. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty post mastectomy patients were allocated randomly and assigned to either a conventional treatment group (n=30) or a complete decongestive therapy (CDT) group (n=30). The conventional treatment group received manual lymphatic drainage, wore a low elastic compression garment, received glenohumeral mobilization, and performed deep breathing exercises, and the complete decongestive therapy group received CDT from a trained physiotherapist and a daily home program along with the conventional treatment, 5 days a week for 6 weeks. [Results] Arm circumference measurements were taken at five levels: the wrist, mid forearm, elbow, mid-upper arm, and axilla. The upper extremity function was evaluated using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, and pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale. Measurements were taken at baseline, and at 4th and 6th weeks after the start of intervention. Within and between group comparisons showed significant improvements in the CDT group. [Conclusion] Complete decongestive therapy and a home program assists breast cancer related lymphedema survivors in regaining their lost functions. It also helps to improve their independence in daily activities, reduce their need for caregivers, and thereby improving their quality of life. Therefore, the results of this study showed that the CDT with a home program is an effective treatment for reducing post mastectomy lymphedema. PMID:26504284

  12. Northeast Technology Education Consortium: Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, W. Tad, Ed.

    This guide is designed to provide additional resources for technology educators who are attempting to shift their programs from industrial arts to technology education. An introduction describes the original demonstration site project, a consortium of Northeastern U.S. schools, the primary goal of which was the advancement of technological…

  13. West Tennessee Research Development Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmey, James W.

    The West Tennessee Research Development Consortium, formed to increase the potentiality of research in two small West Tennessee Colleges, consists of a project designed to train in research methodology one research person on each of the two campuses, and to offer concurrently an inservice training program to eight faculty members in each of the…

  14. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  15. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  16. Goals set after completing a teleconference-delivered program for managing multiple sclerosis fatigue.

    PubMed

    Asano, Miho; Preissner, Katharine; Duffy, Rose; Meixell, Maggie; Finlayson, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Setting goals can be a valuable skill to self-manage multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue. A better understanding of the goals set by people with MS after completing a fatigue management program can assist health care professionals with tailoring interventions for clients. This study aimed to describe the focus of goals set by people with MS after a teleconference-delivered fatigue management program and to evaluate the extent to which participants were able to achieve their goals over time. In total, 485 goals were set by 81 participants. Over a follow-up period, 64 participants rated 284 goals regarding progress made toward goal achievement. Approximately 50% of the rated goals were considered achieved. The most common type of goal achieved was that of instrumental activities of daily living. Short-term goals were more likely to be achieved. This study highlights the need for and importance of promoting and teaching goal-setting skills to people with MS.

  17. Goals Set After Completing a Teleconference-Delivered Program for Managing Multiple Sclerosis Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Miho; Preissner, Katharine; Duffy, Rose; Meixell, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Setting goals can be a valuable skill to self-manage multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue. A better understanding of the goals set by people with MS after completing a fatigue management program can assist health care professionals with tailoring interventions for clients. This study aimed to describe the focus of goals set by people with MS after a teleconference-delivered fatigue management program and to evaluate the extent to which participants were able to achieve their goals over time. In total, 485 goals were set by 81 participants. Over a follow-up period, 64 participants rated 284 goals regarding progress made toward goal achievement. Approximately 50% of the rated goals were considered achieved. The most common type of goal achieved was that of instrumental activities of daily living. Short-term goals were more likely to be achieved. This study highlights the need for and importance of promoting and teaching goal-setting skills to people with MS. PMID:25871602

  18. Consortium--A New Direction for Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Adrienne B.

    1976-01-01

    The shared services and joint planning of the area-wide continuing education program of the Northwest Allegheny Hospitals Corporation (a Consortium of seven acute care and two rehabilitation centers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania) are described. (LH)

  19. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbacher, Don

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  20. Explaining long-term exercise adherence in women who complete a structured exercise program.

    PubMed

    Huberty, Jennifer L; Ransdell, Lynda B; Sidman, Cara; Flohr, Judith A; Shultz, Barry; Grosshans, Onie; Durrant, Lynne

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine factors related to physical activity adherence to understand why women continue to participate in long-term exercise after completing a structured exercise program. Data were collected from focus groups, interviews, and e-mails, and analysis used grounded theory. The central category related to physical activity adherence was self-worth. Motivation, activity enjoyment, priorities, body image, ability to access support, and self-regulation skills had an impact on the self-worth of nonadherers and adherers. Women must value themselves enough to continue to participate in physical activity once they start. Exercise and fitness professionals are encouraged to use strategies to increase self-worth and long-term adherence to physical activity. Some recommended strategies include (a) increasing motivation and enjoyment relative to activity, (b) making activity a high priority in a woman's life, (c) improving or deemphasizing body image, (d) increasing a woman's ability to access support, and (e) facilitating the use of self-regulation strategies. This study is the first to examine qualitative perspectives of exercise adherence among women who completed a structured exercise program. Several concepts related to adherence presented in the quantitative literature are confirmed and enhanced in this study.

  1. The Role of Session Zero in Successful Completion of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Smith, Matthew Lee; Chen, Shuai; Ahn, SangNam; Kulinski, Kristie P.; Lorig, Kate; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been widely disseminated among various racial and ethnic populations. In addition to the six required CDSMP workshop sessions, the delivery sites have the option to offer a Session Zero (or zero class), an information session offered prior to Session One as a marketing tool. Despite assumptions that a zero class is helpful, little is known about the prevalence of these additional sessions or their impact on retaining participants in CDSMP workshops. This study aims to describe the proportion of CDSMP workshops that offered Session Zero and examine the association between Session Zero and workshop completion rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 80,987 middle-aged and older adults collected during a two-year national dissemination of CDSMP. Generalized estimating equation regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between Session Zero and successful workshop completion (attending four or more of the six workshop sessions). Results: On average, 21.04% of the participants attended workshops that offered Session Zero, and 75.33% successfully completed the CDSMP workshop. The participants of the workshops that offered Session Zero had significantly higher odds of completing CDSMP workshops than those who were not offered Session Zero (OR = 1.099, P = <0.001) after controlling for participants’ demographic characteristics, race, ethnicity, living status, household income, number of chronic conditions, and workshop delivery type. Conclusion: As one of the first studies reporting the importance of an orientation session for participant retention in chronic disease management intervention projects, our findings suggest offering an orientation session may increase participant retention in similar translational efforts. PMID:25964918

  2. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  3. TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR UTSI/CFFF MHD PROGRAM COMPLETION AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    DR. JAMES N. CHAPMAN; DR. JOEL W. MUEHLHAUSER

    1998-10-23

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Late in the quarter, all work was stopped on maintenance of the CFFF at DOE instruction. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. Progress is reported on the approved groundwater remediation plan. Actions are underway to dispose of spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of five (5) High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported. A summary is included of the results attained with sol-gel experiments with buffer layers and YBCO. The status of the cost/performance study of electron beam and PLD deposition is pre-sented. A summary of work performed in diagnostics for real time control of HTS processes is presented.

  4. Genomic standards consortium projects.

    PubMed

    Field, Dawn; Sterk, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; De Smet, J Wim; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R; Davies, Neil; Dawyndt, Peter; Garrity, George M; Gilbert, Jack A; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Knight, Rob; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Morrison, Norman; Robbins, Robert; San Gil, Inigo; Sansone, Susanna; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Ussery, Dave; Yilmaz, Pelin; White, Owen; Wooley, John; Caporaso, Gregory

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) is an open-membership community that was founded in 2005 to work towards the development, implementation and harmonization of standards in the field of genomics. Starting with the defined task of establishing a minimal set of descriptions the GSC has evolved into an active standards-setting body that currently has 18 ongoing projects, with additional projects regularly proposed from within and outside the GSC. Here we describe our recently enacted policy for proposing new activities that are intended to be taken on by the GSC, along with the template for proposing such new activities.

  5. Reasons Why Students Did Not Complete Two-Year Post-Secondary Farm Management Programs in North Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Lyle B.; Luft, Vernon D.

    1982-01-01

    This research study identifies major reasons that caused students enrolled in two-year postsecondary farm management programs, at five postsecondary institutions in North Dakota, not to complete the prescribed course of study in which they were enrolled. (SSH)

  6. Goal/Completion Abstract. The Wilbur Wright College Environmental Technician Training Program

    SciTech Connect

    2002-10-03

    In September 1993 DOE through Argonne National Laboratory awarded Wilbur Wright College a grant to develop an Environmental Technician training program. The primary goals included developing a comprehensive curriculum for the best possible training of environmental technicians as well as the building of a state-of-the-art facility to serve these students. The specific goal of the creation of the Environmental Technology Department was to train participants in identifying, auditing, sampling, and managing hazardous substances, handling in routine use, as well as responding to chemical emergencies, and in minimizing the generation of hazardous waste through pollution prevention. The development of the facilities included a state-of-the-art classroom with projection equipment and satellite connection, a computer lab, and a fully equipped wet science laboratory. The program was intended to make available a range of education options for students. Because of the accomplishments of the Environmental Technology Department, it must be considered a success that continues after the completion of the grant.

  7. Portrait of a Consortium: ANKOS (Anatolian University Libraries Consortium)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Phyllis; Karasozen, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium (ANKOS) was created in 2001 with only a few members subscribed to nine e-journal collections and bibliographic databases. This Turkish library consortium had developed from one state and three private universities joining together for the purchase of two databases in 1999. Over time, the numbers of…

  8. A Comparison of the Cognitive Moral Development of Christian University Seniors in Traditional versus Adult Degree Completion Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This research uses the Defining Issues Test-2 (DIT-2) to investigate the cognitive moral development of college seniors in adult degree completion (ADC) programs and traditional undergraduate (TU) programs at three Council of Christian College and University institutions. Overall, TU students had significantly higher scores on the DIT-2, TU…

  9. NECOR: New research consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Three major marine research institutes in the northeastern United States have entered into a formal agreement to coordinate the operation and scheduling of five seagoing oceanographic vessels. NECOR (Northeast Consortium Research Fleet) consists of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the University of Rhode Island, and Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory.NECOR was established, in part, to save money during a time of drastic funding reductions for ship support, explained Jules Hirshman, marine science coordinator at Lamont. Budget axings for 1982 chipped off 10-12% (constant dollars) from 1981 s ship funding, estimates Robert Dinsmore, chairman of facilities and marine operations at Woods Hole and chairman of NECOR's executive committee. Steadily rising fuel costs (Eos, June 23, 1981, p. 549) aggravate the funding problem.

  10. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  11. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  12. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  14. Reuse at the Software Productivity Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, David M.

    1989-01-01

    The Software Productivity Consortium is sponsored by 14 aerospace companies as a developer of software engineering methods and tools. Software reuse and prototyping are currently the major emphasis areas. The Methodology and Measurement Project in the Software Technology Exploration Division has developed some concepts for reuse which they intend to develop into a synthesis process. They have identified two approaches to software reuse: opportunistic and systematic. The assumptions underlying the systematic approach, phrased as hypotheses, are the following: the redevelopment hypothesis, i.e., software developers solve the same problems repeatedly; the oracle hypothesis, i.e., developers are able to predict variations from one redevelopment to others; and the organizational hypothesis, i.e., software must be organized according to behavior and structure to take advantage of the predictions that the developers make. The conceptual basis for reuse includes: program families, information hiding, abstract interfaces, uses and information hiding hierarchies, and process structure. The primary reusable software characteristics are black-box descriptions, structural descriptions, and composition and decomposition based on program families. Automated support can be provided for systematic reuse, and the Consortium is developing a prototype reuse library and guidebook. The software synthesis process that the Consortium is aiming toward includes modeling, refinement, prototyping, reuse, assessment, and new construction.

  15. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  16. Complete Summary of a Four-Part Research Project for the "I Like Me!" Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demoulin, Donald F.

    This report is a compilation of four different studies involving kindergartners (N=950) who participated in the "I LIKE ME!" program. I LIKE ME! is a 12-week program that uses a personalized reader with "I" statements as positive inducements for learning and achievement for kindergartners. The goals of the program are to bring home, school, and…

  17. The Challenge Is Yours. WBVTAE Leadership Identification Program. Projects Completed by Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    This guide describes 35 programs developed by the Wisconsin Leadership Identification Program. The Leadership Identification Program offers mentee participants a structured mentee/mentor relationship, an opportunity to design a formal professional growth plan, a statewide leadership training session, visibility through a statewide newsletter, and…

  18. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., trading, and banking program. 86.1817-08 Section 86.1817-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program. Section 86.1817-08 includes text that...-cycle vehicles may participate in an NMHC averaging, banking and trading program to show compliance...

  19. Comparison of hybrid and completely online RN-to-BSN curricula: aspects of program structure that lead to success.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Susan C; Metzger, Richard L; Finley, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    The large increase in the number of RN-to-BSN programs has occurred in the context of the expansion of Internet-based resources. This article expands on an earlier reported evaluation of a program based on community-derived needs. Several dimensions were identified that appear to contribute to student success in a blended-hybrid and completely online curricula. Students move through a synchronous cohort curriculum. The graduation rate for both programs was above the national average for all programs (80%), and graduation rate for the blended-hybrid program (92%) exceeded the online program (88%). Social support theory framed the important factors in a way that paralleled the factors reported by students as leading to their success. PMID:24779717

  20. Comparison of hybrid and completely online RN-to-BSN curricula: aspects of program structure that lead to success.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Susan C; Metzger, Richard L; Finley, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    The large increase in the number of RN-to-BSN programs has occurred in the context of the expansion of Internet-based resources. This article expands on an earlier reported evaluation of a program based on community-derived needs. Several dimensions were identified that appear to contribute to student success in a blended-hybrid and completely online curricula. Students move through a synchronous cohort curriculum. The graduation rate for both programs was above the national average for all programs (80%), and graduation rate for the blended-hybrid program (92%) exceeded the online program (88%). Social support theory framed the important factors in a way that paralleled the factors reported by students as leading to their success.

  1. Maternal and Child Health Research Program. Completed Projects 1989, 1990, and 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Arlington, VA.

    This publication describes 33 research projects supported by the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau and completed in 1989, 1990, and 1991. It is the third edition in a series of collected abstracts of completed maternal and child health research projects. Each project abstract contains the name of the grantee, name and address of the…

  2. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Cancer.gov

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  3. Health Science Careers: Tech Prep Consortium for New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; D'Anna, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    A high school health sciences program consists of an interdisciplinary core curriculum, clinical job shadowing, and potential to earn college credit. Interactive television and CD-ROMs enhance teaching. A consortium of high schools offers the tech prep program in collaboration with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. (SK)

  4. Analysis of the Competency-Based High School Diploma Program for CETA Clients. Report III: Student/Client Completion Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Samuel H., Jr.

    A study examined the student/client completion of a competency-based high school diploma for CETA clients. Using follow-up forms, attendance records, correspondence, telephone calls, and client information sheets, researchers collected data from clients and staff pertaining to 102 of the 238 program clients from five sites in Texas (Abilene,…

  5. Distance Education in Dental Hygiene Bachelor of Science Degree Completion Programs: As Perceived by Students and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsokris, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated student and faculty perceptions of their experiences with online learning in dental hygiene Bachelor of Science degree completion programs on the dimensions of: quality of learning, connectedness to the learning environment, technology factors and student satisfaction. The experiences of dental hygiene students who took…

  6. Factors That Contribute to the Completion of Programs of Study at Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education for African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Barrett Wade McCoy

    2015-01-01

    The study examined factors that predicted the completion of programs of study at Arkansas institutions of higher education for African American males. Astin's (1993a) Input-Environment-Output (I-E-O) Model was used as the theoretical foundation. Descriptive analyses and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were performed on the data. The…

  7. Teachers' Nature of Science Implementation Practices 2-5 Years after Having Completed an Intensive Science Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Benjamin C.; Clough, Michael P.; Olson, Joanne K.

    2013-01-01

    Few, if any, studies have examined the impact of nature of science (NOS) instruction on science teachers' practices 2 or more years after completing a science teacher education program. Extant studies on preservice and first-year teachers' NOS teaching practices have had disappointing results, with few teachers valuing NOS as a cognitive objective…

  8. Effects of Family Functioning and Parenting Style on Early Entrants' Academic Performance and Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Erron L.; Sayler, Michael F.; Rinn, Anne N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the predictive nature of parenting style and overall family environment on the academic performance and program completion of early college entrants. Furthermore, gender and family form were examined as possible moderators to these relationships. A total of 88 early college entrants participated in…

  9. The Impact of Adult Degree-Completion Programs on the Organizational Climate of Christian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Leaders in Christian higher education are often unaware of how adult degree completion programs (ADCPs) impact a school's organizational behavior, and no research has examined employees' perceptions of its impact. This nonexperimental, descriptive study examined differences in employees' perceptions of the impact on organizational climate of the…

  10. Journey to the Doctorate: Motivating Factors for Persistence and Completion of Doctoral Programs among McNair Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baness King, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Using a qualitative approach, this study investigated the perceptions of motivating factors for persistence and completion of the doctorate among low income, first generation and students of color that participated in the federally funded Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program. Purposive sampling was used to obtain a pool of nine…

  11. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, C.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  12. A Comparison of Completion Times in Traditional versus Computer-Based Developmental Math Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Christi R.

    2013-01-01

    Many students lack adequate mathematic skills and must enroll in developmental math programs to satisfy the math requirement to earn a college degree, but developmental programs are often problematic with high failure rates, preventing graduation. This study examined whether the emporium model, a computer-based developmental math tool, was more…

  13. Exploring Factors Facilitating and Hindering College-University Pathway Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percival, Jennifer; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, Bill; LeSage, Ann; Longo, Fabiola; De La Rocha, Arlene; Hinch, Ron; Samis, John; Sanchez, Otto; Augusto Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore not only the academic measures such as grade point average of success of college-to-university transfer programs (Pathway Programs), but also the social-cultural facilitators and barriers throughout the students' Pathway experience. Design/methodology/approach: The experience of students and…

  14. The Bridge and the Troll Underneath: Summer Bridge Programs and Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Daniel; Attewell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    College graduation rates in the United States are low in both real and relative terms. This has left all stakeholders looking for novel solutions while perhaps ignoring extant but underused programs. This article examines the effect of "summer bridge" programs, which have students enroll in coursework prior to beginning their first full…

  15. Clear Purpose...Complete Commitment. Long-Range Library Program for All Louisianians, 1987-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Library, Baton Rouge.

    This long-range program results from the combined efforts of the State Library staff, the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) Administrative Librarian, Louisiana librarians, the Library Development Committee of Louisiana, and a number of other formal and informal planning groups within the state. The program includes: (1) an assessment of…

  16. Adult Learners as Graduate Students: Underlying Motivation in Completing Graduate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegarty, Niall

    2011-01-01

    The majority of graduate part-time programs are fueled by adult learners seeking to enhance their human capital and advance professional careers. In contrast, degree-granting programs seek to impart knowledge and advance learning in a particular discipline. At this intersection lies the individual student's motivation to satisfy their personal…

  17. NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 1995-1999 Self Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Schaffart, Mary M.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium receives funds from NASA to allow Nebraska colleges and universities to implement balanced programs of research, education and public service related to aeronautics, space science and technology. Nebraska is a capability enhancement state which directs efforts and resources toward developing research infrastructure and enhancing the quality of aerospace research and education for all Nebraskans. Furthermore, the Nebraska Space Grant strives to provide national leadership in applied aspects of aeronautics. Nebraska has met, meets and will continue to meet all requirements set forth by NASA. Nebraska is a top-tier consortium and will continue to be a model program.

  18. X-38 Ship #2 Landing on Lakebed, Completing the Program's 4th Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38, a research vehicle built to help develop technology for an emergency Crew Return Vehicle (CRV), makes a gentle lakebed landing at the end of a July 1999 test flight at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. It was the fourth free flight of the test vehicles in the X-38 program, and the second free flight test of Vehicle 132 or Ship 2. The goal of this flight was to release the vehicle from a higher altitude -- 31,500 feet -- and to fly the vehicle longer -- 31 seconds -- than any previous X-38 vehicle had yet flown. The project team also conducted aerodynamic verification maneuvers and checked improvements made to the drogue parachute. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational

  19. Clean Coal Technology Program: Completing the mission. Comprehensive report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    With its roots in the acid rain debate of the 1980`s, the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program initially emphasized acid rain abatement technologies in its early phases. With the subsequent passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments and growing concern with global climate change, the emphasis of the Program shifted in the later rounds to highly efficient technologies. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the report. Chapter 2 provides a background of the CCT Program including the legislative history, the projects currently in the program, and the lessons that have been learned from the five rounds to date. Chapter 3 discusses the commercial potential of the technologies represented in the program and is based on a continuing series of interviews that have been conducted by the Department of Energy to solicit the views of senior management in those companies and organizations that will be making or affecting commercial decisions on the use of these technologies. Chapter 4 provides an accounting of the funds that have been appropriated for the CCT Program. Chapter 5 presents the options available for the Government to further assist in the commercial implementation of these technologies. Chapter 6 presents a discussion of these options with recommendations.

  20. Consortium for Health and Military Performance and American College of Sports Medicine consensus paper on extreme conditioning programs in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F; Nindl, Bradley C; Deuster, Patricia A; Baumgartner, Neal; Kane, Shawn F; Kraemer, William J; Sexauer, Lisa R; Thompson, Walter R; O'Connor, Francis G

    2011-01-01

    A potential emerging problem associated with increasingly popularized extreme conditioning programs (ECPs) has been identified by the military and civilian communities. That is, there is an apparent disproportionate musculoskeletal injury risk from these demanding programs, particularly for novice participants, resulting in lost duty time, medical treatment, and extensive rehabilitation. This is a significant and costly concern for the military with regard to effectively maintaining operational readiness of the Force. While there are certain recognized positive aspects of ECPs that address a perceived and/or actual unfulfilled conditioning need for many individuals and military units, these programs have limitations and should be considered carefully. Moreover, certain distinctive characteristics of ECPs appear to violate recognized accepted standards for safely and appropriately developing muscular fitness and are not uniformly aligned with established and accepted training doctrine. Accordingly, practical solutions to improve ECP prescription and implementation and reduce injury risk are of paramount importance.

  1. Academic Staff Perceptions of Factors Underlying Program Completion by Australian Indigenous Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Roianne; Usher, Kim; Foster, Kim; Stewart, Lee

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of Indigenous health professionals is one way to help reduce the poor health outcomes of Australia's Indigenous people. However, while Indigenous students are enrolling in Australian tertiary undergraduate nursing courses in increasing numbers, their completion rates remain lower than non-Indigenous students and many…

  2. Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS): A Quantitative Study of Latino Students' Goal Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraza, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    A problem exists with consistency in measuring and tracking students' academic goals in California Community Colleges [CCC]. Effective measurements in CCC that embody academic goals below the associate degree and four-year college articulation agreements, call for attention to determine student academic interests and completion rates.…

  3. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The purpose of this letter is to notify you that the Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy's Innovations for Existing Plants Program has been zeroed out in the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 budget.

  4. Development Strategies Used by the Far West Consortium for D,D&E Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Joseph S.

