Science.gov

Sample records for constant stressing rate

  1. High-Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Carbide Determined by Constant-Stress-Rate and Constant-Stress Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung H.; Salem, J. A.; Nemeth, N. N.

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature slow-crack-growth behaviour of hot-pressed silicon carbide was determined using both constant-stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and constant-stress ("static fatigue") testing in flexure at 1300 C in air. Slow crack growth was found to be a governing mechanism associated with failure of the material. Four estimation methods such as the individual data, the Weibull median, the arithmetic mean and the median deviation methods were used to determine the slow crack growth parameters. The four estimation methods were in good agreement for the constant-stress-rate testing with a small variation in the slow-crack-growth parameter, n, ranging from 28 to 36. By contrast, the variation in n between the four estimation methods was significant in the constant-stress testing with a somewhat wide range of n= 16 to 32.

  2. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  3. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    SciTech Connect

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Estimation and Simulation of Slow Crack Growth Parameters from Constant Stress Rate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Weaver, Aaron S.

    2003-01-01

    Closed form, approximate functions for estimating the variances and degrees-of-freedom associated with the slow crack growth parameters n, D, B, and A(sup *) as measured using constant stress rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing were derived by using propagation of errors. Estimates made with the resulting functions and slow crack growth data for a sapphire window were compared to the results of Monte Carlo simulations. The functions for estimation of the variances of the parameters were derived both with and without logarithmic transformation of the initial slow crack growth equations. The transformation was performed to make the functions both more linear and more normal. Comparison of the Monte Carlo results and the closed form expressions derived with propagation of errors indicated that linearization is not required for good estimates of the variances of parameters n and D by the propagation of errors method. However, good estimates variances of the parameters B and A(sup *) could only be made when the starting slow crack growth equation was transformed and the coefficients of variation of the input parameters were not too large. This was partially a result of the skewered distributions of B and A(sup *). Parametric variation of the input parameters was used to determine an acceptable range for using closed form approximate equations derived from propagation of errors.

  6. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Brittle Materials with Finite Thickness Subjected to Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chio, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional, numerical analysis of slow crack growth (SCG) was performed for brittle materials with finite thickness subjected to constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") loading in flexure. The numerical solution showed that the conventional, simple, one-dimensional analytical solution can be used with a maximum error of about 5% in determining the SCG parameters of a brittle material with the conditions of a normalized thickness (a ratio of specimen thickness to initial crack size) T > 3.3 and of a SCG parameter n > 10. The change in crack shape from semicircular to elliptical configurations was significant particularly at both low stress rate and low T, attributed to predominant difference in stress intensity factor along the crack front. The numerical solution of SCG parameters was supported within the experimental range by the data obtained from constant stress-rate flexural testing for soda-lime glass microslides at ambient temperature.

  7. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 2; Constant Stress Rate Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress rate and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation of strength versus the log of the stress rate was very reasonable for most of the materials. Also, the preloading technique was determined equally applicable to the case of slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n greater than 30 for both the power-law and exponential formulations. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  8. Analysis of the tensile stress-strain behavior of elastomers at constant strain rates. I - Criteria for separability of the time and strain effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. D.; Fedors, R. F.; Schwarzl, F.; Moacanin, J.; Landel, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the tensile stress-strain relation of elastomers at constant strain rate is presented which shows that the time and the stress effect are separable if the experimental time scale coincides with a segment of the relaxation modulus that can be described by a single power law. It is also shown that time-strain separability is valid if the strain function is linearly proportional to the Cauchy strain, and that when time-strain separability holds, two strain-dependent quantities can be obtained experimentally. In the case where time and strain effect are not separable, superposition can be achieved only by using temperature and strain-dependent shift factors.

  9. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald E; Tadmor, Ellad B; Gibson, Joshua S; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-14

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  10. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  11. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    SciTech Connect

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by {sup ··}φ/H φ-dot remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  12. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by ̈phi/H dot phi remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  13. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089-6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 {sup 125}I and 6 {sup 103}Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 0.05 cm{sup 3} voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the {sup 125}I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in {sup 125}I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The {sup 103}Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when

  14. Textbook Deficiencies: Ambiguities in Chemical Kinetics Rates and Rate Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quisenberry, Keith T.; Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-03-01

    Balanced chemical reactions often have at least some stoichiometry coefficients that are not unity. To avoid ambiguity in defining the kinetics rate for a reaction, the IUPAC has established the convention, rate = (1/ν i )/(d[A i ]/d t ) relating the reaction rate to the rate of change of concentration of any reactant or product A i and its stoichiometry number ν i (negative for reactants, positive for products). The rate is a product of the rate constant k and some function of the concentrations of reactants and products that must be determined experimentally. While most general chemistry textbooks correctly state this convention, most also proceed to ignore it in subsequent development, particularly in the use of integrated rate laws and the definition of the reaction half-life. We recommend that in future editions, authors make it clear that (i) the reaction rate and rate constant cannot be defined unambiguously without explicitly stating the reaction for which they apply and therefore (ii) the relation between the half-life, which is a physical property of the reaction system, and the rate constant depends upon how the reaction is written. The errors have arisen in part because most texts simply state the integrated rate expressions for first- and second-order reactions without deriving them. It is both appropriate and easy to include such derivations in texts oriented toward students intending careers in science, engineering, and medicine.

  15. The load dependence of rate constants.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam

    2008-06-07

    As experimental techniques in biophysics have progressed at the single molecule level, there has been considerable interest in understanding how external mechanical influences (such as load) affect chemical reactions. The majority of biophysical studies investigating load-dependent kinetics use an equation where the rate constant exponentially depends on force, which is sometimes called Bell's equation. This equation requires the determination of two parameters that describe the potential energy-strain function: k(0), which is the reaction rate in the absence of load, and x(c), which is the difference in strain between the reactant and transition states. However, there have been theoretical studies based on Kramers' theory suggesting that the rate constant should have load-dependent pre-exponential terms and nonlinear load-dependent terms in the exponential. Kramers' theory requires an exact knowledge of the potential energy-strain function, which is in general not known for an experimental system. Here, we derive a general approximation of Kramers' theory where the potential energy-strain function is described by five parameters, which can, for small loads, be reduced to four-, three-, and finally to two parameters (Bell's equation). We then use an idealized physical system to validate our approximations to Kramers' theory and show how they can predict parameters of interest (such as k(0) and x(c)) better than Bell's equation. Finally, we show previously published experimental data that are not well fitted by Bell's equation but are adequately fitted by these more exact equations.

  16. When Rate Constants Are Not Enough.

    PubMed

    Barker, John R; Frenklach, Michael; Golden, David M

    2015-07-16

    Real-world chemical systems consisting of multiple isomers and multiple reaction channels often react significantly prior to attaining a steady state energy distribution (SED). Detailed elementary reaction models, which implicitly require SED conditions, may be invalid when non-steady-state energy distributions (NSED) exist. NSED conditions may result in reaction rates and product yields that are different from those expected for SED conditions, although this problem is to some extent reduced by using phenomenological models and rate constants. The present study defines pragmatic diagnostics useful for identifying NSED conditions in stochastic master equation simulations. A representative example is presented for each of four classes of common combustion species: RO2 radicals, aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl radicals, and polyaromatic radicals. An example selected from the seminal work of Tsang et al. demonstrates that stochastic simulations and eigenvalue methods for solving the master equation predict the same NSED effects. NSED effects are common under relatively moderate combustion conditions, and accurate simulations may require a master equation analysis.

  17. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis A.; Dickey, Fred M.

    1999-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  18. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.A.; Dickey, F.M.

    1999-09-21

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  19. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  20. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  1. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  2. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  3. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  4. Calculation of kinetic rate constants from thermodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John

    1995-01-01

    A new scheme for relating the absolute value for the kinetic rate constant k to the thermodynamic constant Kp is developed for gases. In this report the forward and reverse rate constants are individually related to the thermodynamic data. The kinetic rate constants computed from thermodynamics compare well with the current kinetic rate constants. This method is self consistent and does not have extensive rules. It is first demonstrated and calibrated by computing the HBr reaction from H2 and Br2. This method then is used on other reactions.

  5. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  6. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  7. Stress drop with constant, scale independent seismic efficiency and overshoot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    To model dissipated and radiated energy during earthquake stress drop, I calculate dynamic fault slip using a single degree of freedom spring-slider block and a laboratory-based static/kinetic fault strength relation with a dynamic stress drop proportional to effective normal stress. The model is scaled to earthquake size assuming a circular rupture; stiffness varies inversely with rupture radius, and rupture duration is proportional to radius. Calculated seismic efficiency, the ratio of radiated to total energy expended during stress drop, is in good agreement with laboratory and field observations. Predicted overshoot, a measure of how much the static stress drop exceeds the dynamic stress drop, is higher than previously published laboratory and seismic observations and fully elasto-dynamic calculations. Seismic efficiency and overshoot are constant, independent of normal stress and scale. Calculated variation of apparent stress with seismic moment resembles the observational constraints of McGarr [1999].

  8. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  9. Rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the interest in the chemistry of germane in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and because previously reported kinetic reaction rate studies at 298 K gave results differing by a factor of 200, laboratory measurements were performed to determine the reaction rate constant for H + GeH4. Results of the study at 298 K, obtained via the direct technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, yield the reaction rate constant, k = (4.08 + or - 0.22) x 10(exp -12) cu cm/s.

  10. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ã-ström, Jonatan; Bezrukov, Dmitry S.; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C+) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 11Π → X1Σ+ and rovibrational transitions on the X1Σ+ and a3Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit-Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius-Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10-250 K, the rate constant is about 10-21 cm3 s-1, rising toward 10-16 cm3 s-1 for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  11. Dependence of rate constants on vibrational temperatures - An Arrhenius description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, D. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation of the variation of rate constants with vibrational temperature is proposed which introduces parameters analogous to those of the classical Arrhenius expression. The constancy of vibrational activation energy is studied for the dissociaton of NO, the ion-molecular reaction of O(+) with N2, and the atom exchange reaction of I with H2. It is found that when a Boltzmann distribution for vibrational states is applicable, the variation of the rate constant with the vibrational temperature can be used to define a vibrational activation energy. The method has application to exchange reactions where a vibrational energy threshold exists.

  12. Flame Chemiluminescence Rate Constants for Quantitative Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luque, Jorge; Smith, Gregory P.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Crosley, David R.; Weiland, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Absolute excited state concentrations of OH(A), CH(A), and C2(d) were determined in three low pressure premixed methane-air flames. Two dimensional images of chemiluminescence from these states were recorded by a filtered CCD camera, processed by Abel inversion, and calibrated against Rayleigh scattering, Using a previously validated 1-D flame model with known chemistry and excited state quenching rate constants, rate constants are extracted for the reactions CH + O2 (goes to) OH(A) + CO and C2H + O (goes to) CH(A) + CO at flame temperatures. Variations of flame emission intensities with stoichiometry agree well with model predictions.

  13. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part I: theory.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, K; Verstraeten, M; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a general theoretical assessment of the potential kinetic advantages of running LC gradient elution separations in the constant-pressure mode instead of in the customarily used constant-flow rate mode. Analytical calculations as well as numerical simulation results are presented. It is shown that, provided both modes are run with the same volume-based gradient program, the constant-pressure mode can potentially offer an identical separation selectivity (except from some small differences induced by the difference in pressure and viscous heating trajectory), but in a significantly shorter time. For a gradient running between 5 and 95% of organic modifier, the decrease in analysis time can be expected to be of the order of some 20% for both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile gradients, and only weakly depending on the value of V(G)/V₀ (or equivalently t(G)/t₀). Obviously, the gain will be smaller when the start and end composition lie closer to the viscosity maximum of the considered water-organic modifier system. The assumptions underlying the obtained results (no effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity or retention coefficient) are critically reviewed, and can be inferred to only have a small effect on the general conclusions. It is also shown that, under the adopted assumptions, the kinetic plot theory also holds for operations where the flow rate varies with the time, as is the case for constant-pressure operation. Comparing both operation modes in a kinetic plot representing the maximal peak capacity versus time, it is theoretically predicted here that both modes can be expected to perform equally well in the fully C-term dominated regime (where H varies linearly with the flow rate), while the constant pressure mode is advantageous for all lower flow rates. Near the optimal flow rate, and for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% organic modifier, time gains of the order of some 20% can be expected (or 25-30% when accounting for

  14. Theoretical Evaluation of the Transient Response of Constant Head and Constant Flow-Rate Permeability Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, M.; Takahashi, M.; Morin, R.H.; Esaki, T.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented that compares the response characteristics of the constant head and the constant flowrate (flow pump) laboratory techniques for quantifying the hydraulic properties of geologic materials having permeabilities less than 10-10 m/s. Rigorous analytical solutions that describe the transient distributions of hydraulic gradient within a specimen are developed, and equations are derived for each method. Expressions simulating the inflow and outflow rates across the specimen boundaries during a constant-head permeability test are also presented. These solutions illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each method, including insights into measurement accuracy and the validity of using Darcy's law under certain conditions. The resulting observations offer practical considerations in the selection of an appropriate laboratory test method for the reliable measurement of permeability in low-permeability geologic materials.

  15. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources.

  16. Oxygen uptake in maximal effort constant rate and interval running.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Daniel; O'Brien, Brendan J; Clark, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in average VO2 of maximal effort interval running to maximal effort constant rate running at lactate threshold matched for time. The average VO2 and distance covered of 10 recreational male runners (VO2max: 4158 ± 390 mL · min(-1)) were compared between a maximal effort constant-rate run at lactate threshold (CRLT), a maximal effort interval run (INT) consisting of 2 min at VO2max speed with 2 minutes at 50% of VO2 repeated 5 times, and a run at the average speed sustained during the interval run (CR submax). Data are presented as mean and 95% confidence intervals. The average VO2 for INT, 3451 (3269-3633) mL · min(-1), 83% VO2max, was not significantly different to CRLT, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 84% VO2max, but both were significantly higher than CR sub-max, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 76% VO2max. The distance covered was significantly greater in CLRT, 4431 (4202-3731) metres, compared to INT and CR sub-max, 4070 (3831-4309) metres. The novel finding was that a 20-minute maximal effort constant rate run uses similar amounts of oxygen as a 20-minute maximal effort interval run despite the greater distance covered in the maximal effort constant-rate run.

  17. Computer Calculation of First-Order Rate Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert C.; Taylor, James W.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the computer program used to calculate first-order rate constants. Discussion includes data preparation, weighting options, comparison techniques, infinity point adjustment, least-square fit, Guggenheim calculation, and printed outputs. Exemplifies the utility of the computer program by two experiments: (1) the thermal decomposition of…

  18. Semiclassical Calculation of Reaction Rate Constants for Homolytical Dissociations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2002-01-01

    There is growing interest in extending organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) to III-V materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition at their optimum growth temperature, such as indium nitride. The group III nitrides are candidate materials for light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. To overcome decomposition of the deposited compound, the reaction must be conducted at high pressures, which causes problems of uniformity. Microgravity may provide the venue for maintaining conditions of laminar flow under high pressure. Since the selection of optimized parameters becomes crucial when performing experiments in microgravity, efforts are presently geared to the development of computational OMCVD models that will couple the reactor fluid dynamics with its chemical kinetics. In the present study, we developed a method to calculate reaction rate constants for the homolytic dissociation of III-V compounds for modeling OMCVD. The method is validated by comparing calculations with experimental reaction rate constants.

  19. Flotation kinetics: Methods for estimating distribution of rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Polat, M.

    1995-12-31

    Many models have been suggested in the past to obtain a satisfactory fit to flotation data. Of these, first-order kinetics models with a distribution of flotation rate constants are most common. A serious limitation of these models is that type of the distribution must be pre-supposed. Methods to overcome this limitation are discussed and a procedure is suggested for estimating the actual distribution of flotation rate constants. It is demonstrated that the classical first-order model fits the data well when applied to coal flotation in narrow size-specific gravity intervals. When applied to material which is fractionated on the basis of size alone, the use of three parameter models, which were modified from their two parameter analogs such as rectangular, sinusoidal, and triangular, gave most reliable results.

  20. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF(.).

    PubMed

    Öström, Jonatan; Bezrukov, Dmitry S; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C(+)) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1(1)Π → X(1)Σ(+) and rovibrational transitions on the X(1)Σ(+) and a(3)Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit-Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius-Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10-250 K, the rate constant is about 10(-21) cm(3) s(-1), rising toward 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1) for a temperature of 30,000 K.

  1. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Öström, Jonatan Gustafsson, Magnus; Bezrukov, Dmitry S.; Nyman, Gunnar

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  2. Comparison of TID Effects in Space-Like Variable Dose Rates and Constant Dose Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Richard D.; McClure, Steven S.; Rax, Bernard G.; Evans, Robin W.; Jun, Insoo

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of the LM193 dual voltage comparator has been studied at different TID dose rate profiles, including several different constant dose rates and a variable dose rate that simulates the behavior of a solar flare. A comparison of results following constant dose rate vs. variable dose rates is made to explore how well the constant dose rates used for typical part testing predict the performance during a simulated space-like mission. Testing at a constant dose rate equal to the lowest dose rate seen during the simulated flare provides an extremely conservative estimate of the overall amount of degradation. A constant dose rate equal to the average dose rate is also more conservative than the variable rate. It appears that, for this part, weighting the dose rates by the amount of total dose received at each rate (rather than the amount of time at each dose rate) results in an average rate that produces an amount of degradation that is a reasonable approximation to that received by the variable rate.

  3. Tensile stress acoustic constants of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, the stress acoustic constants (SACs) of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites were measured to determine the nonlinear moduli of this material. These measurements were made under compressive loading in order to obtain the sufficient number of values needed to calculate these moduli. However, because their strength in tension along fiber directions can be several times greater, most composites are used under tensile loading. Thus, it is important to characterize the nonlinear properties of these materials in tension as well. The SACs which are defined as the slope of the normalized change in ultrasonic 'natural' velocity as a function of stress were measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. Tensile load was applied along the fiber axis with the ultrasonic waves propagating perpendicular to the fiber direction. Changes in velocity were measured using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer with the nominal frequency of the ultrasonic waves being 2.25 MHz.

  4. Tensile Stress Acoustic Constants of Unidirectional Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, the stress acoustic constants (SAC's) of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites were measured to determine the nonlinear moduli of this material. These measurements were made under compressive loading in order to obtain the sufficient number of values needed to calculate these moduli. However, because their strength in tension along fiber directions can be several times greater, most composites are used under tensile loading. Thus, it is important to characterize the nonlinear properties of these materials in tension as well. The SAC's which are defined as the slope of the normalized change in ultrasonic "natural" velocity as a function of stress were measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. Tensile load was applied along the fiber axis with the ultrasonic waves propagating perpendicular to the fiber direction. Changes in velocity were measured using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer with the nominal frequency of the ultrasonic waves being 2.25 MHz.

  5. Constant stress of XD trademark TiAl containing nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, E.; Martin, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    Ti-47at%Al+7vol%(TiN+TiB{sub 2}) alloys, produced by the Martin Marietta XD{trademark} process, were subjected to tensile constant stress creep deformation in the range 760--850{degree}C temperature and 138--276 MPa (20--40 ksi) stress. These alloys have a matrix of TiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al initially containing 1 to 10 {mu}m diameter equiaxed particles of TiB{sub 2} and Ti{sub 2}AlN. Microstructures were examined using optical, SEM and TEM methods in an attempt to correlate the substructures with the property data. In particular, fine coherent particles have been observed to decorate dislocations and the interior of TiAl grains. The presence of these particles is thought to explain the creep resistance of this alloy. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Divided Saddle Theory: A New Idea for Rate Constant Calculation.

    PubMed

    Daru, János; Stirling, András

    2014-03-11

    We present a theory of rare events and derive an algorithm to obtain rates from postprocessing the numerical data of a free energy calculation and the corresponding committor analysis. The formalism is based on the division of the saddle region of the free energy profile of the rare event into two adjacent segments called saddle domains. The method is built on sampling the dynamics within these regions: auxiliary rate constants are defined for the saddle domains and the absolute forward and backward rates are obtained by proper reweighting. We call our approach divided saddle theory (DST). An important advantage of our approach is that it requires only standard computational techniques which are available in most molecular dynamics codes. We demonstrate the potential of DST numerically on two examples: rearrangement of alanine-dipeptide (CH3CO-Ala-NHCH3) conformers and the intramolecular Cope reaction of the fluxional barbaralane molecule.

  7. Stresses and elastic constants of crystalline sodium, from molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schiferl, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    The stresses and the elastic constants of bcc sodium are calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) for temperatures to T = 340K. The total adiabatic potential of a system of sodium atoms is represented by pseudopotential model. The resulting expression has two terms: a large, strictly volume-dependent potential, plus a sum over ion pairs of a small, volume-dependent two-body potential. The stresses and the elastic constants are given as strain derivatives of the Helmholtz free energy. The resulting expressions involve canonical ensemble averages (and fluctuation averages) of the position and volume derivatives of the potential. An ensemble correction relates the results to MD equilibrium averages. Evaluation of the potential and its derivatives requires the calculation of integrals with infinite upper limits of integration, and integrand singularities. Methods for calculating these integrals and estimating the effects of integration errors are developed. A method is given for choosing initial conditions that relax quickly to a desired equilibrium state. Statistical methods developed earlier for MD data are extended to evaluate uncertainties in fluctuation averages, and to test for symmetry. 45 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Phototransformation rate constants of PAHs associated with soot particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyun; Young, Thomas M; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-01-15

    Photodegradation is a key process governing the residence time and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particles, both in the atmosphere and after deposition. We have measured photodegradation rate constants of PAHs in bulk deposits of soot particles illuminated with simulated sunlight. The photodegradation rate constants at the surface (k(p)(0)), the effective diffusion coefficients (D(eff)), and the light penetration depths (z(0.5)) for PAHs on soot layers of variable thickness were determined by fitting experimental data with a model of coupled photolysis and diffusion. The overall disappearance rates of irradiated low molecular weight PAHs (with 2-3 rings) on soot particles were influenced by fast photodegradation and fast diffusion kinetics, while those of high molecular weight PAHs (with 4 or more rings) were apparently controlled by either the combination of slow photodegradation and slow diffusion kinetics or by very slow diffusion kinetics alone. The value of z(0.5) is more sensitive to the soot layer thickness than the k(p)(0) value. As the thickness of the soot layer increases, the z(0.5) values increase, but the k(p)(0) values are almost constant. The effective diffusion coefficients calculated from dark experiments are generally higher than those from the model fitting method for illumination experiments. Due to the correlation between k(p)(0) and z(0.5) in thinner layers, D(eff) should be estimated by an independent method for better accuracy. Despite some limitations of the model used in this study, the fitted parameters were useful for describing empirical results of photodegradation of soot-associated PAHs.

  9. Determination of acidity constants of curcumin in aqueous solution and apparent rate constant of its decomposition.

    PubMed

    Bernabé-Pineda, Margarita; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Romero-Romo, Mario; González-Vergara, Enrique; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto

    2004-04-01

    The stability of curcumin (H3Cur) in aqueous media is improved when the systems in which it is present are at high pH values (higher than 11.7), fitting a model describable by a pseudo-zero order with a rate constant k' for the disappearance of the Cur3- species of 1.39 (10(-9)) Mmin(-1). There were three acidity constants measured for the curcumin as follows: pKA3 = 10.51 +/- 0.01 corresponding to the equilibrium HCur2- = Cur3- + H+, a pKA2 = 9.88 +/- 0.02 corresponding to the equilibrium H2Cur- = HCur-(2) + H+. These pKA values were attributed to the hydrogen of the phenol part of the curcumin, while the pKA1 = 8.38 +/- 0.04 corresponds to the equilibrium H3Cur = H2Cur- + H+ and is attributed the acetylacetone type group. Formation of quinoid structures play an important role in the tautomeric forms of the curcumin in aqueous media, which makes the experimental values differ from the theoretically calculated ones, depending on the conditions adopted in the study.

  10. Rate constants from instanton theory via a microcanonical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Sean R.; Löhle, Andreas; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    Microcanonical instanton theory offers the promise of providing rate constants for chemical reactions including quantum tunneling of atoms over the whole temperature range. We discuss different rate expressions, which require the calculation of stability parameters of the instantons. The traditional way of obtaining these stability parameters is shown to be numerically unstable in practical applications. We provide three alternative algorithms to obtain such stability parameters for non-separable systems, i.e., systems in which the vibrational modes perpendicular to the instanton path couple to movement along the path. We show the applicability of our algorithms on two molecular systems: H2 + OH → H2O + H using a fitted potential energy surface and HNCO + H → NH2CO using a potential obtained on-the-fly from density functional calculations.

  11. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Jackson, Craig M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this review is to draw attention to potential pitfalls in attempts to glean mechanistic information from the magnitudes of standard enthalpies and entropies derived from the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants for protein interactions. Problems arise because the minimalist model that suffices to describe the energy differences between initial and final states usually comprises a set of linked equilibria, each of which is characterized by its own energetics. For example, because the overall standard enthalpy is a composite of those individual values, a positive magnitude for DeltaH(o) can still arise despite all reactions within the subset being characterized by negative enthalpy changes: designation of the reaction as being entropy driven is thus equivocal. An experimenter must always bear in mind the fact that any mechanistic interpretation of the magnitudes of thermodynamic parameters refers to the reaction model rather than the experimental system. For the same reason there is little point in subjecting the temperature dependence of rate constants for protein interactions to transition-state analysis. If comparisons with reported values of standard enthalpy and entropy of activation are needed, they are readily calculated from the empirical Arrhenius parameters.

  12. Oxidation kinetics of zinc sulfide: determination of intrinsic rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, G.M.

    1983-06-01

    An initial reaction rate study was done with the help of a thermogravimetric technique. Energy dispersive x-ray analyses on partially oxidized zinc sulfide pellets with a sintered porosity of 72.4% indicated flat sulfur intensity profiles within pellets reacted below 560/sup 0/C, which suggested a homogeneous reaction mechanism. Therefore, reaction temperatures below 600/sup 0/C were chosen for the reaction rate studies. Initial reaction rate studies on 72.4, 58.2, and 34.0% porous, cylindrical zinc sulfide pellets and the corresponding Arrhenius plot suggested chemical control in the temperature range from 480 to 565/sup 0/C. The corresponding intrinsic rate constant is correlated as k = 3.45 x 10/sup 17/ exp (- 86051/RT) cm/s. The variation in sulfur intensity within sintered pellets having a porosity of 72.4% that were reacted at temperatures above 560/sup 0/C indicated that the pore diffusion resistance gradually became comparable to the chemical reaction resistance leading to a mixed control mechanism above 570/sup 0/C. The critical temperature at which this shift occurred, increased with pellet porosity.

  13. Analysis of constant false alarm rate sidelobe canceller criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, I. S.; Brennan, L. E.

    1985-05-01

    In this final report, the constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection criterion for a sidelobe canceller (SLC) system, introduced in the last quarterly progress report, is found completely and analyzed. This new detection test for radar exhibits the desirable CFAR property that its probability of a false alarm (PFA) is functionally independent of the covariance of the actual noise field encountered. As a consequence, such a CFAR SLC system is ideally suited to cope with the newly evolving smart jammer threat to radar. An important objective, set in the last quarterly progress report, was to find both the false alarm and signal detection probabilities of this test. The first and most important of these two goals has been met. The probability of a false alarm (or PFA) of this CFAR SLC detection criterion is derived in closed form in this report. The success in finding the PFA is due primarily to the use of a generalization of Cochran's theorem.

  14. Rate Constant for the OH + CO Reaction at Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingdi; Sander, Stanley P

    2015-10-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of OH + CO → products (1) have been measured using laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) over the temperature range 193–296 K and at pressures of 50–700 Torr of Ar and N2. The reaction was studied under pseudo-first-order conditions, monitoring the decay of OH in the presence of a large excess of CO. The rate constants can be expressed as a combination of bimolecular and termolecular components. The bimolecular component was found to be temperature-independent with an expression given by kbi(T) = (1.54 ± 0.14) × 10(–13)[e(–(13±17)/T)] cm(3) molecule(–1) s(–1), with an error of one standard deviation. The termolecular component was fitted to the expression, kter = k0(T)[M]/[1 + (k0(T)[M]/k∞(T)] × 0.6({1+[log10(k0(T)[M]/k∞(T))]2}−1) where k0(T) = k0(300)(T/300)(−n) and k∞(T) = k∞(300)(T/300)(−m). The parameters for k0(T) were determined to be k0(300) = (6.0±0.5) × 10(−33) cm(6) molecule(–2) s(–1) in N2 and k0(300) = (3.4 ± 0.3) × 10(–33) cm(6) molecule(–2) s(–1) in Ar, with n = 1.9±0.5 and 2.0±0.4 in N2 and Ar, respectively. These parameters were determined using k0(T) and m from the NASA kinetics data evaluation (JPL Publication No. 10-6) since the experimental pressure range was far from the high-pressure limit. Addition of low concentrations of O2 had no discernible effect on the mechanism of the OH + CO reaction but resulted in secondary reactions which regenerated OH.

  15. Measurement of both the equilibrium constant and rate constant for electronic energy transfer by control of the limiting kinetic regimes.

    PubMed

    Vagnini, Michael T; Rutledge, W Caleb; Wagenknecht, Paul S

    2010-02-01

    Electronic energy transfer can fall into two limiting cases. When the rate of the energy transfer back reaction is much faster than relaxation of the acceptor excited state, equilibrium between the donor and acceptor excited states is achieved and only the equilibrium constant for the energy transfer can be measured. When the rate of the back reaction is much slower than relaxation of the acceptor, the energy transfer is irreversible and only the forward rate constant can be measured. Herein, we demonstrate that with trans-[Cr(d(4)-cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the donor and either trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) or trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the acceptor, both limits can be obtained by control of the donor concentration. The equilibrium constant and rate constant for the case in which trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor are 0.66 and 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The equilibrium constant is in good agreement with the value of 0.60 determined using the excited state energy gap between the donor and acceptor species. For the thermoneutral case in which trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor, an experimental equilibrium constant of 0.99 was reported previously, and the rate constant has now been measured as 4.0 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1).

  16. Robust Biased Brownian Dynamics for Rate Constant Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Gang; Skeel, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    A reaction probability is required to calculate the rate constant of a diffusion-dominated reaction. Due to the complicated geometry and potentially high dimension of the reaction probability problem, it is usually solved by a Brownian dynamics simulation, also known as a random walk or path integral method, instead of solving the equivalent partial differential equation by a discretization method. Building on earlier work, this article completes the development of a robust importance sampling algorithm for Brownian dynamics—i.e., biased Brownian dynamics with weight control—to overcome the high energy and entropy barriers in biomolecular association reactions. The biased Brownian dynamics steers sampling by a bias force, and the weight control algorithm controls sampling by a target weight. This algorithm is optimal if the bias force and the target weight are constructed from the solution of the reaction probability problem. In reality, an approximate reaction probability has to be used to construct the bias force and the target weight. Thus, the performance of the algorithm depends on the quality of the approximation. Given here is a method to calculate a good approximation, which is based on the selection of a reaction coordinate and the variational formulation of the reaction probability problem. The numerically approximated reaction probability is shown by computer experiments to give a factor-of-two speedup over the use of a purely heuristic approximation. Also, the fully developed method is compared to unbiased Brownian dynamics. The tests for human superoxide dismutase, Escherichia coli superoxide dismutase, and antisweetener antibody NC6.8, show speedups of 17, 35, and 39, respectively. The test for reactions between two model proteins with orientations shows speedups of 2578 for one set of configurations and 3341 for another set of configurations. PMID:14507681

  17. Diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenocortical response to stress: effect of constant light and constant darkness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Winget, C. M.; Hetherington, N. W.

    1970-01-01

    The existence of a biological rhythm in the response of animals to noxious stimuli and drugs is well known. However, the mechanism of this response is not well understood. This study was undertaken to describe the existence of a diurnal rhythm in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system before and after stress in female rats kept in controlled environmental conditions in 12L:12D, 24L:OD, or OL:24D. Plasma ACTH and plasma corticosterone concentrations were compared in unstressed animals. The time pattern in the response to stress was determined at four hourly intervals during a 24 hr period in which plasma ACTH and plasma corticosterone were measured at different time intervals. The stress response varied considerably with time of day in both magnitude and duration. The adrenals of rats exposed to constant light for 45 days atrophied, whereas the adrenals of animals kept in constant dark for the same period did not differ significantly from those of controls kept in 12L:12D. The increase in plasma ACTH in response to stress was greater both in the animals maintained in constant light and in constant dark than in the 12L:12D controls. Homeostatic mechanisms involved in these changes are discussed.

  18. Rate constants measured for hydrated electron reactions with peptides and proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braams, R.

    1968-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation on the amino acids of proteins and the reactivity of the protonated amino group depends upon the pK subscript a of the group. Estimates of the rate constants for reactions involving the amino acid side chains are presented. These rate constants gave an approximate rate constant for three different protein molecules.

  19. The temperature dependence of the rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, M. J.; Cornett, K. D.; Murphy, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in the 225-443 K temperature range has been measured by means of the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. Above 300 K, the rate constant levels off in a way that can only be explained by the occurrence of two reaction channels, of which one, operative at low temperatures, proceeds through the formation of an adduct intermediate. The implications of these rate constant values for stratospheric reaction constants is discussed.

  20. Comparison of the quantitative performance of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations using concentration-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, M; Broeckhoven, K; Lynen, F; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Sandra, P; Desmet, G

    2012-04-06

    This contribution discusses the difference in chromatographic performance when switching from the customary employed constant flow rate gradient elution mode to the recently re-introduced constant pressure gradient elution mode. In this mode, the inlet pressure is maintained at a set value even when the mobile phase viscosity becomes lower than the maximum mobile phase viscosity encountered during the gradient program. This leads to a higher average flow rate compared to the constant flow rate mode and results in a shorter analysis time. When both modes carry out the same mobile phase gradient program in volumetric units, normally identical selectivities are obtained. However, small deviations in selectivity are found due to the differences in pressure and viscous heating effects. These selectivity differences are of the same type as those observed when switching from HPLC to UHPLC and are inevitable when speeding up the analysis by applying a higher pressure. It was also found that, when using concentration-sensitive detectors, the constant pressure elution mode leads to identical peak areas as the constant flow rate mode. Also the linearity is maintained. In addition, the repeatability of the peak area and retention time remains the same when switching between both elution modes.

  1. Determination of rate constants and equilibrium constants for solution-phase drug-protein interactions by ultrafast affinity extraction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria I; Hage, David S

    2014-07-01

    A method was created on the basis of ultrafast affinity extraction to determine both the dissociation rate constants and equilibrium constants for drug-protein interactions in solution. Human serum albumin (HSA), an important binding agent for many drugs in blood, was used as both a model soluble protein and as an immobilized binding agent in affinity microcolumns for the analysis of free drug fractions. Several drugs were examined that are known to bind to HSA. Various conditions to optimize in the use of ultrafast affinity extraction for equilibrium and kinetic studies were considered, and several approaches for these measurements were examined. The dissociation rate constants obtained for soluble HSA with each drug gave good agreement with previous rate constants reported for the same drugs or other solutes with comparable affinities for HSA. The equilibrium constants that were determined also showed good agreement with the literature. The results demonstrated that ultrafast affinity extraction could be used as a rapid approach to provide information on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of a drug-protein interaction in solution. This approach could be extended to other systems and should be valuable for high-throughput drug screening or biointeraction studies.

  2. Determination of Rate Constants and Equilibrium Constants for Solution-Phase Drug–Protein Interactions by Ultrafast Affinity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A method was created on the basis of ultrafast affinity extraction to determine both the dissociation rate constants and equilibrium constants for drug–protein interactions in solution. Human serum albumin (HSA), an important binding agent for many drugs in blood, was used as both a model soluble protein and as an immobilized binding agent in affinity microcolumns for the analysis of free drug fractions. Several drugs were examined that are known to bind to HSA. Various conditions to optimize in the use of ultrafast affinity extraction for equilibrium and kinetic studies were considered, and several approaches for these measurements were examined. The dissociation rate constants obtained for soluble HSA with each drug gave good agreement with previous rate constants reported for the same drugs or other solutes with comparable affinities for HSA. The equilibrium constants that were determined also showed good agreement with the literature. The results demonstrated that ultrafast affinity extraction could be used as a rapid approach to provide information on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of a drug–protein interaction in solution. This approach could be extended to other systems and should be valuable for high-throughput drug screening or biointeraction studies. PMID:24911267

  3. Constant rate control algorithm for Wyner-Ziv video codec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowski, Mariusz

    2009-06-01

    In a distributed video coding (DVC) system, the total bit-rate depends on bit-rate of the key frames (Intra frames) and the Wyner-Ziv (WZ) frames. The key frames bit-rate is relatively easy to control since they are encoded with an Intra coding scheme (e.g. H.264/AVC Intra), and there are many proposed solutions in literature which address this issue1, 2. On the other hand, rate control (RC) of the WZ frames at the encoder is more difficult since the bit-rate of WZ frames is difficult to predict and control due to the absence of the side information at the decoder side. In this work, an RC algorithm developed within the VISNET II, the European Network of Excellence, is presented as an efficient solution to achieve and maintain the target bit-rate for the overall Intra frames and WZ bitstream, mainly by changing the degree of compression of the Intra frames which is controlled by quantization parameter (QP). In order to maintain a similar quality for the Intra and WZ frames, the WZ quantization index (QIndex) follows the QP changes. A statistical model is used to describe the relationship between QIndex and the WZ frames bit-rate. Additionally, an analysis of influence of the key frames residuum complexity on WZ frames bitrate was conducted. The proposed algorithm adapted to the VISNET2 WZ video codec3 confirms its efficiency in terms of achieving and maintaining the target bit-rate.

  4. Iterative rate-distortion optimization of H.264 with constant bit rate constraint.

    PubMed

    An, Cheolhong; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we apply the primal-dual decomposition and subgradient projection methods to solve the rate-distortion optimization problem with the constant bit rate constraint. The primal decomposition method enables spatial or temporal prediction dependency within a group of picture (GOP) to be processed in the master primal problem. As a result, we can apply the dual decomposition to minimize independently the Lagrangian cost of all the MBs using the reference software model of H.264. Furthermore, the optimal Lagrange multiplier lambda* is iteratively derived from the solution of the dual problem. As an example, we derive the optimal bit allocation condition with the consideration of temporal prediction dependency among the pictures. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves better performance than the reference software model of H.264 with rate control.

  5. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry's constants - Separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants.

    PubMed

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik R; Comber, Mike; Mayer, Philipp

    2017-05-01

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects test results and (2) can be accounted for by combining equilibrium partition and dynamic biodegradation models. An aqueous mixture of 9 (semi)volatile chemicals was first generated using passive dosing and then diluted with environmental surface water producing concentrations in the ng/L to μg/L range. After incubation for 2 h to 4 weeks, automated Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relatively to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Biodegradation rate constants relating to the chemical in the water phase, kwater, were generally a factor 1 to 11 times higher than biodegradation rate constants relating to the total mass of chemical in the test system, ksystem, with one exceptional factor of 72 times for a long chain alkane. True water phase degradation rate constants were found (i) more appropriate for risk assessment than test system rate constants, (ii) to facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and (iii) to be better defined input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models.

  6. The vibrational dependence of dissociative recombination: Rate constants for N{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Guberman, Steven L.

    2014-11-28

    Dissociative recombination rate constants are reported with electron temperature dependent uncertainties for the lowest 5 vibrational levels of the N{sub 2}{sup +} ground state. The rate constants are determined from ab initio calculations of potential curves, electronic widths, quantum defects, and cross sections. At 100 K electron temperature, the rate constants overlap with the exception of the third vibrational level. At and above 300 K, the rate constants for excited vibrational levels are significantly smaller than that for the ground level. It is shown that any experimentally determined total rate constant at 300 K electron temperature that is smaller than 2.0 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup 3}/s is likely to be for ions that have a substantially excited vibrational population. Using the vibrational level specific rate constants, the total rate constant is in very good agreement with that for an excited vibrational distribution found in a storage ring experiment. It is also shown that a prior analysis of a laser induced fluorescence experiment is quantitatively flawed due to the need to account for reactions with unknown rate constants. Two prior calculations of the dissociative recombination rate constant are shown to be inconsistent with the cross sections upon which they are based. The rate constants calculated here contribute to the resolution of a 30 year old disagreement between modeled and observed N{sub 2}{sup +} ionospheric densities.

  7. Universality of Thermodynamic Constants Governing Biological Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Corkrey, Ross; Olley, June; Ratkowsky, David; McMeekin, Tom; Ross, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Background Mathematical models exist that quantify the effect of temperature on poikilotherm growth rate. One family of such models assumes a single rate-limiting ‘master reaction’ using terms describing the temperature-dependent denaturation of the reaction's enzyme. We consider whether such a model can describe growth in each domain of life. Methodology/Principal Findings A new model based on this assumption and using a hierarchical Bayesian approach fits simultaneously 95 data sets for temperature-related growth rates of diverse microorganisms from all three domains of life, Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. Remarkably, the model produces credible estimates of fundamental thermodynamic parameters describing protein thermal stability predicted over 20 years ago. Conclusions/Significance The analysis lends support to the concept of universal thermodynamic limits to microbial growth rate dictated by protein thermal stability that in turn govern biological rates. This suggests that the thermal stability of proteins is a unifying property in the evolution and adaptation of life on earth. The fundamental nature of this conclusion has importance for many fields of study including microbiology, protein chemistry, thermal biology, and ecological theory including, for example, the influence of the vast microbial biomass and activity in the biosphere that is poorly described in current climate models. PMID:22348140

  8. Inversion of Spectral Lineshapes to Yield Collision Rate Constants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-15

    Rates for Highly Vibrationally Excited Molecules", J. Chem. Phys. 74, 5031 (1981). 4. E. Wilczek, J. BelBruno and J. Gelfand, " Voigt Profiles of Spectral ... Lines : Accuracy of Line Parameters as a Function of Peak Transmittance", Applied Spectroscopy , in press (1981). 5. J. BelBruno, M. Zughul, J. Gelfand...and H.Rabitz, "Analysis of Collision- Broadened and Overlapping Spectral Lines to Obtain Individual Line Param- eters", J. Mol. Spec., in press (1981

  9. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  10. Localization of dilatancy in Ohshima granite under constant uniaxial stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagidani, Takashi; Ehara, Shoji; Nishizawa, Osamu; Kusunose, Kinichiro; Terada, Makoto

    1985-07-01

    The localization of dilatancy during creep of Ohshima granite under uniaxial compression was observed. Hypocenters of 3933 acoustic emission (AE) events were accurately located. It was found that the mechanical behavior of Ohshima granite was controlled by the localization of microcracks. During the stage of loading up to the creep stress, which is 83% of the average short-term fracture strength, the hypocenters of AE events were randomly distributed throughout the specimen. As soon as the primary creep began, abrupt migration and clustering of AE hypocenters into several near-surface zones were observed. AE events formed volumetric concentrations. This migration and clustering strongly suggested the rapid localized development of dilatancy at the very beginning of the primary creep stage. The distribution of AE hypocenters observed in this stage was unchanged until final faulting. By the end of the primary creep stage, AE events began to concentrate into one of these clusters, while the activities of other clusters gradually decayed. This change spread broadly and continuously in time during the creep. In the most active cluster, clustering of AE events by itself gave rise to more AE events. The shape of this cluster was spheroidal with the long axis parallel to the loading axis. No evidence directly related to planar focusing of dilatancy was found. Surface strains were mapped. The axial strain distributions in the loading interval showed that the state of stress within the sample was homogeneous. A large change in both axial and circumferential strain fields occurred during the early stage of the primary creep. After this drastic change, the pattern of strain distribution remained unchanged in the subsequent stage of the creep. The accelerated increase in one of the circumferential strain gauges during the tertiary creep stage showed strongly localized deformation preceding faulting. The development of localized dilatancy identified by hypocenter locations was

  11. Rate Constants for the Reactions of Hydroxyl Radical with Several Alkanes, Cycloalkanes, and Dimethyl Ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMore, W.; Bayes, K.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiements were used to measure rate constants and temperature denpendencies of the reactions of OH with propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and dimethyl ether.

