Science.gov

Sample records for consortium program completion

  1. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  2. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  3. A Consortium-based Research Education Program for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Anne Victoria; Pieper, David; Hammel, Ernest

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a consortium-based research education seminar program developed by the OHEP Center for Medical Education that presents a yearly research forum in which the best research projects from consortium members are presented by the resident-researchers, who compete for recognition and prize money. Of the 128 presentations to date 25 percent…

  4. AACJC International/Intercultural Consortium Summer Study Programs Overseas, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Becky

    Responses are presented to a questionnaire on overseas summer programs that was sent in January 1979 to members of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC) International/Intercultural Consortium (IIC). Program descriptions are listed alphabetically by world region and country. Program information includes: name of program,…

  5. AACJC International/Intercultural Consortium Summer Study Programs Overseas, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Becky, Comp.

    Responses to a questionnaire sent in December 1977 to members of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges' International/Intercultural Consortium (IIC) comprise this report on summer 1978 programs offered overseas by community colleges. The programs are listed alphabetically by world region and country. Program listings contain…

  6. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  7. Establishment of a multi-state experiential pharmacy program consortium.

    PubMed

    Duke, Lori J; Unterwagner, Whitney L; Byrd, Debbie C

    2008-06-15

    In 2002, a regional consortium was created for schools and colleges of pharmacy in Georgia and Alabama to assist experiential education faculty and staff members in streamlining administrative processes, providing required preceptor development, establishing a professional network, and conducting scholarly endeavors. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy with many shared experiential practice sites formed a consortium to help experiential faculty and staff members identify, discuss, and solve common experience program issues and challenges. During its 5 years in existence, the Southeastern Pharmacy Experiential Education Consortium has coordinated experiential schedules, developed and implemented uniform evaluation tools, coordinated site and preceptor development activities, established a work group for educational research and scholarship, and provided opportunities for networking and professional development. Several consortium members have received national recognition for their individual experiential education accomplishments. Through the activities of a regional consortium, members have successfully developed programs and initiatives that have streamlined administrative processes and have the potential to improve overall quality of experiential education programs. Professionally, consortium activities have resulted in 5 national presentations.

  8. Building psychosocial programming in geriatrics fellowships: a consortium model.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Ronald D; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E; Ehrlich, Amy R; Greene, Michele G; Greenberg, Debra F; Raik, Barrie L; Raymond, Joshua J; Clabby, John F; Fields, Suzanne D; Breznay, Jennifer B

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area collaboratively created the New York Metropolitan Area Consortium to Strengthen Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships in 2007 to address this shortfall. The goal of the Consortium is to develop model educational programs for geriatrics fellows that highlight psychosocial issues affecting elder care, share interinstitutional resources, and energize fellowship program directors and faculty. In 2008, 2009, and 2010, Consortium faculty collaboratively designed and implemented a psychosocial educational conference for geriatrics fellows. Cumulative participation at the conferences included 146 geriatrics fellows from 20 academic institutions taught by interdisciplinary Consortium faculty. Formal evaluations from the participants indicated that the conference: a) positively affected fellows' knowledge of, interest in, and comfort with psychosocial issues; b) would have a positive impact on the quality of care provided to older patients; and c) encouraged valuable interactions with fellows and faculty from other institutions. The Consortium, as an educational model for psychosocial learning, has a positive impact on geriatrics fellowship training and may be replicable in other localities.

  9. 78 FR 40084 - Proposed Requirement-Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Chapter II Proposed Requirement--Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant Program AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Proposed...

  10. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW... SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Eligible Tribes § 287.25 May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program? (a) Yes, as long as each Tribe forming the consortium is an “eligible Indian...

  11. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW... SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Eligible Tribes § 287.25 May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program? (a) Yes, as long as each Tribe forming the consortium is an “eligible Indian...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  15. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW... SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Eligible Tribes § 287.25 May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program? (a) Yes, as long as each Tribe forming the consortium is an “eligible Indian...

  16. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW... SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Eligible Tribes § 287.25 May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program? (a) Yes, as long as each Tribe forming the consortium is an “eligible Indian...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may reallocate funds among...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may reallocate funds among...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may reallocate funds among...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may reallocate funds among...

  3. Program Costs and Student Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  4. Program Costs and Student Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  5. 24 CFR 943.120 - What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What programs of a PHA are included... Consortia § 943.120 What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions? (a) A PHA may enter a consortium under this subpart for administration of any of the following program categories: (1) The PHA's...

  6. 24 CFR 943.120 - What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What programs of a PHA are included... Consortia § 943.120 What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions? (a) A PHA may enter a consortium under this subpart for administration of any of the following program categories: (1) The PHA's...

  7. 24 CFR 943.120 - What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What programs of a PHA are included... Consortia § 943.120 What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions? (a) A PHA may enter a consortium under this subpart for administration of any of the following program categories: (1) The PHA's...

  8. 24 CFR 943.120 - What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What programs of a PHA are included... Consortia § 943.120 What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions? (a) A PHA may enter a consortium under this subpart for administration of any of the following program categories: (1) The PHA's...

  9. 24 CFR 943.120 - What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What programs of a PHA are included... Consortia § 943.120 What programs of a PHA are included in a consortium's functions? (a) A PHA may enter a consortium under this subpart for administration of any of the following program categories: (1) The PHA's...

  10. 78 FR 79613 - Final Requirement-Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ...] [Pages 79613-79615] [FR Doc No: 2013-31325] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Chapter II [CFDA Number 84.144F] Final Requirement--Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant Program AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Final requirement. SUMMARY: The...

  11. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up or any Tribe withdraws from a consortium, it will be necessary to allocate unobligated funds...

  12. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up or any Tribe withdraws from a consortium, it will be necessary to allocate unobligated funds...

  13. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up or any Tribe withdraws from a consortium, it will be necessary to allocate unobligated funds...

  14. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up or any Tribe withdraws from a consortium, it will be necessary to allocate unobligated funds...

  15. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....” (b) To apply for and conduct a NEW Program, the consortium must submit a plan to ACF. (c) The...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.248 - What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... program included in an AFA? 1000.248 Section 1000.248 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN.../Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? The Tribe/Consortium has the following role regarding a construction portion of an AFA: (a) Under the Act, the Indian Tribe/Consortium must...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.248 - What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... program included in an AFA? 1000.248 Section 1000.248 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN.../Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? The Tribe/Consortium has the following role regarding a construction portion of an AFA: (a) Under the Act, the Indian Tribe/Consortium must...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.248 - What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... program included in an AFA? 1000.248 Section 1000.248 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN.../Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? The Tribe/Consortium has the following role regarding a construction portion of an AFA: (a) Under the Act, the Indian Tribe/Consortium must...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.248 - What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... program included in an AFA? 1000.248 Section 1000.248 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN.../Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? The Tribe/Consortium has the following role regarding a construction portion of an AFA: (a) Under the Act, the Indian Tribe/Consortium must...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.248 - What is the Tribe's/Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... program included in an AFA? 1000.248 Section 1000.248 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN.../Consortium's role in a construction program included in an AFA? The Tribe/Consortium has the following role regarding a construction portion of an AFA: (a) Under the Act, the Indian Tribe/Consortium must...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.314 - What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.314 What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed? On the effective date of reassumption, the Tribe/Consortium must, at...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.314 - What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.314 What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed? On the effective date of reassumption, the Tribe/Consortium must, at...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.314 - What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.314 What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed? On the effective date of reassumption, the Tribe/Consortium must, at...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.314 - What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.314 What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed? On the effective date of reassumption, the Tribe/Consortium must, at...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.314 - What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.314 What must a Tribe/Consortium do when a program is reassumed? On the effective date of reassumption, the Tribe/Consortium must, at...

  6. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium: Inventory of existing programs, Second edition. Appendix 13.11

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-23

    This is the second edition of an inventory of existing educational programs, focused primarily on inner-city youth, in operation in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The first edition was published on 21 August 1992 and can be obtained from the Weston Institute. However, the complete context of the first edition are included in this edition. The purpose of the inventory is to identify existing programs which could be augmented, adapted, or otherwise strengthened to help fulfil the mission of the Department of Energy-sponsored Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium, the mission of which is to recruit and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas and in environmental restoration and waste management. In planning its programs, the Consortium does not want to ``reinvent the wheel`` and all of its members need to learn what others are doing. Each of the 32 participating academic institutions was invited to submit as many program descriptions as they wished. Due to the summer holidays, or because they did not believe than they were carrying out programs relevant to the mission of the Consortium, some institutions did not submit any program descriptions for the first edition. This second edition lists programs of 27 participating institutions. In addition, several industries, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit institutions were invited to submit program descriptions.

  7. 25 CFR 1000.254 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a... Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program? No, a Tribe/Consortium may not reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.254 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a... Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program? No, a Tribe/Consortium may not reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.254 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a... Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program? No, a Tribe/Consortium may not reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.254 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a... Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program? No, a Tribe/Consortium may not reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program...

  11. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force applied research units and projects, 1992 program. Summary and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    This report contains brief descriptions of projects involved in the urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF). The Consortium is a special network which helps to define urban problems, and commercialize technologies which could help solve those problems. Research and Development priorities within the program are transportation, energy, environment, and economic development and energy efficient facilities. The Consortium has established partnerships with US DOE on energy utilities, alternative vehicle fuels, waste management, and electricity management. A technology transfer committee was established to build a marketing program.

  12. Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium Catalog of Programming 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium, Lincoln, NE.

    This catalog describes over 100 telecommunication programs offered through The Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium (NAPBC). The NAPBC is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to produce and encourage the production and successful use of quality public telecommunication programs by and about Native Americans. Indices to audio visual…

  13. Effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Mathew; Melancon, Jim; Sneed, Demarcus; Nunning, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Currently, heart disease and diabetes dominate society as the leading cause of death for Americans. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a lifestyle enhancement program on factors related to the development of heart disease. The Wabash Valley Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a community-based lifestyle change program with…

  14. Effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Mathew; Melancon, Jim; Sneed, Demarcus; Nunning, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Currently, heart disease and diabetes dominate society as the leading cause of death for Americans. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a lifestyle enhancement program on factors related to the development of heart disease. The Wabash Valley Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a community-based lifestyle change program with…

  15. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... construction programs? 1000.255 Section 1000.255 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium...

  16. Three-Year MD Programs: Perspectives From the Consortium of Accelerated Medical Pathway Programs (CAMPP).

    PubMed

    Cangiarella, Joan; Fancher, Tonya; Jones, Betsy; Dodson, Lisa; Leong, Shou Ling; Hunsaker, Matthew; Pallay, Robert; Whyte, Robert; Holthouser, Amy; Abramson, Steven B

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been renewed interest in three-year MD pathway programs. In 2015, with support from the Josiah Macy Jr., Foundation, eight North American medical schools with three-year accelerated medical pathway programs formed the Consortium of Accelerated Medical Pathway Programs (CAMPP). The schools are two campuses of the Medical College of Wisconsin; McMaster University Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine; Mercer University School of Medicine; New York University School of Medicine; Penn State College of Medicine; Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine; University of California, Davis School of Medicine; and University of Louisville School of Medicine. These programs vary in size and medical specialty focus but all include the reduction of student debt from savings in tuition costs. Each school's mission to create a three-year pathway program differs; common themes include the ability to train physicians to practice in underserved areas or to allow students for whom the choice of specialty is known to progress more quickly. Compared with McMaster, these programs are small, but most capitalize on training and assessing competency across the undergraduate medical education-graduate medical education continuum and include conditional acceptance into an affiliated residency program. This article includes an overview of each CAMPP school with attention to admissions, curriculum, financial support, and regulatory challenges associated with the design of an accelerated pathway program. These programs are relatively new, with a small number of graduates; this article outlines opportunities and challenges for schools considering the development of accelerated programs.

  17. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium: Inventory of existing programs. Appendix 13.5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-21

    This is the ``first effort`` to prepare an inventory of existing educational programs, focused primarily on inner-city youth, in operation in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The purpose of the inventory is to identify existing programs which could be augmented, adapted, or otherwise strengthened to help fulfil the mission of the Department of Energy-sponsored Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium, the mission of which is to recruit and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas and in environmental restoration and waste management. The Consortium does not want to ``reinvent the wheel`` and all of its members need to learn what others are doing. Each of the 30 participating academic institutions was invited to submit as many program descriptions as they wished. Due to the summer holidays, or because they did not believe than they were carrying out programs relevant to the mission of the Consortium, some institutions did not submit any program descriptions. In addition, several industries, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit institutions were invited to submit program descriptions.

  18. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  19. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  20. 25 CFR 1000.367 - Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs? 1000.367 Section 1000.367 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Evaluations § 1000.367 Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.367 - Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs? 1000.367 Section 1000.367 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Evaluations § 1000.367 Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.367 - Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs? 1000.367 Section 1000.367 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Evaluations § 1000.367 Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.367 - Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs? 1000.367 Section 1000.367 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Evaluations § 1000.367 Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust...

  4. Programs to Increase High School Completion

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Robert A.; Knopf, John A.; Wilson, Sandra Jo; Truman, Benedict I.; Milstein, Bobby; Johnson, Robert L.; Fielding, Jonathan E.; Muntaner, Carles J.M.; Jones, Camara Phyllis; Fullilove, Mindy T.; Moss, Regina Davis; Uefffng, Erin; Hunt, Pete C.

    2015-01-01

    Context High school completion (HSC) is an established predictor of long-term morbidity and mortality. U.S. rates of HSC are substantially lower among students from low-income families and most racial/ethnic minority populations than students from high-income families and the non-Hispanic white population. This systematic review assesses the effectiveness of programs to increase HSC and the potential of these programs to improve lifelong health among at-risk students. Evidence acquisition A search located a meta-analysis (search period 1985–2010/2011) on the effects of programs to increase HSC or General Educational Development (GED) diploma receipt; the meta-analysis was concordant with Community Guide definitions and methodologic standards. Programs were assessed separately for the general student population (152 studies) and students who were parents or pregnant (15 studies). A search for studies published between 2010 and August 2012 located ten more recent studies, which were assessed for consistency with the meta-analysis. Analyses were conducted in 2013. Evidence synthesis The review focused on the meta-analysis. Program effectiveness was measured as the increased rate of HSC (or GED receipt) by the intervention group compared with controls. All assessed program types were effective in increasing HSC in the general student population: vocational training, alternative schooling, social–emotional skills training, college-oriented programming, mentoring and counseling, supplemental academic services, school and class restructuring, multiservice packages, attendance monitoring and contingencies, community service, and case management. For students who had children or were pregnant, attendance monitoring and multiservice packages were effective. Ten studies published after the search period for the meta-analysis were consistent with its findings. Conclusions There is strong evidence that a variety of HSC programs can improve high school or GED completion

  5. 25 CFR 1000.99 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.99 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency? Yes, where BIA services for a particular Tribe/Consortium are...

  6. 25 CFR 1000.99 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.99 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency? Yes, where BIA services for a particular Tribe/Consortium are...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.99 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.99 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency? Yes, where BIA services for a particular Tribe/Consortium are...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.99 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.99 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency? Yes, where BIA services for a particular Tribe/Consortium are...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.99 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.99 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate a Tribal share for programs outside its region/agency? Yes, where BIA services for a particular Tribe/Consortium are...

  10. Modularity maximization using completely positive programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanparast, Sakineh; Havens, Timothy C.

    2017-04-01

    Community detection is one of the most prominent problems of social network analysis. In this paper, a novel method for Modularity Maximization (MM) for community detection is presented which exploits the Alternating Direction Augmented Lagrangian (ADAL) method for maximizing a generalized form of Newman's modularity function. We first transform Newman's modularity function into a quadratic program and then use Completely Positive Programming (CPP) to map the quadratic program to a linear program, which provides the globally optimal maximum modularity partition. In order to solve the proposed CPP problem, a closed form solution using the ADAL merged with a rank minimization approach is proposed. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on several real-world data sets used for benchmarks community detection. Simulation results shows the proposed technique provides outstanding results in terms of modularity value for crisp partitions.

  11. 25 CFR 1000.336 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in... Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program? The Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary must negotiate the amount of funding to be returned to the Secretary for...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.336 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in... Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program? The Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary must negotiate the amount of funding to be returned to the Secretary for...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.336 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in... Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program? The Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary must negotiate the amount of funding to be returned to the Secretary for...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.337 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return property used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return property used in... Tribe/Consortium have to return property used in the operation of a retroceded program? On the effective date of any retrocession, the Tribe/Consortium must return all property and equipment, and...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.336 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in... Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program? The Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary must negotiate the amount of funding to be returned to the Secretary for...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.336 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in... Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program? The Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary must negotiate the amount of funding to be returned to the Secretary for...

  17. Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium. 1994 UCETF Program: Summary and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    The Urban Consortium (UC) is a network of the nation`s largest cities and urban counties by population, brought together by PTI to find solutions to their common concerns. The Consortium provides a unique creative forum where elected and appointed officials and technical managers identify, test, and validate practical ways to improve the provision of public services and, where possible, generate new revenue opportunities. Public Technology, Inc. (PTI) is the nonprofit, research, development, and commercialization arm of the National League of Cities, National Association of Counties and the International City and County Management Association, and an association of local governments. Staffed by PTI, the UC addresses the critical needs of local governments through its three task forces: Energy, Environment, and Telecommunications and Information. The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF) program has, since its inception, acted as a laboratory to develop and test solutions and share the resulting products or management approaches with the wider audience of local governments. It has addressed the overlap between energy and environment and economic development policy issues, and, is the nation`s most extensive cooperative local government program to improve energy management and decision-making through applied research and technology cooperation. Developed to meet both the defined needs of cities and counties as well as national priorities, major topics within the 1993/94 program are (1) Transportation; (2) Utility and Commercial/Government Buildings; and (3) Energy Efficient Buildings and Communities. This summary contains short descriptions of the projects and participants in the 1993/94 UCETF program.

  18. Motivational Factors in Registered Nurses Completing a Baccalaureate Completion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate what motivates associate degree (AND) and diploma prepared registered nurses (RN) to pursue a baccalaureate degree (BSN) through an RN-to-BSN program. Studies have shown that the educational level of nurses has direct impact on the safety and quality of care provided to patients.…

  19. Motivational Factors in Registered Nurses Completing a Baccalaureate Completion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate what motivates associate degree (AND) and diploma prepared registered nurses (RN) to pursue a baccalaureate degree (BSN) through an RN-to-BSN program. Studies have shown that the educational level of nurses has direct impact on the safety and quality of care provided to patients.…

  20. Fifteen Years of Collaborative Innovation and Achievement: NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 15-Year Program Performance and Results Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M. (Editor); Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Avery Shelly; Calamaio, Caprice; Carstenson, Larry; Dugan, James; Farr, Lynne; Farritor, Shane

    2003-01-01

    This 15-year evaluation serves as a summary document highlighting the numerous and complete successes of the Nebraska Space Grant Program. Innovation has been highlighted through significant new endeavors during this 5-year period, such as placement of students and faculty at NASA Centers and the expansion of NSGC Native American Outreach Programs. While the last national program evaluation resulted in Nebraska s ranking as the top Capability Enhancement Consortium, and 5th best overall, Nebraska felt there was room for significant growth and development. This has been validated through the recent competitive attainment of Designated Grant status and has allowed for the exploration of new initiatives, as well as the expansion of already successful programs. A comprehensive strategic planning effort has involved all Nebraska representative entities and has guided Nebraska Space Grant through the evaluation period, providing a basis for continual advancement. Nebraska rigorously employs evaluation techniques to ensure that stated outcomes and metrics are achieved and that weaknesses are identified and corrected. With this coordinated approach, Nebraska expects that the next 5 years will yield new opportunities for significant achievement. Nebraska Space Grant will embrace new national endeavors, including the integration of Pender Public Schools -Nebraska s NASA Explorer School, geospatial initiatives, and the National Student Satellite Program.

  1. Fifteen Years of Collaborative Innovation and Achievement: NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 15-Year Program Performance and Results Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M. (Editor); Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Avery Shelly; Calamaio, Caprice; Carstenson, Larry; Dugan, James; Farr, Lynne; Farritor, Shane

    2003-01-01

    This 15-year evaluation serves as a summary document highlighting the numerous and complete successes of the Nebraska Space Grant Program. Innovation has been highlighted through significant new endeavors during this 5-year period, such as placement of students and faculty at NASA Centers and the expansion of NSGC Native American Outreach Programs. While the last national program evaluation resulted in Nebraska s ranking as the top Capability Enhancement Consortium, and 5th best overall, Nebraska felt there was room for significant growth and development. This has been validated through the recent competitive attainment of Designated Grant status and has allowed for the exploration of new initiatives, as well as the expansion of already successful programs. A comprehensive strategic planning effort has involved all Nebraska representative entities and has guided Nebraska Space Grant through the evaluation period, providing a basis for continual advancement. Nebraska rigorously employs evaluation techniques to ensure that stated outcomes and metrics are achieved and that weaknesses are identified and corrected. With this coordinated approach, Nebraska expects that the next 5 years will yield new opportunities for significant achievement. Nebraska Space Grant will embrace new national endeavors, including the integration of Pender Public Schools -Nebraska s NASA Explorer School, geospatial initiatives, and the National Student Satellite Program.

  2. The National Astronomy Consortium Summer Student Research Program at NRAO-Socorro: Year 2 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Perez, Laura M.; Arancibia, Demian; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    I will present a summary of the program structure used for the second year of hosting a summer student research cohort of the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. The NAC is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. I will describe the research, professional development, and inclusivity goals of the program, and show how these were used to create a weekly syllabus for the summer. I will also highlight several unique aspects of this program, including the recruitment of remote mentors for students to better balance the gender and racial diversity of available role models for the students, as well as the hosting of a contemporaneous series of visiting diversity speakers. Finally, I will discuss structures for continuing to engage, interact with, and mentor students in the academic year following the summer program. A goal of this work going forward is to be able to make instructional and organizational materials from this program available to other sites interested in joining the NAC or hosting similar programs at their own institution.

  3. Undergraduate research studies program at participating institutions of the HBCU Fossil Energy Consortium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bota, K.B.

    1991-12-31

    The primary objective of this research program is to expose students in the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Fossil Energy Consortium Institutions to energy and fossil fuels research, to stimulate their interest in the sciences and engineering and to encourage them to pursue graduate studies. This report provides the research accomplishment of the various students who participated in the program. Research results are presented on the following topics: Energy Enhancement and Pollutant Reduction in Coal by Cryogenic Diminution; Competition of NO and SO{sub 2} for OH Generated witin Electrical Aerosol Analyzers; Dispersed Iron Catalysts for Coal Gasification; NQR/NMR Studies of Copper-Cobalt Catalysts for Syngas Concersion; Catalytic gasification of Coal Chars by Potassium Sulfate and Ferrous Sulfate Mixtures; A New Method for Cleaning and Beneficiation of Ultrafine Coal; Characterization Studies of Coal-Derived Liquids; Study of Coal Liquefaction Catalysts and Removal of Certain Toxic Heavy Metal Ions from Coal Conversion Process Wastewaters.

  4. Undergraduate research studies program at participating institutions of the HBCU Fossil Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Bota, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to expose students in the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Fossil Energy Consortium Institutions to energy and fossil fuels research, to stimulate their interest in the sciences and engineering and to encourage them to pursue graduate studies. This report provides the research accomplishment of the various students who participated in the program. Research results are presented on the following topics: Energy Enhancement and Pollutant Reduction in Coal by Cryogenic Diminution; Competition of NO and SO[sub 2] for OH Generated witin Electrical Aerosol Analyzers; Dispersed Iron Catalysts for Coal Gasification; NQR/NMR Studies of Copper-Cobalt Catalysts for Syngas Concersion; Catalytic gasification of Coal Chars by Potassium Sulfate and Ferrous Sulfate Mixtures; A New Method for Cleaning and Beneficiation of Ultrafine Coal; Characterization Studies of Coal-Derived Liquids; Study of Coal Liquefaction Catalysts and Removal of Certain Toxic Heavy Metal Ions from Coal Conversion Process Wastewaters.

  5. The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program as an NF1 Consortium Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    chair of the Biology Committee, and he organized a symposium of investigators and clinicians who were part of a MPNST (malignant peripheral nerve sheath...tumor) Consortium and the MPNST Committee of the NF1 Consortium that convened as a satellite meeting of the full NF1 Consortium meeting in Atlanta

  6. Optimizing completely positive maps using semidefinite programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audenaert, Koenraad; de Moor, Bart

    2002-03-01

    Recently, a lot of attention has been devoted to finding physically realizable operations that realize as closely as possible certain desired transformations between quantum states, e.g., quantum cloning, teleportation, quantum gates, etc. Mathematically, this problem boils down to finding a completely positive trace-preserving (CPTP) linear map that maximizes the (mean) fidelity between the map itself and the desired transformation. In this communication, we want to draw attention to the fact that this problem belongs to the class of so-called semidefinite programming (SDP) problems. As SDP problems are convex, it immediately follows that they do not suffer from local optima. Furthermore, this implies that the numerical optimization of the CPTP map can, and should, be done using methods from the well-established SDP field, as these methods exploit convexity and are guaranteed to converge to the real solution. Finally, we show how the duality inherent to convex and SDP problems can be exploited to prove analytically the optimality of a proposed solution. We give an example of how to apply this proof method by proving the optimality of Hardy and Song's optimal qubit θ shifter (e-print quant-ph/0102100).

  7. The FaceBase Consortium: A comprehensive program to facilitate craniofacial research

    PubMed Central

    Hochheiser, Harry; Aronow, Bruce J.; Artinger, Kristin; Beaty, Terri H.; Brinkley, James F.; Chai, Yang; Clouthier, David; Cunningham, Michael L.; Dixon, Michael; Donahue, Leah Rae; Fraser, Scott E.; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Iwata, Junichi; Klein, Ophir; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Murray, Stephen; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Postlethwait, John; Potter, Steven; Shapiro, Linda; Spritz, Richard; Visel, Axel; Weinberg, Seth M.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The FaceBase Consortium consists of ten interlinked research and technology projects whose goal is to generate craniofacial research data and technology for use by the research community through a central data management and integrated bioinformatics hub. Funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and currently focused on studying the development of the middle region of the face, the Consortium will produce comprehensive datasets of global gene expression patterns, regulatory elements and sequencing; will generate anatomical and molecular atlases; will provide human normative facial data and other phenotypes; conduct follow up studies of a completed genome-wide association study; generate independent data on the genetics of craniofacial development, build repositories of animal models and of human samples and data for community access and analysis; and will develop software tools and animal models for analyzing and functionally testing and integrating these data. The FaceBase website (http://www.facebase.org) will serve as a web home for these efforts, providing interactive tools for exploring these datasets, together with discussion forums and other services to support and foster collaboration within the craniofacial research community. PMID:21458441

  8. Establishment and Results of a Magnetic Resonance Quality Assurance Program for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Forbes, Peter; Dewey, Kevin; Osganian, Stravoula; Clark, Maureen; Wong, Sharon; Ramamurthy, Uma; Kun, Larry; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2008-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is used to assess brain tumor response to therapies and a MR quality assurance program is necessary for multicenter clinical trials employing imaging. This study was performed to determine overall variability of quantitative image metrics measured with the American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom among 11 sites participating in the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) Neuroimaging Center (NIC) MR quality assurance (MR QA) program. Materials and Methods An MR QA program was implemented among 11 participating PBTC sites and quarterly evaluations of scanner performance for seven imaging metrics defined by the ACR were sought and subject to statistical evaluation over a 4.5 year period. Overall compliance with the QA program, means, standard deviations and coefficients of variation (CV) for the quantitative imaging metrics were evaluated. Results Quantitative measures of the seven imaging metrics were generally within ACR recommended guidelines for all sites. Compliance improved as the study progressed. Inter-site variabilities as gauged by coefficients of variation (CV) for slice thickness and geometric accuracy, imaging parameters that influence size and/or positioning measurements in tumor studies, were on the order of 10 % and 1% respectively. Conclusion Although challenging to establish, MR QA programs within the context of PBTC multi-site clinical trials when based on the ACR MR phantom program can a) indicate sites performing below acceptable image quality levels and b) establish levels of precision through instrumental variabilities that are relevant to quantitative image analyses, e.g. tumor volume changes. PMID:18692750

  9. Improving Undergraduate Research Experiences With An Intentional Mentoring Program: Lessons Learned Through Assessment of Keck Geology Consortium Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, K. R.; Garver, J. I.; Greer, L.; Pollock, M.; Varga, R. J.; Davidson, C. M.; Frey, H. M.; Hubbard, D. K.; Peck, W. H.; Wobus, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Keck Geology Consortium, with support from the National Science Foundation (REU Program) and ExxonMobil, is a collaborative effort by 18 colleges to improve geoscience education through high-quality research experiences. Since its inception in 1987 more than 1350 undergraduate students and 145 faculty have been involved in 189 yearlong research projects. This non-traditional REU model offers exceptional opportunities for students to address research questions at a deep level, to learn and utilize sophisticated analytical methods, and to engage in authentic collaborative research that culminates in an undergraduate research symposium and published abstracts volume. The large numbers of student and faculty participants in Keck projects also affords a unique opportunity to study the impacts of program design on undergraduate research experiences in the geosciences. Students who participate in Keck projects generally report significant gains in personal and professional dimensions, as well as in clarification of educational and career goals. Survey data from student participants, project directors, and campus advisors identify mentoring as one of the most critical and challenging elements of successful undergraduate research experiences. Additional challenges arise from the distributed nature of Keck projects (i.e., participants, project directors, advisors, and other collaborators are at different institutions) and across the span of yearlong projects. In an endeavor to improve student learning about the nature and process of science, and to make mentoring practices more intentional, the Consortium has developed workshops and materials to support both project directors and campus research advisors (e.g., best practices for mentoring, teaching ethical professional conduct, benchmarks for progress, activities to support students during research process). The Consortium continues to evolve its practices to better support students from underrepresented groups.