    This document reviews the development strategies of the Far West Consortium for development, dissemination, and evaluation (D,D&E) training. These strategies concerned three areas: 1) cooperating institutions, 2) system development approaches, and 3) functional context programming. To develop the strengths of several agencies, a consortium of…

  5. Outcomes and Processes in the Meyerhoff Scholars Program: STEM PhD Completion, Sense of Community, Perceived Program Benefit, Science Identity, and Research Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Maton, Kenneth I; Beason, Tiffany S; Godsay, Surbhi; Sto Domingo, Mariano R; Bailey, TaShara C; Sun, Shuyan; Hrabowski, Freeman A

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is an effective intervention for high-achieving underrepresented minority (URM) students; African-American Meyerhoff students are significantly more likely to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) PhD programs than comparison students. The first of two studies in this report extends the prior research by examining levels of PhD completion for Meyerhoff (N = 479) versus comparison sample (N = 249) students among the first 16 cohorts. Entering African-American Meyerhoff students were 4.8 times more likely to complete STEM PhDs than comparison sample students. To enhance understanding of potential mechanisms of influence, the second study used data from the 22nd (Fall 2010) to 25th (Fall 2013) cohorts (N = 109) to test the hypothesis that perceived program benefit at the end of freshman year would mediate the relationship between sense of community at the end of Summer Bridge and science identity and research self-efficacy at the end of sophomore year. Study 2 results indicated that perceived program benefit fully mediated the relationship between sense of community and both criterion measures. The findings underscore the potential of comprehensive STEM intervention programs to enhance PhD completion, and suggest mechanisms of influence. PMID:27587857

  6. Outcomes and Processes in the Meyerhoff Scholars Program: STEM PhD Completion, Sense of Community, Perceived Program Benefit, Science Identity, and Research Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Maton, Kenneth I.; Beason, Tiffany S.; Godsay, Surbhi; Sto. Domingo, Mariano R.; Bailey, TaShara C.; Sun, Shuyan; Hrabowski, Freeman A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is an effective intervention for high-achieving underrepresented minority (URM) students; African-American Meyerhoff students are significantly more likely to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) PhD programs than comparison students. The first of two studies in this report extends the prior research by examining levels of PhD completion for Meyerhoff (N = 479) versus comparison sample (N = 249) students among the first 16 cohorts. Entering African-American Meyerhoff students were 4.8 times more likely to complete STEM PhDs than comparison sample students. To enhance understanding of potential mechanisms of influence, the second study used data from the 22nd (Fall 2010) to 25th (Fall 2013) cohorts (N = 109) to test the hypothesis that perceived program benefit at the end of freshman year would mediate the relationship between sense of community at the end of Summer Bridge and science identity and research self-efficacy at the end of sophomore year. Study 2 results indicated that perceived program benefit fully mediated the relationship between sense of community and both criterion measures. The findings underscore the potential of comprehensive STEM intervention programs to enhance PhD completion, and suggest mechanisms of influence. PMID:27587857

  7. Outcomes and Processes in the Meyerhoff Scholars Program: STEM PhD Completion, Sense of Community, Perceived Program Benefit, Science Identity, and Research Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Maton, Kenneth I; Beason, Tiffany S; Godsay, Surbhi; Sto Domingo, Mariano R; Bailey, TaShara C; Sun, Shuyan; Hrabowski, Freeman A

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is an effective intervention for high-achieving underrepresented minority (URM) students; African-American Meyerhoff students are significantly more likely to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) PhD programs than comparison students. The first of two studies in this report extends the prior research by examining levels of PhD completion for Meyerhoff (N = 479) versus comparison sample (N = 249) students among the first 16 cohorts. Entering African-American Meyerhoff students were 4.8 times more likely to complete STEM PhDs than comparison sample students. To enhance understanding of potential mechanisms of influence, the second study used data from the 22nd (Fall 2010) to 25th (Fall 2013) cohorts (N = 109) to test the hypothesis that perceived program benefit at the end of freshman year would mediate the relationship between sense of community at the end of Summer Bridge and science identity and research self-efficacy at the end of sophomore year. Study 2 results indicated that perceived program benefit fully mediated the relationship between sense of community and both criterion measures. The findings underscore the potential of comprehensive STEM intervention programs to enhance PhD completion, and suggest mechanisms of influence.

  8. 40 CFR 86.1817-05 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the manufacturer. (c) Calculations. For each participating test group, NOX emission credits (positive... in clean-fuel vehicles as specified in 40 CFR part 88 are not eligible for this program... same level of significant digits as the emission standard (one-hundredth of a gram per mile for...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1817-05 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the manufacturer. (c) Calculations. For each participating test group, NOX emission credits (positive... in clean-fuel vehicles as specified in 40 CFR part 88 are not eligible for this program... same level of significant digits as the emission standard (one-hundredth of a gram per mile for...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1817-05 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the manufacturer. (c) Calculations. For each participating test group, NOX emission credits (positive... in clean-fuel vehicles as specified in 40 CFR part 88 are not eligible for this program... same level of significant digits as the emission standard (one-hundredth of a gram per mile for...

  11. Community College Students Completing Selected Occupational Programs in Fiscal Year 1991. Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    In March 1992, 1,947 fiscal year 1991 graduates of selected occupational programs in the Illinois Community College System were surveyed concerning their objectives for attending college, current educational status, present employment status, salary, employment start-up, geographic location of employment, and satisfaction with their employment and…

  12. Summary of work completed under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification research program (EDQP)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R. Jr.; Bramwell, D.L.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G.

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the main projects undertaken under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification Research Program (EDQP) sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under FIN A6322. Lasting from fiscal year 1983 to 1987, the program dealt with environmental and dynamic (including seismic) equipment qualification issues for mechanical and electromechanical components and systems used in nuclear power plants. The research results have since been used by both the NRC and industry. The program included seven major research projects that addressed the following issues: (a) containment purge and vent valves performing under design basis loss of coolant accident loads, (b) containment piping penetrations and isolation valves performing under seismic loadings and design basis and severe accident containment wall displacements, (c) shaft seals for primary coolant pumps performing under station blackout conditions, (d) electrical cabinet internals responding to in-structure generated motion (rattling), and (e) in situ piping and valves responding to seismic loadings. Another project investigating whether certain containment isolation valves will close under design basis conditions was also started under this program. This report includes eight main section, each of which provides a brief description of one of the projects, a summary of the findings, and an overview of the application of the results. A bibliography lists the journal articles, papers, and reports that document the research.

  13. SSR: Its Effects on Students' Reading Habits after They Complete the Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiesendanger, Katherine D.; Bader, Lois

    1989-01-01

    Studies the effect of sustained silent reading (SSR) on recreational reading habits after termination of instruction. Finds that SSR students read more than those not in the program, and that SSR has no impact on above average readers, great impact on average readers, and little impact on below average readers. (RS)

  14. Career Program Completers, 1993-94: A Long-Term Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This long-term follow-up study, conducted in the summer of 1998 by Johnson County Community College (JCCC, Kansas) focused on graduates, certificate recipients, and students identified by career program administrators as leaving with marketable skills in 1993-94. Since first administering this type of survey in 1989, JCCC has gained a broader…

  15. Program Director Perspectives on Athletic Training Student Motivation to Complete Their Professional Athletic Training Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Student motivation has been linked to persistence until graduation for athletic training students. There is little research, however on ways athletic training programs (ATPs) foster student motivation. Objective: To expand upon the existing literature regarding retention of students in ATPs, specifically examining the concept of student…

  16. Up to 7 Years of Sustained Weight Loss for Weight Loss Program Completers

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Nia S.; Polsky, Sarit; Catenacci, Victoria A.; Furniss, Anna L.; Prochazka, Allan V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Two issues remain elusive in weight management programs: significant, long-term weight loss maintenance and widely accessible programs that produce significant weight loss for reasonable costs. The purpose of this study is to determine the long-term weight loss of participants who consecutively renew their annual membership in Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), a national, nonprofit, low-cost, peer-led weight loss program. Methods This completers’ analysis was a retrospective cohort study of overweight and obese men and women who joined TOPS in 2005–2011 and consecutively renewed their annual membership at least once. Data were analyzed from June to October 2013. TOPS participants’ weights are sent to the national database when they join and at the time of their annual renewal, thus follow-up weight is only available for those who renew their membership. Among 207,469 individuals who joined during the study period, 74,629 (35.9%) had at least one consecutive annual renewal and were included in the study. Results Cumulative mean (95% CI) weight change as a percentage of initial weight ranged from −6.0% (−6.0%, −5.9%) for 74,629 participants who renewed at 1 year to −8.3% (−8.7%, −7.8%) for 2,289 participants with 7 years of consecutive annual renewal. Conclusions In the subset of individuals who choose to renew their program membership, TOPS can effectively promote maintenance of clinically significant weight loss for an extended period of time. RCTs are needed to further evaluate this low-cost, widely available program, which could be a viable option to treat overweight and obesity. PMID:26033350

  17. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits. PMID:26097697

  18. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  19. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  20. Factors Associated with Hispanic Adults Attending Spanish-Language Disease Self-Management Program Workshops and Workshop Completion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Ahn, SangNam; Jiang, Luohua; Kulinski, Kristie P.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Many factors influence ways in which middle-aged and older Hispanic adults prefer to receive health-related information. While Spanish-language disease management programs are increasingly offered in community and healthcare settings, less is known about their utilization among the Hispanic population. This study aimed to identify participant and workshop factors associated with middle-aged and older Hispanic adults attending Spanish-language disease self-management program workshops and receiving the recommended intervention dose (i.e., successful workshop completion is defined as attending four or more of the six workshop sessions). Data were analyzed from 12,208 Hispanic adults collected during a national dissemination of the Stanford suite of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) programs spanning 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Two logistic regression analyses were performed. Over 65% of participants attended Spanish-language workshops, and 78.3% of participants successfully completed workshops. Relative to participants in English-language workshops, participants who attended Spanish-language CDSME workshops were more likely to successfully complete workshops, as were those aged 80 years and older, females, and those who lived alone. Participants who were aged 50–79 years and female were significantly more likely to attend Spanish-language workshops than their counterparts under age 50. Conversely, those with more chronic conditions were less likely to attend Spanish-language workshops. Those who attended workshops with more participants and where the Hispanic population was less affluent were more likely to attend Spanish-language workshops. This study provides insight into Spanish-language CDSME program recruitment and utilization with implications for program adoption in underserved Hispanic community settings. PMID:25964900

  1. Biodegradation potential of a pentachlorophenol-degrading microbial consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Panneton, C.; Ramsay, J.; Mayer, R.; Chavarie, C.; Bertrand, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    A pentachlorophenol (PCP)-degrading consortium was obtained from contaminated soil after acclimatization to the three monochlorophenol isomers individually and then to PCP. In batch cultures, the consortium completely degraded PCP up to concentrations of 800 mg/L. In biometric flasks studies, the consortium mineralized 70% of {sup 14}C-PCP in an aqueous environment and 60% in contaminated soil slurries in less than 66 h, whereas noninoculated suspensions required 280 h to achieve the same extent of mineralization. In batch culture, a lag phase was always observed before degradation. When PCP was the sole source of carbon, the lag phase increased with the initial PCP concentration, but the specific degradation rate was constant for concentrations of 50 to 500 mg/L. When the number of cells in the inoculum was increased using a mixture of glucose and PCP, the specific PCP degradation rate was lower than when the inoculum was prepared with PCP as the sole source of carbon.

  2. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  3. Commitment language and homework completion in a behavioral employment program for gang-affiliated youth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caitlin; Huey, Stanley J; McDaniel, Dawn D

    2015-05-01

    Research with substance-abusing samples suggests that eliciting commitment language during treatment may improve motivation to change, increase treatment engagement, and promote positive treatment outcomes. However, the relationship between in-session client language and treatment success is not well-understood for youth offender populations. This study evaluated the relationship between commitment language, treatment engagement (i.e., homework completion), and weekly employment outcomes for six gang-affiliated juvenile offenders participating in an employment counseling intervention. Weekly counseling sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for commitment language strength. Multilevel models were fit to the data to examine the relationship between commitment language and counseling homework or employment outcomes within participants over time. Commitment language strength predicted subsequent homework completion but not weekly employment. These findings imply that gang-affiliated delinquent youth who express motivation to change during employment counseling will be more likely to comply with counselor-initiated homework. Further research on counselor techniques for promoting commitment language among juvenile gang offenders is needed.

  4. Training a New Generation of Biostatisticians: A Successful Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Judy M.; Ryan, Philip; Carlin, John B.; Gurrin, Lyle; Marschner, Ian

    2009-01-01

    In response to the worldwide shortage of biostatisticians, Australia has established a national consortium of eight universities to develop and deliver a Masters program in biostatistics. This article describes our successful innovative multi-institutional training model, which may be of value to other countries. We first present the issues…

  5. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  6. Called to Collaboration: The University Consortium for Catholic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Molly; Kennedy, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the University of Consortium for Catholic Education (UCCE) as an example of collaboration between Catholic colleges, universities, schools, and other stakeholders. The UCCE supports a collaborative cadre of primarily Catholic colleges and universities as they design and implement graduate-level teaching service programs for…

  7. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  8. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  9. BioTrol completes SITE (Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation) program demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored the demonstration of two new innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies developed by BioTrol, Inc., Chaska, Minnesota. One of the technologies treated contaminated soils and the other technology treated contaminated groundwater, surface water and waste water. According to the company, this is the first time in the history of the SITE program that soil washing and bioremediation were demonstrated in the field. These demonstrations were conducted at a Superfund site in New Brighton, Minnesota, under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The BioTrol Aqueous Treatment System (BATS) is based on a fixed-film bioreactor that uses naturally occurring bacteria to degrade organic chemicals. The BioTrol Soils Treatment System (BSTS) uses water as the washing medium to scrub contaminants from contaminated soil, thereby isolating the contaminants for subsequent detoxification. The contaminated wash water is recovered for recycle to the washing step using BATS technology. The soil washing process is based on mineral processing technology similar to that used in the mining industry in northern Minnesota.

  10. ACTS Operations Extended Through a University-Based Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert A.; Krawczyk, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program was slated for decommissioning in October 2000. With plans in place to move the spacecraft to an orbital graveyard and then shut the system down, NASA was challenged to consider the feasibility of extending operations for education and research purposes provided that an academic organization would be willing to cover operations costs. This was determined to be viable, and in the fall of 2000, NASA announced that it would consider extending operations. On March 19, 2001, NASA, the Ohio Board of Regents, and the Ohio University signed a Space Act Agreement to continue ACTS operations for 2 more years with options to extend operations up to a total of 4 years. To accomplish this, the Ohio University has formed a university-based consortium, the Ohio Consortium for Advanced Communications Technology (OCACT), and acts as the managing member. The Ohio University is responsible for the full reimbursement of NASA's operations costs, and does this through consortium membership. NASA retains the operating license of the spacecraft and has two contractors supporting spacecraft and master control station operations. This flexible arrangement between NASA and academia allows the education community to access a large communications satellite for learning about spacecraft operations and to use the system's transponders for communications applications. It also allows other organizations, such as commercial companies, to become consortium members and use the ACTS wideband Ka-band (30/20 GHz) payload. From the consortium members, six areas of interest have been identified.

  11. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-12-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the Fall SWC Technology Transfer Workshop for the northeastern U.S., in Pittsburgh, PA, on November 9, 2006, and organizing and identifying projects to exhibit during the SWC/Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) joint reception on November 8, 2006; (2) Distributing a paper copy of the Texas Tech 2004 Final Report and a revised, complete compact disc of all 2004 final reports; (3) Invoicing current and potential members for FY2007; (4) Soliciting nominations for the 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; and (5) Communications and outreach.

  12. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  13. Inlet Unstart Propulsion Integration Wind Tunnel Test Program Completed for High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    One of the propulsion system concepts to be considered for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) is an underwing, dual-propulsion, pod-per-wing installation. Adverse transient phenomena such as engine compressor stall and inlet unstart could severely degrade the performance of one of these propulsion pods. The subsequent loss of thrust and increased drag could cause aircraft stability and control problems that could lead to a catastrophic accident if countermeasures are not in place to anticipate and control these detrimental transient events. Aircraft system engineers must understand what happens during an engine compressor stall and inlet unstart so that they can design effective control systems to avoid and/or alleviate the effects of a propulsion pod engine compressor stall and inlet unstart. The objective of the Inlet Unstart Propulsion Airframe Integration test program was to assess the underwing flow field of a High-Speed Civil Transport propulsion system during an engine compressor stall and subsequent inlet unstart. Experimental research testing was conducted in the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The representative propulsion pod consisted of a two-dimensional, bifurcated inlet mated to a live turbojet engine. The propulsion pod was mounted below a large flat plate that acted as a wing simulator. Because of the plate s long length (nominally 10-ft wide by 18-ft long), realistic boundary layers could form at the inlet cowl plane. Transient instrumentation was used to document the aerodynamic flow-field conditions during an unstart sequence. Acquiring these data was a significant technical challenge because a typical unstart sequence disrupts the local flow field for about only 50 msec. Flow surface information was acquired via static pressure taps installed in the wing simulator, and intrusive pressure probes were used to acquire flow-field information. These data were extensively analyzed to

  14. Approach to molecular characterization of partially and completely untyped samples in an Indian rotavirus surveillance program.

    PubMed

    Babji, Sudhir; Arumugam, Rajesh; Sarvanabhavan, Anuradha; Gentsch, Jon R; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-08-11

    Surveillance networks for rotavirus document the burden of the disease using the proportion of children hospitalized with gastroenteritis positive for rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay. They also describe genotypes of circulating viruses by polymerase chain reaction for the VP7 and VP4 genes, which determine G and P types, respectively. A proportion of samples cannot be genotyped based on initial testing and laboratories need to assess further testing strategies based on resources and feasibility. To 365 samples obtained from an Indian rotavirus strain surveillance program, we applied an approach to determine the G and P types in antigen positive samples that failed to type initially with the standard laboratory protocol. Fifty-eight samples (19%) were negative for the VP6 gene, indicating that the antigen test was likely to have been false positive. Alternative extraction and priming approaches resulted in the identification of G and P types for 264 strains. The identity of one strain was determined by sequencing the first-round amplicons. Thirty-five strains were partially typed and seven strains could not be typed at all. The distribution of G and P types among strains that had initially failed to type, except one strain, did not differ from that in strains that were typed using the standard laboratory protocol.

  15. The School-to-Work Transition of High School and Community College Vocational Program Completers: 1990-1992. EQW Working Papers WP27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, David W.

    The school-to-work transition of high school and community college vocational program completers in 1990-1992 was examined by analyzing administrative records and employment and earnings data of vocational program completers from state education agencies in Colorado, Florida, Missouri, and Washington. A consistently high percentage of vocational…

  16. The Effect of the Threat of Legal Sanction on Program Retention and Completion: Is that Why They Stay in Drug Court?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, John R.; Harvey, Angela N.

    2007-01-01

    Drug courts routinely rely on the threat of legal sanction to motivate drug-using criminal offenders to enter and complete community-based treatment programs. In light of the high failure rates among drug court participants, what is the effect of the threat of legal sanction on program retention and completion? A quasiexperimental research design…

  17. Aerospace Workforce Development: The Nebraska Proposal; and Native Connections: A Multi-Consortium Workforce Development Proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent; Vlasek, Karisa; Russell, Valerie; Teasdale, Jean; Downing, David R.; deSilva, Shan; Higginbotham, Jack; Duke, Edward; Westenkow, Dwayne; Johnson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This report contains two sections, each of which describes a proposal for a program at the University of Nebraska. The sections are entitled: 1) Aerospace Workforce Development Augmentation Competition; 2) Native Connections: A Multi-Consortium Workforce Development Proposal.

  18. 78 FR 2443 - Comment Request for Information Collection for the Registered Apprenticeship-College Consortium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... centers, if applicable; and the value of the apprenticeship program toward college credit, recommended by... facilitate membership in the consortium requests contact information and the nature of the relationship with..., Labor. BILLING CODE 4510-FR-P...

  19. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE PAGES

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  20. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Block, Timothy; Ball, Kia; Fournier, Ashley

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  1. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  2. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  3. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

  4. The Change in Eating Behaviors in a Web-Based Weight Loss Program: A Longitudinal Analysis of Study Completers

    PubMed Central

    Hult, Mari; van der Mark, Marianne; Grotta, Alessandra; Jonasson, Josefine; von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Yvonne; Rössner, Stephan; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    Background Eating behaviors are essential components in weight loss programs, but limited research has explored eating behaviors in Web-based weight loss programs. Objectives The aim was to evaluate an interactive Web-based weight loss program on eating behaviors using the 18-item Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire Revised (TFEQ-R18) which measures uncontrolled eating, emotional eating, and cognitive restrained eating. Our Web-based weight loss program is comprised of information about healthy lifestyle choices, weekly chats with experts, social networking features, databases for recipe searches, and features allowing members to self-report and track their weight, physical activity, and dietary intake on the website. Methods On registering for the weight loss program, 23,333 members agreed to take part in the research study. The participants were then asked to complete the TFEQ-R18 questionnaire at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of participation. All data collection was conducted online, with no face-to-face contact. To study changes in TFEQ-R18 eating behaviors we restricted our study to those members who completed all 3 TFEQ-R18 questionnaires. These participants were defined as “completers” and the remaining as “noncompleters.” The relationships between sex, change in eating behaviors, and total weight loss were studied using repeated measures ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results In total, 22,800 individuals participated (females: 19,065/22,800, 83.62%; mean age 39.6, SD 11.4 years; BMI 29.0 kg/m2; males: 3735/22,800, 16.38%; mean age 43.2, SD 11.7 years; BMI 30.8 kg/m2). Noncompleters (n=22,180) were younger and reported a lower score of uncontrolled eating and a higher score of cognitive restrained eating. Over time, completers (n=620) decreased their uncontrolled eating score (from 56.3 to 32.0; P<.001) and increased their cognitive restrained eating (from 50.6 to 62.9; P<.001). Males decreased their emotional eating (from 57.2 to 35

  5. Research Resource: dkCOIN, the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Consortium Interconnectivity Network: A Pilot Program to Aggregate Research Resources Generated by Multiple Research Consortia

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Neil J.; Howard, Christopher L.; Aufiero, Michael; Easton-Marks, Jeremy; Steffen, David L.; Becnel, Lauren B.; Magnuson, Mark A.; McIndoe, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) supports multiple basic science consortia that generate high-content datasets, reagent resources, and methodologies, in the fields of kidney, urology, hematology, digestive, and endocrine diseases, as well as metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. These currently include the Beta Cell Biology Consortium, the Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas, the Diabetic Complications Consortium, and the Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers. Recognizing the synergy that would accrue from aggregating information generated and curated by these initiatives in a contiguous informatics network, we created the NIDDK Consortium Interconnectivity Network (dkCOIN; www.dkcoin.org). The goal of this pilot project, organized by the NIDDK, was to establish a single point of access to a toolkit of interconnected resources (datasets, reagents, and protocols) generated from individual consortia that could be readily accessed by biologists of diverse backgrounds and research interests. During the pilot phase of this activity dkCOIN collected nearly 2000 consortium-curated resources, including datasets (functional genomics) and reagents (mouse strains, antibodies, and adenoviral constructs) and built nearly 3000 resource-to-resource connections, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of further extending this database in the future. Thus, dkCOIN promises to be a useful informatics solution for rapidly identifying useful resources generated by participating research consortia. PMID:22734043

  6. UPDATE ON US NATIONAL PRRS PROJECT PLANS: THE USDA FUNDED PRRS CAP PROGRAM, THE NPB FUNDED PRRS HOST GENETIC CONSORTIUM, AND US NATIONAL SWINE RESPIRATORY DISEASE NC229 PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are several major US efforts to address swine respiratory diseases. These include the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) funded PRRS coordinated agricultural project (PRRS CAP), the US National Pork Board (NPB) funded PRRS Host Genetic Consortium (PHGC), and the US national Swine Respiratory ...

  7. Program Completion of a Web-Based Tailored Lifestyle Intervention for Adults: Differences between a Sequential and a Simultaneous Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Francine; de Vries, Hein; van Osch, Liesbeth ADM; van Nierop, Peter WM; Kremers, Stef PJ

    2012-01-01

    Background Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors often co-occur and are related to chronic diseases. One effective method to change multiple lifestyle behaviors is web-based computer tailoring. Dropout from Internet interventions, however, is rather high, and it is challenging to retain participants in web-based tailored programs, especially programs targeting multiple behaviors. To date, it is unknown how much information people can handle in one session while taking part in a multiple behavior change intervention, which could be presented either sequentially (one behavior at a time) or simultaneously (all behaviors at once). Objectives The first objective was to compare dropout rates of 2 computer-tailored interventions: a sequential and a simultaneous strategy. The second objective was to assess which personal characteristics are associated with completion rates of the 2 interventions. Methods Using an RCT design, demographics, health status, physical activity, vegetable consumption, fruit consumption, alcohol intake, and smoking were self-assessed through web-based questionnaires among 3473 adults, recruited through Regional Health Authorities in the Netherlands in the autumn of 2009. First, a health risk appraisal was offered, indicating whether respondents were meeting the 5 national health guidelines. Second, psychosocial determinants of the lifestyle behaviors were assessed and personal advice was provided, about one or more lifestyle behaviors. Results Our findings indicate a high non-completion rate for both types of intervention (71.0%; n = 2167), with more incompletes in the simultaneous intervention (77.1%; n = 1169) than in the sequential intervention (65.0%; n = 998). In both conditions, discontinuation was predicted by a lower age (sequential condition: OR = 1.04; P < .001; CI = 1.02-1.05; simultaneous condition: OR = 1.04; P < .001; CI = 1.02-1.05) and an unhealthy lifestyle (sequential condition: OR = 0.86; P = .01; CI = 0.76-0.97; simultaneous condition

  8. As the Twig Is Bent: Lasting Effects of Preschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Longitudinal Studies.