  12. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  13. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 3; Constant Stress and Cyclic Stress Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on advanced structural ceramics tested under constant stress and cyclic stress loading at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation between the time to failure and applied stress (or maximum applied stress in cyclic loading) was very reasonable for most of the materials studied. It was also found that life prediction for cyclic stress loading from data of constant stress loading in the exponential formulation was in good agreement with the experimental data, resulting in a similar degree of accuracy as compared with the power-law formulation. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  14. Rate constant for the fraction of atomic chlorine with formaldehyde from 200 to 500K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    A flash photolysis - resonance fluorescence technique was used to measure rate constant. The results were independent of substantial variations in H2CO, total pressure (Ar), and flash intensity (i.e., initial Cl). The rate constant was shown to be invariant with temperature, the best representation for this temperature range being K = (7.48 + or - 0.50) x 10 to the minus 11 power cu cm molecule-1 s-1 where the error is one standard deviation. The rate constant is theoretically discussed and the potential importance of the reaction in stratospheric chemistry is considered.

  15. Electron-ion dissociative recombination rate constants relevant to the Titan atmosphere and the Interstellar Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, David; Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel

    2014-01-21

    Following the arrival of Cassini at Titan in 2004, the Titan atmosphere has been shown to contain large complex polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons. Since Cassini has provided a great deal of data, there exists a need for kinetic rate data to help with modeling this atmosphere. One type of kinetic data needed is electron-ion dissociative recombination (e-IDR) rate constants. These data are not readily available for larger compounds, such as naphthalene, or oxygen containing compounds, such as 1,4 dioxane or furan. Here, the rate constants for naphthalene, 1,4 dioxane, and furan have been measured and their temperature dependencies are determined when possible, using the University of Georgia's Variable Temperature Flowing Afterglow. The rate constants are compared with those previously published for other compounds; these show trends which illustrate the effects which multi-rings and oxygen heteroatoms substitutions have upon e-IDR rate constants.

  16. Electron-ion dissociative recombination rate constants relevant to the Titan atmosphere and the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, David; Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Following the arrival of Cassini at Titan in 2004, the Titan atmosphere has been shown to contain large complex polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons. Since Cassini has provided a great deal of data, there exists a need for kinetic rate data to help with modeling this atmosphere. One type of kinetic data needed is electron-ion dissociative recombination (e-IDR) rate constants. These data are not readily available for larger compounds, such as naphthalene, or oxygen containing compounds, such as 1,4 dioxane or furan. Here, the rate constants for naphthalene, 1,4 dioxane, and furan have been measured and their temperature dependencies are determined when possible, using the University of Georgia's Variable Temperature Flowing Afterglow. The rate constants are compared with those previously published for other compounds; these show trends which illustrate the effects which multi-rings and oxygen heteroatoms substitutions have upon e-IDR rate constants.

  17. The effects of molecular weight on the single lap shear creep and constant strain rate behavior of thermoplastic polyimidesulfone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembosky, Stanley K.; Sancaktar, Erol

    1985-01-01

    The bonded shear creep and constant strain rate behaviors of zero, one, and three percent endcapped thermoplastic polyimidesulfone adhesive were examined at room and elevated temperatures. Endcapping was accomplished by the addition of phthalic anhydrides. The primary objective was to determine the effects of molecular weight on the mechanical properties of the adhesive. Viscoelastic and nonlinear elastic constitutive equations were utilized to model the adhesive. Ludwik's and Crochet's relations were used to describe the experimental failure data. The effects of molecular weight changes on the above mentioned mechanical behavior were assessed. The viscoelastic Chase-Goldsmith and elastic nonlinear relations gave a good fit to the experimental stress strain behavior. Crochet's relations based on Maxwell and Chase-Goldsmith models were fit to delayed failure data. Ludwik's equations revealed negligible rate dependence. Ultimate stress levels and the safe levels for creep stresses were found to decrease as molecular weight was reduced.

  18. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  19. Absolute rate constant for the reaction of Cl(/sup 2/P) with CINO

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, F.L.; Nava, D.F.; Payne, W.A.; Stief, L.J.

    1987-09-24

    The room temperature rate constant for the reaction Cl + CINO yields Cl/sub 2/ + NO has been measured by the method of discharge flow mass spectrometry. The rate constant was determined from the decay of CINO in the presence of an excess of Cl atoms at a total pressure of 1 Torr. The rate constant obtained was (7.6 +/- 0.8) X 10/sup -11/ cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/. This result is compared with previous determinations, the values of which ranged by more than an order of magnitude and all of which depended on knowledge of the absolute concentration of CINO. The authors suggest that the lack of agreement is attributable principally to uncertainties in (CINO) resulting from absorption of this reactive species on glass and metal surfaces. Our result does not depend directly on (CINO) and supports the highest values published for this rate constant.

  20. Characterization of Iodine Quenching and Energy Transfer Rate Constants for Supersonic Flow Visualization Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-28

    SUBTITLE Sm. CONTRACTNUBER Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate FA9550-41-- o3G Sb. GRANT NUMBER constants for supersonic flow...in the nozzle from a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL). PLIF images are recorded using laser excitation of the I= B-X transition. Data for the...Preacolbed byANSI Sad Z30.16 20071015188 Final report for the project, "Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate constants for

  1. Using the pseudophase kinetic model to interpret chemical reactivity in ionic emulsions: determining antioxidant partition constants and interfacial rate constants.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qing; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence S

    2013-06-15

    Kinetic results obtained in cationic and anionic emulsions show for the first time that pseudophase kinetic models give reasonable estimates of the partition constants of reactants, here t-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) between the oil and interfacial region, P(O)(I), and the water and interfacial region, P(W)(I), and of the interfacial rate constant, k(I), for the reaction with an arenediazonium ion in emulsions containing a 1:1 volume ratio of a medium chain length triglyceride, MCT, and aqueous acid or buffer. The results provide: (a) an explanation for the large difference in pH, >4 pH units, required to run the reaction in CTAB (pH 1.54, added HBr) and SDS (pH 5.71, acetate buffer) emulsions; (b) reasonable estimates of PO(I) and k(I) in the CTAB emulsions; (c) a sensible interpretation of added counterion effects based on ion exchange in SDS emulsions (Na(+)/H3O(+) ion exchange in the interfacial region) and Donnan equilibrium in CTAB emulsions (Br(-) increasing the interfacial H3O(+)); and (d) the significance of the effect of the much greater solubility of TBHQ in MCT versus octane, 1000/1, as the oil. These results should aid in interpreting the effects of ionic surfactants on chemical reactivity in emulsions in general and in selecting the most efficient antioxidant for particular food applications.

  2. Determination of rapid chlorination rate constants by a stopped-flow spectrophotometric competition kinetics method.

    PubMed

    Song, Dean; Liu, Huijuan; Qiang, Zhimin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-05-15

    Free chlorine is extensively used for water and wastewater disinfection nowadays. However, it still remains a big challenge to determine the rate constants of rapid chlorination reactions although competition kinetics and stopped-flow spectrophotometric (SFS) methods have been employed individually to investigate fast reaction kinetics. In this work, we proposed an SFS competition kinetics method to determine the rapid chlorination rate constants by using a common colorimetric reagent, N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD), as a reference probe. A kinetic equation was first derived to estimate the reaction rate constant of DPD towards chlorine under a given pH and temperature condition. Then, on that basis, an SFS competition kinetics method was proposed to determine directly the chlorination rate constants of several representative compounds including tetracycline, ammonia, and four α-amino acids. Although Cl2O is more reactive than HOCl, its contribution to the overall chlorination kinetics of the test compounds could be neglected in this study. Finally, the developed method was validated through comparing the experimentally measured chlorination rate constants of the selected compounds with those obtained or calculated from literature and analyzing with Taft's correlation as well. This study demonstrates that the SFS competition kinetics method can measure the chlorination rate constants of a test compound rapidly and accurately.

  3. Systematic angle random walk estimation of the constant rate biased ring laser gyro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huapeng; Wu, Wenqi; Wu, Meiping; Feng, Guohu; Hao, Ming

    2013-02-27

    An actual account of the angle random walk (ARW) coefficients of gyros in the constant rate biased rate ring laser gyro (RLG) inertial navigation system (INS) is very important in practical engineering applications. However, no reported experimental work has dealt with the issue of characterizing the ARW of the constant rate biased RLG in the INS. To avoid the need for high cost precise calibration tables and complex measuring set-ups, the objective of this study is to present a cost-effective experimental approach to characterize the ARW of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS. In the system, turntable dynamics and other external noises would inevitably contaminate the measured RLG data, leading to the question of isolation of such disturbances. A practical observation model of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS was discussed, and an experimental method based on the fast orthogonal search (FOS) for the practical observation model to separate ARW error from the RLG measured data was proposed. Validity of the FOS-based method was checked by estimating the ARW coefficients of the mechanically dithered RLG under stationary and turntable rotation conditions. By utilizing the FOS-based method, the average ARW coefficient of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system is estimated. The experimental results show that the FOS-based method can achieve high denoising ability. This method estimate the ARW coefficients of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system accurately. The FOS-based method does not need precise calibration table with high cost and complex measuring set-up, and Statistical results of the tests will provide us references in engineering application of the constant rate biased RLG INS.

  4. Systematic Angle Random Walk Estimation of the Constant Rate Biased Ring Laser Gyro

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huapeng; Wu, Wenqi; Wu, Meiping; Feng, Guohu; Hao, Ming

    2013-01-01

    An actual account of the angle random walk (ARW) coefficients of gyros in the constant rate biased rate ring laser gyro (RLG) inertial navigation system (INS) is very important in practical engineering applications. However, no reported experimental work has dealt with the issue of characterizing the ARW of the constant rate biased RLG in the INS. To avoid the need for high cost precise calibration tables and complex measuring set-ups, the objective of this study is to present a cost-effective experimental approach to characterize the ARW of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS. In the system, turntable dynamics and other external noises would inevitably contaminate the measured RLG data, leading to the question of isolation of such disturbances. A practical observation model of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS was discussed, and an experimental method based on the fast orthogonal search (FOS) for the practical observation model to separate ARW error from the RLG measured data was proposed. Validity of the FOS-based method was checked by estimating the ARW coefficients of the mechanically dithered RLG under stationary and turntable rotation conditions. By utilizing the FOS-based method, the average ARW coefficient of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system is estimated. The experimental results show that the FOS-based method can achieve high denoising ability. This method estimate the ARW coefficients of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system accurately. The FOS-based method does not need precise calibration table with high cost and complex measuring set-up, and Statistical results of the tests will provide us references in engineering application of the constant rate biased RLG INS. PMID:23447008

  5. K{sub Air} and H*(10) Rate Constants for Gamma Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Juarez, R. Rodriguez; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Davila, V. M. Hernandez; Mercado, G. A.

    2008-08-11

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to estimate the Air Kerma rate constant and the Ambient dose equivalent rate constant for 139 monoenergetic photon sources. The factor that relates activity to air kerma rate or to ambient dose equivalent is useful to estimate the dose from a photon emitter source. Here 139 point-like and monoenergetic gamma-ray sources, ranging from 0.01 to 10 MeV were utilized in Monte Carlo calculations to estimate both gamma factors. These factors were utilized to calculate the air kerma-and-ambient dose equivalent rate constants for {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba, {sup 198}Au, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 131}I, whose values were compared with those published in the literature.

  6. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  7. Limit case analysis of the "stable indenter velocity" method for obtaining creep stress exponents from constant load indentation creep tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Dean, J.; Clyne, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    This study concerns a commonly-used procedure for evaluating the steady state creep stress exponent, n, from indentation data. The procedure involves monitoring the indenter displacement history under constant load and making the assumption that, once its velocity has stabilised, the system is in a quasi-steady state, with stage II creep dominating the behaviour. The stress and strain fields under the indenter are represented by "equivalent stress" and "equivalent strain rate" values. The estimate of n is then obtained as the gradient of a plot of the logarithm of the equivalent strain rate against the logarithm of the equivalent stress. Concerns have, however, been expressed about the reliability of this procedure, and indeed it has already been shown to be fundamentally flawed. In the present paper, it is demonstrated, using a very simple analysis, that, for a genuinely stable velocity, the procedure always leads to the same, constant value for n (either 1.0 or 0.5, depending on whether the tip shape is spherical or self-similar). This occurs irrespective of the value of the measured velocity, or indeed of any creep characteristic of the material. It is now clear that previously-measured values of n, obtained using this procedure, have varied in a more or less random fashion, depending on the functional form chosen to represent the displacement-time history and the experimental variables (tip shape and size, penetration depth, etc.), with little or no sensitivity to the true value of n.

  8. Theoretical rate constants of super-exchange hole transfer and thermally induced hopping in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Asai, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Koichi

    2005-01-27

    Recently, the electronic properties of DNA have been extensively studied, because its conductivity is important not only to the study of fundamental biological problems, but also in the development of molecular-sized electronics and biosensors. We have studied theoretically the reorganization energies, the activation energies, the electronic coupling matrix elements, and the rate constants of hole transfer in B-form double-helix DNA in water. To accommodate the effects of DNA nuclear motions, a subset of reaction coordinates for hole transfer was extracted from classical molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of DNA in water and then used for ab initio quantum chemical calculations of electron coupling constants based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush model. A molecular mechanics (MM) method was used to determine the nuclear Franck-Condon factor. The rate constants for two types of mechanisms of hole transfer-the thermally induced hopping (TIH) and the super-exchange mechanisms-were determined based on Marcus theory. We found that the calculated matrix elements are strongly dependent on the conformations of the nucleobase pairs of hole-transferable DNA and extend over a wide range of values for the "rise" base-step parameter but cluster around a particular value for the "twist" parameter. The calculated activation energies are in good agreement with experimental results. Whereas the rate constant for the TIH mechanism is not dependent on the number of A-T nucleobase pairs that act as a bridge, the rate constant for the super-exchange process rapidly decreases when the length of the bridge increases. These characteristic trends in the calculated rate constants effectively reproduce those in the experimental data of Giese et al. [Nature 2001, 412, 318]. The calculated rate constants were also compared with the experimental results of Lewis et al. [Nature 2000, 406, 51].

  9. A new approach using coagulation rate constant for evaluation of turbidity removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sameraiy, Mukheled

    2015-09-01

    Coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation processes for treating three levels of bentonite synthetic turbid water using date seeds (DS) and alum (A) coagulants were investigated in the previous research work. In the current research, the same experimental results were used to adopt a new approach on a basis of using coagulation rate constant as an investigating parameter to identify optimum doses of these coagulants. Moreover, the performance of these coagulants to meet (WHO) turbidity standard was assessed by introducing a new evaluating criterion in terms of critical coagulation rate constant (kc). Coagulation rate constants (k2) were mathematically calculated in second order form of coagulation process for each coagulant. The maximum (k2) values corresponded to doses, which were obviously to be considered as optimum doses. The proposed criterion to assess the performance of coagulation process of these coagulants was based on the mathematical representation of (WHO) turbidity guidelines in second order form of coagulation process stated that (k2) for each coagulant should be ≥ (kc) for each level of synthetic turbid water. For all tested turbid water, DS coagulant could not satisfy it. While, A coagulant could satisfy it. The results obtained in the present research are exactly in agreement with the previous published results in terms of finding optimum doses for each coagulant and assessing their performances. On the whole, it is recommended considering coagulation rate constant to be a new approach as an indicator for investigating optimum doses and critical coagulation rate constant to be a new evaluating criterion to assess coagulants' performance.

  10. Extraction of elementary rate constants from global network analysis of E. coli central metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiao; Ridgway, Douglas; Broderick, Gordon; Kovalenko, Andriy; Ellison, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background As computational performance steadily increases, so does interest in extending one-particle-per-molecule models to larger physiological problems. Such models however require elementary rate constants to calculate time-dependent rate coefficients under physiological conditions. Unfortunately, even when in vivo kinetic data is available, it is often in the form of aggregated rate laws (ARL) that do not specify the required elementary rate constants corresponding to mass-action rate laws (MRL). There is therefore a need to develop a method which is capable of automatically transforming ARL kinetic information into more detailed MRL rate constants. Results By incorporating proteomic data related to enzyme abundance into an MRL modelling framework, here we present an efficient method operating at a global network level for extracting elementary rate constants from experiment-based aggregated rate law (ARL) models. The method combines two techniques that can be used to overcome the difficult properties in parameterization. The first, a hybrid MRL/ARL modelling technique, is used to divide the parameter estimation problem into sub-problems, so that the parameters of the mass action rate laws for each enzyme are estimated in separate steps. This reduces the number of parameters that have to be optimized simultaneously. The second, a hybrid algebraic-numerical simulation and optimization approach, is used to render some rate constants identifiable, as well as to greatly narrow the bounds of the other rate constants that remain unidentifiable. This is done by incorporating equality constraints derived from the King-Altman and Cleland method into the simulated annealing algorithm. We apply these two techniques to estimate the rate constants of a model of E. coli glycolytic pathways. The simulation and statistical results show that our innovative method performs well in dealing with the issues of high computation cost, stiffness, local minima and uncertainty

  11. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with formaldehyde from 200 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with formaldehyde has been measured from 200 to 500 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results were independent of substantial variations in (H2CO), total pressure (Ar), and flash intensity (i.e., initial (Cl)). The rate constant was shown to be invariant with temperature, the best representation for this temperature range being k-sub-1 = (7.48 + or - 0.50) times 10 to the -11 cu cm/molecule sec, where the error is one standard deviation. This result is compared with the only previous determination of k-sub-1, which was a relative value obtained at 298 K. The rate constant is theoretically discussed, and the potential importance of the reaction in stratospheric chemistry is considered.

  12. The rate constant for the reaction of oxygen /3P/ atoms with dichlorine monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miziolek, A. W.; Molina, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    A fast flow discharge apparatus was used to measure the rate constant for the reaction of ground state oxygen atoms with dichlorine monoxide in the temperature range 236-295 K. The air afterflow technique (NO2 chemiluminescence) was used for detection of oxygen atoms. The Arrhenius expression for the rate constant was found to be 2.7 plus or minus 0.3 times 10 to the -11th power exp(-560 plus or minus 80/T) cu cm per molecule per sec. At 295 K the rate constant is 4.1 plus or minus 0.5 times 10 to the -12th power cu cm per molecule per sec.

  13. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with acetaldehyde from 210 to 343 K

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, W.A.; Nava, D.F.; Nesbitt, F.L.; Stief, L.J. )

    1990-09-06

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with acetaldehyde has been measured from 210 to 343 K by use of the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The rate constant is shown to be independent of variations in (CH{sub 3}CHO), total pressure (Ar), and, to a lesser extent, flash intensity (initial (Cl)). The rate constant is also independent of temperature over the range studied. The average of all experiments yields k{sub 1} = (6.6 {plus minus} 1.4) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, where the error limit is two standard deviations. This result is compared with previous measurements of k{sub 1}, all of which were relative measurements at 298 K.

  14. Robust reconstruction of the rate constant distribution using the phase function method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yajun; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2006-12-01

    Many biological processes exhibit complex kinetic behavior that involves a nontrivial distribution of rate constants. Characterization of the rate constant distribution is often critical for mechanistic understandings of these processes. However, it is difficult to extract a rate constant distribution from data measured in the time domain. This is due to the numerical instability of the inverse Laplace transform, a long-standing mathematical challenge that has hampered data analysis in many disciplines. Here, we present a method that allows us to reconstruct the probability distribution of rate constants from decay data in the time domain, without fitting to specific trial functions or requiring any prior knowledge of the rate distribution. The robustness (numerical stability) of this reconstruction method is numerically illustrated by analyzing data with realistic noise and theoretically proved by the continuity of the transformations connecting the relevant function spaces. This development enhances our ability to characterize kinetics and dynamics of biological processes. We expect this method to be useful in a broad range of disciplines considering the prevalence of complex exponential decays in many experimental systems.

  15. Effects of various process parameters on struvite precipitation kinetics and subsequent determination of rate constants.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, M S; Ellis, N; Mavinic, D S

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4).6H(2)O) precipitation kinetics were studied with different operating conditions (varying supersaturation, pH, Mg:P ratio, degree of mixing and seeding conditions) and relevant rate constants were determined by fitting a slightly modified first-order kinetic model to the experimental data obtained. The rate of change of ortho-P concentration in the bulk solutions increases with increasing supersaturation ratio. The estimated rate constants are 2.034, 1.716 and 0.690 hr(-1) for the supersaturation ratio of 9.64, 4.83, and 2.44, respectively. Kinetic parameters were also evaluated for the Mg:P ratio between the ranges of 1.0 and 1.6, indicating higher phosphorus removal efficiency with increasing Mg:P ratio. The rate constants were found to be 0.942, 2.034 and 2.712 hr(-1) for Mg:P ratios of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.6, respectively. The experimental observations for kinetic study of struvite precipitation with different stirrer speeds clearly show that the mixing intensity used had little effect on the intrinsic rate constants. K values found to be 2.034 and 1.902 h(-1) for 100 and 70 rpm, respectively. Seeding, with 250-500 microm of seed crystals during the struvite precipitation kinetics test, was found to have very little effect on the ortho-P removal.

  16. Rough-to-smooth transition of an equilibrium neutral constant stress layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Purpose of research on rough-to-smooth transition of an equilibrium neutral constant stress layer is to develop a model for low-level atmospheric flow over terrains of abruptly changing roughness, such as those occurring near the windward end of a landing strip, and to use the model to derive functions which define the extent of the region affected by the roughness change and allow adequate prediction of wind and shear stress profiles at all points within the region. A model consisting of two bounding logarithmic layers and an intermediate velocity defect layer is assumed, and dimensionless velocity and stress distribution functions which meet all boundary and matching conditions are hypothesized. The functions are used in an asymptotic form of the equation of motion to derive a relation which governs the growth of the internal boundary layer. The growth relation is used to predict variation of surface shear stress.

  17. Determination of reaction rate constants for alkylation of 4-(p-nitrobenzyl) pyridine by different alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Walles, S A

    1980-02-01

    The rate constants have been determined for the reaction between some different alkylating agents and 4-(p-nitrobenzyl) pyridine (NBP) in methanol. These constants have been compared with those for alkylation of aniline in water. All the constants were lower in methanol than in water but in different degrees. The rate constants of the different alkylating agents have been calculated at a nucleophilic strength n=2. The genetic risk defined as the degree of alkylation of a nucleophile (n=2) is equivalent to the rate constant kn=2 and the target dose. The dependence of the genetic risk on the rate constant (kn=2) is discussed.

  18. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT PRESSURE RESPONSE FROM A CONSTANT FLOW RATE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporating a flow pump into a conventional triaxial laboratory system allows fluid to be supplied to or withdrawn from the base of a sediment sample at small and constant rates. An initial transient record of hydraulic head versus time is observed which eventually stabilizes to a constant steady state gradient across the sample; values of hydraulic conductivity can subsequently be determined from Darcy's law. In this paper, analytical methods are presented for determining values of specific storage and hydraulic conductivity from the initial transient phase of such a constant flow rate test. These methods are based on a diffusion equation involving pore pressure and are analogous to those used to describe the soil consolidation process and also to interpret aquifer properties from pumping tests.

  19. Proximal femur elastic behaviour is the same in impact and constant displacement rate fall simulation.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, S; Nishiyama, K K; de Bakker, P; Guy, P; Boyd, S K; Oxland, T; Cripton, P A

    2014-11-28

    Understanding proximal femur fracture may yield new targets for fracture prevention screening and treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize force-displacement and failure behaviours in the proximal femur between displacement control and impact loading fall simulations. Twenty-one human proximal femurs were tested in two ways, first to a sub-failure load at a constant displacement rate, then to fracture in an impact fall simulator. Comparisons of sub-failure energy and stiffness were made between the tests at the same compressive force. Additionally, the impact failure tests were compared with previous, constant displacement rate failure tests (at 2 and 100mm/s) in terms of energy, yield force, and stiffness. Loading and displacement rates were characterized and related to specimen stiffness in the impact tests. No differences were observed between the sub-failure constant displacement and impact tests in the aforementioned metrics. Comparisons between failure tests showed that the impact group had the lowest absorbed energy, 24% lower maximum force and 160% higher stiffness than the 100mm/s group (p<0.01 for all), but suffered from low statistical power to differentiate the donor age and specimen BMD. Loading and displacement rates for the specimens tested using impact varied during each test and between specimens and did not show appreciable viscoelasticity. These results indicate that constant displacement rate testing may help understand sub-failure mechanical behaviour, but may not elucidate failure behaviours. The differences between the impact and constant displacement rate fall simulations have important ramifications for interpreting the results of previous experiments.

  20. The rate constant for radiative association of HF: Comparing quantum and classical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Magnus Monge-Palacios, M.; Nyman, Gunnar

    2014-05-14

    Radiative association for the formation of hydrogen fluoride through the A{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} transitions is studied using quantum and classical dynamics. The total thermal rate constant is obtained for temperatures from 10 K to 20 000 K. Agreement between semiclassical and quantum approaches is observed for the A{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} rate constant above 2000 K. The agreement is explained by the fact that the corresponding cross section is free of resonances for this system. At temperatures below 2000 K we improve the agreement by implementing a simplified semiclassical expression for the rate constant, which includes a quantum corrected pair distribution. The rate coefficient for the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} transition is calculated using Breit–Wigner theory and a classical formula for the resonance and direct contributions, respectively. In comparison with quantum calculations the classical formula appears to overestimate the direct contribution to the rate constant by about 12% for this transition. Below about 450 K the resonance contribution is larger than the direct, and above that temperature the opposite holds. The biggest contribution from resonances is at the lowest temperature in the study, 10 K, where it is more than four times larger than the direct. Below 1800 K the radiative association rate constant due to X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} transitions dominates over A{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +}, while above that temperature the situation is the opposite.

  1. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates.

  2. Thermoelastic investigation of residual stress: plastic deformation and the change in thermoelastic constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. F.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Quinn, S.; Burguete, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    Plastic deformation causes very small changes in the thermoelastic response of metallic materials; this variation of the thermoelastic constant has the potential to form the basis of a new non-destructive, non-contact, full-field technique for residual stress assessment that is quicker and cheaper than existing methods. The effect of plastic strain on the thermoelastic constant is presented as a potential basis for a calibration methodology that reveals areas of a component that have experienced plastic strain. Establishing this basis provides the initial step in identifying a new approach to residual stress analysis using the thermoelastic response. An evaluation of initial calibration results is presented and the feasibility of applying the methodology to actual components is assessed. As the response to plastic strain is likely to be small it is necessary to identify the effects of the paint coating; experimental work is presented that highlights the importance of repeatable coating approaches.

  3. DISSOCIATION OF ARSENITE-PEPTIDE COMPLEXES: TRIPHASIC NATURE, RATE CONSTANTS, HALF LIVES AND BIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We determined the number and the dissociation rate constants of different complexes formed from arsenite and two peptides containing either one (RV AVGNDYASGYHYGV for peptide 20) or three cysteines (LE AWQGK VEGTEHLYSMK K for peptide 10) via radioactive 73As labeled arsenite and ...

  4. Predicting organic hydrogen atom transfer rate constants using the Marcus cross relation

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical reactions that involve net hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) are ubiquitous in chemistry and biology, from the action of antioxidants to industrial and metalloenzyme catalysis. This report develops and validates a procedure to predict rate constants for HAT reactions of oxyl radicals (RO•) in various media. Our procedure uses the Marcus cross relation (CR) and includes adjustments for solvent hydrogen-bonding effects on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of the reactions. Kinetic solvent effects (KSEs) are included by using Ingold’s model, and thermodynamic solvent effects are accounted for by using an empirical model developed by Abraham. These adjustments are shown to be critical to the success of our combined model, referred to as the CR/KSE model. As an initial test of the CR/KSE model we measured self-exchange and cross rate constants in different solvents for reactions of the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical and the hydroxylamine 2,2′-6,6′-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-ol. Excellent agreement is observed between the calculated and directly determined cross rate constants. We then extend the model to over 30 known HAT reactions of oxyl radicals with OH or CH bonds, including biologically relevant reactions of ascorbate, peroxyl radicals, and α-tocopherol. The CR/KSE model shows remarkable predictive power, predicting rate constants to within a factor of 5 for almost all of the surveyed HAT reactions. PMID:20215463

  5. The effect of receptor clustering on diffusion-limited forward rate constants.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, B; Wiegel, F W

    1983-01-01

    The effect of receptor clustering on the diffusion-limited forward rate constant (k+) is studied theoretically by modeling cell surface receptors by hemispheres distributed on a plane. We give both exact results and bounds. The exact results are obtained using an electrostatic analogue and applying the method of the images. Accurate upper bounds on k+ are found from a variational principle. PMID:6309261

  6. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  7. USE OF ROUGH SETS AND SPECTRAL DATA FOR BUILDING PREDICTIVE MODELS OF REACTION RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for predicting the log of the rate constants for alkaline hydrolysis of organic esters has been developed with the use of gas-phase min-infrared library spectra and a rule-building software system based on the mathematical theory of rough sets. A diverse set of 41 esters ...

  8. A model to estimate the methane generation rate constant in sanitary landfills using fuzzy synthetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Anurag; Achari, Gopal; Joshi, Ramesh C

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents a model using fuzzy synthetic evaluation to estimate the methane generation rate constant, k, for landfills. Four major parameters, precipitation, temperature, waste composition and landfill depth were used as inputs to the model. Whereas, these parameters are known to impact the methane generation, mathematical relationships between them and the methane generation rate constant required to estimate methane generation in landfills, are not known. In addition, the spatial variations of k within a landfill combined with the necessity of site-specific information to estimate its value, makes k one of the most elusive parameters in the accurate prediction of methane generation within a landfill. In this paper, a fuzzy technique was used to develop a model to predict the methane generation rate constant. The model was calibrated and verified using k values from 42 locations. Data from 10 sites were used to calibrate the model and the rest were used to verify it. The model predictions are reasonably accurate. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted to investigate the effect of uncertainty in the input parameters on the generation rate constant.

  9. RELATIVE RATE CONSTANTS OF CONTAMINANT CANDIDATE LIST PESTICIDES WITH HYDROXYL RADICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to establish the rate constants for the reactions of selected pesticides listed on the US EPA Contaminant Candidate List, with UV and hydroxyl radicals (·OH). Batch experiments were conducted in phosphate buffered solution at pH 7. All pestici...

  10. Formulation of a universal first-order rate constant for enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    It is a common practice to employ k(cat)[E]₀/K(m) as a first-order rate constant for the analysis of an enzymatic reaction, where [E]₀ is the total enzyme concentration. I describe in this report a serious shortcoming in analyzing enzymatic reactions when kcat[E]₀/K(m) is employed and show that k(cat)[E]₀/K(m) can only be applied under very limited conditions. I consequently propose the use of a more universal first-order rate constant, k(cat)[ES](K)/[S]₀, where [ES](K) is the initial equilibrium concentration of the ES-complex derived from [E]₀, [S]₀ and K(m). Employing k(cat)[ES](K)/[S]₀ as the first-order rate constant enables all enzymatic reactions to be reasonably simulated under a wide range of conditions, and the catalytic and binding contributions to the rate constant of any enzyme can be determined under any and all conditions.

  11. Residual stress evolution in multilayer ceramic capacitors corresponding to layer increase and its correlation to the dielectric constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Sung; Kim, Sujin; Shin, Hyunho; Jung, Hyun Suk; Hong, Kug Sun

    2005-05-01

    The residual thermal stress in multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with varying number of layers was analyzed using finite element analysis, in order to find the links among the dielectric constant, the number of layers, and the stress state. In the active region of the MLCC, the in-plane stresses in a ceramic layer, σ11 and σ22, were compressive while the out-of-plane stress, σ33, was mostly tensile. Changes in the dielectric constant were related to the reinforcement of the compressive in-plane stress components for small numbers of layers, while out-of-plane tensile stress was attributed to the increased dielectric constant when the number of layers was large. In the intermediate regime, in-plane stress components and out-of-plane components both affected the dielectric constant.

  12. Comparison of radiative-convective models with constant and pressure-dependent lapse rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.; Kuhn, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most commonly used models for studying climatic processes is the convective adjustment radiation model. In current radiation models, stable temperature profiles are maintained with a convective adjustment in which the temperature lapse rate is set equal to a critical lapse rate whenever the computed lapse rates exceed the critical value. First introduced by Manabe and Strickler (1964), a variety of convective adjustment models are now in use. It is pointed out that on a global scale, moist adiabatic processes, and thus moist adiabatic lapse rates, approximate the atmospheric temperature profile. Comparisons of profiles from a one-dimensional-radiative-convective model have been made using the conventional 6.5 K/km as the critical lapse rate and the pressure-dependent moist adiabatic lapse rates. For a clear sky and a single effective cloud the surface temperatures are 1 to 3 K higher with the constant 6.5 K/km critical lapse rate.

  13. Redox properties and rate constants in free-radical mediated damage.

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, P.; Clarke, E. D.

    1987-01-01

    The interpretation of quantitative relationships between chemical properties and biological effects requires great caution if erroneous conclusions are to be avoided. A knowledge of intracellular concentrations is especially desirable. Since many chemical properties are themselves interrelated, reliable identification of critical reactions may be difficult. Free radicals often react by electron transfer or radical addition, and there are quantitative redox dependencies characteristic of both reaction types. Absolute rate constants, and equilibrium constants, of electron transfer reactions may vary greatly according to the dielectric properties of the reaction environment. PMID:3307869

  14. Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-05-01

    High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length 4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm3 molecule-1 s-1, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane} = (1.90 {+-} 0.30) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1705 {+-} 156 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane} = (1.86 {+-} 0.24) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1513 {+-} 123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane} = (2.02 {+-} 0.19) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1799 {+-} 96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane} = (2.55 {+-} 0.30) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1824 {+-} 114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane} = 1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779} exp(97 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane} = 3.169 x 10{sup -16} T{sup 1.679} exp(119 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane} = 6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148} exp(536 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane} = 2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325} exp(602 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the

  15. Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J.V.

    2009-05-15

    High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length {proportional_to}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=(1.90{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1705{+-}56 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=(1.86{+-}0.24) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1513{+-}123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=(2.02{+-}0.19) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1799{+-}96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=(2.55{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1824{+-}114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779}exp(97 K/T)cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=3.169 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.679}exp(119 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148}exp(536 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325}exp(602 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the first three

  16. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  17. Mixed Quantum-Classical Liouville Approach for Calculating Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-07-12

    In this work, we derive a general mixed quantum-classical formula for calculating thermal proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) rate constants, starting from the time integral of the quantum flux-flux correlation function. This formula allows for the direct simulation of PCET reaction dynamics via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach. Owing to the general nature of the derivation, this formula does not rely on any prior mechanistic assumptions and can be applied across a wide range of electronic and protonic coupling regimes. To test the validity of this formula, we applied it to a reduced model of a condensed-phase PCET reaction. Good agreement with the numerically exact rate constant is obtained, demonstrating the accuracy of our formalism. We believe that this approach constitutes a solid foundation for future investigations of the rates and mechanisms of a wide range of PCET reactions.

  18. Constant Rate or Stepwise Injection of Cold Fluid into a Geologic Formation: A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Operations such as CO2 geologic storage, enhanced geothermal systems, and wastewater injection are rendering fluid injection as important as fluid extraction. In particular, injecting fluid colder than the original fluid causes thermal contraction and ensuing decreases in stresses, which yield an effect opposite of what volume expansion driven by the fluid injection imposes. In this study, we conduct numerical simulations to investigate pore-pressure buildup, thermal diffusion, and stress changes for two conditions: (1) constant rate, and (2) stepwise injection of cold fluid. The numerical-simulation method—which combines fluid flow, poroelasticity, thermal diffusion, and thermal stress—is based on the single-phase flow condition to simplify a computation model and thus facilitate a focus on mechanical responses. We also examine temporal evolutions of stress states and mobilized friction angles across base, injection-zone, and caprock layers for two different stress regimes: normal-faulting and reverse-faulting. Under the normal-faulting stress regime, the maximum mobilized friction angle occurs inside of the injection zone, which may act to improve the stability of the caprock. Special attention is required, however, because the location of the maximum mobilized friction angle is close to interfaces with the caprock and base layers. The hypothetical stepwise injection of cold fluid is shown to improve the stability of the injection zone to some extent. Under the reverse-faulting stress regime, the maximum mobilized friction angle occurs near the middle of the injection zone; stability in the injection zone is enhanced while that in the caprock/base is aggravated with time. The hypothetical stepwise injection not only helps improve the stability of the injection zone but also delays the moment when the maximum friction angle is mobilized. Finally, we suggest using dimensionless parameters to determine a prevalence of the thermal-stress effect in the injection

  19. Determination of the kinetic rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems by high performance affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Ge, Jingwen; Guo, Tao; Yang, Shuo; He, Zhonggui; York, Peter; Sun, Lixin; Xu, Xu; Zhang, Jiwen

    2013-08-30

    It is challenging and extremely difficult to measure the kinetics of supramolecular systems with extensive, weak binding (Ka<10(5)M(-1)), and fast dissociation, such as those composed of cyclodextrins and drugs. In this study, a modified peak profiling method based on high performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was established to determine the dissociation rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems. The interactions of β-cyclodextrin with acetaminophen and sertraline were used to exemplify the method. The retention times, variances and the plate heights of the peaks for acetaminophen or sertraline, conventional non-retained substance (H2O) on the β-cyclodextrin bonded column and a control column were determined at four flow rates under linear elution conditions. Then, plate heights for the theoretical non-retained substance were estimated by the modified HPAC method, in consideration of the diffusion and stagnant mobile phase mass transfer. As a result, apparent dissociation rate constants of 1.82 (±0.01)s(-1) and 3.55 (±0.37)s(-1) were estimated for acetaminophen and sertraline respectively at pH 6.8 and 25°C with multiple flow rates. Following subtraction of the non-specific binding with the support, dissociation rate constants were estimated as 1.78 (±0.00) and 1.91 (±0.02)s(-1) for acetaminophen and sertraline, respectively. These results for acetaminophen and sertraline were in good agreement with the magnitude of the rate constants for other drugs determined by capillary electrophoresis reported in the literature and the peak fitting method we performed. The method described in this work is thought to be suitable for other supramolecules, with relatively weak, fast and extensive interactions.

  20. Constant-load versus heart rate-targeted exercise - Responses of systolic intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, V. Q.; Spodick, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Various systolic intervals were measured prior to and during heart rate-targeted bicycle ergometer exercise. There were striking similarities within each matched exercise set for Q-Im, isovolumetric contraction time, preejection period (PEP), and PEP/left ventricular ejection time (LVET). LVET was significantly shorter for rate-targeted exercise. It is concluded that either constant-load or rate-targeted bicycle ergometry may be used with the choice of method determined by the purpose of the protocol, and that systolic intervals (except LVET) should not be much altered owing to the method chosen.

  1. The Rate Constant for the Reaction H + C2H5 at T = 295 - 150K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pimentel, Andre S.; Payne, Walter A.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Cody, Regina J.; Stief, Louis J.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction between the hydrogen atom and the ethyl (C2H3) radical is predicted by photochemical modeling to be the most important loss process for C2H5 radicals in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. This reaction is also one of the major sources for the methyl radicals in these atmospheres. These two simplest hydrocarbon radicals are the initial species for the synthesis of larger hydrocarbons. Previous measurements of the rate constant for the H + C2H5 reaction varied by a factor of five at room temperature, and some studies showed a dependence upon temperature while others showed no such dependence. In addition, the previous studies were at higher temperatures and generally higher pressures than that needed for use in planetary atmospheric models. The rate constant for the reaction H + C2H5 has been measured directly at T = 150, 202 and 295 K and at P = 1.0 Torr He for all temperatures and additionally at P = 0.5 and 2.0 Torr He at T = 202 K. The measurements were performed in a discharge - fast flow system. The decay of the C2H5 radical in the presence of excess hydrogen was monitored by low-energy electron impact mass spectrometry under pseudo-first order conditions. H atoms and C2H5 radicals were generated rapidly and simultaneously by the reaction of fluorine atoms with H2 and C2H6, respectively. The total rate constant was found to be temperature and pressure independent. The measured total rate constant at each temperature are: k(sub 1)(295K) = (1.02+/-0.24)x10(exp -10), k(sub 1)(202K) = (1.02+/-0.22)x10(exp -10) and k(sub 1)(150K) = (0.93+/-0.21)x10(exp -10), all in units of cu cm/molecule/s. The total rate constant derived from all the combined measurements is k(sub 1) = (l.03+/-0.17)x10(exp -10) cu cm/molecule/s. At room temperature our results are about a factor of two higher than the recommended rate constant and a factor of three lower than the most recently published study.

  2. Likelihood inference of non-constant diversification rates with incomplete taxon sampling.

    PubMed

    Höhna, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale phylogenies provide a valuable source to study background diversification rates and investigate if the rates have changed over time. Unfortunately most large-scale, dated phylogenies are sparsely sampled (fewer than 5% of the described species) and taxon sampling is not uniform. Instead, taxa are frequently sampled to obtain at least one representative per subgroup (e.g. family) and thus to maximize diversity (diversified sampling). So far, such complications have been ignored, potentially biasing the conclusions that have been reached. In this study I derive the likelihood of a birth-death process with non-constant (time-dependent) diversification rates and diversified taxon sampling. Using simulations I test if the true parameters and the sampling method can be recovered when the trees are small or medium sized (fewer than 200 taxa). The results show that the diversification rates can be inferred and the estimates are unbiased for large trees but are biased for small trees (fewer than 50 taxa). Furthermore, model selection by means of Akaike's Information Criterion favors the true model if the true rates differ sufficiently from alternative models (e.g. the birth-death model is recovered if the extinction rate is large and compared to a pure-birth model). Finally, I applied six different diversification rate models--ranging from a constant-rate pure birth process to a decreasing speciation rate birth-death process but excluding any rate shift models--on three large-scale empirical phylogenies (ants, mammals and snakes with respectively 149, 164 and 41 sampled species). All three phylogenies were constructed by diversified taxon sampling, as stated by the authors. However only the snake phylogeny supported diversified taxon sampling. Moreover, a parametric bootstrap test revealed that none of the tested models provided a good fit to the observed data. The model assumptions, such as homogeneous rates across species or no rate shifts, appear to be

  3. Steady-State Computation of Constant Rotational Rate Dynamic Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic stability derivatives are essential to predicting the open and closed loop performance, stability, and controllability of aircraft. Computational determination of constant-rate dynamic stability derivatives (derivatives of aircraft forces and moments with respect to constant rotational rates) is currently performed indirectly with finite differencing of multiple time-accurate computational fluid dynamics solutions. Typical time-accurate solutions require excessive amounts of computational time to complete. Formulating Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in a rotating noninertial reference frame and applying an automatic differentiation tool to the modified code has the potential for directly computing these derivatives with a single, much faster steady-state calculation. The ability to rapidly determine static and dynamic stability derivatives by computational methods can benefit multidisciplinary design methodologies and reduce dependency on wind tunnel measurements. The CFL3D thin-layer N-S computational fluid dynamics code was modified for this study to allow calculations on complex three-dimensional configurations with constant rotation rate components in all three axes. These CFL3D modifications also have direct application to rotorcraft and turbomachinery analyses. The modified CFL3D steady-state calculation is a new capability that showed excellent agreement with results calculated by a similar formulation. The application of automatic differentiation to CFL3D allows the static stability and body-axis rate derivatives to be calculated quickly and exactly.