  10. 25 CFR 1000.88 - Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? 1000.88 Section 1000.88 Indians... in An Afa § 1000.88 Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? No, the Secretary does not have to approve a redesign of...

  11. 25 CFR 1000.88 - Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? 1000.88 Section 1000.88 Indians... in An Afa § 1000.88 Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? No, the Secretary does not have to approve a redesign of...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.88 - Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? 1000.88 Section 1000.88 Indians... in An Afa § 1000.88 Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? No, the Secretary does not have to approve a redesign of...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.301 - When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.301 Section 1000.301 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? The...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.301 - When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.301 Section 1000.301 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? The...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.88 - Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? 1000.88 Section 1000.88 Indians... in An Afa § 1000.88 Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? No, the Secretary does not have to approve a redesign of...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.301 - When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.301 Section 1000.301 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? The...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.301 - When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.301 Section 1000.301 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? The...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.301 - When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When may the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.301 Section 1000.301 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... the Secretary reassume a Federal program operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? The...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.88 - Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? 1000.88 Section 1000.88 Indians... in An Afa § 1000.88 Do Tribes/Consortia need Secretarial approval to redesign BIA programs that the Tribe/Consortium administers under an AFA? No, the Secretary does not have to approve a redesign of...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.367 - Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Will the Department evaluate a Tribe's/Consortium's performance of non-trust related programs? 1000.367 Section 1000.367 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT...

  1. An Industry Consortium Approach to Retirement Planning--A New Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Edmund W.

    1978-01-01

    The National Council on Aging in cooperation with a consortium of nine corporations and four unions is developing a retirement planning approach. Article focuses on preliminary findings of a survey of consortium companies' employees retirement attitudes and preparations. Seventy percent of those 40-65 indicated interest in attending a retirement…

  2. An Industry Consortium Approach to Retirement Planning--A New Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Edmund W.

    1978-01-01

    The National Council on Aging in cooperation with a consortium of nine corporations and four unions is developing a retirement planning approach. Article focuses on preliminary findings of a survey of consortium companies' employees retirement attitudes and preparations. Seventy percent of those 40-65 indicated interest in attending a retirement…

  3. Evaluation Report for the Massachusetts Workplace Literacy Consortium. National Workplace Literacy Program Wave 6, Year 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperazi, Laura; DePascale, Charles A.

    The Massachusetts Workplace Literacy Consortium sought to upgrade work-related literacy skills at 22 partner sites in the state. Members included manufacturers, health care organizations, educational institutions, and labor unions. In its third year, the consortium served 1,179 workers with classes in English for speakers of other languages, adult…

  4. Scientific ballooning on a shoestring budget: The Montana Space Grant Consortium's BOREALIS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpar, D.; Kirn, S.; Hiscock, W.

    High altitude ballooning using Latex weather balloons provides frequent and low cost opportunities to carry small meaningful scientific payloads to well in excess of 100,000 feet. Maximizing payload scientific capability requires utilization of the newest available miniature, low-power, light-weight technologies to minimize system mass and size. The Balloon Outreach, Research, Exploration And Land Imaging System (BOREALIS) program of the Montana Space Grant Consortium has provided for undergraduate student teams to build payload systems up to 5.4 kg to conduct high altitude flight experiments. In the university setting such a program provides direct experience to students in the fabrication and operation of (near)space flight systems and payloads, and subsequent analysis of the scientific data. Over the course of the past three years 19 successful balloon flights have been conducted, with full payload recovery, reaching altitudes in excess of 110,000 feet, providing rewarding and exciting developmental test flights for satellite subsystems and mini-science missions to the edge of space. Missions have included measurement of Ozone altitude profiles, UV and Cosmic Ray fluxes, and atmospheric temperature and pressure soundings. In addition to providing hands on training at our colleges and universities for future scientists and engineers; by involving the public, a much larger audience is exposed to the scientific research process. In this paper we describe our methodologies and program accomplishments, including the design of a payload support system utilizing commercially available subsystems. More information may be found at http://spacegrant.montana.edu/borealis/index.asp

  5. Consortium Directory, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baus, Frederick, Comp.; LaRocco, Teresa, Comp.

    Information on 133 higher education consortia is presented in this directory. Each consortium meets the following criteria: voluntary, formal organization; includes at least two member institutions; undertakes more than a single program; is administered by a professional director; and receives continuing membership support. For each consortium,…

  6. Complete removal of arsenic and zinc from a heavily contaminated acid mine drainage via an indigenous SRB consortium.

    PubMed

    Le Pape, Pierre; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Parmentier, Marc; Joulian, Catherine; Gassaud, Cindy; Fernandez-Rojo, Lidia; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Ikogou, Maya; Stetten, Lucie; Olivi, Luca; Casiot, Corinne; Morin, Guillaume

    2017-01-05

    Acid mine drainages (AMD) are major sources of pollution to the environment. Passive bio-remediation technologies involving sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are promising for treating arsenic contaminated waters. However, mechanisms of biogenic As-sulfide formation need to be better understood to decontaminate AMDs in acidic conditions. Here, we show that a high-As AMD effluent can be decontaminated by an indigenous SRB consortium. AMD water from the Carnoulès mine (Gard, France) was incubated with the consortium under anoxic conditions and As, Zn and Fe concentrations, pH and microbial activity were monitored during 94days. Precipitated solids were analyzed using electron microscopy (SEM/TEM-EDXS), and Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy at the As K-edge. Total removal of arsenic and zinc from solution (1.06 and 0.23mmol/L, respectively) was observed in two of the triplicates. While Zn precipitated as ZnS nanoparticles, As precipitated as amorphous orpiment (am-As(III)2S3) (33-73%), and realgar (As(II)S) (0-34%), the latter phase exhibiting a particular nanowire morphology. A minor fraction of As is also found as thiol-bound As(III) (14-23%). We propose that the formation of the As(II)S nanowires results from As(III)2S3 reduction by biogenic H2S, enhancing the efficiency of As removal. The present description of As immobilization may help to set the basis for bioremediation strategies using SRB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 25 CFR 1000.400 - Can a Tribe/Consortium retain savings from programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... an AFA is in effect. A Tribe/Consortium must use any savings that it realizes under an AFA, including a construction contract: (a) To provide additional services or benefits under the AFA; or (b)...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.400 - Can a Tribe/Consortium retain savings from programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... an AFA is in effect. A Tribe/Consortium must use any savings that it realizes under an AFA, including a construction contract: (a) To provide additional services or benefits under the AFA; or (b)...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.400 - Can a Tribe/Consortium retain savings from programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... an AFA is in effect. A Tribe/Consortium must use any savings that it realizes under an AFA, including a construction contract: (a) To provide additional services or benefits under the AFA; or (b)...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.400 - Can a Tribe/Consortium retain savings from programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... an AFA is in effect. A Tribe/Consortium must use any savings that it realizes under an AFA, including a construction contract: (a) To provide additional services or benefits under the AFA; or (b)...

  11. 25 CFR 1000.400 - Can a Tribe/Consortium retain savings from programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... an AFA is in effect. A Tribe/Consortium must use any savings that it realizes under an AFA, including a construction contract: (a) To provide additional services or benefits under the AFA; or (b)...

  12. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Dagher, Habib; Viselli, Anthony; Goupee, Andrew; Thaler, Jeffrey; Brady, Damian; Browne, Peter; Browning, James; Chung, Jade; Coulling, Alexander; Deese, Heather; Fowler, Matthew; Holberton, Rebecca; Anant, Jain; Jalbert, Dustin; Johnson, Theresa; Jonkman, Jason; Karlson, Benjamin; Kimball, Richard; Koo, Bonjun; Lackner, Matthew; Lambrakos, Kostas; Lankowski, Matthew; Leopold, Adrienne; Lim, Ho-Joon; Mangum, Linda; Martin, Heather; Masciola, Marco; Maynard, Melissa; McCleave, James; Mizrahi, Robert; Molta, Paul; Pershing, Andrew; Pettigrew, Neal; Prowell, Ian; Qua, Andrew; Sherwood, Graham; Snape, Thomas; Steneck, Robert; Stewart, Gordon; Stockwell, Jason; Swift, Andrew H. P.; Thomas, Dale; Viselli, Elizabeth; Zydlewski, Gayle

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  13. Predictors of Participation and Completion in a Workplace Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Paula Sue; White, Bonnie Roe

    1997-01-01

    Responses from 351 employee participants in a workplace education program (218 completers) indicated they were mostly white, female high school graduates ages 26 to 35. Women with Test of Adult Basic Education math scores below 5.0 were less likely to complete. Those who completed higher grades in school were more likely to participate. (SK)

  14. Factors associated with the completion of falls prevention program.

    PubMed

    Batra, Anamica; Page, Timothy; Melchior, Michael; Seff, Laura; Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Palmer, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    Falls and fear of falling can affect independence and quality of life of older adults. Falls prevention programs may help avoiding these issues if completed. Understanding factors that are associated with completion of falls prevention programs is important. To reduce fear of falling and increase activity levels, a Matter of Balance (MOB) and un Asunto de Equilibrio (ADE) workshops were offered to 3420 older adults in South Florida between 1 October 2008 and 31 December 2011. Workshops were conducted in English or Spanish over eight, 2-hour sessions. Participants completed a demographic and a pre-post questionnaire. Factors associated with program completion were identified using logistic regression. For MOB, females were more likely to complete the program (OR = 2.076, P = 0.02). For ADE, females, moderate and extreme interference by falls in social activities were found to affect completion (OR = 2.116, P = 0.001; OR = 2.269, P = 0.003 and OR = 4.133, P = 0.008, respectively). Different factors predicted completion of both programs. Awareness of these factors can help lower the attrition rates, increase benefits and cost effectiveness of program. Future research needs to explore why certain groups had a higher likelihood of completing either program.

  15. Oncofertility Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oncofertility Consortium Conference November 14-16, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois Register for the Oncofertility Conference Call the ... Consortium 303 E Superior Street, Suite 10-121 Chicago, IL, 60611 (312) 503-2504 Social Media Parking ...

  16. Geographic applications program: Reports completed and in preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, R. H. (Compiler)

    1969-01-01

    The purpose of the present compilation is to bring together for ready reference a list of all reports, both completed and in preparation, resulting from NASA sponsorship of the geography program. Wherever possible, complete bibliographic citations are given. Since some of the 141 reports listed are not yet completed, citations can not all be in complete form. The reason for including incomplete citations is the sponsor's need for rather rapid feed-back of information so that it can have a bearing on on-going program planning. This should, therefore, be considered a working bibliography.

  17. Head Start, 4 years After Completing the Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Joo

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of the Head Start program on children's achievements in reading and math tests during their first 4 years of schooling after completing the program. Using nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, I found large measurement error in the parental reports of Head Start attendance, which…

  18. Locus of Control and Completion in an Adult Retraining Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C.

    Since attrition is often a problem in adult training programs, a study was conducted to investigate the relationship between locus of control and course completion of adults enrolled in a retraining program. Rotter's Social Learning Theory of Personality was used as a starting point for the study. The study population was a sample of 108…

  19. Modeling the complete Otto cycle: Preliminary version. [computer programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the equations and the computer program being developed to model the complete Otto cycle. The program incorporates such important features as: (1) heat transfer, (2) finite combustion rates, (3) complete chemical kinetics in the burned gas, (4) exhaust gas recirculation, and (5) manifold vacuum or supercharging. Changes in thermodynamic, kinetic and transport data as well as model parameters can be made without reprogramming. Preliminary calculations indicate that: (1) chemistry and heat transfer significantly affect composition and performance, (2) there seems to be a strong interaction among model parameters, and (3) a number of cycles must be calculated in order to obtain steady-state conditions.

  20. Three key components to successfully completing a nursing doctoral program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald G; Delmore, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Using their personal experience, the authors identify three key components to successfully completing a nursing doctoral program. The first component is asking the right questions to determine the doctoral degree best suited for the potential student. The second component is having a strategic plan that includes aspects such as financial considerations (research costs and potential financial support) and the development of a strong support system (specifically study pairs). The third component is the development of a systematic approach to completing the research, writing the dissertation, and completing the oral requirements. Addressing these areas will help students balance the many demands of doctoral study.

  1. A survey of degree completion programs in dental hygiene education.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karen M; Rogo, Ellen J; Calley, Kristin H; Cellucci, Leigh W

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify specific information related to U.S. dental hygiene baccalaureate degree completion programs. Learning experiences, assessment methods, and baccalaureate institutional partnerships were assessed. Of the sixty dental hygiene programs that offer a degree completion program, the forty-two that met the inclusion criteria (including having operated for at least three years) were invited to participate in a thirty-eight item online survey. A 62 percent (n=26) response rate was obtained. Learning experiences in responding programs included core dental hygiene courses, general education courses, and elective dental hygiene courses. Emphasis areas offered by various programs were in the specialty areas of education, public or community health, and research. Respondents reported that their graduates were employed in multiple settings (65 percent; n=17), with 19 percent (n=5) reporting employment in the combined grouping of private practice, education, and public health. Institutional partnerships included articulation agreements (88 percent; n=21), community college baccalaureate (8 percent; n=2), and university extension (4 percent; n=1) models. The findings of this study provide a baseline for assessing the educational composition and design of U.S. dental hygiene degree completion programs. However, results of this study showed inconsistencies among learning experiences that might raise concerns when considering students' level of preparation for graduate education and future leadership roles in the profession.

  2. UTSI/CFFF MHD Program Completion and Related Activities.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. A plan for Groundwater Remediation was prepared, coordinated with DOE and forwarded to the State for approval. Actions are underway to dispose spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of six High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported.

  3. A Sound and Complete Program Logic for Eiffel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordio, Martin; Calcagno, Cristiano; Müller, Peter; Meyer, Bertrand

    Object-oriented languages provide advantages such as reuse and modularity, but they also raise new challenges for program verification. Program logics have been developed for languages such as C# and Java. However, these logics do not cover the specifics of the Eiffel language. This paper presents a program logic for Eiffel that handles exceptions, once routines, and multiple inheritance. The logic is proven sound and complete w.r.t. an operational semantics. Lessons on language design learned from the experience are discussed.

  4. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from

  5. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Armato, Samuel G.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Bidaut, Luc; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Meyer, Charles R.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Zhao, Binsheng; Aberle, Denise R.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; MacMahon, Heber; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Yankelevitz, David; Biancardi, Alberto M.; Bland, Peyton H.; Brown, Matthew S.; Engelmann, Roger M.; Laderach, Gary E.; Max, Daniel; Pais, Richard C.; Qing, David P.-Y.; Roberts, Rachael Y.; Smith, Amanda R.; Starkey, Adam; Batra, Poonam; Caligiuri, Philip; Farooqi, Ali; Gladish, Gregory W.; Jude, C. Matilda; Munden, Reginald F.; Petkovska, Iva; Quint, Leslie E.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Sundaram, Baskaran; Dodd, Lori E.; Fenimore, Charles; Gur, David; Petrick, Nicholas; Freymann, John; Kirby, Justin; Hughes, Brian; Vande Casteele, Alessi; Gupte, Sangeeta; Sallam, Maha; Heath, Michael D.; Kuhn, Michael H.; Dharaiya, Ekta; Burns, Richard; Fryd, David S.; Salganicoff, Marcos; Anand, Vikram; Shreter, Uri; Vastagh, Stephen; Croft, Barbara Y.; Clarke, Laurence P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC∕IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (“nodule≥3 mm,” “nodule<3 mm,” and “non-nodule≥3 mm”). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked “nodule” by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked “nodule≥3 mm” by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such

  6. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Arbitration Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services and youth psychopathy on Juvenile Diversion program completion for youths involved in a clinical trial, and evaluation of an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management services to youths and their families. The present study examines baseline interview data for…

  7. Persistence of Women in Online Degree-Completion Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Although online courses at postsecondary institutions promise adults access, flexibility, and convenience, many barriers to online learning remain. This article presents findings from a qualitative case study, which explored the phenomenon of undergraduate and graduate women learners' persistence in online degree-completion programs at a college…

  8. Contribution of hot spring bacterial consortium in cadmium and lead bioremediation through quadratic programming model.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sudip Kumar; Raut, Sangeeta; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Mohapatra, Pradeep Kumar Das

    2014-01-30

    In the present investigation, a number of experiments have been conducted to isolate microbial strains from Taptapani Hot Spring Odisha, India for bioremediation of cadmium and lead. The strains Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (SS1), Aeromonas veronii (SS2) and Bacillus barbaricus (SS3) have shown better adaptation to metal tolerance test, with different concentrations of cadmium and lead and hence have been selected for further studies of metal microbial interaction and optimization. The results of bioremediation process indicate that consortium of thermophilic isolates adsorbed heavy metals more effectively than the individually treated isolates. Therefore, A 24 full factorial central composite design has been employed to analyze the effect of metal ion concentration, microbial concentration and time on removal of heavy metals with consortium. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows a high coefficient of determination value. The kinetic data have been fitted to pseudo-first order and second-order models. The isotherm equilibrium data have been well fitted by the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The optimum removal conditions determined for initial ion concentration was 0.3g/l; contact time 72h; microbial concentration, 3ml/l; and pH 7. At optimum adsorption conditions, the adsorption of cadmium and lead are found to be 92% and 93%, respectively, and presence of metals was confirmed through EDS analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Complete biodegradation of 4-fluorocinnamic acid by a consortium comprising Arthrobacter sp. strain G1 and Ralstonia sp. strain H1.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Syed A; Ferreira, Maria Isabel M; Koetsier, Martijn J; Arif, Muhammad I; Janssen, Dick B

    2011-01-01

    A consortium of the newly isolated bacterial strains Arthrobacter sp. strain G1 and Ralstonia sp. strain H1 utilized 4-fluorocinnamic acid for growth under aerobic conditions. Strain G1 converted 4-fluorocinnamic acid into 4-fluorobenzoic acid and used the two-carbon side chain for growth, with some formation of 4-fluoroacetophenone as a dead-end side product. In the presence of strain H1, complete mineralization of 4-fluorocinnamic acid and release of fluoride were obtained. Degradation of 4-fluorocinnamic acid by strain G1 occurred through a β-oxidation mechanism and started with the formation of 4-fluorocinnamoyl-coenzyme A (CoA), as indicated by the presence of 4-fluorocinnamoyl-CoA ligase. Enzymes for further transformation were detected in cell extract, i.e., 4-fluorocinnamoyl-CoA hydratase, 4-fluorophenyl-β-hydroxy propionyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and 4-fluorophenyl-β-keto propionyl-CoA thiolase. Degradation of 4-fluorobenzoic acid by strain H1 proceeded via 4-fluorocatechol, which was converted by an ortho-cleavage pathway.

  10. Program cuts gas well drilling/completion costs

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.N. Jr.; Martin, C.D.

    1996-07-01

    A 2-year cost-reduction program cut East Texas gas-well drilling and completion costs by 37%. Union Pacific Resources (UPR) has implemented the lessons learned during this program in UPR branches in operating areas beyond its East Texas unit, where the company`s ``exploit marginal acreage team`` (EMAT) developed its cost-cutting practices. Impetus for organizing the EMAT was strong because well-development costs in the Cotton Valley (CV) formation in East Texas dictated that a gas well have a probability of producing more than 1.0 bcf gas during its lifetime. UPR held much acreage where wells potentially could only produce between 0.5 and 1.0 bcf; therefore, if UPR could drive costs down, these marginal areas would become economically exploitable. The UPR/Halliburton Energy Service alliance built mutual trust to the point that both sides realized that failure of an individual experiment would not reflect negatively on either side. In this atmosphere, more daring procedures were tried. Many of these are now part of UPR`s standard operating procedure for drilling and completing gas wells. The paper discusses the completion techniques retained, completion techniques under evaluation, completion techniques not retained, drilling techniques retained and not retained.

  11. [Development of an advanced education program for community medicine by Nagasaki pharmacy and nursing science union consortium].

    PubMed

    Teshima, Mugen; Nakashima, Mikiro; Hatakeyama, Susumi

    2012-01-01

    The Nagasaki University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences has conducted a project concerning "development of an advanced education program for community medicine" for its students in collaboration with the University's School of Nursing Sciences, the University of Nagasaki School of Nursing Sciences, and the Nagasaki International University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. The project was named "formation of a strategic base for the integrated education of pharmacy and nursing science specially focused on home-healthcare and welfare", that has been adopted at "Strategic University Cooperative Support Program for Improving Graduate" by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan from the 2009 academic year to the 2011 academic year. Our project is a novel education program about team medical care in collaboration with pharmacist and nurse. In order to perform this program smoothly, we established "Nagasaki pharmacy and nursing science union consortium (Nagasaki University, The University of Nagasaki, Nagasaki International University, Nagasaki Pharmaceutical Association, Nagasaki Society of Hospital Pharmacists, Nagasaki Nursing Association, Nagasaki Medical Association, Nagasaki Prefectural Government)". In this symposium, we introduce contents about university education program and life learning program of the project.

  12. High School Completion Programs: A Community Guide Systematic Economic Review.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shuli; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K; Hahn, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    On-time high school graduation rate is among the 26 leading health indicators for Healthy People 2020. High school completion (HSC) programs aim to increase the likelihood that students finish high school and receive a high school diploma or complete a GED (General Educational Development) program. This systematic review was conducted to determine the economic impact of HSC interventions, assess variability in cost-effectiveness of different types of programs, and compare the lifetime benefit of completing high school with the cost of intervention. Forty-seven included studies were identified from 5303 articles published in English from January 1985 to December 2012. The economic evidence was summarized by type of HSC program. All monetary values were expressed in 2012 US dollars. The data were analyzed in 2013. Thirty-seven studies provided estimates of incremental cost per additional high school graduate, with a median cost for HSC programs of $69 800 (interquartile interval = $35 900-$130 300). Cost-effectiveness ratios varied depending on intervention type, study settings, student populations, and costing methodologies. Ten studies estimated the lifetime difference of economic benefits between high school nongraduates and graduates; 4 used a governmental perspective and reported benefit per additional high school to range from $187 000 to $240 000; 6 used a societal perspective and reported a range of $347 000 to $718 000. Benefits exceeded costs in most studies from a governmental perspective and in all studies from a societal perspective. Interventions to increase HSC rates produce substantial economic benefits to government and society including averted health care costs. From a societal perspective, the benefits also exceed costs, implying a positive rate of return from investment in HSC programs.

  13. USA program in geothermal drilling and completion research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.; Caskey, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    The program objective is to conduct long-range R and D aimed at developing advanced geothermal drilling and completion systems to expand resource utilization. The program is organized into four broad categories: (1) rock penetration mechanics, (2) drilling fluids, (3) borehole mechanics, and (4) diagnostics technology. Although much effort has been concentrated on bit development under rock penetration mechanics, current work focuses on understanding the limitations of drag bits as they apply to hard rock drilling systems. Fluid technology R and D addresses the high temperature, high corrosion and abnormal pressure problems found in geothermal areas. A high-temperature clay-based mud has been developed. The R and D in borehole mechanics addresses the problems of lost circulation and lining and cementing the well, as well as problems of production maintenance such as perforating and scale removal. Well logging and downhole instrumentation R and D activities are organized under the diagnostics technology program element.

  14. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  19. The National Astronomy Consortium: Lessons learned from a program to support underrepresented students in pursuing STEM careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Brisbin, Drew; Boyd, Patricia T.; Benjamin, Robert A.; NAC Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. Students are also given an opportunity to apply for a second year in this program, often at a different site. In addition to providing research and professional experience, the NAC also seeks to strengthen ties between the majority and minority-serving institutions in order to better serve these students throughout their careers. I will report on lessons learned from the second year of hosting a cohort at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. I will discuss the program structure during and after the summer, mentoring challenges, and ways that these challenges were addressed, including organizing a series of guest speakers and connecting students with a broader community of remote mentors.

  20. Initiating Experiential Learning Programs: Four Case Studies. CAEL Institutional Report. The Consortium of the California State University and Colleges. Memphis State University. Union College. University of Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortnick, Barrie D.; And Others

    Four experiential learning programs that are in the early stages of development are described. The report from the Consortium of the California State University and Colleges details the efforts of a traditional, decentralized system to introduce flexibility into the use of examinations for crediting prior learning. A description of a large,…

  1. A Commonwealth Consortium to Develop, Implement and Evaluate a Pilot Program of Computer-Assisted Instruction for Urban High Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitzel, Harold E.; And Others

    The school districts of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, the Department of Education of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and Pennsylvania State University formed the Computer-Assisted Instruction Consortium to develop and evaluate two high school mathematics programs utilizing the medium of computer-assisted instruction. The first 18 months of the…

  2. UTSI/CFFF MHD PROGRAM COMPLETION AND RELATED ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Joel W. Muehlhauser

    2004-07-21

    In this final technical report, UTSI summarizes work completed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95PC95231. This work began on the contract effective date, September 15, 1995 and is continuing on a very small basis to complete the groundwater remediation as of this date. The work scope required UTSI to continue to maintain the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility and keep it in readiness for anticipated testing. This effort was terminated in September 1998 by DOE stop-work letter. Work continued on reporting, environmental restoration and on the High Temperature Superconductivity work that was underway. The work included preparing reports on the MHD POC tests that had been completed just prior to this contract initiation under an earlier contract with DOE Chicago. These four reports are summarized herein. This report summarizes the environmental restoration work performed under the contract, including groundwater monitoring and remediation, removal of wastes from the facility, removal of asbestos from the cooling tower and actions in compliance with the license to discharge water into Woods Reservoir. This report covers work in support of the DOE High Temperature Superconductivity program including: (1) Assistance to DOE in preparing a development plan; (2) Cooperation with industry, national laboratories and other universities to promote the commercialization of thin film superconductors (coated conductors); (3) Process Evaluations; (4) Process Diagnostic Development; and (5) Process Economics. The assistance to DOE task included convening an advisory board composed of all the major participants in the DOE program and preparing a draft development plan and Research and Development Roadmap leading to commercialization of the coated conductor technology. Under this program, cooperative agreements and cooperative work was undertaken with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Midwest Superconductivity, Inc., EURUS Technologies, Inc., Westinghouse Electric Company, and others. In the

  3. 73 FR 18313 - Retirement Research Consortium Request for Applications (RFA) Program Announcement No. SSA-ORES...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2008-04-03

    ... and creative thinking that relates the principles of the program to economic and demographic realities... encourages applicants to propose creative methods of disseminating data and information. Applications...