    The Consortium for Longitudinal Studies was formed to answer the question of whether early education programs have measurable long term effects on the performance of children from low income families. Every early intervention study that had a specific curriculum, focused on children from low income families, was completed prior to l969, and had an…

  9. Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

    1994-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

  10. VAMDC Consortium: A Service to Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L Dubernet, M.; Moreau, N.; Zwoelf, C. M.; Ba, Y. A.

    2015-12-01

    The VAMDC Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates Atomic and Molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and a political organisation. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of spectra and for the modelisation of media of many fields of astrophysics. This paper presents how the VAMDC Consortium is organised in order to provide a ``service'' to the astrophysics community.

  11. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  12. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  13. The SARA Consortium: Providing Undergraduate Access to a 0.9-m Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Southeastern Research for Astronomy (SARA) operates a 0.9-m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). The member institutions are Florida Institute of Technology, East Tennessee State University, Florida International University, The University of Georgia at Athens, Valdosta State University, and Clemson University. The NSF awarded the KPNO #1 0.9-m telescope to the SARA Consortium in 1990. We built a new facility and began routine on-site observations in 1995. We began routine remote observations in 1999 using VNC to export the telescope and CCD control screens, and a web-cam in the dome to provide critical visual feedback on the status of the telescope and dome. The mission of the SARA Consortium is to foster astronomical research and education in the Southeastern United States. Although only two of the member institutions have no graduate programs, all six have a strong emphasis on undergraduate research and education. By pooling our resources, we are able to operate a research-grade facility that none of the individual schools could manage by itself, and in the process we can offer our undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in our research projects as well as to complete their own independent research projects using a facility at a premier site. The SARA Consortium also hosts a NSF REU Summer Intern Program in Astronomy, in which we support 11-12 students that work one-on-one with a SARA faculty mentor. Most of these interns are selected from primarily undergraduate institutions, and have not had significant previous research experience. As part of the program, interns and mentors travel to KPNO for a 4-5 night observing run at the telescope. The SARA NSF REU Program is funded through NSF grant AST-0097616.

  14. CDEP Consortium on Ocean Data Assimilation for Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction (ODASI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rienecker, Michele; Zebiak, Stephen; Kinter, James; Behringer, David; Rosati, Antonio; Kaplan, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    The ODASI consortium is focused activity of the NOAA/OGP/Climate Diagnostics and Experimental Prediction Program with the goal of improving ocean data assimilation methods and their implementations in support of seasonal forecasts with coupled general circulation models. The consortium is undertaking coordinated assimilation experiments, with common forcing data sets and common input data streams. With different assimilation systems and different models, we aim to understand what approach works best in improving forecast skill in the equatorial Pacific. The presentation will provide an overview of the consortium goals and plans and recent results focused towards evaluating data impacts.

  15. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report draft, 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCUs/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise educational programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development and transfer to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. While the Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan is the cornerstone of its overall program efforts, the initial programmatic activities of the Consortium focused on environmental education at all levels with the objective of addressing the underrepresentation of minorities in the environmental professions. This 1996 Annual Report provides an update on the activities of the Consortium with a focus on environmental curriculum development for the Technical Qualifications Program (TQP) and Education for Sustainability.

  16. The current status of education and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs in Japan: a survey by the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Sumida, Iori; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yamada, Syogo

    2015-07-01

    To standardize educational programs and clinical training for medical physics students, the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification (JBMP) began to accredit master's, doctorate, and residency programs for medical physicists in 2012. At present, 16 universities accredited by the JBMP offer 22 courses. In this study, we aimed to survey the current status of educational programs and career paths of students after completion of the medical physicist program in Japan. A questionnaire was sent in August 2014 to 32 universities offering medical physicist programs. The questionnaire was created and organized by the educational course certification committee of the JBMP and comprised two sections: the first collected information about the university attended, and the second collected information about characteristics and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs from 2008 to 2014. Thirty universities (16 accredited and 14 non-accredited) completed the survey (response rate 94 %). A total of 209, 40, and 3 students graduated from the master's, doctorate, and residency programs, respectively. Undergraduates entered the medical physicist program constantly, indicating an interest in medical physics among undergraduates. A large percentage of the students held a bachelor's degree in radiological technology (master's program 94 %; doctorate program 70 %); graduates obtained a national radiological technologist license. Regarding career paths, although the number of the graduates who work as medical physicist remains low, 7 % with a master's degree and 50 % with a doctorate degree worked as medical physicists. Our results could be helpful for improving the medical physicist program in Japan.

  17. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  18. FLYSUB-Consortium Tracking and RICH Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aria; Azumoun, Bob; Blatnik, Marie; Pak, Robert; Purschke, Martin; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Woody, Craig; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Twigger, Jessie; Zhang, Aiwu; Dehmelt, Klaus; Deshpande, Abhay; Feege, Nils; Hemmick, Thomas; Bai, Xinzhang; Gnanvo, Kondo; Gu, Chao; Liyanage, Nilanga; Majka, Richard; Smirnov, Nikolai

    2013-09-23

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experiments of FLYSUB-Consortium who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The ultimate goal of this test-beam effort is to test and verify the performance of the individual components according to their expectation.

  19. A Study of the Significant Factors That Affect the Job Placement Rates of Students Who Have Completed a HERO Program. Year 2 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Development and Evaluation Associates, Inc., Berkeley, MI.

    A three-year study examined the significant factors that affect the job placement rates of students completing a Home Economics Related Occupations (HERO) program. Other purposes of the study were to develop and pilot test a model that could be used to determine factors related to student placement in a variety of vocational education programs and…

  20. The Effects of Presenting High-Preference Items, Paired with Choice, via Computer-Based Video Programming on Task Completion of Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda C.; Gast, David L.; Cronin, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    Task completion time was substantially decreased for two middle school students with a diagnosis of moderate mental retardation and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) following the presentation of high-preference items and choice via a computer-based video program. The study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of the program compared to…

  1. Dropout Prevention and Intervention Programs: Effects on School Completion and Dropout among School-Aged Children and Youth. Campbell Systematic Reviews. 2011:8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sandra Jo; Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Lipsey, Mark W.; Steinka-Fry, Katarzyna; Morrison, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this systematic review were to summarize the available evidence on the effects of prevention and intervention programs aimed at primary and secondary students for increasing school completion or reducing school dropout. The primary focus of the meta-analysis was to examine the comparative effectiveness of different programs and…

  2. Career Action -- A Most Unique and Pragmatic Evening Degree Completion Program Exclusively for Full-Time Employees (Bachelor of Science in Business Administration).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ralph John

    Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, offers a program toward a bachelor's degree by attending evening classes exclusively. During visits made to personnel directors of firms employing 50 or more persons, complete presentations of the entire program were made. Registration was done by mail. Some students received reimbursement from firms,…

  3. GUIDCOUN: A Comprehensive FORTRAN IV Computer Program for Generating Item and Test Analyses as Well as a Complete Standard Scores Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program providing comprehensive test and item analysis is presented. Completing its performance on one run, the program, written in Fortran and emphasizing ease of use, integrates various statistical techniques for analyzing individual items and the overall test, in addition to generating a variety of standard scores. (Author/JKS)

  4. Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

    1994-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

  5. Medical complications and falls in patients with spinal cord injury during the immediate phase after completing a rehabilitation program

    PubMed Central

    Wannapakhe, Jirabhorn; Arrayawichanon, Preeda; Saengsuwan, Jiamjit; Amatachaya, Sugalya

    2015-01-01

    Background/objectives Complications and falls are crucial problems in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, existing evidence on complications comes from data from hospital records over a long period of time, and falls were mostly reported retrospectively in patients with incomplete SCI. This study prospectively explored the occurrence of complications and falls, and associated factors in patients with SCI during the 6 months after discharge. Methods One hundred subjects with SCI (50 wheelchair-bound (WB) and 50 ambulatory (AM) subjects) from a tertiary rehabilitation center completed the study. Every month, subjects were monitored for data on medical complications and falls. Descriptive information is provided for each group. Results Every WB subject had complications and 14 subjects were re-hospitalized. The most frequent complications found in these subjects were neurogenic pain (36 subjects), urinary tract infection (UTI) (25 subjects), and pressure ulcers (21 subjects). In AM subjects, 38 subjects (76%) experienced complications and 3 subjects needed re-hospitalization. The most frequent complications included neurogenic pain (35 subjects) and UTI (11 subjects). Eighteen WB subjects (36%) and 27 AM subjects (54%) experienced falls. WB subjects had significantly increased odds for incidence of UTI and pressure ulcers, whereas AM subjects had significantly greater odds for falls (P < 0.05). Conclusion A number of subjects with SCI experienced complications and falls after completing a rehabilitation program. The findings add to our knowledge about complications and falls after SCI, and confirm the importance of effective strategies to minimize the occurrence of complications and falls in these individuals. PMID:24621026

  6. Increasing Sales by Developing Production Consortiums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher A.; Russo, Robert

    Intended to help rehabilitation facility administrators increase organizational income from manufacturing and/or contracted service sources, this document provides a decision-making model for the development of a production consortium. The document consists of five chapters and two appendices. Chapter 1 defines the consortium concept, explains…

  7. Student Non-Completion of an Undergraduate Degree: Wrong Program Selection or Part of a Career Plan?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, M.; Laven, G.; Burgess, T.

    2011-01-01

    Institution wide comparisons of students who leave university before completing their degree and students who complete their studies, have identified "wrong course selection" and a lack of vocational focus as common reasons for non-completion. It is not fully understood, though, whether these trends are constant across different disciplines and…

  8. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  9. Leadership in Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Programs: A Pilot Study Comparing Stand-Alone Leadership Courses and Leadership-Infused Curricula.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle L; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J; Farnsworth, Tracy J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to define the extent to which leadership and leadership skills are taught in dental hygiene degree completion programs by comparing stand-alone leadership courses/hybrid programs with programs that infuse leadership skills throughout the curricula. The study involved a mixed-methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program directors and faculty members who teach a stand-alone leadership course, a hybrid program, or leadership-infused courses in these programs. A quantitative comparison of course syllabi determined differences in the extent of leadership content and experiences between stand-alone leadership courses and leadership-infused curricula. Of the 53 U.S. dental hygiene programs that offer degree completion programs, 49 met the inclusion criteria, and 19 programs provided course syllabi. Of the program directors and faculty members who teach a stand-alone leadership course or leadership-infused curriculum, 16 participated in the interview portion of the study. The results suggested that competencies related to leadership were not clearly defined or measurable in current teaching. Reported barriers to incorporating a stand-alone leadership course included overcrowded curricula, limited qualified faculty, and lack of resources. The findings of this study provide a synopsis of leadership content and gaps in leadership education for degree completion programs. Suggested changes included defining a need for leadership competencies and providing additional resources to educators such as courses provided by the American Dental Education Association and the American Dental Hygienists' Association. PMID:27139211

  10. Biodegradation of hexachlorobenzene by a constructed microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Yan, Da-Zhong; Mao, Ling-Qi; Li, Cun-Zhi; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    A consortium comprised of an engineered Escherichia coli DH5α and a natural pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrader, Sphingobium chlorophenolicum ATCC 39723, was assembled for degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a persistent organic pollutant. The engineered E. coli strain, harbouring a gene cassette (camA (+) camB (+) camC) that encodes the F87W/Y96F/L244A/V247L mutant of cytochrome P-450cam (CYP101), oxidised HCB to PCP. The resulting PCP was then further completely degraded by ATCC 39723. The results showed that almost 40 % of 4 μM HCB was degraded by the consortium at a rate of 0.033 nmol/mg (dry weight)/h over 24 h, accompanied by transient accumulation and immediate consumption of the intermediate PCP, detected by gas chromatography. In contrast, in the consortium comprised of Pseudomonas putida PaW340 harbouring camA (+) camB (+) camC and ATCC 39723, PCP accumulated in PaW340 cells but could not be further degraded, which may be due to a permeability barrier of Pseudomonas PaW340 for PCP transportation. The strategy of bacterial co-culture may provide an alternative approach for the bioremediation of HCB contamination.

  11. Biodegradation of hexachlorobenzene by a constructed microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Yan, Da-Zhong; Mao, Ling-Qi; Li, Cun-Zhi; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    A consortium comprised of an engineered Escherichia coli DH5α and a natural pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrader, Sphingobium chlorophenolicum ATCC 39723, was assembled for degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a persistent organic pollutant. The engineered E. coli strain, harbouring a gene cassette (camA (+) camB (+) camC) that encodes the F87W/Y96F/L244A/V247L mutant of cytochrome P-450cam (CYP101), oxidised HCB to PCP. The resulting PCP was then further completely degraded by ATCC 39723. The results showed that almost 40 % of 4 μM HCB was degraded by the consortium at a rate of 0.033 nmol/mg (dry weight)/h over 24 h, accompanied by transient accumulation and immediate consumption of the intermediate PCP, detected by gas chromatography. In contrast, in the consortium comprised of Pseudomonas putida PaW340 harbouring camA (+) camB (+) camC and ATCC 39723, PCP accumulated in PaW340 cells but could not be further degraded, which may be due to a permeability barrier of Pseudomonas PaW340 for PCP transportation. The strategy of bacterial co-culture may provide an alternative approach for the bioremediation of HCB contamination. PMID:25532745

  12. Distance education in dental hygiene bachelor of science degree completion programs: As perceived by students and faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokris, Maureen

    This study investigated student and faculty perceptions of their experiences with online learning in dental hygiene Bachelor of Science degree completion programs on the dimensions of: quality of learning, connectedness to the learning environment, technology factors and student satisfaction. The experiences of dental hygiene students who took their core BS dental hygiene (BSDH) courses completely online were compared and contrasted with the perceptions of dental hygiene students who had taken a portion of the BSDH courses online and a portion in a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. Furthermore, this study compared and contrasted the perceptions of faculty on these same four dimensions based on the position held by the faculty member and the course format they are teaching in: online or a combination of online and a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. This study revealed several important differences and similarities between students who had taken their courses online and those who had taken a portion of the BSDH courses online and a portion in a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. The results showed students who had taken their courses online described factors related to the instructor as important to the quality of the learning experience such as: the experience and qualifications of the professor, the examples they provided and the instructors prompt response to questions. Students who had taken courses in both formats described factors related to the amount of effort they put into the course, their classmates' preparedness, the course materials and assignments as important to the quality of the learning experience. Although students who completed courses online reported difficulty participating in group activities, they were more positive regarding the level of interaction they experienced with their classmates online Findings indicated students who had taken their courses in both formats would have liked more opportunities to interact

  13. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  14. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  15. NASA Space Radiation Transport Code Development Consortium.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Lawrence W

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the University of Tennessee (lead institution), the University of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking.

  16. The bioleaching potential of a bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Mauricio; Cortés, María Paz; Travisany, Dante; Di Genova, Alex; Budinich, Marko; Reyes-Jara, Angélica; Hödar, Christian; González, Mauricio; Parada, Pilar; Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Cambiazo, Verónica; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the molecular foundation of a consortium of five efficient bacteria strains isolated from copper mines currently used in state of the art industrial-scale biotechnology. The strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans Licanantay, Acidiphilium multivorum Yenapatur, Leptospirillum ferriphilum Pañiwe, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Wenelen and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Cutipay were selected for genome sequencing based on metal tolerance, oxidation activity and bioleaching of copper efficiency. An integrated model of metabolic pathways representing the bioleaching capability of this consortium was generated. Results revealed that greater efficiency in copper recovery may be explained by the higher functional potential of L. ferriphilum Pañiwe and At. thiooxidans Licanantay to oxidize iron and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. The consortium had a greater capacity to resist copper, arsenic and chloride ion compared to previously described biomining strains. Specialization and particular components in these bacteria provided the consortium a greater ability to bioleach copper sulfide ores. PMID:27416516

  17. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  18. International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) —

    Cancer.gov

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comprises a group of major mouse genetics research institutions along with national funding organisations formed to address the challenge of developing an encyclopedia of mammalian gene function.

  19. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group of... carry out a research project (see definition of “articles of collaboration,” in § 37.1225)....

  20. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group of... carry out a research project (see definition of “articles of collaboration,” in § 37.1225)....

  1. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM: FINDING SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Interior (DOI) developed the framework for a Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) for the United States Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) through an interag...

  2. Biodegradation mechanisms and kinetics of azo dye 4BS by a microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Hu, Wenrong; Li, Yuezhong

    2004-10-01

    A microbial consortium consisting of a white-rot fungus 8-4* and a Pseudomonas 1-10 was isolated from wastewater treatment facilities of a local dyeing house by enrichment, using azo dye Direct Fast Scarlet 4BS as the sole source of carbon and energy, which had a high capacity for rapid decolorization of 4BS. To elucidate the decolorization mechanisms, decolorization of 4BS was compared between individual strains and the microbial consortium under different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement on dye decolorization rates under either static or shaking culture, which might be attributed to the synergetic reaction of single strains. From the curve of COD values and the UV-visible spectra of 4BS solutions before and after decolorization cultivation with the microbial consortium, it was found that 4BS could be mineralized completely, and the results had been used for presuming the degrading pathway of 4BS. This study also examined the kinetics of 4BS decolorization by immobilized microbial consortium. The results demonstrated that the optimal decolorization activity was observed in pH range between four and 9, temperature range between 20 and 40 degrees C and the maximal specific decolorization rate occurred at 1,000 mg l(-1) of 4BS. The proliferation and distribution of microbial consortium were also microscopically observed, which further confirmed the decolorization mechanisms of 4BS.

  3. Moving the Completion Needle at Community Colleges: CUNY's Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linderman, Donna; Kolenovic, Zineta

    2013-01-01

    Despite enrolling almost half of all undergraduate students in the United States, community colleges have struggled for decades with low degree-completion rates. CUNY community colleges struggle with the challenge of low completion rates even when the degree timetable is expanded. According to the CUNY Office of Institutional Research and…

  4. Effect of High School Completion of the Agricultural Education Program on the Rate of Return on Investment for the Commonwealth of Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevins, Phillip Scott

    2010-01-01

    This research study sought to determine the effect high school completion of the agricultural career and technical education program has on the rate of return on investment by public schools in Virginia. The research questions guiding this study included: (1) Were students able to find employment related to the agricultural career and technical…

  5. The Effectiveness of Marshall University's Master of Arts in Teaching and Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certificate Programs as Determined by Graduates' and Completers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivy, Melissa F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined graduates' and completers' perceptions of the effectiveness of Marshall University's alternative certification programs, the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) and Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certificate (PBTC), from 1999-2010. This non-experimental descriptive cross-sectional study used the "Spivy Survey of MAT and PBTC Program…

  6. A Follow-up Study of the One Hundred and Eleven Graduates -- Class of 1968 of the Jackson County Adult Evening High School Completion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gran, James R.

    After one year, a folloup study was made of graduates of the Jackson County Adult Evening High School Completion Program; it supplemented teacher and student evaluations and a followup study made the year before of the first year graduates. The questionnaire used was about the same as the one used the year before (1967). It was found that age,…

  7. Effectiveness of Australia’s Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: maintenance of self-reported anthropometric and behavioural changes after program completion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) is a population-wide telephone-based program aimed at assisting adults to implement lifestyle improvements. It is a relatively uncommon example of the translation of efficacious trials to up-scaled real-world application. GHS participants who completed the 6-month coaching program made significant initial improvements to their weight, waist circumference, Body Mass Index (BMI), physical activity and nutrition behaviours. This study examines the maintenance of anthropometric and behaviour change improvements 6-months after program completion. Methods GHS coaching participants (n=1088) were recruited between February 2009 and June 2011. Participants were eligible if they completed the 6-month coaching program and had available data at 12-month follow-up (n=277). Weight, waist circumference, BMI, fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity were collected at baseline and 6-months by GHS coaches and 12-months (6-months post program) by independent evaluators. Matched pair t-tests, mixed linear regression and logistic regression analyses were performed to assess maintenance of program effects. Results Improvements in weight (−2.9 kg, 95% CI: -3.6, -2.1), waist circumference (−5.4 cm, 95% CI: -6.7, -4.1), BMI (−1.1units, 95% CI: -1.5, -0.8), and fruit (+0.3 serves per day, 95% CI: 0.2, 0.3) and vegetable (+0.5 serves per day 95% CI: 0.3, 0.6) consumption were observed from baseline to 12-months. Apart from vegetable consumption, there were no significant differences between 6-month and 12-month changes from baseline, indicating these risk factor improvements were maintained from the end of the coaching program. There were also improvements in the proportion of participants undertaking recommended levels of physical activity from baseline to 12-months (increase of 5.2%), however the improvements made at end of the coaching program were not maintained at the 6-month follow up. Conclusions

  8. Enhanced decolorization and biodegradation of textile azo dye Scarlet R by using developed microbial consortium-GR.

    PubMed

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Kalyani, D C; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2009-05-01

    A developed consortium-GR, consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 (PV) and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 (MG), completely decolorized an azo dye Scarlet R under static anoxic condition with an average decolorization rate of 16,666 microg h(-1); which is much faster than that of the pure cultures (PV, 3571 microg h(-1); MG, 2500 microg h(-1)). Consortium-GR gave best decolorization performance with nearly complete mineralization of Scarlet R (over 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 3h, much shorter relative to the individual strains. Induction in the riboflavin reductase and NADH-DCIP reductase was observed in the consortium, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes during the fast decolorization process. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis showed that 1,4-benzenediamine was formed during decolorization/degradation of Scarlet R by consortium-GR. Phytotoxicity studies revealed no toxicity of the biodegraded products of Scarlet R by consortium-GR. In addition, consortium-GR applied for mixture of industrial dyes showed 88% decolorization under static condition with significant reduction in TOC (62%) and COD (68%) within 72 h, suggesting potential application of this microbial consortium in bioremediation of dye-containing wastewater.

  9. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  10. CAVITY LIKE COMPLETIONS IN WEAK SANDS PREFERRED UPSTREAM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Palmer; John McLennan

    2004-04-30

    The technology referred to as Cavity Like Completions (CLC) offers a new technique to complete wells in friable and unconsolidated sands. A successfully designed CLC provides significant increases in well PI (performance index) at lower costs than alternative completion techniques. CLC technology is being developed and documented by a partnership of major oil and gas companies through a GPRI (Global Petroleum Research Institute) joint venture. Through the DOE-funded PUMP program, the experiences of the members of the joint venture will be described for other oil and gas producing companies. To date six examples of CLC completions have been investigated by the JV. The project was performed to introduce a new type of completion (or recompletion) technique to the industry that, in many cases, offers a more cost effective method to produce oil and gas from friable reservoirs. The project's scope of work included: (1) Further develop theory, laboratory and field data into a unified model to predict performance of cavity completion; (2) Perform at least one well test for cavity completion (well provided by one of the sponsor companies); (3) Provide summary of geo-mechanical models for PI increase; and (4) Develop guidelines to evaluate success of potential cavity completion. The project tracks the experiences of a joint industry consortium (GPRI No. 17) over a three year period and compiles results of the activities of this group.