  4. Kinetic rate constant prediction supports the conformational selection mechanism of protein binding.

    PubMed

    Moal, Iain H; Bates, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of protein-protein kinetic rate constants provides a fundamental test of our understanding of molecular recognition, and will play an important role in the modeling of complex biological systems. In this paper, a feature selection and regression algorithm is applied to mine a large set of molecular descriptors and construct simple models for association and dissociation rate constants using empirical data. Using separate test data for validation, the predicted rate constants can be combined to calculate binding affinity with accuracy matching that of state of the art empirical free energy functions. The models show that the rate of association is linearly related to the proportion of unbound proteins in the bound conformational ensemble relative to the unbound conformational ensemble, indicating that the binding partners must adopt a geometry near to that of the bound prior to binding. Mirroring the conformational selection and population shift mechanism of protein binding, the models provide a strong separate line of evidence for the preponderance of this mechanism in protein-protein binding, complementing structural and theoretical studies.

  5. Effects of the anion salt nature on the rate constants of the aqueous proton exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Jose M; Garzon, Andres; Crovetto, Luis; Orte, Angel; Lopez, Sergio G; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2012-04-28

    The proton-transfer ground-state rate constants of the xanthenic dye 9-[1-(2-methyl-4-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (TG-II), recovered by Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS), have proven to be useful to quantitatively reflect specific cation effects in aqueous solutions (J. M. Paredes, L. Crovetto, A. Orte, J. M. Alvarez-Pez and E. M. Talavera, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 1685-1694). Since these phenomena are more sensitive to anions than to cations, in this paper we have accounted for the influence of salts with the sodium cation in common, and the anion classified according to the empirical Hofmeister series, on the proton transfer rate constants of TG-II. We demonstrate that the presence of ions accelerates the rate of the ground-state proton-exchange reaction in the same order than ions that affect ion solvation in water. The combination of FLCS with a fluorophore undergoing proton transfer reactions in the ground state, along with the desirable feature of a pseudo-dark state when the dye is protonated, allows one unique direct determination of kinetic rate constants of the proton exchange chemical reaction.

  6. Estimating the rate constant of cyclic GMP hydrolysis by activated phosphodiesterase in photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingruber, Jürgen; Holcman, David

    2008-10-01

    The early steps of light response occur in the outer segment of rod and cone photoreceptor. They involve the hydrolysis of cGMP, a soluble cyclic nucleotide, that gates ionic channels located in the outer segment membrane. We shall study here the rate by which cGMP is hydrolyzed by activated phosphodiesterase (PDE). This process has been characterized experimentally by two different rate constants βd and βsub: βd accounts for the effect of all spontaneously active PDE in the outer segment, and βsub characterizes cGMP hydrolysis induced by a single light-activated PDE. So far, no attempt has been made to derive the experimental values of βd and βsub from a theoretical model, which is the goal of this work. Using a model of diffusion in the confined rod geometry, we derive analytical expressions for βd and βsub by calculating the flux of cGMP molecules to an activated PDE site. We obtain the dependency of these rate constants as a function of the outer segment geometry, the PDE activation and deactivation rates and the aqueous cGMP diffusion constant. Our formulas show good agreement with experimental measurements. Finally, we use our derivation to model the time course of the cGMP concentration in a transversally well-stirred outer segment.

  7. Strain rate and stress field in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, Nicolas; Woessner, Jochen; Giardini, Domenico; Rothacher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In this study we test whether the surface deformation and the seismic activity are in agreement in terms of seismic moment release and stress/strain orientations within the territory of Switzerland. We find that for most of the country, the stress released (~2.0 10E11 N·m/yr) is consistent with the lithosphere deformation (<5 10E-8 /yr) constrained using the Global Positioning System (GPS). South of the Alpine front, we note that surface strain rates displays few agreement with long-term (and deep) deformation of the upper mantle. In this area, we propose that shear strain is being distributed in the upper crust as a result of the clockwise rotation of the Adria plate. For three regions (Basel, Swiss Jura and Ticino), we find that seismic current activity and surface deformation not to be in agreement. In the Basel area, deep seismicity exists while surface deformation is absent. This situation contrasts to what is found in the Ticino and the Swiss Jura, where seismic activity is close to absent but surface deformation is detected (~2 10E-8 /yr). While the surface deformation and seismic activity is inconsistent for the Ticino, we find them to comply in the Valais region where MW≥6 events are historically documented. Our comparison implies that the Ticino faces the potential of damaging earthquakes every hundred to few hundred years.

  8. Estimation of Anaerobic Debromination Rate Constants of PBDE Pathways Using an Anaerobic Dehalogenation Model.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Filiz; Imamoglu, Ipek

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to estimate anaerobic debromination rate constants (km) of PBDE pathways using previously reported laboratory soil data. km values of pathways are estimated by modifying a previously developed model as Anaerobic Dehalogenation Model. Debromination activities published in the literature in terms of bromine substitutions as well as specific microorganisms and their combinations are used for identification of pathways. The range of estimated km values is between 0.0003 and 0.0241 d(-1). The median and maximum of km values are found to be comparable to the few available biologically confirmed rate constants published in the literature. The estimated km values can be used as input to numerical fate and transport models for a better and more detailed investigation of the fate of individual PBDEs in contaminated sediments. Various remediation scenarios such as monitored natural attenuation or bioremediation with bioaugmentation can be handled in a more quantitative manner with the help of km estimated in this study.

  9. Rate constant for formation of chlorine nitrate by the reaction ClO + NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M. T.; Lin, C. L.; Demore, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    The pseudo-first-order decay of ClO in a large excess of NO2 was monitored in a discharge flow/mass-spectrometer apparatus in order to measure the rate constant of the reaction ClO + NO2 + M yields ClONO2 + M for M = He, Ar, and N2 over the temperature range from 248 to 417 K. Numerical results are given for He at 248, 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 9 torr); for Ar at 298 K (1 to 4 torr); and for N2 at 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 6 torr). Systematic errors are estimated, and identification of the reaction product is discussed. The results obtained are shown to be in excellent agreement with other recent measurements of the same rate constant.

  10. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene from 298 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene have been measured at room temperature by two techniques, flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence and discharge flow-resonance fluorescence. The measured values are (6.19 + or - 1.68) x 10 to the -14th and (7.3 + or - 1.3) x 10 to the -14th cu cm/molecule/s, respectively. In addition, rate constants as a function of temperature have been measured over the range 298-500 K using the FP-RF technique. The results are best represented by the Arrhenius expression k = (1.88 + or - 1.12) x 10 to the -11th exp(-1725 + or - 190/T) cu cm/molecule/s, where the indicated errors are at the two standard deviation level.

  11. Rate constant for the reaction of O(3P) with diacetylene from 210 to 423 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. B.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction of O(3P) with diacetylene (C4H2) has been measured as a function of pressure and temperature by the flash-photolysis/resonance-fluorescence method. At 298 K and below, no pressure dependence of the rate constant was observed, but at 423 K a moderate (factor-of-2) increase was detected in the range 3 to 75 torr Ar.Results at or near the high-pressure limit are represented by an Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 210 to 423 K. The results are compared with previous determinations, all of which employed the discharge-flow/mass-spectrometry technique. The mechanism of the reaction is considered, including both primary and secondary processes. The heats of formation of the reactants, adducts, and products for the O(3P) + C4H2 reaction are discussed and contrasted with those for O(3P) + C2H2.

  12. Evaluation of canonical and microcanonical nonadiabatic reaction rate constants by using the Zhu-Nakamura formulas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Mil'nikov, Gennady; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2004-11-08

    We consider a problem of calculating both thermal and microcanonical rate constants for nonadiabatic chemical reactions. Instead of using the conventional transition state theory, we use a generalized seam surface and introduce a concept of a coordinate dependent effective nonadiabatic transition probability based on the Zhu-Nakamura theory which can treat the nonadiabatic tunneling properly. The present approach can be combined with Monte Carlo method so as to be applicable to chemical reactions in complicated systems. The method is demonstrated to work well in wide energy and temperature range. Numerical tests also show that it is very essential for accurate evaluation of the thermal rate constant to use the generalized seam surface and take into account the nonadiabatic tunneling effect.

  13. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule–Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide‐and‐conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction‐type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre‐exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  14. Rate constants of the reactions of ozone with nitriles, acrylates and terpenes in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Hushider B.; Rao, K. V. S. Rama; Iyer, R. Mahadeva

    Rate constants for the reactions of acrylonitrile, methacrylonitrile, methyl and ethyl acrylate with O 3 have been determined with the help of a flow system coupled to an u.v. spectrophotometer. The rate constants obtained have enabled an estimation of the tropospheric lifetimes with respect to O 3 and have also offered a clue to the nature of the initial ozone attack on the unsaturates. Non-stoichiometry observed in the case of acrylonitrile and ethyl acrylate has been rationalized by secondary free radical reactions. Absorptivities of the four unsaturates in vapour as well as in the solution phase have been reported. A brief attempt to study ozone-terpene reactions is also described.

  15. Effect of Solvent Dielectric Properties on the Spontaneous-Emission Rate Constant of Molecular Singlet Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarnikova, E. S.; Parkhats, M. V.; Stasheuski, A. S.; Dzhagarov, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum yields and luminescence lifetimes of singlet oxygen in 18 different solvents and binary mixtures were measured using laser fluorometry. The results allowed a direct effect of the refractive index on the radiative rate constant kr of the singlet-oxygen a 1 Δ g → X 3 Σ g - transition caused by a change of photon state density in addition to an indirect effect through a local-field factor to be determined. The experimentally observed rise of kr with increasing medium refractive index could not be explained by the influence of only these two factors. The discrepancy was overcome by taking into account changes of the singlet-oxygen transition dipole moment. Consideration of all three factors explained the influence of the medium on rate constant kr

  16. Absolute rate constant for the O plus NO chemiluminescence in the near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golde, M. F.; Roche, A. E.; Kaufman, F.

    1973-01-01

    Infrared chemiluminescence from the process O + NO (+M) NO2 + hv (+M) has been studied between 1.3 and 4.1 micrometer. The wavelength dependence of the continuum between 1.3 and 3.3 micrometer is in fair agreement with previous studies and the measured radiative rate constant at 1.51 micrometer establishes the NO-O glow in this spectral range as a secondary emission standard. Comparison with previous studies of the visible region of the glow implies that the overall radiative rate constant lies in the range (9.4 to 11.2) x 10 to the minus 17 power cu cm sec/1. In the region 3.3 to 4.1 micrometer, the previously observed broad band, peaking at 3.7 micrometer, shows a complex kinetic dependence on O and M.

  17. Direct rate constant measurement of radical disulphide anion formation for cysteine and cysteamine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezyk, Stephen P.

    1995-03-01

    The techniques of pulse radiolysis, laser photolysis and absorption spectroscopy have been used to directly determine rate constants for radical disulphide anion formation for cysteine and cysteamine in aqueous solution. The measured values for cysteine, over the pH range 7-12, allowed calculation of individual rate constants for the constituent reactions RS . + RSH → RSSR -. + H + and RS . + RS - → RSSR -. as (3.39 ± 0.31) × 10 8 and (1.21 ± 0.04) × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively. Analogous values for cysteamine were also determined by this technique as (3.06 ± 0.16) × 10 8 and (3.65 ± 0.07) × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1.

  18. Rate constants of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors in rat brain medulla. Evaluation by competition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, G.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1985-07-25

    The method of competition kinetics, which measures the binding kinetics of an unlabeled ligand through its effect on the binding kinetics of a labeled ligand, was employed to investigate the kinetics of muscarinic agonist binding to rat brain medulla pons homogenates. The agonists studied were acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and oxotremorine, with N-methyl-4-(TH)piperidyl benzilate employed as the radiolabeled ligand. Our results suggested that the binding of muscarinic agonists to the high affinity sites is characterized by dissociation rate constants higher by 2 orders of magnitude than those of antagonists, with rather similar association rate constants. Our findings also suggest that isomerization of the muscarinic receptors following ligand binding is significant in the case of antagonists, but not of agonists. Moreover, it is demonstrated that in the medulla pons preparation, agonist-induced interconversion between high and low affinity bindings sites does not occur to an appreciable extent.

  19. A method for computing association rate constants of atomistically represented proteins under macromolecular crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sanbo; Cai, Lu; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-12-01

    In cellular environments, two protein molecules on their way to form a specific complex encounter many bystander macromolecules. The latter molecules, or crowders, affect both the energetics of the interaction between the test molecules and the dynamics of their relative motion. In earlier work (Zhou and Szabo 1991 J. Chem. Phys. 95 5948-52), it has been shown that, in modeling the association kinetics of the test molecules, the presence of crowders can be accounted for by their energetic and dynamic effects. The recent development of the transient-complex theory for protein association in dilute solutions makes it possible to easily incorporate the energetic and dynamic effects of crowders. The transient complex refers to a late on-pathway intermediate, in which the two protein molecules have near-native relative separation and orientation, but have yet to form the many short-range specific interactions of the native complex. The transient-complex theory predicts the association rate constant as ka = ka0exp( - ΔG*el/kBT), where ka0 is the ‘basal’ rate constant for reaching the transient complex by unbiased diffusion, and the Boltzmann factors captures the influence of long-range electrostatic interactions between the protein molecules. Crowders slow down the diffusion, therefore reducing the basal rate constant (to kac0), and induce an effective interaction energy ΔGc. We show that the latter interaction energy for atomistic proteins in the presence of spherical crowders is ‘long’-ranged, allowing the association rate constant under crowding to be computed as kac = kac0exp[ - (ΔG*el + ΔG*c)/kBT]. Applications demonstrate that this computational method allows for realistic modeling of protein association kinetics under crowding.

  20. Optimal decay rate for the wave equation on a square with constant damping on a strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    We consider the damped wave equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the unit square parametrized by Cartesian coordinates x and y. We assume the damping a to be strictly positive and constant for x<σ and zero for x>σ . We prove the exact t^{-4/3}-decay rate for the energy of classical solutions. Our main result (Theorem 1) answers question (1) of Anantharaman and Léautaud (Anal PDE 7(1):159-214, 2014, Section 2C).

  1. Revealing equilibrium and rate constants of weak and fast noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Gleb G; Okhonin, Victor; Gorelsky, Serge I; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2011-03-15

    Rate and equilibrium constants of weak noncovalent molecular interactions are extremely difficult to measure. Here, we introduced a homogeneous approach called equilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (ECEEM) to determine k(on), k(off), and K(d) of weak (K(d) > 1 μM) and fast kinetics (relaxation time, τ < 0.1 s) in quasi-equilibrium for multiple unlabeled ligands simultaneously in one microreactor. Conceptually, an equilibrium mixture (EM) of a ligand (L), target (T), and a complex (C) is prepared. The mixture is introduced into the beginning of a capillary reactor with aspect ratio >1000 filled with T. Afterward, differential mobility of L, T, and C along the reactor is induced by an electric field. The combination of differential mobility of reactants and their interactions leads to a change of the EM peak shape. This change is a function of rate constants, so the rate and equilibrium constants can be directly determined from the analysis of the EM peak shape (width and symmetry) and propagation pattern along the reactor. We proved experimentally the use of ECEEM for multiplex determination of kinetic parameters describing weak (3 mM > K(d) > 80 μM) and fast (0.25 s ≥ τ ≥ 0.9 ms) noncovalent interactions between four small molecule drugs (ibuprofen, S-flurbiprofen, salicylic acid and phenylbutazone) and α- and β-cyclodextrins. The affinity of the drugs was significantly higher for β-cyclodextrin than α-cyclodextrin and mostly determined by the rate constant of complex formation.

  2. Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?

    PubMed

    Regnery, J; Wing, A D; Alidina, M; Drewes, J E

    2015-08-01

    This study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e., redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e., less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR.

  3. Comparisons of measured rate constants with spectroscopically determined electron-transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Stephen F; Konradsson, Asgeir E; Weaver, Michael N; Stephenson, Rachel M; Lockard, Jenny V; Zink, Jeffrey I; Zhao, Yi

    2007-06-21

    This work involves comparison of rate constants measured for an intervalence (IV) compound with electron-transfer parameters derived from its optical absorption spectrum. The temperature-dependent rate constants for the radical cation having 3-tert-butyl-2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-yl (hydrazine) charge-bearing units attached para to a tetramethylbenzene bridge (1+) were previously measured. In this study, resonance Raman is used to calculate the magnitudes of the distortions of normal modes of vibration caused by excitation into the intervalence absorption band. These data produce a vibrational reorganization energy lambdavsym of 9250 cm(-1), and averaged single-mode omegav for use in the Golden Rule equation of 697 cm(-1). Zhu-Nakamura theory has been used to calculate preexponential factors for analysis of the previously measured variable temperature optical spectra using quartic-enhanced intervalence bands to extract the total reorganization energy and the intramolecular electron-transfer rate constants for intramolecular electron transfer using electron spin resonance. In contrast to using the Golden Rule equation, separation of lambda into solvent and vibrational components is not significant for these data. The Zhu-Nakamura theory calculations produce ln(k/T) versus 1/T slopes that are consistent with the experimental data for electronic couplings that are somewhat larger than the values obtained from the optical spectra using Hush's method.

  4. Analytical results for the pulsed operation of high field constant stress coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbockstal, Luc; Askenazy, Salomon; Herlach, Fritz; Schneider-Muntau, Hans-Jorg

    1994-07-01

    Based on the analytical expressions for the radial current density in coils optimized for constant stress, the implications for pulsed operation are discussed; the pulse duration, peak power and energy are determined. A cut-off on the current density, which peaks at the inside of the coil, limits the localized heating and increases the pulse duration at the expense of center field or materials requirements. From the relation between strength, conductivity and cut-off level, optimal properties of construction materials are determined.

  5. Theoretical growth rates, periods, and pulsation constants for long-period variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. W.; Wood, P. R.

    1982-08-01

    An extensive set of linear, nonadiabatic pulsation models for red giant and supergiant stars is computed, in order that the dependence of pulsation periods (P), pulsation constants (Q), and growth rate on physical input parameters can be determined from the systematic behavior seen in the models. Also investigated is the extent of the dependence of P, Q, and growth rate on uncertain quantities such as atmospheric molecular opacity, surface boundary conditions, and effective temperature. The growth rate for the fundamental mode is found to increase with luminosity on the giant branch while the growth rate for the first overtone decreases. Dynamical instabilities found in previous adiabatic models of extreme red giants do not occur when nonadiabatic effects are included in the models.

  6. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Mesospheric Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingdi; Peng, Jian; Reppert, Kelsey; Callahan, Sara; Smith, Gregory P

    2016-06-09

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We remeasured its rate constant to reduce its uncertainty and extended the measurements to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques. H atoms were produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O((1)D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measured the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone using LIF. We monitored either the H atom decay by two photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH (v = 9) product time evolution with excitation of the B(2)Σ(+)-X(2)Π (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in the blue B(2)Σ(+)-A(2)Σ(+) (0,7) band. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 140 to 305 K at 20 to 200 Torr in Ar. Small kinetic modeling corrections were made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results are consistent with the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere.

  7. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  8. A Method for Achieving Constant Rotation Rates in a Micro-Orthogonal Linkage System

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1999-05-12

    Silicon micromachine designs include engines that consist of orthog- onally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small as 50 {micro}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000 rpm. Generally, these en- gines will run with non-uniform rotation rates if the drive signals are not properly designed and maintained over a range of system parameters. We present a method for producing constant rotation rates in a micro-engine driven by an orthogonal linkage system. We show that provided the val- ues of certain masses, springs, damping factors, and lever arms are in the right proportions, the system behaves as though it were symmetrical. We will refer to systems built in this way as being quasi-symmetrical. We show that if a system is built quasi-symmetrically , then it is possible to achieve constant rotation rates even if one does not know the form of the friction function, or the value of the friction. We analyze this case in some detail.

  9. Isothermal titration calorimetry determination of individual rate constants of trypsin catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, César; Condado-Morales, Itzel; Olguin, Luis F; Costas, Miguel

    2015-06-15

    Determination of individual rate constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions is central to the understanding of their mechanism of action and is commonly obtained by stopped-flow kinetic experiments. However, most natural substrates either do not fluoresce/absorb or lack a significant change in their spectra while reacting and, therefore, are frequently chemically modified to render adequate molecules for their spectroscopic detection. Here, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to obtain Michaelis-Menten plots for the trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of several substrates at different temperatures (278-318K): four spectrophotometrically blind lysine and arginine N-free esters, one N-substituted arginine ester, and one amide. A global fitting of these data provided the individual rate constants and activation energies for the acylation and deacylation reactions, and the ratio of the formation and dissociation rates of the enzyme-substrate complex, leading also to the corresponding free energies of activation. The results indicate that for lysine and arginine N-free esters deacylation is the rate-limiting step, but for the N-substituted ester and the amide acylation is the slowest step. It is shown that ITC is able to produce quality kinetic data and is particularly well suited for those enzymatic reactions that cannot be measured by absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy.

  10. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of rate constants in biosensor studies.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Jackson, Craig M

    2005-02-15

    A comparison is made between Arrhenius and transition-state analyses of the temperature dependence of rate constants reported in four published biosensor studies. Although the Eyring transition-state theory seemingly affords a more definitive solution to the problem of characterizing the activation energetics, the analysis is equivocal because of inherent assumptions about reaction mechanism and the magnitude of the transmission coefficient. In view of those uncertainties it is suggested that a preferable course of action entails reversion to the empirical Arrhenius analysis with regard to the energy of activation and a preexponential factor. The former is essentially equivalent to the enthalpy of activation, whereas the magnitude of the latter indicates directly the extent of disparity between the frequency of product formation and the universal frequency factor (temperature multiplied by the ratio of the Boltzmann and Planck constants) and hence the likelihood of a more complicated kinetic mechanism than that encompassed by the Eyring transition-state theory.

  11. Determination of first-order degradation rate constants from monitoring networks.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Christof; Chen, Cui; Gronewold, Jan; Kolditz, Olaf; Bauer, Sebastian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, different strategies for estimating first-order degradation rate constants from measured field data are compared by application to multiple, synthetic, contaminant plumes. The plumes were generated by numerical simulation of contaminant transport and degradation in virtual heterogeneous aquifers. These sites were then individually and independently investigated on the computer by installation of extensive networks of observation wells. From the data measured at the wells, that is, contaminant concentrations, hydraulic conductivities, and heads, first-order degradation rates were estimated by three 1D centerline methods, which use only measurements located on the plume axis, and a two-dimensional method, which uses all concentration measurements available downgradient from the contaminant source. Results for both strategies show that the true rate constant used for the numerical simulation of the plumes in general tends to be overestimated. Overestimation is stronger for narrow plumes from small source zones, with an average overestimation factor of about 5 and single values ranging from 0.5 to 20, decreasing for wider plumes, with an average overestimation factor of about 2 and similar spread. Reasons for this overestimation are identified in the velocity calculation, the dispersivity parameterization, and off-centerline measurements. For narrow plumes, the one- and the two-dimensional strategies show approximately the same amount of overestimation. For wider plumes, however, incorporation of all measurements in the two-dimensional approach reduces the estimation error. No significant relation between the number of observation wells in the monitoring network and the quality of the estimated rate constant is found for the two-dimensional approach.

  12. Atmospheric fate of a series of carbonyl nitrates: photolysis frequencies and OH-oxidation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Bertoa, R; Picquet-Varrault, B; Tamas, W; Pangui, E; Doussin, J-F

    2012-11-20

    Multifunctional organic nitrates are potential NO(x) reservoirs whose atmospheric chemistry is somewhat little known. They could play an important role in the spatial distribution of reactive nitrogen species and consequently in ozone formation and distribution in remote areas. In this work, the rate constants for the reaction with OH radical and the photolysis frequencies of α-nitrooxyacetone, 3-nitrooxy-2-butanone, and 3-methyl-3-nitrooxy-2-butanone have been determined at room temperature at 1000 mbar total pressure of synthetic air. The rate constants for the OH oxidation were measured using the relative rate technique, with methanol as reference compound. The following rate constants were obtained for the reaction with OH: k(OH) = (6.7 ± 2.5) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for α-nitrooxyacetone, (10.6 ± 4.1) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for 3-nitrooxy-2-butanone, and (2.6 ± 0.9) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for 3-methyl-3-nitrooxy-2-butanone. The corresponding photolysis frequencies extrapolated to typical atmospheric conditions for July first at noon at 40° latitude North were (4.8 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) s(-1), (5.7 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) s(-1), and (7.4 ± 0.2) × 10(-5) s(-1), respectively. The data show that photolysis is a major atmospheric sink for these organic nitrates.

  13. Osmosis-induced swelling of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in constant total stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valcke, E.; Marien, A.; Smets, S.; Li, X.; Mokni, N.; Olivella, S.; Sillen, X.

    2010-11-01

    In geological disposal conditions, contact of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste, which contains high amounts of the hygroscopic and highly soluble NaNO 3, with groundwater will result in water uptake and swelling of the waste, and in subsequent leaching of the embedded NaNO 3 and radionuclides. The swelling of and the NaNO 3 leaching from non-radioactive Eurobitum samples, comprised between two stainless steel filters and in contact with 0.1 M KOH, was studied in restricted (semi-confined) swelling conditions, i.e. under a constant total stress, or counterpressure, of 2.2, 3.3, or 4.4 MPa ( i.e. oedometer conditions). Four tests were stopped after hydration times between 800 and 1500 days, and the samples were analyzed by micro-focus X-ray Computer Tomography (μCT) and by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). The complete set of data enabled a consistent interpretation of the observations and lead to an improved understanding of the phenomenology of the water uptake, swelling, and NaNO 3 leaching in restricted swelling conditions. Under the studied conditions, the bituminous matrix surrounding the NaNO 3 crystals and pores with NaNO 3 solution behaved as a highly efficient semi-permeable membrane, i.e. osmotic processes occurred. In the main part of the leached layers, a high average NaNO 3 concentration and related to this a high osmotic pressure prevailed, explaining why in the studied range the swelling was not measurably affected by the counterpressure. At the interface with the stainless steel filters, a low permeable re-compressed bitumen layer was formed, contributing to the slow release of NaNO 3 compared to the water uptake rate. A fully coupled Chemo-Hydro-Mechanical (CHM) constitutive model has been developed that integrates the key processes involved and that reproduces satisfactorily the results; this is presented in another work. Combination of the experimental and the modelling study allow to conclude that under semi

  14. Mn2O3 Slurry Reuse by Circulation Achieving High Constant Removal Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishii, Sadahiro; Nakamura, Ko; Hanawa, Kenzo; Watanabe, Satoru; Arimoto, Yoshihiro; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Doi, Toshiro K.

    2012-04-01

    Fumed silica is widely used in SiO2 chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). In semiconductor processes, only fresh slurry is used, and used slurry is disposed. Sustainable development demands a reduction in waste. Since reuse of slurry is effective for reducing the amount of used slurry generated, we investigated the reuse of Mn2O3 slurry and conventional fumed silica slurry. In both cases, abrasive concentration decreases as reuse time increases. The removal rate for Mn2O3 slurry maintains a value 4 times that of the conventional fumed silica slurry during slurry reuse, because the removal rate for Mn2O3 slurry is almost constant for solid concentrations between 1.0 and 10 wt %. Pad conditioning was not performed for Mn2O3 slurry. The removal rate for conventional slurry decreases as the number of times of reuse increases, even when pad conditioning is appropriately performed.

  15. Calorimetric determination of rate constants and enthalpy changes for zero-order reactions.

    PubMed

    Almeida e Sousa, Luis; Beezer, Anthony E; Hansen, Lee D; Clapham, David; Connor, Joseph A; Gaisford, Simon

    2012-06-07

    Calorimetry is a general method for determination of the rates of zero-order processes, but analysis of the data for the rate constant and reaction enthalpy is difficult because these occur as a product in the rate equation so evaluation of one requires knowledge of the other. Three methods for evaluation of both parameters, without prior knowledge, are illustrated with examples and compared with literature data. Method 1 requires the reaction to be studied in two buffers with different enthalpies of ionization. Method 2 is based on calculation of reaction enthalpy from group additivity functions. Method 3 applies when reaction progresses to completion. The methods are applied to the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, the hydrolysis of acetylsalicylic acid, and the photodegradation of nifedipine, respectively.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of mechanical properties of rock using an automated triaxial compression test with a constant mean stress criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Mellegard, K.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1999-07-01

    A computerized, servohydraulic test system has been used in the laboratory to perform axisymmetric, triaxial compression tests on natural rock salt using a load path that maintains constant mean stress. The constant mean stress test protocol illustrates that modern test systems allow a nonstandard load path which can focus on a particular aspect of rock characterization; namely, the onset of dilation. Included are discussions of how the constant mean stress test could be used to investigate material anisotropy and determine elastic moduli. The results from the constant mean stress tests are compared to test results from a traditional test method. The paper also addresses system calibration concerns and the effects of pressure changes on the direct-contact extensometers used to measure strain.

  17. The Proline Enamine Formation Pathway Revisited in Dimethyl Sulfoxide: Rate Constants Determined via NMR.

    PubMed

    Haindl, Michael H; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2015-10-14

    Enamine catalysis is a fundamental activation mode in organocatalysis and can be successfully combined with other catalytic methods, e.g., photocatalysis. Recently, the elusive enamine intermediates were detected, and their stabilization modes were revealed. However, the formation pathway of this central organocatalytic intermediate is still a matter of dispute, and several mechanisms involving iminium and/or oxazolidinone are proposed. Here, the first experimentally determined rate constants and rates of enamine formation are presented using 1D selective exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) buildup curves and initial rate approximation. The trends of the enamine formation rates from exo-oxazolidinones and endo-oxazolidinones upon variation of the proline and water concentrations as well as the nucelophilic/basic properties of additives are investigated together with isomerization rates of the oxazolidinones. These first kinetic data of enamine formations in combination with theoretical calculations reveal the deprotonation of iminium intermediates as the dominant pathway in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The dominant enamine formation pathway varies according to the experimental conditions, e.g., the presence and strength of basic additives. The enamine formation is zero-order in proline and oxazolidinones, which excludes the direct deprotonation of oxazolidinones via E2 mechanism. The nucleophilicity of the additives influences only the isomerization rates of the oxazolidinones and not the enamine formation rates, which excludes a nucleophile-assisted anti elimination of oxazolidinones as a major enamine formation pathway.

  18. Constant rate of p53 tetramerization in response to DNA damage controls the p53 response

    PubMed Central

    Gaglia, Giorgio; Lahav, Galit

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the tumor suppressor protein p53 have been previously investigated in single cells using fluorescently tagged p53. Such approach reports on the total abundance of p53 but does not provide a measure for functional p53. We used fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) to quantify in single cells the dynamics of p53 tetramers, the functional units of p53. We found that while total p53 increases proportionally to the input strength, p53 tetramers are formed in cells at a constant rate. This breaks the linear input–output relation and dampens the p53 response. Disruption of the p53-binding protein ARC led to a dose-dependent rate of tetramers formation, resulting in enhanced tetramerization and induction of p53 target genes. Our work suggests that constraining the p53 response in face of variable inputs may protect cells from committing to terminal outcomes and highlights the importance of quantifying the active form of signaling molecules in single cells. Quantification of the dynamics of p53 tetramers in single cells using a fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay reveals that, while total p53 increases proportionally to the DNA damage strength, p53 tetramers are formed at a constant rate. PMID:25344068

  19. Evaluation and comparison of diffusion MR methods for measuring apparent transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Gore, John C.; Xu, Junzhong

    2017-02-01

    Two diffusion-based approaches, CG (constant gradient) and FEXI (filtered exchange imaging) methods, have been previously proposed for measuring transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, but their accuracy and feasibility have not been comprehensively evaluated and compared. In this work, both computer simulations and cell experiments in vitro were performed to evaluate these two methods. Simulations were done with different cell diameters (5, 10, 20 μm), a broad range of kin values (0.02-30 s-1) and different SNR's, and simulated kin's were directly compared with the ground truth values. Human leukemia K562 cells were cultured and treated with saponin to selectively change cell transmembrane permeability. The agreement between measured kin's of both methods was also evaluated. The results suggest that, without noise, the CG method provides reasonably accurate estimation of kin especially when it is smaller than 10 s-1, which is in the typical physiological range of many biological tissues. However, although the FEXI method overestimates kin even with corrections for the effects of extracellular water fraction, it provides reasonable estimates with practical SNR's and more importantly, the fitted apparent exchange rate AXR showed approximately linear dependence on the ground truth kin. In conclusion, either CG or FEXI method provides a sensitive means to characterize the variations in transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, although the accuracy and specificity is usually compromised. The non-imaging CG method provides more accurate estimation of kin, but limited to large volume-of-interest. Although the accuracy of FEXI is compromised with extracellular volume fraction, it is capable of spatially mapping kin in practice.

  20. Rate Constants of Hydroperoxyl Radical Addition to Cyclic Nitrones: A DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Villamena, Frederick A.; Merle, John K.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Zweier*, Jay L.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrones are potential synthetic antioxidants against the reduction of radical-mediated oxidative damage in cells, and as analytical reagent for the identification of HO2• and other such transient species. In this work, the PCM/B3LYP/6−31+G(d,p)//B3LYP/6−31G(d) and PCM/mPW1K/6−31+G(d,p) density functional theory (DFT) methods were employed to predict the reactivity of HO2• with various functionalized nitrones as spin traps. The calculated second-order rate constants and free energies of reaction at both levels of theory were in the range of 100−103 M−1 s−1 and 1 to −12 kcal mol−1, respectively, and the rate constants for some nitrones are on the same order of magnitude as those observed experimentally. The trend in HO2• reactivity to nitrones could not be explained solely on the basis of the relationship of the theoretical positive charge densities on the nitronyl-C, with their respective ionization potentials, electron affinities, rate constants, or free energies of reaction. However, various modes of intramolecular H-bonding interaction were observed at the transition state (TS) structures of HO2• addition to nitrones. The presence of intramolecular H-bonding interactions in the transition states were predicted and may play a significant role towards a facile addition of HO2• to nitrones. In general, HO2• addition to ethoxycarbonyl- and spirolactam- substituted nitrones, as well as those nitrones without electron-withdrawing substituents, such as 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and 5-spirocyclopentyl-pyrroline N-oxide (CPPO), are most preferred compared to the methylcarbamoyl-substituted nitrones. This study suggests that the use of specific spin traps for efficient trapping of HO2• could pave the way toward improved radical detection and antioxidant protection. PMID:17845014

  1. Theoretical study and rate constant calculation of the CH2O+CH3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-yao; Li, Ze-sheng; Wu, Jia-yan; Wei, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Gang; Sun, Chia-chung

    2003-10-01

    The potential energy surface of the CH2O+CH3 reaction is explored at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p), MP4SDQ/6-311G(d,p), and QCISD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p) (single point) levels of theory. Theoretical calculations suggest that the major product channel (R1) is the hydrogen abstraction leading to the product P1 CHO+CH4 (R1), while the addition process leading to P2H+CH3CHO (R2) appears to be negligibly small. The calculated enthalpies and dissociation activation energies for CH3CH2O and CH3OCH2 radicals involved in the reaction are in line with the experimental values. Dual-level dynamics calculation is carried out for the direct hydrogen abstraction channel. The energy profile of (R1) is refined with the interpolated single-point energies (ISPE) method at the QCISD(T)//MP2 level. The rate constants, which are evaluated by canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) including small-curvature tunneling (SCT) correction, are in good agreement with the available experimental data. It is shown that tunneling effect plays a significant role in the rate constant calculation; and as a result, the CVT/SCT rate constants exhibit typical non-Arrhenius behavior over a wide temperature range 300-2000 K. The three parameter expression is k=6.35×10-26 T4.4 exp(-2450/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  2. Evaluation and comparison of diffusion MR methods for measuring apparent transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Gore, John C; Xu, Junzhong

    2017-02-01

    Two diffusion-based approaches, CG (constant gradient) and FEXI (filtered exchange imaging) methods, have been previously proposed for measuring transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, but their accuracy and feasibility have not been comprehensively evaluated and compared. In this work, both computer simulations and cell experiments in vitro were performed to evaluate these two methods. Simulations were done with different cell diameters (5, 10, 20μm), a broad range of kin values (0.02-30s(-1)) and different SNR's, and simulated kin's were directly compared with the ground truth values. Human leukemia K562 cells were cultured and treated with saponin to selectively change cell transmembrane permeability. The agreement between measured kin's of both methods was also evaluated. The results suggest that, without noise, the CG method provides reasonably accurate estimation of kin especially when it is smaller than 10s(-1), which is in the typical physiological range of many biological tissues. However, although the FEXI method overestimates kin even with corrections for the effects of extracellular water fraction, it provides reasonable estimates with practical SNR's and more importantly, the fitted apparent exchange rate AXR showed approximately linear dependence on the ground truth kin. In conclusion, either CG or FEXI method provides a sensitive means to characterize the variations in transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, although the accuracy and specificity is usually compromised. The non-imaging CG method provides more accurate estimation of kin, but limited to large volume-of-interest. Although the accuracy of FEXI is compromised with extracellular volume fraction, it is capable of spatially mapping kin in practice.

  3. Rate constants for chemical reactions in high-temperature nonequilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the nonequilibrium atmospheric chemistry regime that will be encountered by the proposed Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle in the upper atmosphere, where air density is too low for thermal and chemical equilibrium to be maintained, the detailed high temperature air chemistry plays a critical role in defining radiative and convective heating loads. Although vibrational and electronic temperatures remain low (less than 15,000 K), rotational and translational temperatures may reach 50,000 K. Attention is presently given to the effects of multiple temperatures on the magnitudes of various chemical reaction rate constants, for the cases of both bimolecular exchange reactions and collisional excitation and dissociation reactions.

  4. Perturbation theory in the catalytic rate constant of the Henri-Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Kosmas, Marios; Papamichael, Emmanouel M

    2012-11-01

    The Henry-Michaelis-Menten (HMM) mechanism of enzymatic reaction is studied by means of perturbation theory in the reaction rate constant k (2) of product formation. We present analytical solutions that provide the concentrations of the enzyme (E), the substrate (S), as well as those of the enzyme-substrate complex (C), and the product (P) as functions of time. For k (2) small compared to k (-1), we properly describe the entire enzymatic activity from the beginning of the reaction up to longer times without imposing extra conditions on the initial concentrations E ( o ) and S ( o ), which can be comparable or much different.

  5. Rate constant and reaction channels for the reaction of atomic nitrogen with the ethyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Stief, L.J.; Nesbitt, F.L.; Payne, W.A. ); Kuo, S.C.; Tao, W.; Klemm, R.B. )

    1995-04-01

    The absolute rate constant and primary reaction products have been determined at [ital T]=298 K for the atom--radical reaction N([sup 4][ital S])+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] in a discharge flow system with collision-free sampling to a mass spectrometer. The rate constant measurements employed low energy electron impact ionization while the product study used dispersed synchrotron radiation as the photoionization source. The rate constant was determined under pseudo-first-order conditions by monitoring the decay of C[sub 2]H[sub 5] or C[sub 2]D[sub 5] as a function of time in the presence of excess N atoms. The result is [ital k]=(1.1[plus minus]0.3)[times]10[sup [minus]10] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1]. For the reaction product experiments using photoionization mass spectrometry, products observed at 114 nm (10.9 eV) were CD[sub 3], D[sub 2]CN and C[sub 2]D[sub 4] for the N+C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reaction. The product identification is based on the unambiguous combination of product [ital m]/[ital z] values, the shift of the [ital m]/[ital z] peaks observed for the N+C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reaction products with respect to the N+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reaction products and the photoionization threshold measured for the major products. The observed products are consistent with the occurrence of the reaction channels D[sub 2]CN+CD[sub 3](2a) and C[sub 2]D[sub 4]+ND(2c). Formation of C[sub 2]D[sub 4] product via channel (2c) accounts for approximately 65% of the C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reacted. Most, if not all, of the remaining 35% is probably accounted for by channel (2a). These rate constant and product results are compared with those for the N+CH[sub 3] reaction as well as other atom+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reactions. The role of the N+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reaction in the formation of HCN in the atmospheres of Titan and Neptune is briefly considered. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. Rate constant for the reaction NH2 + NO from 216 to 480 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Brobst, W. D.; Nava, D. F.; Borkowski, R. P.; Michael, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute rate constant was measured by the technique of flash photolysis-laser induced fluorescence (FP-LIF). NH2 radicals were produced by the flash photolysis of ammonia and the fluorescent NH2 photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. At each temperature, the results were independent of variations in total pressure, and flash intensity. The results are compared with previous determinations using the techniques of mass spectrometry, absorption spectroscopy, laser absorption spectroscopy, and laser induced fluorescence. The implications of the results are discussed with regard to combustion, post combustion, and atmospheric chemistry. The results are also discussed theoretically.

  7. Rapid estimation of glucosinolate thermal degradation rate constants in leaves of Chinese kale and broccoli (Brassica oleracea) in two seasons.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Kristin; Verkerk, Ruud; Bonnema, Guusje; Dekker, Matthijs

    2012-08-15

    Kinetic modeling was used as a tool to quantitatively estimate glucosinolate thermal degradation rate constants. Literature shows that thermal degradation rates differ in different vegetables. Well-characterized plant material, leaves of broccoli and Chinese kale plants grown in two seasons, was used in the study. It was shown that a first-order reaction is appropriate to model glucosinolate degradation independent from the season. No difference in degradation rate constants of structurally identical glucosinolates was found between broccoli and Chinese kale leaves when grown in the same season. However, glucosinolate degradation rate constants were highly affected by the season (20-80% increase in spring compared to autumn). These results suggest that differences in glucosinolate degradation rate constants can be due to variation in environmental as well as genetic factors. Furthermore, a methodology to estimate rate constants rapidly is provided to enable the analysis of high sample numbers for future studies.

  8. Path integral evaluation of the quantum instanton rate constant for proton transfer in a polar solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Miller, William H.