  4. The Consortium of Professional Associations for Study of Special Teacher Improvement Programs. CONPASS: From Its Origins to June 30, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Theodore B., Jr.

    This document outlines the history and major activities of the Consortium since its origin in May 1966. It began as a grouping of five discipline-oriented associations concerned with conducting and evaluating Office of Education-funded teacher institutes in specific subject fields. The Consortium has since expanded to a membership of 13…

  5. 25 CFR 26.25 - What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Job Placement Services § 26.25 What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application? To be complete, a Job Placement Program application must contain all of the...

  6. 25 CFR 26.25 - What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Job Placement Services § 26.25 What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application? To be complete, a Job Placement Program application must contain all of the...

  7. 25 CFR 26.25 - What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Job Placement Services § 26.25 What constitutes a complete Job Placement Program application? To be complete, a Job Placement Program application must contain all of...

  8. The development of a diversity mentoring program for faculty and trainees: A program at the Brown Clinical Psychology Training Consortium

    PubMed Central

    de Dios, Marcel A.; Kuo, Caroline; Hernandez, Lynn; Clark, Uraina S.; Wenze, Susan J.; Boisseau, Christina L.; Hunter, Heather L.; Reddy, Madhavi K.; Tolou-Shams, Marina; Zlotnick, Caron

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need for increasing the diversity representation among clinicians and researchers in academic medicine, including departments of psychiatry and psychology. Mentorship of under-represented groups has been identified as an important way to remediate diversity-related barriers in the field. This paper outlines the early development and pilot implementation of a diversity mentorship program at Brown University. In an effort to inform and guide future diversity programs, we discuss the challenges faced in creating the program, the successes experienced during the first year, and the future directions undertaken as a means for improving the program. PMID:25346563

  9. The development of a diversity mentoring program for faculty and trainees: A program at the Brown Clinical Psychology Training Consortium.

    PubMed

    de Dios, Marcel A; Kuo, Caroline; Hernandez, Lynn; Clark, Uraina S; Wenze, Susan J; Boisseau, Christina L; Hunter, Heather L; Reddy, Madhavi K; Tolou-Shams, Marina; Zlotnick, Caron

    2013-06-01

    There is a critical need for increasing the diversity representation among clinicians and researchers in academic medicine, including departments of psychiatry and psychology. Mentorship of under-represented groups has been identified as an important way to remediate diversity-related barriers in the field. This paper outlines the early development and pilot implementation of a diversity mentorship program at Brown University. In an effort to inform and guide future diversity programs, we discuss the challenges faced in creating the program, the successes experienced during the first year, and the future directions undertaken as a means for improving the program.

  10. The BADER Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    will study individuals with upper extremity amputations, a subgroup of injured service people who have been underrepresented in research in the past...external auditing purposes.  Two charges from the BADER Consortium were randomly selected for audit under the annual University of Delaware audit...use at Navy sites.  Fully executed two CRADAs for new research projects. Institution Date of distribution Date of completed agreement

  11. End-of-life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Training Program: improving palliative care in critical care.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty R; Dahlin, Constance; Campbell, Margaret L; Paice, Judith A; Malloy, Pam; Virani, Rose

    2007-01-01

    The integration of palliative care in critical care settings is essential to improve care of the dying, and critical care nurses are leaders in these efforts. However, lack of education in providing end-of-life (EOL) care is an obstacle to nurses and other healthcare professionals as they strive to deliver palliative care. Education regarding pain and symptom management, communication strategies, care at the end of life, ethics, and other aspects of palliative care are urgently needed. Efforts to increase EOL care education in most undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula are beginning; yet, most critical care nurses have not received formal training in palliative care. Moreover, educational resources such as critical care nursing textbooks often contain inadequate information on palliative care. The ELNEC-Critical Care program provides a comprehensive curriculum that concentrates on the requirements of those nurses who are working in areas of critical care. Extensive support materials include CD-ROM, binder, Web sites, newsletters, textbooks, and other supplemental items. The ultimate goal is to improve EOL care for patients in all critical care settings and enhance the experience of family members witnessing the dying process of their loved ones.

  12. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  13. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  14. Fifteen Years of Collaborative Innovation and Achievement: NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 15-Year Program Performance and Results Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Avery, Shelly; Carstenson, Larry; Dugan, James; Farritor, Shane; Joyce, James; Rebrovich, Barb

    2003-01-01

    Condensing five years of significant work into a brief narrative fitting PPR requirements gave the affiliates of the Nebraska Space Grant a valuable chance for reflection. Achievements of Space Grant in Nebraska were judiciously chosen for this document that best illustrate the resultant synergism of this consortium, keeping in mind that these examples are only a representation of greater activity throughout the state. Following are highlights of many of the finer and personal achievements for Nebraska Space Grant. The Consortium welcomes inquiries to elaborate on any of these accomplishments.

  15. UTSI/CFFF MHD Program Completion and Related Activity

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, being funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development by the DOE HIPPS Program, are being implemented on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and control room. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. Actions are under way to dispose of spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program.

  16. 78 FR 15377 - Completion of Claims Adjudication Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... (``Commission'') by the Department of State by letters dated December 11, 2008 (the ``Libya I program''), and January 15, 2009 (the ``Libya II program''), involving claims of United States nationals against the Government of Libya that were settled under the ``Claims Settlement Agreement Between the United States...

  17. Health Education Consortium. Articulated Nursing Education Program. Final Report from January 1, 1980 to June 30, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulledge, Earl N.

    A project entitled the Health Education Consortium was initiated to develop an articulated nursing educational route that would meet the educational needs of all types of nursing personnel from nurses aides through and including nurses with master of science degrees. Included among the major activities of the project were the following:…

  18. 33 CFR 263.18 - Program completion-time objectives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... submission of funding request or negative report to OCE 2 1 2 (b) Completion of feasibility study by... these objectives is encouraged for specific studies and projects when appropriate. However,...

  19. Delaware Occupational Teacher Education Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, John I.

    The Delaware Occupational Teacher Education Consortium is comprised of three colleges: the University of Delaware, Delaware State College, and Delaware Technical and Community College. These schools established a joint program in 1972 for preparing and certifying industrial arts, trade, and industry teachers in B.S. and M.S. degree programs. The…

  20. Follow-Up of JCCC Career Program Completers, Class of 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In an overall plan to assess institutional effectiveness, Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas conducts annual follow-up studies of students who completed career programs during the previous academic year, and also surveys employers of those completers. In fall 1993, surveys were mailed to 768 career program completers, including…

  1. Historical Cost Growth of Completed Weapon System Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Management Program of RAND Project AIR FORCE. The project’s technical monitor is Jay Jordan, Technical Director of the Air Force Cost Analysis Agency. Other...CGFs for development costs range from a low of 1.16 for the nine ship weapon systems reviewed in Asher and Mag- gelet (1984) to a high of 2.26 for six...to procurement) for each weapon system 2.26 (n = 6) 1.43 (n = 6) Not reported Asher and Maggelet (1984) Last SAR for program or December 1983 As of

  2. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Schill, Lyndele; Ivory, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) program is designed to increase the number of underrepresented minority students into STEM and STEM careers by providing unique summer research experiences followed by long-term mentoring and cohort support. Hallmarks of the NAC program include: research or internship opportunities at one of the NAC partner sites, a framework to continue research over the academic year, peer and faculty mentoring, monthly virtual hangouts, and much more. NAC students also participate in two professional travel opportunities each year: the annual NAC conference at Howard University and poster presentation at the annual AAS winter meeting following their summer internship.The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Consortium (NRAO) and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicist (NSBP), along with a number of minority and majority universities.

  3. Persistence Factors Revealed: Students' Reflections on Completing a Fully Online Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Dazhi; Baldwin, Sally; Snelson, Chareen

    2017-01-01

    Despite their rapid growth, online programs routinely face student attrition. How to retain students and help them successfully complete is usually a top priority for online programs. This study investigated persistence factors that contributed to students' successful completion from one of the largest and most successful online programs in the…

  4. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Non-Completers in Online Doctor of Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Bernadette Marie

    2012-01-01

    The chance of an individual completing a traditional doctorate program is 50% (Bowen & Rudenstine, 1992; Council of Graduate Schools Ph.D. Completion Project, 2008; Ivankova & Stick, 2007). Student attrition in online programs is 10% to 20% greater than that of traditional, residential programs (Allen & Seaman, 2010; Carr, 2000; Diaz,…

  5. Who Completes Child Maltreatment Prevention Programs? Data Trends #153

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" describes child maltreatment prevention programs designed to increase protective factors and decrease risk factors in families who may otherwise succumb to…

  6. The Nature Specialist: A Complete Guide to Program and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lenore Hendler

    This manual contains a collection of approaches and activities for nature specialists at residential or day camps. It is organized so that the novice may use it to maximize the effectiveness of a camp program. The book is full of descriptions of various field experiments in which children can participate. Comments in section 1, "Getting Started,"…

  7. Black Women in Nursing Education Completion Programs: Issues Affecting Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lolita Chappel; Cervero, Ronald M.; Johnson-Bailey, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 10 black women enrolled in or graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs identified intrapersonal and cultural factors encouraging their participation. Hindrances were classified as the experience of being the "other" and the culture of racism. Findings show that individual and institutional racism is a barrier in registered…

  8. Black Women in Nursing Education Completion Programs: Issues Affecting Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lolita Chappel; Cervero, Ronald M.; Johnson-Bailey, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 10 black women enrolled in or graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs identified intrapersonal and cultural factors encouraging their participation. Hindrances were classified as the experience of being the "other" and the culture of racism. Findings show that individual and institutional racism is a barrier in registered…

  9. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  10. The Stroke Belt Consortium.

    PubMed

    Alberts, M J

    1996-01-01

    The "Stroke Belt" describes a region of the southeastern United States with a high incidence of stroke and mortality due to stroke. In an effort to address the problem of stroke in this region, we have formed the Stroke Belt Consortium (SBC). This report describes the formation and functions of the SBC. The SBC is a unique organization with representatives from many areas, including health care, government, nonprofit organizations, the pharmaceutical industry, minority groups, educational groups, and managed care. The goals of the consortium are to advance public and professional education about stroke in the Stroke Belt, with a special emphasis on the populations in that region. The first meeting of the consortium was held in November 1994. Many helpful and innovative ideas and initiatives were generated at the first SBC meeting. These included improved techniques for professional education, the development of a mass media campaign for public education, screening of college students for stroke risk factors, and using fast-food restaurants and sporting events as venues to promote stroke education. This type of organized effort may produce cost-effective programs and initiatives, particularly for largescale educational efforts, that will enhance the prevention and treatment of stroke patients. If successful in the Stroke Belt, similar organizations can be formed in other regions of the nation to address specific issues related to stroke prevention, education, and treatment.

  11. UTSI/CFFF MHD program completion and related activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Joel W. Muehlhauser; Dr. James N. Chapman

    1999-07-30

    Maintenance work on the DOE CFFF facility and other related government property remained in suspension in accordance with the stop work order issued by DOE. Environmental remediation and preservation of the facility continued. Final actions were completed to dispose of the soil that was contaminated by diesel oil. Actions are underway to dispose of other wastes. Progress is reported on the 5 high temperature superconductivity projects under Task 6. Results are reported for various techniques for annealing cold rolled nickel tapes and applying buffer layer by the Sol-Gel process. Included in the annealing/coating work is one case that involved oxidizing the nickel to nickel oxide which is textured before application of the buffer layer. Work under the Optimum Coated Conductor included issuing a topical report describing the work on grain boundary grooving in nickel substrates as a function of annealing temperature and time. Also, the work to evaluate the mutual effects of adjacent superconductors. In the cost/performance analysis project, completion of a study on the economics of production of coated conductors by the MOCVD process is reported. In the diagnostics for real time process control project, a topical report that outlines the requirements for control of promising manufacturing processes was submitted, additional work is reported on using absorption spectroscopy as the basis for control of the stoichiometry for the MOCVD process and the work on scatterometry for measuring uniformity of surfaces is summarized.

  12. Programs Offered and Programs Completed at North Dakota Institutions of Postsecondary Education, July 1, 2008-June 30, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepp, Julie; Domagala, Anna

    2009-01-01

    This report provides information on degree and certificate programs offered and student program completions for fiscal year 2008-09 in North Dakota's public and private postsecondary educational institutions. Institutional programs are coded in accordance with the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP Code) system provided by the National…

  13. Programs Offered and Programs Completed at North Dakota Institutions of Postsecondary Education: July 1, 1990-June 20, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blom, Nancy S.; Olsen, Tammey

    This report provides information on degree and certificate programs offered and student program completions for fiscal year 1990-91 in North Dakota's public and private postsecondary educational institutions. Institutional programs are coded in accordance with the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP Code) system provided by the Center…

  14. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLGOY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-23

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for

  15. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for

  16. UTSI/CFFF MHD PROGRAM COMPLETION AND RELATED ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Muehlhauser

    2003-10-20

    The Discharge Monitoring Reports (DMRs) for July, August and September, 2003, were prepared and submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Discussions were held during July with our environmental consulting firm (TVG Environmental) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) about the groundwater testing program for the CFFF. Both TVG and TDEC advised that we continue with the semiannual sampling schedule for at least the next 6 months to a year. A relatively new category titled Site-Specific Impaired Classification is being considered for the CFFF, but the documentation requirements are expected to be extensive and expensive. The next sampling event will be contracted for in November 2003. In addition to regular monthly report to TDEC, a regional inspector from TDEC came by to inspect the CFFF for compliance with the water discharge permit. He took a short tour of the facility and subsequently issued a statement that the CFFF was in compliance with the permit. TVG Environmental, Inc. of Nashville was requested to provide a cost quote to perform the next scheduled groundwater sampling event for the CFFF. They quoted the same per-event cost as the two previous sampling events. TVG was awarded the contract and the next scheduled semiannual sampling event will occur in mid-November.

  17. Implementing Writing Assessment in a Degree Completion Program: Key Issues and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Jeff E.; Allred, Ellen R.; Hunt, Rob

    2010-01-01

    This article details the advantages and challenges of implementing writing assessment in a degree completion program; it describes the steps involved in the writing assessment process. Study results demonstrate that graduates from a degree completion program generally have adequate writing skills; nevertheless, many could improve their…

  18. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  19. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

  20. Program Completion and Re-Arrest in a Batterer Intervention System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Larry W.; Stoops, Charles; Call, Christine; Flett, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the effects of batterer intervention program (BIP) completion on domestic violence re-arrest in an urban system of 30 BIPs with a common set of state standards, common program completion criteria, and centralized criminal justice supervision. Method: 899 men arrested for domestic violence were assessed and completed…

  1. 25 CFR 26.32 - What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application? 26.32 Section 26.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.32 What constitutes a complete Job Training...

  2. A Case Study of English Language Learners Who Have Successfully Completed a Healthcare Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloud Smith, Theresa Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if English Language Learners (ELLs), who had successfully completed a healthcare education program, identified support services as having an impact on their academic success, and to identify what support services were critical to their successful completion of the healthcare education program. The…

  3. 25 CFR 26.32 - What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application? 26.32 Section 26.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.32 What constitutes a complete Job...

  4. VET Program Completion Rates: An Evaluation of the Current Method. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2016

    2016-01-01

    This work asks one simple question: "how reliable is the method used by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) to estimate projected rates of VET program completion?" In other words, how well do early projections align with actual completion rates some years later? Completion rates are simple to calculate with a…

  5. The Twin Cities biomedical consortium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, A S

    1975-07-01

    Twenty-eight health science libraries in the St. Paul-Minneapolis area formed the Twin Cities Biomedical Consortium with the intention of developing a strong network of biomedical libraries in the Twin Cities area. Toward this end, programs were designed to strengthen lines of communication and increase cooperation among local health science libraries; improve access to biomedical information at the local level; and enable the Consortium, as a group, to meet an increasing proportion of its members' needs for biomedical information. Presently, the TCBC comprises libraries in twenty-two hospitals, two county medical societies, one school of nursing, one junior college, and two private corporations.

  6. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  7. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-04-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  8. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  9. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  10. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  11. Profiles of Students Completing Teacher Education Programs at MSU: Fall, 1983 through Spring, 1986. Program Evaluation Series No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Donald J.; Kalaian, Sima A.

    The program evaluation design at Michigan State University (MSU) includes three surveys (entry-level, exit-level, and follow-up) that trace the progress of teacher candidates from program entry through their initial years of teaching. This report provides a comprehensive profile of students completing teacher preparation programs at MSU from fall,…

  12. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  13. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., trading, and banking program. 86.1817-08 Section 86.1817-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program. Section 86.1817-08 includes text that...-cycle vehicles may participate in an NMHC averaging, banking and trading program to show compliance...

  14. Results From the John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium. A Success Story for NASA and Northeast Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Barna, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium was established by NASA in 2002 to formulate and implement an integrated, interdisciplinary research program to address risks faced by astronauts during long-duration space missions. The consortium is comprised of a preeminent team of Northeast Ohio institutions that include Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, The National Center for Space Exploration Research, and the NASA Glenn Research Center. The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium research is focused on fluid physics and sensor technology that addresses the critical risks to crew health, safety, and performance. Effectively utilizing the unique skills, capabilities and facilities of the consortium members is also of prime importance. Research efforts were initiated with a general call for proposals to the consortium members. The top proposals were selected for funding through a rigorous, peer review process. The review included participation from NASA's Johnson Space Center, which has programmatic responsibility for NASA's Human Research Program. The projects range in scope from delivery of prototype hardware to applied research that enables future development of advanced technology devices. All of the projects selected for funding have been completed and the results are summarized. Because of the success of the consortium, the member institutions have extended the original agreement to continue this highly effective research collaboration through 2011.

  15. Predictors of completion status in a remedial program for male convicted drinking drivers.

    PubMed

    Rootman, Dan B; Mann, Robert E; Ferris, Lorraine E; Chalin, Catherine; Adlaf, Edward; Shuggi, Rania

    2005-05-01

    Rates of attrition in alcohol and drug treatment programs are often greater than 50%, and completion of treatment has been shown to be a potent predictor of posttreatment outcome. The current study examined both rates and predictors of completion among male participants in a remedial measures program for convicted drinking drivers. Male individuals (n = 5,409) convicted of a drinking driving offense in Ontario between October 2000 and December 2002 who did and did not complete a mandatory rehabilitation program were described in terms of demographic, drug use and legal variables collected at time of assessment. The program completion rate was extremely high (97.3%). In multivariate analyses, noncompleters-relative to completers-were younger; drank more frequently; were less likely to own a home; and were more likely to live in urban centers, have two or more lifetime impaired driving convictions and have experienced more than one adverse consequence of substance use. Ontario's remedial measures program for convicted drinking drivers, in which the return of a suspended license after the period of mandatory suspension is contingent on the completion of the program, demonstrates a very low level of client attrition. Individuals who do not complete the program bear many similarities to those at high risk for persistent drink-drive behavior and its associated negative health consequences.

  16. The complete sequence of a heterochromatic island from a higher eukaryote. The Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Washington University Genome Sequencing Center, and PE Biosystems Arabidopsis Sequencing Consortium.

    PubMed

    2000-02-04

    Heterochromatin, constitutively condensed chromosomal material, is widespread among eukaryotes but incompletely characterized at the nucleotide level. We have sequenced and analyzed 2.1 megabases (Mb) of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 4 that includes 0.5-0.7 Mb of isolated heterochromatin that resembles the chromosomal knobs described by Barbara McClintock in maize. This isolated region has a low density of expressed genes, low levels of recombination and a low incidence of genetrap insertion. Satellite repeats were absent, but tandem arrays of long repeats and many transposons were found. Methylation of these sequences was dependent on chromatin remodeling. Clustered repeats were associated with condensed chromosomal domains elsewhere. The complete sequence of a heterochromatic island provides an opportunity to study sequence determinants of chromosome condensation.

  17. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  18. Differences between Lab Completion and Non-Completion on Student Performance in an Online Undergraduate Environmental Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, Gianluca

    2011-12-01

    Web-based technology has revolutionized the way education is delivered. Although the advantages of online learning appeal to large numbers of students, some concerns arise. One major concern in online science education is the value that participation in labs has on student performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between lab completion and student academic success as measured by test grades, scientific self-confidence, scientific skills, and concept mastery. A random sample of 114 volunteer undergraduate students, from an online Environmental Science program at the American Public University System, was tested. The study followed a quantitative, non-experimental research design. Paired sample t-tests were used for statistical comparison between pre-lab and post-lab test grades, two scientific skills quizzes, and two scientific self-confidence surveys administered at the beginning and at the end of the course. The results of the paired sample t-tests revealed statistically significant improvements on all post-lab test scores: Air Pollution lab, t(112) = 6.759, p < .001; Home Chemicals lab t(114) = 8.585, p < .001; Water Use lab, t(116) = 6.657, p < .001; Trees and Carbon lab, t(113) = 9.921, p < .001; Stratospheric Ozone lab, t(112) =12.974, p < .001; Renewable Energy lab, t(115) = 7.369, p < .001. The end of the course Scientific Skills quiz revealed statistically significant improvements, t(112) = 8.221, p < .001. The results of the two surveys showed a statistically significant improvement on student Scientific Self-Confidence because of lab completion, t(114) = 3.015, p < .05. Because age and gender were available, regression models were developed. The results indicated weak multiple correlation coefficients and were not statistically significant at alpha = .05. Evidence suggests that labs play a positive role in a student's academic success. It is recommended that lab experiences be included in all online Environmental Science

  19. The BADER Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Research Core and Scientific Technical Cores; approval and establishment of eight clinical research projects;  development  and  implementation of an... developed  research focus (gap) areas in partnership with EACE; established and  implemented a complete process for the call, submission, review and...Bridge Advanced  Developments  for Exceptional Rehabilitation.  The  omnibus consortium model system, as opposed to a project centric model, focuses on the

  20. JCCC Career Program Completers 1986-87: A Three-Year Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In 1990, a follow-up study was conducted of 1986-87 Johnson County Community College (JCCC) career program completers to assess their career and educational experiences over an extended period of time. Data from 128 returned mail surveys and 166 completed telephone interviews represented responses from 86.2% of the 462 students who left JCCC with…

  1. JCCC Career Program Completers 1986-87: A Three-Year Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In 1990, a follow-up study was conducted of 1986-87 Johnson County Community College (JCCC) career program completers to assess their career and educational experiences over an extended period of time. Data from 128 returned mail surveys and 166 completed telephone interviews represented responses from 86.2% of the 462 students who left JCCC with…

  2. Assessing the Effect of Adult High School Completion Programs on Graduate Placement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Moines Area Community Coll., Ankeny, IA.

    Three thousand eight hundred ninety-eight adults who had received a High School Equivalency Diploma (HSED) during 1976 in Iowa were surveyed to assess the impact of finishing a high school completion program on their placement after completion. Three hundred Iowa employers were also surveyed to analyze existing personnel policies and practices…

  3. Follow-Up of JCCC Career Program Completers: Class of 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This paper presents the results of a follow-up study of students who completed a Johnson County Community College (JCCC) (Kansas) career program. Of 699 students on a list of completers, 465 returned surveys for an adjusted response rate of 67%. Of 176 potential respondents who were employers of students, 124 returned surveys for an adjusted…

  4. What We Know about Guided Pathways: Helping Students to Complete Programs Faster. Research Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Thomas; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Jenkins, Davis

    2015-01-01

    The idea behind guided pathways is straightforward. College students are more likely to complete a degree in a timely fashion if they choose a program and develop an academic plan early on, have a clear road map of the courses they need to take to complete a credential, and receive guidance and support to help them stay on plan. However, most…

  5. Enhancing Program Completion Rates among Two-Year College Students of Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opp, Ronald D.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a study of 573 two-year colleges, which analyzed significant indicators of program completion for students of color. Finds that percentages of faculty and administrators of color and the amount of contact student affairs officers have with students of color were the strongest predictors of completion. (Contains 54 references.) (NB)

  6. Follow-Up of JCCC Career Program Completers: Class of 1997-98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    The report summarizes the results of follow-up studies of 494 students who completed a career program at Kansas' Johnson County Community College (JCCC) during the 1997-1998 academic year, and of the employers of completers who were working in a job related to their course of study. Results of these studies provide valuable insights into the…

  7. Predicting Completion vs. Defection in a Community-Based Reintegration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Melinda A.

    2004-01-01

    The current study provides empirical data associated with successful program completion by examining the differing characteristics between clients who graduated from a community-based reintegration program operating in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and those who left prior to graduation. Substance dependence risk, level of education, employment or…

  8. Predicting Program Completion among Families Enrolled in a Child Neglect Preventive Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girvin, Heather; DePanfilis, Diane; Daining, Clara

    2007-01-01

    Objective: An exploratory analysis of self-report data gathered by the Family Connections program is used to build a predictive model of program completion. Method: The sample includes 136 families in a poor, urban neighborhood who meet risk criteria for child neglect. Families are randomly assigned to receive 3- or 9-month interventions.…

  9. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Program Completion among Adult Basic Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batiste, Mildred M.

    2014-01-01

    Program completion among adult learners attending adult basic education programs has been found to be an area of struggle. Cognitive ability has always been the primary factor for determining an individual's ability. However, non-cognitive ability has been proposed as a significant factor in academic success. Many attrition models have been…

  10. Examination of Applicant Profiles for Admission into and Completion of an Online Secondary Teacher Certification Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Jon J.; Davis, Trina J.; Capraro, Robert M.; Smith, Ben L.; Beason, Lynn; Graham, B. Diane; Strader, R. Arlen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether particular biographic and academic characteristics would predict whether an applicant would matriculate into and successfully complete an online secondary teacher certification program for Texas public schools. Extensive biographic data on applicants were compiled into a program data base…

  11. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Program Completion among Adult Basic Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batiste, Mildred M.

    2014-01-01

    Program completion among adult learners attending adult basic education programs has been found to be an area of struggle. Cognitive ability has always been the primary factor for determining an individual's ability. However, non-cognitive ability has been proposed as a significant factor in academic success. Many attrition models have been…

  12. Enhancing Doctoral Completion in Women: Evidence from a Qualitative Study of a Unique Federally Funded Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sandra P.; Drake-Clark, Donna; Grasso, Maureen; Banta, Trudy

    2014-01-01

    In an era where campus environments were often unwelcoming to women, and there were few women role models, an innovative program funded by the National Institute of Education produced 100% completion by female and minority doctoral students. At a 25-year reunion, the graduates reflected on their program experiences and careers. Reflections were…

  13. The Self-Reported Impact of Graduate Program Completion on the Careers and Plans of Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Patrick J.; Spencer, Bob; Halinski, Tara

    2008-01-01

    The Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University, commenced a survey of all graduates of its two programs, the master of distance education (MDE) degree, and the graduate diploma (GD) in technology, in late 2006. Alumni were asked how program completion had affected their careers, and their plans for the future. A total of 84 graduates…

  14. THE HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION PROGRAM FOR ADULTS AND OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Public Instruction, Lansing.

    DETAILED RECOMMENDATIONS ARE GIVEN FOR A PROGRAM OF HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION STUDIES FOR ADULTS AND TEENAGERS IN MICHIGAN. THE BACKGROUND AND THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF THE DROPOUT PROBLEM ARE REVIEWED, AND THE OPPORTUNITIES AND PROBLEMS (PRINCIPALLY ACCREDITATION AND FINANCIAL POLICY) PRESENTED BY EXISTING PROGRAMS IN MICHIGAN AND CERTAIN OTHER…

  15. Enhancing Doctoral Completion in Women: Evidence from a Qualitative Study of a Unique Federally Funded Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sandra P.; Drake-Clark, Donna; Grasso, Maureen; Banta, Trudy

    2014-01-01

    In an era where campus environments were often unwelcoming to women, and there were few women role models, an innovative program funded by the National Institute of Education produced 100% completion by female and minority doctoral students. At a 25-year reunion, the graduates reflected on their program experiences and careers. Reflections were…

  16. The Experiences of Young Adult Offenders Who Completed a Drug Court Treatment Program.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kathleen A; Barongi, Melissa M; Rigg, Khary K

    2017-04-01

    Although there has been a proliferation of studies on the effectiveness of drug court programs, these studies are largely quantitative in nature. Little is known about the experiences of persons who participate in drug court. In this study, we aimed to fill this knowledge gap by exploring experiences of young adults who completed an adult drug court treatment program. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted, typed into a word-processing program, and then entered into a data analysis software program. Using grounded theory strategies, analysis revealed several emergent themes, which are presented chronologically to provide a narrative of study participants' experiences before, during, and after the program. Findings provide insights on how participants perceive drug courts and experiences that might facilitate or impede completion of drug court programs. Our findings are particularly important for drug court professionals as they attempt to develop appropriate recommendations for best practices and new policy initiatives.