  11. Challenging Conventional Wisdom: Building an Adult-Centered Degree Completion Program at a Traditional University's Satellite Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson Norton, Susan; Pickus, Keith

    2011-01-01

    This essay will discuss the creation of adult-learner degree programs at Wichita State University's satellite campuses with a particular focus on how such programs complement the mission of a traditional urban-serving research institution. It will assess the decision-making process that led to the transformation of satellite campuses into…

  12. Transformative Graduate Education Programs: An Analysis of Impact on STEM and Non-STEM Ph.D. Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniola, David; Chang, Mido; Olsen, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Transformative graduate education programs (TGP) are programs that are national in scope and are intended to impact the reformation of graduate education in the United States. We employ data from national sources and shift the unit of analysis from the individual doctoral student to the doctoral institution as whole in order to begin to assess the…

  13. An Exploration of How Involvement in a Freshman Retention Program Relates to Intention to Complete an Undergraduate Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clounch, Teresa Lynn

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the relationship of the level and type of involvement of freshman students in the Hawk Link Retention Program, a first-year program at the University of Kansas, to intent to return and graduate. The study found that participants were retained at a high level but that their type and level of involvement were not related to…

  14. A 14- to 24-year longitudinal study of a comprehensive sexual health model treatment program for adolescent sex offenders: predictors of successful completion and subsequent criminal recidivism.

    PubMed

    Seabloom, William; Seabloom, Mary E; Seabloom, Eric; Barron, Robert; Hendrickson, Sharon

    2003-08-01

    The study determines the effectiveness of a sexuality-positive adolescent sexual offender treatment program and examines subsequent criminal recidivism in the three outcome groups (completed, withdrawn, referred). The sample consists of 122 adolescent males and their families (491 individuals). Of the demographic variables, only living situation was significant, such that patients living with parents were more likely to graduate. None of the behavioral variables were found to be significant. Of the treatment variables, length of time in the program and participation in the Family Journey Seminar were included in the final model. When they were included in the model, no other treatment variable were significantly related to probability of graduation. There were no arrests or convictions for sex-related crimes in the population of participants that successfully completed the program. This group was also less likely than the other groups to be arrested (p = 0.014) or convicted (p = 0.004) across all crime categories.

  15. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  16. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements.

    PubMed

    Parker, Brent C; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C; Wu, H Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Gibbons, John P

    2014-03-06

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP-accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)-MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU-MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two-year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for-profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs.

  17. Continuum of Care in a Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Program in Ghana: Low Completion Rate and Multiple Obstacle Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yeji, Francis; Shibanuma, Akira; Oduro, Abraham; Debpuur, Cornelius; Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Owusu-Agei, Seth; Gyapong, Margaret; Okawa, Sumiyo; Ansah, Evelyn; Asare, Gloria Quansah; Nanishi, Keiko; Williams, John; Addei, Sheila; Tawiah, Charlotte; Yasuoka, Junko; Enuameh, Yeetey; Sakeah, Evelyn; Wontuo, Peter; Jimba, Masamine; Hodgson, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Background Slow progress has been made in achieving the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in Ghana. Ensuring continuum of care (at least four antenatal visits; skilled birth attendance; postnatal care within 48 hours, at two weeks, and six weeks) for mother and newborn is crucial in helping Ghana achieve these goals and beyond. This study examined the levels and factors associated with continuum of care (CoC) completion among Ghanaian women aged 15–49. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted among women who experienced live births between January 2011 and April 2013 in three regions of Ghana. In a two-stage random sampling method, 1,500 women with infants were selected and interviewed about maternal and newborn service usage in line with CoC. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with CoC completion. Results Only 8.0% had CoC completion; the greatest gap and contributor to the low CoC was detected between delivery and postnatal care within 48 hours postpartum. About 95% of women had a minimum of four antenatal visits and postnatal care at six weeks postpartum. A total of 75% had skilled assisted delivery and 25% received postnatal care within 48 hours. Factors associated with CoC completion at 95% CI were geographical location (OR = 0.35, CI 0.13–0.39), marital status (OR = 0.45; CI 0.22–0.95), education (OR = 2.71; CI 1.11–6.57), transportation (OR = 1.97; CI 1.07–3.62), and beliefs about childhood illnesses (OR = 0.34; CI0.21–0.61). Conclusion The continuum of care completion rate is low in the study site. Efforts should focus on increasing postnatal care within 48 hours and overcoming the known obstacles to increasing the continuum of care completion rate. PMID:26650388

  18. Ramping up for College Readiness in Minnesota High Schools: Implementation of a Schoolwide Program. REL 2016-146

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Jim; Davis, Elisabeth; Stephan, Jennifer; Bonsu, Pamela; Narlock, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The College Readiness Consortium at the University of Minnesota has developed Ramp-Up to Readiness™ (Ramp-Up), a schoolwide advisory program to increase students' likelihood of college enrollment and completion by enhancing five dimensions of college readiness (academic, admissions, career, financial, and personal-social) among students in middle…

  19. Use of an Individualized Reading Program Under Voluntary Complete Integration: Effects on Third Grade Pupils and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goolsby, Thomas M., Jr.; Frary, Robert B.

    This study was an attempt to assist a rural county school system in central Georgia with instruction at the third grade level in reading skills development after voluntary and complete integration. Specifically it was to (1) determine the general nature of the integration process in the county and its topical relationships and effects upon…

  20. 25 CFR 1000.68 - May non-BIA bureaus provide technical assistance to a Tribe/Consortium in drafting its planning...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Financial Assistance for Planning and Negotiation Grants for Non-BIA Programs Eligibility and Application... Tribe/Consortium in drafting its planning grant application? 1000.68 Section 1000.68 Indians OFFICE OF... planning grant application? Yes, upon request from the Tribe/Consortium, a non-BIA bureau may...

  1. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium annual report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    The HBCU/MI Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among the member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) agreed to work together to initiate research, technology development and education programs to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. As a group the HBCU/MI Consortium is uniquely positioned to reach women and the minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. As part of their initial work, they developed the Research, Education, and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan to actualize the Consortium`s guiding principles. In addition to developing a comprehensive research agenda, four major programs were begun to meet these goals. This report summarizes the 1990--1991 progress.

  2. Computer program: Jet 3 to calculate the large elastic plastic dynamically induced deformations of free and restrained, partial and/or complete structural rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    A user-oriented FORTRAN 4 computer program, called JET 3, is presented. The JET 3 program, which employs the spatial finite-element and timewise finite-difference method, can be used to predict the large two-dimensional elastic-plastic transient Kirchhoff-type deformations of a complete or partial structural ring, with various support conditions and restraints, subjected to a variety of initial velocity distributions and externally-applied transient forcing functions. The geometric shapes of the structural ring can be circular or arbitrarily curved and with variable thickness. Strain-hardening and strain-rate effects of the material are taken into account.

  3. Completing Invoices. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, Jean

    Supporting performance objective 46 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on completing invoices are included in this packet. (The packet is the fifth in a set of nine on performing computational clerical activities--CE 016 951-959.) The…

  4. Gender differences in predictors of initiation, retention, and completion in an HMO-based substance abuse treatment program.

    PubMed

    Green, Carla A; Polen, Michael R; Dickinson, Daniel M; Lynch, Frances L; Bennett, Marjorie D

    2002-12-01

    We studied gender differences in treatment process indicators among 293 HMO members recommended for substance abuse treatment. Treatment initiation, completion, and time spent in treatment did not differ by gender, but factors predicting these outcomes differed markedly. Initiation was predicted in women by alcohol diagnoses; in men, by being employed or married. Failure to initiate treatment was predicted in women by mental health diagnoses; in men, by less education. Treatment completion was predicted in women by higher income and legal/agency referral; in men, by older age. Failure to complete was predicted in women by more dependence diagnoses and higher Addiction Severity Index Employment scores; in men, by worse psychiatric status, receiving Medicaid, and motivation for entering treatment. More time spent in treatment was predicted, in women, by alcohol or opiate diagnoses and legal/agency referral; in men, by fewer mental health diagnoses, higher education, domestic violence victim status, and prior 12-step attendance. Clinical implications of results are discussed. PMID:12495790

  5. Success of High-Risk Students after Completion of an Elementary School Intervention Program: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marilyn; Hill, George C.; Bandera, Marcia

    This paper reports on long-term effects of a fifth-grade intervention for high-risk students. The intervention, "Just Do It, Jr." (JDR), was a collaborative after-school program between University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Elko County School District (Nevada), in which fifth-graders at risk of academic failure participated in a life…

  6. They Come but Do They Finish? Program Completion for Honors Students at a Major Public University, 1998-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodstein, Lynne; Szarek Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the option of enrolling in honors programs and colleges at major public universities has increasingly become an alternative to elite private and public institutions for some of the brightest and most academically-talented high school graduates. To attract these high-achieving students, universities may offer applicants incentives…

  7. Perspective: PhD scientists completing medical school in two years: looking at the Miami PhD-to-MD program alumni twenty years later.

    PubMed

    Koniaris, Leonidas G; Cheung, Michael C; Garrison, Gwen; Awad, William M; Zimmers, Teresa A

    2010-04-01

    Producing and retaining physician-scientists remains a major challenge in advancing innovation, knowledge, and patient care across all medical disciplines. Various programs during medical school, including MD-PhD programs, have been instituted to address the need for continued production of physician-scientists. From 1971 through 1989, 508 students with a prior PhD in the sciences, mathematics, or engineering graduated in two years from an accelerated MD program at the University of Miami School of Medicine. The program, designed to address potential clinical physician shortages rather than physician-scientist shortages, quickly attracted many top-notch scientists to medicine. Many program graduates went to top-tier residencies, pursued research careers in academic medicine, and became academic leaders in their respective fields. A retrospective examination of graduates conducted in 2008-2009 demonstrated that approximately 59% took positions in academic university medical departments, 3% worked for governmental agencies, 5% entered industry as researchers or executives, and 33% opted for private practice. Graduates' positions included 85 full professors, 11 university directors or division heads, 14 academic chairs, 2 medical school deans, and 1 astronaut. Overall, 30% of graduates had obtained National Institutes of Health funding after completing the program. These results suggest that accelerated medical training for accomplished scientists can produce a large number of successful physician-scientists and other leaders in medicine. Furthermore, these results suggest that shortening the medical portion of combined MD-PhD programs might also be considered. PMID:20354390

  8. The Teleprasenz Consortium: Structure and intentions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blauert, Jens

    1991-01-01

    The Teleprasenz-Consortium is an open group of currently 37 scientists of different disciplines who devote a major part of their research activities to the foundations of telepresence technology. Telepresence technology is basically understood as a means to bridge spatial and temporal gaps as well as certain kinds of concealment, inaccessibility and danger of exposure. The activities of the consortium are organized into three main branches: virtual environment, surveillance and control systems, and speech and language technology. A brief summary of the main activities in these areas is given.

  9. A quantitative analysis of factors that influence and predict students' intention to major in and complete an undergraduate program in STEM or non-STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuemei

    2005-11-01

    The goal of this study was to explore and understand the factors that influence students' intention to major in and complete an undergraduate program in a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) discipline, in a non-STEM field, and how students' gender directly and indirectly affects their success in college. A quantitative study of three thousand four (3004) ACT-tested students who entered a Midwestern, land-grant university as freshmen in fall, 1999 was conducted based on their ACT Assessment information and their enrollment and graduation status after five years. A wide variety of variables were considered and logistic regression, factor analysis, and path analysis were used to analyze the data. The results show that students who intended to major in or completed STEM programs generally have better academic qualifications than their counterparts who intended to major in non-STEM fields. Students who intended to major in or completed STEM programs came from lower income families and smaller communities than those who intended to major in or graduated from non-STEM programs. In this study, gender's direct effect on students' college achievement is eleven times the total of gender's indirect effects through several major factors for students in both STEM fields and non-STEM fields. Perhaps nature has favored females when students' achievement is measured as their college GPA. The results also show that the overall high dropout rate is strongly associated with students' inadequate preparation in high school and family income. Out-of-school accomplishment in community service is a negative influence on their completion of a college degree. ACT scores are not necessary for prediction of college graduation.

  10. Cancer Core Europe: a consortium to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum challenge.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Caldas, Carlos; Ringborg, Ulrik; Medema, René; Tabernero, Josep; Wiestler, Otmar

    2014-11-01

    European cancer research for a transformative initiative by creating a consortium of six leading excellent comprehensive cancer centres that will work together to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum. Prerequisites for joint translational and clinical research programs are very demanding. These require the creation of a virtual single 'e-hospital' and a powerful translational platform, inter-compatible clinical molecular profiling laboratories with a robust underlying computational biology pipeline, standardised functional and molecular imaging, commonly agreed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for liquid and tissue biopsy procurement, storage and processing, for molecular diagnostics, 'omics', functional genetics, immune-monitoring and other assessments. Importantly also it requires a culture of data collection and data storage that provides complete longitudinal data sets to allow for: effective data sharing and common database building, and to achieve a level of completeness of data that is required for conducting outcome research, taking into account our current understanding of cancers as communities of evolving clones. Cutting edge basic research and technology development serve as an important driving force for innovative translational and clinical studies. Given the excellent track records of the six participants in these areas, Cancer Core Europe will be able to support the full spectrum of research required to address the cancer research- cancer care continuum. Cancer Core Europe also constitutes a unique environment to train the next generation of talents in innovative translational and clinical oncology. PMID:25263570

  11. Ecofriendly degradation, decolorization and detoxification of textile effluent by a developed bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Phugare, Swapnil S; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Surwase, Shripad N; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2011-07-01

    Present study illustrates the effectual decolorization and degradation of the textile effluent using a developed bacterial consortium SDS, consisted of bacterial species Providencia sp. SDS and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa strain BCH, originally isolated from dye contaminated soil. The intensive metabolic activity of the consortium SDS led to complete decolorization of textile effluent within 20 h at pH 7 and temperature 30°C. Significant induction in the activities of veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, azoreductase and DCIP reductase were observed during decolorization, which indicates their involvement in decolorization and degradation process. The decolorization and biodegradation was monitored using UV-vis spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, HPLC and HPTLC analysis. Toxicological analysis of effluent before and after treatment was performed using classical Allium cepa test. Investigations of various toxicological parameters viz, oxidative stress response, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and phytotoxicity, collectively concludes that, the toxicity of effluent reduces significantly after treatment with consortium SDS.

  12. A distributed health data network analysis of survival outcomes: the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries perspective.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samprit; Cafri, Guy; Isaacs, Abby J; Graves, Stephen; Paxton, Elizabeth; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-12-17

    The International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries is a multinational initiative established by the United States Food and Drug Administration to develop a health data network aimed at providing a robust infrastructure to facilitate evidence-based decision-making on performance of medical devices. Through the International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries, individual data holders have complete control of their data and can choose to participate in studies of their choice. In this article, we present an overview of the data extraction process and the analytic strategy employed to answer several device performance-related questions in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. In the process, we discuss some nuances pertinent to International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries data that pose certain statistical challenges, and we briefly suggest strategies to be adopted to address them. PMID:25520413

  13. MEXUS Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branan, Alvord; Hergert, Michael

    The MEXUS program, a transnational, undergraduate, dual-degree program in the United States and Mexico, addresses the problem of how universities can better prepare students to manage business in an interdependent global marketplace. The program was initiated as a consortium of four institutions (San Diego State University and Southwestern College…

  14. Extending ACTS Operations Through a University-Based Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert; Krawcyzk, Richard; Irwin, Dennis; Kruse, Hans

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program was slated for decommissioning in October 2000 as was announced at the 6th Ka-band Utilization Conference in May 2000. Quite a celebration was had at that event too centering on the decommissioning of this very successful technology program. With plans in place to move the spacecraft to an orbital graveyard and then shut the system down, NASA was challenged to consider the feasibility of extending operations for education and research purposes provided that an academic organization would be willing to cover operations costs. Continuing operations of the system was determined viable and in the fall of 2000, an announcement was made by NASA to consider extending operations. Plans are now in place to continue the operations of ACTS through a university-based consortium led by Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Initial plans are for two more years of operations, with options to extend up to a total of four years. This paper will present the change in plans to continue operations of ACTS. A description of the multi-month transition of the spacecraft to its new and final orbital location is provided. With the spacecraft at this new location, an update on its performance is presented as well as estimates of long-term performance. The consortium development will be presented along with its organization, membership, and operations plans for using ACTS.

  15. Engagement Scholarship Consortium Poster Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargerstock, Burton A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Outreach Scholarship Conference has long provided a venue for the presentation of posters representing innovative research, effective practices, and impactful programs. In 2011, conference planners developed a series of measures focused on enriching the poster session as a platform for showcasing community-based scholarship and…

  16. JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

    2009-03-28

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special

  17. JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

    2008-04-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of

  18. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Warren Reece

    2011-03-22

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  19. Area Consortium on Training. "Training for Technology" Project, 1982-1983. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moock, Lynn D.

    The Area Consortium on Training initiated the Training for Technology Project to fill industry needs for skilled personnel and job needs for economically disadvantaged persons. Major accomplishments included establishment of a training team for economic development and for development of training programs; contacting of more than 100 employers;…

  20. RSC Classroom Research Consortium Project: 1990-91/Year-Two Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Mary Anne

    In 1989, a consortium of four community colleges in Southern California (i.e., Cerritos College, Mt. San Antonio College, Rancho Santiago College, and Rio Hondo College) received a Title III grant of $2.5 million to support the development of innovative teaching and learning programs. The specific goals of the project are to increase the academic…

  1. Planning and Developing a Regional Community College Allied Health Consortium: A Case Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tworek, Richard K.

    In an effort to reduce duplication of educational services and improve career opportunities, the East Central Illinois Community College Consortium (ECICCC) was created to provide cooperative allied health education programs. Four institutions, Danville Junior College, Lake Land College, Parkland College, and Richland Community College,…

  2. Nursing Faculty Collaborate with Embedded Librarians to Serve Online Graduate Students in a Consortium Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillot, Ladonna; Stahr, Beth; Meeker, Bonnie Juve'

    2010-01-01

    Nursing and library faculty face many information literacy challenges when graduate nursing programs migrate to online course delivery. The authors describe a collaborative model for providing cost-effective online library services to new graduate students in a three-university consortium. The embedded librarian service links a health sciences…

  3. Strength in Numbers: Balancing Institutional Identity with the Benefits of Consortium Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mary Ellen

    2012-01-01

    All college and university communications professionals work hard to promote their institutions' strengths and uniqueness. They tout high-caliber faculty, programs, and facilities and point to the achievements of their graduates as examples of their success. But those who work for institutions that are members of a higher education consortium also…

  4. A Look in Retrospect. C.M.A.--A Consortium. Colleges of Mid-America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steir, William F., Jr.

    This paper is a general study of the ideals and basic principles upon which consortia are based and an analysis of the Colleges of Mid-America (C.M.A.) consortium in particular. The statement of purpose for the C.M.A. includes: (1) to nurture areas of common interest and develop enriched educational programs for our respective students; (2) to…

  5. Cancer patient and survivor research from the cancer information service research consortium: a preview of three large randomized trials and initial lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Alfred C; Diefenbach, Michael A; Stanton, Annette L; Miller, Suzanne M; Fleisher, Linda; Raich, Peter C; Morra, Marion E; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Tran, Zung Vu; Bright, Mary Anne

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe 3 large randomized trials from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium. Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 also tests a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the 2-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1: n =208; Project 2: n =340; Project 3: n =792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52%, and 67% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most, or some) was 90%, 85%, and 83% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium interventions, perceived usefulness and benefit was high, and more than 90% reported that they would recommend them to other cancer patients. The authors present 5 initial lessons learned that may help inform future cancer communications research.

  6. Computers and Collaborative Learning. Proceedings of the Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium (CALICO) Annual Symposium (Middlebury, Vermont, June 19-23, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borchardt, Frank L., Ed.; Johnson, Eleanor M. T., Ed.

    This conference proceeding presents abstracts, complete papers, and presenter biographies from the 1995 Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium (CALICO) annual symposium on computers and collaborative learning. Presented topics included courseware, preconference workshop reports, and conference papers presented, including guest speaker…

  7. 78 FR 19716 - International Consortium of Cardiovascular Registries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration International Consortium of Cardiovascular Registries AGENCY... of Cardiovascular Registries.'' The purpose of this meeting is to discuss the development of an international consortium of cardiovascular registries with a broad array of interested stakeholders. The...

  8. THE FEDERAL INTEGRATED BIOTREATMENT RESEARCH CONSORTIUM (FLASK TO FIELD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Federal Integrated Biotreatment Research Consortium (Flask to Field) represented a 7-year concerted effort by several research laboratories to develop bioremediation technologies for contaminated DoD sites. The consortium structure consisted of a director and four thrust are...

  9. United We Stand: Lessons Learned from a Consortium of Small Astronomy Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, B.

    2010-08-01

    In 1989, the astronomy departments of eight liberal arts colleges located in the northeast formed a consortium to broaden undergraduate research opportunities and to form a "meta- department" of approximately 25 research astronomers. Each of the participating departments is small (typically, two faculty members), so forming the consortium naturally broadened the research interests of this "virtual department." With generous initial support from the W.M. Keck Foundation, we established a summer exchange program to allow our undergraduates to do research at any of the participating colleges. We also inaugurated a student research symposium at which all summer research students from the eight institutions could report their scientific findings in astronomy.

  10. Oak woodlands and forests fire consortium: A regional view of fire science sharing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabner, Keith W.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Marschall, Joseph M.; Abadir, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Fire Science Program established 14 regional fire science knowledge exchange consortia to improve the delivery of fire science information and communication among fire managers and researchers. Consortia were developed regionally to ensure that fire science information is tailored to meet regional needs. In this paper, emphasis was placed on the Oak Woodlands and Forests Fire Consortium to provide an inside view of how one regional consortium is organized and its experiences in sharing fire science through various social media, conference, and workshop-based fire science events.

  11. TIDY, a complete code for renumbering and editing FORTRAN source programs. User's manual for IBM 360/67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, A. V.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1973-01-01

    TIDY, a computer code which edits and renumerates FORTRAN decks which have become difficult to read because of many patches and revisions, is described. The old program is reorganized so that statement numbers are added sequentially, and extraneous FORTRAN statements are deleted. General instructions for using TIDY on the IBM 360/67 Tymeshare System, and specific instructions for use on the NASA/AMES IBM 360/67 TSS system are included as well as specific instructions on how to run TIDY in conversational and in batch modes. TIDY may be adopted for use on other computers.

  12. Consortium wins major Brazilian gas contract

    SciTech Connect

    O`Driscoll

    1994-08-16

    An international consortium of BHP of Australia, Tenneco Gas of the U.S. and British Gas was selected Monday by Petroleo Braileiro SA (Petrobras) to Monday by Petroleo Brasileiro SA (Petrobras) to develop a $2 billion natural gas pipeline linking reserves in Bolivia with markets in southern and southeastern Brazil.

  13. A consortium approach to intravenous certification.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D; Ziemba, S; Shumlas, D; Files, B

    1998-01-01

    Providing education for intravenous therapy without offering redundant courses is a concern for staff development educators. The consortium approach maximizes resources, provides a standard and consistent level of intravenous training, and provides a cost-effective remedy. Problems, solutions, and benefits to students, educators, and hospitals are described in this article. Emergent issues are also discussed.

  14. Retirement Plan Consortium Structures for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevin, John

    2012-01-01

    As school districts continue to seek administrative efficiencies and cost reductions in the wake of severe budget pressures, the resources they devote to creating or expanding retirement plan consortia is increasing. Understanding how to structure a retirement plan consortium is paramount to successfully achieving the many objectives of…

  15. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in... incorporated or that otherwise agrees to jointly carry out a RD&D project (see definition of “articles...

  16. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM; PARTNERS FOR PRESERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented at EMAP Symposium 2001: Coastal Monitoring Through Partnerships, 24-27 April 2001, Pensacola Beach, FL.

    The Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) was one recommendation to the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (CRTF), to conserve the coral reef ecosystems of the U...