    2005-01-01

    The quantum instanton approximation for thermal rate constants, a type of quantum transition state theory (QTST), is applied to a model proton transfer reaction in liquid methyl chloride developed by Azzouz and Borgis. Monte Carlo path integral methods are used to carry out the calculations, and two other closely related QTST's, namely, the centroid-density and Hansen-Andersen QTST, are also evaluated for comparison using the present path integral approach. A technique is then introduced that calculates the kinetic isotope effect directly via thermodynamic integration of the rate with respect to hydrogen mass, which has the practical advantage of avoiding costly evaluation of the activation free energy. The present application to the Azzouz-Borgis problem shows that the above three types of QTST provide very similar results for the rate, within 30% of each other, which is nontrivial considering the totally different derivations of these QTSTs; the latter rates are also in reasonable agreement with some other previous results (e.g., obtained via molecular dynamics with quantum transitions), within a factor of ˜2(7) for the H(D) transfer, thus significantly diminishing the possible range of the exact rates. In addition, it is revealed that a small but nonnegligible inconsistency exists in the parametrization of the Azzouz-Borgis model employed in previous studies, which resulted in the large apparent discrepancy in the calculated rates.

  9. Derivation of a valid momentary first-order rate constant for kinetic and energetic analyses of enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Taiji

    2016-12-01

    To analyze enzymatic reactions energetically for comparison with non-enzymatic reactions (first order) under the same dimension, a method to derive valid momentary first-order rate constants for enzymatic reactions was developed. The momentary first-order rate constant, k enz0 = k cat[E'S']e,0/[S]0, was derived for an enzymatic reaction under a certain condition. It was shown that this rate constant is applicable for a wide range of enzymatic reactions. Utilizing this constant, one can conduct reliable kinetic and energetic analyses of enzymatic reactions.

  10. [The catalytic rate constant. Effect of acetone on acidic hydrolysis of ester cyclohexyl acidacetylomethyl (AmMC)].

    PubMed

    Barańczyk, A; Zajac, M

    1992-01-01

    The catalytic rate constants k(HCl) were established for hydrolysis of beta-lactam moiety in AmMC using equation k(obs) = k(H2O) + k(HCl)[HCl]. The estimate the effect of aceton the relation log k(HCl) = log kD + k Z(mu)/D was applied. The rate constant increases with the decrease of dielectric constant of the solvent.

  11. GROUND WATER ISSUE - CALCULATION AND USE OF FIRST-ORDER RATE CONSTANTS FOR MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This issue paper explains when and how to apply first-order attenuation rate constant calculations in monitored natural attenuation (MNA) studies. First-order attenuation rate constant calculations can be an important tool for evaluating natural attenuation processes at ground-wa...

  12. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  13. Evaluated rate constants for selected HCFC's and HFC's with OH and O((sup)1D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, Robert F.; Kurylo, Michael J.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1990-01-01

    The chemistry of HCFC's and HFC's in the troposphere is controlled by reactions with OH in which a hydrogen atom is abstracted from the halocarbon to form water and a halo-alkyl radical. The halo-alkyl radical subsequently reacts with molecular oxygen to form a peroxy radical. The reactions of HCFC's and HFC's with O(exp1D) atoms are unimportant in the troposphere, but may be important in producing active chlorine of OH in the stratosphere. Here, the rate constants for the reactions of OH and O(exp1D) with many HFC's and HCFC's are evaluated. Recommendations are given for the five HCFC's and three HFC's specified by AFEAS as primary alternatives as well as for all other isomers of C1 and C2 HCFC's and HFC's where rate data exist. In addition, recommendations are included for CH3CCl3, CH2Cl2, and CH4.

  14. Rate constants for the quenching of metastable O2 (1Sigma g +) molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwang, Y. C.; Leu, M.-T.

    1985-01-01

    The O2 (1Sigma g +) rates for CO2, H2, N2, Cl2, CO, O3, and 2,3 DMB-2 are determined by monitoring the 762-nm emission in a fast-flow-discharge chemiluminescence detection system (Leu, 1984; Leu and Smith, 1981). The results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. The rate constants (in cu cm/s x 10 to the -16th) are 4600 + or - 500 for CO2, 7000 + or - 300 for H2, 17 + or - 1 for N2, 4.5 + or - 0.8 for Cl2, 45 + or - 5 for CO, 220,000 + or - 30,000 for O3, and 6000 + or - 100 for 2,3 DMB-2. The temperature dependence of the CO2 and O3 quenching reactions at 245-362 K is found to be negligible.

  15. Dynamic Monte Carlo rate constants for magnetic Hamiltonians coupled to a phonon bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Lazarus; Novotny, Mark

    2007-03-01

    For quantitative comparisons between experimental time- dependent measurements and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations, a relation between the time constant in the simulation and real time is necessary. We calculate the transition rate for spin S system using the lattice frame method for a rigid spin cluster in an elastic medium [1]. We compare this with the transition rate for an Ising spin 12 system using the quantum- mechanical density-matrix method [2] with the results of ref [1,3]. These transition probabilities are different from those of either the Glauber or the Metropolis dynamics, and reflect the properties of the bosonic bath. Comparison with recent experiments [4] will be discussed. [1] E. M. Chudnovsky, D. A. Garanin, and R. Schilling (PRB 72, 2006) [2] K. Park, M. A. Novotny, and P. A. Rikvold (PRE 66, 2002) [3] K Saito, S. Takesue, and S. Miyashita, (PRE 61, 2002) [4] T. Meunier et al (Condensed Matter, 2006)

  16. Exposure rate constants and lead shielding values for over 1,100 radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Smith, David S; Stabin, Michael G

    2012-03-01

    The authors have assembled a compilation of exposure rate constants, ƒ-factors, and lead shielding thicknesses for more than 1,100 radionuclides described in ICRP Publication 107. Physical data were taken from well established reference sources for mass-energy absorption coefficients in air, attenuation coefficients, and buildup factors in lead and other variables.The data agreed favorably for the most part with those of other investigators; thus this compilation provides an up-to-date and sizeable database of these data, which are of interest to many for routine calculations. Emissions were also segregated by emitting nuclide, and decay product emissions were emitted from the calculated coefficients, thus for the first time providing for the calculation of exposure rates from arbitrary mixtures of nuclides in arbitrary equilibrium states.

  17. Airfoil stall penetration at constant pitch rate and high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1989-01-01

    The model wing consists of a set of fiberglass panels mounted on a steel spar that spans the 8 ft test section of the UTRC Large Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The first use of this system was to measure surface pressures and flow conditions for a series of constant pitch rate ramps and sinusoidal oscillations a Mach number range, a Reynolds number range, and a pitch angle range. It is concluded that an increased pitch rate causes stall events to be delayed, strengthening of the stall vortex, increase in vortex propagation, and increase in unsteady airloads. The Mach number range causes a supersonic zone near the leading edge, stall vortex to be weaker, and a reduction of unsteady airloads.

  18. Decomposition of phenylarsonic acid by AOP processes: degradation rate constants and by-products.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, K; Czaplicka, M; Bratek, Ł

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents results of the studies photodegradation, photooxidation, and oxidation of phenylarsonic acid (PAA) in aquatic solution. The water solutions, which consist of 2.7 g dm(-3) phenylarsonic acid, were subjected to advance oxidation process (AOP) in UV, UV/H2O2, UV/O3, H2O2, and O3 systems under two pH conditions. Kinetic rate constants and half-life of phenylarsonic acid decomposition reaction are presented. The results from the study indicate that at pH 2 and 7, PAA degradation processes takes place in accordance with the pseudo first order kinetic reaction. The highest rate constants (10.45 × 10(-3) and 20.12 × 10(-3)) and degradation efficiencies at pH 2 and 7 were obtained at UV/O3 processes. In solution, after processes, benzene, phenol, acetophenone, o-hydroxybiphenyl, p-hydroxybiphenyl, benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, and biphenyl were identified.

  19. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines

    PubMed Central

    Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Summary The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol−1 and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG ‡ and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  20. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension.

    PubMed

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  1. Estimation of rate constants of PCB dechlorination reactions using an anaerobic dehalogenation model.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Filiz; Imamoglu, Ipek

    2017-02-15

    This study aims to estimate anaerobic dechlorination rate constants (km) of reactions of individual PCB congeners using data from four laboratory microcosms set up using sediment from Baltimore Harbor. Pathway km values are estimated by modifying a previously developed model as Anaerobic Dehalogenation Model (ADM) which can be applied to any halogenated hydrophobic organic (HOC). Improvements such as handling multiple dechlorination activities (DAs) and co-elution of congeners, incorporating constraints, using new goodness of fit evaluation led to an increase in accuracy, speed and flexibility of ADM. DAs published in the literature in terms of chlorine substitutions as well as specific microorganisms and their combinations are used for identification of pathways. The best fit explaining the congener pattern changes was found for pathways of Phylotype DEH10, which has the ability to remove doubly flanked chlorines in meta and para positions, para flanked chlorines in meta position. The range of estimated km values is between 0.0001-0.133d(-1), the median of which is found to be comparable to the few available published biologically confirmed rate constants. Compound specific modelling studies such as that performed by ADM can enable monitoring and prediction of concentration changes as well as toxicity during bioremediation.

  2. Determination of the epimerization rate constant of amygdalin by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lishuang; Ye, Hongzhi; Zheng, Lili; Chen, Lidian; Chu, Kedan; Liu, Xianxiang; Xu, Xueqin; Chen, Guonan

    2011-01-01

    A new method for separation and determination of amygdalin and its epimer (neoamygdalin) in the epimerization of amygdalin by MEEKC is proposed. For the chiral separation of amygdalin and neoamygdalin, a running buffer composed of 80 mM sodium cholate, 5.0% v/v butan-1-ol, 0.5% v/v heptane and 94.5% v/v 30 mM Na(2) B(4) O(7) buffer (pH 9.00) is proposed. Under optimum conditions, the basic separation of amygdalin and neoamygdalin can be achieved within 7 min. The calibration curve for amygdalin showed excellent linearity in the concentration range of 20-1000 μg/mL with a detection limit of 5.0 μg/mL (S/N=3). The epimerization rate constant of amygdalin in basic microemulsion was first determined by monitoring the concentration changes of amygdalin, and the epimerization rate constant of amygdalin was found to be 2×10(-3) min(-1) at 25°C under the above optimum microemulsion conditions.

  3. Bimolecular Rate Constants for FAD-Dependent Glucose Dehydrogenase from Aspergillus terreus and Organic Electron Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruoka, Nozomu; Sadakane, Takuya; Hayashi, Rika; Tsujimura, Seiya

    2017-01-01

    The flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) from Aspergillus species require suitable redox mediators to transfer electrons from the enzyme to the electrode surface for the application of bioelectrical devices. Although several mediators for FAD-GDH are already in use, they are still far from optimum in view of potential, kinetics, sustainability, and cost-effectiveness. Herein, we investigated the efficiency of various phenothiazines and quinones in the electrochemical oxidation of FAD-GDH from Aspergillus terreus. At pH 7.0, the logarithm of the bimolecular oxidation rate constants appeared to depend on the redox potentials of all the mediators tested. Notably, the rate constant of each molecule for FAD-GDH was approximately 2.5 orders of magnitude higher than that for glucose oxidase from Aspergillus sp. The results suggest that the electron transfer kinetics is mainly determined by the formal potential of the mediator, the driving force of electron transfer, and the electron transfer distance between the redox active site of the mediator and the FAD, affected by the steric or chemical interactions. Higher k2 values were found for ortho-quinones than for para-quinones in the reactions with FAD-GDH and glucose oxidase, which was likely due to less steric hindrance in the active site in the case of the ortho-quinones. PMID:28287419

  4. Theoretically predicted rate constants for mercury oxidation by hydrogen chloride in coal combustion flue gases.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Jennifer; Robles, Joe; Marsden, David C J; Blowers, Paul

    2003-09-15

    In this work, theoretical rate constants are estimated for mercury oxidation reactions by hydrogen chloride that may occur in the flue gases of coal combustion. Rate constants are calculated using transition state theory at the quadratic configuration interaction (QCI) level of theory with single and double excitations, and are compared to results obtained from density functional theory, both including high level pseudopotentials for mercury. Thermodynamic and kinetic data from the literature are used to assess the accuracy of the theoretical calculations when possible. Validation of the chosen methods and basis sets is based upon previous and current research on mercury reactions involving chlorine. The present research shows that the QCISD method with the 1992 Stevens et al. basis set leads to the most accurate kinetic and thermodynamic results for the oxidation of mercury via chlorine containing molecules. Also, a comparison of the heats of reaction data for a series of mercury oxidation reactions reveals that the density functional method, B3LYP, with the 1997 Stuttgart basis set provides reasonably accurate results for these large systems.

  5. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  6. Absolute rate constants of alkoxyl radical reactions in aqueous solution. [Tert-butyl hydroperoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Erben-Russ, M.; Michel, C.; Bors, W.; Saran, M.

    1987-04-23

    The pulse radiolysis technique was used to generate the alkoxyl radical derived from tert-butyl hydroperoxide (/sup t/BuOOH) in aqueous solution. The reactions of this radical with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-6-benzothiazolinesulfonate) (ABTS) and promethazine were monitored by kinetic spectroscopy. The unimolecular decay rate constant of the tert-butoxyl radical (/sup t/BuO) was determined to be 1.4 x 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/. On the basis of this value, the rate constants for /sup t/BuO attack on quercetin, crocin, crocetin, ascorbate, isoascorbate, trolox c, glutathione, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. In addition, the reaction of /sup t/BuO with the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was observed by directly monitoring the formation of the fatty acid pentadienyl radicals. Interestingly, the attack of /sup t/BuO on PUFA was found to be faster by about one order of magnitude as compared to the same reaction in a nonpolar solvent.

  7. Quantification of rate constants for successive enzymatic reactions with DNP hyperpolarized MR.

    PubMed

    Allouche-Arnon, Hyla; Hovav, Yonatan; Friesen-Waldner, Lanette; Sosna, Jacob; Moshe Gomori, J; Vega, Shimon; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2014-06-01

    A kinetic model is provided to obtain reaction rate constants in successive enzymatic reactions that are monitored using NMR spectroscopy and hyperpolarized substrates. The model was applied for simulation and analysis of the successive oxidation of choline to betaine aldehyde, and further to betaine, by the enzyme choline oxidase. This enzymatic reaction was investigated under two different sets of conditions: two different choline molecular probes were used, [1,1,2,2-D4 , 1-(13) C]choline chloride and [1,1,2,2-D4 , 2-(13) C]choline chloride, in different MR systems (clinical scanner and high-resolution spectrometer), as well as in different reactors and reaction volumes (4.8 and 0.7 mL). The kinetic analysis according to the model yielded similar results in both set-ups, supporting the robustness of the model. This was achieved despite the complex and negating influences of reaction kinetics and polarization decay, and in the presence of uncontrolled mixing characteristics, which may introduce uncertainties in both effective timing and effective pulses. The ability to quantify rate constants using hyperpolarized MR in the first seconds of consecutive enzyme activity is important for further development of the utilization of dynamic nuclear polarization-MR for biological determinations.

  8. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Goldman, Lawrence M; Ming, Shonoi; Amyes, Tina L; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2015-07-28

    The caged complex between orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ScOMPDC) and 5-fluoroorotidine 5'-monophosphate (FOMP) undergoes decarboxylation ∼300 times faster than the caged complex between ScOMPDC and the physiological substrate, orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP). Consequently, the enzyme conformational changes required to lock FOMP at a protein cage and release product 5-fluorouridine 5'-monophosphate (FUMP) are kinetically significant steps. The caged form of ScOMPDC is stabilized by interactions between the side chains from Gln215, Tyr217, and Arg235 and the substrate phosphodianion. The control of these interactions over the barrier to the binding of FOMP and the release of FUMP was probed by determining the effect of all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations on kcat/Km and kcat for turnover of FOMP by wild-type ScOMPDC; its values are limited by the rates of substrate binding and product release, respectively. The Q215A and Y217F mutations each result in an increase in kcat and a decrease in kcat/Km, due to a weakening of the protein-phosphodianion interactions that favor fast product release and slow substrate binding. The Q215A/R235A mutation causes a large decrease in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, which are limited by the rate of the decarboxylation step, but much smaller decreases in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of FOMP, which are limited by the rate of enzyme conformational changes. By contrast, the Y217A mutation results in large decreases in kcat/Km for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of both OMP and FOMP, because of the comparable effects of this mutation on rate-determining decarboxylation of enzyme-bound OMP and on the rate-determining enzyme conformational change for decarboxylation of FOMP. We propose that kcat = 8.2 s(-1) for decarboxylation of FOMP by the Y217A mutant is equal to the rate constant for cage formation from the

  9. A QSAR for the hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant: validation, domain of application, and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Tomas

    A large number of anthropogenic organic chemicals are emitted into the troposphere. Reactions with the hydroxyl radical are a dominant removal pathway for most organic compounds, but experimentally determined gas-phase reaction rate constants are only available for about 750 compounds. The lack of experimental data increases the importance of applying quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) to evaluate and predict reactivities. It is generally acknowledged that these empirical relationships are valid only within the same domain for which they were developed. However, model validation is sometimes neglected and the application domain is not always well defined. The purpose of this paper is to outline how validation and domain definition can facilitate the modeling and prediction of the hydroxyl radical reaction rates for a large database. A substantial number of theoretical descriptors (867) were generated from 2D molecular structures for compounds present in the Syracuse Research Corporation's PhysProp Database. A QSAR model was developed for the hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant using a projection-based regression technique, partial least squares regression (PLSR). The PLSR model was subsequently validated with an external test set. The main factors of variation could be attributed to two reaction pathways, hydrogen atom abstraction and addition to double bonds or aromatic systems. A set of 17 293 compounds, drawn from the PhysProp Database, was projected onto the PLSR model and 74% were inside the applicability domain. The predicted hydroxyl reaction rates for 25% of these compounds were slow or negligible, with atmospheric half-lives in the range from days to years. Finally, the list of persistent organic compounds was matched against the OECD list of high production volume chemicals (HPVC). Together with the experimental data, nearly three hundred compounds were identified as both persistent and in high volume production.

  10. Study on constant-step stress accelerated life tests in white organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J P; Liu, C; Chen, X; Cheng, G L; Zhou, A X

    2014-11-01

    In order to obtain reliability information for a white organic light-emitting diode (OLED), two constant and one step stress tests were conducted with its working current increased. The Weibull function was applied to describe the OLED life distribution, and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and its iterative flow chart were used to calculate shape and scale parameters. Furthermore, the accelerated life equation was determined using the least squares method, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was performed to assess if the white OLED life follows a Weibull distribution, and self-developed software was used to predict the average and the median lifetimes of the OLED. The numerical results indicate that white OLED life conforms to a Weibull distribution, and that the accelerated life equation completely satisfies the inverse power law. The estimated life of a white OLED may provide significant guidelines for its manufacturers and customers.

  11. Extension of the master sintering curve for constant heating rate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Tammy Michelle

    The purpose of this work is to extend the functionality of the Master Sintering Curve (MSC) such that it can be used as a practical tool for predicting sintering schemes that combine both a constant heating rate and an isothermal hold. Rather than just being able to predict a final density for the object of interest, the extension to the MSC will actually be able to model a sintering run from start to finish. Because the Johnson model does not incorporate this capability, the work presented is an extension of what has already been shown in literature to be a valuable resource in many sintering situations. A predicted sintering curve that incorporates a combination of constant heating rate and an isothermal hold is more indicative of what is found in real-life sintering operations. This research offers the possibility of predicting the sintering schedule for a material, thereby having advanced information about the extent of sintering, the time schedule for sintering, and the sintering temperature with a high degree of accuracy and repeatability. The research conducted in this thesis focuses on the development of a working model for predicting the sintering schedules of several stabilized zirconia powders having the compositions YSZ (HSY8), 10Sc1CeSZ, 10Sc1YSZ, and 11ScSZ1A. The compositions of the four powders are first verified using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size and surface area are verified using a particle size analyzer and BET analysis, respectively. The sintering studies were conducted on powder compacts using a double pushrod dilatometer. Density measurements are obtained both geometrically and using the Archimedes method. Each of the four powders is pressed into ¼" diameter pellets using a manual press with no additives, such as a binder or lubricant. Using a double push-rod dilatometer, shrinkage data for the pellets is obtained over several different heating rates. The shrinkage data is then converted to reflect the change in relative

  12. Fast proton exchange in histidine: measurement of rate constants through indirect detection by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Akansha Ashvani; Duma, Luminita; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe

    2014-05-19

    Owing to its imidazole side chain, histidine participates in various processes such as enzyme catalysis, pH regulation, metal binding, and phosphorylation. The determination of exchange rates of labile protons for such a system is important for understanding its functions. However, these rates are too fast to be measured directly in an aqueous solution by using NMR spectroscopy. We have obtained the exchange rates of the NH3(+) amino protons and the labile NH(ε2) and NH(δ1) protons of the imidazole ring by indirect detection through nitrogen-15 as a function of temperature (272 Krates up to 8.5×10(4) s(-1) could be determined (i.e., lifetimes as short as 12 μs). The three chemical shifts δH(i) of the invisible exchanging protons H(i) and the three one-bond scalar coupling constants (1)J(N,H(i)) could also be determined accurately.

  13. The Influence of Photolysis Rate Constants in Ozone Production for the Paso del Norte Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Fernando; Fitzgerald, Rosa

    2012-03-01

    In this research work we are focusing on understanding the relationship between photolysis rates and the photochemical ozone changes observed in the Paso del Norte region. The city of El Paso, Texas together with Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, forms the largest contiguous bi-national metropolitan area. This region suffers year-round ozone pollution events, and a better understanding is needed to mitigate them. Previous studies have found that ambient ozone concentrations tend to be higher on weekends rather than on weekdays, this phenomenon being referred to, as the ``weekend effect.'' If the ozone standard is exceeded more frequently on weekends, then this phenomenon must be considered in the design of ozone control strategies. In this work we investigate some of the most representative weekend ozone episodes at El Paso, TX, during the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 using the ozone photolysis rates. In this research the TUV radiative-transfer model is used to calculate the local photolysis rates and a UV MFRSR instrument is used to obtain experimental parameters. Seasonal variations and the weekday-weekend effect is studied. The results of this research will help to understand the underlying behavior of the photolysis rate constants when different atmospheric conditions are present.

  14. A photon spectrometric dose-rate constant determination for the Advantage Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Bongiorni, Paul; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Although several dosimetric characterizations using Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) have been reported for the new Advantage Pd-103 source (IsoAid, LLC, Port Richey, FL), no AAPM consensus value has been established for the dosimetric parameters of the source. The aim of this work was to perform an additional dose-rate constant ({Lambda}) determination using a recently established photon spectrometry technique (PST) that is independent of the published TLD and Monte Carlo techniques. Methods: Three Model IAPD-103A Advantage Pd-103 sources were used in this study. The relative photon energy spectrum emitted by each source along the transverse axis was measured using a high-resolution germanium spectrometer designed for low-energy photons. For each source, the dose-rate constant was determined from its emitted energy spectrum. The PST-determined dose-rate constant ({sub PST}{Lambda}) was then compared to those determined by TLD ({sub TLD}{Lambda}) and Monte Carlo ({sub MC}{Lambda}) techniques. A likely consensus {Lambda} value was estimated as the arithmetic mean of the average {Lambda} values determined by each of three different techniques. Results: The average {sub PST}{Lambda} value for the three Advantage sources was found to be (0.676{+-}0.026) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}. Intersource variation in {sub PST}{Lambda} was less than 0.01%. The {sub PST}{Lambda} was within 2% of the reported {sub MC}{Lambda} values determined by PTRAN, EGSnrc, and MCNP5 codes. It was 3.4% lower than the reported {sub TLD}{Lambda}. A likely consensus {Lambda} value was estimated to be (0.688{+-}0.026) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, similar to the AAPM consensus values recommended currently for the Theragenics (Buford, GA) Model 200 (0.686{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, the NASI (Chatsworth, CA) Model MED3633 (0.688{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, and the Best Medical (Springfield, VA) Model 2335 (0.685{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} {sup 103}Pd

  15. Rate Constants for Peroxidation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Sterols in Solution and in Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Libin; Davis, Todd A.; Porter, Ned A.

    2013-01-01

    Rate constants for autoxidation propagation of several unsaturated lipids in benzene solution at 37°C and in phosphatidylcholine liposomes were determined by a linoleate radical clock. This radical clock is based on competition between hydrogen atom abstraction by an intermediate peroxyl radical derived from linoleic acid that leads to a trans,cis-conjugated hydroxyoctadecadienoic product and β–fragmentation of the same peroxyl that gives the trans,trans-product hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid. Rate constants determined by this approach in solution relative to linoleic acid (kp = 62 M−1s−1) were: arachidonic acid (kp = 197 ± 13 M−1s−1), eicosapentaenoic acid (kp = 249 ± 16 M−1s−1), docosahexaenoic acid (kp = 334 ± 37 M−1s−1), cholesterol (kp = 11 ± 2 M−1s−1), and 7-dehydrocholesterol (kp = 2,260 ± 40 M−1s−1). Free radical oxidations of multilamellar and unilamellar liposomes of various mixtures of glycerophosphatidylcholine molecular species were also carried out. In some experiments, cholesterol or 7-dehydrocholesterol was incorporated into the lipid mixture undergoing oxidation. A phosphatidylcholine bearing a linoleate ester at sn-2 was a component of each liposome peroxidation reaction and the ratio of trans,cis/trans,trans (t,c/t,t)-conjugated diene oxidation products formed from this phospholipid was determined for each oxidation reaction. This t,c/t,t-product ratio from linoleate was used to “clock” liposome constituents as hydrogen atom donors in the lipid bilayer. Application of this lipid bilayer radical clock gives relative autoxidation propagation rate constants of arachidonate (20:4), eicosapentaenoate (20:5), docosahexaenoate (22:6), and 7-dehydrocholesterol to be 115 ± 7, 145 ± 8, 172 ± 13, and 832 ± 86, respectively, a reactivity trend that parallels the one in solution. We also conclude from the liposome oxidations that linoleate peroxyl radicals at different positions on the eighteen-carbon chain (at C-9 and C

  16. Rate constants for the slow Mu + propane abstraction reaction at 300 K by diamagnetic RF resonance.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Donald G; Cottrell, Stephen P; McKenzie, Iain; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2015-08-14

    The study of kinetic isotope effects for H-atom abstraction rates by incident H-atoms from the homologous series of lower mass alkanes (CH4, C2H6 and, here, C3H8) provides important tests of reaction rate theory on polyatomic systems. With a mass of only 0.114 amu, the most sensitive test is provided by the rates of the Mu atom. Abstraction of H by Mu can be highly endoergic, due to the large zero-point energy shift in the MuH bond formed, which also gives rise to high activation energies from similar zero-point energy corrections at the transition state. Rates are then far too slow near 300 K to be measured by conventional TF-μSR techniques that follow the disappearance of the spin-polarised Mu atom with time. Reported here is the first measurement of a slow Mu reaction rate in the gas phase by the technique of diamagnetic radio frequency (RF) resonance, where the amplitude of the MuH product formed in the Mu + C3H8 reaction is followed with time. The measured rate constant, kMu = (6.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1) at 300 K, is surprisingly only about a factor of three slower than that expected for H + C3H8, indicating a dominant contribution from quantum tunneling in the Mu reaction, consistent with elementary transition state theory calculations of the kMu/kH kinetic isotope effect.

  17. Stress focusing and collapse of a thin film under constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Eugenio; Cabezas, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Thin elastic sheets and shells are prone to focus stress when forced, due to their near inextensibility. Singular structures such as ridges, vertices, and folds arising from wrinkles, are characteristic of the deformation of such systems. Usually the forcing is exerted at the boundaries or at specific points of the surface, in displacement controlled experiments. On the other hand, much of the phenomenology of stress focusing can be found at micro and nanoscales, in physics and biology, making it universal. We will consider the post-buckling regime of a thin elastic sheet that is subjected to a constant normal distributed force. Specifically, we will present experiments made on thin elastoplastic sheets that collapse under atmospheric pressure. For instance, in vacuum-sealing technology, when a flat plastic bag is forced to wrap a solid volume, a series of self-contacts and folds develop. The unfolded bag shows a pattern of scars whose structure is determined by the geometry of the volume and by the exact way it stuck to its surface, by friction. Inspired by this everyday example we study the geometry of folds that result from collapsing a hermetic bag on regular rigid bodies.

  18. The Influence of Uncompensated Solution Resistance on the Determination and Standard Electrochemical Rate Constants Using Cyclic Voltammetry, and Some Comparisons with AC Voltammetry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-25

    constants, k2ob, using cyclic voltammetry . The results are expressed in terms of systematic deviations of ’apparent measured’ rate constants, k2ob...Keywords: Digital simulation analysis, Uncompensated solution resistance, Electrochemical rate constants, Cyclic voltammetry .

  19. Lipase-catalyzed transesterification in organic media: solvent effects on equilibrium and individual rate constants.

    PubMed

    García-Alles, L F; Gotor, V

    1998-09-20

    The kinetics of the immobilized lipase B from Candida antarctica have been studied in organic solvents. This enzyme has been shown to be slightly affected by the water content of the organic media, and it does not seem to be subject to mass transfer limitations. On the other hand, some evidence indicates that the catalytic mechanism of reactions catalyzed by this lipase proceeds through the acyl-enzyme intermediate. Moreover, despite the fact that the immobilization support dramatically enhances the catalytic power of the enzyme, it does not interfere with the intrinsic solvent effect. Consequently, this enzyme preparation becomes optimum for studying the role played by the organic solvent in catalysis. To this end, we have measured the acylation and deacylation individual rate constants, and the binding equilibrium constant for the ester, in several organic environments. Data obtained show that the major effect of the organic solvent is on substrate binding, and that the catalytic steps are almost unaffected by the solvent, indicating the desolvation of the transition state. However, the strong decrease in binding for hydrophilic solvents such as THF and dioxane, compared to the rest of solvents, cannot be easily explained by means of thermodynamic arguments (desolvation of the ester substrate). For this reason, data have been considered as an indication of the existence of an unknown step in the catalytic pathway occurring prior to formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate.

  20. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cranor, W.L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants (kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient (Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07??m3??g-1??d-1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values (n??=??3) of anthracene and p,p???-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57??m3??g-1??d-1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  1. Quantum Yields and Rate Constants of Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Excitation Quenching (Experiment and Model).

    PubMed Central

    Laisk, A.; Oja, V.; Rasulov, B.; Eichelmann, H.; Sumberg, A.

    1997-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor Moench.), amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.), and cytochrome b6f complex-deficient transgenic tobacco leaves were used to test the response of plants exposed to differnt light intensities and CO2 concentrations before and after photoinhibition at 4000 [mu]mol photons m-2 s-1 and to thermoinhibition up to 45[deg]C. Quantum yields of photochemical and nonphotochemical excitation quenching (YP and YN) and the corresponding relative rate constants for excitation capture from the antenna-primary radical pair equilibrium system (k[prime]P and k[prime]N) were calculated from measured fluorescence parameters. The above treatments resulted in decreases in YP and K[prime]P and in approximately complementary increases in YN and K[prime]N under normal and inhibitory conditions. The results were reproduced by a mathematical model of electron/proton transport and O2 evolution/CO2 assimilation in photosynthesis based on budget equations for the intermediates of photosynthesis. Quantitative differences between model predictions and experiments are explainable, assuming that electron transport is organized into domains that contain relatively complete electron and proton transport chains (e.g. thylakoids). With the complementation that occurs between the photochemical and nonphotochemical excitation quenching, the regulatory system can constantly maintain the shortest lifetime of excitation necessary to avoid the formation of chlorophyll triplet states and singlet oxygen. PMID:12223845

  2. Crystallization of isotactic polypropylene from mesomorphic phase: a constant heating rate study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, H.; Nishida, K.; Matsuba, G.; Kanaya, T.; Ogawa, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied crystallization behaviour of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) from mesomorphic phase in structural point of view. Time-resolved wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) measurements during a heating process have been performed using a synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray beam line at SPring-8, Japan. The heating process was so programmed to reproduce a thermal trace of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) with a constant heating rate (10 °C/min) in order to compare the structural change with thermal behaviour. SR-WAXD sensitively detected the crystallization behaviour and we have obtained fractions of alpha-crystal, mesomorphic phase and amorphous phase as a function of temperature by analysing the data. The results showed that the crystallization from mesomorphic phase proceeds in between 60 and 120 °C (meso-alpha transition). During this process, the crystallization from amorphous hardly takes place. The crystalline fraction shows almost constant in between 120 and 140 °C meanwhile, the mesomorphic fraction still decreases above 120 °C. The crystalline fraction starts to decrease above 140 °C and the most extensively decreases at around 165 °C (melting point). We have also determined the energy level of the mesomorphic phase (meta-stable state) relative to that of alpha-crystal (stable state), considering the balance among the fractions of alpha-crystal, mesomorphic phase and amorphous.

  3. The Br+HO 2 reaction revisited: Absolute determination of the rate constant at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdet, G.; Le Bras, G.; Mellouki, A.; Poulet, G.

    1990-09-01

    The absolute determination of the rate constant for the reaction Br+HO 2→HBr+O 2 has been done at 298 K using the discharge-flor EPR method. The value k1 = (1.5±0.2) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was obtained. Previous indirect measurements of k1 from a discharge-flow, LIF/mass spectrometric study of the Br/H 2CO/O 2 system have been reinterpreted, leading to values for k1 ranging from 1.0 × 10 -12 to 2.2 × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 at 298 K. These results are discussed and compared with other literature values.

  4. Impact of the differential fluence distribution of brachytherapy sources on the spectroscopic dose-rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, Martha J.; Bartol, Laura J.; DeWerd, Larry A. E-mail: ladewerd@wisc.edu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate why dose-rate constants for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds computed using the spectroscopic technique, Λ{sub spec}, differ from those computed with standard Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. A potential cause of these discrepancies is the spectroscopic technique’s use of approximations of the true fluence distribution leaving the source, φ{sub full}. In particular, the fluence distribution used in the spectroscopic technique, φ{sub spec}, approximates the spatial, angular, and energy distributions of φ{sub full}. This work quantified the extent to which each of these approximations affects the accuracy of Λ{sub spec}. Additionally, this study investigated how the simplified water-only model used in the spectroscopic technique impacts the accuracy of Λ{sub spec}. Methods: Dose-rate constants as described in the AAPM TG-43U1 report, Λ{sub full}, were computed with MC simulations using the full source geometry for each of 14 different {sup 125}I and 6 different {sup 103}Pd source models. In addition, the spectrum emitted along the perpendicular bisector of each source was simulated in vacuum using the full source model and used to compute Λ{sub spec}. Λ{sub spec} was compared to Λ{sub full} to verify the discrepancy reported by Rodriguez and Rogers. Using MC simulations, a phase space of the fluence leaving the encapsulation of each full source model was created. The spatial and angular distributions of φ{sub full} were extracted from the phase spaces and were qualitatively compared to those used by φ{sub spec}. Additionally, each phase space was modified to reflect one of the approximated distributions (spatial, angular, or energy) used by φ{sub spec}. The dose-rate constant resulting from using approximated distribution i, Λ{sub approx,i}, was computed using the modified phase space and compared to Λ{sub full}. For each source, this process was repeated for each approximation in order to determine which approximations used in

  5. Negative ion formation by Rydberg electron transfer: Isotope-dependent rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, H.S. Jr.; Klots, C.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of negative ions during collisions of rubidium atoms in selected ns and nd Rydberg states with carbon disulfide molecules has been studied for a range of effective principal quantum numbers (10 {le} n* {le} 25). For a narrow range of n* near n* = 17, rate constants for CS{sub 2}{sup {minus}} formation are found to depend upon the isotopic composition of the molecule, producing a negative ion isotope ratio (mass 78 to mass 76, amu) up to 10.5 times larger than the natural abundance ratio of CS{sub 2} isotopes in the reagent. The isotope ratio is found to depend strongly upon the initial quantum state of the Rydberg atom and perhaps upon the collision energy and CS{sub 2} temperature. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Critical evaluation and rate constants of chemoselective ligation reactions for stoichiometric conjugations in water.

    PubMed

    Saito, Fumito; Noda, Hidetoshi; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-17

    Chemoselective ligation reactions have contributed immensely to the development of organic synthesis and chemical biology. However, the ligation of stoichiometric amounts of large molecules for applications such as protein-protein conjugates is still challenging. Conjugation reactions need to be fast enough to proceed under dilute conditions and chemoselective in the presence of unprotected functional groups; the starting materials and products must be stable under the reaction conditions. To compare known ligation reactions for their suitability under these conditions, we determined the second-order rate constants of ligation reactions using peptide substrates with unprotected functional groups. The reaction conditions, the chemoselectivity of the reactions, and the stability of the starting materials and products were carefully evaluated. In some cases, the stability could be improved by modifying the substrate structure. These data obtained under the ligation conditions provide a useful guide to choose an appropriate ligation reaction for synthesis of large molecules by covalent ligation reactions of unprotected substrates in water.

  7. Determination of ultimate carbonaceous BOD and the specific rate constant (K1)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Bennett, J.P.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1982-01-01

    Ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BODu) and the specific rate constant (K1) at which the demand is exerted are important parameters in designing biological wastewater treatment plants and in assessing the impact of wastewater on receiving streams. An analytical method is presented which uses time-series concentrations of BOD, defined as the calculated sum of dissolved oxygen (DO) losses at each time of measurement, for determining BODu and K1. Time-series DO measurements are obtained from a water sample that is incubated in darkness at 20 degrees Celsius in the presence of nitrapyrin, a chemical nitrification inhibitor. Time-series concentrations of BOD that approximate first order kinetics can be analyzed graphically or mathematically to compute BODu and K1.

  8. Micro-mechanism and rate constants for OH-initiated degradation of methomyl in atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuchao; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Gong, Chen; Hu, Jingtian

    2014-07-01

    The atmospheric degradation reactions of the two isomers of methomyl (MTL) initiated by OH radical in the presence of O2, NO and H2O have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). The calculations were all carried out at MPWB1K level. The geometrical parameters and vibrational frequencies of stationary points were calculated with 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. Single-point energy calculations were performed with 6-311+G (3df, 2p) basis sets. Profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed and all possible channels involved in the reactions were discussed. The rate constants of main elementary reactions were calculated over a temperature range of 200-400 K and mostly fitted to Arrhenius formulas. The atmospheric lifetimes of reaction species were discussed for the first time, which can be applied to the study on model simulation and management of hazardous materials.

  9. Estimation of rate constants of elementary processes - A review of the state of the art.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    'Thermochemical kinetics,' the codification and extrapolation of empirical observations, as applied to certain elementary reactions of importance to combustion studies, is described. This approach allows the critical scrutiny of experimental data in areas where sufficient previous data exist, while, at the same time, illuminating those key areas where more experimentation is crucial. It is shown that combination of transition-state theory with an understanding of the molecular basis of entropy puts fairly rigid constraints on the values of the Arrhenius A-factor for most reactions. This, in turn, means that the activation energy is often the key datum that is missing, and that such data can be obtained with some degree of confidence, even from measurements of rate constants at only one temperature. In complex mechanisms, it is often possible to distinguish among alternate pathways and pinpoint key processes.

  10. Determination of rate constants of N-alkylation of primary amines by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenghong

    2013-09-05

    Macromolecules containing N-diazeniumdiolates of secondary amines are proposed scaffolds for controlled nitrogen oxide (NO) release medical applications. Preparation of these compounds often involves converting primary amine groups to secondary amine groups through N-alkylation. However, N-alkylation results in not only secondary amines but tertiary amines as well. Only N-diazeniumdiolates of secondary amines are suitable for controlled NO release; therefore, the yield of secondary amines is crucial to the total NO load of the carrier. In this paper, (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to estimate the rate constants for formation of secondary amine (k1) and tertiary amine (k2) for alkylation reagents such as propylene oxide (PO), methyl acrylate (MA), and acrylonitrile (ACN). At room temperature, the ratio of k2/k1 for the three reactions was found to be around 0.50, 0.026, and 0.0072.

  11. Surface hopping, transition state theory, and decoherence. II. Thermal rate constants and detailed balance

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amber; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2015-10-07

    We investigate a simple approach to compute a non-adiabatic thermal rate constant using the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) dynamics. We study the effects of both decoherence (using our augmented-FSSH (A-FSSH) algorithm) and forbidden hops over a large range of parameters, including high and low friction regimes, and weak and strong electronic coupling regimes. Furthermore, when possible, we benchmark our results against exact hierarchy equations of motion results, where we usually find a maximum error of roughly a factor of two (at reasonably large temperatures). In agreement with Hammes-Schiffer and Tully, we find that a merger of transition state theory and surface hopping can be both accurate and efficient when performed correctly. We further show that detailed balance is followed approximately by A-FSSH dynamics.

  12. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  13. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats.

  14. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Xu, Feng; Li, Hua; Zhang, Xile

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V{sub 20} of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability.

  15. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats. PMID:27423150

  16. Ozonation of pharmaceutical compounds: Rate constants and elimination in various water matrices.

    PubMed

    Javier Benitez, F; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldán, Gloria

    2009-09-01

    The ozonation of four pharmaceuticals (metoprolol, naproxen, amoxicillin, and phenacetin) in ultra-pure (UP) water was studied in the pH range between 2.5 and 9. The experiments allowed the determination of the apparent rate constants for the reactions between ozone and the selected compounds. The values obtained varied depending on the pH, and ranged between 239 and 1.27x10(4)M(-1) s(-1) for metoprolol; 2.62x10(4) and 2.97x10(5)M(-1)s(-1) for naproxen; 2.31x10(3) and 1.21x10(7)M(-1)s(-1) for amoxicillin; and 215 and 1.57x10(3)M(-1)s(-1) for phenacetin. Due to the acidic nature of these substances, the degree of dissociation of each pharmaceutical was determined at every pH of work, and the specific rate constants of the neutral and ionic species formed were evaluated. Additionally, the simultaneous ozonation of the pharmaceuticals in different water matrices was carried out by considering a groundwater, a surface water from a public reservoir, and three secondary effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants. The influence of the operating conditions (initial ozone dose, nature of pharmaceuticals and type of water) on the pharmaceuticals elimination efficiency was established, and a kinetic model was proposed for the evaluation of the partial contribution to the global oxidation of both, the direct ozonation reaction and the radical pathway.