  17. Effect of Type Opportunity Technological Programs on the Completion Rate of Opportunity Program Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinard, Roscoe C.

    The Opportunities Program is a collaboration between the Illinois state welfare program and the City Colleges of Chicago to educate/train welfare recipients in short-term programs. A review of the research identified these effective student retention strategies: student support, high quality instruction, and remediation. A review of research on…

  18. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  19. 25 CFR 1000.338 - What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract status if it has retroceded a program that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.338 What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...? Retrocession has no effect on mature contract status, provided that the 3 most recent audits covering...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.338 - What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract status if it has retroceded a program that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.338 What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...? Retrocession has no effect on mature contract status, provided that the 3 most recent audits covering...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.338 - What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract status if it has retroceded a program that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.338 What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...? Retrocession has no effect on mature contract status, provided that the 3 most recent audits covering...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.338 - What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract status if it has retroceded a program that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.338 What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...? Retrocession has no effect on mature contract status, provided that the 3 most recent audits covering...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.338 - What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract status if it has retroceded a program that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.338 What happens to a Tribe's/Consortium's mature contract...? Retrocession has no effect on mature contract status, provided that the 3 most recent audits covering...

  4. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with

  5. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing

  6. Radiogenomics Consortium (RGC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiogenomics Consortium's hypothesis is that a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity to radiation therapy is influenced by common genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  7. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  8. The Complete Resource Guide for Summer Youth Programs. Program Ideas for Summer Youth Jobs Project Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide consists of suggestions, ideas, and tips intended to stimulate development of cooperative summer youth employment programs in local communities. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: tips on where to start, suggestions on how to get started, hints on securing resources, program resources, use of…

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host

  10. In-Hospital Vital Status and Heart Transplants After Intervention for Congenital Heart Disease in the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium: Completeness of Ascertainment Using the National Death Index and United Network for Organ Sharing Datasets.

    PubMed

    Spector, Logan G; Menk, Jeremiah S; Vinocur, Jeffrey M; Oster, Matthew E; Harvey, Brian A; St Louis, James D; Moller, James; Kochilas, Lazaros K

    2016-08-09

    The long-term outcomes of patients undergoing interventions for congenital heart disease (CHD) remain largely unknown. We linked the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) with the National Death Index (NDI) and the United Network for Organ Sharing Dataset (UNOS) registries to study mortality and transplant occurring up to 32 years postintervention. The objective of the current analysis was to determine the sensitivity of this linkage in identifying patients who are known to have died or undergone heart transplant. We used direct identifiers from 59 324 subjects registered in the PCCC between 1982 and 2003 to test for completeness of case ascertainment of subjects with known vital and heart transplant status by linkage with the NDI and UNOS registries. Of the 4612 in-hospital deaths, 3873 were identified by the NDI as "true" matches for a sensitivity of 84.0% (95% CI, 82.9-85.0). There was no difference in sensitivity across 25 congenital cardiovascular conditions after adjustment for age, sex, race, presence of first name, death year, and residence at death. Of 455 known heart transplants in the PCCC, there were 408 matches in the UNOS registry, for a sensitivity of 89.7% (95% CI, 86.9-92.3). An additional 4851 deaths and 363 transplants that occurred outside the PCCC were identified through 2014. The linkage of the PCCC with the NDI and UNOS national registries is feasible with a satisfactory sensitivity. This linkage provides a conservative estimate of the long-term death and heart transplant events in this cohort. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. Consortium Proves Adage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Kim

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Minnesota Preparatory Schools, a secondary-level consortium formed by Cotter High School, Saint Mary's University, the Minnesota Academy of Mathematics and Science, De La Salle Language Institute, and the Minnesota Conservatory for the Arts. Indicates that the consortium provides students with flexible schedules geared toward their…

  12. Developmental Education in Higher Education. Advanced Institutional Development Program (AIDP) Two-year College Consortium, Vol. II, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Johnnie Ruth; And Others

    This monograph, consisting of four sections, focuses on developmental education in the higher education setting. The first section, by Johnnie Ruth Clarke, provides an overall perspective on learning through developmental programs. Included are discussions of the developmental approach, developmental students and instructional activities, and…

  13. Outcome Measurements in Higher Education. Advanced Institutional Development Program (AIDP) Two-year College Consortium, Vol. 1, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, L. James, Ed.

    Pressures from both outside and inside the institution are making it imperative that community colleges improve their ability to document and articulate the outputs and impacts of their programs. This document addresses itself to this issue and to the problems associated with measurement of outcomes in postsecondary education. An approach taken by…

  14. The Connecticut General Assembly: Teacher's Manual for Visitation Program of the Connecticut Consortium for Law and Citizenship Education, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Margaret

    This program is intended for easy incorporation into curricula on U.S. history, state and local government, or contemporary issues and events. The objective is for high school students to gain direct exposure to the workings of the Connecticut state legislature and the decision-making process. The teacher's manual contains an introduction, a guide…

  15. Technical Progress Report for UTSI/CFFF MDH Program Completion and Related Activity

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. A plan for Groundwater Remediation was prepared, coordinated with DOE and approved by the State of Tennessee. Actions are underway to dispose of spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of five (5) High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported.

  16. Explaining Long-Term Exercise Adherence in Women Who Complete a Structured Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ransdell, Lynda B.; Sidman, Cara; Flohr, Judith A.; Shultz, Barry; Grosshans, Onie; Durrant, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine factors related to physical activity adherence to understand why women continue to participate in long-term exercise after completing a structured exercise program. Data were collected from focus groups, interviews, and e-mails, and analysis used grounded theory. The central category related…

  17. Transforming Nursing Programs to Reduce Time to Completion. Strategies for Transformative Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, A.; King, D.; Combs, M.

    2016-01-01

    This brief focuses on the efforts of the nursing programs at Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas (PCCUA) to reduce time to completion, increase achievement, and enhance student support. To accomplish these goals, PCCUA involved healthcare providers, faculty, students, college curriculum committees, the Accreditation Commission…

  18. Effects of Family Functioning and Parenting Style on Early Entrants' Academic Performance and Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Erron L.; Sayler, Michael F.; Rinn, Anne N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the predictive nature of parenting style and overall family environment on the academic performance and program completion of early college entrants. Furthermore, gender and family form were examined as possible moderators to these relationships. A total of 88 early college entrants participated in…

  19. The Effect of Student Attributes and Program Characteristics on Doctoral Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittings, Glenn Allen

    2010-01-01

    More than a decade after the state of Kentucky enacted higher education reform that provided specific direction to the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville, this research study sought to examine the effect of student characteristics and program characteristics on doctoral degree completion. This study attempted to address the…

  20. Resiliency in Physics: The Lived Experiences of African-American Women Who Completed Doctoral Physics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnette, Samara Fleming

    2013-01-01

    Currently, little is known about African-American women with doctoral degrees in physics. This study examined the lived experiences of African-American women who completed doctoral programs in physics. Due to factors of race and gender, African-American women automatically enter a double-bind in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  1. Resiliency in Physics: The Lived Experiences of African-American Women Who Completed Doctoral Physics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnette, Samara Fleming

    2013-01-01

    Currently, little is known about African-American women with doctoral degrees in physics. This study examined the lived experiences of African-American women who completed doctoral programs in physics. Due to factors of race and gender, African-American women automatically enter a double-bind in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  2. Why We Complete a Teacher Education Program: Credentialed Teachers, a Critical Incident Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alastuey, Lisa; Justice, Madeline; Weeks, Sandy; Hardy, James

    2005-01-01

    This study focused on the initial reasons individuals enter and complete the teacher education program, and pass the state test. These same individuals do not enter the public school classroom. This study identified meaningful categories for incidents reported as effective or helpful to successfully facilitating their decision to enter and…

  3. Accelerated Degree Completion Programs: The Effects of Core Professors in Nontraditional Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadd, Dale Fredrick

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional Accelerated Degree Completion Programs (ADCPs) became popular in the 1980s at many private, higher education institutions, and involved cohort groups facilitated by core or major professors. There has been little research addressing the effectiveness of a core-professor or multiple-professor approach within ADCPs, or research on how…

  4. Don't Drink and Drive. Completion of Treatment Guidelines. Driver Education Evaluation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremper, Mel

    This booklet sets forth a common framework within which providers of substance abuse services approved by the Maine Division of Driver Education Evaluation Programs (DEEP) can evaluate, treat, and certify the completion of treatment of persons convicted of operating under the influence. It presents criteria for classifying individuals according to…

  5. Three Phases of Low-Cost Rocket Engine Demonstration Program Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the TRW Space & Technology Group have successfully completed three phases of testing on the Low-Cost Roc ket Engine Demonstration Program. TRW and the McDonnell Douglas Corpo ration are working, in a joint effort, to quickly develop and produce a highly stable, inexpensive, simple, yet reliable, expendable launc h vehicle.

  6. Effects of Family Functioning and Parenting Style on Early Entrants' Academic Performance and Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Erron L.; Sayler, Michael F.; Rinn, Anne N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the predictive nature of parenting style and overall family environment on the academic performance and program completion of early college entrants. Furthermore, gender and family form were examined as possible moderators to these relationships. A total of 88 early college entrants participated in…

  7. Explaining Long-Term Exercise Adherence in Women Who Complete a Structured Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ransdell, Lynda B.; Sidman, Cara; Flohr, Judith A.; Shultz, Barry; Grosshans, Onie; Durrant, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine factors related to physical activity adherence to understand why women continue to participate in long-term exercise after completing a structured exercise program. Data were collected from focus groups, interviews, and e-mails, and analysis used grounded theory. The central category related…

  8. Teachers' Longitudinal NOS Understanding after Having Completed a Science Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Benjamin C.; Clough, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The study reported here investigated experienced teachers' views on several nature of science (NOS) issues 2 to 5 years after they completed a demanding secondary science teacher education program in which the NOS was an extensive and recurring component. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed to determine study…

  9. 77 FR 59648 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... University NAGPRA Program has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... the human remains and associated funerary objects and a present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and...

  10. An Exploration of Factors Affecting Persistence to Degree Completion in an Undergraduate Music Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, Russell B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of students (N = 26) in an undergraduate music education degree program in an attempt to identify commonalities among students persisting to degree completion. All participants were in their final year of the music education degree at the time of the study. Multiple data collection methods…

  11. Follow-Up of JCCC Career Program Completers, Class of 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    Each year, Kansas' Johnson County Community College (JCCC) surveys students who completed career programs during the previous year and their current employers to determine outcomes and levels of satisfaction. In fall 1995, 723 students who earned degrees and certificates or who left the college with marketable skills were surveyed. Completed…

  12. Follow-Up of Career Program Completers: Class of 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    In November 1991, a follow-up study was conducted of 514 former students of Johnson County Community College (JCCC), in Kansas, who had earned a career program degree or certificate in 1990-91, or had been identified as leaving the college with marketable skills. Of these, 480 completed mail or telephone surveys for a response rate of 93%.…

  13. Government-Funded Program Completions 2014. Preliminary. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides data on Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) programs completed from 2010 to 2014 in Australia's government-funded vocational education and training (VET) system (broadly defined as all activity delivered by government providers and government-funded activity delivered by community education and other registered…

  14. Accelerated Degree Completion Programs: The Effects of Core Professors in Nontraditional Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadd, Dale Fredrick

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional Accelerated Degree Completion Programs (ADCPs) became popular in the 1980s at many private, higher education institutions, and involved cohort groups facilitated by core or major professors. There has been little research addressing the effectiveness of a core-professor or multiple-professor approach within ADCPs, or research on how…

  15. An Intervention Designed to Increase Participation and Completion Rates of Community College Students in Nontraditional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straight, Carli A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the missions of California Community Colleges (CCCs) is to provide career and technical education (CTE) to students that will prepare them for the workforce. Major funding for CTE programs comes from grant monies that are tied to the condition that institutions must demonstrate an effort to increase the participation and completion rates of…

  16. Education and Outreach Programs Offered by the Center for High Pressure Research and the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, G. A.

    2003-12-01

    Major research facilities and organizations provide an effective venue for developing partnerships with educational organizations in order to offer a wide variety of educational programs, because they constitute a base where the culture of scientific investigation can flourish. The Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) conducts education and outreach programs through the Earth Science Educational Resource Center (ESERC), in partnership with other groups that offer research and education programs. ESERC initiated its development of education programs in 1994 under the administration of the Center for High Pressure Research (CHiPR), which was funded as a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center from 1991 to 2002. Programs developed during ESERC's association with CHiPR and COMPRES have targeted a wide range of audiences, including pre-K, K-12 students and teachers, undergraduates, and graduate students. Since 1995, ESERC has offered inquiry-based programs to Project WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) students at a high school and undergraduate level. Activities have included projects that investigated earthquakes, high pressure mineral physics, and local geology. Through a practicum known as Project Java, undergraduate computer science students have developed interactive instructional tools for several of these activities. For K-12 teachers, a course on Long Island geology is offered each fall, which includes an examination of the role that processes in the Earth's interior have played in the geologic history of the region. ESERC has worked with Stony Brook's Department of Geosciences faculty to offer courses on natural hazards, computer modeling, and field geology to undergraduate students, and on computer programming for graduate students. Each summer, a four-week residential college-level environmental geology course is offered to rising tenth graders from the Brentwood, New York schools in partnership with

  17. Using Career Pathways to Guide Students through Programs of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.; Krismer, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes career pathways that evolved through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training consortium grant designed to help students complete programs of study and enter health care careers.

  18. Using Career Pathways to Guide Students through Programs of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.; Krismer, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes career pathways that evolved through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training consortium grant designed to help students complete programs of study and enter health care careers.

  19. A complete denture impression technique survey of postdoctoral prosthodontic programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mamta; Vahidi, Farhad; Berg, Robert W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to survey program directors of postdoctoral prosthodontic programs in the United States regarding their programs' complete denture impression techniques. The key objectives of the survey were to identify the current trends in complete denture impression making and to determine which techniques and materials are taught in US postdoctoral prosthodontic programs. An online survey was sent to all program directors of US postdoctoral prosthodontic programs. The survey comprised two sections: preliminary impressions and final impressions. The survey contained 22 questions that would take approximately 5 minutes to complete. All responses remained anonymous throughout the survey. The response rate for the survey was 87%. A majority of the programs did not separately border mold the tray prior to making the preliminary impressions (82%). The impression material of choice for the preliminary impression was irreversible hydrocolloid (88%). Selective pressure was the predominantly used impression philosophy (80%). All programs border molded the custom tray, and 95% recorded the borders in sections. The material of choice for border molding the custom tray was modeling plastic impression compound (71%). The most commonly used impression material for the final impressions was polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) (42%), and the second most commonly used impression material was polysulphide (32%). The most common technique for locating the posterior palatal seal was marking intraorally and transferring onto the final impression (65%). Most programs routinely advised their patients not to wear their existing dentures for at least 24 hours before the final impressions were made (83%). Based on the results of this study, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) The most commonly used material for the preliminary impression was irreversible hydrocolloid and for the final impression was PVS. (2) Modeling plastic impression compound was used by most programs to

  20. Programs to increase high school completion: a community guide systematic health equity review.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Robert A; Knopf, John A; Wilson, Sandra Jo; Truman, Benedict I; Milstein, Bobby; Johnson, Robert L; Fielding, Jonathan E; Muntaner, Carles J M; Jones, Camara Phyllis; Fullilove, Mindy T; Moss, Regina Davis; Ueffing, Erin; Hunt, Pete C

    2015-05-01

    High school completion (HSC) is an established predictor of long-term morbidity and mortality. U.S. rates of HSC are substantially lower among students from low-income families and most racial/ethnic minority populations than students from high-income families and the non-Hispanic white population. This systematic review assesses the effectiveness of programs to increase HSC and the potential of these programs to improve lifelong health among at-risk students. A search located a meta-analysis (search period 1985-2010/2011) on the effects of programs to increase HSC or General Educational Development (GED) diploma receipt; the meta-analysis was concordant with Community Guide definitions and methodologic standards. Programs were assessed separately for the general student population (152 studies) and students who were parents or pregnant (15 studies). A search for studies published between 2010 and August 2012 located ten more recent studies, which were assessed for consistency with the meta-analysis. Analyses were conducted in 2013. The review focused on the meta-analysis. Program effectiveness was measured as the increased rate of HSC (or GED receipt) by the intervention group compared with controls. All assessed program types were effective in increasing HSC in the general student population: vocational training, alternative schooling, social-emotional skills training, college-oriented programming, mentoring and counseling, supplemental academic services, school and class restructuring, multiservice packages, attendance monitoring and contingencies, community service, and case management. For students who had children or were pregnant, attendance monitoring and multiservice packages were effective. Ten studies published after the search period for the meta-analysis were consistent with its findings. There is strong evidence that a variety of HSC programs can improve high school or GED completion rates. Because many programs are targeted to high-risk students and

  1. California Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, John; Berger, Wolfgang; Wiskerchen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The organizational and administrative structure of the CaSGC has the Consortium Headquarters Office (Principal Investigator - Dr. John Kosmatka, California Statewide Director - Dr. Michael Wiskerchen) at UC San Diego. Each affiliate member institution has a campus director and an scholarship/fellowship selection committee. Each affiliate campus director also serves on the CaSGC Advisory Council and coordinates CMIS data collection and submission. The CaSGC strives to maintain a balance between expanded affiliate membership and continued high quality in targeted program areas of aerospace research, education, workforce development, and public outreach. Associate members are encouraged to participate on a project-by-project basis that meets the needs of California and the goals and objectives of the CaSGC. Associate members have responsibilities relating only to the CaSGC projects they are directly engaged in. Each year, as part of the CaSGC Improvement Plan, the CaSGC Advisory Council evaluates the performance of the affiliate and associate membership in terms of contributions to the CaSGC Strategic Plan, These CaSGC membership evaluations provide a constructive means for elevating productive members and removing non-performing members. This Program Improvement and Results (PIR) report will document CaSGC program improvement results and impacts that directly respond to the specific needs of California in the area of aerospace-related education and human capital development and the Congressional mandate to "increase the understanding, assessment, development and utilization of space resources by promoting a strong education base, responsive research and training activities, and broad and prompt dissemination of knowledge and technology".

  2. Optoelectronic technology consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs-Brenner, Mary

    1992-12-01

    The Optoelectronics Technology Consortium has been established to position U.S. industry as the world leader in optical interconnect technology by developing, fabricating, intergrating and demonstrating the producibility of optoelectronic components for high-density/high-data-rate processors and accelerating the insertion of this technology into military and commercial applications. This objective will be accomplished by a program focused in three areas. (1) Demonstrated performance: OETC will demonstrate an aggregate data transfer rate of 16 Gbit/s between single transmitter and receiver packages, as well as the expandability of this technology by combing four links in parallel to achieve a 64 Gbit/s link. (2) Accelerated development: By collaborating during precompetitive technology development stage, OTEC will advance the development of optical components and produce links for a multiboard processor testbed demonstration; and (3) Producibility: OETC's technology will achieve this performance by using components that are affordable, and reliable, with a line BER less than 10(exp -15) and MTTF greater than 10(exp 6) hours.

  3. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  4. Assessing a Consortium's Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lorna M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the example of the Five Colleges consortium, explores the measuring of benefits and costs involved in intercollegiate cooperation. Discusses how the benefits are often other than cost-savings, which is ostensibly why many institutions join such consortia. (EV)

  5. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  6. A blueprint of pain curriculum across prelicensure health sciences programs: one NIH Pain Consortium Center of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE) experience.

    PubMed

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z; Gordon, Deborah B; Tauben, David; Palisoc, Jenny; Drangsholt, Mark; Lindhorst, Taryn; Danielson, Jennifer; Spector, June; Ballweg, Ruth; Vorvick, Linda; Loeser, John D

    2013-12-01

    To improve U.S. pain education and promote interinstitutional and interprofessional collaborations, the National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium has funded 12 sites to develop Centers of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPEs). Each site was given the tasks of development, evaluation, integration, and promotion of pain management curriculum resources, including case studies that will be shared nationally. Collaborations among schools of medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and others were encouraged. The John D. Loeser CoEPE is unique in that it represents extensive regionalization of health science education, in this case in the region covering the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho. This paper describes a blueprint of pain content and teaching methods across the University of Washington's 6 health sciences schools and provides recommendations for improvement in pain education at the prelicensure level. The Schools of Dentistry and Physician Assistant provide the highest percentage of total required curriculum hours devoted to pain compared with the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work. The findings confirm the paucity of pain content in health sciences curricula, missing International Association for the Study of Pain curriculum topics, and limited use of innovative teaching methods such as problem-based and team-based learning. Findings confirm the paucity of pain education across the health sciences curriculum in a CoEPE that serves a large region in the United States. The data provide a pain curriculum blueprint that can be used to recommend added pain content in health sciences programs across the country. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  8. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  9. Monitoring Completed Coastal Projects Program: Monitoring of Jetty Improvements at Umpqua River, Oregon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    iD-A247 764 iii a~ ’"MONITORING COMPLETED COASTAL w PROJECTS PROGRAM MISCELLANEOUS PAPER CERC-92-1 MONITORING OF JETTY IMPROVEMENTS AT UMPQUA RIVER...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED February 1992 Final report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Monitoring of Jetty Improvements at Umpqua River...from National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. 12a. DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION

  10. 25 CFR 1000.224 - How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a... Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request? A Tribe/Consortium may request a... request. (a) To set up a meeting, the Tribe/Consortium should contact: (1) For BIA programs, the...

  11. 25 CFR 1000.224 - How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a... Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request? A Tribe/Consortium may request a... request. (a) To set up a meeting, the Tribe/Consortium should contact: (1) For BIA programs, the...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.224 - How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a... Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request? A Tribe/Consortium may request a... request. (a) To set up a meeting, the Tribe/Consortium should contact: (1) For BIA programs, the...

  13. Exploring the relationship between criminogenic risk assessment and mental health court program completion.

    PubMed

    Bonfine, Natalie; Ritter, Christian; Munetz, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The two primary goals of mental health courts are to engage individuals with severe mental illness in the criminal justice system with clinical mental health services and to prevent future involvement with the criminal justice system. An important factor in helping to achieve both goals is to identify participants' level of clinical needs and criminogenic risk/needs. This study seeks to better understand how criminogenic risk affects outcomes in a mental health court. Specifically, we explore if high criminogenic risk is associated with failure to complete mental health court. Our subjects are participants of a municipal mental health court (MHC) who completed the Level of Services Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) upon entry to the program (N=146). We used binary logistic regression to determine the association between termination from the program with the total LSI-R. Our findings suggest that, net of prior criminal history, time in the program and clinical services received, high criminogenic risk/need is associated with failure to complete mental health court. In addition to providing clinical services, our findings suggest the need for MHCs to include criminogenic risk assessment to identify criminogenic risk. For participants to succeed in MHCs, both their clinical and criminogenic needs should be addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research program is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry- defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. It is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation; it is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. This update reviews the AGTSR triad, which consists of university/industry R&D activities, technology transfer programs, and trial student programs.

  15. 25 CFR 1000.254 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds from a construction program to a non-construction program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... construction program to a non-construction program? 1000.254 Section 1000.254 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.254 May...

  16. Urban energy management today: Ten year compendium of UCETF programs. Products and expertise of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, 1979--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The reports listed in this Overview summarize projects conducted through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force by local government staff who have defined and implemented many of the energy strategies described above. Reports from their projects illustrate effective approaches to plan and implement these strategies, as well as software tools, surveys, and technical instruments valuable to other local government officials conducting similar projects.

  17. Functional impact of multidisciplinary outpatient program on patients with chronic complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Derakhshanrad, N; Vosoughi, F; Yekaninejad, M S; Moshayedi, P; Saberi, H

    2015-12-01

    Prospective study. The objective of this study was to determine whether an integrated and an intensive outpatient program would result in functional improvement of spinal cord injury (SCI) patients with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A injuries as measured by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III). Patient recruitment and evaluations were conducted at the Brain and Spinal Injury Repair Research Centre (BASIR), Tehran, Iran. Observed SCIM III scores and SCI Ability Realization Measurement Index changes were used to measure the change in 134 patients with complete SCI (AIS A), after participation in an outpatient rehabilitation program consisting of a bimonthly multidisciplinary education program, combined with a twice-weekly occupational therapy, physical therapy and home nursing as a rehabilitation package for a 6-month period. A significant increase in median total SCIM III scores following comparison of 'pre-treatment' scores and final 'post-treatment' scores (9.5 score, P<0.001) was found. The increase in final SCIM III scores was highest in lower cervical (8.75 scores) and thoracic cases (13.5 scores). With the exception of high cervical patients, all subgroups had a significant SCIM III score improvement. Multidisciplinary, outpatient rehabilitation programs are recommended as a safe and an effective post-injury rehabilitation for AIS A SCI patients. Such programs may complement inpatient rehabilitation and promote functional recovery. Multidisciplinary outpatient programs are effective in achieving long-term independence in SCI patients and reducing the cost of care for developing countries. This study suggests that high cervical injuries benefit more from inpatient programs.

  18. Northeast Technology Education Consortium: Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, W. Tad, Ed.

    This guide is designed to provide additional resources for technology educators who are attempting to shift their programs from industrial arts to technology education. An introduction describes the original demonstration site project, a consortium of Northeastern U.S. schools, the primary goal of which was the advancement of technological…

  19. National STEM Consortium Evaluation. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Acting as the lead agency for the "National STEM Consortium" (NSC), Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) engaged Hezel Associates to provide an independent program and impact evaluation of the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL)-funded STEM certificate initiative. This report is comprehensive and covers the findings from all 4 years of the…

  20. Formation of a Human Services Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehallis, George; And Others

    Background information is provided concerning the efforts of Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC), under the sponsorship of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, to form a national consortium of two-year colleges for the development of Human Resources programs aimed at training chemical substance abuse workers. The report first presents…

  1. Goals set after completing a teleconference-delivered program for managing multiple sclerosis fatigue.

    PubMed

    Asano, Miho; Preissner, Katharine; Duffy, Rose; Meixell, Maggie; Finlayson, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Setting goals can be a valuable skill to self-manage multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue. A better understanding of the goals set by people with MS after completing a fatigue management program can assist health care professionals with tailoring interventions for clients. This study aimed to describe the focus of goals set by people with MS after a teleconference-delivered fatigue management program and to evaluate the extent to which participants were able to achieve their goals over time. In total, 485 goals were set by 81 participants. Over a follow-up period, 64 participants rated 284 goals regarding progress made toward goal achievement. Approximately 50% of the rated goals were considered achieved. The most common type of goal achieved was that of instrumental activities of daily living. Short-term goals were more likely to be achieved. This study highlights the need for and importance of promoting and teaching goal-setting skills to people with MS.