  17. Consortium on Inclusive Schooling Practices. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Christine; Roach, Virginia; Strieker, Toni; McGregor, Gail

    This final report describes the activities and accomplishments of the Consortium on Inclusive Schooling Practices, a federally-funded 5-year project to investigate the utility of a systemic approach for building the capacity of state and local education agencies to provide inclusive educational services. The project focused on four states…

  18. Response surface methodology for optimization of medium for decolorization of textile dye Direct Black 22 by a novel bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Mohana, Sarayu; Shrivastava, Shalini; Divecha, Jyoti; Madamwar, Datta

    2008-02-01

    Decolorization and degradation of polyazo dye Direct Black 22 was carried out by distillery spent wash degrading mixed bacterial consortium, DMC. Response surface methodology (RSM) involving a central composite design (CCD) in four factors was successfully employed for the study and optimization of decolorization process. The hyper activities and interactions between glucose concentration, yeast extract concentration, dye concentration and inoculum size on dye decolorization were investigated and modeled. Under optimized conditions the bacterial consortium was able to decolorize the dye almost completely (>91%) within 12h. Bacterial consortium was able to decolorize 10 different azo dyes. The optimum combination of the four variables predicted through RSM was confirmed through confirmatory experiments and hence this bacterial consortium holds potential for the treatment of industrial waste water. Dye degradation products obtained during the course of decolorization were analyzed by HPTLC.

  19. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium.

    PubMed

    Rich, S S; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H; Hilner, J E; Julier, C; Morahan, G; Nerup, J; Nierras, C; Pociot, F; Todd, J A

    2009-12-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual's risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community. To facilitate the access to these resources, the T1DGC has developed a Consortium Agreement (http://www.t1dgc.org) that specifies the rights and responsibilities of investigators who participate in Consortium activities. The T1DGC has assembled a resource of affected sib-pair families, parent-child trios, and case-control collections with banks of DNA, serum, plasma, and EBV-transformed cell lines. In addition, both candidate gene and genome-wide (linkage and association) studies have been performed and displayed in T1DBase (http://www.t1dbase.org) for all researchers to use in their own investigations. In this supplement, a subset of the T1DGC collection has been used to investigate earlier published candidate genes for T1D, to confirm the results from a genome-wide association scan for T1D, and to determine associations with candidate genes for other autoimmune diseases or with type II diabetes that may be involved with beta-cell function.

  20. Factors predicting completion of a home visitation program by high-risk pregnant women: the North Carolina Maternal Outreach Worker Program.

    PubMed Central

    Navaie-Waliser, M; Martin, S L; Campbell, M K; Tessaro, I; Kotelchuck, M; Cross, A W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to identify characteristics of high-risk pregnant women that predicted long-term participation in a home visitation program. METHODS: Data regarding sociodemographic characteristics, perceived needs, psychological functioning, substance use, and informal social support were collected prospectively from 152 short-term and 221 long-term program participants. RESULTS: In comparison with short-term participants, long-term participants were more likely to have been African American, married, nonsmokers, and enrolled in the program during their second trimester of pregnancy, and they were more likely to have had emotional and instrumental support needs. CONCLUSIONS: Women with greater social support needs and healthier behaviors were more receptive to long-term home visitation than other women. PMID:10630150

  1. Establishing a Consortium for the Study of Rare Diseases: The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Seminara, Jennifer; Tuchman, Mendel; Krivitzky, Lauren; Krischer, Jeffrey; Lee, Hye-Seung; LeMons, Cynthia; Baumgartner, Matthias; Cederbaum, Stephen; Diaz, George A.; Feigenbaum, Annette; Gallagher, Renata C.; Harding, Cary O.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Lanpher, Brendan; Lee, Brendan; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; McCandless, Shawn E.; Merritt, J. Lawrence; Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Seashore, Margretta R.; Stricker, Tamar; Summar, Marshall; Waisbren, Susan; Yudkoff, Marc; Batshaw, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium (UCDC) was created as part of a larger network established by the National Institutes of Health to study rare diseases. This paper reviews the UCDC’s accomplishments over the first six years, including how the Consortium was developed and organized, clinical research studies initiated, and the importance of creating partnerships with patient advocacy groups, philanthropic foundations and biotech and pharmaceutical companies. PMID:20188616

  2. Meeting report: the fourth Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) workshop.

    PubMed

    Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Garrity, George M; Gray, Tanya; Sterk, Peter; Cochrane, Guy; Vaughan, Robert; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Angiuoli, Sam; Dawyndt, Peter; Guralnick, Robert; Goldstein, Philip; Hall, Neil; Hirschman, Lynette; Kravitz, Saul; Lister, Allyson L; Markowitz, Victor; Thomson, Nick; Whetzel, Trish

    2008-06-01

    This meeting report summarizes the proceedings of the "eGenomics: Cataloguing our Complete Genome Collection IV" workshop held June 6-8, 2007, at the National Institute for Environmental eScience (NIEeS), Cambridge, United Kingdom. This fourth workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) was a mix of short presentations, strategy discussions, and technical sessions. Speakers provided progress reports on the development of the "Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence" (MIGS) specification and the closely integrated "Minimum Information about a Metagenome Sequence" (MIMS) specification. The key outcome of the workshop was consensus on the next version of the MIGS/MIMS specification (v1.2). This drove further definition and restructuring of the MIGS/MIMS XML schema (syntax). With respect to semantics, a term vetting group was established to ensure that terms are properly defined and submitted to the appropriate ontology projects. Perhaps the single most important outcome of the workshop was a proposal to move beyond the concept of "minimum" to create a far richer XML schema that would define a "Genomic Contextual Data Markup Language" (GCDML) suitable for wider semantic integration across databases. GCDML will contain not only curated information (e.g., compliant with MIGS/MIMS), but also be extended to include a variety of data processing and calculations. Further information about the Genomic Standards Consortium and its range of activities can be found at http://gensc.org.

  3. Electron donor preference of a reductive dechlorinating consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium was developed by the USGS and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for use in bioaugmentation applications. The consortium had the capacity to completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1.1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. A suite of electron donors with characteristics useful for bioaugmentation applications was tested. The electron donors included lactate (the donor used during WBC-2 development), ethanol, chitin (Chitorem???), hydrogen releasing compound (HRC???), emulsified vegetable oil (Newman Zone???), and hydrogen gas. Ethanol, lactate, and chitin were particularly effective with respect to stimulating, supporting, and sustaining reductive dechlorination of the broad suite of chemicals that WBC-2 biodegraded. Chitorem??? was the most effective "slow release" electron donor tested. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  4. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    agreements and their completion were problematic for the US and world economies. This resulted in the President and Congress implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, abbreviated ARRA (Pub.L. 111-5), commonly referred to as the Stimulus or The Recovery Act. The stimulus money available for transportation projects encouraged the SCAQMD to seek additional funds. In August of 2009, they eventually were awarded an additional $45.5 M, and the scope of their project was expanded to 378 vehicles. However, as a consequence of the stimulus money and the inundation of DOE with applications for new project under the ARRA, the expected time table for producing and testing vehicles was significantly delayed. As a result, these vehicles were not available for validating the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium. Therefore, in April of 2011, the Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) for the project was revised, and limited to producing the draft protocol for PHEV certification as its deliverable.

  5. Creating Future Stem Leaders: The National Astronomy Consortium:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Benjamin, Robert A.; Brisbin, Drew; Giles, Faye; National Astronomy Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and Associated Universities Inc., (AUI) in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP), and a number of minority and majority universities to increase the numbers of students from underrepresented groups and those otherwise overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM or STEM-related careers. The seed for the NAC was a partnership between NRAO and Howard University which began with an exchange of a few summer students five years ago. Since then the NAC has grown tremendously. Today the NAC aims to host between 4 to 5 cohorts nationally in an innovative model in which the students are mentored throughout the year with multiple mentors and peer mentoring, continued engagement in research and professional development / career training throughout the academic year and throughout their careers. We will summarize the results from this innovative and highly succesful program and provide lessons learned.

  6. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  7. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  8. LBL/JSU/AGMUS science consortium annual report, FY 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In 1983, a formal Memorandum of Understanding joined the Ana G. Mendez University System (AGMUS), Jackson State University (JSU), and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in a consortium designed to advance the science and technology programs of JSU and AGMUS. This is the first such collaboration between a Hispanic university system, a historically Black university, and a national laboratory. The goals of this alliance are basic and direct: to develop and effect a long-term, comprehensive program that will enable the campuses of AGMUS and JSU to provide a broad, high-quality offering in the natural and computer sciences, to increase the number of minority students entering these fields, and to contribute to scientific knowledge and the federal government`s science mission through research. This report documents the progress toward these goals and includes individual success stories. The LBL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium has developed plans for utilizing its program successes to help other institutions to adopt or adapt those elements of the model that have produced the greatest results. Within the five-year plan formulated in 1990 are eight major components, each with defining elements and goals. These elements have become the components of the Science Consortium`s current plan for expansion and propagation.

  9. A Lean Six Sigma quality improvement project to increase discharge paperwork completeness for admission to a comprehensive integrated inpatient rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Nathan J; Hoyer, Erik H; Cabahug, Philippines; González-Fernández, Marlís; Mehta, Megha; Walker, N Colbey; Powers, Richard L; Mayer, R Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) process analysis can be used to increase completeness of discharge summary reports used as a critical communication tool when a patient transitions between levels of care. The authors used the LSS methodology as an intervention to improve systems process. Over the course of the project, 8 required elements were analyzed in the discharge paperwork. The authors analyzed the discharge paperwork of patients (42 patients preintervention and 143 patients postintervention) of a comprehensive integrated inpatient rehabilitation program (CIIRP). Prior to this LSS project, 61.8% of required discharge elements were present. The intervention improved the completeness to 94.2% of the required elements. The percentage of charts that were 100% complete increased from 11.9% to 67.8%. LSS is a well-established process improvement methodology that can be used to make significant improvements in complex health care workflow issues. Specifically, the completeness of discharge documentation required for transition of care to CIIRP can be improved.

  10. Eastern Gas Shales Program. Completion and stimulation of five New York State Energy Research and Development Authority Wells Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Rdissi, A.

    1981-11-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of the Devonian Shales as a source of natural gas, DOE/METC in Morgantown, West Virginia, has undertaken the Eastern Gas Shale Program (EGSP); not only to characterize and identify the resource, but also to enhance and improve the productivity of wells completed in the shale. One of the methods used to achieve improved productivity is hydraulic fracturing and, more specifically, foam fracturing. The efforts by DOE/METC included completion and stimulation of five New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) wells; located in western Allegany County and southwestern Cattaraugus County, New York. The five wells were drilled on high shcool and college properties during the months of June and July 1981. DOE/METC's contribution to the program funded the stimulation and completion of the wells. This work was done under the engineering and field supervision of Gruy Federal, Inc. as contractor to DOE. The completion work took place in the months of July and August 1981. This consisted of running a cement bond log in each well. All logs showed good bonding. This was followed by perforating the Marcellus Shale through the 4-1/2-inch casing. During the next phase, the formation was broken down with 1500 gallons of regular HF acid and, then, foam fractured using 50,000 gallons of foam consisting of water and nitrogen; the fractures were propped with 60,000 pounds of sand. After the cleanout operations, open flow potentials and rock pressures were measured in each well. None of the wells had a gas show before fracturing but, after fracturing, open flow ranged from a low of 19 Mcf/D to a high of 73 Mcf/D. 1 reference, 6 figures, 1 table.

  11. Anxiety Online—A Virtual Clinic: Preliminary Outcomes Following Completion of Five Fully Automated Treatment Programs for Anxiety Disorders and Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Denny; Austin, David William; Kyrios, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background The development of e-mental health interventions to treat or prevent mental illness and to enhance wellbeing has risen rapidly over the past decade. This development assists the public in sidestepping some of the obstacles that are often encountered when trying to access traditional face-to-face mental health care services. Objective The objective of our study was to investigate the posttreatment effectiveness of five fully automated self-help cognitive behavior e-therapy programs for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A), obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and social anxiety disorder (SAD) offered to the international public via Anxiety Online, an open-access full-service virtual psychology clinic for anxiety disorders. Methods We used a naturalistic participant choice, quasi-experimental design to evaluate each of the five Anxiety Online fully automated self-help e-therapy programs. Participants were required to have at least subclinical levels of one of the anxiety disorders to be offered the associated disorder-specific fully automated self-help e-therapy program. These programs are offered free of charge via Anxiety Online. Results A total of 225 people self-selected one of the five e-therapy programs (GAD, n = 88; SAD, n = 50; PD/A, n = 40; PTSD, n = 30; OCD, n = 17) and completed their 12-week posttreatment assessment. Significant improvements were found on 21/25 measures across the five fully automated self-help programs. At postassessment we observed significant reductions on all five anxiety disorder clinical disorder severity ratings (Cohen d range 0.72–1.22), increased confidence in managing one’s own mental health care (Cohen d range 0.70–1.17), and decreases in the total number of clinical diagnoses (except for the PD/A program, where a positive trend was found) (Cohen d range 0.45–1.08). In addition, we found significant improvements in

  12. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  13. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes. PMID:22623907

  14. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.

  15. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) Report

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda M.; Cowan, Morton J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Kohn, Donald B.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C.; Bleesing, Jack J. H.; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M.; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J.; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M.; Logan, Brent R.; Long-Boyle, Janel R.; Malech, Harry L.; McGhee, Sean A.; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J.; Routes, John M.; Shearer, William T.; Small, Trudy N.; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R.; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome and Chronic Granulomatous Disease through retrospective, prospective and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to: encourage training of junior investigators; establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues; work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness; and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for PID. To date, the PIDTC has funded two pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans; and B cell reconstitution in SCID patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first two PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives. PMID:24139498

  16. Removal of triphenylmethane dyes by bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  17. Developing a community-based graduate medical education consortium for residency sponsorship: one community's experience.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Peter W; Nocella, Kiki

    2012-08-01

    Faced with a funding crisis that threatened a single-sponsor family medicine residency program critical to a county-wide health system, health care organizations located in the California community described in this article formed a nonprofit, corporate graduate medical education (GME) consortium to sponsor a new residency program. Institutional GME sponsors are typically single hospitals or academic medical centers associated with medical schools. However, as the authors describe, community-based residency sponsorship through a GME consortium can allow multiple stakeholders to assume a model of shared ownership that reflects alignment of pooled community resources with the distributive benefits associated with residencies. Although this community's stakeholders encountered expected governance complexities as they worked to reconcile competing interests, they successfully collaborated to develop the Valley Consortium for Medical Education by addressing a variety of fiscal, workforce benefit, and community coordination challenges. The authors describe the key phases of development and discuss the challenges that must be overcome to establish an institutional sponsor with multiple stakeholders. The financial pressure that traditional institutional sponsors are experiencing with the inexorable decline in GME funding may prompt them to explore partnerships in which they can share expenses for the mutual benefit of physician workforce development. The authors believe that the community-based GME consortium is a viable model to consider.

  18. Developing a community-based graduate medical education consortium for residency sponsorship: one community's experience.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Peter W; Nocella, Kiki

    2012-08-01

    Faced with a funding crisis that threatened a single-sponsor family medicine residency program critical to a county-wide health system, health care organizations located in the California community described in this article formed a nonprofit, corporate graduate medical education (GME) consortium to sponsor a new residency program. Institutional GME sponsors are typically single hospitals or academic medical centers associated with medical schools. However, as the authors describe, community-based residency sponsorship through a GME consortium can allow multiple stakeholders to assume a model of shared ownership that reflects alignment of pooled community resources with the distributive benefits associated with residencies. Although this community's stakeholders encountered expected governance complexities as they worked to reconcile competing interests, they successfully collaborated to develop the Valley Consortium for Medical Education by addressing a variety of fiscal, workforce benefit, and community coordination challenges. The authors describe the key phases of development and discuss the challenges that must be overcome to establish an institutional sponsor with multiple stakeholders. The financial pressure that traditional institutional sponsors are experiencing with the inexorable decline in GME funding may prompt them to explore partnerships in which they can share expenses for the mutual benefit of physician workforce development. The authors believe that the community-based GME consortium is a viable model to consider. PMID:22722363

  19. Facilitate, Collaborate, Educate: the Role of the IRIS Consortium in Supporting National and International Research in Seismology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. W.; Beck, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    the test of time. Many of these technical standards for equipment and data exchange have extended to become de-facto global standards and influenced instrument development and network practices throughout the world. A governance structure for the Consortium was created that continues to encourage strong community guidance in the operation and evolution of IRIS programs. From the outset, there was a commitment to maintaining a complete archive of all IRIS data, with significant emphasis on metadata and quality control. Building on long-standing traditions of collaboration in seismological research, an explicit IRIS policy of free and open data exchange has expanded the culture of data sharing among it members, which, through example, encouragement and support, has extended to influence the data policies of numerous other organizations in seismology and the Earth sciences. The technical revolution in sensors, communications and data collection that accompanied the early development of IRIS is now available to the entire world. The challenge for IRIS and the seismology community in the decades ahead will be to encourage the implementation of these technologies, along with appropriate training and resources, to further the research community’s endeavors to understand the structure and evolution of our planet and apply that knowledge to the mitigation of earthquake hazards.

  20. CFD parametric study of consortium impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-07-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Finite Difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. A second-order central difference scheme plus adaptive dissipation terms was employed in the FDNS code, along with a predictor plus multi-corrector pressure-based solution procedure. The multi-zone, multi-block capability allows the FDNS code to efficiently solve flow fields with complicated geometry. The FDNS code has been benchmarked by analyzing the pump consortium inducer, and it provided satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD parametric study of the pump consortium impeller was conducted using the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is a new design concept of the advanced rocket engines. The parametric study was to analyze the baseline design of the consortium impeller and its modification which utilizes TANDEM blades. In the present study, the TANDEM blade configuration of the consortium impeller considers cut full blades for about one quarter chord length from the leading edge and clocks the leading edge portion with an angle of 7.5 or 22.5 degrees. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect and trend of the TANDEM blade modification and provide the result as a design guideline. A 3-D flow analysis, with a 103 x 23 x 30 mesh grid system and with the inlet flow conditions measured by Rocketdyne, was performed for the baseline consortium impeller. The numerical result shows that the mass flow rate splits through various blade passages are relatively uniform

  1. The Chicago Thoracic Oncology Database Consortium: A Multisite Database Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Carey, George B; Tan, Yi-Hung Carol; Bokhary, Ujala; Itkonen, Michelle; Szeto, Kyle; Wallace, James; Campbell, Nicholas; Hensing, Thomas; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An increasing amount of clinical data is available to biomedical researchers, but specifically designed database and informatics infrastructures are needed to handle this data effectively. Multiple research groups should be able to pool and share this data in an efficient manner. The Chicago Thoracic Oncology Database Consortium (CTODC) was created to standardize data collection and facilitate the pooling and sharing of data at institutions throughout Chicago and across the world. We assessed the CTODC by conducting a proof of principle investigation on lung cancer patients who took erlotinib. This study does not look into epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but rather it discusses the development and utilization of the database involved. Methods:  We have implemented the Thoracic Oncology Program Database Project (TOPDP) Microsoft Access, the Thoracic Oncology Research Program (TORP) Velos, and the TORP REDCap databases for translational research efforts. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) were created to document the construction and proper utilization of these databases. These SOPs have been made available freely to other institutions that have implemented their own databases patterned on these SOPs. Results: A cohort of 373 lung cancer patients who took erlotinib was identified. The EGFR mutation statuses of patients were analyzed. Out of the 70 patients that were tested, 55 had mutations while 15 did not. In terms of overall survival and duration of treatment, the cohort demonstrated that EGFR-mutated patients had a longer duration of erlotinib treatment and longer overall survival compared to their EGFR wild-type counterparts who received erlotinib. Discussion: The investigation successfully yielded data from all institutions of the CTODC. While the investigation identified challenges, such as the difficulty of data transfer and potential duplication of patient data, these issues can be resolved

  2. Factors Associated with Successful Completion of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program among Middle-Aged and Older Asian-American Participants: A National Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, SangNam; Smith, Matthew Lee; Cho, Jinmyoung; Jiang, Luohua; Post, Lindsey; Ory, Marcia G.

    2014-01-01

    Asian-Americans are a small but fast-growing population in the United States who are increasingly experiencing multiple chronic diseases. While the evidence-based Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been disseminated among various racial and ethnic populations, few studies specifically investigate participants with an Asian background. The study aims to identify characteristics of middle-aged and older Asian-American CDSMP participants (older than 50 years) and investigate factors related to successful workshop completion (i.e., attending 4+ of the 6 sessions) among this population. Data were analyzed from 2,716 middle-aged and older Asian-Americans collected during a 2-year national dissemination of CDSMP. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify individual- and workshop-level covariates related to successful workshop completion. The majority of participants were female, living with others, and living in metro areas. The average age was 71.3 years old (±9.2), and the average number of chronic conditions was 2.0 (±1.5). Successful completion of CDSMP workshops among participants was associated with their number of chronic conditions (OR = 1.10, P = 0.011), living in non-metro areas (OR = 1.77, P = 0.009), attending workshops from area agencies on aging (OR = 1.56, P = 0.018), and attending a workshop with higher completion rates (OR = 1.03, P < 0.001). This study is the first large-scale examination of Asian-American participants enrolled in CDSMP and highlights characteristics related to intervention attendance among this under-studied minority population. Knowing such characteristics is important for serving the growing number of Asian-Americans with chronic conditions. PMID:25964933

  3. NSF Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium; Scientific Research Support & Data Services for the Polar Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, P. J.; Pundsack, J. W.; Carbotte, S. M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Grunow, A.; Lazzara, M. A.; Carpenter, P.; Sjunneskog, C. M.; Yarmey, L.; Bauer, R.; Adrian, B. M.; Pettit, J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium (a2dc) is a collaboration of research centers and support organizations that provide polar scientists with data and tools to complete their research objectives. From searching historical weather observations to submitting geologic samples, polar researchers utilize the a2dc to search andcontribute to the wealth of polar scientific and geospatial data.The goals of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium are to increase visibility in the research community of the services provided by resource and support facilities. Closer integration of individual facilities into a "one stop shop" will make it easier for researchers to take advantage of services and products provided by consortium members. The a2dc provides a common web portal where investigators can go to access data and samples needed to build research projects, develop student projects, or to do virtual field reconnaissance without having to utilize expensive logistics to go into the field.Participation by the international community is crucial for the success of a2dc. There are 48 nations that are signatories of the Antarctic Treaty, and 8 sovereign nations in the Arctic. Many of these organizations have unique capabilities and data that would benefit US ­funded polar science and vice versa.We'll present an overview of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium, current participating organizations, challenges & opportunities, and plans to better coordinate data through a geospatial strategy and infrastructure.

  4. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  5. Migrating from Informal to Formal Consortium — COSTLI Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdie, C.; Patil, Y. M.

    2010-10-01

    There are many models of library consortia which have come into existence due to various reasons and compulsions. FORSA (Forum for Resource Sharing in Astronomy) is an informal consortium born from the links between academic institutions specializing in astronomy in India. FORSA is a cooperative venture initiated by library professionals. Though this consortium was formed mainly for inter-lending activities and bibliographic access, it has matured over the years to adopt the consortium approach on cooperative acquisitions, due to increased requirements.

  6. Physiological characterization of a broad spectrum reductively dechlorinating consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium (WBC-2) was developed by the US Geological Survey and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for potential use in bioaugmentation applications. On the basis of bench-scale tests, the consortium could completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and vinyl chloride in culture medium. Batch microcosms were carried out under anaerobic conditions in culture medium with neutral pH and with pH adjusted from acidic (pH 4, 5, and 6) to alkaline (pH 8 and 9). To evaluate oxygen sensitivity of WBC-2, an aliquot was removed from an anaerobic culture vessel and poured into smaller containers on the bench top where a series of oxygen exposures were applied to the culture by bubbling ambient air through the culture at a rate of ??? 100 mL/min. Chlorinated methanes tended to inhibit activity of a wide range of microorganisms. Although toxicity effects from CT addition were observed with WBC-2 in liquid culture at 3 mg/L concentration, WBC-2 in the columns could maintain degradation of CT and chloroform (CF) and of the chlorinated ethanes and ethylenes at CT and CF concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/L, respectively. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  7. The CTSA Consortium's Catalog of Assets for Translational and Clinical Health Research (CATCHR).