  17. Quantification of in Situ Biodegradation Rate Constants Using a Novel Combined Isotope Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, P.; Sültenfuß, J.; Martus, P.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the enormous potential of the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) for studying the biodegradation of organic compounds such as monoaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated solvents and other organic contaminants and environmental transformation mechanisms in groundwater. In addition, two-dimensional isotope analysis such as carbon and hydrogen have been successfully studied indicating the potential to also investigate site-specific reaction mechanisms. The main objective of the current study however is to quantify real effective in situ biodegradation rate constants in a coal-tar contaminated aquifer by combining compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and tracer-based (3H-3He) ground-water dating (TGD). Hence, groundwater samples are used to determine groundwater residence times, and carbon and hydrogen stable isotopes are analyzed for selected BTEX and PAH. The results of the hydrogen stable isotopes surprisingly indicate no isotope fractionation and therefore no biodegradation. In contrast, for stable carbon isotopes of selected BTEX such as o-xylene and toluene, isotope shifts are detected indicating active biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions. These and previous results of stable carbon isotopes show that only for o-xylene a clear evidence for biodegradation is possible for the studied site. Nevertheless, in combining these results with the groundwater residence times, which range between 1 year for the shallow wells (20 m below surface) and 41 years for the deeper wells (40 m below surface), it is feasible to effectively determine in situ biodegradation rate constants for o-xylene. Conversely, the outcome also evidently demonstrate the major limitations of the novel combined isotope approach for a successful implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) at such field sites.

  18. Product distributions and rate constants for ion-molecule reactions in water, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Pinizzotto, R. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal energy, bimolecular ion-molecule reactions occurring in gaseous water, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and methane have been identified and their rate constants determined using ion cyclotron resonance methods. Absolute rate constants were determined for the disappearance of the primary ions by using the trapped ion method, and product distributions were determined for these reactions by using the cyclotron ejection method. Previous measurements are reviewed and compared with the results using the present methods. The relative rate constants for hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer, and charge transfer are also determined for reactions of the parent ions.

  19. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  20. Effect of Beetroot Juice on Moderate-Intensity Exercise at a Constant Rating of Perceived Exertion.

    PubMed

    Rienks, Jordyn N; Vanderwoude, Andrea A; Maas, Elizabeth; Blea, Zachary M; Subudhi, Andrew W

    Dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to reduce oxygen consumption at a fixed work rate. We questioned whether a similar effect would be observed during variable work rate exercise at a specific rating of perceived exertion (RPE), as is commonly prescribed for aerobic training sessions. Using a double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover design, ten females (25 ± 3 years; VO2peak 37.1 ± 5.3 ml/kg/min) performed two 20-min cycle ergometer trials at a constant RPE of 13 (somewhat hard) 2.5 hours following ingestion of 140 ml of concentrated beetroot juice (12.9 mmol nitrate), or nitrate-depleted placebo. Performance was measured in terms of total VO2 (L) consumed and total mechanical work (kJ) accomplished across each trial. Following each experimental trial, subjects rode at 75W for an additional 5 min to determine the effect of beetroot juice on fixed work rate exercise. Coefficients of variation in total VO2 (L) and work performed (kJ) during the RPE 13 clamp trials were 8.2 and 9.5%, respectively. Consumption of beetroot juice did not affect total VO2 or work performed during RPE 13 exercise, but lowered resting systolic blood pressure by ~5 mmHg (P=0.041) and oxygen consumption at 75W by ~4% (P=0.048), relative to placebo. Since the effect of beetroot juice on oxygen consumption is small and may be masked by daily variability during self-regulated exercise, it is unlikely to have a notable effect on daily training.

  1. Potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements: OH reaction rate constants between 250 and 315 K and infrared absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, N.L.; Medhurst, L.J.; Nelson, H.H.

    1993-12-20

    The authors measured the rate constant for reactions of the OH radical with several potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements over the temperature range 251-314 K using laser photolysis laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The compounds studied and Arrhenius parameters determined from fits to the measured rate constants are as follows: CHF{sub 2}OCHF{sub 2} (E 134), k(T) = (5.4 {+-} 3.5) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}3.1 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 3} (FC 236fa), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}1.8 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CHFCHF{sub 2} (FC 236ea), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.0 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; and CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CH{sub 2}F (FC 236cb), k(T) = (2.6 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.2 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]. The measured activation energies (2-3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) are consistent with a mechanism of H atom abstraction. The tropospheric lifetimes, estimated from the measured OH reaction rates, and measured integrated infrared absorption cross sections over the range 770 to 1430 cm{sup {minus}1} suggest that E 134 and FC 236fa may have significant global warming potential, while FC 236ea and FC 236cb do not. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. An intercomparison technique for measuring thermal attachment cross sections and rate constants in distinct final channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alajajian, S. H.; Chutjian, A.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique is introduced for comparing negative-ion signal rates in which a common ion is produced by dissociative attachment in a series of molecules. Measurements are carried out at electron energies less than 100 MeV and at resolutions of 6-8 MeV (FWHM). The technique is demonstrated by detection of the Cl(-) signal in CFCl3, CCl4, CF2Cl2, 1,1,2-C2Cl3F3, 1,1,1-C2Cl3F3 and C2Cl4. Measurements for 1,1,1-C2Cl3F3 show that there is a significant open channel, other than Cl(-) formation, which accounts for about 60 percent of negative-ion formation in thermal-multiple-collision (swarm) experiments. Channel cross sections and rate constants are given for the process Cl(-)/1,1,1-Cl2Cl3F3, as well as in C2Cl4, for the separate channels Cl(-)/C2Cl4 and C2Cl4(-)/C2Cl4.

  3. Evaluation of a constant rate infusion of lidocaine for balanced anesthesia in dogs undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Maria; Cruz, Ignacio

    2011-08-01

    This study assessed the intraoperative analgesic effects of intravenous lidocaine administered by a constant rate infusion (CRI) in surgical canine patients. A prospective, blinded, randomized study was designed with 2 treatment groups: A (lidocaine) and B (placebo), involving 41 dogs. All patients were premedicated with acepromazine and buprenorphine, induced with propofol and midazolam; anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Group A received 2 mg/kg IV lidocaine immediately after induction, followed within 5 min by a CRI at 50 μg/kg/min. Group B received an equivalent volume of saline instead of lidocaine. Changes in heart rate and blood pressure during maintenance were treated by increasing CRI. Fentanyl was used as a supplemental analgesic when intraoperative nociceptive response was not controlled with the maximum dose of lidocaine infusion. There was a significantly lower use of supplemental intraoperative analgesia in the lidocaine than in the placebo group. Group B dogs had almost twice as high a risk of intraoperative nociceptive response as group A dogs.

  4. Kinetic mechanism of phenylalanine hydroxylase: intrinsic binding and rate constants from single-turnover experiments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Pavon, Jorge Alex; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-02-12

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) catalyzes the key step in the catabolism of dietary phenylalanine, its hydroxylation to tyrosine using tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and O(2). A complete kinetic mechanism for PheH was determined by global analysis of single-turnover data in the reaction of PheHΔ117, a truncated form of the enzyme lacking the N-terminal regulatory domain. Formation of the productive PheHΔ117-BH(4)-phenylalanine complex begins with the rapid binding of BH(4) (K(d) = 65 μM). Subsequent addition of phenylalanine to the binary complex to form the productive ternary complex (K(d) = 130 μM) is approximately 10-fold slower. Both substrates can also bind to the free enzyme to form inhibitory binary complexes. O(2) rapidly binds to the productive ternary complex; this is followed by formation of an unidentified intermediate, which can be detected as a decrease in absorbance at 340 nm, with a rate constant of 140 s(-1). Formation of the 4a-hydroxypterin and Fe(IV)O intermediates is 10-fold slower and is followed by the rapid hydroxylation of the amino acid. Product release is the rate-determining step and largely determines k(cat). Similar reactions using 6-methyltetrahydropterin indicate a preference for the physiological pterin during hydroxylation.

  5. Constant rate exposure of pregnant hamsters to arsenate during early gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferm, V.H.; Hanlon, D.P.

    1985-08-01

    The teratogenic and embryotoxic effects of constant-rate exposure of pregnant hamsters to arsenate have been examined by means of subcutaneous implants of osmotic minipumps. Different total exposure regimes were established by varying the duration of minipump implants and by varying the concentration of arsenate in the minipumps. Dams were killed on Day 13 pregnancy, 5 days after the critical stage of organogenesis. Numbers of resorptions, dead fetuses, and living fetuses were obtained. Fetal weights, crown-rump lengths, and the incidence of malformations were recorded. Control animals were treated identically with minipumps containing demineralized water. The percentage of malformations per litter, a direct measure of teratogenesis, was dependent only upon the concentration of arsenate in the minipumps. The minimum teratogenic response was achieved with a dose of 70 ..mu..mol/kg dam/24 hr during the critical stages of organogenesis. The embryotoxic (fetotoxic) indicators, fetal weight and crown-rump length, decreased with increases in exposure time and with increased concentrations of arsenate. The resorption rate also depended directly upon duration of exposure and concentration of arsenate in the mini-pump.

  6. Adiabatic decohesion in a thermoplastic craze thickening at constant or increasing rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leevers, Patrick S.; Godart, Marie-Aude

    When a crack in a thermally non-diffusive material is impact loaded—or propagates at high speed—a cohesive process which resists slow crack extension may itself cause decohesion by adiabatic heating. By assuming that decohesion ultimately occurs by low-energy disentanglement within a melt layer of critical thickness, the fracture resistance of craze-forming crystalline polymers can be estimated quantitatively. Previous estimates used a simple, thermomechanically linear representation of craze fibril drawing. This paper presents a more physically realistic, numerical formulation, and demonstrates it for constant craze thickening rate (as imposed by an ideal full-notch tension test) and for linearly increasing thickening rate (as at the tip of an impact-loaded or rapidly propagating crack). For a linear material, the numerical formulation gives results which asymptotically approach those from analytical solutions, as craze density approaches zero. In more realistic model polymers, the enthalpy of fusion increasingly delays decohesion as impact speed increases, although the temperature distribution of an endotherm appears to have little effect. Increasing molecular weight, heuristically associated with decreasing craze density and increasing structural dimension, increases the predicted impact fracture resistance. In every case, fracture resistance passes through a minimum as impact speed increases. The conclusions encourage the use of impact fracture tests, and discourage the use of the full-notch tension test, to assess the dynamic fracture resistance of a craze-forming polymer.

  7. A new method for measuring the oxygen diffusion constant and oxygen consumption rate of arteriolar walls.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuhiko; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Ushiyama, Akira; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen transport is believed to primarily occur via capillaries and depends on the oxygen tension gradient between the vessels and tissues. As blood flows along branching arterioles, the O(2) saturation drops, indicating either consumption or diffusion. The blood flow rate, the O(2) concentration gradient, and Krogh's O(2) diffusion constant (K) of the vessel wall are parameters affecting O(2)delivery. We devised a method for evaluating K of arteriolar wall in vivo using phosphorescence quenching microscopy to measure the partial pressure of oxygen in two areas almost simultaneously. The K value of arteriolar wall (inner diameter, 63.5 ± 11.9 μm; wall thickness, 18.0 ± 1.2 μm) was found to be 6.0 ± 1.2 × 10(-11) (cm(2)/s)(ml O(2)·cm(-3) tissue·mmHg(-1)). The arteriolar wall O(2) consumption rate (M) was 1.5 ± 0.1 (ml O(2)·100 cm(-3) tissue·min(-1)), as calculated using Krogh's diffusion equation. These results suggest that the arteriolar wall consumes a considerable proportion of the O(2) that diffuses through it.

  8. Rate constant and thermochemistry for K + O2 + N2 = KO2 + N2.

    PubMed

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Viljanen, Jan; Toivonen, Juha; Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-04-09

    The addition reaction of potassium atoms with oxygen has been studied using the collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy (CPFAAS) method. KCl vapor was photolyzed with 266 nm pulses and the absorbance by K atoms at 766.5 nm was measured at various delay times with a narrow line width diode laser. Experiments were carried out with O2/N2 mixtures at a total pressure of 1 bar, over 748-1323 K. At the lower temperatures single exponential decays of [K] yielded the third-order rate constant for addition, kR1, whereas at higher temperatures equilibration was observed in the form of double exponential decays of [K], which yielded both kR1 and the equilibrium constant for KO2 formation. kR1 can be summarized as 1.07 × 10(-30)(T/1000 K)(-0.733) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1). Combination with literature values leads to a recommended kR1 of 5.5 × 10(-26)T(-1.55) exp(-10/T) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1) over 250-1320 K, with an error limit of a factor of 1.5. A van't Hoff analysis constrained to fit the computed ΔS298 yields a K-O2 bond dissociation enthalpy of 184.2 ± 4.0 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K and ΔfH298(KO2) = -95.2 ± 4.1 kJ mol(-1). The corresponding D0 is 181.5 ± 4.0 kJ mol(-1). This value compares well with a CCSD(T) extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, with all electrons correlated, of 177.9 kJ mol(-1).

  9. Beta-lactamases as fully efficient enzymes. Determination of all the rate constants in the acyl-enzyme mechanism.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H; Martin, M T; Waley, S G

    1990-03-15

    The rate constants for both acylation and deacylation of beta-lactamase PC1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the RTEM beta-lactamase from Escherichia coli were determined by the acid-quench method [Martin & Waley (1988) Biochem. J. 254, 923-925] with several good substrates, and, for a wider range of substrates, of beta-lactamase I from Bacillus cereus. The values of the acylation and deacylation rate constants for benzylpenicillin were approximately the same (i.e. differing by no more than 2-fold) for each enzyme. The variation of kcat./Km for benzylpenicillin with the viscosity of the medium was used to obtain values for all four rate constants in the acyl-enzyme mechanism for all three enzymes. The reaction is partly diffusion-controlled, and the rate constant for the dissociation of the enzyme-substrate complex has approximately the same value as the rate constants for acylation and deacylation. Thus all three first-order rate constants have comparable values. Here there is no single rate-determining step for beta-lactamase action. This is taken to be a sign of a fully efficient enzyme.

  10. KABAM Version 1.0 User's Guide and Technical Documentation - Appendix H - Methods for Estimating Metabolism Rate Constant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Appendix H of KABAM Version 1.0 documentation related to estimating the metabolism rate constant. KABAM is a simulation model used to predict pesticide concentrations in aquatic regions for use in exposure assessments.

  11. Determination of calibration constants for the hole-drilling residual stress measurement technique applied to orthotropic composites. II - Experimental evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. B.; Prabhakaran, R.; Tompkins, S.

    1987-01-01

    The first step in the extension of the semidestructive hole-drilling technique for residual stress measurement to orthotropic composite materials is the determination of the three calibration constants. Attention is presently given to an experimental determination of these calibration constants for a highly orthotropic, unidirectionally-reinforced graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide composite. A comparison of the measured values with theoretically obtained ones shows agreement to be good, in view of the many possible sources of experimental variation.

  12. Three-minute constant rate step test for detecting exertional dyspnea relief after bronchodilation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Benoit; Wilkinson-Maitland, Courtney A; Hamilton, Alan; Bourbeau, Jean; Perrault, Hélène; Jensen, Dennis; Maltais, François

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of the 3-minute constant rate step test (3-MST) to detect the relief of exertional dyspnea (respiratory discomfort) after acute bronchodilation in COPD patients. Patients and methods A total of 40 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 45.7 (±14.7), % predicted) performed four 3-MSTs at randomly assigned stepping rates of 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min after inhalation of nebulized ipratropium bromide (500 µg)/salbutamol (2.5 mg) and saline placebo, which were randomized to order. Patients rated their intensity of perceived dyspnea at the end of each 3-MST using Borg 0–10 category ratio scale. Results A total of 37 (92.5%), 36 (90%), 34 (85%) and 27 (67.5%) patients completed all 3 minutes of exercise at 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min under both treatment conditions, respectively. Compared with placebo, ipratropium bromide/salbutamol significantly decreased dyspnea at the end of the third minute of exercise at 14 steps/min (by 0.6±1.0 Borg 0–10 scale units, P<0.01) and 16 steps/min (by 0.7±1.3 Borg 0–10 scale units, P<0.01); however, no statically significant differences were observed between treatments at 20 and 24 steps/min (both P>0.05). Conclusion The 3-MST, when performed at 14 and 16 steps/min, was responsive to detect the relief of exertional dyspnea after acute bronchodilation in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. PMID:27942208

  13. Stress Ratio Effects on Crack Opening Loads and Crack Growth Rates in Aluminum Alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio (R) and crack opening behavior on fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for aluminum alloy (AA) 2024-T3 were investigated using constant-delta K testing, closure measurements, and fractography. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained for a range of delta K and stress ratios. Results show that constant delta K fatigue crack growth for R ranging from near 0 to 1 is divided into three regions. In Region 1, at low R, da/dN increases with increasing R. In Region 2, at intermediate R, fatigue crack growth rates are relatively independent of R. In Region 3, at high R, further increases in da/dN are observed with increasing R.

  14. Determination of calibration constants for the hole-drilling residual stress measurement technique applied to orthotropic composites. I - Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. B.; Prabhakaran, R.; Tompkins, S.

    1987-01-01

    The hole-drilling technique for the measurement of residual stresses using electrical resistance strain gages has been widely used for isotropic materials and has been adopted by the ASTM as a standard method. For thin isotropic plates, with a hole drilled through the thickness, the idealized hole-drilling calibration constants are obtained by making use of the well-known Kirsch's solution. In this paper, an analogous attempt is made to theoretically determine the three idealized hole-drilling calibration constants for thin orthotropic materials by employing Savin's (1961) complex stress function approach.

  15. Rate constant for the reaction C2H5 + HBr → C2H6 + Br.

    PubMed

    Golden, David M; Peng, Jingping; Goumri, A; Yuan, J; Marshall, Paul

    2012-06-21

    RRKM theory has been employed to analyze the kinetics of the title reaction, in particular, the once-controversial negative activation energy. Stationary points along the reaction coordinate were characterized with coupled cluster theory combined with basis set extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. A shallow minimum, bound by 9.7 kJ mol(-1) relative to C(2)H(5) + HBr, was located, with a very small energy barrier to dissociation to Br + C(2)H(6). The transition state is tight compared to the adduct. The influence of vibrational anharmonicity on the kinetics and thermochemistry of the title reaction were explored quantitatively. With adjustment of the adduct binding energy by ∼4 kJ mol(-1), the computed rate constants may be brought into agreement with most experimental data in the literature, including new room-temperature results described here. There are indications that at temperatures above those studied experimentally, the activation energy may switch from negative to positive.

  16. Estimating spatially-variable first-order rate constants in groundwater reactive transport systems.

    PubMed

    Bailey, R T; Baù, D

    2011-03-25

    Numerical reactive transport models are often used as tools to assess aquifers contaminated with reactive groundwater solutes as well as investigating mitigation scenarios. The ability to accurately simulate the fate and transport of solutes, however, is often impeded by a lack of information regarding the parameters that define chemical reactions. In this study, we employ a steady-state Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), a data assimilation algorithm, to provide improved estimates of a spatially-variable first-order rate constant λ through assimilation of solute concentration measurement data into reactive transport simulation results. The methodology is applied in a steady-state, synthetic aquifer system in which a contaminant is leached to the saturated zone and undergoes first-order decay. Multiple sources of uncertainty are investigated, including hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and the statistical parameters that define the spatial structure of the parameter field. For the latter scenario, an iterative method is employed to identify the statistical mean of λ of the reference system. Results from all simulations show that the filter scheme is successful in conditioning the λ ensemble to the reference λ field. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the estimation of the λ values is dependent on the number of concentration measurements assimilated, the locations from which the measurement data are collected, the error assigned to the measurement values, and the correlation length of the λ fields.

  17. Detection of exudates in fundus imagery using a constant false-alarm rate (CFAR) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Manish; Kapoor, Elina

    2014-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in adults in the United States. The presence of exudates in fundus imagery is the early sign of diabetic retinopathy so detection of these lesions is essential in preventing further ocular damage. In this paper we present a novel technique to automatically detect exudates in fundus imagery that is robust against spatial and temporal variations of background noise. The detection threshold is adjusted dynamically, based on the local noise statics around the pixel under test in order to maintain a pre-determined, constant false alarm rate (CFAR). The CFAR detector is often used to detect bright targets in radar imagery where the background clutter can vary considerably from scene to scene and with angle to the scene. Similarly, the CFAR detector addresses the challenge of detecting exudate lesions in RGB and multispectral fundus imagery where the background clutter often exhibits variations in brightness and texture. These variations present a challenge to common, global thresholding detection algorithms and other methods. Performance of the CFAR algorithm is tested against a publicly available, annotated, diabetic retinopathy database and preliminary testing suggests that performance of the CFAR detector proves to be superior to techniques such as Otsu thresholding.

  18. Competitive kinetics versus stopped flow method for determining the degradation rate constants of steroids by ozonation.

    PubMed

    López-López, Alberto; Flores-Payán, Valentín; León-Becerril, Elizabeth; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; Vallejo-Rodríguez, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Steroids are classified as endocrine disrupting chemicals; they are persistent with low biodegradability and are hardly degraded by conventional methods. Ozonation process has been effective for steroids degradation and the determination of the kinetics is a fundamental aspect for the design and operation of the reactor. This study assessed two methods: competitive kinetics and stopped flow, for determining the degradation kinetics of two steroids, estradiol (E2) and ethinylestradiol (EE2) in spiked water. Experiments were performed at pH 6, 21 °C, and using tertbutyl alcohol as scavenger of hydroxyl radicals; competitive kinetics method used sodium phenolate as reference compound. For the stopped flow, the experiments were performed in a BioLogic SFM-3000/S equipment. For both methods, the second order rate constants were in the order of 10(6) and 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for E2 and EE2 respectively. The competitive kinetics can be applied with assurance and reliability but needing an additional analysis method to measure the residual concentrations. Stopped flow method allows the evaluation of the degradation kinetics in milliseconds and avoids the use of additional analytical methodologies; this method allows determining the reaction times on line. The methods are applicable for degradation of other emerging contaminants or other steroids and could be applied in water treatment at industrial level. Finally, it is important to consider the resources available to implement the most appropriate method, either competitive kinetics or the stopped-flow method.

  19. α-Terpineol reactions with the nitrate radical: Rate constant and gas-phase products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian T.; Ham, Jason E.

    The bimolecular rate constant of k rad +α-terpineol (16 ± 4) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was measured using the relative rate technique for the reaction of the nitrate radical (NO 3rad ) with α-terpineol (2-(4-methyl-1-cyclohex-3-enyl)propan-2-ol) at 297 ± 3 K and 1 atmosphere total pressure. To more clearly define part of α-terpineol's indoor environment degradation mechanism, the products of α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction were investigated. The identified reaction products were: acetone, glyoxal (HC( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H), and methylglyoxal (CH 3C( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H). The use of derivatizing agents O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and N, O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were used to propose the other major reaction products: 6-hydroxyhept-5-en-2-one, 4-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-1-methyl-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 5-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 1-formyl-5-hydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl)-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate, and 1,4-diformyl-5-hydroxy-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate. The elucidation of these products was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound + NO 3rad gas-phase mechanisms. The additional gas-phase products (2,6,6-trimethyltetrahydro-2 H-pyran-2,5-dicarbaldehyde and 2,2-dimethylcyclohexane-1,4-dicarbaldehyde) are proposed to be the result of cyclization through a reaction intermediate.

  20. Rate constant measurements for the overall reaction of OH + 1-butanol → products from 900 to 1200 K.

    PubMed

    Pang, Genny A; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M; Bowman, Craig T

    2012-03-15

    The rate constant for the overall reaction OH + 1-butanol → products was determined in the temperature range 900 to 1200 K from measurements of OH concentration time histories in reflected shock wave experiments of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as a fast source of OH radicals with 1-butanol in excess. Narrow-linewidth laser absorption was employed for the quantitative OH concentration measurement. A detailed kinetic mechanism was constructed that includes updated rate constants for 1-butanol and TBHP kinetics that influence the near-first-order OH concentration decay under the present experimental conditions, and this mechanism was used to facilitate the rate constant determination. The current work improves upon previous experimental studies of the title rate constant by utilizing a rigorously generated kinetic model to describe secondary reactions. Additionally, the current work extends the temperature range of experimental data in the literature for the title reaction under combustion-relevant conditions, presenting the first measurements from 900 to 1000 K. Over the entire temperature range studied, the overall rate constant can be expressed in Arrhenius form as 3.24 × 10(-10) exp(-2505/T [K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The influence of secondary reactions on the overall OH decay rate is discussed, and a detailed uncertainty analysis is performed yielding an overall uncertainty in the measured rate constant of ±20% at 1197 K and ±23% at 925 K. The results are compared with previous experimental and theoretical studies on the rate constant for the title reaction and reasonable agreement is found when the earlier experimental data were reinterpreted.

  1. Heart Rate and Stress in a College Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Vogt, F. Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Conditions producing stress are present in all colleges and universities. In this paper we report on an investigation utilizing heart rate as an indicator of stress in students when participating in activities encountered in a college classroom or laboratory. The activities included presenting an oral report, taking an exam, and participating in a…

  2. Application of an Artificial Neural Network to the Prediction of OH Radical Reaction Rate Constants for Evaluating Global Warming Potential.

    PubMed

    Allison, Thomas C

    2016-03-03

    Rate constants for reactions of chemical compounds with hydroxyl radical are a key quantity used in evaluating the global warming potential of a substance. Experimental determination of these rate constants is essential, but it can also be difficult and time-consuming to produce. High-level quantum chemistry predictions of the rate constant can suffer from the same issues. Therefore, it is valuable to devise estimation schemes that can give reasonable results on a variety of chemical compounds. In this article, the construction and training of an artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction of rate constants at 298 K for reactions of hydroxyl radical with a diverse set of molecules is described. Input to the ANN consists of counts of the chemical bonds and bends present in the target molecule. The ANN is trained using 792 (•)OH reaction rate constants taken from the NIST Chemical Kinetics Database. The mean unsigned percent error (MUPE) for the training set is 12%, and the MUPE of the testing set is 51%. It is shown that the present methodology yields rate constants of reasonable accuracy for a diverse set of inputs. The results are compared to high-quality literature values and to another estimation scheme. This ANN methodology is expected to be of use in a wide range of applications for which (•)OH reaction rate constants are required. The model uses only information that can be gathered from a 2D representation of the molecule, making the present approach particularly appealing, especially for screening applications.

  3. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Rate Constants and Substituent Effects for the Reactions of Hydroxyl Radicals With Three Partially Fluorinated Ethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, K.-J.; DeMore, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    Rate constants and temperature dependencies for the reactions of OH with CF3OCH3 (HFOC-143a), CF2HOCF2H (HFOC-134), and CF3OCF2H (HFOC-125) were studied using a relative rate technique in the temperature range 298-393 K. The following absolute rate constants were derived: HFOC-143a, 1.9E-12 exp(-1555/T); HFOC-134, 1.9E-12 exp(-2006/T); HFOC-125, 4.7E-13 exp(-2095/T). Units are cm(exp 3)molecule(exp -1) s(exp -1). Substituent effects on OH abstraction rate constants are discussed, and it is shown that the CF3O group has an effect on the OH rate constants similar to that of a fluorine atom. The effects are related to changes in the C-H bond energies of the reactants (and thereby the activation energies) rather than changes in the preexponential factors. On the basis of a correlation of rate constants with bond energies, the respective D(C-H) bond strengths in the three ethers are found to be 102, 104, and 106 kcal/mol, with an uncertainty of about 1 kcal/mol.

  5. Stress, strain rate and anisotropy in Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. K.; Aoki, Y.; Unglert, K.; Ohkura, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Shimizu, H.; Iguchi, M.; Tameguri, T.; Ohminato, T.; Mori, J.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy, the directional dependence of wave speeds, may be caused by stress-oriented cracks or by strain-oriented minerals, yet few studies have quantitatively compared anisotropy to stress and strain over large regions. Here we compare crustal stress and strain rates on the Island of Kyushu, Japan, as measured from inversions of focal mechanisms, GPS and shear wave splitting. Over 85,000 shear wave splitting measurements from local and regional earthquakes are obtained from the NIED network between 2004 and 2012, and on Aso, Sakurajima, Kirishima and Unzen volcano networks. Strain rate measurements are made from the Japanese Geonet stations. JMA-determined S arrival times processed with the MFAST shear wave splitting code measure fast polarisations (Φ), related to the orientation of the anisotropic medium and time delays (dt), related to the path length and the percent anisotropy. We apply the TESSA 2-D delay time tomography and spatial averaging code to the highest quality events, which have nearly vertical incidence angles, separating the 3455 shallow (depth < 40 km) from the 4957 deep (> = 40 km) earthquakes. Using square grids with 30 km sides for all the inversions, the best correlations are observed between splitting from shallow earthquakes and stress. Axes of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) and Φ correlate with a coefficient c of 0.56, significant at the 99% confidence level. Their mean difference is 31.9°. Axes of maximum compressional strain rate and SHmax are also well aligned, with an average difference of 28°, but they do not correlate with each other, meaning that where they differ, the difference is not systematic. Anisotropy strength is negatively correlated with the stress ratio parameter determined from focal mechanism inversion (c = - 0.64; significant at the 99% confidence level). The anisotropy and stress results are consistent with stress-aligned microcracks in the crust in a dominantly strike-slip regime. Eigenvalues of

  6. Stress State and Stress Rate Dependencies of Stiffness of Soft Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teachavorasinskun, Supot

    The influence of the stress anisotropy imposed during consolidation on the stiffness of soft Bangkok clays was explored using the triaxial equipment. Several testing conditions were imposed on the samples to examine the effects of stress state as well as the rate of loading. It was found the stiffness at moderate strain levels was almost independent to the stress state; i.e., the deviator stress level. On the contrary, the rate of stress application played a very important role. The faster the rate of stress application, the higher the values of the stiffness at moderate strains. Nevertheless, a simple empirical equation can be given based on the test results to represent the influence of rate of application on the stiffness of soft clay.

  7. Kinetics analysis for development of a rate constant estimation model for ultrasonic degradation reaction of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Tomoki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound has been used as an advanced oxidation method for wastewater treatment. Sonochemical degradation of organic compounds in aqueous solution occurs by pyrolysis and/or reaction with hydroxyl radicals. Moreover, kinetics of sonochemical degradation has been proposed. However, the effect of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate has not been investigated. In our previous study, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate of methylene blue was proposed. In this study, sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was performed at various frequencies. Apparent degradation rate constant was evaluated assuming that sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was a first-order reaction. Specifically, we focused on effects of ultrasonic frequency and power on rate constant, and the applicability of our proposed model was demonstrated. Using this approach, maximum sonochemical degradation rate was observed at 490 kHz, which agrees with a previous investigation into the effect of frequency on the sonochemical efficiency value evaluated by KI oxidation dosimetry. Degradation rate increased with ultrasonic power at every frequency. It was also observed that threshold power must be reached for the degradation reaction to progress. The initial methylene blue concentration and the apparent degradation rate constant have a relation of an inverse proportion. Our proposed model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant using ultrasonic power and sonochemical efficiency value can apply to this study which extended the frequency and initial concentration range.

  8. Non-Condon equilibrium Fermi's golden rule electronic transition rate constants via the linearized semiclassical method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-06-28

    In this paper, we test the accuracy of the linearized semiclassical (LSC) expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant for electronic transitions in the presence of non-Condon effects. We do so by performing a comparison with the exact quantum-mechanical result for a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions. The comparison is performed over a wide range of frictions and temperatures for model (1) and over a wide range of temperatures for model (2). The linearized semiclassical method is found to reproduce the exact quantum-mechanical result remarkably well for both models over the entire range of parameters under consideration. In contrast, more approximate expressions are observed to deviate considerably from the exact result in some regions of parameter space.

  9. Relationship between phenol-induced cytotoxicity and experimental inhibition rate constant or a theoretical parameter.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, S; Kadoma, Y

    2012-06-01

    We synthesized various dimer forms of 2-methoxyphenols and 2-tert-butylphenols, as dimers such as curcumin exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We investigated the QSARs between the cytotoxicity and independent variables; kinetic parameters (inhibition rate constant (kinh/kp), stoichiometric factor (n)) or DFT-based theoretical parameters (i.e. phenolic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE), ionization potential according to Koopman's theorem (IP), LUMO, absolute hardness (η), electronegativity (χ) and electrophilicity (ω)) for 2-methoxyphenols and 2- tert- or 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols. The cytotoxicity of these phenols against human tumor cells (HSG, HL60) and/or human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) showed a marked negative linear relationship to kinh/kp, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of phenols may be related to radical reactions. By contrast, a linear relationship between the cytotoxicity and η-term was demonstrated; 2-methoxyphenols showed a negative slope, whereas 2-tert- or 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols showed a positive slope. Also, the cytotoxicity of tert-butylphenols was linearly dependent on the LUMO-term, showing a positive slope. The cytotoxicity of methoxy-substituted monophenols toward both HSG and HGF cells was related to both log P and η- terms. Also, that of X-phenols toward murine L-1210 cells was related to both log P and η or IP-terms, determined from a dataset reported by Zhang et al., 1998. It was concluded that the phenol-induced cytotoxicity was attributable to radical reactions resulting from the terms (kinh/kp, IP, η, and LUMO) in QSAR. The LUMO-dependent cytotoxicity of 2-tert- or 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols may be related to their quinone oxidation products. Experimental and theoretical parameters provide a useful approach for analysis of the cytotoxicity for phenolic compounds.

  10. Evaluating the methane generation rate constant (k value) of low-organic waste at Danish landfills.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zishen; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The methane (CH4) generation rate constant (k value, yr(-1)) is an essential parameter when using first-order decay (FOD) landfill gas (LFG) generation models to estimate CH4 generation from landfills. Four categories of waste (street cleansing, mixed bulky, shredder, and sludge waste) with a low-organic content, as well as temporarily stored combustible waste, were sampled from four Danish landfills. Anaerobic degradation experiments were set up in duplicate for all waste samples and incubated for 405 days, while the cumulative CH4 generation was continuously monitored. Applying FOD equations to the experimental results, half-life time values (t½, yr) and k values of various waste categories were determined. In general, similar waste categories obtained from different Danish landfills showed similar results. Sludge waste had the highest k values, which were in the range 0.156-0.189 yr(-1). The combustible and street cleansing waste showed k values of 0.023-0.027 yr(-1) and 0.073-0.083 yr(-1), respectively. The lowest k values were obtained for mixed bulky and shredder wastes ranging from 0.013 to 0.017 yr(-1). Most low-organic waste samples showed lower k values in comparison to the default numeric values in current FOD models (e.g., IPCC, LandGEM, and Afvalzorg). Compared with the k values reported in the literature, this research determined low-organic waste for the first time via reliable large-scale and long-term experiments. The degradation parameters provided in this study are valuable when using FOD LFG generation models to estimate CH4 generation from modern landfills that receive only low-organic waste.

  11. Reaction mechanism and rate constants of the CH+CH4 reaction: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Joao Marcelo; Mebel, Alexander M.

    2015-07-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of CH radical insertion into methane. The results show that the reaction can be viewed to occur via two stages. On the first stage, the CH radical approaches methane without large structural changes to acquire proper positioning for the subsequent stage, where H-migration occurs from CH4 to CH, along with a C-C bond formation. Where the first stage ends and the second begins, a tight transition state was located using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) and MP4(SDQ)/6-311++G(d,p) methods. Using a rigid rotor - harmonic oscillator approach within transition state theory, we show that at the MP5/6-311++G(d,p)//MP4(SDQ)/6-311++G(d,p) level the calculated rate constants are in a reasonably good agreement with experiment in a broad temperature range of 145-581 K. Even at low temperatures, the insertion reaction bottleneck is found about the location of the tight transition state, rather than at long separations between the CH and CH4 reactants. In addition, high level CCSD(T)-F12/CBS calculations of the remainder of the C2H5 potential energy surface predict the CH+CH4 reaction to proceed via the initial insertion step to the ethyl radical which then can emit a hydrogen atom to form highly exothermic C2H4+H products.

  12. Theoretical study of the mechanism and rate constant of the B + CO2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Poully, Benjamin; Bergeat, Astrid; Hannachi, Yacine

    2008-09-04

    The different stationary points on the potential energy surface relative to the title reaction have been reinvestigated at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level with relative energies computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ optimized geometries and by using the G3B3 composite method. Two entrance channels have been identified. The first one corresponds to boron addition at one of the oxygen atoms of the CO 2 molecule leading to trans-BOCO, which is found to be about 27 kcal/mol exothermic with a potential energy barrier of 16.4 kcal/mol (G3B3). The second channel, which has not been identified in previous theoretical works, corresponds to a direct insertion of the boron atom into a CO bond and leads to OBCO. The B + CO 2 --> OBCO step is found to be about 84 kcal/mol exothermic and needs to overcome a potential energy barrier of only 3.6 kcal/mol (G3B3). The rate constant at 300 K of the insertion step, calculated by using TST theory with G3B3 calculated activation energy value, is 5.4 10 (-14) cm (3) molecule (-1) s (-1), in very good agreement with the experimental data ((7.0 +/- 2.8) 10 (-14) cm (3) molecule (-1) s (-1), DiGiuseppe, T. G.; Davidovits, P. J. Chem. Phys. 1981, 74, 3287). The one corresponding to the addition process is found to be several orders of magnitude smaller because of a much higher potential energy barrier. The addition channel would not contribute to the title reaction even at high temperature. A modified Arrhenius equation has been fitted in the 300-1000 K temperature range, which might be useful for chemical models.

  13. Leave-one-out procedure in the validation of elimination rate constant analysis.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, T; Jaroszewski, J J; Sasinowska-Motyl, M

    2012-12-01

    Many registration agencies and other organizations define how to calculate the elimination rate constant (kel) value. No validation procedures have been introduced to verify the correct selection of the concentration-time (C-T) points used for the kel calculation. The purpose of this paper is to discover whether kel analysis can be subjected to the condensed validation procedure and what acceptance criteria should be adopted for such a procedure. For the analysis, data collected during bioequivalence studies of 4 drugs were selected, including 2 highly lipophilic drugs (itraconazole, atorvastatin) and 2 weakly lipophilic drugs (trimetazidine, perindopril). Pharmacokinetic calculations were performed with the use of WinNonlin Professional v 5.3. Internal validation of the kel analysis using leave-one-out cross-validation was performed. The present analysis proves that the C-T selection process for the kel calculations cannot be automated. In each of the analysed data series there were such C-T sequences that did not meet even one of the validation criteria. This paper proposes 3 validation criteria which need to be met in order to confirm the optimal selection of C-T data to calculate kel: Q 2≥0.6, R2≥ 0.85, Q 2-R2<0.3, were Q 2 - squared cross-validated correlation coefficient, R2 - coefficient of determination). Application of the validation procedure for the kel analysis under discussion proves the accuracy of the calculations, even if repeated kel analysis is based on a different sequence of points in the elimination phase.

  14. Non-Condon equilibrium Fermi's golden rule electronic transition rate constants via the linearized semiclassical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we test the accuracy of the linearized semiclassical (LSC) expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant for electronic transitions in the presence of non-Condon effects. We do so by performing a comparison with the exact quantum-mechanical result for a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions. The comparison is performed over a wide range of frictions and temperatures for model (1) and over a wide range of temperatures for model (2). The linearized semiclassical method is found to reproduce the exact quantum-mechanical result remarkably well for both models over the entire range of parameters under consideration. In contrast, more approximate expressions are observed to deviate considerably from the exact result in some regions of parameter space.

  15. Mercury chemistry in the MBL: Modeling results including Hg + halogen atom reaction rate constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedgecock, I. M.; Pirrone, N.

    2003-04-01

    The inclusion, of recently published kinetic data for the reactions between gas phase elemental Hg and halogen atoms and molecules, in a photochemical box model including aerosols of the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), suggests that the cycling of Hg over the world's oceans may be much more dynamic than was once thought, as a direct result of halogen activation from marine aerosols. The rate of gas phase oxidation of Hg(0) in the model leads to high concentrations of gas phase oxidised Hg (Hg(II)), which is deposited to the sea surface either directly from the gas phase or indirectly via scavenging by sea salt and non-sea-salt sulphate aerosol particles and subsequent deposition. The model base run predicts Hg(II) concentrations higher than those measured in the marine atmosphere, and a lifetime for Hg(0) of a matter of days, rather than months as has been generally assumed. In light of previous measurements and the known stability of the hemispherical background concentration of Hg(0) the influence of liquid water content (the number of deliquescent aerosol droplets), cloud optical depth at the top of the boundary layer, and the Henry's Law constants for HgCl2 and HgBr2 have been investigated. In order to maintain a stable background concentration of Hg(0) a source strength (for emission from the sea, or entrainment from the free troposphere) of at least 15 ng m-2 hr-1 is required, which seems most unlikely considering results from flux chamber experiments. The model therefore either overestimates the rate of gas phase oxidation or lacks a fundamental reduction process. The evidence from studies of mercury depletion events in the Arctic troposphere lend support to the fast reaction between Hg(0) and Br containing radicals which have been included in the model, it is necessary therefore to investigate homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms for the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) in order to explain the measured Hg(II) concentrations in the MBL and the stable

  16. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A.; Yu, Cedric X.

    2009-11-01

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc™ deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to <=± 5°. This restriction requires the treatment arc to be broken into multiple sectors such that the local MU fluctuation within each sector is reduced, thereby lowering the angular deviation of the segments during redistribution. The converted CDR plans were delivered with a single gantry sweep as in the VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was delivered

  17. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A; Yu, Cedric X

    2009-11-07

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to

  18. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  19. Principals Responding to Constant Pressure: Finding a Source of Stress Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Caryn M.

    2013-01-01

    This conceptual article presents a review of the research concerning the stress level of principals over the past three decades, with emphasis on the occupational stress that principals encounter because of heightened accountability and expectations for student achievement. Mindfulness meditation, as a stress management intervention, provides the…

  20. Rate Constants for Fine-structure Excitations in O–H Collisions with Error Bars Obtained by Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Daniel; Krems, Roman V.

    2017-02-01

    We present an approach using a combination of coupled channel scattering calculations with a machine-learning technique based on Gaussian Process regression to determine the sensitivity of the rate constants for non-adiabatic transitions in inelastic atomic collisions to variations of the underlying adiabatic interaction potentials. Using this approach, we improve the previous computations of the rate constants for the fine-structure transitions in collisions of O({}3{P}j) with atomic H. We compute the error bars of the rate constants corresponding to 20% variations of the ab initio potentials and show that this method can be used to determine which of the individual adiabatic potentials are more or less important for the outcome of different fine-structure changing collisions.

  1. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.; Borkowski, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with acetylene, important in both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, is determined for temperatures between 228 and 413 K. The flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique was employed at five temperatures over wide ranges of pressure and acetylene concentrations, with the OH produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons measured by multiscaling techniques. Results indicate that, except at the lowest temperature, the bimolecular rate constant for the reaction depends strongly on total pressure, with the pressure effect becoming more pronounced with increasing temperature. At limiting high pressures, the rate constant is found to be equal to 6.83 + or - 1.19 x 10 to the -12th exp (-646 + or - 47/T) cu cm/molecule per sec, where T is the temperature. Results thus demonstrate the importance of environmental conditions in theoretical studies of atmospheric and combustion product compositions

  2. Determination of rate and equilibrium constants for the reactions between electron transfer mediators and proteins by linear sweep voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Parker, V D; Roddick, A; Seefeldt, L C; Wang, H; Zheng, G

    1997-07-01

    Redox proteins undergo measurable charge transfer at electrodes only under special circumstances, while they readily take part in electron transfer reactions with mediators in solution. Advantage was taken of the latter fact to develop a new method to study the kinetics and equilibria of protein-mediator electron transfer reactions. It was shown that rate and equilibrium constants for the electron exchange between electron transfer mediator and the protein can be obtained from the analysis of the perturbation of the linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) response of the mediator due to the presence of the protein. The experiments were carried out under conditions where the protein does not interact with the electrode. Theoretical data obtained by digital simulation are presented to show the conditions under which rate and equilibrium constants are accessible by the LSV technique. The electron transfer reactions between ferri- and ferrocytochrome c and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylphenylenediamine and the corresponding radical cation in phosphate-buffered saline (0.04 M phosphate, pH 7.4, 0.1 M NaCl) buffer were selected to demonstrate the technique. These studies resulted in an equilibrium constant equal to 1.0 and forward and reverse rate constants equal to 1.6 x 10(4) M-1 s-1. The data available from this method include forward and reverse rate constants for electron transfer and the formal potential for the protein redox couple.