  2. Goals Set After Completing a Teleconference-Delivered Program for Managing Multiple Sclerosis Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Miho; Preissner, Katharine; Duffy, Rose; Meixell, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Setting goals can be a valuable skill to self-manage multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue. A better understanding of the goals set by people with MS after completing a fatigue management program can assist health care professionals with tailoring interventions for clients. This study aimed to describe the focus of goals set by people with MS after a teleconference-delivered fatigue management program and to evaluate the extent to which participants were able to achieve their goals over time. In total, 485 goals were set by 81 participants. Over a follow-up period, 64 participants rated 284 goals regarding progress made toward goal achievement. Approximately 50% of the rated goals were considered achieved. The most common type of goal achieved was that of instrumental activities of daily living. Short-term goals were more likely to be achieved. This study highlights the need for and importance of promoting and teaching goal-setting skills to people with MS. PMID:25871602

  3. Consortium of institutes for decentralized wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.W.

    1998-07-01

    The Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment is a group of thirteen (and expanding) North American colleges and universities that formed with the goal of helping to protect public health and maintain a sustainable environment. To accomplish this goal, academicians work closely with private sector partners from industry, manufacturing, consulting, regulatory agencies, and citizen/community groups to transfer research-based information into education and training programs for decentralized wastewater treatment. This document will focus on the mission, organizational structure, and recent grant activities of the Consortium.

  4. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  5. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  6. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  7. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  8. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  9. The Nebraska Instrument Sharing Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The Nebraska Instrument Sharing Consortium (NISC) is a group of small colleges that have banded together to provide modern instrumentation to their students at an affordable price. Consortium activities are described, including how the instruments are moved between campuses. (JN)

  10. Predicting Colonoscopy Completion among African American and Latino/a Participants in a Patient Navigation Program

    PubMed Central

    Pelto, Debra J.; Sly, Jamilia R.; Winkel, Gary; Redd, William H.; Thompson, Hayley S.; Itzkowitz, Steven H.; Jandorf, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Patient Navigation (PN) effectively increases screening colonoscopy (SC) rates, a key to reducing deaths from colorectal cancer (CRC). Ethnic minority populations have disproportionately low SC rates and high CRC mortality rates and, therefore, especially stand to benefit from PN. Adapting the Health Belief Model as an explanatory model, the current analysis examined predictors of SC rates in two randomized studies that used PN to increase SC among 411 African American and 461 Latino/a patients at a large urban medical center. Speaking Spanish but not English (OR 2.192; p<0.005), having a higher income (OR 1.218; p<0.005), and scoring higher on the Pros of Colonoscopy scale (OR 1.535; p=0.023) independently predicted colonoscopy completion. Health education and PN programs that increase awareness of the benefits of getting a colonoscopy may encourage colonoscopy completion. In the context of language-appropriate PN programs for African American and Latino/a individuals, those with lower incomes and English speakers may require additional education and counseling to support their decision-making around colonoscopy. PMID:25893157

  11. Gender differences in effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) lifestyle intervention: an Australasian study.

    PubMed

    Kent, Lillian M; Morton, Darren P; Rankin, Paul M; Mitchell, Brett G; Chang, Esther; Diehl, Hans

    2014-12-01

    Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a lifestyle modification program that promotes healthy diet, physical activity and stress management techniques. Among US CHIP participants, differences in gender responsiveness to improvements in chronic disease risk factors were demonstrated. This study examined gender differences in outcomes to the CHIP intervention in Australasia. Changes in body weight, blood pressure (BP), blood lipid profile and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were assessed in 925 participants (34.3% men, mean age=56.0±12.5 years; 65.7% women, mean age=54.4±13.5 years) 30 days after program commencement. Significant reductions (P<0.001) in all biometrics measured were found for men and women but were greater among men for total (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), triglycerides (TG), FPG, body mass index (BMI) and TC/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) ratio. Participants with highest baseline classifications of BMI, systolic BP, blood lipids and FPG showed greatest reductions in 30 days. CHIP more effectively reduced chronic disease risk factors among men than women. All participants, but particularly men, entering the program with the greatest risk achieved the largest reductions. Possible physiological or behavioural factors include food preferences, making commitments and differential support modes. SO WHAT?: Developers of lifestyle intervention programs should consider gender differences in physiological and behavioural factors when planning interventions. In particular, developers should manage expectations of people entering lifestyle interventions to increase awareness that men tend to respond better than women. In addition, this is a call for further research to identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for the disproportionate responsiveness of males.

  12. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  13. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  14. TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR UTSI/CFFF MHD PROGRAM COMPLETION AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    DR. JAMES N. CHAPMAN; DR. JOEL W. MUEHLHAUSER

    1998-10-23

    Routine preventive maintenance of the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is being performed. Modernization programs, funded under subcontract from Foster Wheeler Development Corporation by the DOE HIPPS Program, have been completed on the coal processing system, the data acquisition and control system and the control room. Late in the quarter, all work was stopped on maintenance of the CFFF at DOE instruction. Environmental restoration actions continued with monitoring of groundwater wells and holding pond effluent. Progress is reported on the approved groundwater remediation plan. Actions are underway to dispose of spent seed/ash mixtures and excess coal remaining from the MHD POC program. The status of five (5) High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) projects is reported. A summary is included of the results attained with sol-gel experiments with buffer layers and YBCO. The status of the cost/performance study of electron beam and PLD deposition is pre-sented. A summary of work performed in diagnostics for real time control of HTS processes is presented.

  15. The Role of Session Zero in Successful Completion of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Smith, Matthew Lee; Chen, Shuai; Ahn, SangNam; Kulinski, Kristie P.; Lorig, Kate; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been widely disseminated among various racial and ethnic populations. In addition to the six required CDSMP workshop sessions, the delivery sites have the option to offer a Session Zero (or zero class), an information session offered prior to Session One as a marketing tool. Despite assumptions that a zero class is helpful, little is known about the prevalence of these additional sessions or their impact on retaining participants in CDSMP workshops. This study aims to describe the proportion of CDSMP workshops that offered Session Zero and examine the association between Session Zero and workshop completion rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 80,987 middle-aged and older adults collected during a two-year national dissemination of CDSMP. Generalized estimating equation regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between Session Zero and successful workshop completion (attending four or more of the six workshop sessions). Results: On average, 21.04% of the participants attended workshops that offered Session Zero, and 75.33% successfully completed the CDSMP workshop. The participants of the workshops that offered Session Zero had significantly higher odds of completing CDSMP workshops than those who were not offered Session Zero (OR = 1.099, P = <0.001) after controlling for participants’ demographic characteristics, race, ethnicity, living status, household income, number of chronic conditions, and workshop delivery type. Conclusion: As one of the first studies reporting the importance of an orientation session for participant retention in chronic disease management intervention projects, our findings suggest offering an orientation session may increase participant retention in similar translational efforts. PMID:25964918

  16. The role of session zero in successful completion of chronic disease self-management program workshops.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Luohua; Smith, Matthew Lee; Chen, Shuai; Ahn, SangNam; Kulinski, Kristie P; Lorig, Kate; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-01-01

    The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been widely disseminated among various racial and ethnic populations. In addition to the six required CDSMP workshop sessions, the delivery sites have the option to offer a Session Zero (or zero class), an information session offered prior to Session One as a marketing tool. Despite assumptions that a zero class is helpful, little is known about the prevalence of these additional sessions or their impact on retaining participants in CDSMP workshops. This study aims to describe the proportion of CDSMP workshops that offered Session Zero and examine the association between Session Zero and workshop completion rates. Data were analyzed from 80,987 middle-aged and older adults collected during a two-year national dissemination of CDSMP. Generalized estimating equation regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between Session Zero and successful workshop completion (attending four or more of the six workshop sessions). On average, 21.04% of the participants attended workshops that offered Session Zero, and 75.33% successfully completed the CDSMP workshop. The participants of the workshops that offered Session Zero had significantly higher odds of completing CDSMP workshops than those who were not offered Session Zero (OR = 1.099, P = <0.001) after controlling for participants' demographic characteristics, race, ethnicity, living status, household income, number of chronic conditions, and workshop delivery type. As one of the first studies reporting the importance of an orientation session for participant retention in chronic disease management intervention projects, our findings suggest offering an orientation session may increase participant retention in similar translational efforts.

  17. Consortium--A New Direction for Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Adrienne B.

    1976-01-01

    The shared services and joint planning of the area-wide continuing education program of the Northwest Allegheny Hospitals Corporation (a Consortium of seven acute care and two rehabilitation centers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania) are described. (LH)

  18. Consortium--A New Direction for Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Adrienne B.

    1976-01-01

    The shared services and joint planning of the area-wide continuing education program of the Northwest Allegheny Hospitals Corporation (a Consortium of seven acute care and two rehabilitation centers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania) are described. (LH)

  19. College Bound Program, New York, N.Y. Model Programs, Compensatory Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    The College Bound Program was initiated with the summer session of 1967 as a far-reaching attempt to help disadvantaged students complete high school and enter and succeed in college. A consortium of local colleges and universities agreed to admit successful program graduates and provide them financial aid. The program has remained essentially…

  20. Factors influencing participation in weekly support groups among women completing an HIV/STD intervention program.

    PubMed

    VanDevanter, N; Parikh, N S; Cohall, R M; Merzel, C; Faber, N; Litwak, E; Gonzales, V; Kahn-Krieger, S; Messeri, P; Weinberg, G; Greenberg, J

    1999-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the influence and importance of social support has been well documented and the findings have suggested a beneficial effect on stress-related situations, mental and physical health, and social functioning. More recently, small group/skills training behavioral interventions have demonstrated success in changing behaviors which affect the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV among populations at risk for these diseases. Studies of support groups to date have been conducted exclusively in research settings where women are offered financial incentives for participation. Little is known about the willingness of women to participate in ongoing support groups after successfully completing a skills training intervention. The present study examines the factors that may influence participation among women in a weekly support group after completing a structured, six session HIV/STD intervention. Both quantitative and qualitative data are collected from 265 women in the intervention arm of a multi-site randomized controlled behavioral intervention trial. Results reveal that less than a quarter (22%) of women participated in at least one support group. Participation varied significantly by site, ranging from 34% to 15% (p = .008). Participation was also strongly linked to recent use of domestic violence services. Qualitative data indicated that although monetary incentives play some role in the woman's decision to participate, other factors are also important. These include program outreach, support group size, salience of the group content, consistency of group leadership from the intervention to the support group, and use of peer leaders along with professional facilitators. Implications for design of post-intervention support groups programs are discussed.

  1. Increased cortisol awakening response after completing the summer treatment program in children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Rumiko; Okamura, Hisayoshi; Egami, Chiyomi; Tada, Yasuhiro; Anai, Chizuru; Mukasa, Akiko; Iemura, Akiko; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Furusho, Junichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Yamashita, Yushiro

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, we examined the CAR in children with ADHD and their mothers before, immediately after, and 4months after an intensive summer treatment program (STP). Participants were 37 children aged 7-12years who completed the STP in 2009 and 2010, and their mothers. Daily saliva samples for cortisol measurement were collected twice daily at awakening and 30min afterwards at pre-STP, post-STP, and during a follow-up measurement period. ADHD symptom scores were evaluated by parents, and participants completed the Kid-KINDL(R) QOL questionnaire. CAR was low in children with ADHD before the STP, and increased to the control range 4months after STP. Maternal CAR also tended to increase after STP. Changes in the CAR in children tended to correlate with an improved ADHD inattention scores (p=0.091), physical health (p=0.070), and school life subscales scores in the Kid-KINDL(R) (p=0.079). We demonstrated that STP improved the behavior and QOL of children with ADHD. Our results indicate that STP could lead to improvements in HPA axis function, as reflected by increased CAR after STP. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Goal/Completion Abstract. The Wilbur Wright College Environmental Technician Training Program

    SciTech Connect

    2002-10-03

    In September 1993 DOE through Argonne National Laboratory awarded Wilbur Wright College a grant to develop an Environmental Technician training program. The primary goals included developing a comprehensive curriculum for the best possible training of environmental technicians as well as the building of a state-of-the-art facility to serve these students. The specific goal of the creation of the Environmental Technology Department was to train participants in identifying, auditing, sampling, and managing hazardous substances, handling in routine use, as well as responding to chemical emergencies, and in minimizing the generation of hazardous waste through pollution prevention. The development of the facilities included a state-of-the-art classroom with projection equipment and satellite connection, a computer lab, and a fully equipped wet science laboratory. The program was intended to make available a range of education options for students. Because of the accomplishments of the Environmental Technology Department, it must be considered a success that continues after the completion of the grant.

  3. The Development of a Stress Management Program for the Adult Degree Completion Program Admissions Team at a Four-Year Private Liberal Arts College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Brian

    A stress management program was developed for the adult degree completion program admissions team at Warner Southern College, a four-year private liberal arts college. A relatively recent stress-inducing change was caused by an administrative decision to expand the program offerings from five sites to seven, using current staff. Derived from the…

  4. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbacher, Don

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  5. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  6. Reasons Why Students Did Not Complete Two-Year Post-Secondary Farm Management Programs in North Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Lyle B.; Luft, Vernon D.

    1982-01-01

    This research study identifies major reasons that caused students enrolled in two-year postsecondary farm management programs, at five postsecondary institutions in North Dakota, not to complete the prescribed course of study in which they were enrolled. (SSH)

  7. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  8. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Reduction in self- esteem may impact this relationship such that if self-esteem is not reduced as a result of bullying , psychological distress and sui...resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is significant...practice that will have a direct impact on suicide-related and other mental health outcomes for military personnel. 3. Disseminate Consortium

  9. Effects of a Nurse-Managed Program on Hepatitis A and B Vaccine Completion Among Homeless Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Liu, Yihang; Marfisee, Mary; Shoptaw, Steven; Gregerson, Paul; Saab, Sammy; Leake, Barbara; Tyler, Darlene; Gelberg, Lillian

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection constitutes a major health problem for homeless persons. Ability to complete an HBV vaccination series is complicated by the need to prioritize competing needs, such as addiction issues, safe places to sleep, and food, over health concerns. Objectives The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse-case-managed intervention compared with that of two standard programs on completion of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine series among homeless adults and to assess socio-demographic factors and risk behaviors related to the vaccine completion. Methods A randomized, three-group, prospective, quasi-experimental design was conducted with 865 homeless adults residing in homeless shelters, drug rehabilitation sites, and outdoor areas in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. The programs included (a) nurse-case-managed sessions plus targeted hepatitis education, incentives, and tracking (NCMIT); (b) standard targeted hepatitis education plus incentives and tracking (SIT); and (c) standard targeted hepatitis education and incentives only (SI). Results Sixty-eight percent of the NCMIT participants completed the three-series vaccine at 6 months, compared with 61% of SIT participants and 54% of SI participants. NCMIT participants had almost 2 times greater odds of completing vaccination than those of participants in the SI program. Completers were more likely to be older, to be female, to report fair or poor health, and not to have participated in a self-help drug treatment program. Newly homeless White adults were significantly less likely than were African Americans to complete the vaccine series. Discussion The use of vaccination programs incorporating nurse case management and tracking is critical in supporting adherence to completion of a 6-month HAV/HBV vaccine. The finding that White homeless persons were the least likely to complete the vaccine series suggests that programs tailored to

  10. Dropout Prevention and Intervention Programs: Effects on School Completion and Dropout among School-Aged Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sandra Jo; Tanner-Smith, Emily; Lipsey, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to summarize the available evidence on the effects of prevention and intervention programs aimed at primary and secondary students for increasing school completion or reducing school dropout. Program effects on the closely related outcomes of school attendance (absences, truancy) will also be examined.…

  11. A Comparison of the Cognitive Moral Development of Christian University Seniors in Traditional versus Adult Degree Completion Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This research uses the Defining Issues Test-2 (DIT-2) to investigate the cognitive moral development of college seniors in adult degree completion (ADC) programs and traditional undergraduate (TU) programs at three Council of Christian College and University institutions. Overall, TU students had significantly higher scores on the DIT-2, TU…

  12. Learning Together: A Study of Six B.A. Completion Cohort Programs in Early Care and Education. Year 1 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California at Berkeley, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report reflects the first year of a multiyear effort to examine B.A. completion cohort programs in early care and education in four California counties. The six programs under investigation were developed with similar goals: (1) To increase and retain a pool of B.A.-level professionals in the ECE field with culturally, linguistically, and…

  13. Early Results from the Flexibility in Surgical Training Research Consortium: Resident and Program Director Attitudes Toward Flexible Rotations in Senior Residency.

    PubMed

    Klingensmith, Mary E; Awad, Michael; Delman, Keith A; Deveney, Karen; Fahey, Thomas J; Lees, Jason S; Lipsett, Pamela; Mullen, John T; Smink, Douglas S; Wayne, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    To assess the attitudes of residents and program directors (PDs) involved in flexible training to gauge satisfaction with this training paradigm and elicit limitations. Anonymous surveys were sent to residents and PDs in participant programs. Respondents were asked to rate responses on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree). A total of 9 residency programs that are collaborating to prospectively study the effect of flexible tracks on resident performance and outcome. A total of 138 residents who were in clinical years 4 and 5 and 10 PDs. Of the 138 possible residents, 100 responded to the resident survey (72.5% response rate). Among resident respondents, 33% were participating in a flexible track option. The most frequently listed specialties of focus were cardiothoracic surgery (19%), vascular surgery (13%), acute care surgery (11%), colorectal surgery (8%), surgical oncology (7%), and pediatric surgery (7%). Participants in flexible tracks tended to strongly agree that their career would be enhanced by flexible rotations; interestingly, of those not in flexible tracks, most tended to also agree that flexible rotations would enhance their future careers. Flexible track participants report receiving greater autonomy on flexible rotations and believe they would be better prepared for fellowship and career. They express overall very high satisfaction with the flexible experience. Limitations expressed by residents (in flexible tracks or not) include uncertainty for how this paradigm serves those interested in comprehensive general surgery, concern about scheduling difficulties, and some displeasure in missing high-volume general surgery rotations in lieu of specialty-focused rotations. The PD survey was completed by 8 of 9 PDs for a response rate of 89%. All the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that careers of residents are enhanced by flexible rotations and that important operative and clinical experiences are gained. Overall, 87

  14. Genomic standards consortium projects.

    PubMed

    Field, Dawn; Sterk, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; De Smet, J Wim; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R; Davies, Neil; Dawyndt, Peter; Garrity, George M; Gilbert, Jack A; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Knight, Rob; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Morrison, Norman; Robbins, Robert; San Gil, Inigo; Sansone, Susanna; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Ussery, Dave; Yilmaz, Pelin; White, Owen; Wooley, John; Caporaso, Gregory

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) is an open-membership community that was founded in 2005 to work towards the development, implementation and harmonization of standards in the field of genomics. Starting with the defined task of establishing a minimal set of descriptions the GSC has evolved into an active standards-setting body that currently has 18 ongoing projects, with additional projects regularly proposed from within and outside the GSC. Here we describe our recently enacted policy for proposing new activities that are intended to be taken on by the GSC, along with the template for proposing such new activities.

  15. Federal consortium visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-10

    Members of the Southeast U.S. Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer gather at the base of the B-1/B-2 Test Stand during a Feb. 10 visit to John C. Stennis Space Center. The group visited Stennis to tour facilities and receive briefings on work at the rocket engine test site. They also visited the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center site and received a briefing on construction of the new science center. The FLC is a nationwide network of federal laboratories to facilitate technology transfers between federal agencies and commercial companies.

  16. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  17. Portrait of a Consortium: ANKOS (Anatolian University Libraries Consortium)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Phyllis; Karasozen, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium (ANKOS) was created in 2001 with only a few members subscribed to nine e-journal collections and bibliographic databases. This Turkish library consortium had developed from one state and three private universities joining together for the purchase of two databases in 1999. Over time, the numbers of…

  18. Portrait of a Consortium: ANKOS (Anatolian University Libraries Consortium)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Phyllis; Karasozen, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium (ANKOS) was created in 2001 with only a few members subscribed to nine e-journal collections and bibliographic databases. This Turkish library consortium had developed from one state and three private universities joining together for the purchase of two databases in 1999. Over time, the numbers of…

  19. The Structural Genomics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Molly Morgan; Castle-Clarke, Sophie; Brooker, Daniel; Nason, Edward; Huzair, Farah; Chataway, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) supports drug discovery efforts through a unique, open access model of public-private collaboration. This study presents the results of an independent evaluation of the Structural Genomics Consortium, conducted by RAND Europe with the Institute on Governance. The evaluation aimed to establish the role of the SGC within the wider drug discovery and PPP landscape, assessing the merits of the SGC open access model relative to alternative models of funding R&D in this space, as well as the key trends and opportunities in the external environment that may impact on the future of the SGC. It also established the incentives and disincentives for investment, strengths and weaknesses of the SGC's model, and the opportunities and threats the SGC will face in the future. This enabled us to assess the most convincing arguments for funding the SGC at present; important trade-offs or limitations that should be addressed in moving towards the next funding phase; and whether funders are anticipating changes either to the SGC or the wider PPP landscape. Finally, we undertook a quantitative analysis to ascertain what judgements can be made about the SGC's past and current performance track record, before unpacking the role of the external environment and particular actors within the SGC in developing scenarios for the future. PMID:28560088

  20. Complete Summary of a Four-Part Research Project for the "I Like Me!" Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demoulin, Donald F.

    This report is a compilation of four different studies involving kindergartners (N=950) who participated in the "I LIKE ME!" program. I LIKE ME! is a 12-week program that uses a personalized reader with "I" statements as positive inducements for learning and achievement for kindergartners. The goals of the program are to bring home, school, and…

  1. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to hire... negotiated Federal benefit package that is paid for by the Tribe/Consortium out of AFA program funds; or...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to hire... negotiated Federal benefit package that is paid for by the Tribe/Consortium out of AFA program funds; or...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.85 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that exceeds one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that... Programs Contents and Scope of Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.85 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA... availability of Congressional appropriations, a Tribe/Consortium may negotiate an AFA with a term that...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.85 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that exceeds one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that... Programs Contents and Scope of Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.85 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA... availability of Congressional appropriations, a Tribe/Consortium may negotiate an AFA with a term that...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to hire... negotiated Federal benefit package that is paid for by the Tribe/Consortium out of AFA program funds; or...

  6. 25 CFR 1000.85 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that exceeds one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that... Programs Contents and Scope of Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.85 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA... availability of Congressional appropriations, a Tribe/Consortium may negotiate an AFA with a term that...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.85 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that exceeds one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that... Programs Contents and Scope of Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.85 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA... availability of Congressional appropriations, a Tribe/Consortium may negotiate an AFA with a term that...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.85 - Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that exceeds one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA with a term that... Programs Contents and Scope of Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.85 Can a Tribe/Consortium negotiate an AFA... availability of Congressional appropriations, a Tribe/Consortium may negotiate an AFA with a term that...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to hire... negotiated Federal benefit package that is paid for by the Tribe/Consortium out of AFA program funds; or...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.390 - How can a Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... help implement an AFA? 1000.390 Section 1000.390 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Tribe/Consortium hire a Federal employee to help implement an AFA? If a Tribe/Consortium chooses to hire... negotiated Federal benefit package that is paid for by the Tribe/Consortium out of AFA program funds; or...

  11. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B; Maunsell, John HR

    2009-01-01

    As the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC) ends its first year, it is worth looking back to see how the experiment has worked. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium. PMID:19284614

  12. Chance-constrained/stochastic linear programming model for acid rain abatement—I. Complete colinearity and noncolinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. H.; McBean, E. A.; Farquhar, G. J.

    A Linear Programming model is presented for development of acid rain abatement strategies in eastern North America. For a system comprised of 235 large controllable point sources and 83 uncontrolled area sources, it determines the least-cost method of reducing SO 2 emissions to satisfy maximum wet sulfur deposition limits at 20 sensitive receptor locations. In this paper, the purely deterministic model is extended to a probabilistic form by incorporating the effects of meteorologic variability on the long-range pollutant transport processes. These processes are represented by source-receptor-specific transfer coefficients. Experiments for quantifying the spatial variability of transfer coefficients showed their distributions to be approximately lognormal with logarithmic standard deviations consistently about unity. Three methods of incorporating second-moment random variable uncertainty into the deterministic LP framework are described: Two-Stage Programming Under Uncertainty (LPUU), Chance-Constrained Programming (CCP) and Stochastic Linear Programming (SLP). A composite CCP-SLP model is developed which embodies the two-dimensional characteristics of transfer coefficient uncertainty. Two probabilistic formulations are described involving complete colinearity and complete noncolinearity for the transfer coefficient covariance-correlation structure. Complete colinearity assumes complete dependence between transfer coefficients. Complete noncolinearity assumes complete independence. The completely colinear and noncolinear formulations are considered extreme bounds in a meteorologic sense and yield abatement strategies of largely didactic value. Such strategies can be characterized as having excessive costs and undesirable deposition results in the completely colinear case and absence of a clearly defined system risk level (other than expected-value) in the noncolinear formulation.

  13. Development of computer programs to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of complete light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program for determining the flight characteristics of light aircraft was developed. The parameters which were used in the computer program are defined. The accuracy of the system for various types of airfoils is analyzed and the airfoils for which the system does not provide adequate data are identified. The application of a computer program for predicting the fuselage characteristics is discussed. The assumptions and parameters of the fuselage characteristics program are explained. It is stated that the computer programs make it possible to determine the response of a light aircraft to a small disturbance given the geometric and inertial characteristics of the aircraft.

  14. Developing a statewide nursing consortium, island style.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Lois; Niederhauser, Victoria; Ono, Charlene K; Johnson, Nancy Katherine; Vogler, Joyce; Ceria-Ulep, Clementina D

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the transformational changes in the scope and pedagogy of nursing education within a state university system through the development of the Hawaii Statewide Nursing Consortium (HSNC) curriculum. Modeled after the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education, the HSNC used a community-based participatory approach to develop the curriculum to support all students within the state who are eligible to earn a baccalaureate degree. The curriculum was designed as a long-term solution to the anticipated shortage of nurses to care for Hawaii's diverse population. It is also an effort to increase capacity in schools of nursing by making the best use of resources in the delivery of a baccalaureate curriculum that offers exit opportunities after the completion of an associate degree. Finally, it provides new ways of educating students who will be better prepared to meet Hawaii's health needs.

  15. Comparison of hybrid and completely online RN-to-BSN curricula: aspects of program structure that lead to success.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Susan C; Metzger, Richard L; Finley, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    The large increase in the number of RN-to-BSN programs has occurred in the context of the expansion of Internet-based resources. This article expands on an earlier reported evaluation of a program based on community-derived needs. Several dimensions were identified that appear to contribute to student success in a blended-hybrid and completely online curricula. Students move through a synchronous cohort curriculum. The graduation rate for both programs was above the national average for all programs (80%), and graduation rate for the blended-hybrid program (92%) exceeded the online program (88%). Social support theory framed the important factors in a way that paralleled the factors reported by students as leading to their success.

  16. Reuse at the Software Productivity Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, David M.

    1989-01-01

    The Software Productivity Consortium is sponsored by 14 aerospace companies as a developer of software engineering methods and tools. Software reuse and prototyping are currently the major emphasis areas. The Methodology and Measurement Project in the Software Technology Exploration Division has developed some concepts for reuse which they intend to develop into a synthesis process. They have identified two approaches to software reuse: opportunistic and systematic. The assumptions underlying the systematic approach, phrased as hypotheses, are the following: the redevelopment hypothesis, i.e., software developers solve the same problems repeatedly; the oracle hypothesis, i.e., developers are able to predict variations from one redevelopment to others; and the organizational hypothesis, i.e., software must be organized according to behavior and structure to take advantage of the predictions that the developers make. The conceptual basis for reuse includes: program families, information hiding, abstract interfaces, uses and information hiding hierarchies, and process structure. The primary reusable software characteristics are black-box descriptions, structural descriptions, and composition and decomposition based on program families. Automated support can be provided for systematic reuse, and the Consortium is developing a prototype reuse library and guidebook. The software synthesis process that the Consortium is aiming toward includes modeling, refinement, prototyping, reuse, assessment, and new construction.

  17. Maternal and Child Health Research Program. Completed Projects 1989, 1990, and 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Arlington, VA.