    PubMed

    Shirey-Rice, Jana; Mapes, Brandy; Basford, Melissa; Zufelt, Anneliese; Wehbe, Firas; Harris, Paul; Alcorn, Michael; Allen, David; Arnim, Margaret; Autry, Susan; Briggs, Michael S; Carnegie, Andrea; Chavis-Keeling, Deborah; De La Pena, Carlos; Dworschak, Doris; Earnest, Julie; Grieb, Terri; Guess, Marilyn; Hafer, Nathaniel; Johnson, Tesheia; Kasper, Amanda; Kopp, Janice; Lockie, Timothy; Lombardo, Vincetta; McHale, Leslie; Minogue, Andrea; Nunnally, Beth; O'Quinn, Deanna; Peck, Kelly; Pemberton, Kieran; Perry, Cheryl; Petrie, Ginny; Pontello, Andria; Posner, Rachel; Rehman, Bushra; Roth, Deborah; Sacksteder, Paulette; Scahill, Samantha; Schieri, Lorri; Simpson, Rosemary; Skinner, Anne; Toussant, Kim; Turner, Alicia; Van der Put, Elaine; Wasser, June; Webb, Chris D; Williams, Maija; Wiseman, Lori; Yasko, Laurel; Pulley, Jill

    2014-04-01

    The 61 CTSA Consortium sites are home to valuable programs and infrastructure supporting translational science and all are charged with ensuring that such investments translate quickly to improved clinical care. Catalog of Assets for Translational and Clinical Health Research (CATCHR) is the Consortium's effort to collect and make available information on programs and resources to maximize efficiency and facilitate collaborations. By capturing information on a broad range of assets supporting the entire clinical and translational research spectrum, CATCHR aims to provide the necessary infrastructure and processes to establish and maintain an open-access, searchable database of consortium resources to support multisite clinical and translational research studies. Data are collected using rigorous, defined methods, with the resulting information made visible through an integrated, searchable Web-based tool. Additional easy-to-use Web tools assist resource owners in validating and updating resource information over time. In this paper, we discuss the design and scope of the project, data collection methods, current results, and future plans for development and sustainability. With increasing pressure on research programs to avoid redundancy, CATCHR aims to make available information on programs and core facilities to maximize efficient use of resources.

  8. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  9. Document delivery by the Jupiter Library Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessels, Robert H. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Jupiter library consortium consists of 4 of the leading libraries in the Netherlands. During 1993 Jupiter received 600,000 requests for copies of journal articles, or 70 percent of all external article requests in the Netherlands. Over 90 percent of the requested documents were delivered from a collection of 40,000 current international journal subscriptions. Jupiter and its affiliate libraries are non-profit organizations belonging to, and serving, the scientific and technical research community. The usage of the current journal collection of the libraries was analyzed to improve the cost/benefit ratio.

  10. Consortium for materials development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During fiscal 1993, the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) maintained the organizational structure and project orientation established in prior years. The commercial objectives are improved materials, biomedical applications, and infrastructure and support hardware. Projects include nonlinear optical materials; space materials (specifically polymer foam/films, atomic oxygen and high temperature superconductors); alloyed and blended materials: sintered and alloyed materials; polymer and carbonate blends; electrodeposition; organic separation; materials dispersion and biodynamics; space carriers: Consort, COMET support, Spacehab utilization; and flight services: accelerometers, CMIX, USEC, ORSEP, and Space Experiment Facility (SEF).

  11. Consortium for materials development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The status of the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) is reviewed. Individual CMDS materials projects and flight opportunities on suborbital and orbital carriers are outlined. Projects include: surface coatings and catalyst production; non-linear optical organic materials; physical properties of immiscible polymers; nuclear track detectors; powdered metal sintering; iron-carbon solidification; high-temperature superconductors; physical vapor transport crystal growth; materials preparation and longevity in hyperthermal oxygen; foam formation; measurement of the microgravity environment; and commercial management of space fluids.

  12. External RNA Controls Consortium Beta Version Update.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hangnoh; Pine, P Scott; McDaniel, Jennifer; Salit, Marc; Oliver, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Spike-in RNAs are valuable controls for a variety of gene expression measurements. The External RNA Controls Consortium developed test sets that were used in a number of published reports. Here we provide an authoritative table that summarizes, updates, and corrects errors in the test version that ultimately resulted in the certified Standard Reference Material 2374. We have noted existence of anti-sense RNA controls in the material, corrected sub-pool memberships, and commented on control RNAs that displayed inconsistent behavior. PMID:27512518

  13. External RNA Controls Consortium Beta Version Update

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hangnoh; Pine, P. Scott; McDaniel, Jennifer; Salit, Marc; Oliver, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Spike-in RNAs are valuable controls for a variety of gene expression measurements. The External RNA Controls Consortium developed test sets that were used in a number of published reports. Here we provide an authoritative table that summarizes, updates, and corrects errors in the test version that ultimately resulted in the certified Standard Reference Material 2374. We have noted existence of anti-sense RNA controls in the material, corrected sub-pool memberships, and commented on control RNAs that displayed inconsistent behavior. PMID:27512518

  14. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    : one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  15. Experience of the Paris Research Consortium Climate-Environment-Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joussaume, Sylvie; Pacteau, Chantal; Vanderlinden, Jean Paul

    2016-04-01

    It is now widely recognized that the complexity of climate change issues translates itself into a need for interdisciplinary approaches to science. This allows to first achieve a more comprehensive vision of climate change and, second, to better inform the decision-making processes. However, it seems that willingness alone is rarely enough to implement interdisciplinarity. The purpose of this presentation is to mobilize reflexivity to revisit and analyze the experience of the Paris Consortium for Climate-Environment-Society. The French Consortium Climate-Environment-Society aims to develop, fund and coordinate interdisciplinary research into climate change and its impacts on society and environment. Launched in 2007, the consortium relies on the research expertise of 17 laboratories and federation in the Paris area working mainly in the fields of climatology, hydrology, ecology, health sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. As examples, economists and climatologists have studied greenhouse gas emission scenarios compatible with climate stabilization goals. Historical records have provided both knowledge about past climate change and vulnerability of societies. Some regions, as the Mediterranean and the Sahel, are particularly vulnerable and already have to cope with water availability, agricultural production and even health issues. A project showed that millet production in West Africa is expected to decline due to warming in a higher proportion than observed in recent decades. Climate change also raises many questions concerning health: combined effects of warming and air quality, impacts on the production of pollens and allergies, impacts on infectious diseases. All these issues lead to a need for approaches integrating different disciplines. Furthermore, climate change impacts many ecosystems which, in turn, affect its evolution. Our experience shows that interdisciplinarity supposes, in order to take shape, the conjunction between programming

  16. Human Factors. Proceedings of the Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium (CALICO) Annual Symposium (Flagstaff, Arizona, March 4-18, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borchardt, Frank L., Ed.; Johnson, Eleanor M. T., Ed.

    This conference proceedings presents abstracts, complete papers, and author biographies for the 1994 Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium (CALICO) annual symposium on human factors in computer-assisted language learning (CALL), specifically the actual use of software by the human learner and teacher. Presented topics included…

  17. Complete Madness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, David C.

    1997-05-01

    The use of MAD notation for the representation of charged particle optical systems has proved to be surprisingly popular. Originally, the MAD notation was intended to be used in other computer programs only for the representation of the beam line itself. Preliminary specifications, calculations to be done, and fitting procedures would all continue to be expressed in the notation peculiar to the various programs. hspace*1.5cm One such program is TRANSPORT. Retention of the original notation has been a source of much confusion. It is better to have everything in the data be in the MAD style format. We have now accomplished this change. Details will be provided. *Operated by the Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy. ^1 TRANSPORT, D.C. Carey, K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker, SLAC Report No. R-95-462, May 1995.

  18. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M.; Brooks, Philip J.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Kelley, Christine A.; Kuo, Lillian S.; Labosky, Patricia A.; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A.; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A.; Tucker, Jessica M.; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c) identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d) demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e) developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators. PMID:26320938

  19. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the tenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: {lg_bullet} 2004 SWC Final Project Reports distribution; {lg_bullet} Exhibit and present at the Midcontinent Oil and Gas Prospect Fair, Great Bend, KS, September 12, 2006; {lg_bullet} Participate and showcase current and past projects at the 2006 Oklahoma Oil and Gas Trade Expo, Oklahoma City, OK, October 26, 2006; {lg_bullet} Finalize agenda and identify exhibitors for the northeastern US, Fall SWC Technical Transfer Workshop, Pittsburghhh, PA, November 9, 2006; {lg_bullet} Continue distribution of the public broadcast documentary, ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''; {lg_bullet} Communications/outreach; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  20. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) update.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Shearer, William T; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Decaluwe, Hélène; Haddad, Elie

    2016-08-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a collaboration of 41 North American centers studying therapy for rare primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs), including severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). An additional 3 European centers have partnered with the PIDTC to study CGD. Natural history protocols of the PIDTC analyze outcomes of treatment for rare PIDs in multicenter longitudinal retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. Since 2009, participating centers have enrolled more than 800 subjects on PIDTC protocols for SCID, and enrollment in the studies on WAS and CGD is underway. Four pilot projects have been funded, and 12 junior investigators have received fellowship awards. Important publications of the consortium describe the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for SCID during 2000-2009, diagnostic criteria for SCID, and the pilot project of newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshops provide an opportunity to strengthen collaborations with junior investigators, patient advocacy groups, and international colleagues. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the PIDTC has recently received renewal for another 5 years. Here we review accomplishments of the group, projects underway, highlights of recent workshops, and challenges for the future. PMID:27262745

  1. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a

  2. The response of maize (Zea mays L.) plant assisted with bacterial consortium and fertilizer under oily sludge.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Asim; Saddiqui, Samina; Bano, Asghari

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of PGPR consortium and fertilizer alone and in combination on the physiology of maize grown under oily sludge stress environment as well on the soil nutrient status. Consortium was prepared from Bacillus cereus (Acc KR232400), Bacillus altitudinis (Acc KF859970), Comamonas (Delftia) belonging to family Comamonadacea (Acc KF859971) and Stenotrophomonasmaltophilia (Acc KF859973). The experiment was conducted in pots with complete randomized design with four replicates and kept in field. Oily sludge was mixed in ml and Ammonium nitrate and Diammonium phosphate (DAP) were added at 70 ug/g and 7 ug/g at sowing. The plant was harvested at 21 d for estimation of protein, proline and antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD). To study the degradation, total petroleum hydrocarbon was extracted by soxhelt extraction and extract was analyzed by GC-FID at different period after incubation. Combined application of consortium and fertilizer enhanced the germination %, protein and, proline content by 90,130 and 99% higher than untreated maize plants. Bioavailability of macro and micro nutrient was also enhanced with consortium and fertilizer in oily sludge. The consortium and fertilizer in combined treatment decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase dismutase (POD) of the maize leaves grown in oily sludge. Degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPHs) was 59% higher in combined application of consortium and fertilizer than untreated maize at 3 d. The bacterial consortium can enhanced the maize tolerance to oily sludge and enhanced degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPHs). The maize can be considered as tolerant plant species to remediate oily sludge contaminated soils.

  3. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid–fluid and fluid–substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  4. 25 CFR 1000.283 - If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../Consortium do? As part of the notification required by 28 U.S.C. 2679(c), if the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's... Solicitor, Department of the Interior, Room 6511, 1849 C Street NW., Washington, DC 20240, (b) Inform the... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's...

  5. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... is not formally incorporated must provide a collaboration agreement, commonly referred to as the articles of collaboration, which sets out the rights and responsibilities of each consortium member. This agreement binds the individual consortium members together and should discuss, among other things,...

  6. 47 CFR 54.631 - Designation of Consortium Leader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designation of Consortium Leader. 54.631 Section 54.631 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.631 Designation of Consortium Leader....

  7. 47 CFR 54.631 - Designation of Consortium Leader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designation of Consortium Leader. 54.631 Section 54.631 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.631 Designation of Consortium Leader....

  8. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  9. Policy Report of the Physician Consortium on Substance Abuse Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, David C.; Faggett, Walter L.

    This report contains the recommendations of the Physician Consortium for significantly improving medical education and training to enhance the physician's role in early identification, treatment, and prevention of substance abuse. In addition, the consortium subcommittees report on their examination of substance abuse treatment needs of ethnic and…

  10. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a... consortium will be paid to the lead agency. (b) The lead agency must not be a PHA that is designated as...

  11. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is a consortium? 943.118 Section 943.118 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium?...

  12. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is a consortium? 943.118 Section 943.118 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium?...

  13. The Consortium for Higher Education Tax Reform Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This White Paper presents the work of the Consortium for Higher Education Tax Reform, a partnership funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as part of the second phase of its Reimagining Aid Design and Delivery (RADD) initiative. Consortium partners are the Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success at CLASP, the Education Trust, New…

  14. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium? A... consortium also submits a joint PHA Plan. The lead agency collects the assistance funds from HUD that would... same fiscal year so that the applicable periods for submission and review of the joint PHA Plan are...

  15. United States Participation in the Pacific Circle Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The goal of the Pacific Circle Project is to improve international and intercultural understanding among the people and nations of the Pacific. Consortium member countries are Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. Within the countries are chosen member institutions. Two major types of activities of the consortium are the exchange…

  16. Effect of perchloroethylene (PCE) on methane and acetate production by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Bereded-Samuel, Y.; Petersen, J.N.; Skeen, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of perchloroethylene (PCE) concentration in the range of 0-100 mg/L on methane and acetate production by a methanol-enriched methanogenic consortia were investigated at 17{degrees}C. The results indicate that PCE is more inhibitory to methanogenesis than to acetogenesis. At concentrations as low as 10 ppm, PCE affects the methanogenic activity of the consortium, and has completely inhibited this activity at 100 ppm. Conversely, PCE does not begin to inhibit acetogenic activity until the concentration is above 10 ppm, and has not completely inhibited it even at a PCE concentration of 100 ppm. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  17. The Black Rock Forest Consortium: A narrative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzetto-More, Nicole Antoinette

    The Black Rock Forest is a 3,785-acre wilderness area whose richly forested landscape represents the splendor of the Hudson Valley Region of New York State. Although originally intended to become the home of wealthy banker James Stillman, it was his son Ernest whose love of conservation caused him to embrace the then new and revolutionary practice of sustainable forestry and establish Black Rock in 1928. Due to Ernest Stillman's foresight, the property was protected from development and bequeathed to Harvard University following his death for the establishment of an experimental forest. The modern environmental movement in America began when the Black Rock Forest was threatened with development by Consolidated Edison, and the people of the surrounding community banded together, battling tirelessly for over 17 years to stop the degradation of this historic forest. The outcome of this crusade marked a hallmark win for the environment leaving an illustrious and inveterate legacy. The campaign resulted in the watershed legislation the National Environmental Policy Act, the formation of several environmental advocacy groups, the creation of the Council on Environmental Quality of the Executive Office of the President, as well as set a precedent for communities to initiate and win cases against major corporations in order to safeguard natural resources. In the midst of the controversy it became apparent that alternative futures for the Forest needed to be explored. As a result of a committee report and one man's vision, the idea emerged to create a consortium that would purchase and steward the Forest. With a formation that took nearly fifteen years, the Black Rock Forest Consortium was formed, a unique amalgamation of K--12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, and science and cultural centers that successfully collaborate to enhance scientific research, environmental conservation, and education. The Consortium works to bridge the gaps between learners

  18. What Students Said about Interactive Video Instruction: Results of Two Surveys Conducted by the West Suburban Post-Secondary Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Marilyn A.

    The West Suburban Post-Secondary Consortium (WSPSC) of Oak Brook, Illinois is a not-for-profit organization of collaborating educational institutions that offer courses, programs and degrees in the western suburbs of Chicago. Interactive video is a successful instructional delivery method in the WSPSC, according to the students who took video…

  19. 25 CFR 1000.382 - What may the Tribe's/Consortium's annual report on self-governance address?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-governance address? 1000.382 Section 1000.382 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... report on self-governance address? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's annual self-governance report may address... the programs and services funded under self-governance, summarized and annotated as the Tribe may...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.382 - What may the Tribe's/Consortium's annual report on self-governance address?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-governance address? 1000.382 Section 1000.382 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... report on self-governance address? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's annual self-governance report may address... the programs and services funded under self-governance, summarized and annotated as the Tribe may...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.382 - What may the Tribe's/Consortium's annual report on self-governance address?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-governance address? 1000.382 Section 1000.382 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... report on self-governance address? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's annual self-governance report may address... the programs and services funded under self-governance, summarized and annotated as the Tribe may...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.382 - What may the Tribe's/Consortium's annual report on self-governance address?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-governance address? 1000.382 Section 1000.382 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... report on self-governance address? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's annual self-governance report may address... the programs and services funded under self-governance, summarized and annotated as the Tribe may...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.382 - What may the Tribe's/Consortium's annual report on self-governance address?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-governance address? 1000.382 Section 1000.382 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... report on self-governance address? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's annual self-governance report may address... the programs and services funded under self-governance, summarized and annotated as the Tribe may...

  4. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  5. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  6. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  7. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  8. Consortium sandbox: building and sharing resources.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mark D

    2014-06-25

    Some common challenges of biomedical product translation-scientific, regulatory, adoption, and reimbursement-can best be addressed by the broad sharing of resources or tools. But, such aids remain undeveloped because the undertaking requires expertise from multiple research sectors as well as validation across organizations. Biomedical resource development can benefit from directed consortia-a partnership framework that provides neutral and temporary collaborative environments for several, oftentimes competing, organizations and leverages the aggregated intellect and resources of stakeholders so as to create versatile solutions. By analyzing 369 biomedical research consortia, we tracked consortia growth around the world and gained insight into how this partnership model advances biomedical research. Our analyses suggest that research-by-consortium provides benefit to biomedical science, but the model needs further optimization before it can be fully integrated into the biomedical research pipeline.

  9. The Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, A.; Baker, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    The United States and Russia discovered a mutual interest in fuel cell development during a series of workshops designed to teach entrepreneurial skills to Russian nuclear weapon scientists and engineers to aid them in converting their skill to peaceful applications. The proposal for a Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium was initiated at the third workshop held in Livermore, CA, in May 1994. Representatives from U.S. fuel cell industries, U.S. research institutes, Russian institutes and ministries, and U.S. national laboratories attended, including those from GAZPROM, the Russian natural gas company. GASPROM needs to provide power for telemetry, cathodic corrosion protection of gas lines, and gas line pumping power in remote areas, and estimates that it needs approximately seventy thousand 1.5 to 15 KW plants to do so. Since the workshop, several direct working relationships have developed between the Russian Nuclear Weapon Institutes and the U.S. fuel cell industry.

  10. Course of symptom change during anxiety treatment: Reductions in anxiety and depression in patients completing the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Bomyea, Jessica; Lang, Ariel; Craske, Michelle G.; Chavira, Denise A.; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Rose, Raphael D.; Golinelli, Daniela; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Welch, Stacy S.; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Stein, Murray B.

    2015-01-01

    When treating anxious patients with co-occurring depression, research demonstrates that both types of symptoms independently improve. The current analyses examined how reductions in anxiety and depression may be interrelated both during treatment, as well as over time following treatment. Participants were 503 individuals with one or more DSM-IV anxiety disorders who completed a collaborative care anxiety management program. Anxiety and depression were assessed at each treatment session (i.e., session by session data) and also at 6, 12, and 18-month post-baseline assessments (i.e., long-term outcomes data). Mediation analysis examined changes in symptoms in session by session data and long-term outcomes data. Anxiety and depression changed reciprocally in session by session data; change in anxiety mediated change in depression to a greater extent than vice versa. In the long-term outcomes data, change in anxiety mediated change in depression. However, the reverse mediation model of the long-term outcomes period revealed that accounting for changes in depression altered the effect of time on anxiety. Thus, temporal change during active treatment may share similarities with those related to maintaining gains after treatment, although differences arose in the reverse mediation models. Limitations of the methodology and implications of anxiety treatment for depression outcomes are discussed. PMID:26228164

  11. Course of symptom change during anxiety treatment: Reductions in anxiety and depression in patients completing the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management program.

    PubMed

    Bomyea, Jessica; Lang, Ariel; Craske, Michelle G; Chavira, Denise A; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Rose, Raphael D; Golinelli, Daniela; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Welch, Stacy S; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Stein, Murray B

    2015-09-30

    When treating anxious patients with co-occurring depression, research demonstrates that both types of symptoms independently improve. The current analyses examined how reductions in anxiety and depression may be interrelated both during treatment, as well as over time following treatment. Participants were 503 individuals with one or more DSM-IV anxiety disorders who completed a collaborative care anxiety management program. Anxiety and depression were assessed at each treatment session (i.e., session by session data) and also at 6, 12, and 18-month post-baseline assessments (i.e., long-term outcomes data). Mediation analyses examined changes in symptoms in session by session data and long-term outcomes data. Anxiety and depression changed reciprocally in session by session data; change in anxiety mediated change in depression to a greater extent than vice versa. In the long-term outcomes data, change in anxiety mediated change in depression. However, the reverse mediation model of the long-term outcomes period revealed that accounting for changes in depression altered the effect of time on anxiety. Thus, temporal change during active treatment may share similarities with those related to maintaining gains after treatment, although differences arose in the reverse mediation models. Limitations of the methodology and implications of anxiety treatment for depression outcomes are discussed.

  12. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise education programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development to address the nation`s critical environmental contamination problems. The Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan became the working agenda. The Consortium is a resource for collaboration among the member institutions and with federal an state agencies, national and federal laboratories, industries, (including small businesses), majority universities, and two and four-year technical colleges. As a group of 17 institutions geographically located in the southern US, the Consortium is well positioned to reach a diverse group of women and minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. This Report provides a status update on activities and achievements in environmental curriculum development, outreach at the K--12 level, undergraduate and graduate education, research and development, and technology transfer.

  13. The Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect

    1991-02-25

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) . This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management by the Consortium universities resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. The term waste management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration. (2) Research programs at the leading edge, providing training to faculty and students and feeding into the education programs. (3) Education and research at the campuses, as well as from three field sites. (4) Ties with other multi-disciplinary university facilities. (5) Ties with two National Laboratories located in New Mexico. (6) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a proposed satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (7) An outreach program to interest others in environmental management, especially precollege students, minority students and practitioners in the field. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the first year.

  14. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fifth year final reports summary, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    As part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research programs focused on: (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants, and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of eleven studies in these areas.

  15. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

  16. Completing Purchase Invoices. Student's Manual and Instructor's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Mary

    Supporting performance objective 51 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Bookkeeper Catalog, this instructor's manual concerns the completing of purchase invoices. (This module is the sixth in a set of ten on bookkeeping [CE 019 480-489].) The student materials include a pre- and posttest, three instruction sheets…

  17. Completing Sales Invoices. Student's Manual and Instructor's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElveen, Peggy

    Supporting specific performance objectives of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Bookkeeper Catalog, a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on completing sales invoices are included in this module. (This module is the eighth in a set of ten on bookkeeping [CE 019 480-489].) The student materials include…

  18. Xavier University CERE Program [Consortium for Environmental Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Sally

    1999-09-01

    The workshop provided training for 20 environmental professionals and educators. The focus of instruction for two days was the use of the Internet as a communcation tool. Instructors introduced participants to email, designing and building Web pages, and conducting research using search engines. The focus for three days was learning how Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can be used in the classroom and the workplace. Participants were introducted to the GIS on the Internet and Use of ArcView software.

  19. Improving Your Organisation's Workplace Learning. Consortium Research Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Many organisations, including VET providers, are looking to find ways to achieve competitive advantage through the people they employ. Creating this advantage has a number of facets and most of these depend on training and developing people, and their ability to learn. The VET sector also faces significant changes in the ways it does business.…

  20. [Activity of NTDs Drug-discovery Research Consortium].

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an extremely important issue facing global health care. To improve "access to health" where people are unable to access adequate medical care due to poverty and weak healthcare systems, we have established two consortiums: the NTD drug discovery research consortium, and the pediatric praziquantel consortium. The NTD drug discovery research consortium, which involves six institutions from industry, government, and academia, as well as an international non-profit organization, is committed to developing anti-protozoan active compounds for three NTDs (Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and African sleeping sickness). Each participating institute will contribute their efforts to accomplish the following: selection of drug targets based on information technology, and drug discovery by three different approaches (in silico drug discovery, "fragment evolution" which is a unique drug designing method of Astellas Pharma, and phenotypic screening with Astellas' compound library). The consortium has established a brand new database (Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease Database; iNTRODB), and has selected target proteins for the in silico and fragment evolution drug discovery approaches. Thus far, we have identified a number of promising compounds that inhibit the target protein, and we are currently trying to improve the anti-protozoan activity of these compounds. The pediatric praziquantel consortium was founded in July 2012 to develop and register a new praziquantel pediatric formulation for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Astellas Pharma has been a core member in this consortium since its establishment, and has provided expertise and technology in the area of pediatric formulation development and clinical development.