  3. Effect of initial acceleration on the development of the flow field of an airfoil pitching at constant rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koochesfahani, M. M.; Smiljanovski, V.; Brown, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    We present results from a series of experiments where an airfoil is pitched at constant rate from 0 to 60 degrees angle of attack. It is well documented that the dynamic stall behavior of such an airfoil strongly depends on the nondimensional pitch rate K = dot-alpha C/(2U(sub infinity)), where C is the chord, dot-alpha the constant pitch rate, and U(sub infinity) the free stream speed. In reality, the actual motion of the airfoil deviates from the ideal ramp due to the finite acceleration and deceleration periods imposed by the damping of drive system and response characteristics of the airfoil. It is possible that the pitch rate alone may not suffice in describing the flow and that the details of the motion trajectory before achieving a desired constant pitch rate may also affect the processes involved in the dynamic stall phenomenon. The effects of acceleration and deceleration periods are investigated by systematically varing the acceleration magnitude and its duration through the initial acceleration phase to constant pitch rate. The magnitude and duration of deceleration needed to bring the airfoil motion to rest is similarly controlled.

  4. Novel method of determination of the internal enzyme distribution within porous solid supports and the deactivation rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Do, D.D.; Hossain, M.M.

    1986-04-01

    This article presents a method for determining the rate constant for deactivation and the internal distribution of immobilized enzyme. This method makes use of the parallel deactivation process in a diffusion-controlled regime, in which the internal activity profile behaves like a penetration front. This front basically traces through the initial active enzymatic profile, and one can determine the internal profile and the rate constant for deactivation from the experimentally observable bulk concentration versus time. This method is applied to the experimental data of the system of hydrogen peroxide-immobilized catalase on controlled pore glas and Si-Al particles. 26 references.

  5. Is the dissociative recombination of H3(+) really slow. A new spectroscopic measurement of the rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, T.

    1988-06-01

    The dissociative rate constant for H3(+) occupies a key role in model calculations of the interstellar chemical evolution. The decay of an infrared absorption signal of H3(+) was measured as a function of time, and the decay curve was analyzed and found to fit very well to the form expected for a recombination decay. The signal decay is attributed to the dissociative recombination with electrons, and the rate constant was determined to be (1./8 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the -7th cu cm/s, which disagrees with the recent value obtained with the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe technique. 22 references.

  6. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics formalism for Marcus theory of heterogeneous and self-exchange electron-transfer rate constants.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Richa; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2008-05-08

    The cross-exchange electron-transfer rate constant expression of Marcus is derived from the Flux-force formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The relationship governing the Onsager's phenomenological coefficients for cross-exchange and self-exchange electron-transfer processes is deduced. Onsager's phenomenological coefficient pertaining to the Butler-Volmer equation is derived and estimated from the experimental exchange current densities. The correlation between the heterogeneous and the homogeneous electron-transfer rate constants derived by Marcus is analyzed in terms of the corresponding phenomenological coefficients.

  7. Rate constant measurements for the reaction Cl + CH2O yields HCl + CHO Implications regarding the removal of stratospheric chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. C.; Kurylo, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique was employed to investigate the rate constant for the reaction Cl + CH2O yields HCl + CHO from 223 to 323 K. An Arrhenius fit of the data gives a rate constant equal to (1.09 + or - 0.40) x 10 to the -10th exp/-(131 + or - 98)/T/ in units of cu cm/molecule per sec. The results are compared to two very recent kinetic studies and are assessed in view of the reaction's role in disrupting the Cl-ClO stratospheric ozone depletion chain.

  8. Absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine /2P/ atoms and hydrogen peroxide from 298 to 424 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine (2P) atoms and hydrogen peroxide was determined from 298 to 424 K, using the discharge flow resonance fluorescence technique. Pseudo-first-order conditions were used with hydrogen peroxide in large excess. A fast flow-sampling procedure limited hydrogen peroxide decomposition to less than 5% over the temperature range studied. At 298 K, the rate constant is (4.1 plus or minus 0.2) x 10 to the minus 13th cu cm/molecule-sec.

  9. Aftershock decay, productivity, and stress rates in Hawaii: Indicators of temperature and stress from magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Fred W.; Wright, Tom; Nakata, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    We examined dozens of aftershock sequences in Hawaii in terms of Gutenberg-Richter and modified Omori law parameters. We studied p, the rate of aftershock decay; Ap, the aftershock productivity, defined as the observed divided by the expected number of aftershocks; and c, the time delay when aftershock rates begin to fall. We found that for earthquakes shallower than 20 km, p values >1.2 are near active magma centers. We associate this high decay rate with higher temperatures and faster stress relaxation near magma reservoirs. Deep earthquakes near Kilauea's inferred magma transport path show a range of p values, suggesting the absence of a large, deep magma reservoir. Aftershock productivity is >4.0 for flank earthquakes known to be triggered by intrusions but is normal (0.25 to 4.0) for isolated main shocks. We infer that continuing, post-main shock stress from the intrusion adds to the main shock's stress step and causes higher Ap. High Ap in other zones suggests less obvious intrusions and pulsing magma pressure near Kilauea's feeding conduit. We calculate stress rates and stress rate changes from pre-main shock and aftershock rates. Stress rate increased after many intrusions but decreased after large M7–8 earthquakes. Stress rates are highest in the seismically active volcano flanks and lowest in areas far from volcanic centers. We found sequences triggered by intrusions tend to have high Ap, high (>0.10 day) c values, a stress rate increase, and sometimes a peak in aftershock rate hours after the main shock. We interpret these values as indicating continuing intrusive stress after the main shock.

  10. Stress corrosion-controlled rates of mode I fracture propagation in calcareous bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Surface bedrock on natural rock slopes is subject to constant and cyclic environmental stresses (wind, water, wave, ice, seismic or gravitational). Studies indicate that these stresses range up to several hundred kPa, generally too low to cause macroscopic changes in intact rock, although clear evidence of fracture generation, crack propagation and weathering of bedrock illustrates the effect of environmental stresses at the Earth's surface. We suggest that material degradation and its extent, is likely to be controlled by the rate of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion is a fluid-material reaction, where fluids preferentially react with strained atomic bonds at the tip of developing fractures. Stress corrosion in ferrous and siliceous materials is often accepted as the fracture propagation and degradation rate-controlling process where materials are subject to stresses and fluids. Although evidence for chemical weathering in propagating bedrock fractures is clear in natural environments, the physical system and quantification of stress corrosion in natural rocks is yet to be addressed. Here, we present preliminary data on the relationship between stresses at levels commonly present on natural rock slopes, and material damage resulting from stress corrosion under constant or cyclic tensile loading. We undertake single notch three-point bending tests (SNBT) on fresh calcareous bedrock specimens (1100x100x100mm) over a two-month period. Two beams containing an artificial notch are stressed to 75% of their ultimate strength, and a constant supply of weak acid is applied at the notch tip to enhance chemical reactions. A third, unloaded, beam is also exposed to weak acid in order to elucidate the contribution of stress corrosion cracking to the material degradation. Stresses at the tip of propagating cracks affect the kinetics of the chemical reaction in the specimen exposed to both loading and corrosion, leading to an increase in degradation, and greater

  11. Heart rate variability (HRV): an indicator of stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Durek, Joseph J.; O'Kane, Barbara L.; Tran, Nhien; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2014-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) can be an important indicator of several conditions that affect the autonomic nervous system, including traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder and peripheral neuropathy [3], [4], [10] & [11]. Recent work has shown that some of the HRV features can potentially be used for distinguishing a subject's normal mental state from a stressed one [4], [13] & [14]. In all of these past works, although processing is done in both frequency and time domains, few classification algorithms have been explored for classifying normal from stressed RRintervals. In this paper we used 30 s intervals from the Electrocardiogram (ECG) time series collected during normal and stressed conditions, produced by means of a modified version of the Trier social stress test, to compute HRV-driven features and subsequently applied a set of classification algorithms to distinguish stressed from normal conditions. To classify RR-intervals, we explored classification algorithms that are commonly used for medical applications, namely 1) logistic regression (LR) [16] and 2) linear discriminant analysis (LDA) [6]. Classification performance for various levels of stress over the entire test was quantified using precision, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity measures. Results from both classifiers were then compared to find an optimal classifier and HRV features for stress detection. This work, performed under an IRB-approved protocol, not only provides a method for developing models and classifiers based on human data, but also provides a foundation for a stress indicator tool based on HRV. Further, these classification tools will not only benefit many civilian applications for detecting stress, but also security and military applications for screening such as: border patrol, stress detection for deception [3],[17], and wounded-warrior triage [12].

  12. Dynamic shear-stress-enhanced rates of nutrient consumption in gas-liquid semi-continuous-flow suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, Laurence A.; Volpato, Fabio Z.; Paulino, Alexandre T.; Belfiore, Carol J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to establish guidelines for generating significant mammalian cell density in suspension bioreactors when stress-sensitive kinetics enhance the rate of nutrient consumption. Ultra-low-frequency dynamic modulations of the impeller (i.e., 35104 Hz) introduce time-dependent oscillatory shear into this transient analysis of cell proliferation under semi-continuous creeping flow conditions. Greater nutrient consumption is predicted when the amplitude A of modulated impeller rotation increases, and stress-kinetic contributions to nutrient consumption rates increase linearly at higher modulation frequency via an application of fluctuation-dissipation response. Interphase mass transfer is required to replace dissolved oxygen as it is consumed by aerobic nutrient consumption in the liquid phase. The theory and predictions described herein could be important at small length scales in the creeping flow regime where viscous shear is significant at the interface between the nutrient medium and isolated cells in suspension. Two-dimensional flow around spherically shaped mammalian cells, suspended in a Newtonian culture medium, is analyzed to calculate the surface-averaged magnitude of the velocity gradient tensor and modify homogeneous rates of nutrient consumption that are stimulated by viscous shear, via the formalism of stress-kinetic reciprocal relations that obey Curie's theorem in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Time constants for stress-free free and stress-sensitive stress nutrient consumption are defined and quantified to identify the threshold (i.e., stress,threshold) below which the effect of stress cannot be neglected in accurate predictions of bioreactor performance. Parametric studies reveal that the threshold time constant for stress-sensitive nutrient consumption stress,threshold decreases when the time constant for stress

  13. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-08-14

    concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

  14. Reaction rate constant for OH + HOONO/sub 2/. -->. products over the temperature range 246 to 324 K

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, P.L.; Black, G.; Barker, J.R.

    1982-04-29

    Absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for the title reaction have been determined for temperatures ranging from 246 to 324 K. The laser flash-photolysis resonance-fluorescence (LFPRF) technique was used to generate O(/sup 1/D) which reacted with H/sub 2/ and/or H/sub 2/O to produce OH radicals. The bimolecular rate constants for the title reaction showed no dependence on total (He) pressure over the range approx. 3 to 15 torr, and they did not depend upon initial (OH) or upon its mode of formation. The H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ impurity was explicitly measured in all experiments, and the rate constants were corrected for its contribution. A weighted least-squares analysis of the data obtained at nine temperatures (226 data points) gave the Arrhenius expression (k +- 1sigma) = (8.05 +- 5.69) x 10/sup -12/ exp (-193 +- 194/T) cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/ with covariance 1.098 x 10/sup -9/. A simple weighted average (temperature independent) fits the data just as well, and when the effects of systematic errors are taken into account, our recommended rate constant is (k +- 2sigma) = (4.0 +- 1.6) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/.

  15. Temperature dependence of the rate constants for oxidation of organic compounds by peroxyl radicals in aqueous alcohol solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B.; Huie, R.E.; Kumar, M.; Neta, P.

    1992-01-23

    Rate constants for reactions of chlorinated methylperoxyl radicals with chlorpromazine (2-chloro-10-[3-(dimethylamino)-propyl]phenothiazine), trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), and ascorbate in aqueous alcohol solutions have been measured by pulse radiolysis as a function of temperature, generally between 5 and 75{degrees}C. The rate constants varied between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, the calculated Arrhenius activation energies ranged from 1 to 30 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}, and the preexponential factors also varied considerably, with log A ranging from 7 to 14. In general, room temperature rate constants increase with an increase in the number of chlorine atoms on the radical (increasing its electron affinity and thus the driving force for the reaction) and with an increase in the solvent polarity. The Arrhenius preexponential factor and the activation energy both increased as the proportion of water in the solvent mixture increased; i.e., the increase in rate constant with solvent polarity is a result of two compensating effects. Electron transfer from the organic reductants to the chlorinated methylperoxyl radicals is suggested to take place via an inner-sphere mechanism involving a transient adduct of the peroxyl radical to the reductant. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Fluorescence anisotropy-based measurement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa penicillin-binding protein 2 transpeptidase inhibitor acylation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Gao, Ning; Gu, Rong-Fang; Thresher, Jason

    2014-10-15

    High-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are essential integral membrane proteins of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane responsible for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. They are the targets of antibacterial β-lactam drugs, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. β-Lactams covalently acylate the active sites of the PBP transpeptidase domains. Because β-lactams are time-dependent inhibitors, quantitative assessment of the inhibitory activity of these compounds ideally involves measurement of their second-order acylation rate constants. We previously described a fluorescence anisotropy-based assay to measure these rate constants for soluble constructs of PBP3 (Anal. Biochem. 439 (2013) 37-43). Here we report the expression and purification of a soluble construct of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP2 as a fusion protein with NusA. This soluble PBP2 was used to measure second-order acylation rate constants with the fluorescence anisotropy assay. Measurements were obtained for mecillinam, which reacts specifically with PBP2, and for several carbapenems. The assay also revealed that PBP2 slowly hydrolyzed mecillinam and was used to measure the rate constant for this deacylation reaction.

  17. Multiple-estimate Monte Carlo calculation of the dose rate constant for a cesium-131 interstitial brachytherapy seed

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, Richard S.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2007-01-03

    The purpose of this study was to calculate a more accurate dose rate constant for the Cs-131 (model CS-1, IsoRay Medical, Inc., Richland, Washington) interstitial brachytherapy seed. Previous measurements of the dose rate constant for this seed have been reported by others with incongruity. Recent direct measurements by thermoluminescence dosimetry and by gamma-ray spectroscopy were about 15 percent greater than earlier thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements. Therefore, we set about to calculate independent values by a Monte Carlo approach that combined three estimates as a consistency check, and to quantify the computational uncertainty. The calculated dose rate constant for the Cs-131 seed was 1.040 cGy h^{-1} U^{-1} for an ionization chamber model and 1.032 cGy h^{-1} U^{-1} for a circular ring model. A formal value of 2.2% uncertainty was calculated for both values. The range of our multi-estimate values were from 1.032 cGy h^{-1} U^{-1} to 1.061 cGy h^{-1} U^{-1}. We also modeled three I-125 seeds with known dose rate constants to test the accuracy of this study's approach.

  18. The ClpXP protease unfolds substrates using a constant rate of pulling but different gears.

    PubMed

    Sen, Maya; Maillard, Rodrigo A; Nyquist, Kristofor; Rodriguez-Aliaga, Piere; Pressé, Steve; Martin, Andreas; Bustamante, Carlos

    2013-10-24

    ATP-dependent proteases are vital to maintain cellular protein homeostasis. Here, we study the mechanisms of force generation and intersubunit coordination in the ClpXP protease from E. coli to understand how these machines couple ATP hydrolysis to mechanical protein unfolding. Single-molecule analyses reveal that phosphate release is the force-generating step in the ATP-hydrolysis cycle and that ClpXP translocates substrate polypeptides in bursts resulting from highly coordinated conformational changes in two to four ATPase subunits. ClpXP must use its maximum successive firing capacity of four subunits to unfold stable substrates like GFP. The average dwell duration between individual bursts of translocation is constant, regardless of the number of translocating subunits, implying that ClpXP operates with constant "rpm" but uses different "gears."

  19. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  20. Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-04-01

    Accurate determination of dose-rate constant (lambda) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (< 50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of lambda taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of lambda. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in lambda determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it

  1. Does the diversification rate of endemic birds of mainland China follow abrupt, gradual shifting or constant patterns?

    PubMed

    Chen, Youhua

    2017-03-01

    In this brief report, time-varying (including both gradual and abrupt change) and time-constant diversification models are fitted on a phylogeny of endemic birds of mainland China to test the diversification patterns of endemic birds in the region. The results show that phylogeny of endemic birds is best quantified by a constant-rate diversification model through model comparison. Limitations of the study are discussed. In particular, ignorance of non-endemic taxa and the limited sampling of endemic taxa could influence the conclusions of the study.

  2. Determination of blade stresses under constant speed and transient conditions with nonlinear damping

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, J.S.; Vyas, N.S.

    1996-04-01

    Determination of resonant stresses is an important step in the life estimation of turbomachine blades. Resonance may occur either at a steady operating speed or under transient conditions of operation when the blade passes through a critical speed. Damping plays a significant role in limiting the amplitudes of vibration and stress values. The blade damping mechanism is very complex in nature, because of interfacial slip, material hysteresis, and gas dynamic damping occurring simultaneously. In this paper, a numerical technique to compute the stress response of a turbine blade with nonlinear damping characteristics, during steady and transient operations of the rotor, is presented. Damping is defined as a function of vibratory mode, rotor speed, and strain amplitude. The technique is illustrated by computing the stress levels at resonant rotor speeds for typical operation of a turbomachine.

  3. Real-time association rate constant measurement using combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonds, Boris; Wang, Chun-Wei; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2010-02-01

    This document reports a novel method of measuring association rate constant (ka) for antibody-antigen interaction using evanescent wave-based combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probes. The method was demonstrated by measuring association rate constant for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA antibody interaction. "Direct method" was used for detection; goat anti-BSA "capture" antibodies were immobilized on the probe surfaces while the antigen (BSA) was directly labeled with Alexa 488 dye. The probes were subsequently submerged in 3nM Labeled BSA in egg albumin (1 mg/ml). The fluorescence signal recorded was proportional to BSA anti-BSA conjugates and continuous signal was acquired suing a fiber optic spectrometer (Ocean Optics, Inc.). A 476 nm diode laser was use as an excitation source. Association constant was estimated from a plot of signal as a function of time. Measured association rate constant ka for the binding of BSA with anti-BSA at room temperature is (8.33 +/- 0.01) x 104 M-1s-1.

  4. Time Dependent Dielectric Breakdown of Silicon Dioxide under Constant Tunneling Current Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Two Factor Example Showing Interaction Effects ........ .................... 61 4.22 Example of Curvature .............. 64 3.1 Sianal Current Circuit ...system to yield data for evaluation of the effects of the several stress factors used in this experiment on the integrity of the thin oxides in the...the integrity of the oxides under test and the stress factors. The fabrication and structure of the test vehicles will be more fully covered in the

  5. Rate constant calculations of the C2 + HCN → CCCN+H addition via the Master Equation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Washington Barbosa; Albernaz, Alessandra F; Barreto, Patricia R P; Correa, Eberth

    2017-04-01

    The addition of C2 to HCN is of relevant interest in astrochemistry. We studied the pathways of this addition to produce CCCN and estimated its reaction rate using the Master Equation in the circumstellar environment. From the results of this study, it was possible to show that a different pathway in the Surface Potential Energy-PES can also be investigated. In a circumstellar envelop environment, with temperatures varying between 1000 K and 2000 K, the abundances of these species are favorable to this kind of addition, and our branching ratio for the rate constant showed that the new pathway is more favorable in comparison with other possibilities for this range of temperatures in this environment, and must be taken into account in any computation of the rate constant. Graphical Abstract Branching ratios of pathways involved in the C2 + HCN → CCCN+H addition, at a temperature range of 1000-2000 K.

  6. On the thermodynamics of stress rate in the evolution of back stress in viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Chaboche, J.-L.; Walker, K. P.

    1991-01-01

    A thermodynamic foundation using the concept of internal state variables is presented for the kinematic description of a viscoplastic material. Three different evolution equations for the back stress are considered. The first is that of classical, nonlinear, kinematic hardening. The other two include a contribution that is linear in stress rate. Choosing an appropriate change in variables can remove this stress rate dependence. As a result, one of these two models is shown to be equivalent to the classical, kinematic hardening model; while the other is a new model, one which seems to have favorable characteristics for representing ratchetting behavior. All three models are thermodynamically admissible.

  7. Volitional Control of Heart Rate During Exercise Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFevers, Victoria A.

    Thirty five volunteer college women were divided into three groups to determine if heart rate could be conditioned instrumentally and lowered during exercise stress on the treadmill. The three groups were a) experimental group I, 15 subjects who received instrumental conditioning with visual feedback; b) instrumental group II, 9 subjects who…

  8. Transcriptome analysis reveals that constant heat stress modifies the metabolism and structure of the porcine longissimus dorsi skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yue; Feng, Yuejin; Yang, Peige; Cui, Yanjun; Liu, Jiru; Yang, Chunhe; Gu, Xianhong

    2016-12-01

    Exposure to high ambient temperatures is detrimental to pig rearing and porcine meat quality. Deep molecular sequencing allows for genomic characterization of porcine skeletal muscles and helps understand how the genomic landscape may impact meat quality. To this end, we performed mRNA-seq to molecularly dissect the impact of heat stress on porcine skeletal muscles, longissimus dorsi. Sixteen castrated, male DLY pigs [which are crossbreeds between Duroc (D) boars and Landrace (L) × Yorkshire (Y) sows, 79.0 ± 1.5 kg BW] were evenly split into two groups that were subjected to either control (CON) (22 °C; 55 % humidity) or constant heat stress (H30; 30 °C; 55 % humidity) conditions for 21 days. Seventy-eight genes were found to be differentially expressed, of which 37 were up-regulated and 41 were down-regulated owing to constant heat stress. We predicted 5247 unknown genes and 6108 novel transcribed units attributed to alternative splicing (AS) events in the skeletal muscle. Furthermore, 30,761 and 31,360 AS events were observed in the CON and H30 RNA-seq libraries, respectively. The differentially expressed genes in the porcine skeletal muscles were involved in glycolysis, lactate metabolism, lipid metabolism, cellular defense, and stress responses. Additionally, the expression levels of these genes were associated with variations in meat quality between the CON and H30 groups, indicating that heat stress modulated genes crucial to skeletal muscle development and metabolism. Our transcriptomic analysis provides valuable information for understanding the molecular mechanisms governing porcine skeletal muscle development. Such insights may lead to innovative strategies to improve meat quality of pigs under heat stress.

  9. A Constant Rate of Spontaneous Mutation in DNA-Based Microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, John W.

    1991-08-01

    In terms of evolution and fitness, the most significant spontaneous mutation rate is likely to be that for the entire genome (or its nonfrivolous fraction). Information is now available to calculate this rate for several DNA-based haploid microbes, including bacteriophages with single- or double-stranded DNA, a bacterium, a yeast, and a filamentous fungus. Their genome sizes vary by ≈6500-fold. Their average mutation rates per base pair vary by ≈16,000-fold, whereas their mutation rates per genome vary by only ≈2.5-fold, apparently randomly, around a mean value of 0.0033 per DNA replication. The average mutation rate per base pair is inversely proportional to genome size. Therefore, a nearly invariant microbial mutation rate appears to have evolved. Because this rate is uniform in such diverse organisms, it is likely to be determined by deep general forces, perhaps by a balance between the usually deleterious effects of mutation and the physiological costs of further reducing mutation rates.

  10. Theoretical Prediction of Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction by OH, H, O, CH3, and HO2 Radicals from Toluene.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Hao; Guo, Jun-Jiang; Li, Rui; Wang, Fan; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2016-05-26

    Hydrogen abstraction from toluene by OH, H, O, CH3, and HO2 radicals are important reactions in oxidation process of toluene. Geometries and corresponding harmonic frequencies of the reactants, transition states as well as products involved in these reactions are determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) level. To achieve highly accurate thermochemical data for these stationary points on the potential energy surfaces, the Gaussian-4(G4) composite method was employed. Torsional motions are treated either as free rotors or hindered rotors in calculating partion functions to determine thermodynamic properties. The obtained standard enthalpies of formation for reactants and some prodcuts are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental data with the largest error of 0.5 kcal mol(-1). The conventional transition state theory (TST) with tunneling effects was adopted to determine rate constants of these hydrogen abstraction reactions based on results from quantum chemistry calculations. To faciliate its application in kinetic modeling, the obtained rate constants are given in Arrhenius expression: k(T) = AT(n) exp(-EaR/T). The obtained reaction rate constants also agree reasonably well with available expermiental data and previous theoretical values. Branching ratios of these reactions have been determined. The present reaction rates for these reactions have been used in a toluene combustion mechanism, and their effects on some combustion properties are demonstrated.

  11. Theory for rates, equilibrium constants, and Brønsted slopes in F1-ATPase single molecule imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Marcus, Rudolph A

    2015-11-17

    A theoretical model of elastically coupled reactions is proposed for single molecule imaging and rotor manipulation experiments on F1-ATPase. Stalling experiments are considered in which rates of individual ligand binding, ligand release, and chemical reaction steps have an exponential dependence on rotor angle. These data are treated in terms of the effect of thermodynamic driving forces on reaction rates, and lead to equations relating rate constants and free energies to the stalling angle. These relations, in turn, are modeled using a formalism originally developed to treat electron and other transfer reactions. During stalling the free energy profile of the enzymatic steps is altered by a work term due to elastic structural twisting. Using biochemical and single molecule data, the dependence of the rate constant and equilibrium constant on the stall angle, as well as the Børnsted slope are predicted and compared with experiment. Reasonable agreement is found with stalling experiments for ATP and GTP binding. The model can be applied to other torque-generating steps of reversible ligand binding, such as ADP and Pi release, when sufficient data become available.

  12. Ab-Initio Based Computation of Rate Constants of Spin Forbidden Transitions in (Bio)inorganic Complexes and Metalloproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Rodriguez, Jorge H.

    2009-03-01

    Some (bio)chemical reactions are non-adiabatic processes whereby the total spin angular momentum, before and after the reaction, is not conserved. These are named spin- forbidden reactions. The application of spin density functional theory (SDFT) to the prediction of rate constants is a challenging task of fundamental and practical importance. We apply non-adiabatic transition state theory in conjunction with SDFT to predict the rate constant of the spin- forbidden dihydrogen binding to iron tetracarbonyl. To model the surface hopping probability between singlet and triplet states, the Landau-Zener formalism is used. The lowest energy point for singlet-triplet crossing, known as minimum energy crossing point (MECP), was located and used to compute, in a semi-quantum approach, reaction rate constants at 300 K. The predicted rates are in good agreement with experiment. In addition, we present results which are relevant to the ligand binding reactions of metalloproteins. This work is supported in part by NSF via CAREER award CHE-0349189 (JHR).

  13. QSAR ANALYSIS OF SORPTION-CORRECTED RATE CONSTANTS FOR REDUCTIVE BIOTRANSFORMATION OF HALOGENATED AROMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inherent coupling among geochemical and microbial reactions may have significant effects on the environmental fate of a containinant. For example, sorption processes may decrease the concentration of an organic compound in solution, thereby reducing the biodegradation rate of...

  14. Stress Detection Using Low Cost Heart Rate Sensors.

    PubMed

    Salai, Mario; Vassányi, István; Kósa, István

    2016-01-01

    The automated detection of stress is a central problem for ambient assisted living solutions. The paper presents the concepts and results of two studies targeted at stress detection with a low cost heart rate sensor, a chest belt. In the device validation study ( n = 5), we compared heart rate data and other features from the belt to those measured by a gold standard device to assess the reliability of the sensor. With simple synchronization and data cleaning algorithm, we were able to select highly (>97%) correlated, low average error (2.2%) data segments of considerable length from the chest data for further processing. The protocol for the clinical study ( n = 46) included a relax phase followed by a phase with provoked mental stress, 10 minutes each. We developed a simple method for the detection of the stress using only three time-domain features of the heart rate signal. The method produced accuracy of 74.6%, sensitivity of 75.0%, and specificity of 74.2%, which is impressive compared to the performance of two state-of-the-art methods run on the same data. Since the proposed method uses only time-domain features, it can be efficiently implemented on mobile devices.

  15. Stress Detection Using Low Cost Heart Rate Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Salai, Mario; Kósa, István

    2016-01-01

    The automated detection of stress is a central problem for ambient assisted living solutions. The paper presents the concepts and results of two studies targeted at stress detection with a low cost heart rate sensor, a chest belt. In the device validation study (n = 5), we compared heart rate data and other features from the belt to those measured by a gold standard device to assess the reliability of the sensor. With simple synchronization and data cleaning algorithm, we were able to select highly (>97%) correlated, low average error (2.2%) data segments of considerable length from the chest data for further processing. The protocol for the clinical study (n = 46) included a relax phase followed by a phase with provoked mental stress, 10 minutes each. We developed a simple method for the detection of the stress using only three time-domain features of the heart rate signal. The method produced accuracy of 74.6%, sensitivity of 75.0%, and specificity of 74.2%, which is impressive compared to the performance of two state-of-the-art methods run on the same data. Since the proposed method uses only time-domain features, it can be efficiently implemented on mobile devices. PMID:27372071

  16. Unwinding and rewinding the nucleosome inner turn: force dependence of the kinetic rate constants.

    PubMed

    Mochrie, S G J; Mack, A H; Schlingman, D J; Collins, R; Kamenetska, M; Regan, L

    2013-01-01

    A simple model for the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn is constructed and quantitatively compared to the results of recent measurements [A. H. Mack et al., J. Mol. Biol. 423, 687 (2012)]. First, a coarse-grained model for the histone-DNA free-energy landscape that incorporates both an elastic free-energy barrier and specific histone-DNA bonds is developed. Next, a theoretical expression for the rate of transitions across a piecewise linear free-energy landscape with multiple minima and maxima is presented. Then, the model free-energy landscape, approximated as a piecewise linear function, and the theoretical expression for the transition rates are combined to construct a model for the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn. Least-mean-squares fitting of the model rates to the rates observed in recent experiments rates demonstrates that this model is able to well describe the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn, observed in the recent experiments, except at the highest forces studied, where an additional ad hoc term is required to describe the data, which may be interpreted as an indication of an alternate high-force nucleosome disassembly pathway, that bypasses simple unwinding. The good agreement between the measurements and the model at lower forces demonstrates that both specific histone-DNA contacts and an elastic free-energy barrier play essential roles for nucleosome winding and unwinding, and quantifies their relative contributions.

  17. Unwinding and rewinding the nucleosome inner turn: Force dependence of the kinetic rate constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochrie, S. G. J.; Mack, A. H.; Schlingman, D. J.; Collins, R.; Kamenetska, M.; Regan, L.

    2013-01-01

    A simple model for the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn is constructed and quantitatively compared to the results of recent measurements [A. H. Mack , J. Mol. Biol.JMOBAK0022-283610.1016/j.jmb.2012.08.021 423, 687 (2012)]. First, a coarse-grained model for the histone-DNA free-energy landscape that incorporates both an elastic free-energy barrier and specific histone-DNA bonds is developed. Next, a theoretical expression for the rate of transitions across a piecewise linear free-energy landscape with multiple minima and maxima is presented. Then, the model free-energy landscape, approximated as a piecewise linear function, and the theoretical expression for the transition rates are combined to construct a model for the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn. Least-mean-squares fitting of the model rates to the rates observed in recent experiments rates demonstrates that this model is able to well describe the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn, observed in the recent experiments, except at the highest forces studied, where an additional ad hoc term is required to describe the data, which may be interpreted as an indication of an alternate high-force nucleosome disassembly pathway, that bypasses simple unwinding. The good agreement between the measurements and the model at lower forces demonstrates that both specific histone-DNA contacts and an elastic free-energy barrier play essential roles for nucleosome winding and unwinding, and quantifies their relative contributions.

  18. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 2. Trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.F.; Sauer, K.; Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A.

    1995-05-18

    Resolution of the absorption spectrum of the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore in C-phycocyanin (PC) trimers is achieved by comparison of the steady state absorption spectra of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3}. Comparison of the anisotropy decays of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3} also greatly aids in the assignment of the dominant kinetic processes in PC trimers. A comparison is made of calculated Foerster rate constants for energy transfer with those rate constants resolved experimentally in the PC trimers. 35 refs.., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 1. Monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K.; Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A.

    1995-05-18

    Rate constants for excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric aggregation state, isolated from the cyanobacterium cynechococcus sp. PCC 7002, are calculated, using Foerster theory and compared with the results of time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The assignments of the energy-transfer rate constants in PC monomers are confirmed here by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of the PC monomers isolated from both the wild-type and a mutant strain (cpcB/C155S) whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore. It is concluded that the Foerster model of resonant energy transfer in the weak coupling limit successfully describes the dominant energy-transfer processes in this protein in the monomeric state. 31 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Rate constants for the reactions of benzyl and methyl-substituted benzyl radicals with O 2 and NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebata, Takayuki; Obi, Kin-ichi; Tanaka, Ikuzo

    1981-02-01

    Rate constants for reactions of benzyl, o-niethylbenzyl and p-meihylbenzyl radicals with O 2 and NO have been measured at room temperature. The radicals were generated by UV flash photolysis and the time decay measured by absorption at ≈ 300 nm. The rate constants are: benzyl (0.99 ± 0.07 and 9.5 ± 1.2), o-methylbenzyl (1.2 ± 0.07 and 8.6 ± 0.8) and p-mithyl-benzyl (1.1= 0.10 and 8.9 = 0.9) for O 2 and NO respectively in units of 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1.

  1. Rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with formaldehyde over the temperature range 228-362 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Michael, J. V.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction OH + H2CO have been measured over the temperature range 228-362 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results were independent of variations in forbidden H2CO, total pressure of forbidden Ar and flash intensity (i.e., initial forbidden OH). The rate constant was found to be invariant with temperature in this range, the best representation being k1 = (1.05 + or - 0.11) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/molecule sec where the error is two standard deviations. This result is compared with previous absolute and relative determinations of k1. The reaction is also discussed from a theoretical point of view.

  2. Equilibrium Fermi's Golden Rule Charge Transfer Rate Constants in the Condensed Phase: The Linearized Semiclassical Method vs Classical Marcus Theory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-05-19

    In this article, we present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant and the progression of more approximate expressions that lead to the classical Marcus expression. We do so within the context of the canonical Marcus model, where the donor and acceptor potential energy surface are parabolic and identical except for a shift in both the free energies and equilibrium geometries, and within the Condon region. The comparison is performed for two different spectral densities and over a wide range of frictions and temperatures, thereby providing a clear test for the validity, or lack thereof, of the more approximate expressions. We also comment on the computational cost and scaling associated with numerically calculating the linearized semiclassical expression for the rate constant and its dependence on the spectral density, temperature, and friction.

  3. Evaluation of the reaction rate constants for the gas-phase Al-CH4-air combustion chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, A. S.; Titova, N. S.; Starik, A. M.

    2012-10-01

    The most likely reaction pathways and reaction products in the Al-CH4-O2-N2 system are investigated using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. The B3LYP functional with extended 6-311+G(3df,2p) basis set as well as the CBS-QB3 composite method are mainly utilised. Theoretical analysis of corresponding reaction rate constants is also performed with the use of simple theoretical models. A critical overview of current knowledge on combustion-relevant reactions with aluminium compounds is given. On the basis of critical comparison of available experimental kinetic data with theoretical calculations, the approximations for rate constants for 44 reversible elementary reactions involving Al-containing species are recommended for use in combustion issues.

  4. Rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with formaldehyde over the temperature range 228-362 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Michael, J. V.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction OH ? H2CO measured over the temperature range 228-362 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique are given. The results are independent of variations in H2CO concentration, total pressure Ar concentration, and flash intensity (i.e., initial OH concentration). The rate constant is found to be invariant with temperature in this range, the best representation being k sub 1 = (1.05 ? or - 0.11) x 10 to the 11th power cu cm molecule(-1) s(-1) where the error is two standard deviations. This result is compared with previous absolute and relative determinations of k sub 1. The reaction is also discussed from a theoretical point of view.

  5. Rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) with aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.M.; Allen, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of aldehydes and ketones are formed in the troposphere by the gas-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. These compounds are expected to readily partition into cloud, fog, and aquated aerosol drops where they can participate in a variety of aqueous-phase reactions. It has been previously demonstrated by other researchers that aqueous-phase photochemical reactions involving aromatic aldehydes and ketones may lead to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidant for S(IV) and is also an {center_dot}OH precursor. Aldehydes and ketones may also participate in other aqueous-phase reactions within atmospheric water drops including reactions with {center_dot}OH. Rate constants for reactions involving {center_dot}OH in aqueous solutions have been reported for only a limited number of tropospheric aldehydes and ketones. The authors have measured the rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of {center_dot}OH with several tropospheric aldehydes and ketones by the technique of competition kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by continuous illumination at 313 nm of an aqueous acidified solution containing Fe(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, an {center_dot}OH scavenger, the aldehyde or ketone whose rate constant was to be measured, and a standard for which the rate constant for reaction with {center_dot}OH is well known. Nitrobenzene was used as the standard in all experiments. Loss of the aldehyde or ketone and the standard were monitored by HPLC. Losses attributable to direct photolysis and dark reactions were minimal.

  6. Rate and equilibrium constants for the addition of N-heterocyclic carbenes into benzaldehydes: a remarkable 2-substituent effect.

    PubMed

    Collett, Christopher J; Massey, Richard S; Taylor, James E; Maguire, Oliver R; O'Donoghue, AnnMarie C; Smith, Andrew D

    2015-06-01

    Rate and equilibrium constants for the reaction between N-aryl triazolium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) precatalysts and substituted benzaldehyde derivatives to form 3-(hydroxybenzyl)azolium adducts under both catalytic and stoichiometric conditions have been measured. Kinetic analysis and reaction profile fitting of both the forward and reverse reactions, plus onwards reaction to the Breslow intermediate, demonstrate the remarkable effect of the benzaldehyde 2-substituent in these reactions and provide insight into the chemoselectivity of cross-benzoin reactions.

  7. Stability analysis of 4-species Aβ aggregation model: A novel approach to obtaining physically meaningful rate constants.

    PubMed

    Ghag, G; Ghosh, P; Mauro, A; Rangachari, V; Vaidya, A

    2013-11-01

    Protein misfolding and concomitant aggregation towards amyloid formation is the underlying biochemical commonality among a wide range of human pathologies. Amyloid formation involves the conversion of proteins from their native monomeric states (intrinsically disordered or globular) to well-organized, fibrillar aggregates in a nucleation-dependent manner. Understanding the mechanism of aggregation is important not only to gain better insight into amyloid pathology but also to simulate and predict molecular pathways. One of the main impediments in doing so is the stochastic nature of interactions that impedes thorough experimental characterization and the development of meaningful insights. In this study, we have utilized a well-known intermediate state along the amyloid-β peptide aggregation pathway called protofibrils as a model system to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which they form fibrils using stability and perturbation analysis. Investigation of protofibril aggregation mechanism limits both the number of species to be modeled (monomers, and protofibrils), as well as the reactions to two (elongation by monomer addition, and protofibril-protofibril lateral association). Our new model is a reduced order four species model grounded in mass action kinetics. Our prior study required 3200 reactions, which makes determining the reaction parameters prohibitively difficult. Using this model, along with a linear perturbation argument, we rigorously determine stable ranges of rate constants for the reactions and ensure they are physically meaningful. This was accomplished by finding the ranges in which the perturbations dieout in a five-parameter sweep, which includes the monomer and protofibril equilibrium concentrations and three of the rate constants. The results presented are a proof-of-concept method in determining meaningful rate constants that can be used as a bonafide way for determining accurate rate constants for other models involving complex

  8. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for the Addition of N-Heterocyclic Carbenes into Benzaldehydes: A Remarkable 2-Substituent Effect.

    PubMed

    Collett, Christopher J; Massey, Richard S; Taylor, James E; Maguire, Oliver R; O'Donoghue, AnnMarie C; Smith, Andrew D

    2015-06-01

    Rate and equilibrium constants for the reaction between N-aryl triazolium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) precatalysts and substituted benzaldehyde derivatives to form 3-(hydroxybenzyl)azolium adducts under both catalytic and stoichiometric conditions have been measured. Kinetic analysis and reaction profile fitting of both the forward and reverse reactions, plus onwards reaction to the Breslow intermediate, demonstrate the remarkable effect of the benzaldehyde 2-substituent in these reactions and provide insight into the chemoselectivity of cross-benzoin reactions.

  9. Channel specific rate constants for reactions of O(1D) with HCl and HBr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate coefficients and product yields for reactions of O(1D) with HCl(1) and HBr(2) at 287 K are presently determined by means of the time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of O(3P) and H(2S) in conjunction with pulsed laser photolysis of O3/HX/He mixtures. Total rate coefficients for O(1D) removal are found to be, in units of 10 to the -10th cu cm/molecule per sec, k(1) = 1.50 + or - 0.18 and k(2) 1.48 + or - 0.16; the absolute accuracy of these rate coefficients is estimated to be + or - 20 percent.

  10. Rate constants and temperature dependences for the reactions of hydroxyl radical with several halogenated methanes, ethanes, and propanes by relative rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, K.-J.; DeMore, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    Rate constants of 15 OH reactions with halogen-substituted alkanes, C1 to C3, were studied using a relative rate technique in the temperature range 283-403 K. Compounds studied were CHF2Cl (22), CHF2Br (22B), CH3F (41), CH2F2 (32), CHF3 (23), CHClFCCl2F (122a), CHCl2CF3 (123), CHClFCF3 (124), CH3CF3 (143a), CH3CH2F (161), CF3CHFCF3 (227ea), CF3CH2CF3 (236fa), CF3CHFCHF2 (236ea), and CHF2CF2CH2F (245ca). Using CH4, CH3CCl3, CF3CF2H, and C2H6 as primary reference standards (JPL 92-20 rate constants), absolute rate constants are derived. Results are in good agreement with previous experimental results for six of the compounds studied, including CHF2Cl, CHF2Br, CH2F2, CH3CF3, CHFClCFCl2, and CF3CHFCF3. For the remainder the relative rate constants are lower than those derived from experiments in which OH loss was used to measure the reaction rate. Comparisons of the derived Arrhenius A factors with previous literature transition-state calculations show order of magnitude agreement in most cases. However, the experimental A factors show a much closer proportionality to the number of H atoms in the molecule than is evident from the transition state calculations. For most of the compounds studied, an A factor of (8 +/- 3)E-13 cm(exp 3)/(molecule s) per C-H bond is observed. A new measurement of the ratio k(CH3CCl3)/k(CH4) is reported that is in good agreement with previous data.