    This publication describes 33 research projects supported by the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau and completed in 1989, 1990, and 1991. It is the third edition in a series of collected abstracts of completed maternal and child health research projects. Each project abstract contains the name of the grantee, name and address of the…

  18. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  19. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  20. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  1. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  2. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  3. A Blueprint of Pain Curriculum across Prelicensure Health Sciences Programs: One NIH Pain Consortium Center of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE) Experience

    PubMed Central

    Doorenbos, AZ; Gordon, DB; Tauben, D; Palisoc, J; Drangsholt, M; Lindhorst, T; Danielson, J; Spector, J; Ballweg, R; Vorvick, L; Loeser, JD

    2013-01-01

    To improve U.S. pain education and promote inter-institutional and inter-professional collaborations, the NIH Pain Consortium has funded 12 sites to develop Centers of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE). Each site was given the tasks of development, evaluation, integration, and promotion of pain management curriculum resources, including case studies that will be shared nationally. Collaborations among schools of medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and others were encouraged. The John D. Loeser CoEPE is unique in that it represents extensive regionalization of health science education, in this case in the region covering the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho (WWAMI). This paper describes a blueprint of pain content and teaching methods across the University of Washington’s six health sciences schools and provides recommendations for improvement in pain education at the prelicensure level. The Schools of Dentistry and Physician Assistant provide the highest percentage of total required curriculum hours devoted to pain compared with the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work. The findings confirm paucity of pain content in health sciences curricula, missing International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) curriculum topics, and limited use of innovative teaching methods such as problem-based and team-based learning. PMID:24094694

  4. Journey to the Doctorate: Motivating Factors for Persistence and Completion of Doctoral Programs among McNair Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baness King, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Using a qualitative approach, this study investigated the perceptions of motivating factors for persistence and completion of the doctorate among low income, first generation and students of color that participated in the federally funded Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program. Purposive sampling was used to obtain a pool of nine…

  5. The Impact of Adult Degree-Completion Programs on the Organizational Climate of Christian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Leaders in Christian higher education are often unaware of how adult degree completion programs (ADCPs) impact a school's organizational behavior, and no research has examined employees' perceptions of its impact. This nonexperimental, descriptive study examined differences in employees' perceptions of the impact on organizational climate of the…

  6. The Impact of Adult Degree-Completion Programs on the Organizational Climate of Christian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Leaders in Christian higher education are often unaware of how adult degree completion programs (ADCPs) impact a school's organizational behavior, and no research has examined employees' perceptions of its impact. This nonexperimental, descriptive study examined differences in employees' perceptions of the impact on organizational climate of the…

  7. Some Follow-Up Procedures with Alcoholics Who Have Completed an Alcohol Treatment Program in a Veterans Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Louis F.; Wilson, Earl D.

    1988-01-01

    Determined effects on sobriety of two follow-up treatments, self-management and letter and telephone, for alcoholics (N=60) who had completed an alcohol treatment program. Results showed significant difference for the letter and telephone group after one month in comparison to the self-management and the control groups, but no significant…

  8. Factors That Contribute to the Completion of Programs of Study at Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education for African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Barrett Wade McCoy

    2015-01-01

    The study examined factors that predicted the completion of programs of study at Arkansas institutions of higher education for African American males. Astin's (1993a) Input-Environment-Output (I-E-O) Model was used as the theoretical foundation. Descriptive analyses and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were performed on the data. The…

  9. Treatment Process Predictors of Program Completion or Dropout among Minority Adolescents Enrolled in a Brief Motivational Substance Abuse Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordaro, Millie; Tubman, Jonathan G.; Wagner, Eric F.; Morris, Staci Leon

    2012-01-01

    This study documents significant differences in alliance in a predominantly Latino sample of adolescents who either completed or dropped out of a Guided Self-Change treatment program. Therapeutic alliance, working alliance, and patient involvement were assessed via ratings of audio-recorded segments of participants' counseling sessions.…

  10. Distance Education in Dental Hygiene Bachelor of Science Degree Completion Programs: As Perceived by Students and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsokris, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated student and faculty perceptions of their experiences with online learning in dental hygiene Bachelor of Science degree completion programs on the dimensions of: quality of learning, connectedness to the learning environment, technology factors and student satisfaction. The experiences of dental hygiene students who took…

  11. Factors That Contribute to the Completion of Programs of Study at Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education for African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Barrett Wade McCoy

    2015-01-01

    The study examined factors that predicted the completion of programs of study at Arkansas institutions of higher education for African American males. Astin's (1993a) Input-Environment-Output (I-E-O) Model was used as the theoretical foundation. Descriptive analyses and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were performed on the data. The…

  12. The Bridge and the Troll Underneath: Summer Bridge Programs and Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Daniel; Attewell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    College graduation rates in the United States are low in both real and relative terms. This has left all stakeholders looking for novel solutions while perhaps ignoring extant but underused programs. This article examines the effect of "summer bridge" programs, which have students enroll in coursework prior to beginning their first full…

  13. Adult Learners as Graduate Students: Underlying Motivation in Completing Graduate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegarty, Niall

    2011-01-01

    The majority of graduate part-time programs are fueled by adult learners seeking to enhance their human capital and advance professional careers. In contrast, degree-granting programs seek to impart knowledge and advance learning in a particular discipline. At this intersection lies the individual student's motivation to satisfy their personal…

  14. Running a Completely Automated Experiment by Microcomputer: An Example Program in BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment which compares the effectiveness of two key word techniques of vocabulary acquisition and gives the original 228-line program which was used. The program is written in BASIC to be run on Commodore CBM or PET machines with one disk drive. Eight references are listed. (MER)

  15. The Bridge and the Troll Underneath: Summer Bridge Programs and Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Daniel; Attewell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    College graduation rates in the United States are low in both real and relative terms. This has left all stakeholders looking for novel solutions while perhaps ignoring extant but underused programs. This article examines the effect of "summer bridge" programs, which have students enroll in coursework prior to beginning their first full…

  16. Exploring Factors Facilitating and Hindering College-University Pathway Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percival, Jennifer; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, Bill; LeSage, Ann; Longo, Fabiola; De La Rocha, Arlene; Hinch, Ron; Samis, John; Sanchez, Otto; Augusto Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore not only the academic measures such as grade point average of success of college-to-university transfer programs (Pathway Programs), but also the social-cultural facilitators and barriers throughout the students' Pathway experience. Design/methodology/approach: The experience of students and…

  17. Exploring Factors Facilitating and Hindering College-University Pathway Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percival, Jennifer; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, Bill; LeSage, Ann; Longo, Fabiola; De La Rocha, Arlene; Hinch, Ron; Samis, John; Sanchez, Otto; Augusto Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore not only the academic measures such as grade point average of success of college-to-university transfer programs (Pathway Programs), but also the social-cultural facilitators and barriers throughout the students' Pathway experience. Design/methodology/approach: The experience of students and…

  18. Eight Baccalaureate Degree Completion Programs To Be Offered by Indiana State University Statewide via Mediated Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Commission for Higher Education, Indianapolis.

    This document proposes establishment of eight bachelor of science programs to be offered through Partnerships for Enhancing Postsecondary Participation by Indiana State University. These mediated instruction programs are in the areas of: (1) business administration, (2) community health, (3)electronics technology, (4) general industrial…

  19. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  20. REU in the KNAC Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, P. J.

    1996-05-01

    Research for undergraduates has long been an important part of the undergraduate curriculum at the eight colleges of the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium (KNAC): Colgate University, Haverford College, Middlebury College, Swarthmore College, Vassar College, Wellesley College, Wesleyan University, and Williams College. We formed the consortium in 1989 and made a proposal to the W. M. Keck Foundation for funds to improve our observational equipment and to provide more and broader research opportunities for our students. During the first two years, each college obtained a CCD camera, filter sets, and a workstation. Since the summer of 1990, the consortium has funded from twelve to fourteen consortium college undergraduates per year to work for the summer at one of the consortium institutions other their own institution. Each fall we have a student symposium where the students present their research to the faculty and students of the consortium. The proceedings of the symposium are published and distributed. Often students are also co-authors on publications. In addition, the Consortium provides funds for the students to travel to professional observatories and to professional meetings. Several new research collaborations have developed among our faculty and students including supernova photometry, parallax of asteroids, and wide-field imaging and mosaicking.

  1. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles §...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1817-08...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1817-08 - Complete heavy-duty vehicle averaging, trading, and banking program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles §...

  4. Health Science Careers: Tech Prep Consortium for New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; D'Anna, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    A high school health sciences program consists of an interdisciplinary core curriculum, clinical job shadowing, and potential to earn college credit. Interactive television and CD-ROMs enhance teaching. A consortium of high schools offers the tech prep program in collaboration with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. (SK)

  5. X-38 Ship #2 Landing on Lakebed, Completing the Program's 4th Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38, a research vehicle built to help develop technology for an emergency Crew Return Vehicle (CRV), makes a gentle lakebed landing at the end of a July 1999 test flight at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. It was the fourth free flight of the test vehicles in the X-38 program, and the second free flight test of Vehicle 132 or Ship 2. The goal of this flight was to release the vehicle from a higher altitude -- 31,500 feet -- and to fly the vehicle longer -- 31 seconds -- than any previous X-38 vehicle had yet flown. The project team also conducted aerodynamic verification maneuvers and checked improvements made to the drogue parachute. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational

  6. X-38 Ship #2 Landing on Lakebed, Completing the Program's 4th Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38, a research vehicle built to help develop technology for an emergency Crew Return Vehicle (CRV), makes a gentle lakebed landing at the end of a July 1999 test flight at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. It was the fourth free flight of the test vehicles in the X-38 program, and the second free flight test of Vehicle 132 or Ship 2. The goal of this flight was to release the vehicle from a higher altitude -- 31,500 feet -- and to fly the vehicle longer -- 31 seconds -- than any previous X-38 vehicle had yet flown. The project team also conducted aerodynamic verification maneuvers and checked improvements made to the drogue parachute. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational

  7. Clean Coal Technology Program: Completing the mission. Comprehensive report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    With its roots in the acid rain debate of the 1980`s, the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program initially emphasized acid rain abatement technologies in its early phases. With the subsequent passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments and growing concern with global climate change, the emphasis of the Program shifted in the later rounds to highly efficient technologies. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the report. Chapter 2 provides a background of the CCT Program including the legislative history, the projects currently in the program, and the lessons that have been learned from the five rounds to date. Chapter 3 discusses the commercial potential of the technologies represented in the program and is based on a continuing series of interviews that have been conducted by the Department of Energy to solicit the views of senior management in those companies and organizations that will be making or affecting commercial decisions on the use of these technologies. Chapter 4 provides an accounting of the funds that have been appropriated for the CCT Program. Chapter 5 presents the options available for the Government to further assist in the commercial implementation of these technologies. Chapter 6 presents a discussion of these options with recommendations.

  8. Feasibility study: management of selected aspects of the advanced Solar Thermal Technology Program by a University consortium. Final report, June 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, A.F.; Brown, J.H.U.

    1981-02-01

    To increase the involvement of universities and advanced technology industries in task-oriented supporting research for the Solar Thermal Energy System (STES) program, organizational issues are considered. A generic and discipline focused program is considered which could provide applied research capabilities for all elements in the STES program. A management structure is presented which is organized around the management and research capabilities of universities. The proposed organization structure is designed to effectively plan, implement, and manage an applied research program dedicated to providing research support for and in coordination with the STES program. The chief aim is to enhance and expand the involvement of universities in the STES program through one or two university management and through the active participation by other universities and industries in an executive advisory board. A large number of consortia development studies were considered and university and industry views were consolidated. A two university team management approach is believed to have distinct advantages.

  9. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Cancer.gov

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  10. Academic Staff Perceptions of Factors Underlying Program Completion by Australian Indigenous Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Roianne; Usher, Kim; Foster, Kim; Stewart, Lee

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of Indigenous health professionals is one way to help reduce the poor health outcomes of Australia's Indigenous people. However, while Indigenous students are enrolling in Australian tertiary undergraduate nursing courses in increasing numbers, their completion rates remain lower than non-Indigenous students and many…

  11. Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS): A Quantitative Study of Latino Students' Goal Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraza, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    A problem exists with consistency in measuring and tracking students' academic goals in California Community Colleges [CCC]. Effective measurements in CCC that embody academic goals below the associate degree and four-year college articulation agreements, call for attention to determine student academic interests and completion rates. Specific…

  12. Spiritual Involvement as a Predictor to Completing a Salvation Army Substance Abuse Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf-Branigin, Michael; Duke, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates successful completion at a faith-based organization providing residential substance abuse treatment services. Method: The authors apply a complex systems paradigm using a single moderator variable. The participants are primarily African Americans and most have current criminal justice involvement. Probabilities of treatment…

  13. New model-fitting and model-completion programs for automated iterative nucleic acid refinement.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Keitaro; Zhou, Yong; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2013-06-01

    In the past decade many structures of nucleic acids have been determined, which have contributed to our understanding of their biological functions. However, crystals containing nucleic acids often diffract X-rays poorly. This makes electron-density interpretation difficult and requires a great deal of expertise in crystallography and knowledge of nucleic acid structure. Here, new programs called NAFIT and NABUILD for fitting and extending nucleic acid models are presented. These programs can be used as modules in the automated refinement system LAFIRE, as well as acting as independent programs. NAFIT performs sequential grouped fitting with empirical torsion-angle restraints and antibumping restraints including H atoms. NABUILD extends the model using a skeletonized map in a coarse-grained manner. It has been shown that NAFIT greatly improves electron-density fit and geometric quality and that iterative refinement with NABUILD significantly reduces the Rfree factor.

  14. Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium (SIBC).

    PubMed

    Wirz, Beat; Kittelmann, Matthias; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Taking up the common challenges in biocatalysis, a group of industrialists decided to react with a bottom-up solution, and created the Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium (SIBC). The Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium is a pre-competitive working group to better implement and utilize existing know-how and resources in biocatalysis, and to influence and shape the economic and educational political environment. Recent examples of activities are outlined.

  15. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, C.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  16. Matriculation of GED Recipients to Community College after Completing ABLE Programs Understanding Student, Program, and Institutional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Belinda M.

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges and Adult Basic and Literacy Education (ABLE) programs developed partnerships to improve access to post-secondary education for adult learners and General Educational Development (GED) recipients. However, the number of students that use the GED to gain access to college is disproportionately low compared to the quantity of GED…

  17. NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 1995-1999 Self Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Schaffart, Mary M.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium receives funds from NASA to allow Nebraska colleges and universities to implement balanced programs of research, education and public service related to aeronautics, space science and technology. Nebraska is a capability enhancement state which directs efforts and resources toward developing research infrastructure and enhancing the quality of aerospace research and education for all Nebraskans. Furthermore, the Nebraska Space Grant strives to provide national leadership in applied aspects of aeronautics. Nebraska has met, meets and will continue to meet all requirements set forth by NASA. Nebraska is a top-tier consortium and will continue to be a model program.

  18. Servant-Leader Development in an Adult Accelerated Degree Completion Program: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Angela R.

    2009-01-01

    Although many private Christian liberal arts programs exist today that seek to foster servant-leader (SL) development within their students, there is a void of both literature and data that details how servant-leadership development occurs and what contexts may be appropriate or necessary for this development. The purpose of this study was to…

  19. Preadmission Academic Achievement Criteria as Predictors of Nursing Program Completion and NCLEX-RN Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Tanya L.

    2009-01-01

    Admission policies and practices in higher education, including those in nursing programs, are diverse; yet administrators have traditionally relied upon preadmission academic achievement for selection of qualified students. Higher education administrators have the responsibility to serve the institution and all of its constituents, ensuring that…

  20. Application of Curriculum Learning Outcomes from an Adult Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Breck A.

    2003-01-01

    Of 247 graduates of a management and organizational development program, 188 identified themselves as leaders; 155 responded to a survey of learning outcomes. Only 3 of 27 outcomes were frequently applied in their work (communication skills, flexibility to adapt to change, and adjustment to organizational culture). (Contains 63 references.) (SK)

  1. Program Director Perspectives on Athletic Training Student Motivation to Complete Their Professional Athletic Training Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Student motivation has been linked to persistence until graduation for athletic training students. There is little research, however on ways athletic training programs (ATPs) foster student motivation. Objective: To expand upon the existing literature regarding retention of students in ATPs, specifically examining the concept of student…

  2. Preadmission Academic Achievement Criteria as Predictors of Nursing Program Completion and NCLEX-RN Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Tanya L.

    2009-01-01

    Admission policies and practices in higher education, including those in nursing programs, are diverse; yet administrators have traditionally relied upon preadmission academic achievement for selection of qualified students. Higher education administrators have the responsibility to serve the institution and all of its constituents, ensuring that…

  3. Summary of work completed under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification research program (EDQP)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R. Jr.; Bramwell, D.L.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G.

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the main projects undertaken under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification Research Program (EDQP) sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under FIN A6322. Lasting from fiscal year 1983 to 1987, the program dealt with environmental and dynamic (including seismic) equipment qualification issues for mechanical and electromechanical components and systems used in nuclear power plants. The research results have since been used by both the NRC and industry. The program included seven major research projects that addressed the following issues: (a) containment purge and vent valves performing under design basis loss of coolant accident loads, (b) containment piping penetrations and isolation valves performing under seismic loadings and design basis and severe accident containment wall displacements, (c) shaft seals for primary coolant pumps performing under station blackout conditions, (d) electrical cabinet internals responding to in-structure generated motion (rattling), and (e) in situ piping and valves responding to seismic loadings. Another project investigating whether certain containment isolation valves will close under design basis conditions was also started under this program. This report includes eight main section, each of which provides a brief description of one of the projects, a summary of the findings, and an overview of the application of the results. A bibliography lists the journal articles, papers, and reports that document the research.

  4. Program Director Perspectives on Athletic Training Student Motivation to Complete Their Professional Athletic Training Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Student motivation has been linked to persistence until graduation for athletic training students. There is little research, however on ways athletic training programs (ATPs) foster student motivation. Objective: To expand upon the existing literature regarding retention of students in ATPs, specifically examining the concept of student…

  5. Servant-Leader Development in an Adult Accelerated Degree Completion Program: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Angela R.

    2009-01-01

    Although many private Christian liberal arts programs exist today that seek to foster servant-leader (SL) development within their students, there is a void of both literature and data that details how servant-leadership development occurs and what contexts may be appropriate or necessary for this development. The purpose of this study was to…

  6. Career Program Completers. 1989-90 Long-Term Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In summer 1994, a long-term follow-up study was conducted of 1989-90 graduates of career programs at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas. A survey was mailed to 536 graduates, certificate holders, and students who left JCCC with marketable skills to assess their satisfaction with JCCC and their jobs. With telephone follow-up, a…

  7. Follow-Up of JCCC Career Program Completers: Class of 1998-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This document summarizes fall 1999 major findings of Johnson County Community College's (JCCC's) career program effectiveness in the following categories: utilization of community college preparation, community college experiences, satisfaction with JCCC, current educational endeavors and future educational plans, and employer perceptions. A total…

  8. Outcomes and Processes in the Meyerhoff Scholars Program: STEM PhD Completion, Sense of Community, Perceived Program Benefit, Science Identity, and Research Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Maton, Kenneth I.; Beason, Tiffany S.; Godsay, Surbhi; Sto. Domingo, Mariano R.; Bailey, TaShara C.; Sun, Shuyan; Hrabowski, Freeman A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is an effective intervention for high-achieving underrepresented minority (URM) students; African-American Meyerhoff students are significantly more likely to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) PhD programs than comparison students. The first of two studies in this report extends the prior research by examining levels of PhD completion for Meyerhoff (N = 479) versus comparison sample (N = 249) students among the first 16 cohorts. Entering African-American Meyerhoff students were 4.8 times more likely to complete STEM PhDs than comparison sample students. To enhance understanding of potential mechanisms of influence, the second study used data from the 22nd (Fall 2010) to 25th (Fall 2013) cohorts (N = 109) to test the hypothesis that perceived program benefit at the end of freshman year would mediate the relationship between sense of community at the end of Summer Bridge and science identity and research self-efficacy at the end of sophomore year. Study 2 results indicated that perceived program benefit fully mediated the relationship between sense of community and both criterion measures. The findings underscore the potential of comprehensive STEM intervention programs to enhance PhD completion, and suggest mechanisms of influence. PMID:27587857

  9. Up to 7 Years of Sustained Weight Loss for Weight Loss Program Completers

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Nia S.; Polsky, Sarit; Catenacci, Victoria A.; Furniss, Anna L.; Prochazka, Allan V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Two issues remain elusive in weight management programs: significant, long-term weight loss maintenance and widely accessible programs that produce significant weight loss for reasonable costs. The purpose of this study is to determine the long-term weight loss of participants who consecutively renew their annual membership in Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), a national, nonprofit, low-cost, peer-led weight loss program. Methods This completers’ analysis was a retrospective cohort study of overweight and obese men and women who joined TOPS in 2005–2011 and consecutively renewed their annual membership at least once. Data were analyzed from June to October 2013. TOPS participants’ weights are sent to the national database when they join and at the time of their annual renewal, thus follow-up weight is only available for those who renew their membership. Among 207,469 individuals who joined during the study period, 74,629 (35.9%) had at least one consecutive annual renewal and were included in the study. Results Cumulative mean (95% CI) weight change as a percentage of initial weight ranged from −6.0% (−6.0%, −5.9%) for 74,629 participants who renewed at 1 year to −8.3% (−8.7%, −7.8%) for 2,289 participants with 7 years of consecutive annual renewal. Conclusions In the subset of individuals who choose to renew their program membership, TOPS can effectively promote maintenance of clinically significant weight loss for an extended period of time. RCTs are needed to further evaluate this low-cost, widely available program, which could be a viable option to treat overweight and obesity. PMID:26033350

  10. Comparison of Development Test and Evaluation and Overall Program Estimate at Completion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    attained in completing the work on the contract up to current time ( Nystrom , 1995).” The index approach develops the EAC by adding the 2 actual... Nystrom , 1995; Unger, 2001; Trahan, 2009). Previous regression work primarily focuses on ACWP, BCWP, 9 CPI, and Time as the independent and...official start we found on the Format 3, B2 EHF and H1 BOA. Nystrom noted that all regression-based models require a known, correct, start date to

  11. 25 CFR 1000.337 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return property used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... thereto: (a) That was acquired under the AFA for the program being retroceded; and (b) That has a per item value in excess of $5,000 at the time of the retrocession, or as otherwise provided in the AFA....

  12. 25 CFR 1000.337 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return property used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... thereto: (a) That was acquired under the AFA for the program being retroceded; and (b) That has a per item value in excess of $5,000 at the time of the retrocession, or as otherwise provided in the AFA....

  13. 25 CFR 1000.337 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return property used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... thereto: (a) That was acquired under the AFA for the program being retroceded; and (b) That has a per item value in excess of $5,000 at the time of the retrocession, or as otherwise provided in the AFA....

  14. 25 CFR 1000.337 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return property used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... thereto: (a) That was acquired under the AFA for the program being retroceded; and (b) That has a per item value in excess of $5,000 at the time of the retrocession, or as otherwise provided in the AFA....

  15. UTSI/CFFF MHD program completion and related activity. Technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Actions taken to maintain the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility in standby condition are reported. Plans are discussed to upgrade the facility coal processing system and data acquisition and control system with funds from another DOE program (HIPPS). Major actions in site environmental remediation were continuation of sampling and analysis from the 8 groundwater wells and completion of drilling of another 7 wells. Drilling methodology and soil sampling techniques are described. Work on the plan for development of coated conductors continued.

  16. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    PubMed

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  17. Using process indicators to optimize service completion of an ED drug and alcohol brief intervention program.

    PubMed

    Akin, Joanna; Johnson, J Aaron; Seale, J Paul; Kuperminc, Gabriel P

    2015-01-01

    The strongest evidence for effectiveness of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) programs is in primary care settings. Emergency department (ED) studies have shown mixed results. Implementation of SBIRT into ED settings is complicated by the type of patients seen and the fast-paced, high-throughput nature of the ED environment that makes it difficult to reach patients flagged for SBIRT services. This study uses data from an ED-based SBIRT program to examine the relationship between screen-positive rate, ED patient flow, and SBIRT service delivery. Data for the study (N = 67137) were derived from weekly reports extracted directly from one hospital's electronic health record. Measures included time and day of patient entry, drug/alcohol screen result (positive or negative), and whether the patient was reached by SBIRT specialists. Factorial analysis of variance compared variations in screen-positive rates by day and time and the percentage of patients reached by SBIRT specialists during these periods. Overall, 56% of screen-positive patients received SBIRT services. Only 5% of patients offered SBIRT services refused. Day and time of entry had a significant interaction effect on the reached rate (F12,14166 =3.48, P < .001). Although patient volume was lowest between 11 pm and 7 am, screen-positive rates were highest during this period, particularly on weekends; and patients were least likely to be reached during these periods. When implementing an ED-based SBIRT program, thoughtful consideration should be given to patient flow and staffing to maximize program impact and increase the likelihood of sustainability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Improved Three Axis Test Table (ITATT): Program Status and Recommendation for Completion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    8ihMs Group qo O4e3/ 023 1 WfltlhfJ____________. Contraves USA U’NTERIM REPORT ON THIE IMPROVED) THREE AXIS TEST TABLE (ITATh): PROGRAM STATUS AND...Bhirle Group £OIn VHI TR-27824 Page i. Contraves USA TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I INTRODUCTION - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................ 1 2 PURPOSE...D ata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.1.3 What Has Contraves Learned? .......................... 8

  19. Predictors of and health- and fall-related program outcomes resulting from complete and adequate doses of a fall risk reduction program.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, Thelma J; Durbin, Laura L; Hertzberg, Fern; Nobile-Hernandez, Diana; Jia, Haomiao

    2016-10-07

    Falls are dangerous and costly for older adults. The A Matter of Balance/Volunteer Lay Leader (AMOB/VLL) program is an evidence-based fall risk reduction program that could help reduce this burden. This study introduced a door-through-door transportation program to improve program delivery (N = 126). Characteristics predicting completion of all eight AMOB/VLL sessions were identified using logistic regression. Individual growth models were employed to determine the immediate, intermediate, and long-term goal outcomes resulting from receiving an adequate dose of the program (five to eight sessions). Self-restriction of activities due to fear of falling (OR 5.04, 95 % CI 1.86-13.69) and a lower frequency of moderate and vigorous physical activity (OR 1.14, 95 % CI 1.04-1.27) were significantly predictive of receiving a complete dose. Three outcome goals were significant, including (1) immediate-improved self-efficacy of managing medications and treatments, (2) intermediate-reduced activity limitations, and (3) intermediate-reduced physical disability. Self-restriction of activities due to a fear of falling and physical activity levels may be simple and effective screening questions to prevent AMOB/VLL attrition. In our study, those who did receive the program improved on a specific type of self-efficacy and on self-reported physical functioning.

  20. Factors Associated with Hispanic Adults Attending Spanish-Language Disease Self-Management Program Workshops and Workshop Completion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Ahn, SangNam; Jiang, Luohua; Kulinski, Kristie P.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Many factors influence ways in which middle-aged and older Hispanic adults prefer to receive health-related information. While Spanish-language disease management programs are increasingly offered in community and healthcare settings, less is known about their utilization among the Hispanic population. This study aimed to identify participant and workshop factors associated with middle-aged and older Hispanic adults attending Spanish-language disease self-management program workshops and receiving the recommended intervention dose (i.e., successful workshop completion is defined as attending four or more of the six workshop sessions). Data were analyzed from 12,208 Hispanic adults collected during a national dissemination of the Stanford suite of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) programs spanning 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Two logistic regression analyses were performed. Over 65% of participants attended Spanish-language workshops, and 78.3% of participants successfully completed workshops. Relative to participants in English-language workshops, participants who attended Spanish-language CDSME workshops were more likely to successfully complete workshops, as were those aged 80 years and older, females, and those who lived alone. Participants who were aged 50–79 years and female were significantly more likely to attend Spanish-language workshops than their counterparts under age 50. Conversely, those with more chronic conditions were less likely to attend Spanish-language workshops. Those who attended workshops with more participants and where the Hispanic population was less affluent were more likely to attend Spanish-language workshops. This study provides insight into Spanish-language CDSME program recruitment and utilization with implications for program adoption in underserved Hispanic community settings. PMID:25964900

  1. Commitment language and homework completion in a behavioral employment program for gang-affiliated youth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caitlin; Huey, Stanley J; McDaniel, Dawn D

    2015-05-01

    Research with substance-abusing samples suggests that eliciting commitment language during treatment may improve motivation to change, increase treatment engagement, and promote positive treatment outcomes. However, the relationship between in-session client language and treatment success is not well-understood for youth offender populations. This study evaluated the relationship between commitment language, treatment engagement (i.e., homework completion), and weekly employment outcomes for six gang-affiliated juvenile offenders participating in an employment counseling intervention. Weekly counseling sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for commitment language strength. Multilevel models were fit to the data to examine the relationship between commitment language and counseling homework or employment outcomes within participants over time. Commitment language strength predicted subsequent homework completion but not weekly employment. These findings imply that gang-affiliated delinquent youth who express motivation to change during employment counseling will be more likely to comply with counselor-initiated homework. Further research on counselor techniques for promoting commitment language among juvenile gang offenders is needed.