  1. The End of Life Nursing Education Nursing Consortium project.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty; Malloy, Pam; Virani, Rose

    2015-04-01

    In 2000, the City of Hope Medical Center and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) developed the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)-Core curriculum to educate nurses and other healthcare professionals on end of life care, so that attention to the dying could be improved and their unique needs addressed. Since its inception, over 19,500 nurses and other professionals have attended the ELNEC train-the-trainer courses. Upon course completion, the participants, often nurse educators, returned to their schools, healthcare systems, and communities and introduced the ELNEC content into nursing curricula, annual competencies, and new employee orientation. In 2005, the national ELNEC Project Team concluded that an international curriculum should be developed. The first ELNEC International course was launched in 2006 in Salzburg, Austria. Since that time, trainers have come from 85 countries world-wide, and the curriculum has been translated into eight languages. In 2015, three international courses will be presented: in Beijing, China, Kipkaren, Kenya, and Salzburg, Austria.

  2. Assessing Medicare Part D Claim Completeness Using Medication Self-reports: The Role of Veteran Status and Generic Drug Discount Programs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Stearns, Sally C.; Thudium, Emily M.; Alburikan, Khalid A.; Rodgers, Jo Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medicare Part D claims are commonly used for research, but missing claims could compromise their validity. This study assessed two possible causes of missing claims: veteran status and Generic Drug Discount Programs (GDDP). Methods We merged medication self-reports from telephone interviews in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) with Part D claims for six medications (three were commonly in GDDP in 2009). Merged records (4,468) were available for 2,905 ARIC participants enrolled in Part D. Multinomial logit regression provided estimates of the association of concordance (self-report & Part D, self-report only, or Part D only) with veteran and GDDP status, controlling for participant socio-demographics. Results Sample participants were 74±5 years of age, 68% white and 63% female; 19% were male veterans. Compared to females, male veterans were 11% (95% CI: 7%–16%) less likely to have matched medications in self-report & Part D and 11% (95% CI: 7%–16%) more likely to have self-report only. Records for GDDP versus non-GDDP medications were 4% (95% CI: 1%–7%) more likely to be in self-report & Part D and 3% (95% CI: 1%–5%) less likely to be in Part D only, with no difference in self-report only. Conclusions Part D claims were more likely to be missing for veterans, but claims for medications commonly available through GDDP were more likely to match with self-reports. While researchers should be aware of the possibility of missing claims, GDDP status was associated with a higher rather than lower likelihood of claims being complete in 2009. PMID:25793271

  3. A beginners guide for video production. [Prepared by the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium for Technology Initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the municipal solid and liquid waste streams. Many innovative programs for managing small sources of hazardous waste have been developed in response to the Plan. With the assistance of Urban Consortium grants, the City of Seattle has researched and developed a series of reports describing the planning, operation and evaluation of the plan's HHW collection programs. Three of the Plan's programs of particular interest to other jurisdictions are the fixed site and mobile HHW Collection Facilities, and the Business Waste Consultations provided to SQG's. In 1991, Seattle received an Urban Consortium grant to produce two videos showing how the HHW Collection Facilities and Business Consultations programs work. This report provides an overviews of the video development and production process and a discussion of the lessons learned by the staff directing the production.

  4. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  5. The National Astronomy Consortium - An Adaptable Model for OAD?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik

    2015-08-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and Associated Universities Inc., (AUI) in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP), and a number of minority and majority universities to increase the numbers of students from underrepresented groups and those otherwise overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM or STEM-related careers. The seed for the NAC was a partnership between NRAO and Howard University which began with an exchange of a few summer students five years ago. Since then the NAC has grown tremendously. Today the NAC aims to host between 4 to 5 cohorts nationally in an innovative model in which the students are mentored throughout the year with multiple mentors and peer mentoring, continued engagement in research and professional development / career training throughout the academic year and throughout their careers.The NAC model has already shown success and is a very promising and innovative model for increasing participation of young people in STEM and STEM-related careers. I will discuss how this model could be adapted in various countries at all levels of education.

  6. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds. PMID:26143035

  7. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds.

  8. Entrepreneurship Program Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Guzman, Geannina

    This publication contains a synthesis of information collected by the National Entrepreneurship Education Consortium on the efforts of local vocational education programs in the area of entrepreneurship education. The programs described represent all instructional levels and all areas of the country. A directory of programs listed by state is…

  9. America Reads-Mississippi Future Teacher Corps: A Study of Program Completers' Perception of Factors Influencing the Decision to Become and Remain Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Deborah Green

    2012-01-01

    Despite the number of programs in Mississippi that focus on developing and training teachers, the State continues to face a critical teacher shortage. This non-experimental, ex-post facto, quantitative study investigated the America Reads-Mississippi (ARM) Future Teacher Corps (FTC) program, an AmeriCorps program in Mississippi with a mission to…

  10. Consortium for Materials Development in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During FY99 the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) was reorganized around the following guidelines: industry driven, product focus, an industry led advisory council, focus on University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) core competencies, linkage to regional investment firms to assist commercialization and to take advantage of space flights. The organizational structure of the CMDS changed considerably during the year. The decision was made to reduce the organization to a Director and an Administrative Assistant. The various research projects, including the employees, were transferred to the appropriate UAH research center or college. In addition, an advisory council was established to provide direction and guidance to the CMDS to ensure a strong commercial focus. The council will (i) review CMDS commercial development plans and provide feedback, (ii) perform an annual evaluation of the Center's progress and present the results of this review to the UAH Vice President for Research, (iii) serve as an avenue of communication between the CMDS and its commercial partners, and (iv) serve as an ambassador and advocate for the CMDS.

  11. AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Maria E.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Douwes, Jeroen; Hoppin, Jane A.; Kromhout, Hans; Lebailly, Pierre; Nordby, Karl-Christian; Schenker, Marc; Schüz, Joachim; Waring, Stephen C.; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Baldi, Isabelle; Dalvie, Mohamed Aqiel; Ferro, Giles; Fervers, Béatrice; Langseth, Hilde; London, Leslie; Lynch, Charles F.; McLaughlin, John; Merchant, James A.; Pahwa, Punam; Sigsgaard, Torben; Stayner, Leslie; Wesseling, Catharina; Yoo, Keun-Young; Zahm, Shelia H.; Straif, Kurt; Blair, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1), Canada (3), Costa Rica (2), USA (6), Republic of Korea (1), New Zealand (2), Denmark (1), France (3) and Norway (3). The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals) or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases). To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides. PMID:21655123

  12. SUNrises on the International Plant Nucleus Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Graumann, Katja; Bass, Hank W.; Parry, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear periphery is a dynamic, structured environment, whose precise functions are essential for global processes—from nuclear, to cellular, to organismal. Its main components—the nuclear envelope (NE) with inner and outer nuclear membranes (INM and ONM), nuclear pore complexes (NPC), associated cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal components as well as chromatin are conserved across eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In metazoans in particular, the structure and functions of nuclear periphery components are intensely researched partly because of their involvement in various human diseases. While far less is known about these in plants, the last few years have seen a significant increase in research activity in this area. Plant biologists are not only catching up with the animal field, but recent findings are pushing our advances in this field globally. In recognition of this developing field, the Annual Society of Experimental Biology Meeting in Salzburg kindly hosted a session co-organized by Katja Graumann and David E. Evans (Oxford Brookes University) highlighting new insights into plant nuclear envelope proteins and their interactions. This session brought together leading researchers with expertise in topics such as epigenetics, meiosis, nuclear pore structure and functions, nucleoskeleton and nuclear envelope composition. An open and friendly exchange of ideas was fundamental to the success of the meeting, which resulted in founding the International Plant Nucleus Consortium. This review highlights new developments in plant nuclear envelope research presented at the conference and their importance for the wider understanding of metazoan, yeast and plant nuclear envelope functions and properties. PMID:23324458

  13. National Consortium Supports Cities in Evaluating LED Streetlights

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-30

    Fact sheet that introduces Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, a group of municipalities, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations who are interested in making investments in LED street and area lighting.

  14. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  15. A Perspective from the National Consortium for Secondary STEM Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonds, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the role of National Consortium for Secondary STEM Schools in the process of data-informed decision-making for both improving and addressing achievement gaps in participatory specialized STEM high schools.

  16. Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Cancer.gov

    Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium collaborates with three genomic facilities, epidemiologists, population geneticists, and biostatisticians from multiple institutions to study hormone-related gene variants and environmental factors in breast and prostate cancers.

  17. Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer

    The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

  18. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  19. The Cardiac Safety Research Consortium enters its second decade: An invitation to participate.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Rick; Kowey, Peter R; Rodriguez, Ignacio; Cabell, Christopher H; Gintant, Gary; Green, Cynthia L; Kunz, Barbara Lopez; Mortara, Justin; Sager, Philip T; Stockbridge, Norman; Wright, Theressa J; Finkle, John; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2016-07-01

    The Cardiac Safety Research Consortium (CSRC), a transparent, public-private partnership established in 2005 as a Critical Path Program and formalized in 2006 under a Memorandum of Understanding between the United States Food and Drug Administration and Duke University, is entering its second decade. Our continuing goal is to advance paradigms for more efficient regulatory science related to the cardiovascular safety of new therapeutics, both in the United States and globally, particularly where such safety questions add burden to innovative research and development. Operationally, CSRC brings together a broad base of stakeholders from academia, industry, and government agencies in a collaborative forum focused on identifying barriers and then creating novel solutions through shared data, expertise, and collaborative research. This white paper provides a brief overview of the Consortium's activities in its first decade and a context for some of our current activities and future directions. The growth and success of the CSRC have been primarily driven by members' active participation and the development of goodwill and trust throughout our membership, which have facilitated novel collaborations across traditionally competitive or contentious stakeholder boundaries. The continued expansion of our base of participating academicians, industry experts, and regulators will define the Consortium's success in our second decade. It is our hope that sharing our endeavors to date will stimulate additional participation in the CSRC and also provide a model for other groups starting to develop similar collaborative forums. PMID:27297854

  20. A Consortium Project to Improve Retention and the First Year of College: Results and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Marc

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the operation and perceived effectiveness of a short-term, nine-community-college consortium, a consortium dedicated to the improvement of student retention and first-year education at each of the colleges in the consortium. The consortium was composed of Alabama community colleges, essentially during calendar year 2002. Its…

  1. Improving acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) outcome in developing countries through networking, results of the International Consortium on APL.

    PubMed

    Rego, Eduardo M; Kim, Haesook T; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Undurraga, Maria Soledad; Uriarte, Maria del Rosario; Jacomo, Rafael H; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Homero; Melo, Raul A M; Bittencourt, Rosane; Pasquini, Ricardo; Pagnano, Katia; Fagundes, Evandro M; Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes; Chiattone, Carlos S; Martinez, Lem; Meillón, Luis A; Gómez-Almaguer, David; Kwaan, Hau C; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Gallagher, Robert; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Schrier, Stanley L; Tallman, Martin; Grimwade, David; Ganser, Arnold; Berliner, Nancy; Ribeiro, Raul C; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Löwenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A

    2013-03-14

    Thanks to modern treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is now the most curable type of leukemia. However, this progress has not yielded equivalent benefit in developing countries. The International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (IC-APL) was established to create a network of institutions in developing countries that would exchange experience and data and receive support from well-established US and European cooperative groups. The IC-APL formulated expeditious diagnostic, treatment, and supportive guidelines that were adapted to local circumstances. APL was chosen as a model disease because of the potential impact on improved diagnosis and treatment. The project included 4 national coordinators and reference laboratories, common clinical record forms, 5 subcommittees, and laboratory and data management training programs. In addition, participating institutions held regular virtual and face-to-face meetings. Complete hematological remission was achieved in 153/180 (85%) patients and 27 (15%) died during induction. After a median follow-up of 28 months, the 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were 4.5%, 80%, and 91%, respectively. The establishment of the IC-APL network resulted in a decrease of almost 50% in early mortality and an improvement in OS of almost 30% compared with historical controls, resulting in OS and DFS similar to those reported in developed countries. PMID:23319575

  2. Requirement for a microbial consortium to completely oxidize glucose in Fe(III)- reducing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    In various sediments in which Fe(III) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process, [14C]glucose was fermented to 14C-fatty acids in a manner similar to that observed in methanogenic sediments. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in Fe(III)-reducing sediments, fermentable substrates are oxidized to carbon dioxide by the combined activity of fermentative bacteria and fatty acid-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  3. Bacterial diversity of a consortium degrading high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a two-liquid phase biosystem.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, Isabelle; Juteau, Pierre; Déziel, Eric; Lépine, François; Beaudet, Réjean; Villemur, Richard

    2009-04-01

    High-molecular-weight (HMW) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that persist in the environment due to their low solubility in water and their sequestration by soil and sediments. Although several PAH-degrading bacterial species have been isolated, it is not expected that a single isolate would exhibit the ability to degrade completely all PAHs. A consortium composed of different microorganisms can better achieve this. Two-liquid phase (TLP) culture systems have been developed to increase the bioavailability of poorly soluble substrates for uptake and biodegradation by microorganisms. By combining a silicone oil-water TLP system with a microbial consortium capable of degrading HMW PAHs, we previously developed a highly efficient PAH-degrading system. In this report, we characterized the bacterial diversity of the consortium with a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of part of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to monitor the bacterial population changes during PAH degradation of the consortium when pyrene, chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene were provided together or separately in the TLP cultures. No substantial changes in bacterial profiles occurred during biodegradation of pyrene and chrysene in these cultures. However, the addition of the low-molecular-weight PAHs phenanthrene or naphthalene in the system favored one bacterial species related to Sphingobium yanoikuyae. Eleven bacterial strains were isolated from the consortium but, interestingly, only one-IAFILS9 affiliated to Novosphingobium pentaromativorans-was capable of growing on pyrene and chrysene as sole source of carbon. A 16S rDNA library was derived from the consortium to identify noncultured bacteria. Among 86 clones screened, 20 were affiliated to different bacterial species-genera. Only three strains were represented in the screened clones. Eighty

  4. The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, S. E.; Wiggins, H. V.; Creek, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) is a nonprofit membership organization composed of universities and institutions that have a substantial commitment to research in the Arctic. Founded in 1988 to serve as a forum for advancing interdisciplinary studies of the Arctic, ARCUS synthesizes and disseminates scientific information on arctic research and educates scientists and the general public about the needs and opportunities for research in the Arctic. ARCUS works closely with national and international stakeholders in advancing science planning and educational activities across disciplinary and organizational boundaries. Examples of ARCUS projects include: - Arctic Sea Ice Outlook - an international effort that provides monthly summer reports synthesizing community estimates of the expected sea ice minimum. - Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook - a resource for Alaska Native subsistence hunters, coastal communities, and others that provides weekly reports with information on sea ice conditions relevant to walrus in Alaska waters. - PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) - a program for K-12 educators and researchers to work together in hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctic to advance polar science education. - ArcticInfo mailing list, Witness the Arctic newsletter, and the Arctic Calendar - communication tools for the arctic community to keep apprised of relevant news, meetings, and announcements. - Project Office for the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, which aims to provide scientific understanding of arctic environmental change to help society understand and respond to a rapidly changing Arctic. More information about these and other ARCUS activities can be found at the ARCUS website at: http://www.arcus.org.

  5. The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, S. E.; Wiggins, H. V.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) is a nonprofit membership organization composed of universities and institutions that have a substantial commitment to research in the Arctic. ARCUS was formed in 1988 to serve as a forum for planning, facilitating, coordinating, and implementing interdisciplinary studies of the Arctic; to act as a synthesizer and disseminator of scientific information on arctic research; and to educate scientists and the general public about the needs and opportunities for research in the Arctic. ARCUS, in collaboration with the broader science community, relevant agencies and organizations, and other stakeholders, coordinates science planning and educational activities across disciplinary and organizational boundaries. Examples of ARCUS projects include: - Arctic Sea Ice Outlook - an international effort that provides monthly summer reports synthesizing community estimates of the expected sea ice minimum. - Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook - a resource for Alaska Native subsistence hunters, coastal communities, and others that provides weekly reports with information on sea ice conditions relevant to walrus in Alaska waters. - PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) - a program whereby K-12 educators and researchers work together in hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctic to advance polar science education. - ArcticInfo mailing list, Witness the Arctic newsletter, and the Arctic Calendar - communication tools for the arctic science community to keep apprised of relevant news, meetings, and announcements. - Coordination for the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, which aims to provide scientific understanding of arctic environmental change to help society understand and respond to a rapidly changing Arctic.

  6. The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creek, K. R.; Fox, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) is a nonprofit membership organization composed of universities and institutions that have a substantial commitment to research in the Arctic. Founded in 1988 to serve as a forum for advancing interdisciplinary studies of the Arctic, ARCUS synthesizes and disseminates scientific information on arctic research and educates scientists and the general public about the needs and opportunities for research in the Arctic. ARCUS works closely with national and international stakeholders in advancing science planning and educational activities across disciplinary and organizational boundaries. Examples of ARCUS projects include: - Arctic Sea Ice Outlook - an international effort that provides monthly summer reports synthesizing community estimates of the expected sea ice minimum. - Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook - a resource for Alaska Native subsistence hunters, coastal communities, and others that provides weekly reports with information on sea ice conditions relevant to walrus in Alaska waters. - PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) - a program for K-12 educators and researchers to work together in hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctic to advance polar science education. - ArcticInfo mailing list, Witness the Arctic newsletter, and the Arctic Calendar - communication tools for the arctic community to keep apprised of relevant news, meetings, and announcements. - Project Office for the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, which aims to provide scientific understanding of arctic environmental change to help society understand and respond to a rapidly changing Arctic. More information about these and other ARCUS activities can be found at the ARCUS website at: http://www.arcus.org.

  7. Introduction to ALFA and the GALFA Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.

    2004-12-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of the ALFA instrument, a 7 element focal plane array on the Arecibo 305m telescope, which covers the frequency range 1225 to 1525 MHz. Each pixel observes two orthogonal linear polarizations. There are several spectrometers for different types of observations. For Galactic astronomy, a FFT spectrometer has been developed by D. Werthimer and colleagues, which has 8192 channels covering 7 MHz ( 1500 km/s at 0.2 km/s resolution) along with 256 channels covering 100 MHz intended for measuring and removing spectral baselines. ALFA test observations have been underway since August 2004, and astronomical observations should be ramping up through Fall 2004 and be in full swing by early 2005. The GALFA consortium is comprised of individuals interested in using the ALFA system for galactic astronomy. It is divided by interest into subconsortia, focusing on a number of the outstanding problems which can be addressed by ALFA on the Arecibo telescope, with 8-10 K/Jy gain, 3.5' beamwidth, and 30-35 K system temperature. One subconsortium is planning to carry out a survey of 21cm continuum radiation from the Milky Way, focusing on mapping the polarized emission in order to perform Faraday tomography of the magnetic field distribution. Radio recombination lines are the focus of another subconsortium; the ALFA system will be able to observe multiple RRLs that fall within its bandpass. HI emission and absorption will be utilized by a number of consortia, but applied to different problems, including the Galactic plane, high latitude clouds, high velocity clouds, turbulence, and the relationship of the atomic and molecular components of the ISM. Each subconsortium is making plans, starting with relatively small-scale projects, and working towards large-scale projects. Commensal (GALFA together with extragalactic or pulsar observations) are anticipated, using multiple signal processing systems simultaneously.

  8. 20 CFR 664.210 - How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.210 How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an...

  9. 20 CFR 664.210 - How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.210 How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an...

  10. 20 CFR 664.210 - How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.210 How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an...

  11. Enhanced biodegradation of PAHs by microbial consortium with different amendment and their fate in in-situ condition.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anamika; Singh, Shashi Bala; Sharma, Richa; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Ansari, Raunaq; Vasudevan, Venugopal; Arora, Anju; Singh, Surender; Saha, Supradip; Nain, Lata

    2016-10-01

    Microbial degradation is a useful tool to prevent chemical pollution in soil. In the present study, in-situ bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by microbial consortium consisting of Serratia marcescens L-11, Streptomyces rochei PAH-13 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium VV-18 has been reported. In preliminary studies, the consortium degraded nearly 60-70% of PAHs in broth within 7 days under controlled conditions. The same consortium was evaluated for its competence under natural conditions by amending the soil with ammonium sulphate, paddy straw and compost. Highest microbial activity in terms of dehydrogenase, FDA hydrolase and aryl esterase was recorded on the 5(th) day. The degradation rate of PAHs significantly increased up to 56-98% within 7 days under in-situ however almost complete dissipation (83.50-100%) was observed on the 30(th) day. Among all the co-substrates evaluated, faster degradation of PAHs was observed in compost amended soil wherein fluorene, anthracene, phenanthrene and pyrene degraded with half-life of 1.71, 4.70, 2.04 and 6.14 days respectively. Different degradation products formed were also identified by GC-MS. Besides traces of parent PAHs eleven non-polar and five polar products were identified by direct and silylation reaction respectively. Various products formed indicated that consortium was capable to degrade PAHs by oxidation to mineralization. PMID:27558829

  12. Enhanced biodegradation of PAHs by microbial consortium with different amendment and their fate in in-situ condition.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anamika; Singh, Shashi Bala; Sharma, Richa; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Ansari, Raunaq; Vasudevan, Venugopal; Arora, Anju; Singh, Surender; Saha, Supradip; Nain, Lata

    2016-10-01

    Microbial degradation is a useful tool to prevent chemical pollution in soil. In the present study, in-situ bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by microbial consortium consisting of Serratia marcescens L-11, Streptomyces rochei PAH-13 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium VV-18 has been reported. In preliminary studies, the consortium degraded nearly 60-70% of PAHs in broth within 7 days under controlled conditions. The same consortium was evaluated for its competence under natural conditions by amending the soil with ammonium sulphate, paddy straw and compost. Highest microbial activity in terms of dehydrogenase, FDA hydrolase and aryl esterase was recorded on the 5(th) day. The degradation rate of PAHs significantly increased up to 56-98% within 7 days under in-situ however almost complete dissipation (83.50-100%) was observed on the 30(th) day. Among all the co-substrates evaluated, faster degradation of PAHs was observed in compost amended soil wherein fluorene, anthracene, phenanthrene and pyrene degraded with half-life of 1.71, 4.70, 2.04 and 6.14 days respectively. Different degradation products formed were also identified by GC-MS. Besides traces of parent PAHs eleven non-polar and five polar products were identified by direct and silylation reaction respectively. Various products formed indicated that consortium was capable to degrade PAHs by oxidation to mineralization.

  13. Wellness: A Bargain for Life, A Resource for Higher Education. The Complete Guide to Creating an Effective Wellness Program in Higher Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Vickie L., Ed.

    This book provides college and university personnel administrators with information and resources for the development and expansion of wellness programs at institutions of higher education. The five contributed chapters address some of the issues involved in the development of wellness programs. In Chapter 1, "Wellness in Higher Education" by R.…

  14. Cross-Registration and Joint Academic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strandness, Jean T.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a cross-registration system and formation of joint academic programs between colleges create a variety of educational opportunities for students and provide both direct and indirect benefits to a consortium's member institutions and their faculty. The Tri-College University Consortium in North Dakota illustrates the advantages…

  15. 25 CFR 1000.18 - May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? 1000.18 Section 1000.18 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? In accordance with the...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.18 - May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? 1000.18 Section 1000.18 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? In accordance with the...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.18 - May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? 1000.18 Section 1000.18 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? In accordance with the...