  11. Inverting for Shear Stress Rate on the Northern Cascadia Megathrust Using Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhat, L.; Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Past physics-based models of slow slip events (SSE) have shown that, when averaged over many SSE cycles, the shear stress within the SSE zone remains roughly constant. Stress accumulates between SSE, and then is released during slow slip events. However, the predicted long-term deformation rates from such models, assuming the plate boundary is locked to the top of the ETS zone, do not fit well GPS velocities and uplift rates determined from leveling and tide-gauge data. These physics-based models particularly misfit the vertical rates. At the same time, previous kinematic inversions display a gap between the down-dip limit of the locked region and the top of the ETS zone. Our inversions of geodetic data for fault slip rates exhibit a steeper slip-rate profile at the top of the ETS zone, relative to the constant shear stress model, as well as creep up dip of the ETS zone. We explore physics-based models with velocity-strengthening regions of different length up dip the ETS zone, i.e. within the "gap" identified in kinematic inversions. However, this still does not match the observations well. We therefore try a new approach: we invert for shear stress rates on the megathrust that best fit the data. We show that a small decrease in shear stress within the top of the ETS zone, reaching 5 kPa/year at a depth of ~ 30 km, is required to fit the data. Possible explanations for this include a slow decrease in normal stress with time, possibly due to an increase in pore pressure, or a reduction in fault friction. We explore these hypotheses, using 2D quasi-dynamic simulations with rate-and-state friction and isothermal v-cutoff models for generating slow slip events. The potential for creep above the top of the ETS zone has important implications for the mechanical relationship between deep slow slip and dynamic events in the locked region.

  12. Gas exchange responses to constant work-rate exercise in patients with glycogenosis type V and VII.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hean-Yee; O'Dochartaigh, Conor S; Lovell, Sharon; Patterson, Victor H; Wasserman, Karlman; Nicholls, D Paul; Riley, Marshall S

    2004-06-01

    During constant work-rate exercise above the lactic acidosis threshold, oxygen consumption fails to plateau by 3 minutes, but continues to rise slowly. This slow component correlates closely with the rise in lactate in normal subjects. We investigated if oxygen consumption during constant work-rate exercise could rise after 3 minutes in the absence of a rise in lactate. We studied five patients with McArdle's disease, one patient with phosphofructokinase deficiency and six normal subjects. Subjects performed two 6-minute duration constant work-rate exercise tests at 40 and 70% of peak oxygen consumption. During low-intensity exercise, oxygen consumption reached steady state by 3 minutes in both groups. Lactate rose slightly in control subjects but not in patients. During high-intensity exercise, oxygen consumption rose from the third to the sixth minute by 144 (21-607) ml/minute (median and range) in control subjects and by 142 (73-306) ml/minute in patients (p = not significant, Mann-Whitney U test). Over the same period, lactate (geometric mean and range) rose from 2.68 (1.10-5.00) to 5.39 (2.70-10.00) mmol/L in control subjects, but did not rise in patients (1.20 [0.64-1.60] to 0.70 [0.57-1.20] mmol/L). We conclude that the slow component of oxygen consumption during heavy exercise is not dependent on lactic acidosis.

  13. Zero-Order Antibiotic Release from Multilayer Contact Lenses: Nonuniform Drug and Diffusivity Distributions Produce Constant-Rate Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Gustavo; Es-Haghi, Siamak Shams; Nugay, Turgut; Cakmak, Mukerrem

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach to zero-order constant-rate drug delivery from contact lenses is presented. Quasi-Case II non-Fickian transport is achieved by nonuniform drug and diffusivity distributions within three-layer bimodal amphiphilic conetworks (β-APCNs). The center layer is a highly oxygen permeable β-APCN matrix, which contains the drug and exhibits a high drug diffusivity. The outer β-APCN layers contain no-drug and are loaded with vitamin E, which slows diffusion. In contrast to single-layer neat-polymer and vitamin E-loaded films that display first-order "burst" kinetics, it is demonstrated experimentally and by modeling that the combined effect of nonuniform distribution of drug loading and diffusion constants within the three-layer lens maintains low local drug concentration at the lens-fluid interface and yields zero-order drug delivery. The release rates of topical antibiotics provide constant-rate therapeutic-level delivery with appropriate oxygen permeability for at least 30 h, at which time ≈25% of the drug was released.

  14. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  15. Computational study on the mechanisms and rate constants of the OH-initiated oxidation of ethyl vinyl ether in atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Han, Dandan; Cao, Haijie; Li, Jing; Li, Mingyue; He, Maoxia; Hu, Jingtian

    2014-09-01

    The hydroxylation reactions of ethyl vinyl ether (EVE) in the present of O2 and NO are analyzed by using MPWB1K/6-311++G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. According to the calculated thermodynamic data, the detailed reaction mechanisms of EVE and OH are proposed. All of the ten possible reaction pathways are discussed. The major products of the title reaction are ethyl formate and formaldehyde, which is in accordance with experimental detection. The rate constants of the primary reactions over the temperature of 250-400K and the pressure range of 100-2000Torr are computed by employing MESMER program. At 298K and 760Torr, OH-addition channels are predominate and the total rate constant is ktot=4.53×10(-11)cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1). The Arrhenius equation is obtained as ktot=6.27×10(-12)exp(611.5/T), according to the rate constants given at different temperatures. Finally, the atmospheric half life of EVE with respect to OH is estimated to be 2.13h.

  16. The H2 + CO ↔ H2CO Reaction: Rate Constants and Relevance to Hot and Dense Astrophysical Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichietti, R. M.; Spada, R. F. K.; da Silva, A. B. F.; Machado, F. B. C.; Haiduke, R. L. A.

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical thermochemical and kinetic investigation of the thermal H2 + CO ↔ H2CO reaction was performed for a temperature range from 200 to 4000 K. Geometries and vibrational frequencies of reactants, product, and transition state (TS) were obtained at CCSD/cc-pVxZ (x = T and Q) levels and scaling factors were employed to consider anharmonicity effects on vibrational frequencies, zero-point energies, and thermal corrections provided by these methodologies. Enthalpies Gibbs energies, and rate constants for this reaction were determined by including a complete basis set extrapolation correction for the electronic properties calculated at CCSD(T)/cc-pVyZ (y = Q and 5) levels. Our study indicates that enthalpy changes for this reaction are highly dependent on temperature. Moreover, forward and reverse (high-pressure limit) rate constants were obtained from variational TS theory with quantum tunneling corrections. Thus, modified Arrhenius’ equations were fitted by means of the best forward and reverse rate constant values, which provide very reliable estimates for these quantities within the temperature range between 700 and 4000 K. To our knowledge, this is the first kinetic study done for the forward H2 + CO \\to H2CO process in a wide temperature range. Finally, these results can be used to explain the formaldehyde abundance in hot and dense interstellar media, possibly providing data about the physical conditions associated with H2CO masers close to massive star-forming regions.

  17. Rate constant for OH with selected large alkanes : shock-tube measurements and an improved group scheme.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-04-06

    High-temperature rate constant experiments on OH with the five large (C{sub 5}-C{sub 8}) saturated hydrocarbons n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2,2,3,3-TMB), n-pentane, n-hexane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane (2,3-DMB) were performed with the reflected-shock-tube technique using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. Single-point determinations at {approx}1200 K on n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-TMB, n-hexane, and 2,3-DMB were previously reported by Cohen and co-workers; however, the present work substantially extends the database to both lower and higher temperature. The present experiments span a wide temperature range, 789-1308 K, and represent the first direct measurements of rate constants at T > 800 K for n-pentane. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of {approx}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high OH concentration detection sensitivity permitted pseudo-first-order analyses for unambiguously measuring rate constants.

  18. Stress Distributions and Calving Rates at Antarctic Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmann, Julia; Müller, Ralf; Humbert, Angelika; Rückamp, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Ice shelves are the floating ice masses from which icebergs are calving off. The calving of large tabular icebergs are singular events and occur on timescales of years to decades. However small scale calving happens on more continuous periods and contribute to the mass balance of an ice shelf. For a better understanding of the influence of environmental parameters on calving mechanisms, a fracture mechanical approach examines the nature and frequency of calving events. The ice shelf is modeled as a two, respectively three, dimensional rectangular body loaded by gravity and water pressure. There are two responses of ice to load: on long time scales ice reacts like a viscous fluid, and on short time scale like an elastic solid. In this study only the small scale calving events are analyzed, which usually occur on a rather short time scale. The finite element software COMSOL is used to compute the deformations and stresses, where in a first approach a linear elastic analysis is performed. The stresses in the vicinity of the calving front are evaluated to estimate the position of a calving event. This leads to a bell shaped distribution of stresses on the surface and the location of the maximum tensile stress, which denotes the most likely position for a calving event, is located at the surface. The distance of the maximum stress at the surface is verified with a model of an elastically supported beam, loaded by a bending moment instead of the water pressure at the ice front. Directly after a calving event the ice front is nearly vertical. After a certain time interval the exposure, due to waves and water flow, leads to an ice front, which is shaped like an under-water "nose". Therefore, the geometry is slightly modified and the added belly at the ice shelf front is modelled as half of an ellipse, where bouyancy forces affect this boundary. A crack originates, if the tensile stress at some point exceeds a critical stress bound. The analysis of calving with a rate

  19. APPROXIMATION OF BIODEGRADATION RATE CONSTANTS FOR MONOAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (BTEX) IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two methods were used to approximate site-specific biodegradation rates of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes [BTEX]) dissolved in ground water. Both use data from monitoring wells and the hydrologic properties of the quifer to estimate a biode...

  20. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    PubMed Central

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol. PMID:27708500

  1. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas-Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Macleod, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second-order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140-mL gas-phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10(-12) (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7-2.2) × 10(-12)) and 2.6 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.3-2.9) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.5-3.2) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30-37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5-10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  2. Non-Constant Learning Rates in Retrospective Experience Curve Analyses and their Correlation to Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Max; Smith, Sarah J.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2015-07-16

    A key challenge for policy-makers and technology market forecasters is to estimate future technology costs and in particular the rate of cost reduction versus production volume. A related, critical question is what role should state and federal governments have in advancing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies? This work provides retrospective experience curves and learning rates for several energy-related technologies, each of which have a known history of federal and state deployment programs. We derive learning rates for eight technologies including energy efficient lighting technologies, stationary fuel cell systems, and residential solar photovoltaics, and provide an overview and timeline of historical deployment programs such as state and federal standards and state and national incentive programs for each technology. Piecewise linear regimes are observed in a range of technology experience curves, and public investments or deployment programs are found to be strongly correlated to an increase in learning rate across multiple technologies. A downward bend in the experience curve is found in 5 out of the 8 energy-related technologies presented here (electronic ballasts, magnetic ballasts, compact fluorescent lighting, general service fluorescent lighting, and the installed cost of solar PV). In each of the five downward-bending experience curves, we believe that an increase in the learning rate can be linked to deployment programs to some degree. This work sheds light on the endogenous versus exogenous contributions to technological innovation and highlights the impact of exogenous government sponsored deployment programs. This work can inform future policy investment direction and can shed light on market transformation and technology learning behavior.

  3. Strain rates, stress markers and earthquake clustering (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B.; Gerstenberger, M.; Abercrombie, R. E.; Reyners, M.; Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The 2010-present Canterbury earthquakes comprise a well-recorded sequence in a relatively low strain-rate shallow crustal region. We present new scientific results to test the hypothesis that: Earthquake sequences in low-strain rate areas experience high stress drop events, low-post seismic relaxation, and accentuated seismic clustering. This hypothesis is based on a physical description of the aftershock process in which the spatial distribution of stress accumulation and stress transfer are controlled by fault strength and orientation. Following large crustal earthquakes, time dependent forecasts are often developed by fitting parameters defined by Omori's aftershock decay law. In high-strain rate areas, simple forecast models utilizing a single p-value fit observed aftershock sequences well. In low-strain rate areas such as Canterbury, assumptions of simple Omori decay may not be sufficient to capture the clustering (sub-sequence) nature exhibited by the punctuated rise in activity following significant child events. In Canterbury, the moment release is more clustered than in more typical Omori sequences. The individual earthquakes in these clusters also exhibit somewhat higher stress drops than in the average crustal sequence in high-strain rate regions, suggesting the earthquakes occur on strong Andersonian-oriented faults, possibly juvenile or well-healed . We use the spectral ratio procedure outlined in (Viegas et al., 2010) to determine corner frequencies and Madariaga stress-drop values for over 800 events in the sequence. Furthermore, we will discuss the relevance of tomographic results of Reyners and Eberhart-Phillips (2013) documenting post-seismic stress-driven fluid processes following the three largest events in the sequence as well as anisotropic patterns in surface wave tomography (Fry et al., 2013). These tomographic studies are both compatible with the hypothesis, providing strong evidence for the presence of widespread and hydrated regional

  4. Slopes, nearly constant loss, universality, and hopping rates for dispersive ionic conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, J. Ross; Ahmad, Mohamad M.

    2007-01-01

    The title topics are investigated, discussed, and new insights provided by considering isothermal frequency response data for seven different materials having quite different conductivity spans and involving different electrode polarization effects and temperatures. These data sets were fitted using several different models, including the Kohlrausch-related K0 and K1 ones derived from stretched-exponential response in the temporal domain. The quasi-universal UN model, the K1 with its shape parameter, β1, fixed at 1/3, fitted most of the data very well, and its fits of such data were used to compare its predictions for hopping rate with those derived from fitting with the conventional 'universal dynamic response' Almond-West real-part-of-conductivity model. The K1-model theoretical hopping rate, involving the mean waiting time for a hop and derived from microscopic stochastic analysis, was roughly twice as large as the empirical Almond-West rate for most of the materials considered and should be used in place of it. Its use in a generalized Nernst-Einstein equation led to comparison of estimates of the concentration of fully dissociated mobile charge carriers in superionic PbSnF4 with earlier estimates of Ahmad using an Almond-West hopping rate value. Agreement with an independent structure-derived value was relatively poor. Fitting results obtained using the K0 model, for Na2SO4 data sets for two different polycrystalline material phases, and involving severely limited conductivity variation, were far superior to those obtained using the K1 model. The estimated values of the K0 shape parameter, β0, were close to 1/3 for both phases, strongly suggesting that the charge motion was one dimensional for each phase, even though they involved different crystalline structures.

  5. Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constants of Charge Recombination Reactions in Bacterial Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy, T. T.; Yen, V. T. H.; Thao, T. T.; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    The bacterial reaction center couples light-induced electron transfer via a tightly bound ubiquinone (QA) to a mobile ubiquinone (QB). Based on the electron transfer theory by Marcus, we have investigated the rate of charge recombination reactions from Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, by mean of finding an approximation formula. The results obtained are verified for not only at high and low temperature as the previous works but also at the medium temperature range.

  6. Stress rate and proof-testing of silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Fracture mechanics test methods were applied to evaluate the proof-test characteristics of single-crystal silicon wafers. The results indicate that the strength distribution of silicon wafers is truncated by proof-testing. No subcritical crack growth occurred during proof-loading, as inferred from the lack of a stress-rate effect on strength. Mechanical proof-testing appears to be an effective method for eliminating weak samples before cell processing.

  7. Contemporary deformation and stressing rates in Southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Syed Tabrez; Freed, Andrew M.

    2010-11-01

    The subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath North America induces broad scale stressing of the Alaskan crust that has led to the development of the highest mountains in North America, the highest slip rates along some of the longest strike-slip faults on Earth, and widespread seismicity that includes the 1964 M9.2 Alaska earthquake, the second largest ever recorded. These features are a consequence of deformation associated with three primary processes, interseismic loading due to relative plate motions, large earthquakes and post-seismic processes. How these mechanisms contribute to the evolution of stress in the Alaskan crust is not well understood. Here we use observed contemporary surface velocities to constrain 2-D and 3-D viscoelastic numerical models of relative Pacific/North American plate motions, coseismic slip associated with the 1964 (M9.2) megathrust event and strike-slip earthquakes on the transform boundary in 1949 (M8.1), 1958 (M7.8) and 1972 (M7.6) (the four largest events prior to the 2002 M7.9 Denali quake), viscoelastic relaxation following these events, and afterslip, to gain insight into how these processes are shaping Alaska today. Results suggest that interseismic deformation and on-going post-seismic deformation following the 1964 earthquake both contribute significantly to the GPS measured contemporary velocity field. Viscoelastic relaxation associated with a mantle with a viscosity of ~1019 Pa s is required to explain southerly directed velocities that are observed in the Cook Inlet region to well north of the Denali fault. Results also suggest that subduction of the Pacific Plate leads to a broad zone of deformation with high stressing rates concentrated in a band that lies several hundred kilometres from the plate boundary, coeval with the inboard location of the maximum locking depth of the megathrust. Interseismic deformation and stressing rates remain high further inland across the Yakutat microplate, where flat subduction extends

  8. Dissolution rate of South African calcium-based materials at constant pH.

    PubMed

    Siagi, Z O; Mbarawa, M

    2009-04-30

    One of the most important steps in the wet limestone-gypsum flue gas desulphurization (WFGD) process is limestone dissolution, which provides the dissolved alkalinity necessary for SO(2) absorption. Accurately evaluating the limestone dissolution rate is important in the design and efficient operation of WFGD plants. In the present work, the dissolution of limestone from different sources in South Africa has been studied in a pH-Stat apparatus under conditions similar to those encountered in wet FGD processes. The influence of various parameters such as the reaction temperature (30rate increased with a decrease in particle size, decrease in pH and an increase in temperature. Kinetic analysis of the results indicates that the dissolution of limestone is according to the shrinking core model with surface control, i.e. 1-(1-3)(1/3)=kt.

  9. Implementation of Constant Dose Rate and Constant Angular Spacing Intensity-modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical Cancer by Using a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruo-Hui; Fan, Xiao-Mei; Bai, Wen-Wen; Cao, Yan-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can only be implemented on the new generation linacs such as the Varian Trilogy® and Elekta Synergy®. This prevents most existing linacs from delivering VMAT. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a conventional linear accelerator delivering constant dose rate and constant angular spacing intensity-modulated arc therapy (CDR-CAS-IMAT) for treating cervical cancer. Methods: Twenty patients with cervical cancer previously treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using Varian Clinical 23EX were retreated using CDR-CAS-IMAT. The planning target volume (PTV) was set as 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram. The homogeneity index (HI), target volume conformity index (CI), the dose to organs at risk, radiation delivery time, and monitor units (MUs) were also compared. The paired t-test was used to analyze the two data sets. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 19.0 software. Results: Compared to the IMRT group, the CDR-CAS-IMAT group showed better PTV CI (0.85 ± 0.03 vs. 0.81 ± 0.03, P = 0.001), clinical target volume CI (0.46 ± 0.05 vs. 0.43 ± 0.05, P = 0.001), HI (0.09±0.02 vs. 0.11 ± 0.02, P = 0.005) and D95 (5196.33 ± 28.24 cGy vs. 5162.63 ± 31.12 cGy, P = 0.000), and cord D2 (3743.8 ± 118.7 cGy vs. 3806.2 ± 98.7 cGy, P = 0.017) and rectum V40 (41.9 ± 6.1% vs. 44.2 ± 4.8%, P = 0.026). Treatment time (422.7 ± 46.7 s vs. 84.6 ± 7.8 s, P = 0.000) and the total plan Mus (927.4 ± 79.1 vs. 787.5 ± 78.5, P = 0.000) decreased by a factor of 0.8 and 0.15, respectively. The IMRT group plans were superior to the CDR-CAS-IMAT group plans considering decreasing bladder V50 (17.4 ± 4.5% vs. 16.6 ± 4.2%, P = 0.049), bowel V30 (39.6 ± 6.5% vs. 36.6 ± 7.5%, P = 0.008), and low-dose irradiation volume; there were no significant differences in other statistical indexes. Conclusions

  10. Long-term prediction of creep strains of mineral wool slabs under constant compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnip, Ivan; Vaitkus, Saulius; Keršulis, Vladislovas; Vėjelis, Sigitas

    2012-02-01

    The results obtained in determining the creep strain of mineral wool slabs under compressive stress, used for insulating flat roofs and facades, cast-in-place floors, curtain and external basement walls, as well as for sound insulation of floors, are presented. The creep strain tests were conducted under a compressive stress of σ c =0.35 σ 10%. Interval forecasting of creep strain was made by extrapolating the creep behaviour and approximated in accordance with EN 1606 by a power equation and reduced to a linear form using logarithms. This was performed for a lead time of 10 years. The extension of the range of the confidence interval due to discount of the prediction data, i.e. a decrease in their informativity was allowed for by an additional coefficient. Analysis of the experimental data obtained from the tests having 65 and 122 days duration showed that the prediction of creep strains for 10 years can be made based on data obtained in experiments with durations shorter than the 122 days as specified by EN 13162. Interval prediction of creep strains (with a confidence probability of 90%) was based on using the mean square deviation of the actual direct observations of creep strains in logarithmic form to have the linear trend in a retrospective area.

  11. Theoretical determination of the rate constant for OH hydrogen abstraction from toluene.

    PubMed

    Uc, Víctor H; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raúl; Galano, Annia; García-Cruz, Isidoro; Vivier-Bunge, Annik

    2006-08-24

    The OH abstraction of a hydrogen atom from both the side chain and the ring of toluene has been studied in the range 275-1000 K using quantum chemistry methods. It is found that the best method of calculation is to perform geometry optimization and frequency calculations at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(d,p) level, followed by CCSD(T) calculations of the optimized structures with the same basis set. Four different reaction paths are considered, corresponding to the side chain and three possible ring hydrogen abstractions, and the branching ratio is determined as a function of temperature. Although negligible at low temperatures, at 1000 K ring-H abstraction is found to contribute 11% to the total abstraction reaction. The calculated rate coefficients agree very well with experimental results. Side chain abstraction is shown to occur through a complex mechanism that includes the reversible formation of a collisionally stabilized reactant complex.

  12. Metabolic Rate Constants for Hydroquinone in F344 Rat and Human Liver Isolated Hepatocytes: Application to a PBPK model.

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S.; Wu, Hong; English, J C.; Corley, Rick A.

    2004-11-15

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important industrial chemical that also occurs naturally in foods and in the leaves and bark of a number of plant species. Exposure of laboratory animals to HQ may result in a species-, sex-, and strain-specific nephrotoxicity. The sensitivity of male F344 vs. female F344 and Sprague-Dawley rats or B6C3F1 mice appears to be related to differences in the rates of formation and further metabolism of key nephrotoxic metabolites. Metabolic rate constants for the conversion of HQ through several metabolic steps to the mono-glutathione conjugate and subsequent detoxification via mercapturic acid were measured in suspension cultures of hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats and humans. An in vitro mathematic kinetic model was used to analyze each metabolic step by simultaneously fitting the disappearance of each substrate and the appearance of subsequent metabolites. An iterative, nested approach was used whereby downstream metabolites were considered first and the model was constrained by the requirement that rate constants determined during analysis of individual metabolic steps must also satisfy the complete, integrated metabolism scheme, including competitive pathways. The results from this study indicated that the overall capacity for metabolism of HQ and its mono-glutathione conjugate is greater in hepatocytes from humans than those isolated from rats, suggesting a greater capacity for detoxification of the glutathione conjugates. Metabolic rate constants were applied to an existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the model was used to predict total glutathione metabolites produced in the liver. The results showed that body burdens of these metabolites will be much higher in rats than humans.

  13. Theoretical determination of chemical rate constants using novel time-dependent methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.

    1994-01-01

    The work completed within the grant period 10/1/91 through 12/31/93 falls primarily in the area of reaction dynamics using both quantum and classical mechanical methodologies. Essentially four projects have been completed and have been or are in preparation of being published. The majority of time was spent in the determination of reaction rate coefficients in the area of hydrocarbon fuel combustion reactions which are relevant to NASA's High Speed Research Program (HSRP). These reaction coefficients are important in the design of novel jet engines with low NOx emissions, which through a series of catalytic reactions contribute to the deterioration of the earth's ozone layer. A second area of research studied concerned the control of chemical reactivity using ultrashort (femtosecond) laser pulses. Recent advances in pulsed-laser technologies have opened up a vast new field to be investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The photodissociation of molecules adsorbed on surfaces using novel time-independent quantum mechanical methods was a third project. And finally, using state-of-the-art, high level ab initio electronic structure methods in conjunction with accurate quantum dynamical methods, the rovibrational energy levels of a triatomic molecule with two nonhydrogen atoms (HCN) were calculated to unprecedented levels of agreement between theory and experiment.

  14. Determination of Chemical Kinetic Rate Constants of a Model for Carbothermal Processing of Lunar Regolith Simulant Using Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R; Gokoglu, S.; Hegde, U.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously developed a chemical conversion model of the carbothermal processing of lunar regolith using methane to predict the rate of production of carbon monoxide. In this carbothermal process, gaseous methane is pyrolyzed as it flows over the hot surface of a molten zone of lunar regolith and is converted to carbon and hydrogen. Hydrogen is carried away by the exiting stream of gases and carbon is deposited on the melt surface. The deposited carbon mixes with the melt and reacts with the metal oxides in it to produce carbon monoxide that bubbles out of the melt. In our model, we assume that the flux of carbon deposited is equal to the product of the surface reaction rate constant gamma and the concentration of methane adjacent to the melt surface. Similarly, the rate of consumption of carbon per unit volume in the melt is equal to the product of the melt reaction rate constant k and the concentrations of carbon and metal oxide in the melt. In this paper, we describe our effort to determine gamma and k by comparison of the predictions from our model with test data obtained by ORBITEC (Orbital Technologies Corporation). The concentration of methane adjacent to the melt surface is a necessary input to the model. It is inferred from the test data by a mass balance of methane, adopting the usual assumptions of the continuously-stirred-tank-reactor model, whereby the average concentration of a given gaseous species equals its exit concentration. The reaction rates gamma and k have been determined by a non-linear least-squares fit to the test data for the production of carbon monoxide and the fraction of the incoming methane that is converted. The comparison of test data with our model predictions using the determined chemical kinetic rate constants provides a consistent interpretation of the process over the full range of temperatures, pressures, and methane flow rates used in the tests, thereby increasing our confidence to use the model for scale-up purposes.

  15. Effect-compartment equilibrium rate constant (keo) for propofol during induction of anesthesia with a target-controlled infusion device.

    PubMed

    Lim, Thiam Aun; Wong, Wai Hong; Lim, Kin Yuee

    2006-01-01

    The effect-compartment concentration (C(e)) of a drug at a specific pharmacodynamic endpoint should be independent of the rate of drug injection. We used this assumption to derive an effect-compartment equilibrium rate constant (k(eo)) for propofol during induction of anesthesia, using a target controlled infusion device (Diprifusor). Eighteen unpremedicated patients were induced with a target blood propofol concentration of 5 microg x ml(-1) (group 1), while another 18 were induced with a target concentration of 6 microg x ml(-1) (group 2). The time at loss of the eyelash reflex was recorded. Computer simulation was used to derive the rate constant (k(eo)) that resulted in the mean C(e) at loss of the eyelash reflex in group 1 being equal to that in group 2. Using this population technique, we found the k(eo) to be 0.57 min(-1). The mean (SD) effect compartment concentration at loss of the eyelash reflex was 2.39 (0.70) microg x ml(-1). This means that to achieve a desired C(e) within 3 min of induction, the initial target blood concentration should be set at 1.67 times that of the desired C(e) for 1 min, after which it should revert to the desired concentration.

  16. The reaction H + C4H2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for atmospheric modeling of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, D. F.; Mitchell, M. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction H + C4H2 has been measured over the temperature (T) interval 210-423 K, using the technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. At each of the five temperatures employed, the results were independent of variations in C4H2 concentration, total pressure of Ar or N2, and flash intensity (i.e., the initial H concentration). The rate constant, k, was found to be equal to 1.39 x 10 to the -10th exp (-1184/T) cu cm/s, with an error of one standard deviation. The Arrhenius parameters at the high pressure limit determined here for the H + C4H2 reaction are consistent with those for the corresponding reactions of H with C2H2 and C3H4. Implications of the kinetic carbon chemistry results, particularly those at low temperature, are considered for models of the atmospheric carbon chemistry of Titan. The rate of this reaction, relative to that of the analogous, but slower, reaction of H + C2H2, appears to make H + C4H2 a very feasible reaction pathway for effective conversion of H atoms to molecular hydrogen in the stratosphere of Titan.

  17. Measuring Rate Constants for Reactions of the Simplest Criegee Intermediate CH_2OO by Monitoring the OH Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingdi; Bayes, Kyle D.; Sander, Stanley P.

    2014-06-01

    Criegee radicals are important atmospheric intermediates formed from ozonolysis of alkenes. It potentially contributes to the atmospheric oxidation cycle mainly by generating OH radicals through unimolecular decomposition. In this work, we focus on studying the unimolecular decomposition reaction of the smallest Criegee intermediate (CH2OO), which was generated by reacting CH2I with O2. While generating the CH2OO molecule by reacting CH2I with O2, significant amounts of the OH radical were observed by laser-induced fluorescence. The addition of molecules known to react with CH2OO increased the observed decay rates of the OH signal. Using the OH signals as a proxy for the CH2OO concentration, the rate constant for the reaction of hexafluoroacetone with CH2OO was determined. The rate constant for the reaction of SO2 with CH2OO showed no pressure dependence over the range of 50 to 200 Torr. This work provides the direct experimental evidence for the unimolecular decomposition of CH2OO, and possible mechanisms of CH2OO have been investigated by this multidimensional study.

  18. Measuring rate constants for reactions of the simplest Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) by monitoring the OH radical.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingdi; Bayes, Kyle D; Sander, Stanley P

    2014-01-30

    While generating the CH2OO molecule by reacting CH2I with O2, significant amounts of the OH radical were observed by laser-induced fluorescence. At least two different processes formed OH. A fast process was probably initiated by a reaction of vibrationally hot CH2I radicals. The second process appeared to be associated with the decay of the CH2OO molecule. The addition of molecules known to react with CH2OO increased the observed decay rates of the OH signal. Using the OH signals as a proxy for the CH2OO concentration, the rate constant for the reaction of hexafluoroacetone with CH2OO was determined to be (3.33 ± 0.27) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), in good agreement with the value measured by Taatjes et al.1 The rate constant for the reaction of SO2 with CH2OO, (3.53 ± 0.29) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), showed no pressure dependence over the range of 50-200 Torr and was in agreement with the value at 4 Torr reported by Welz et al.

  19. The reaction H + C4H2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for atmospheric modeling of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, D. F.; Mitchell, M. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-04-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction H + C4H2 has been measured over the temperature (T) interval 210-423 K, using the technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. At each of the five temperatures employed, the results were independent of variations in C4H2 concentration, total pressure of Ar or N2, and flash intensity (i.e., the initial H concentration). The rate constant, k, was found to be equal to 1.39 x 10 to the -10th exp (-1184/T) cu cm/s, with an error of one standard deviation. The Arrhenius parameters at the high pressure limit determined here for the H + C4H2 reaction are consistent with those for the corresponding reactions of H with C2H2 and C3H4. Implications of the kinetic carbon chemistry results, particularly those at low temperature, are considered for models of the atmospheric carbon chemistry of Titan. The rate of this reaction, relative to that of the analogous, but slower, reaction of H + C2H2, appears to make H + C4H2 a very feasible reaction pathway for effective conversion of H atoms to molecular hydrogen in the stratosphere of Titan.

  20. [Determination of rate constants of gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene with ozone].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z R; Hu, D

    2001-10-01

    alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are the most dominating species among natural terpenes. Terpenes are mainly emitted from forest trees, flowers and grass. In the lower troposphere terpenes can react fast with OH radical, ozone, NO3 radical and ground state oxygen atom. These reactions may contribute to the occurring of aerosols, peroxides (hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxide), carbon cycle (mainly CO), acid rain (organic acids, NO3- and SO4(2-), ozone and active radicals such as OH radical. Reactions with ozone occur both in the daytime and in the night. The study in this field in China began in the late 1980. The main work focus on the source emission and the experimental simulation has just started. It is most of our group's work. In this paper preliminary experimental simulation of the gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene with ozone were carried out in the quartz chamber. The rate constants of these reactions were measured using long-path Fourier transform infra-red combined with relative rate constant method. And the rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene with ozone were determined as 2.83 x 10(17) cm3.molecule-1.s-1 and 1.48 x 10(17) cm3.molecule-1.s-1 at 1.0 x 10(5) Pa and 296 +/- 3 K. The results are quite similar to the data from Atkinson group. No cyclohexane was added to the reaction system during the measurement to restrain the formation of OH radical. The formation of OH radical could not be quantified, so that the effect of subsidiary reactions induced by OH radical has not been calculated. In the later simulation study and model this effect should be considered.

  1. Comparison of calculated and experimental thermal attachment rate constants for SF6 in the temperature range 200-600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections are calcualted for the process e(-) + SF6 yields SF6(-) in the energy range 1-200 meV. An electron scattering approximation is used in which diatomiclike potential energy curves near the equilibrium SF6 ground state are constructed from recent spectroscopic data. Excellent agreement is found over the entire energy range with experimental attachment cross sections at a temperature of 300 K for s-wave (l = 0) scattering. The same calculation, with appropriate adjustment of the thermal populations, is used to calculate attachment rate constants in the range 50-600 K for both s- and p-wave scattering.

  2. Rate constants and isotope effects for the reaction of H-atom abstraction from RH substrates by PINO radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opeida, I. A.; Litvinov, Yu. E.; Kushch, O. V.; Kompanets, M. A.; Shendrik, A. N.; Matvienko, A. G.; Novokhatko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen atom abstraction from the C-H bonds of substrates of different structures by phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals is studied. The rate constants of this reaction are measured and the kinetic isotope effects are determined. It is shown that in addition to the thermodynamic factor, Coulomb forces and donor-acceptor interactions affect the reaction between phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals and substrate molecules, altering the shape of the transition state. This favors the tunneling of hydrogen atoms and leads to a substantial reduction in the activation energy of the process.

  3. Effects of grain shape on the response of a two-dimensional granular material under constant shear rate.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Nelson; Melo, Francisco; Vivanco, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    We present a study on the effects of particle shape (disks, hexagons, and pentagons) on the macroscopic coefficient of friction of a two-dimensional, monodisperse, single-shaped, granular system, subjected to shear. We found that the mechanism of stress relaxation in disks is based on the sliding of adjacent planes parallel to the applied deformation direction. In hexagons, stress is relaxed through the creation of rigid pivots, which require hexagonal domains to nucleate and are responsible for the large fluctuations in the dilatancy and shear force. In pentagons the stress relaxation mechanism is through the rotation of individual pentagons, which is a consequence of their permanent misalignment, and are responsible for the small but relatively rapid fluctuations in the shear force. We observed that the friction coefficient is larger for polygonal particles than for the rounded ones. A maximum in the friction coefficient is observed in hexagon granulates with an initial width around 6.5 grains caused by the increased frequency in nucleation of rigid pivots. In mixtures of disks and hexagons we observed three different friction coefficient behaviors, which depended on the relative concentration of hexagons; in low concentrations of hexagons, <20%, the friction coefficient corresponds to that obtained in solely disks, at intermediate concentrations, <80%, the coefficient varies linearly with concentration, and at larger concentrations the friction coefficient corresponds to the values obtained for solely hexagons. On the contrary, mixtures of pentagons and hexagons showed two regimes; a low constant friction regime at concentrations lower than 60%, and an increased in friction observed with higher concentrations of hexagons.

  4. Dynamic energy release rate in couple-stress elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morini, L.; Piccolroaz, A.; Mishuris, G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is concerned with energy release rate for dynamic steady state crack problems in elastic materials with microstructures. A Mode III semi-infinite crack subject to loading applied on the crack surfaces is considered. The micropolar behaviour of the material is described by the theory of couple-stress elasticity developed by Koiter. A general expression for the dynamic J-integral including both traslational and micro-rotational inertial contributions is derived, and the conservation of this integral on a path surrounding the crack tip is demonstrated.

  5. The Effect of Trailing Vortices on the Production of Lift on an Airfoil Undergoing a Constant Rate of Change of Angle of Attack.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect a trailing vortex wake has on an airfoil undergoing a constant rate of change of angle of...When applied to the constant rate - of - change of angle-of-attack problem, the results showed that a trailing vortex wake has a measurable and

  6. Tissue vitamin concentrations are maintained constant by changing the urinary excretion rate of vitamins in rats' restricted food intake.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that mild food restriction induces a reduction in tryptophan-nicotinamide conversion, which helps to explain why death secondary to pellagra is pandemic during the hungry season. In this study, we investigated the levels of B-group vitamins in the liver, kidney, blood, and urine in rats that underwent gradual restriction of food intake (80, 60, 40, and 20% restriction vs. ad libitum food intake). No significant differences in the B-group vitamin concentrations (mol/g tissue) in the liver and kidney were observed at any level of food restriction. However, the urine excretion rates exhibited some characteristic phenomena that differed by vitamin. These results show that the tissue concentrations of B-group vitamins were kept constant by changing the urinary elimination rates of vitamins under various levels of food restriction. Only vitamin B12 was the only (exception).

  7. Calculations of rate constants for the three-body recombination of H2 in the presence of H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    1988-01-01

    A new global potential energy hypersurface for H2 + H2 is constructed and quasiclassical trajectory calculations performed using the resonance complex theory and energy transfer mechanism to estimate the rate of three body recombination over the temperature range 100 to 5000 K. The new potential is a faithful representation of ab initio electron structure calculations, is unchanged under the operation of exchanging H atoms, and reproduces the accurate H3 potential as one H atom is pulled away. Included in the fitting procedure are geometries expected to be important when one H2 is near or above the dissociation limit. The dynamics calculations explicitly include the motion of all four atoms and are performed efficiently using a vectorized variable-stepsize integrator. The predicted rate constants are approximately a factor of two smaller than experimental estimates over a broad temperature range.

  8. Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions from Phenolic Compounds by Peroxyl Radicals: Multireference Character and Density Functional Theory Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Muñoz-Rugeles, Leonardo; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan Raul; Bao, Junwei Lucas; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-07-14

    An assessment of multireference character in transition states is considered to be an important component in establishing the expected reliability of various electronic structure methods. In the present work, the multireference characters of the transition states and the forming and breaking of bonds for a large set of hydrogen abstraction reactions from phenolic compounds by peroxyl radicals have been analyzed using the T1, M, B1, and GB1 diagnostics. The extent of multireference character depends on the system and on the conditions under which the reaction takes place, and some systematic trends are observed. In particular, the multireference character is found to be reduced by solvation, the size of the phenolic compound, and deprotonation in aqueous solution. However, the deviations of calculated rate constants from experimental ones are not correlated with the extent of multireference character. The performance of single-determinant density functional theory was investigated for the kinetics of these reactions by comparing calculated rate constants to experimental data; the results from these analyses showed that the M05 functional performs well for the task at hand.

  9. Direct rate constant measurements for the reaction of ground-state atomic oxygen with ethylene, 244-1052 K

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Nesbitt, F.L.; Skolnik, E.G.; Lee, J.H.; Smalley, J.F.

    1987-03-12

    The rate constant for the reaction of ground-state atomic oxygen with ethylene was determined by using two techniques: flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF, 244-1052 K) and discharge flow-resonance fluorescence (DF-RF, 298-1017 K). Kinetic complications due to the presence of molecular oxygen in the FP-RF experiments at high temperatures (T > 800 K) were overcome by using NO as the photolytic source of the O atoms. The rate constant, k/sub 1/ (T), derived in this study exhibits extreme non-Arrhenius behavior, but it can be successfully fit to the sum of exponentials expression, 244-1052 K, k/sub 1/(T) = (1.02 +/- 0.06) x 10/sup -11/ exp(-753 +/- 17 K/T) + (2.75 +/- 0.26) x 10/sup -10/ exp(-4220 +/- 550 K/T), in units of cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. Additionally, a fit of the results of this work to a simple transition-state theory expression and the comparison of these results with those of other workers are discussed.

  10. KiSThelP: a program to predict thermodynamic properties and rate constants from quantum chemistry results.

    PubMed

    Canneaux, Sébastien; Bohr, Frédéric; Henon, Eric

    2014-01-05

    Kinetic and Statistical Thermodynamical Package (KiSThelP) is a cross-platform free open-source program developed to estimate molecular and reaction properties from electronic structure data. To date, three computational chemistry software formats are supported (Gaussian, GAMESS, and NWChem). Some key features are: gas-phase molecular thermodynamic properties (offering hindered rotor treatment), thermal equilibrium constants, transition state theory rate coefficients (transition state theory (TST), variational transition state theory (VTST)) including one-dimensional (1D) tunnelling effects (Wigner, and Eckart) and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) rate constants, for elementary reactions with well-defined barriers. KiSThelP is intended as a working tool both for the general public and also for more expert users. It provides graphical front-end capabilities designed to facilitate calculations and interpreting results. KiSThelP enables to change input data and simulation parameters directly through the graphical user interface and to visually probe how it affects results. Users can access results in the form of graphs and tables. The graphical tool offers customizing of 2D plots, exporting images and data files. These features make this program also well-suited to support and enhance students learning and can serve as a very attractive courseware, taking the teaching content directly from results in molecular and kinetic modelling.

  11. Carbofuran removal in continuous-photocatalytic reactor: Reactor optimization, rate-constant determination and carbofuran degradation pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Vishnuganth, M A; Remya, Neelancherry; Kumar, Mathava; Selvaraju, N

    2017-02-22

    Carbofuran (CBF) removal in a continuous-flow photocatalytic reactor with granular activated carbon supported titanium dioxide (GAC-TiO2) catalyst was investigated. The effects of feed flow rate, TiO2 concentration and addition of supplementary oxidants on CBF removal were investigated. The central composite design (CCD) was used to design the experiments and to estimate the effects of feed flow rate and TiO2 concentration on CBF removal. The outcome of CCD experiments demonstrated that reactor performance was influenced mainly by feed flow rate compared to TiO2 concentration. A second-order polynomial model developed based on CCD experiments fitted the experimental data with good correlation (R(2) ∼ 0.964). The addition of 1 mL min(-1) hydrogen peroxide has shown complete CBF degradation and 76% chemical oxygen demand removal under the following operating conditions of CBF ∼50 mg L(-1), TiO2 ∼5 mg L(-1) and feed flow rate ∼82.5 mL min(-1). Rate constant of the photodegradation process was also calculated by applying the kinetic data in pseudo-first-order kinetics. Four major degradation intermediates of CBF were identified using GC-MS analysis. As a whole, the reactor system and GAC-TiO2 catalyst used could be constructive in cost-effective CBF removal with no impact to receiving environment through getaway of photocatalyst.

  12. Calculation of rate constants for dissociative attachment of low-energy electrons to hydrogen halides HCl, HBr, and HI and their deuterated analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Houfek, Karel; Cizek, Martin; Horacek, Jiri

    2002-12-01

    Calculations of rate constants for the process of dissociative attachment of low-energy electrons to hydrogen halides HCl, HBr, and HI and for the reverse process of associative detachment based on the nonlocal resonance model are reported. The calculated data are of importance for the modeling of plasma processes, environmental chemistry, etc. The calculated dissociative attachment rate constants are found to be in good agreement with existing experimental data. It is shown that at low temperatures the rate constants are very sensitive to small changes of the parameters of the nonlocal resonance model used for the calculation of the rate constants and represent a severe test of the theory. The isotopic effect and its dependence on the temperature is also discussed. The calculations of rate constants for the reverse process of associative detachment are also reported and discussed.