  2. Consortium for Health and Military Performance and American College of Sports Medicine consensus paper on extreme conditioning programs in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F; Nindl, Bradley C; Deuster, Patricia A; Baumgartner, Neal; Kane, Shawn F; Kraemer, William J; Sexauer, Lisa R; Thompson, Walter R; O'Connor, Francis G

    2011-01-01

    A potential emerging problem associated with increasingly popularized extreme conditioning programs (ECPs) has been identified by the military and civilian communities. That is, there is an apparent disproportionate musculoskeletal injury risk from these demanding programs, particularly for novice participants, resulting in lost duty time, medical treatment, and extensive rehabilitation. This is a significant and costly concern for the military with regard to effectively maintaining operational readiness of the Force. While there are certain recognized positive aspects of ECPs that address a perceived and/or actual unfulfilled conditioning need for many individuals and military units, these programs have limitations and should be considered carefully. Moreover, certain distinctive characteristics of ECPs appear to violate recognized accepted standards for safely and appropriately developing muscular fitness and are not uniformly aligned with established and accepted training doctrine. Accordingly, practical solutions to improve ECP prescription and implementation and reduce injury risk are of paramount importance.

  3. The Bilingual Human Services Educational Consortium of Bangor Community College. Third Year Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigney, Tracy B.

    This third-party evaluation report, presented in six sections, begins with an introductory section on the procedures used to evaluate the Bilingual Human Services Educational Consortium. (The consortium, a one-year college level program, prepares underemployed and unemployed Franco-Americans for paraprofessional human service jobs.) Also described…

  4. The Consortium for Institutional Effectiveness & Student Success in the Community College: Membership Resource Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreider, Paul E.; And Others

    The Consortium for Institutional Effectiveness and Student Success in the Community College was established in 1988 to foster programs in support of the teaching and learning process, student retention and success strategies, and institutional effectiveness. Administered at Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC) in Oregon, the consortium currently has…

  5. Final Report: Appalachian Consortium. Evaluation of a Dissemination and Diffusion Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsbery Systems Analysis, Ltd., Flushing, NY.

    The Appalachian Consortium was evaluated as an organization for the dissemination of educational information regarding programs for the early identification of preschool handicapped children. Chapter I provides a historical overview and discusses the Consortium's independence from the Appalachian Educational Laboratory. The chapter also indicates…

  6. Teachers as Innovators. A Selection of Reports by the Teachers and Counselors of the Thirteen-College Curriculum Program 1969-70 (Five-College Consortium Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Services to Education, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This is the third collection of year-end reports selected by the Institute for Services to Education (ISE) from the reports prepared by the teachers and counselors of the Thirteen-College Curriculum Program (TCCP). The present document, covering the year 1969-70, comprises a selection of entire reports. The reports are addressed simultaneously to…

  7. Public Law 99-457: Challenges and Opportunities for State Title V Programs. HHS Region III Perinatal Information Consortium. Technical Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciarillo, William G.

    The report relates existing State Title V programs based on the Social Security Act to implications of Public Law 99-457 (the Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments of 1986), especially Part H which authorizes comprehensive coordinated statewide early intervention delivery systems for infants and toddlers with handicaps. In section I,…

  8. Rape myth acceptance in men who completed the prostitution offender program of British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carolin; Kennedy, M Alexis; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2009-06-01

    In an effort to characterize the attitudes and characteristics of men who solicit sex, this study investigated rape myth acceptance as assessed by a modification of Burt's Rape Myth Acceptance Scale. The participants were all men who took part in the Prostitution Offender Program of British Columbia after being arrested for attempting to solicit sex from an undercover police officer. Relationships between endorsement of rape myths, other attitudes, sexual behavior, and demographic variables were examined. Results reveal that age, education, use of pornography, ideal frequency of intercourse, and believing that purchasing sex is a problem are all negatively correlated with rape myth acceptance. Positive correlations were found between rape myth acceptance and sexual conservatism, sexual violence/coercion, and social desirability. Results are discussed in terms of the association between rape myth acceptance and the violence frequently perpetrated against those working in the sex trade.

  9. Inlet Unstart Propulsion Integration Wind Tunnel Test Program Completed for High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    One of the propulsion system concepts to be considered for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) is an underwing, dual-propulsion, pod-per-wing installation. Adverse transient phenomena such as engine compressor stall and inlet unstart could severely degrade the performance of one of these propulsion pods. The subsequent loss of thrust and increased drag could cause aircraft stability and control problems that could lead to a catastrophic accident if countermeasures are not in place to anticipate and control these detrimental transient events. Aircraft system engineers must understand what happens during an engine compressor stall and inlet unstart so that they can design effective control systems to avoid and/or alleviate the effects of a propulsion pod engine compressor stall and inlet unstart. The objective of the Inlet Unstart Propulsion Airframe Integration test program was to assess the underwing flow field of a High-Speed Civil Transport propulsion system during an engine compressor stall and subsequent inlet unstart. Experimental research testing was conducted in the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The representative propulsion pod consisted of a two-dimensional, bifurcated inlet mated to a live turbojet engine. The propulsion pod was mounted below a large flat plate that acted as a wing simulator. Because of the plate s long length (nominally 10-ft wide by 18-ft long), realistic boundary layers could form at the inlet cowl plane. Transient instrumentation was used to document the aerodynamic flow-field conditions during an unstart sequence. Acquiring these data was a significant technical challenge because a typical unstart sequence disrupts the local flow field for about only 50 msec. Flow surface information was acquired via static pressure taps installed in the wing simulator, and intrusive pressure probes were used to acquire flow-field information. These data were extensively analyzed to

  10. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The purpose of this letter is to notify you that the Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy's Innovations for Existing Plants Program has been zeroed out in the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 budget.

  11. Body System Effects of a Multi-Modal Training Program Targeting Chronic, Motor Complete Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Gant, Katie; Nagle, Kathleen; Cowan, Rachel; Field-Fote, Edelle; Nash, Mark; Kressler, Jochen; Thomas, Christine K; Castellanos, Mabelin; Widerstrom-Noga, Eva; Anderson, Kimberly D

    2017-08-10

    The safety and efficacy of pharmacologic and cellular transplantation strategies are currently being evaluated in people with spinal cord injury. In studies of people with chronic spinal cord injuries, it is thought that functional recovery will be best achieved when drug or cell therapies are combined with rehabilitation protocols. However, any functional recovery due to the therapy may be confounded by the conditioned state of the body and by training-induced effects on neuroplasticity. For this reason, we sought to investigate the effects of a multi-modal training program on several body systems. The training program included body weight supported treadmill training for locomotion, circuit resistance training for upper body conditioning, functional electrical stimulation for activation of sublesional muscles, and wheelchair skills training for overall mobility. Eight participants with chronic, thoracic-level, motor-complete spinal cord injury completed the 12 week program. After 12 weeks, upper extremity muscular strength improved significantly for all participants, and some participants experienced improvements in function which may be explained by increased strength. Neurological function did not change. Changes in pain and spasticity were highly variable between participants. This is the first demonstration of the effect of this combination of four training modalities. However, balancing participant and study-site burden with capturing meaningful outcome measures is also an important consideration.

  12. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  13. Clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension: Time for a consortium.

    PubMed

    Newman, John H; Elliott, Gregory C; Haworth, Glennis S; Zampaglione, Edio; Brar, Satjit; Gibbs, Simon J; Sandoval, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Current and past clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension, while valuable, are limited by the absence of mechanistic aims, by dissatisfaction with endpoints and the inability to share data. Clinical studies in pulmonary hypertension might be enhanced by a consortium approach that utilizes the expertise of academic medicine, the treatment initiatives of the pharmaceutical industry and study design from funding agencies interested in biological mechanisms. A meeting of interested parties, the Pulmonary Hypertension Academic Research Consortium (PHARC), was held from 30 April to 1 May 2012 in Bethesda, Maryland. Members at the conference were from the USA Federal Drug Administration (FDA); pharmaceutical industry (Pfizer, Novartis, Bayer and Gilead); USA National Institutes of Health (NHLBI); the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI), a non-governmental organization (NGO); and research and clinical members of pulmonary hypertension programs of international scope. A recommendation to develop a clinical trials consortium was the product of the working group on academic standards in clinical trials. The working group concluded that clinical trials hold immense promise to move the field of pulmonary hypertension forward if the trials are designed by a consortium with input from multiple groups. This would result in study design, conduct and analysis determined by consortium members with a high degree of independent function. The components of a well-balanced consortium that give it scientific effectiveness are: (1) the consortium can work with multiple companies simultaneously; (2) sponsors with special interests, such as testing biological mechanisms, can add investigations to a study at lower cost than with present granting strategies; (3) data handling including archiving, analysis and future sharing would be improved; (4) ancillary studies supported by the collection and dissemination of tissues and fluids would generate a broader approach to discovery than

  14. Outcomes and Processes in the Meyerhoff Scholars Program: STEM PhD Completion, Sense of Community, Perceived Program Benefit, Science Identity, and Research Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Maton, Kenneth I; Beason, Tiffany S; Godsay, Surbhi; Sto Domingo, Mariano R; Bailey, TaShara C; Sun, Shuyan; Hrabowski, Freeman A

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is an effective intervention for high-achieving underrepresented minority (URM) students; African-American Meyerhoff students are significantly more likely to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) PhD programs than comparison students. The first of two studies in this report extends the prior research by examining levels of PhD completion for Meyerhoff (N = 479) versus comparison sample (N = 249) students among the first 16 cohorts. Entering African-American Meyerhoff students were 4.8 times more likely to complete STEM PhDs than comparison sample students. To enhance understanding of potential mechanisms of influence, the second study used data from the 22nd (Fall 2010) to 25th (Fall 2013) cohorts (N = 109) to test the hypothesis that perceived program benefit at the end of freshman year would mediate the relationship between sense of community at the end of Summer Bridge and science identity and research self-efficacy at the end of sophomore year. Study 2 results indicated that perceived program benefit fully mediated the relationship between sense of community and both criterion measures. The findings underscore the potential of comprehensive STEM intervention programs to enhance PhD completion, and suggest mechanisms of influence. © 2016 K. I. Maton et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  16. Training a New Generation of Biostatisticians: A Successful Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Judy M.; Ryan, Philip; Carlin, John B.; Gurrin, Lyle; Marschner, Ian

    2009-01-01

    In response to the worldwide shortage of biostatisticians, Australia has established a national consortium of eight universities to develop and deliver a Masters program in biostatistics. This article describes our successful innovative multi-institutional training model, which may be of value to other countries. We first present the issues…

  17. Called to Collaboration: The University Consortium for Catholic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Molly; Kennedy, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the University of Consortium for Catholic Education (UCCE) as an example of collaboration between Catholic colleges, universities, schools, and other stakeholders. The UCCE supports a collaborative cadre of primarily Catholic colleges and universities as they design and implement graduate-level teaching service programs for…

  18. Training a New Generation of Biostatisticians: A Successful Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Judy M.; Ryan, Philip; Carlin, John B.; Gurrin, Lyle; Marschner, Ian

    2009-01-01

    In response to the worldwide shortage of biostatisticians, Australia has established a national consortium of eight universities to develop and deliver a Masters program in biostatistics. This article describes our successful innovative multi-institutional training model, which may be of value to other countries. We first present the issues…

  19. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  20. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  1. Advances in industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium for biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Li; Zhou, Jin-Jie; Quan, Chun-Shan; Xiu, Zhi-Long

    2017-01-01

    One of the important targets of industrial biotechnology is using cheap biomass resources. The traditional strategy is microbial fermentations with single strain. However, cheap biomass normally contains so complex compositions and impurities that it is very difficult for single microorganism to utilize availably. In order to completely utilize the substrates and produce multiple products in one process, industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium draws more and more attention. In this review, we first briefly described some examples of existing industrial bioprocesses involving microbial consortia. Comparison of 1,3-propanediol production by mixed and pure cultures were then introduced, and interaction relationships between cells in microbial consortium were summarized. Finally, the outlook on how to design and apply microbial consortium in the future was also proposed.

  2. Characteristics of drug-abusing women with children in residential treatment: a preliminary evaluation of program retention and treatment completion.

    PubMed

    Simons, Lori

    2008-01-01

    An ex post facto study was conducted to investigate treatment outcomes for 80 women and 168 children admitted into a residential substance-abuse treatment program. The results indicated childhood emotional neglect is a barrier for remaining in and completing treatment for African-American women with comorbid psychological disorders but not for those with crack cocaine dependent disorders. African-American women with comorbid psychological disorders were also three times more likely to dropout of treatment. In addition, there were relatively few differences for between drug-exposed and nonexposed children. However, the results indicated that children of substance-abusing women who completed treatment were more likely to have behavioral problems, to receive early intervention services, and to have mothers as legal guardians by the end of treatment. Implications for gender-specific interventions for African-American women and their children in residential treatment are discussed.

  3. 25 CFR 1000.101 - Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.101 Section 1000.101 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.101 Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? No, at the discretion of the Tribe/Consortium, Tribal...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.101 - Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.101 Section 1000.101 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.101 Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? No, at the discretion of the Tribe/Consortium, Tribal...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.101 - Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.101 Section 1000.101 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.101 Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? No, at the discretion of the Tribe/Consortium, Tribal...

  6. 25 CFR 1000.101 - Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.101 Section 1000.101 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.101 Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? No, at the discretion of the Tribe/Consortium, Tribal...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.101 - Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? 1000.101 Section 1000.101 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY... Affairs Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.101 Are all funds identified as Tribal shares always paid to the Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? No, at the discretion of the Tribe/Consortium, Tribal...

  8. The Effect of the Threat of Legal Sanction on Program Retention and Completion: Is that Why They Stay in Drug Court?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, John R.; Harvey, Angela N.

    2007-01-01

    Drug courts routinely rely on the threat of legal sanction to motivate drug-using criminal offenders to enter and complete community-based treatment programs. In light of the high failure rates among drug court participants, what is the effect of the threat of legal sanction on program retention and completion? A quasiexperimental research design…

  9. The School-to-Work Transition of High School and Community College Vocational Program Completers: 1990-1992. EQW Working Papers WP27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, David W.

    The school-to-work transition of high school and community college vocational program completers in 1990-1992 was examined by analyzing administrative records and employment and earnings data of vocational program completers from state education agencies in Colorado, Florida, Missouri, and Washington. A consistently high percentage of vocational…

  10. The Influence of Religious Affiliation on Participant Responsiveness to the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) Lifestyle Intervention.

    PubMed

    Kent, L M; Morton, D P; Ward, E J; Rankin, P M; Ferret, R B; Gobble, J; Diehl, H A

    2016-10-01

    Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) and non-SDA (21.3 and 78.7 %, respectively) individuals (n = 7172) participating in the Complete Health Improvement Program, a 30-day diet and lifestyle intervention, in North America (241 programs, 2006-2012) were assessed for changes in selected chronic disease risk factors: body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), pulse, lipid profile and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Reductions were greater among the non-SDA for BMI, pulse and blood lipids. Furthermore, the majority of non-SDA in the highest risk classifications for BP, lipids and FPG, but only some lipids among SDA, were able to show improvement by 20 % or more.

  11. Genesis of an oak-fire science consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabner, K.W.; Stambaugh, M. C.; Guyette, R.P.; Dey, D. C.; Willson, G.D.; Dey, D. C.; Stambaugh, M. C.; Clark, S.L.; Schweitzer, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    With respect to fire management and practices, one of the most overlooked regions lies in the middle of the country. In this region there is a critical need for both recognition of fire’s importance and sharing of fire information and expertise. Recently we proposed and were awarded funding by the Joint Fire Science Program to initiate the planning phase for a regional fire consortium. The purpose of the consortium will be to promote the dissemination of fire information across the interior United States and to identify fire information needs of oak-dominated communities such as woodlands, forests, savannas, and barrens. Geographically, the consortium region will cover: 1) the Interior Lowland Plateau Ecoregion in Illinois, Indiana, central Kentucky and Tennessee; 2) the Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma Ozarks; 3) the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma; and 4) the Cross Timbers Region in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. This region coincides with the southwestern half of the Central Hardwoods Forest Region. The tasks of this consortium will be to disseminate fire information, connect fire professionals, and efficiently address fire issues within our region. If supported, the success and the future direction of the consortium will be driven by end-users, their input, and involvement.

  12. ACTS Operations Extended Through a University-Based Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert A.; Krawczyk, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program was slated for decommissioning in October 2000. With plans in place to move the spacecraft to an orbital graveyard and then shut the system down, NASA was challenged to consider the feasibility of extending operations for education and research purposes provided that an academic organization would be willing to cover operations costs. This was determined to be viable, and in the fall of 2000, NASA announced that it would consider extending operations. On March 19, 2001, NASA, the Ohio Board of Regents, and the Ohio University signed a Space Act Agreement to continue ACTS operations for 2 more years with options to extend operations up to a total of 4 years. To accomplish this, the Ohio University has formed a university-based consortium, the Ohio Consortium for Advanced Communications Technology (OCACT), and acts as the managing member. The Ohio University is responsible for the full reimbursement of NASA's operations costs, and does this through consortium membership. NASA retains the operating license of the spacecraft and has two contractors supporting spacecraft and master control station operations. This flexible arrangement between NASA and academia allows the education community to access a large communications satellite for learning about spacecraft operations and to use the system's transponders for communications applications. It also allows other organizations, such as commercial companies, to become consortium members and use the ACTS wideband Ka-band (30/20 GHz) payload. From the consortium members, six areas of interest have been identified.

  13. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  14. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  15. The BADER Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    of Defense’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP), is further challenging the clinical community, federal agencies, industry and...military clinical research centers, academia, industry and an array of federal agencies. Our efforts have successfully developed and implemented an...injury; as such, the Department of Defense is currently challenging the clinical community, industry and academia to unite and make lasting

  16. 25 CFR 1000.91 - What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... under an AFA? 1000.91 Section 1000.91 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.91 What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? (a) At the option of the Tribe/Consortium, the Secretary must provide the following program...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.91 - What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... under an AFA? 1000.91 Section 1000.91 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.91 What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? (a) At the option of the Tribe/Consortium, the Secretary must provide the following program...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.91 - What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under an AFA? 1000.91 Section 1000.91 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.91 What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? (a) At the option of the Tribe/Consortium, the Secretary must provide the following program...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.91 - What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... under an AFA? 1000.91 Section 1000.91 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.91 What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? (a) At the option of the Tribe/Consortium, the Secretary must provide the following program...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.91 - What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... under an AFA? 1000.91 Section 1000.91 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... Programs Determining Afa Amounts § 1000.91 What funds must be transferred to a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA? (a) At the option of the Tribe/Consortium, the Secretary must provide the following program...

  1. A complete dosimetry experimental program in support to the core characterization and to the power calibration of the CABRI reactor. A complete dosimetry experimental program in support of the core characterization and of the power calibration of the CABRI reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rodiac, F.; Hudelot, JP.; Lecerf, J.; Garnier, Y.; Ritter, G.

    2015-07-01

    CABRI is an experimental pulse reactor operated by CEA at the Cadarache research center. Since 1978 the experimental programs have aimed at studying the fuel behavior under Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. Since 2003, it has been refurbished in order to be able to provide RIA and LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) experiments in prototypical PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 deg. C). This project is part of a broader scope including an overall facility refurbishment and a safety review. The global modification is conducted by the CEA project team. It is funded by IRSN, which is conducting the CIP experimental program, in the framework of the OECD/NEA project CIP. It is financed in the framework of an international collaboration. During the reactor restart, commissioning tests are realized for all equipment, systems and circuits of the reactor. In particular neutronics and power commissioning tests will be performed respectively in 2015 and 2016. This paper focuses on the design of a complete and original dosimetry program that was built in support to the CABRI core characterization and to the power calibration. Each one of the above experimental goals will be fully described, as well as the target uncertainties and the forecasted experimental techniques and data treatment. (authors)

  2. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  3. East bay fire chiefs' consortium

    Treesearch

    Michael Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to planning for public fire protection has been based on independent actions by each fire department or district. The county fire chiefs’ associations, while providing interagency communication, were not adequate to deal with the regional nature of the wildland urban interface problem. The formation of the East Bay Fire Chiefs’ Consortium grew...

  4. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  5. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  6. The Role of the Consortium Director.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    The director of a college consortium must be a strong leader, whose primary duties range from providing leadership to securing resources and to clearly communicating the consortium's mission. The director must keep in mind that the consortium's work is valuable only to the degree that it eases the load on the individual member institutions and…

  7. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-12-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the Fall SWC Technology Transfer Workshop for the northeastern U.S., in Pittsburgh, PA, on November 9, 2006, and organizing and identifying projects to exhibit during the SWC/Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) joint reception on November 8, 2006; (2) Distributing a paper copy of the Texas Tech 2004 Final Report and a revised, complete compact disc of all 2004 final reports; (3) Invoicing current and potential members for FY2007; (4) Soliciting nominations for the 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; and (5) Communications and outreach.

  8. Learning through collaboration: the NEXus consortium as a winning collaborative.

    PubMed

    Komnenich, Pauline; Hayes, Janice S; Magilvy, Kathy; McNeil, Paula A

    2013-02-01

    The Nursing Education Exchange (NEXus) is a consortium of academic doctoral programs in nursing, initiated in response to a national shortage of well-qualified nurse educators and the need to increase the number of doctoral faculty in nursing programs across the United States. The vision for the consortium was to use distance-accessible delivery methods to provide rural nurse educators and clinical nurses with access to quality doctoral programs in nursing while remaining in their home environments. In addition, smaller or newly established doctoral programs would be able to offer a wider variety of elective coursework without recruiting and hiring additional faculty, further decreasing their limited available resources. This article describes the initiation and implementation of a successful nursing education collaborative that has gained increasing influence across the country and is recognized by its acronym, NEXus. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Aerospace Workforce Development: The Nebraska Proposal; and Native Connections: A Multi-Consortium Workforce Development Proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent; Vlasek, Karisa; Russell, Valerie; Teasdale, Jean; Downing, David R.; deSilva, Shan; Higginbotham, Jack; Duke, Edward; Westenkow, Dwayne; Johnson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This report contains two sections, each of which describes a proposal for a program at the University of Nebraska. The sections are entitled: 1) Aerospace Workforce Development Augmentation Competition; 2) Native Connections: A Multi-Consortium Workforce Development Proposal.

  10. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site:Targeted Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Cornell Medical College Prostate Cancer Research Program (WCMC-PCRP) is a Clinical Research Site of the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium...effectively bring novel agents and new biomarker driven trials directly to patients 17 Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction...purpose and scope of the research. The Weill Cornell Medical College Prostate Cancer Research Program (WCMC-PCRP) is a Clinical Research Site of the

  11. Program Completion of a Web-Based Tailored Lifestyle Intervention for Adults: Differences between a Sequential and a Simultaneous Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Francine; de Vries, Hein; van Osch, Liesbeth ADM; van Nierop, Peter WM; Kremers, Stef PJ

    2012-01-01

    Background Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors often co-occur and are related to chronic diseases. One effective method to change multiple lifestyle behaviors is web-based computer tailoring. Dropout from Internet interventions, however, is rather high, and it is challenging to retain participants in web-based tailored programs, especially programs targeting multiple behaviors. To date, it is unknown how much information people can handle in one session while taking part in a multiple behavior change intervention, which could be presented either sequentially (one behavior at a time) or simultaneously (all behaviors at once). Objectives The first objective was to compare dropout rates of 2 computer-tailored interventions: a sequential and a simultaneous strategy. The second objective was to assess which personal characteristics are associated with completion rates of the 2 interventions. Methods Using an RCT design, demographics, health status, physical activity, vegetable consumption, fruit consumption, alcohol intake, and smoking were self-assessed through web-based questionnaires among 3473 adults, recruited through Regional Health Authorities in the Netherlands in the autumn of 2009. First, a health risk appraisal was offered, indicating whether respondents were meeting the 5 national health guidelines. Second, psychosocial determinants of the lifestyle behaviors were assessed and personal advice was provided, about one or more lifestyle behaviors. Results Our findings indicate a high non-completion rate for both types of intervention (71.0%; n = 2167), with more incompletes in the simultaneous intervention (77.1%; n = 1169) than in the sequential intervention (65.0%; n = 998). In both conditions, discontinuation was predicted by a lower age (sequential condition: OR = 1.04; P < .001; CI = 1.02-1.05; simultaneous condition: OR = 1.04; P < .001; CI = 1.02-1.05) and an unhealthy lifestyle (sequential condition: OR = 0.86; P = .01; CI = 0.76-0.97; simultaneous condition

  12. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

  13. Optoelectronic Technology Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-15

    with the connector fixtures will be carried out in the seventh quarter of the program. 8 4.0. Summary. Effort during the current quarter has included...IIIIIIIIII! 111= Figure 1. Mask layout for devices to be packaged as deliverablCI. To date, a single process run has been carried out using the mask set...Voltage V-x Bias Max Power Coat Arm # (v. fnjlc-addedl Voltnge t Out (UMW Rato ( dlj 1 8.0 9.1 137 6.3 2 7.82 12.1 17.9 9.2 3 7.83 10.8 18.0 7.4 4

  14. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Block, Timothy; Ball, Kia; Fournier, Ashley

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  15. New Graduate RNs' Perceptions of Transitioning to Professional Practice After Completing Ontario's New Graduate Guarantee Orientation Program.

    PubMed

    Guay, Jo'Anne; Bishop, Susan E; Espin, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    By 2022, Canada will be short 60,000 RNs. Contributing to this shortage are difficulties experienced by new graduate RNs (NGRNs) transitioning to professional practice. This grounded theory study explored NGRNs' transition experiences in the 12 months after completing Ontario's New Graduate Guarantee orientation program. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 NGRNs on the Nursing Resource Team in one urban Ontario academic hospital network. Discovering Professional Self described NGRNs' transition as progressive, with transitory setbacks. In the early part of the transition, NGRNs experienced Surviving Without a Safety Net, which involved Experiencing Fear, Figuring It Out, and Learning on the Job. In the later part of transition, the NGRNs experienced Turning of the Tables, which involved Being Trusted, Gaining Confidence, and Feeling Comfortable in their professional role. Recommendations focus on educational strategies to enhance the NGRNs' transition experience. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE PAGES

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; ...

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  17. [The MEN consortium of Japan].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akihiro

    2012-07-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is not as well recognized in Asia, including Japan, as in the West. The clinical features of MEN and management conditions have yet to be clarified in Japan. Thus, we established a MEN study group designated the MEN Consortium of Japan in 2008. Its missions are to: 1) clarify the current status of clinical management of MEN; 2) promote basic research; 3) improve the diagnosis and treatment of MEN; 4) undertake public relations to increase awareness of MEN; and 5) support and collaborate with patient advocacy groups, etc. Clinical and genetic information on more than 1,000 patients was collected and analyzed. The database established by the MEN Consortium of Japan is the first such database for Asian patients and is one of the most extensive MEN databases worldwide. This is anticipated to promote clarification of the current status of MEN in Japan and improve future clinical management.

  18. Knowledge attainment, perceptions, and professionalism in participants completing the didactic phase of an Army reserve critical care nursing residency program.