  18. Cancer Patient and Survivor Research from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium: A Preview of Three Large Randomized Trials and Initial Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    MARCUS, ALFRED C.; DIEFENBACH, MICHAEL A.; STANTON, ANNETTE L.; MILLER-HALEGOUA, SUZANNE N.; FLEISHER, LINDA; RAICH, PETER C.; MORRA, MARION E.; PEROCCHIA, ROSEMARIE SLEVIN; TRAN, ZUNG VU; BRIGHT, MARY ANNE

    2014-01-01

    Three large randomized trials are described from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium (CISRC). Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 is also testing a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the two-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1 = 208, Project 2 = 340, Project 3 = 792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52% and 67% for Projects 1–3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most or some) was 90%, 85% and 83% for Projects 1–3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the CISRC interventions, perceived utility and benefit was high, and more than 90% would recommend them to other cancer patients. Five initial lessons learned are presented that may help inform future cancer communications research. PMID:23448232

  19. Computerized comprehensive data analysis of Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC)

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Jun; Pu Jiantao; Zheng Bin; Wang Xingwei; Leader, Joseph K.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) is the largest public CT image database of lung nodules. In this study, the authors present a comprehensive and the most updated analysis of this dynamically growing database under the help of a computerized tool, aiming to assist researchers to optimally use this database for lung cancer related investigations. Methods: The authors developed a computer scheme to automatically match the nodule outlines marked manually by radiologists on CT images. A large variety of characteristics regarding the annotated nodules in the database including volume, spiculation level, elongation, interobserver variability, as well as the intersection of delineated nodule voxels and overlapping ratio between the same nodules marked by different radiologists are automatically calculated and summarized. The scheme was applied to analyze all 157 examinations with complete annotation data currently available in LIDC dataset. Results: The scheme summarizes the statistical distributions of the abovementioned geometric and diagnosis features. Among the 391 nodules, (1) 365 (93.35%) have principal axis length {<=}20 mm; (2) 120, 75, 76, and 120 were marked by one, two, three, and four radiologists, respectively; and (3) 122 (32.48%) have the maximum volume overlapping ratios {>=}80% for the delineations of two radiologists, while 198 (50.64%) have the maximum volume overlapping ratios <60%. The results also showed that 72.89% of the nodules were assessed with malignancy score between 2 and 4, and only 7.93% of these nodules were considered as severely malignant (malignancy {>=}4). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that LIDC contains examinations covering a diverse distribution of nodule characteristics and it can be a useful resource to assess the performance of the nodule detection and/or segmentation schemes.

  20. Student Research Projects in Geophysics Through a Consortium of Undergraduate Geology Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, G. C.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning in 1987, and continuing to the present, the Keck Geology Consortium, a group of 12 undergraduate institutions, has sponsored a series of summer research projects. These projects typically involve from 9 to 12 students and 3 to 4 faculty members and consist of a 4 to 5 week summer research program followed by continuation of the research at the students' home institutions, often as a senior thesis. Many of these projects have included extensive field and laboratory geophysical components. In order for students to carry out successful research projects in geophysics, several hurdles have to be cleared. Frequently these students have not had a formal course in geophysics, so although they may have strong geologic and quantitative skills, there is usually the need for a concentrated classroom immersion in the geophysical theory and methods related to the project. Field geophysics projects are labor intensive, so it is common for a group of three or more students to produce only one or two complete data sets in the course of the summer program. Generating individualized projects so that students feel ownership of their thesis research can be challenging. Most of the departments do not have a geophysicist on the faculty, so follow-up support for the student research involves continued long-distance collaboration between project directors, students and sponsoring faculty. The impact of the internet on this collaboration cannot be overstated. Finally, diverse computing environments at the participating institutions were a significant problem in the early years. Migration of geophysical software to Windows from Unix, and the widespread availability of Linux has mitigated these problems in recent years. The geophysical components of these projects have been largely successful. A series of vignettes is presented showing the range and nature of geophysical projects that have been carried out. In addition to anecdotal evidence of student satisfaction, there is

  1. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  2. Global health education consortium: 20 years of leadership in global health and global health education.

    PubMed

    Velji, Anvar

    2011-06-01

    The Global Health Education Consortium (GHEC) is a group of universities and institutions committed to improving the health and human rights of underserved populations worldwide through improved education and training of the global health workforce. In the early 1990s, GHEC brought together many of the global health programs in North America to improve competencies and curricula in global health as well as to involve member institutions in health policy, development issues, and delivery of care in the inner cities, marginalized areas, and abroad.

  3. School Partnerships in Education: A Rural Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; And Others

    Partnerships between higher education and public schools in rural areas can lead to improved education in both sectors. When launching a partnership, all concerned must convince a wide sector of the community that such programs are cost effective and will lead to more successful educational programming. By providing such a rationale early, the…

  4. The conception of administrators regarding the formation of a healthcare consortium in Pernambuco, Brazil: a case study.

    PubMed

    e Silva, Keila S Brito; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola B

    2011-01-01

    The formation of healthcare consortia is a management strategy adopted by a number of cities in Brazil in order to minimize the difficulties the population has in access to services of greater technological complexity. As administrators are the main governmental actors in the promotion of this strategy, the aim of the present study was to identify the motives, expectations and difficulties faced by the mayors, and secretaries of health that make up a healthcare consortium undergoing a formation process in the rural, coastal zone of the state of Pernambuco. A descriptive, qualitative, case study was conducted. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews held with mayors and secretaries of health of the municipalities participating in the consortium. Data were analyzed by means of content analysis, using the NVivo 2.0 software program. The administrators cited difficulty in access to specialized services and the high cost of transporting patients to distant locations for treatment as motives for the formation of the consortium. With the implantation of this healthcare strategy, the expectations are a reduction in costs regarding patient transportation, an increase in access to services of greater complexity, and negotiations with other spheres of government. The main difficulties faced are political-partisan conflicts and excessive bureaucracy. Although there were no considerable divergences in the administrators' perceptions, it was evident that those who initiated the formation of the consortium offered a deeper, more detailed discourse, thereby demonstrating greater involvement when compared to those who offered continuity to the process.

  5. [The consortium of Biological Resource Centres (BRC) and tumour cell and tissue banks in the Marseilles metropolitan area].

    PubMed

    Chabannon, Christian; Lassailly, François; Romain, Sylvie; Xerri, Luc; Bonavita, Marie-José; Atger, Véronique; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Maraninchi, Dominique; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Martin, Pierre-Marie

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this presentation is to describe current and future aspects of the operations within the consortium of Biological Resource Centres (BRC) and Tumour cell and tissue banks of the Marseilles metropolitan area. The consortium was created in year 2001, through the association of several tissue and cell banks that were operating for many years in Marseilles. Existing collections are not exclusively collections of tumour cells or tissues; however, the two tumour cell and tissue banks located at the Regional Cancer Research Centre and at the University Hospital account for a very significant proportion of the collections. Our collective work leads to the recognition and funding of the consortium by Inserm, through the "Collections 2003" grant. The consortium objectives are to define a common scientific strategy, to share professional practices in the logistics and database management of the banks, to establish a quality management program, and to build a common catalogue that describes existing biological resources. Through these efforts, the ultimate goal is to adopt rules that define BRC, as defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

  6. The Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) Program: A Completely Automated System for Telescope Control, Wide-Field Imaging, and Object Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Rabinowitz, D. L.; Helin, E. F.; Lawrence, K. J.; Bambery, R. J.; Clark, C. C.; Groom, S. L.; Levin, S.; Lorre, J.; Shaklan, S. B.; Kervin, P.; Africano, J. A.; Sydney, P.; Soohoo, V.

    1998-01-01

    The Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) system operates autonomously at the Maui Space Surveillance Site on the summit of the extinct Haleakala Volcano Crater, Hawaii. The program began in December 1995 and continues with an observing run every month.

  7. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.; Jiang, X.; Tao, D.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1996-10-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities were focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies were conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing and a spiral model was developed by West Virginia University. For the University of Kentucky the advisory board approved a project entitled: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Project management and administration will be provided by Virginia Tech., for the first year. Progress reports for coal dewatering and destabilization of flotation froth studies are presented in this report.

  8. Medical education in Korea: the e-learning consortium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Han, Joungho; Park, Ie Byung; Kee, Changwon

    2009-09-01

    This article reports the latest development in e-learning in Korean medical education. The Korean Consortium for e-Learning in Medical Education was formed for collaboration in providing quality online learning resources for medical schools around the nation. This e-learning strategy is aimed at improving the quality of medical education at the national level by providing students with equal access to quality learning resources and fostering students' self-directed learning and, in doing so, enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of developing online learning resources by sharing necessary resources among the medical schools. The consortium also plans to share e-learning content with medical schools in other countries by engaging more medical schools in the consortium and also by sharing e-learning content developed by other institutions or consortiums. The consortium is also dedicated to the research and development of effective online learning strategies for medical education, including interactive virtual patient cases and other innovative pedagogies using Web 2.0 technologies.

  9. Factors Influencing the Successful Completion of the General Education Development (GED) Program at Community College of Philadelphia as Perceived by the GED Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucho, Admasu Etefa

    This study determined which of three types of educational barriers (institutional, situational, or dispositional) represented the major problem preventing adult students from completing their general educational development (GED) studies at Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) in Pennsylvania. A Likert-type survey instrument was used to collect…

  10. The Impact of Institutional Support Services, Policies, and Programs on the Completion and Graduation of African American Students Enrolled at Select Two-Year Colleges in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Martino

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Association of Community Colleges (2010), more than 40% of all African American students enrolled in postsecondary education are enrolled in two-year colleges. A review of the literature indicated that improving persistence and completion rates for African American students is a challenge that two-year colleges face. This…

  11. First to the Finish Line: A Case Study of First Generation Baccalaureate Degree Completers in the University of Maryland Student Support Services Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahan, Christine Pour

    2010-01-01

    This study explores factors first generation college graduates identify as impacting their successful baccalaureate degree attainment. This research was conducted using qualitative case study method, and a cross case analysis of individual case summaries was completed. Through a review of degree attainment, persistence, and first generation…

  12. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  13. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  14. The Connecticut Cardiovascular Consortium: a unique, state-wide research collaboration to advance clinical outcomes in patients with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Boden, W E; McKay, R G; Cabin, H S; Radford, M J; Krumholz, H M; Zaret, B L; Garner, L; Bull, M B; Fisherkeller, M; Kosinski, E J; Krauthamer, M J; Maljanian, R; McDowell, A V; Sands, M J; Schwartz, K V; Seltzer, J P; Hager, J D

    2001-10-01

    The establishment of "best clinical practices" founded upon evidence-based medicine has become an increasingly important priority. Frequently, management guidelines are derived from published research data and disseminated among practitioners to help optimize patient care. The ultimate clinical impact of these guidelines in the "real world," however, is often clouded by an incomplete assessment of patient outcomes throughout the continuum of health-care delivery models. In order to address this gap in clinical outcome assessment, we propose to establish the Connecticut Cardiovascular Consortium. The Consortium will consist of a collaborative partnership among all 31 Connecticut hospitals working in concert with Connecticut Office of Health Care Access (OHCA). The primary objective of the Consortium will be to assess, compare, and optimize clinical outcomes among Connecticut residents with cardiovascular disease. As an initial goal for the Consortium, we further propose to undertake a prospective, observational study of Connecticut residents who present with ST Segment Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction (STEMI). Recent advances in pharmacologic and mechanical reperfusion for STEMI have resulted in a need to define the optimal use of these therapies in the community at large. The primary purpose of this study will be to determine the relative merits of different treatment patterns for STEMI with regard to the use of fibrinolytic therapy and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Particular emphasis will be placed on assessing the relative benefits of urgent mechanical revascularization performed at the state's seven tertiary facilities with PCI capability compared to all other treatment modalities. Successful completion of this unique collaborative endeavor is expected to have significant impact on improved patient care and on current health-care policy for medical resource allocation. Moreover, continued collaboration of health-care providers within the

  15. Measure Metric: A Multi-State Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Kenneth W.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the "Measure Metric" series of twelve fifteen-minute programs and related classroom materials for grades 5 and 6 for teaching the metric system and the International System of Units (SI). (SL)

  16. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  17. The ISPRS Student Consortium: From launch to tenth anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjir, U.; Detchev, I.; Reyes, S. R.; Akkartal Aktas, A.; Lo, C. Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    2014-04-01

    The ISPRS Student Consortium is an international organization for students and young professionals in the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, and the geospatial information sciences. Since its start ten years ago, the number of members of the Student Consortium has been steadily growing, now reaching close to 1000. Its increased popularity, especially in recent years, is mainly due to the organization's worldwide involvement in student matters. The Student Consortium has helped organize numerous summer schools, youth forums, and student technical sessions at ISPRS sponsored conferences. In addition, the organization publishes a newsletter, and hosts several social media outlets in order to keep its global membership up-to-date on a regular basis. This paper will describe the structure of the organization, and it will give some example of its past student related activities.

  18. The TB Structural Genomics Consortium: A decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Habel, Jeff E.; Johnston, Jodie M.; Krieger, Inna; Miallau, Linda; Sankaranarayanan, Ramasamy; Morse, Robert P.; Bruning, John; Swanson, Stephanie; Kim, Haelee; Kim, Chang-Yub; Li, Hongye; Bulloch, Esther M.; Payne, Richard J.; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Hung, Li-Wei; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun; James, Michael N.G.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sacchettini, James C.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The TB Structural Genomics Consortium is a worldwide organization of collaborators whose mission is the comprehensive structural determination and analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins to ultimately aid in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Congruent to the overall vision, Consortium members have additionally established an integrated facilities core to streamline M. tuberculosis structural biology and developed bioinformatics resources for data mining. This review aims to share the latest Consortium developments with the TB community, including recent structures of proteins that play significant roles within M. tuberculosis. Atomic resolution details may unravel mechanistic insights and reveal unique and novel protein features, as well as important protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, which ultimately leads to a better understanding of M. tuberculosis biology and may be exploited for rational, structure-based therapeutics design. PMID:21247804

  19. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  20. Development and Assessment of CFD Models Including a Supplemental Program Code for Analyzing Buoyancy-Driven Flows Through BWR Fuel Assemblies in SFP Complete LOCA Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artnak, Edward Joseph, III

    This work seeks to illustrate the potential benefits afforded by implementing aspects of fluid dynamics, especially the latest computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach, through numerical experimentation and the traditional discipline of physical experimentation to improve the calibration of the severe reactor accident analysis code, MELCOR, in one of several spent fuel pool (SFP) complete loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. While the scope of experimental work performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) extends well beyond that which is reasonably addressed by our allotted resources and computational time in accordance with initial project allocations to complete the report, these simulated case trials produced a significant array of supplementary high-fidelity solutions and hydraulic flow-field data in support of SNL research objectives. Results contained herein show FLUENT CFD model representations of a 9x9 BWR fuel assembly in conditions corresponding to a complete loss-of-coolant accident scenario. In addition to the CFD model developments, a MATLAB based controlvolume model was constructed to independently assess the 9x9 BWR fuel assembly under similar accident scenarios. The data produced from this work show that FLUENT CFD models are capable of resolving complex flow fields within a BWR fuel assembly in the realm of buoyancy-induced mass flow rates and that characteristic hydraulic parameters from such CFD simulations (or physical experiments) are reasonably employed in corresponding constitutive correlations for developing simplified numerical models of comparable solution accuracy.

  1. Clear Purpose...Complete Commitment. A Long-Range Program to Provide Louisianans with Library and Information Services Adequate to Their Needs, 1986-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Library, Baton Rouge.

    The long-range program presented in this document results from the combined efforts of the State Library staff, the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) Administrative Librarian, Louisiana librarians, the Library Development Committee of Louisiana, and a number of other formal and informal planning groups within the state. The program…

  2. 20 CFR 664.210 - How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and documented? 664.210 Section 664.210 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... secure and hold employment” criterion in § 664.200(c)(6) defined and documented? Definitions and... educational program, or to secure and hold employment” criterion of § 664.200(c)(6) may be established at...

  3. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  4. Electronic health record: implementation across the Michigan Academic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Andrea C; Schafer, Patricia; Dontje, Kathy; Pohl, Joanne M; Nagelkerk, Jean; Cavanagh, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The Michigan Academic Consortium of academic nurse-managed primary care centers supported member sites to venture into computer-based advances with the potential to improve quality of health services and students' educational experiences. The experiences of this consortium as it incorporated electronic health records in tandem with an electronic patient management system at several of its member sites reveal the benefits and challenges of such an endeavor. The processes of selection, adoption, and implementation of the electronic health record are discussed in this article. Many lessons learned in the process are discussed.

  5. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting. PMID:26843697

  6. Terragenome: International Soil Metagenome Sequencing Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Jansson, Janet [LBNL

    2016-07-12

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Janet Jansson of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discusses the Terragenome Initiative at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  7. User's guide to computer program CIVM-JET 4B to calculate the transient structural responses of partial and/or complete structural rings to engine-rotor-fragment impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stagliano, T. R.; Spilker, R. L.; Witmer, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    A user-oriented computer program CIVM-JET 4B is described to predict the large-deflection elastic-plastic structural responses of fragment impacted single-layer: (a) partial-ring fragment containment or deflector structure or (b) complete-ring fragment containment structure. These two types of structures may be either free or supported in various ways. Supports accommodated include: (1) point supports such as pinned-fixed, ideally-clamped, or supported by a structural branch simulating mounting-bracket structure and (2) elastic foundation support distributed over selected regions of the structure. The initial geometry of each partial or complete ring may be circular or arbitrarily curved; uniform or variable thicknesses of the structure are accommodated. The structural material is assumed to be initially isotropic; strain hardening and strain rate effects are taken into account.

  8. GeoFORCE Texas: An Outreach Program that is Increasing the Number and Diversity of Students Completing STEM Degrees and Entering the Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, E.; Moore, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    GeoFORCE Texas is an outreach program of the Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin. Established in 2005 with the goal of increasing the number and diversity of students studying geosciences and engineering and entering the high-tech workforce, GeoFORCE has been highly successful. Key elements to that success will be presented here. GeoFORCE targets bright students in rural and inner-city schools where they are generally not academically challenged. Every summer throughout high school we take them on geologic field trips all over the country. In 2014, GeoFORCE led 15 field academies for about 600 students. The program is rigorous and academic. We emphasize college-level thinking skills. Because it is a 4-year program, they have a pretty good grounding in physical geology by the time they graduate. More importantly, they develop confidence in their ability to handle college, and a strong motivation to earn a college degree. GeoFORCE students are mostly minority (85%) and more than half will be the first in their family to graduate from college. GeoFORCE students exceed national averages in rates of going to college (97%), majoring in STEM fields (66%), majoring in geosciences (15%) and engineering (13%), and graduating from college (~85%). GeoFORCE is a public/private partnership and a workforce-focused program. The Jackson School funds staff and operating expenses (37%). Money for student programs comes from private industry (44%), state and federal grants (14%), and foundations and individual donors (5%). Our corporate partners are in the energy sector. In addition to funding, corporate sponsors attend the summer field programs, mentor GeoFORCE students, and provide opportunities for the students to visit the companies. As our students move toward college graduation, our industry and government partners have begun to hire them as interns. GeoFORCE graduates are now entering the workforce. Our first two cohorts are 4 and 5 years past high

  9. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-06-01

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L-1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L-1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h-l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents. PMID:26086710

  10. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-01-01

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L−1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L−1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h−l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents. PMID:26086710

  11. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-06-16

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L-1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L-1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h-l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents.

  12. Variability in Risk Assessment and Management Plan (RAMP) scores completed as part of the Ontario Johne's Education and Management Assistance Program(2010-2013).

    PubMed

    Pieper, Laura; DeVries, Trevor J; Sorge, Ulrike S; Godkin, Ann; Hand, Karen J; Perkins, Nicole R; Imada, Jamie; Kelton, David F

    2015-04-01

    As a proactive measure toward controlling the nontreatable and contagious Johne's disease in cattle, the Ontario dairy industry launched the voluntary Ontario Johne's Education and Management Assistance Program in 2010. The objective of this study was to describe the results of the first 4 yr of the program and to investigate the variability in Risk Assessment and Management Plan (RAMP) scores associated with the county, veterinary clinic, and veterinarian. Of 4,158 Ontario dairy farms, 2,153 (51.8%) participated in the program between January 2010 and August 2013. For this study, RAMP scores and whole-herd milk or serum ELISA results were available from 2,103 farms. Herd-level ELISA-positive prevalence (herds with one or more test-positive cows were considered positive) was 27.2%. Linear mixed model analysis revealed that the greatest RAMP score variability was at the veterinarian level (24.2%), with relatively little variability at the county and veterinary clinic levels. Consequently, the annual RAMP should be done by the same veterinarian to avoid misleading or discouraging results. PMID:25648804

  13. Advanced Offshore Wind Energy - Atlantic Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kempton, Willett

    2015-11-04

    This project developed relationships among the lead institution, U of Delaware, wind industry participants from 11 companies, and two other universities in the region. The participating regional universities were University of Maryland and Old Dominion University. Research was carried out in six major areas: Analysis and documentation of extreme oceanic wind events & their impact on design parameters, calibration of corrosivity estimates measured on a coastal turbine, measurment and modeling of tower structures, measurement and modeling of the tribology of major drive components, and gearbox conditioning monitoring using acoustic sensors. The project also had several educational goals, including establishing a course in wind energy and training graduate students. Going beyond these goals, three new courses were developed, a graduate certificate program in wind power was developed and approved, and an exchange program in wind energy was established with Danish Technical University. Related to the installation of a Gamesa G90 turbine on campus and a Gamesa-UD research program established in part due to this award, several additional research projects have been carried out based on mutual industry-university interests, and funded by turbine revenues. This award and the Gamesa partnership have jointly led to seven graduate students receiving full safety and climb training, to become “research climbers” as part of their wind power training, and contributing to on-turbine research. As a result of the educational program, already six graduate students have taken jobs in the US wind industry.

  14. Bilingual Human Services Educational Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Bangor Community Coll.

    This report presents results of the third year of a project designed to enhance employability and career mobility of limited English speaking Franco-American adults in jobs providing services for the elderly. The first section states project objectives of the college-level, credit-bearing program conducted at five university campuses: (1) to…

  15. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison; Sharon Elder

    2006-01-24

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organized and hosted two technology transfer meetings; (2) Collaborated with the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) to host a Natural Gas Outlook conference in Pittsburgh, PA; (3) Provided a SWC presentation at the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) meeting in Jackson Hole, WY; and (4) Completed and released a stripper well industry documentary entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Sloan Consortium International Conference on Online Learning (18th, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, October 10-12, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan Consortium (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Sloan Consortium (Sloan-C) is to help learning organizations continually improve the quality, scale, and breadth of online programs according to their own distinctive missions, so that education will become a part of everyday life, accessible and affordable for anyone, anywhere, at any time, in a wide variety of disciplines.…

  17. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, Stan

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  18. 24 CFR 943.128 - How does a consortium carry out planning and reporting functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES... the consortium agreement, the consortium must submit joint five-year Plans and joint Annual Plans for... the joint PHA Plan....

  19. The MRI-Linear Accelerator Consortium: Evidence-Based Clinical Introduction of an Innovation in Radiation Oncology Connecting Researchers, Methodology, Data Collection, Quality Assurance, and Technical Development

    PubMed Central

    Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Verheij, Marcel; Choudhury, Ananya; Harrington, Kevin J.; Schultz, Chris; Sahgal, Arjun; Frank, Steven J.; Goldwein, Joel; Brown, Kevin J.; Minsky, Bruce D.; van Vulpen, Marco

    2016-01-01

    An international research consortium has been formed to facilitate evidence-based introduction of MR-guided radiotherapy (MR-linac) and to address how the MR-linac could be used to achieve an optimized radiation treatment approach to improve patients’ survival, local, and regional tumor control and quality of life. The present paper describes the organizational structure of the clinical part of the MR-linac consortium. Furthermore, it elucidates why collaboration on this large project is necessary, and how a central data registry program will be implemented. PMID:27790408

  20. Appeal Resource and Training Consortium (ARTC) 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    APPEAL (Asia Pacific Programme of Education for All) Resource and Training Consortium (ARTC) was initiated in May 1997 at the Technical Working Group Meeting organized by APPEAL in cooperation with the Indian Institute of Education (IIE) to provide technical support and assistance to the work of APPEAL among the Member States. This booklet is a…