    PubMed

    Wynd, C A; Gotschall, W

    2000-04-01

    Combat hospitals in today's Army demand nurses with critical care nursing "8A" additional skills identifiers. The intensity of future wars and operations other than war, together with highly technological weapons, forecast a large number of casualties evacuated rapidly from combat with wounds that require skillful and intensive nursing care. Many of the critical care nurses providing future care are positioned in the reserve components and require creative approaches to education and training concentrated into one weekend per month. An Army Reserve critical care nursing residency program was designed in one midwestern combat support hospital. The didactic course, phase I, was evaluated for effectiveness in achieving outcomes of increased knowledge attainment, enhanced perceptions of critical care nursing, and higher degrees of professionalism. Twenty-seven registered nurses completed the course, and 30 nurses from the same hospital served as controls. A repeated-measures analysis examined outcomes before intervention (time 1), at course completion (time 2), and at a 6-month follow-up (time 3). The course was effective at increasing scores on knowledge attainment and perceptions of critical care nursing; however; professionalism scores were initially high and remained so throughout the study. This research extends information about critical care nursing education and evaluates a training mechanism for meeting the unique requirements and time constraints of nurses in the reserve components who need to provide a high level of skill to soldiers in combat.

  19. Effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program in Reducing Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in an Appalachian Population.

    PubMed

    Leibold, Christopher; Shubrook, Jay H; Nakazawa, Masato; Drozek, David

    2016-02-01

    In 11 counties in Appalachian Ohio, the self-reported prevalence of diabetes mellitus (11.3%) is higher than the state (7.8%) or national (7.2%) average. Direct medical costs for diabetes in the United States are estimated at $176 billion annually. Indirect costs from disability, work loss, and premature death add up to another $69 billion. To determine the effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in a sample of Appalachian participants with elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels or a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In a retrospective study, data from 6 CHIP cohorts conducted in Appalachian Ohio from 2011 to 2012 were combined and analyzed for short-term changes in CVD risk factors from baseline. This study focused on a subsample of the overall CHIP, whose participants had elevated FBG levels or T2DM. Statistical analysis was completed by calculating means and SDs and using paired t tests to compare differences in variables. After the CHIP intervention, 110 participants with baseline elevated FBG levels showed notable reductions in FBG levels, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure (all P values <.001). Likewise, participants in the subsample with T2DM experienced reductions in all CVD risk factors (all P values <.05). The CHIP lifestyle intervention was effective in reducing CVD risk factors in this Appalachian population with elevated FBG levels or with T2DM.

  20. As the Twig Is Bent: Lasting Effects of Preschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Longitudinal Studies.

    The Consortium for Longitudinal Studies was formed to answer the question of whether early education programs have measurable long term effects on the performance of children from low income families. Every early intervention study that had a specific curriculum, focused on children from low income families, was completed prior to l969, and had an…

  1. As the Twig Is Bent: Lasting Effects of Preschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Longitudinal Studies.

    The Consortium for Longitudinal Studies was formed to answer the question of whether early education programs have measurable long term effects on the performance of children from low income families. Every early intervention study that had a specific curriculum, focused on children from low income families, was completed prior to l969, and had an…

  2. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  3. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  4. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  5. Effect of complete decongestive therapy and home program on health- related quality of life in post mastectomy lymphedema patients.

    PubMed

    Melam, Ganeswara Rao; Buragadda, Syamala; Alhusaini, Adel A; Arora, Nisha

    2016-05-04

    Secondary lymphedema is common in women treated for breast cancer. It may be a result of surgery or radiotherapy. Edema commonly affects the arm, leading to discomfort, reduced arm movements, pain and diminished quality of life. Therefore, the relationship between post mastectomy lymphedema and quality of life has evolved as an important criteria in treatment of breast cancer survivors. Sixty breast cancer survivors who developed post mastectomy lymphedema were recruited. Patients were divided into 2 groups (n = 30) according to the treatment they received; Conventional therapy (CT) and Complete Decongestive Therapy (CDT) groups. Measurements were taken at baseline, 4 and 6 weeks. Health related Quality of Life was evaluated with the EORTC QLQ C30 and EORTC QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. Pain was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze participant demographics and repeated measures of ANOVA was used for within and between group comparisons. Both groups showed improved quality of life and diminished pain after 6 weeks of treatment. However, greater improvement was observed in CDT group compared to the CT group. In this study, remedial exercises and home program in addition to manual lymphatic drainage and compression bandaging resulted in improved quality of life. Early identification of lymphedema and incorporation of remedial exercises and a home program improve the quality of life for breast cancer survivors. Trial registry ID: ISRCTN13242080 , Date of registration: 7 April 2016.

  6. Leadership in Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Programs: A Pilot Study Comparing Stand-Alone Leadership Courses and Leadership-Infused Curricula.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle L; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J; Farnsworth, Tracy J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to define the extent to which leadership and leadership skills are taught in dental hygiene degree completion programs by comparing stand-alone leadership courses/hybrid programs with programs that infuse leadership skills throughout the curricula. The study involved a mixed-methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program directors and faculty members who teach a stand-alone leadership course, a hybrid program, or leadership-infused courses in these programs. A quantitative comparison of course syllabi determined differences in the extent of leadership content and experiences between stand-alone leadership courses and leadership-infused curricula. Of the 53 U.S. dental hygiene programs that offer degree completion programs, 49 met the inclusion criteria, and 19 programs provided course syllabi. Of the program directors and faculty members who teach a stand-alone leadership course or leadership-infused curriculum, 16 participated in the interview portion of the study. The results suggested that competencies related to leadership were not clearly defined or measurable in current teaching. Reported barriers to incorporating a stand-alone leadership course included overcrowded curricula, limited qualified faculty, and lack of resources. The findings of this study provide a synopsis of leadership content and gaps in leadership education for degree completion programs. Suggested changes included defining a need for leadership competencies and providing additional resources to educators such as courses provided by the American Dental Education Association and the American Dental Hygienists' Association.

  7. The current status of education and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs in Japan: a survey by the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Sumida, Iori; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yamada, Syogo

    2015-07-01

    To standardize educational programs and clinical training for medical physics students, the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification (JBMP) began to accredit master's, doctorate, and residency programs for medical physicists in 2012. At present, 16 universities accredited by the JBMP offer 22 courses. In this study, we aimed to survey the current status of educational programs and career paths of students after completion of the medical physicist program in Japan. A questionnaire was sent in August 2014 to 32 universities offering medical physicist programs. The questionnaire was created and organized by the educational course certification committee of the JBMP and comprised two sections: the first collected information about the university attended, and the second collected information about characteristics and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs from 2008 to 2014. Thirty universities (16 accredited and 14 non-accredited) completed the survey (response rate 94 %). A total of 209, 40, and 3 students graduated from the master's, doctorate, and residency programs, respectively. Undergraduates entered the medical physicist program constantly, indicating an interest in medical physics among undergraduates. A large percentage of the students held a bachelor's degree in radiological technology (master's program 94 %; doctorate program 70 %); graduates obtained a national radiological technologist license. Regarding career paths, although the number of the graduates who work as medical physicist remains low, 7 % with a master's degree and 50 % with a doctorate degree worked as medical physicists. Our results could be helpful for improving the medical physicist program in Japan.

  8. Research resource: dkCOIN, the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) consortium interconnectivity network: a pilot program to aggregate research resources generated by multiple research consortia.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Neil J; Howard, Christopher L; Aufiero, Michael; Easton-Marks, Jeremy; Steffen, David L; Becnel, Lauren B; Magnuson, Mark A; McIndoe, Richard A; Cartailler, Jean-Philippe

    2012-10-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) supports multiple basic science consortia that generate high-content datasets, reagent resources, and methodologies, in the fields of kidney, urology, hematology, digestive, and endocrine diseases, as well as metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. These currently include the Beta Cell Biology Consortium, the Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas, the Diabetic Complications Consortium, and the Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers. Recognizing the synergy that would accrue from aggregating information generated and curated by these initiatives in a contiguous informatics network, we created the NIDDK Consortium Interconnectivity Network (dkCOIN; www.dkcoin.org). The goal of this pilot project, organized by the NIDDK, was to establish a single point of access to a toolkit of interconnected resources (datasets, reagents, and protocols) generated from individual consortia that could be readily accessed by biologists of diverse backgrounds and research interests. During the pilot phase of this activity dkCOIN collected nearly 2000 consortium-curated resources, including datasets (functional genomics) and reagents (mouse strains, antibodies, and adenoviral constructs) and built nearly 3000 resource-to-resource connections, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of further extending this database in the future. Thus, dkCOIN promises to be a useful informatics solution for rapidly identifying useful resources generated by participating research consortia.

  9. Program To Operationalize a New Training Pattern for Training Evaluation Personnel in Education. Final Report. Part D - Report on Implementation of Decision-Oriented Evaluation Units in Consortium Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nealy, Bill; And Others

    This document is divided into three main parts. The first part includes the introduction, history, objectives and rational for the Model Training Project (MTP); part two deals with the individual consortium responses to the questionnaire developed for this report; and the final section contains the summary and conclusions derived from the previous…

  10. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  11. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  12. Improving safety of aircraft engines: a consortium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1996-11-01

    With over seven million departures per year, air transportation has become not a luxury, but a standard mode of transportation for the United States. A critical aspect of modern air transport is the jet engine, a complex engineered component that has enabled the rapid travel to which we have all become accustomed. One of the enabling technologies for safe air travel is nondestructive evaluation, or NDE, which includes various inspection techniques used to assess the health or integrity of a structure, component, or material. The Engine Titanium Consortium (ETC) was established in 1993 to respond to recommendations made by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Titanium Rotating Components Review Team (TRCRT) for improvements in inspection of engine titanium. Several recent accomplishments of the ETC are detailed in this paper. The objective of the Engine Titanium Consortium is to provide the FAAand the manufacturers with reliable and costeffective new methods and/or improvements in mature methods for detecting cracks, inclusions, and imperfections in titanium. The consortium consists of a team of researchers from academia and industry-namely, Iowa State University, Allied Signal Propulsion Engines, General Electric Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Engines-who work together to develop program priorities, organize a program plan, conduct the research, and implement the solutions. The true advantage of the consortium approach is that it brings together the research talents of academia and the engineering talents of industry to tackle a technology-base problem. In bringing industrial competitors together, the consortium ensures that the research results, which have safety implications and result from FAA funds, are shared and become part of the public domain.

  13. Dropout Prevention and Intervention Programs: Effects on School Completion and Dropout among School-Aged Children and Youth. Campbell Systematic Reviews. 2011:8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sandra Jo; Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Lipsey, Mark W.; Steinka-Fry, Katarzyna; Morrison, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this systematic review were to summarize the available evidence on the effects of prevention and intervention programs aimed at primary and secondary students for increasing school completion or reducing school dropout. The primary focus of the meta-analysis was to examine the comparative effectiveness of different programs and…

  14. An Investigation of the Factors Contributing to Successful Completion of Undergraduate Degrees by the Students Enrolled in the College Assistance Migrant Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escamilla, Anna; Trevino, Nicole Guerrero

    2014-01-01

    Students from farmworker families are often cited as having deficits that prohibit completion of undergraduate degree program. Statistics regarding graduates of the College Assistance Migrant Program in a southwestern university have shown graduation rates that are similar to the general population of graduates at that university. This qualitative…

  15. An Investigation of the Factors Contributing to Successful Completion of Undergraduate Degrees by the Students Enrolled in the College Assistance Migrant Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escamilla, Anna; Trevino, Nicole Guerrero

    2014-01-01

    Students from farmworker families are often cited as having deficits that prohibit completion of undergraduate degree program. Statistics regarding graduates of the College Assistance Migrant Program in a southwestern university have shown graduation rates that are similar to the general population of graduates at that university. This qualitative…

  16. A Post Secondary Prevocational Education Model: A Guide for Implementation. A Research Verified Training Program to Help the High-Risk Student Complete Post Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blattner, Bruce E.; And Others

    This guide comprises a summary of the development of and materials for use in the implementation of a research-verified model training program to help high-risk students complete postsecondary education programs. Discussed first is the original pilot project that was implemented to serve the high-risk postsecondary vocational students entering the…

  17. The international AGN watch: A multiwavelength monitoring consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alloin, D.; Clavel, J.; Peterson, B. M.; Reichert, G. A.; Stirpe, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    The International AGN Watch, an informal consortium of over 100 astronomers, was established to coordinate multiwavelength monitoring of a limited number of active galactic nuclei and thus obtain comprehensive continuum and emission-line variability data with unprecedented temporal and wavelength coverage. We summarize the principal scientific results from two completed space-based and ground-based campaigns on the Seyfert galaxies NGC 5548 and NGC 3783. We describe a project in progress and outline our future plans.

  18. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report draft, 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCUs/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise educational programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development and transfer to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. While the Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan is the cornerstone of its overall program efforts, the initial programmatic activities of the Consortium focused on environmental education at all levels with the objective of addressing the underrepresentation of minorities in the environmental professions. This 1996 Annual Report provides an update on the activities of the Consortium with a focus on environmental curriculum development for the Technical Qualifications Program (TQP) and Education for Sustainability.

  19. Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

    1994-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

  20. Improved completion rates and characterization of drug reactions with an intensive Chagas disease treatment program in rural Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Tornheim, Jeffrey A; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F; Gilman, Robert H; Castellon, Mario; Solano Mercado, Marco A; Sullca, Walter; Torrico, Faustino; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease treatment is limited by drug availability, adverse side effect profiles of available medications, and poor adherence. Adult Chagas disease patients initiating 60-days of benznidazole were randomized to weekly or twice-weekly evaluations of medication adherence and screening for adverse drug events (ADEs). Mid-week evaluations employed phone-based evaluations. Adherence was measured by self-report, pill counts with intentional over-distribution, and Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS). Prospective data were compared to historical controls treated with benznidazole at the same hospital. 162 prospective patients were compared to 172 historical patients. Pill counts correlated well with MEMS data (R = 0.498 for 7-day intervals, R = 0.872 for intervals >7 days). Treatment completion rates were higher among prospective than historical patients (82.1% vs. 65.1%), primarily due to lower abandonment rates. Rates of ADEs were lower among prospective than historical patients (56.8% vs. 66.9%). Twice-weekly evaluations increased identification of mild ADEs, prompting higher suspension rates than weekly evaluations. While twice-weekly evaluations identified ADEs earlier, they did not reduce incidence of moderate or severe ADEs. Many dermatologic ADEs were moderately severe upon presentation (35.6%), were not reduced by use of antihistamines, occurred among adult patients of all ages, and occurred throughout treatment, rather than the first few weeks alone. Intensive management improved completion and identified more ADEs, but did not reduce moderate or severe ADEs. Risk of dermatologic ADEs cannot be reduced by selecting younger adults or monitoring only during the first few weeks of treatment. Pill counts and phone-based encounters are reliable tools for treatment programming in rural Bolivia.

  1. Improved Completion Rates and Characterization of Drug Reactions with an Intensive Chagas Disease Treatment Program in Rural Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Tornheim, Jeffrey A.; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F.; Gilman, Robert H.; Castellon, Mario; Solano Mercado, Marco A.; Sullca, Walter; Torrico, Faustino; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease treatment is limited by drug availability, adverse side effect profiles of available medications, and poor adherence. Methods Adult Chagas disease patients initiating 60-days of benznidazole were randomized to weekly or twice-weekly evaluations of medication adherence and screening for adverse drug events (ADEs). Mid-week evaluations employed phone-based evaluations. Adherence was measured by self-report, pill counts with intentional over-distribution, and Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS). Prospective data were compared to historical controls treated with benznidazole at the same hospital. Results 162 prospective patients were compared to 172 historical patients. Pill counts correlated well with MEMS data (R = 0.498 for 7-day intervals, R = 0.872 for intervals >7 days). Treatment completion rates were higher among prospective than historical patients (82.1% vs. 65.1%), primarily due to lower abandonment rates. Rates of ADEs were lower among prospective than historical patients (56.8% vs. 66.9%). Twice-weekly evaluations increased identification of mild ADEs, prompting higher suspension rates than weekly evaluations. While twice-weekly evaluations identified ADEs earlier, they did not reduce incidence of moderate or severe ADEs. Many dermatologic ADEs were moderately severe upon presentation (35.6%), were not reduced by use of antihistamines, occurred among adult patients of all ages, and occurred throughout treatment, rather than the first few weeks alone. Conclusions Intensive management improved completion and identified more ADEs, but did not reduce moderate or severe ADEs. Risk of dermatologic ADEs cannot be reduced by selecting younger adults or monitoring only during the first few weeks of treatment. Pill counts and phone-based encounters are reliable tools for treatment programming in rural Bolivia. PMID:24069472

  2. CDEP Consortium on Ocean Data Assimilation for Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction (ODASI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rienecker, Michele; Zebiak, Stephen; Kinter, James; Behringer, David; Rosati, Antonio; Kaplan, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    The ODASI consortium is focused activity of the NOAA/OGP/Climate Diagnostics and Experimental Prediction Program with the goal of improving ocean data assimilation methods and their implementations in support of seasonal forecasts with coupled general circulation models. The consortium is undertaking coordinated assimilation experiments, with common forcing data sets and common input data streams. With different assimilation systems and different models, we aim to understand what approach works best in improving forecast skill in the equatorial Pacific. The presentation will provide an overview of the consortium goals and plans and recent results focused towards evaluating data impacts.

  3. CDEP Consortium on Ocean Data Assimilation for Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction (ODASI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rienecker, Michele; Zebiak, Stephen; Kinter, James; Behringer, David; Rosati, Antonio; Kaplan, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    The ODASI consortium is focused activity of the NOAA/OGP/Climate Diagnostics and Experimental Prediction Program with the goal of improving ocean data assimilation methods and their implementations in support of seasonal forecasts with coupled general circulation models. The consortium is undertaking coordinated assimilation experiments, with common forcing data sets and common input data streams. With different assimilation systems and different models, we aim to understand what approach works best in improving forecast skill in the equatorial Pacific. The presentation will provide an overview of the consortium goals and plans and recent results focused towards evaluating data impacts.

  4. Study Abroad: A Review of the Kentucky Institute for International Studies (KIIS) and Geographers' Role in the Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambrook, Richard Alan

    2008-01-01

    The Kentucky Institute for International Studies is a consortium of colleges and universities that provides semester length and short summer semester over-seas study programs. This article traces the growth of the consortium from its roots at Murray State University in 1975 through the celebration of its thirtieth anniversary in 2005. Aspects…

  5. Study Abroad: A Review of the Kentucky Institute for International Studies (KIIS) and Geographers' Role in the Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambrook, Richard Alan

    2008-01-01

    The Kentucky Institute for International Studies is a consortium of colleges and universities that provides semester length and short summer semester over-seas study programs. This article traces the growth of the consortium from its roots at Murray State University in 1975 through the celebration of its thirtieth anniversary in 2005. Aspects…

  6. 25 CFR 1000.32 - What happens when a Tribe wishes to withdraw from a Consortium annual funding agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... withdraw from a Consortium's AFA must notify the Consortium, bureau, and OSG of the intent to withdraw. The... body; and (2) Received no later than 180 days before the effective date of the next AFA. (b) The... withdrawn programs to be administered under a Title IV AFA, Title I contract, or directly by the bureau....

  7. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report for 1986. Volume 1. Executive Summary.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    University, Syracuse NY Additionally, Colgate University (Hamilton NY) was an original member institution, but withdrew from the Consortium owing to the...to the Consortium a complete report covering the research task or tasks undertaken during the past year. Summaries of their work are included in the...the task undertaken at Colgate University, "Planner System for the Application of Indications and Warning," (Principal Investigator: Sergei Nirenburg

  8. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  9. Developing the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education: the back story.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Barbara C; Spencer, Angela G

    2013-01-01

    The Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education (OCNE) is a collaborative partnership between community colleges and a multicampus university in Oregon that developed in response to an emerging nursing shortage and changing health needs in the population. OCNE has created a redesigned curriculum with shared agreements for academic standards, admission, and seamless transition from associate to baccalaureate programs. Although the schools share pedagogical resources, curriculum, and standards, each partner school retains autonomy and accountability for its degree program. The creation and continued development of the consortium required the participation of people from multiple organizations with diverse concerns. Through a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded evaluation of OCNE, this retrospective analysis was conducted to describe the process of consensus building that resulted in OCNE and to provide an explanatory framework for the benefit of others who are seeking to redesign nursing education in their communities.

  10. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  11. FLYSUB-Consortium Tracking and RICH Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aria; Azumoun, Bob; Blatnik, Marie; Pak, Robert; Purschke, Martin; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Woody, Craig; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Twigger, Jessie; Zhang, Aiwu; Dehmelt, Klaus; Deshpande, Abhay; Feege, Nils; Hemmick, Thomas; Bai, Xinzhang; Gnanvo, Kondo; Gu, Chao; Liyanage, Nilanga; Majka, Richard; Smirnov, Nikolai

    2013-09-23

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experiments of FLYSUB-Consortium who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The ultimate goal of this test-beam effort is to test and verify the performance of the individual components according to their expectation.

  12. A multilevel decomposition approach to estimate the role of program location and neighborhood disadvantage in racial disparities in alcohol treatment completion.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jerry Owen; Robinson, Paul; Bluthenthal, Ricky N

    2007-01-01

    Large racial disparities in completion rates from substance abuse treatment programs in urban settings remain largely unexplained, although evidence is accumulating that neighborhood conditions may influence individual substance abuse patterns and consequences. Understanding racial disparities in alcohol treatment completion, in particular, is crucial to resolving health disparities because racial/ethnic minorities bear a disproportionate burden of alcohol-related health consequences. Patient records for all non-homeless African American (N=1677), Hispanic (N=1635), and white (N=1216) alcohol outpatients, ages 18 or older, discharged during 1998-2000 from publicly funded treatment programs in Los Angeles County, the second largest system of publicly funded substance abuse treatment in the United States, were combined with census data. We tested the hypothesis that racial differences in treatment completion are related to differences in neighborhood context, particularly neighborhood-level disadvantage. Estimates from multilevel statistical models indicate that treatment neighborhood disadvantage is independently associated with treatment completion after controlling for patient characteristics and facility- and zip code-level random effects. Results of a Oaxaca decomposition of the regression estimates indicate that racial differences in treatment neighborhood disadvantage account for 32.3% of African American-white differences in treatment completion. Hispanic-white differences in completion, and the effect of home neighborhood disadvantage on completion, were non-significant. We conclude that the location of publicly funded alcohol treatment programs is related to racial disparities in treatment completion, but additional research is necessary to understand the mechanism behind this association.

  13. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B; Maunsell, John HR; Sagvolden, Terje

    2009-01-01

    The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC) was conceived in the summer of 2007 at a meeting of editors and publishers of neuroscience journals. One of the working groups addressed whether it was possible to construct a system for permitting authors whose manuscript received supportive reviews at one journal but was not accepted to send a revised manuscript together with its first round of reviews to a new journal for the second round. This would speed up the review process and reduce the work for reviewers and editors. The working group not only designed a framework for transferring reviews among journals, but also implemented it as the NPRC. By the fall of 2007, more than a dozen major journals had signed onto the NPRC, sufficient to launch the experiment in January, 2008. We invite authors who have not yet used the NPRC to try this method for appropriate manuscripts. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium. PMID:19149887

  14. Long-term effectiveness of the community-based Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) lifestyle intervention: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kent, Lillian; Morton, Darren; Hurlow, Trevor; Rankin, Paul; Hanna, Althea; Diehl, Hans

    2013-11-20

    To examine the long-term (three or more years) effectiveness of the volunteer-delivered Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) intervention. Cohort study. Hawera, New Zealand. Of the total cohort of 284 individuals who self-selected to complete the CHIP lifestyle intervention between 2007 and 2009, 106 (37% of the original cohort, mean age=64.9±7.4 years, range 42-87 years; 35% males, 65% female) returned in 2012 for a complimentary follow-up health assessment (mean follow-up duration=49.2+10.4 months). 30-day lifestyle modification programme (diet, physical activity, substance use and stress management) delivered by volunteers in a community setting. Changes in body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglycerides (TG). After approximately 4 years, participants with elevated biometrics at programme entry maintained significantly lowered BMI (-3.2%; 34.8±5.4 vs 33.7±5.3 kg/m(2), p=0.02), DBP (-9.4%; 89.1±4.1 vs 80.8±12.6 mm Hg, p=0.005), TC (-5.5%; 6.1±0.7 vs 5.8±1.0 mmol/L, p=0.04) and TG (-27.5%; 2.4±0.8 vs 1.7±0.7 mmol/L, p=0.002). SBP, HDL, LDL and FPG were not significantly different from baseline. Participants with elevated baseline biometrics who reported being compliant to the lifestyle principles promoted in the intervention (N=71, 67% of follow-up participants) recorded further reductions in BMI (-4.2%; 34.8±4.5 vs 33.4±4.8 kg/m(2), p=0.02), DBP (-13.3%; 88.3±3.2 vs 77.1±12.1 mm Hg, p=0.005) and FPG (-10.4%; 7.0±1.5 vs 6.3±1.3 mmol/L, p=0.02). Individuals who returned for follow-up assessment and entered the CHIP lifestyle intervention with elevated risk factors were able to maintain improvements in most biometrics for more than 3 years. The results suggest that the community-based CHIP lifestyle intervention can be effective in the longer term, even when delivered by

  15. Student Non-Completion of an Undergraduate Degree: Wrong Program Selection or Part of a Career Plan?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, M.; Laven, G.; Burgess, T.

    2011-01-01

    Institution wide comparisons of students who leave university before completing their degree and students who complete their studies, have identified "wrong course selection" and a lack of vocational focus as common reasons for non-completion. It is not fully understood, though, whether these trends are constant across different…

  16. The planet search program at the ESO Coudé Echelle spectrometer. III. The complete Long Camera survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, M.; Kürster, M.; Els, S.; Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.; Dennerl, K.; Döbereiner, S.

    2002-09-01

    We present the complete results of the planet search program carried out at the ESO Coudé Echelle Spectrometer (CES) on La Silla, using the Long Camera from Nov. 1992 to April 1998. The CES survey has monitored 37 late-type (F8V - M5V) stars in the southern hemisphere for variations in their differential radial velocities (RV) in order to detect Doppler reflex motions caused by planetary companions. This led to the discovery of the first extrasolar planet in an Earth-like orbit around the young (ZAMS) and active G0V star iota Horologii (Kürster et al. \\cite{martin00}). Here we present the RV results for all survey stars and perform a statistical examination of the whole data-set. Each star is tested for RV variability, RV trends (linear and non-linear) and significant periodic signals. beta Hyi and epsilon Ind are identified as long-term, low-amplitude RV variables. Furthermore, for 30 CES survey stars we determine quantitative upper mass-limits for giant planets based on our long-term RV results. We find that the CES Long Camera survey would have detected short-period (``51 Peg-type'') planets around all 30 stars but no planets with msin i < 1 {M}_Jup at orbital separations larger than 2 AU. Finally, we demonstrate that the CES planet search can be continued without applying velocity corrections to the RV results coming from the currently installed Very Long Camera at the CES. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla. Appendices A and B are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  17. The Salix Consortium in New York

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, T.; Jones, J.

    1998-09-28

    Energy crops for electrical production are being given a boost by the Salix Consortium, an association of 20 corporations and industrial, government, farming, and research organizations. The consortium supports commercial development of willows for generating electricity, which are being grown for utilities across the Northeast region of the U.S. for use in cofiring with coal in existing power plants.

  18. Detroit MEDLINE Consortium; An Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSchryver, Victor; And Others

    The Detroit MEDLINE Consortium is an experimental pilot project which is intended to extend use of the on line retrieval system to the hospital environment. The consortium was initiated to increase the capacity for bibliographic information retrieval supportive of the delivery of patient care in the hospital environment. Secondarily, it addresses…

  19. Increasing Sales by Developing Production Consortiums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher A.; Russo, Robert

    Intended to help rehabilitation facility administrators increase organizational income from manufacturing and/or contracted service sources, this document provides a decision-making model for the development of a production consortium. The document consists of five chapters and two appendices. Chapter 1 defines the consortium concept, explains…

  20. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Consortium. 37.1255 Section 37.1255 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group...