  13. Kinetics of the transformation of phenyl-urea herbicides during ozonation of natural waters: rate constants and model predictions.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; Acero, Juan L; Garcia, Carolina

    2007-10-01

    Oxidation of four phenyl-urea herbicides (isoproturon, chlortoluron, diuron, and linuron) was studied by ozone at pH=2, and by a combination of O3/H2O2 at pH=9. These experiments allowed the determination of the rate constants for their reactions with ozone and OH radicals. For reactions with ozone, the following rate constants were obtained: 1.9 +/- 0.2, 16.5 +/- 0.6, 393.5 +/- 8.4, and 2191 +/- 259 M(-1) s(-1) for linuron, diuron, chlortoluron, and isoproturon, respectively. The rate constants for the reaction with OH radicals were (7.9 +/- 0.1) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for isoproturon, (6.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for chlortoluron, (6.6 +/- 0.1) x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for diuron, and (5.9 +/- 0.1) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for linuron. Furthermore, the simultaneous ozonation of these selected herbicides in some natural water systems (a commercial mineral water, a groundwater, and surface water from a reservoir) was studied. The influence of operating conditions (initial ozone dose, nature of herbicides, and type of water systems) on herbicide removal efficiency was established, and the parameter Rct (proposed by Elovitz, M.S., von Gunten, U., 1999. Hydroxyl radical/ozone ratios during ozonation processes. I. The Rct concept. Ozone Sci. Eng. 21, 239-260) was evaluated from simultaneous measurement of ozone and OH radicals. A kinetic model was proposed for the prediction of the elimination rate of herbicides in these natural waters, and application of this model revealed that experimental results and predicted values agreed fairly well. Finally, the partial contributions of direct ozone and radical pathways were evaluated, and the results showed that reaction with OH radicals was the major pathway for the oxidative transformation of diuron and linuron, even when conventional ozonation was applied, while for chlortoluron and isoproturon, direct ozonation was the major pathway.

  14. Rate constants for OH with selected large alkanes : shock-tube measurements and an improved group scheme.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-04-30

    High-temperature rate constant experiments on OH with the five large (C{sub 5}-C{sub 8}) saturated hydrocarbons n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2,2,3,3-TMB), n-pentane, n-hexane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane (2,3-DMB) were performed with the reflected-shock-tube technique using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. Single-point determinations at {approx}1200 K on n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-TMB, n-hexane, and 2,3-DMB were previously reported by Cohen and co-workers; however, the present work substantially extends the database to both lower and higher temperature. The present experiments span a wide temperature range, 789-1308 K, and represent the first direct measurements of rate constants at T > 800 K for n-pentane. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of {approx}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high OH concentration detection sensitivity permitted pseudo-first-order analyses for unambiguously measuring rate constants. The experimental results can be expressed in Arrhenius form in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} as follows: K{sub OH+n-heptane} = (2.48 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1927 {+-} 69 K)/T] (838-1287 K); k{sub OH+2,2,3,3-TMB} = (8.26 {+-} 0.89) x 10{sup -11} exp[(-1337 {+-} 94 K)/T] (789-1061 K); K{sub OH+n-pentane} = (1.60 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1903 {+-} 146 K)/T] (823-1308 K); K{sub OH+n-hexane} = (2.79 {+-} 0.39) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-2301 {+-} 134 K)/T] (798-1299 K); and k{sub OH+2,3-DMB} = (1.27 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1617 {+-} 118 K)/T] (843-1292 K). The available experimental data, along with lower-T determinations, were used to obtain evaluations of the experimental rate constants over the temperature range from {approx}230 to 1300 K for most of the title reactions. These extended-temperature-range evaluations, given as three-parameter fits, are as follows: k{sub OH+n-heptane} = 2.059 x 10{sup -5}T{sup 1.401} exp(33 K/T) cm{sup 3

  15. Determination of the Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constants for HO2/Acetonylperoxy Reaction and Acetonylperoxy Self-Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, E. C.; Grieman, F. J.; Hui, A. O.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Reactions of hydroperoxy radical, HO2, with carbonyl containing RO2 can play an important role in the oxidation chemistry of the troposphere. Discovered radical product channels in addition to radical termination channels have resulted in increased study of these important reactions. In our continued study of HO2 reactions with acetonylperoxy and acetylperoxy radicals, we report here our first results on the kinetics of the acetonylperoxy system. Previous studies have resulted in conflicting results and no temperature dependence of the rate constants. Using the Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy (IRKS) method in which a temperature-controlled slow-flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis of Cl2 are used to produce HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2O2 from methanol and acetone, respectively, we studied the chemical kinetics involved over the temperature range of 295 to 240 K. Rates of chemical reaction were determined by monitoring the HO2 concentration as a function of time by sensitive near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy while simultaneously measuring the disappearance of [CH3C(O)CH2O2] in the ultraviolet at 300 nm. The simultaneous fits resulted in the determination of the temperature dependence of the rate constants for the HO2/acetonylperoxy reaction and the acetonylperoxy self-reaction. At the lower temperatures, the reactions of HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2O2 with the adducts HO2•CH3OH and HO2•CH3C(O)CH3 formed in significant concentrations needed to be included in the fitting models.

  16. MORATE 6.5: A new version of a computer program for direct dynamics calculations of chemical reaction rate constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei-Ping; Lynch, Gillian C.; Liu, Yi-Ping; Rossi, Ivan; Stewart, James J. P.; Steckler, Rozeanne; Garrett, Bruce C.; Isaacson, Alan D.; Lu, Da-hong; Melissas, Vasilios S.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    1995-08-01

    MORATE (Molecular Orbital RATE calculations) is a computer program for direct dynamics calculations of unimolecular and bimolecular rate constants of gas-phase chemical reactions involving atoms, diatoms, or polyatomic species. The dynamical methods used are conventional or variational transition state theory and multidimensional semiclassical approximations for tunneling and nonclassical reflection. Variational transition states are found by a one-dimensional search of generalized-transition-state dividing surfaces perpendicular to the minimum-energy path, and tunneling probabilities are evaluated by multidimensional semiclassical algorithms, including the small-curvature and large-curvature tunneling approximations and the microcanonical optimized multidimensional tunneling approximation. The computer program is a conventiently interfaced package consisting of the POLYRATE program, version 6.5, for dynamical rate constant calculations, and the MOPAC program, version 5.05mn, for semiempirical electronic structure computations. In single-level mode, the potential energies, gradients, and higher derivatives of the potential are computed whenever needed by electronic structure calculations employing semiempirical molecular orbital theory without the intermediary of a global or semiglobal fit. All semiempirical methods available in MOPAC, in particular MINDO/3, MNDO, AM1, and PM3, can be called on to calculate the potential, gradient, or Hessian, as required at various steps of the dynamics calculations, and, in addition, the code has flexible options for electronic structure calculations with neglect of diatomic differential overlap and specific reaction parameters (NDDO-SRP). In dual-level mode, MINDO/3, MNDO, AM1, PM3, or NDDO-SRP is used as a lower level to calculate the reaction path, and interpolated corrections to energies and frequencies are added; these corrections are based on higher-level data read from an external file.

  17. Muonium Addition Reactions and Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase: k∞ Rate Constants for Mu + C2H2.

    PubMed

    Arseneau, Donald J; Garner, David M; Reid, Ivan D; Fleming, Donald G

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics of the addition reaction of muonium (Mu) to acetylene have been studied in the gas phase at N2 moderator pressures mainly from ∼800 to 1000 Torr and over the temperature range from 168 to 446 K, but also down to 200 Torr at 168 K and over a much higher range of pressures, from 10 to 44 bar at 295 K, demonstrating pressure-independent rate constants, kMu(T). Even at 200 Torr moderator pressure, the kinetics for Mu + C2H2 addition behave as if effectively in the high-pressure limit, giving k∞ = kMu due to depolarization of the muon spin in the MuC2H2 radical formed in the addition step. The rate constants kMu(T) exhibit modest Arrhenius curvature over the range of measured temperatures. Comparisons with data and with calculations for the corresponding H(D) + C2H2 addition reactions reveal a much faster rate for the Mu reaction at the lowest temperatures, by 2 orders of magnitude, in accord with the propensity of Mu to undergo quantum tunneling. Moreover, isotopic atom exchange, which contributes in a major way to the analogous D atom reaction, forming C2HD + H, is expected to be unimportant in the case of Mu addition, a consequence of the much higher zero-point energy and hence weaker C-Mu bond that would form, meaning that the present report of the Mu + C2H2 reaction is effectively the only experimental study of kinetic isotope effects in the high-pressure limit for H-atom addition to acetylene.

  18. Gas-phase chemistry of (alpha-terpineol with ozone and OH radical: rate constants and products.

    PubMed

    Wells, J R

    2005-09-15

    A bimolecular rate constant, kOH+alpha-terpineol, of (1.9 +/- 0.5) x 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) was measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the relative rate technique for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with alpha-terpineol (1-methyl-4-isopropyl-1-cyclohexen-8-ol) at (297 +/- 3) K and 1 atm total pressure. Additionally, a bimolecular rate constant, kO3+alpha-terpineol, of (3.0 +/- 0.2) x 10(-16) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) was measured by monitoring the first order decrease in ozone concentration as a function of excess alpha-terpineol. To better understand alpha-terpineol's gas-phase transformation in the indoor environment, the products of the alpha-terpineol + OH and alpha-terpineol + 03 reactions were also investigated. The positively identified alpha-terpineol/OH reaction products were acetone, ethanedial (glyoxal, HC(=O)C(=O)H), and 2-oxopropanal (methyl glyoxal, CH3C(=O)C(=O)H). The positively identified alpha-terpineol/O3 reaction product was 2-oxopropanal (methyl glyoxal, CH3C(=O)C(=O)H). The use of derivatizing agents O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentalfluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) clearly indicated that several other reaction products were formed. The elucidation of these other reaction products was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible alpha-terpineol/OH and alpha-terpineol/O3 reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound/ OH and volatile organic compound/O3 gas-phase reaction mechanisms.

  19. Flow stress and material model study at high strain rate and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Brar, N. S.

    1994-07-01

    The flow stress of M200 maraging steel, C1008 steel, and 6061-T6 aluminum at low temperatures to 123 K and at a strain rate of about 103 s-1 is measured using split Hopkinson bar (SHB). Liquid nitrogen is used to cool the specimen to the desired temperature. The flow stress of M200 increased to 1.93 GPa at 123 K, an increase of 22 percent compared to 1.58 GPa at room temperature. In the case of 6061-T6 aluminum the flow stress remains at about 390 MPa at temperatures in the range 293 to 123 K. For C1008 steel, the flow stress increased to 860 MPa at 123 K from its room temperature value of 610 MPa. The failure strain for C1008 steel at 123 K was 0.02, compared to 0.2 at room temperature, suggesting a ductile to brittle transition. The Johnson-Cook material model constant ``m'', which accounts for temperature effect, is 0.5 for C1008 at temperatures in the range 123 K to 950 K.

  20. A constant stress-drop model for producing broadband synthetic seismograms: Comparison with the next generation attenuation relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.

    2009-01-01

    Broadband (0.1-20 Hz) synthetic seismograms for finite-fault sources were produced for a model where stress drop is constant with seismic moment to see if they can match the magnitude dependence and distance decay of response spectral amplitudes found in the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) relations recently developed from strong-motion data of crustal earthquakes in tectonically active regions. The broadband synthetics were constructed for earthquakes of M 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5 by combining deterministic synthetics for plane-layered models at low frequencies with stochastic synthetics at high frequencies. The stochastic portion used a source model where the Brune stress drop of 100 bars is constant with seismic moment. The deterministic synthetics were calculated using an average slip velocity, and hence, dynamic stress drop, on the fault that is uniform with magnitude. One novel aspect of this procedure is that the transition frequency between the deterministic and stochastic portions varied with magnitude, so that the transition frequency is inversely related to the rise time of slip on the fault. The spectral accelerations at 0.2, 1.0, and 3.0 sec periods from the synthetics generally agreed with those from the set of NGA relations for M 5.5-7.5 for distances of 2-100 km. At distances of 100-200 km some of the NGA relations for 0.2 sec spectral acceleration were substantially larger than the values of the synthetics for M 7.5 and M 6.5 earthquakes because these relations do not have a term accounting for Q. At 3 and 5 sec periods, the synthetics for M 7.5 earthquakes generally had larger spectral accelerations than the NGA relations, although there was large scatter in the results from the synthetics. The synthetics showed a sag in response spectra at close-in distances for M 5.5 between 0.3 and 0.7 sec that is not predicted from the NGA relations.

  1. Calculated Third Order Rate Constants for Interpreting the Mechanisms of Hydrolyses of Chloroformates, Carboxylic Acid Halides, Sulfonyl Chlorides and Phosphorochloridates

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, T. William

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolyses of acid derivatives (e.g., carboxylic acid chlorides and fluorides, fluoro- and chloroformates, sulfonyl chlorides, phosphorochloridates, anhydrides) exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics. Reaction mechanisms vary from those involving a cationic intermediate (SN1) to concerted SN2 processes, and further to third order reactions, in which one solvent molecule acts as the attacking nucleophile and a second molecule acts as a general base catalyst. A unified framework is discussed, in which there are two reaction channels—an SN1-SN2 spectrum and an SN2-SN3 spectrum. Third order rate constants (k3) are calculated for solvolytic reactions in a wide range of compositions of acetone-water mixtures, and are shown to be either approximately constant or correlated with the Grunwald-Winstein Y parameter. These data and kinetic solvent isotope effects, provide the experimental evidence for the SN2-SN3 spectrum (e.g., for chloro- and fluoroformates, chloroacetyl chloride, p-nitrobenzoyl p-toluenesulfonate, sulfonyl chlorides). Deviations from linearity lead to U- or V-shaped plots, which assist in the identification of the point at which the reaction channel changes from SN2-SN3 to SN1-SN2 (e.g., for benzoyl chloride). PMID:26006228

  2. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: constraining the evolution of Newton's constant using the growth rate of structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nesseris, Savvas; Blake, Chris; Davis, Tamara; Parkinson, David E-mail: cblake@astro.swin.edu.au E-mail: d.parkinson@uq.edu.au

    2011-07-01

    We constrain the evolution of Newton's constant using the growth rate of large-scale structure measured by the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.9. We use this data in two ways. Firstly we constrain the matter density of the Universe, Ω{sub m} (assuming General Relativity), and use this to construct a diagnostic to detect the presence of an evolving Newton's constant. Secondly we directly measure the evolution of Newton's constant, G{sub eff}, that appears in Modified Gravity theories, without assuming General Relativity to be true. The novelty of these approaches are that, contrary to other methods, they do not require knowledge of the expansion history of the Universe, H(z), making them model independent tests. Our constraints for the second derivative of Newton's constant at the present day, assuming it is slowly evolving as suggested by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints, using the WiggleZ data is G double-dot{sub eff}(t{sub 0}) = −1.19 ± 0.95·10{sup −20} h{sup 2} yr{sup −2}, where h is defined via H{sub 0} = 100 h km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1}, while using both the WiggleZ and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy (SDSS LRG) data is G double-dot{sub eff}(t{sub 0}) = −3.6 ± 6.8·10{sup −21} h{sup 2} yr{sup −2}, both being consistent with General Relativity. Finally, our constraint for the rms mass fluctuation σ{sub 8} using the WiggleZ data is σ{sub 8} = 0.75 ± 0.08, while using both the WiggleZ and the SDSS LRG data σ{sub 8} = 0.77 ± 0.07, both in good agreement with the latest measurements from the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation.

  3. Comparison of ultrasonic degradation rates constants of methylene blue at 22.8 kHz, 127 kHz, and 490 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Techniques such as solvent extraction, incineration, chemical dehalogenation, and biodegradation have been investigated for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds. We found ultrasound to be an attractive technology for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds in water. However, the effects of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate constants were not investigated quantitatively. In this study, the degradation process of a model for hazardous organic compound methylene blue was investigated using ultrasonic irradiation. The study focused on the effects of ultrasonic frequency and ultrasonic power on the degradation rate constant. The apparent degradation rate constants were estimated based on time dependence of methylene blue concentration assuming pseudo-first-order kinetics for the decomposition. A linear relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and ultrasonic power was identified. In addition, the apparent degradation rate constants at frequencies of 127 and 490 kHz were much larger than those at 22.8 kHz. A relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and the sonochemical efficiency value (SE value) was also found. Based on these results, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant of methylene blue based on the ultrasonic power and the SE value is proposed in this study.

  4. A molecular copper catalyst for electrochemical water reduction with a large hydrogen-generation rate constant in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peili; Wang, Mei; Yang, Yong; Yao, Tianyi; Sun, Licheng

    2014-12-08

    The copper complex [(bztpen)Cu](BF4)2 (bztpen=N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine) displays high catalytic activity for electrochemical proton reduction in acidic aqueous solutions, with a calculated hydrogen-generation rate constant (k(obs)) of over 10000 s(-1). A turnover frequency (TOF) of 7000 h(-1) cm(-2) and a Faradaic efficiency of 96% were obtained from a controlled potential electrolysis (CPE) experiment with [(bztpen)Cu](2+) in pH 2.5 buffer solution at -0.90 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) over two hours using a glassy carbon electrode. A mechanism involving two proton-coupled reduction steps was proposed for the dihydrogen generation reaction catalyzed by [(bztpen)Cu](2+).

  5. Theoretical rate constants and kinetic isotope effects in the reaction of methane with H, D, T, and Mu atoms.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-García, J

    2008-03-07

    The rate constants and kinetic isotope effects of the reaction of methane with four isotopes of hydrogen, protium (H), deuterium (D), tritium (T), and muonium (Mu), were studied using variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling on an analytical potential energy surface, PES-2002, previously constructed by our group. For the four isotopes, our kinetics results agree reasonably with available experimental measurements, improving previous theoretical results that used different potential energy surfaces and/or theoretical approaches. In the comparison of the reactivity between protium and muonium, which is the most severe test of the surface and theoretical method due to the large mass difference between the two isotopes, some sources of discrepancy between theory and experiment were analyzed. These were the zero-point energy, tunneling effect, and the role of the reactivity from methane excited vibrational states.

  6. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the F + H 2 system. Rate constants, kinetic isotope effects and energy partitioning among reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenman, Efrat; Persky, Avigdor

    1995-06-01

    Quasiclassical trajectory calculations were carried out for the reactions F + H 2, F + D 2, and F + HD, using two potential energy surfaces T5A and 6SEC. The results which include rate constants and kinetic isotope effects as a function of temperature, isotopic branching ratios for F + HD as a function off collision energy and the energy partitioning and vibrational state distributions of the products at room temperature, are compared with experimental data. For most of the quantities under study, the results for the 6SEC surface are in qualitative agreement with experiment, as opposed to the results for the T5A surface. The conclusions from the present study concerning the quality of the 6SEC surface are consistent with the conclusions of Aoiz et al. which are based mainly on calculations of vibrationally state resolved differential cross sections and vibrational distributions of products, for specific collision energies.

  7. A nonmonotonic dependence of standard rate constant on reorganization energy for heterogeneous electron transfer processes on electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weilin; Li, Songtao; Zhou, Xiaochun; Xing, Wei; Huang, Mingyou; Lu, Tianhong; Liu, Changpeng

    2006-05-01

    In the present work a nonmonotonic dependence of standard rate constant (k0) on reorganization energy (λ) was discovered qualitatively from electron transfer (Marcus-Hush-Levich) theory for heterogeneous electron transfer processes on electrode surface. It was found that the nonmonotonic dependence of k0 on λ is another result, besides the disappearance of the famous Marcus inverted region, coming from the continuum of electronic states in electrode: with the increase of λ, the states for both Process I and Process II ET processes all vary from nonadiabatic to adiabatic state continuously, and the λ dependence of k0 for Process I is monotonic thoroughly, while for Process II on electrode surface the λ dependence of k0 could show a nonmonotonicity.

  8. Measurement of electron-attachment line shapes, cross sections, and rate constants in HI and DI at ultralow electron energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alajajian, S. H.; Chutjian, A.

    1988-01-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections are reported in the electron energy range 0-150 MeV, at an energy resolution of 6.5 MeV (full width at half maximum) for the molecules HI and DI. Use is made of the Kr photoionization method to obtain cross sections for HI, and a signal intercomparison technique to obtain cross sections and the thermal-attachment rate constant for DI. Attachment properties of the two molecules are very similar. The ratio of attachment cross sections is discussed in terms of the reduced-mass dependence of the dissociation width and the survival probability, and in terms of spectroscopic thresholds and rotational populations for attachment at 300 K. Approximate potential-energy curves for the lowest states of the neutral molecule and negative ion are given.

  9. Energy landscape analysis of native folding of the prion protein yields the diffusion constant, transition path time, and rates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Gupta, Amar Nath; Liu, Xia; Neupane, Krishna; Brigley, Angela M; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2012-09-04

    Protein folding is described conceptually in terms of diffusion over a configurational free-energy landscape, typically reduced to a one-dimensional profile along a reaction coordinate. In principle, kinetic properties can be predicted directly from the landscape profile using Kramers theory for diffusive barrier crossing, including the folding rates and the transition time for crossing the barrier. Landscape theory has been widely applied to interpret the time scales for protein conformational dynamics, but protein folding rates and transition times have not been calculated directly from experimentally measured free-energy profiles. We characterized the energy landscape for native folding of the prion protein using force spectroscopy, measuring the change in extension of a single protein molecule at high resolution as it unfolded/refolded under tension. Key parameters describing the landscape profile were first recovered from the distributions of unfolding and refolding forces, allowing the diffusion constant for barrier crossing and the transition path time across the barrier to be calculated. The full landscape profile was then reconstructed from force-extension curves, revealing a double-well potential with an extended, partially unfolded transition state. The barrier height and position were consistent with the previous results. Finally, Kramers theory was used to predict the folding rates from the landscape profile, recovering the values observed experimentally both under tension and at zero force in ensemble experiments. These results demonstrate how advances in single-molecule theory and experiment are harnessing the power of landscape formalisms to describe quantitatively the mechanics of folding.

  10. Model system-bath Hamiltonian and nonadiabatic rate constants for proton-coupled electron transfer at electrode-solution interfaces.

    PubMed

    Navrotskaya, Irina; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2008-06-28

    An extension of the Anderson-Newns-Schmickler model for electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is presented. This model describes reactions in which electron transfer between a solute complex in solution and an electrode is coupled to proton transfer within the solute complex. The model Hamiltonian is derived in a basis of electron-proton vibronic states defined within a double adiabatic approximation for the electrons, transferring proton, and bath modes. The interaction term responsible for electronic transitions between the solute complex and the electrode depends on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode within the solute complex. This model Hamiltonian is used to derive the anodic and cathodic rate constants for nonadiabatic electrochemical PCET. The derivation is based on the master equations for the reduced density matrix of the electron-proton subsystem, which includes the electrons of the solute complex and the electrode, as well as the transferring proton. The rate constant expressions differ from analogous expressions for electrochemical electron transfer because of the summation over electron-proton vibronic states and the dependence of the couplings on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. These differences lead to additional contributions to the total reorganization energy, an additional exponential temperature-dependent prefactor, and a temperature-dependent term in the effective activation energy that has different signs for the anodic and cathodic processes. This model can be generalized to describe both nonadiabatic and adiabatic electrochemical PCET reactions and provides the framework for the inclusion of additional effects, such as the breaking and forming of other chemical bonds.

  11. Development and Validation of Students' Stress Rating Scale (SSRS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balamurugan, M.; Kumaran, D.

    2008-01-01

    Each and every person is under the grip of stress. Starting from a two-year infant to an adult, stress takes an entry in different forms but it alters the normal functioning of a person. One cannot eliminate stress but can reduce stress in their life. The stressors are normative demands and critical life events. Normative stressors include…

  12. Differential effects of cyclic and constant stress on ATP release and mucociliary transport by human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Picher, Maryse; Boucher, Richard C

    2007-01-01

    In the lungs, the first line of defence against bacterial infection is the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) lining the airway surface. The superficial airway epithelium exhibits complex regulatory pathways that blend ion transport to adjust ASL volume to maintain proper mucociliary clearance (MCC). We hypothesized that stresses generated by airflow and transmural pressures during breathing govern ASL volume by regulating the rate of epithelial ATP release. Luminal ATP, via interactions with apical membrane P2-purinoceptors, regulates the balance of active ion secretion versus absorption to maintain ASL volume at optimal levels for MCC. In this study we tested the hypothesis that cyclic compressive stress (CCS), mimicking normal tidal breathing, regulates ASL volume in airway epithelia. Polarized tracheobronchial epithelial cultures from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects responded to a range of CCS by increasing the rate of ATP release. In normal airway epithelia, the CCS-induced increase in ASL ATP concentration was sufficient to induce purinoceptor-mediated increases in ASL height and MCC, via inhibition of epithelial Na+-channel-mediated Na+ absorption and stimulation of Cl− secretion through CFTR and the Ca2+-activated chloride channels. In contrast, static, non-oscillatory stress did not stimulate ATP release, ion transport or MCC, emphasizing the importance of rhythmic mechanical stress for airway defence. In CF airway cultures, which exhibit basal ASL depletion, CCS was partially effective, producing less ASL volume secretion than in normal cultures, but a level sufficient to restore MCC. The present data suggest that CCS may (1) regulate ASL volume in the normal lung and (2) improve clearance in the lungs of CF patients, potentially explaining the beneficial role of exercise in lung defence. PMID:17317749

  13. A simple approach to evaluate the kinetic rate constant for ATP synthesis in resting human skeletal muscle at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-09-01

    Inversion transfer (IT) is a well-established technique with multiple attractive features for analysis of kinetics. However, its application in measurement of ATP synthesis rate in vivo has lagged behind the more common saturation transfer (ST) techniques. One well-recognized issue with IT is the complexity of data analysis in comparison with much simpler analysis by ST. This complexity arises, in part, because the γ-ATP spin is involved in multiple chemical reactions and magnetization exchanges, whereas Pi is involved in a single reaction, Pi → γ-ATP. By considering the reactions involving γ-ATP only as a lumped constant, the rate constant for the reaction of physiological interest, kPi→γATP , can be determined. Here, we present a new IT data analysis method to evaluate kPi→γATP using data collected from resting human skeletal muscle at 7 T. The method is based on the basic Bloch-McConnell equation, which relates kPi→γATP to m˙Pi, the rate of Pi magnetization change. The kPi→γATP value is accessed from m˙Pi data by more familiar linear correlation approaches. For a group of human subjects (n = 15), the kPi→γATP value derived for resting calf muscle was 0.066 ± 0.017 s(-1) , in agreement with literature-reported values. In this study we also explored possible time-saving strategies to speed up data acquisition for kPi→γATP evaluation using simulations. The analysis indicates that it is feasible to carry out a (31) P IT experiment in about 10 min or less at 7 T with reasonable outcome in kPi→γATP variance for measurement of ATP synthesis in resting human skeletal muscle. We believe that this new IT data analysis approach will facilitate the wide acceptance of IT to evaluate ATP synthesis rate in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  15. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    PubMed Central

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  16. Sensitivity study of forecasted aftershock seismicity based on Coulomb stress calculation and rate- and state-dependent frictional response (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, M.; Hainzl, S.; Woessner, J.; Enescu, B.; Catalli, F.; Lombardi, A.

    2009-12-01

    It is nowadays well established that both Coulomb stress perturbations and the rate- and state-dependent frictional response of fault populations are needed to model the spatial and temporal evolution of seismicity. This represents the most popular physics-based approach to forecast the rate of earthquake production and its performances have to be verified with respect to alternative statistical methods. Despite the numerous applications of Coulomb stress interactions, a rigorous validation of the forecasting capabilities is still missing. In this work, we use the Dieterich (1994) physics-based approach to simulate the spatio-temporal evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches modelled through a rate- and state-dependent friction law. According to this model, seismicity rate changes depend on the amplitude of stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults (represented by the parameter Aσ), the stressing rate and the background seismicity rate of the study area. In order to apply this model in a predictive manner, we need to understand the variability of input physical model parameters and their correlations. We first discuss the impact of uncertainties in model parameters and, in particular, in computed coseismic stress perturbations on the seismicity rate changes forecasted through the frictional model. We aim to understand how the variability of Coulomb stress changes affects the correlation between predicted and observed changes in the rate of earthquake production. We use the aftershock activity following the 1992 M 7.3 Landers (California) earthquake as one of our case studies. We analyze the variability of stress changes resulting from the use of different published slip distributions. We find that the standard deviation of the uncertainty is of the same size as the absolute stress change and that their ratio, the coefficient of variation (CV), is approximately constant in

  17. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic

  18. Radical scavenging ability of gallic acid toward OH and OOH radicals. Reaction mechanism and rate constants from the density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marino, Tiziana; Galano, Annia; Russo, Nino

    2014-09-04

    Gallic acid is a ubiquitous compound, widely distributed in the vegetal kingdom and frequently found in the human diet. In the present work, its primary antioxidant activity has been investigated using the density functional theory (DFT), and the quantum mechanics-based test for overall free radical scavenging activity (QM-ORSA) protocol. It was found that gallic acid is a better antioxidant than the reference compound, Trolox, regardless of the polarity of the environment. In addition, gallic acid is predicted to be among the best peroxyl radical scavengers identified so far in nonpolar (lipid) media. This compound is capable of scavenging hydroxyl radicals at diffusion-limited rates, and hydroperoxyl radicals with rate constants in the order of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The deprotonation of gallic acid, in aqueous solution, is predicted to increase the protective action of this compound against oxidative stress. Gallic acid was also identified as a versatile scavenger, capable of rapidly deactivating a wide variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) via electron transfer at physiological pH.

  19. Absence of earthquake correlation with Earth tides: An indication of high preseismic fault stress rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vidale, J.E.; Agnew, D.C.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Oppenheimer, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    Because the rate of stress change from the Earth tides exceeds that from tectonic stress accumulation, tidal triggering of earthquakes would be expected if the final hours of loading of the fault were at the tectonic rate and if rupture began soon after the achievement of a critical stress level. We analyze the tidal stresses and stress rates on the fault planes and at the times of 13,042 earthquakes which are so close to the San Andreas and Calaveras faults in California that we may take the fault plane to be known. We find that the stresses and stress rates from Earth tides at the times of earthquakes are distributed in the same way as tidal stresses and stress rates at random times. While the rate of earthquakes when the tidal stress promotes failure is 2% higher than when the stress does not, this difference in rate is not statistically significant. This lack of tidal triggering implies that preseismic stress rates in the nucleation zones of earthquakes are at least 0.15 bar/h just preceding seismic failure, much above the long-term tectonic stress rate of 10-4 bar/h.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the rate constant for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with methyl ethyl ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimal, D.; Stevens, P. S.

    2007-12-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) or 2-butanone is a high-volume industrial solvent with a production rate greater than 70 million lbs yr-1. It is also a photo-oxidation product of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere. MEK is removed from the atmosphere primarily by its reaction with hydroxyl (OH) radical. As a result, knowledge of the chemical mechanism and temperature dependence of this reaction is important as MEK may be transported to the upper troposphere and influence the chemistry of this region of the atmosphere. We present absolute measurements of the rate constant and the kinetic isotope effect for the reaction of MEK with OH radicals at low pressure and over the temperature range 263-388 K using a discharge-flow technique coupled with resonance fluorescence detection of OH radicals. Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface suggest that the reaction of MEK and OH proceeds by H-abstraction mediated by the formation of a 7- membered hydrogen-bonded complex. This mechanism is similar to that of several other atmospherically relevant oxygenated VOCs such as acetone, acetic acid and hydroxyacetone. The influence of the pre-reactive complex on the temperature dependence for this reaction will be discussed.

  1. ESTIMATION OF HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER AND PHOSPHATE ESTER COMPOUNDS IN AQUEOUS SYSTEMS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE BY SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid ester and phosphate ester compounds in aqueous non- aqueous and systems strictly from molecular structure. The energy diffe...

  2. SU-E-T-421: Feasibility Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Constant Dose Rate for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. Methods: The nine-Field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry Run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Results: Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V20 of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs Decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. Conclusion: VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability. This work is supported by the grant project, National Natural; Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237)

  3. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Fohlmeister, Jürgen F

    2015-06-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m(3) → m(4)). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation.

  4. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m3 → m4). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation. PMID:25867741

  5. Theoretical study on the rate constants for the C2H5 + HBr --> C2H6 + Br reaction.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Li; Li, Ze-Sheng; Liu, Jing-Yao; Xiao, Jing-Fa; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2004-02-01

    The reaction C(2)H(5) + HBr --> C(2)H(6) + Br has been theoretically studied over the temperature range from 200 to 1400 K. The electronic structure information is calculated at the BHLYP/6-311+G(d,p) and QCISD/6-31+G(d) levels. With the aid of intrinsic reaction coordinate theory, the minimum energy paths (MEPs) are obtained at the both levels, and the energies along the MEP are further refined by performing the single-point calculations at the PMP4(SDTQ)/6-311+G(3df,2p)//BHLYP and QCISD(T)/6-311++G(2df,2pd)//QCISD levels. The calculated ICVT/SCT rate constants are in good agreement with available experimental values, and the calculate results further indicate that the C(2)H(5) + HBr reaction has negative temperature dependence at T < 850 K, but clearly shows positive temperature dependence at T > 850 K. The current work predicts that the kinetic isotope effect for the title reaction is inverse in the temperature range from 200 to 482 K, i.e., k(HBr)/k(DBr) < 1.

  6. Low-pressure effective fluorescence lifetimes and photo-physical rate constants of one- and two-ring aromatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzler, Thorsten; Faust, Stephan; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-12-01

    One- and two-ring aromatics such as toluene and naphthalene are frequently used molecular tracer species in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging diagnostics. Quantifying LIF signal intensities requires knowledge of the photo-physical processes that determine the fluorescence quantum yield. Collision-induced and intramolecular energy transfer processes in the excited electronic state closely interact under practical conditions. They can be separated through experiments at variable low pressures. Effective fluorescence lifetimes of gaseous toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, anisole, naphthalene, and 1-methylnaphthalene diluted in CO2 were measured after picosecond laser excitation at 266 nm and time-resolved detection of fluorescence intensities. Measurements in an optically accessible externally heated cell between 296 and 475 K and 0.010-1 bar showed that effective fluorescence lifetimes generally decrease with temperature, while the influence of the bath-gas pressure depends on the respective target species and temperature. The results provide non-radiative and fluorescence rate constants and experimentally validate the effect of photo-induced cooling.

  7. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  8. Atmospheric reaction of Cl + methacrolein: a theoretical study on the mechanism, and pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cuihong; Xu, Baoen; Zhang, Shaowen

    2014-05-22

    Methacrolein is a major degradation product of isoprene, the reaction of methacrolein with Cl atoms may play some roles in the degradation of isoprene where these species are relatively abundant. However, the energetics and kinetics of this reaction, which govern the reaction branching, are still not well understood so far. In the present study, two-dimensional potential energy surfaces were constructed to analyze the minimum energy path of the barrierless addition process between Cl and the C═C double bond of methacrolein, which reveals that the terminal addition intermediate is directly formed from the addition reaction. The terminal addition intermediate can further yield different products among which the reaction paths abstracting the aldehyde hydrogen atom and the methyl hydrogen atom are dominant reaction exits. The minimum reaction path for the direct aldehydic hydrogen atom abstraction is also obtained. The reaction kinetics was calculated by the variational transition state theory in conjunction with the master equation method. From the theoretical model we predicted that the overall rate constant of the Cl + methacrolein reaction at 297 K and atmospheric pressure is koverall = 2.3× 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the branching ratio of the aldehydic hydrogen abstraction is about 12%. The reaction is pressure dependent at P < 10 Torr with the high pressure limit at about 100 Torr. The calculated results could well account for the experimental observations.

  9. Intramolecular exchange energy transfer in a bridged bimetallic transition metal complex: Calculation of rate constants using emission spectral fitting parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.Y.; Baba, A.I.; Kim, W.Y.; Schmehl, R.H.; Atherton, S.J.

    1996-11-21

    The photophysical behavior of the transition metal complexes [[(bpy){sub 2}Ru]{sub 2}(bphb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4}, [[(tpy)(CN)Ru]{sub 2}(bhpb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 2} and [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bhpb)Ru(tpy)(CN)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4} (bpy = 2,2`-bipyridine, typ = 2,2`,6`,2{double_prime}-terpyridine, bphb = 1,4-bis(2,2`-bipyrid-4-yl)benzene) was investigated in acetonitrile solution and low-temperature glasses. Luminescence spectra, excitation spectra, and transient absorption decays of the three complexes serve to show that intermolecular electronic energy transfer from the MLCT excited state of the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the MLCT state of the tpy-containing chromophore occurs in the unsymmetric bimetallic complex. Nearly complete energy transfer from the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the tpy-containing chromophore was observed even in 4:1 ethanol: methanol glasses at 20K. A semiclassical exchange energy transfer mechanism was used to treat the available data; the Franck-Condon weighted density of state (FCWD) was obtained using parameters determined from fits of luminescence spectra. Give the FCWD at room temperature and the experimental rate constant, an electronic coupling matrix element of approximately 60 cm{sup -1} was determined for this system. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Catalytic antibody light chain capable of cleaving a chemokine receptor CCR-5 peptide with a high reaction rate constant.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Yukie; Hifumi, Emi; Tsuruhata, Kumi; Fujinami, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Uda, Taizo

    2004-04-20

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb), ECL2B-2, was obtained by immunizing a peptide possessing a part of a sequence of a chemokine receptor, CCR-5, which is present as a membrane protein on the macrophage surface, and which plays an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. From the DNA and the deduced amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of ECL2B-2 MAb, molecular modeling was conducted to calculate the steric conformation of the antibody. Modeling suggested that the structure of ECL2B-2 could possess one or two catalytic triad(s), composed of Asp(1), Ser(27a) (or Ser(27e)), and His(93) (or His(27d)), in the light chain of ECL2B-2. The three amino acid residues, Asp(1), Ser(27a), and His(93), are identical to those of catalytic antibody light chains such as VIPase and i41SL1-2. The light chain of ECL2B-2 MAb degraded the antigenic peptide CCR-5 within about 100 h. Surprisingly, the light chain had a very high catalytic reaction rate constant (k(cat)) of 2.23 min(-1), which is greater by factors of tens to hundreds than those of natural catalytic antibodies obtained previously. The heavy chain of ECL2B-2 MAb, which has no catalytic triad because of a lack of His residue, did not degrade the CCR-5 peptide.

  11. Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom transfer from tertiary amides to the cumyloxyl radical: evaluating the role of stereoelectronic effects.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Milan, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    A time-resolved kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of alkanamides to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out. With N,N-dialkylformamides HAT preferentially occurs from the formyl C-H bond, while in N-formylpyrrolidine HAT mostly occurs from the ring α-C-H bonds. With the acetamides and the alkanamides almost exclusive HAT from the C-H bonds that are α to nitrogen was observed. The results obtained show that alignment between the C-H bond being broken and the amide π-system can lead to significant increases in the HAT rate constant (kH). This finding points toward the important role of stereoelectronic effects on the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The highest kH values were measured for the reactions of CumO(•) with N-acylpyrrolidines. These substrates have ring α-C-H bonds that are held in a conformation that is optimally aligned with the amide π-system, thus allowing for the relatively facile HAT reaction. The lowest kH value was measured for the reaction of N,N-diisobutylacetamide, wherein the steric bulk associated with the N-isobutyl groups increases the energy barrier required to reach the most suitable conformation for HAT. The experimental results are well supported by the computed BDEs for the C-H bonds of the most representative substrates.

  12. Using a Family of Dividing Surfaces Normal to the Minimum EnergyPath for Quantum Instanton Rate Constants

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yimin; Miller, Wlliam H.

    2006-02-22

    One of the outstanding issues in the quantum instanton (QI) theory (or any transition state-type theory) for thermal rate constants of chemical reactions is the choice of an appropriate ''dividing surface'' (DS) that separates reactants and products. (In the general version of the QI theory, there are actually two dividing surfaces involved.) This paper shows one simple and general way for choosing DS's for use in QI Theory, namely using the family of (hyper) planes normal to the minimum energy path (MEP) on the potential energy surface at various distances s along it. Here the reaction coordinate is not one of the dynamical coordinates of the system (which will in general be the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms), but rather simply a parameter which specifies the DS. It is also shown how this idea can be implemented for an N-atom system in 3d space in a way that preserves overall translational and rotational invariance. Numerical application to a simple system (the colliner H + H{sub 2} reaction) is presented to illustrate the procedure.

  13. Dissociation Rate Constants of Human Fibronectin Binding to Fibronectin-binding Proteins on Living Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Clinical Patients*

    PubMed Central

    Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N.; Lower, Brian H.; Lamlertthon, Supaporn; Fowler, Vance G.; Lower, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is part of the indigenous microbiota of humans. Sometimes, S. aureus bacteria enter the bloodstream, where they form infections on implanted cardiovascular devices. A critical, first step in such infections is a bond that forms between fibronectin-binding protein (FnBP) on S. aureus and host proteins, such as fibronectin (Fn), that coat the surface of implants in vivo. In this study, native FnBPs on living S. aureus were shown to form a mechanically strong conformational structure with Fn by atomic force microscopy. The tensile acuity of this bond was probed for 46 bloodstream isolates, each from a patient with a cardiovascular implant. By analyzing the force spectra with the worm-like chain model, we determined that the binding events were consistent with a multivalent, cluster bond consisting of ∼10 or ∼80 proteins in parallel. The dissociation rate constant (koff, s−1) of each multibond complex was determined by measuring strength as a function of the loading rate, normalized by the number of bonds. The bond lifetime (1/koff) was two times longer for bloodstream isolates from patients with an infected device (1.79 or 69.47 s for the 10- or 80-bond clusters, respectively; n = 26 isolates) relative to those from patients with an uninfected device (0.96 or 34.02 s; n = 20 isolates). This distinction could not be explained by different amounts of FnBP, as confirmed by Western blots. Rather, amino acid polymorphisms within the Fn-binding repeats of FnBPA explain, at least partially, the statistically (p < 0.05) longer bond lifetime for isolates associated with an infected cardiovascular device. PMID:22219202

  14. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Stressing-Rate State Evolution in Rate-State Friction Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Rubin, A. M.; Bayart, E.; Savage, H. M.; Marone, C.; Beeler, N. M.

    2013-12-01

    Standard rate and state friction laws fail to explain the full range of observations from laboratory friction experiments. A new state evolution law has been proposed by Nagata et al. (2012) that adds a linear stressing-rate-dependent term to the Dieterich (aging) law, which may provide a remedy. They introduce a parameter c that controls the contribution of the stressing rate to state evolution. We show through analytical approximations that the new law can transition between the responses of the traditional Dieterich (aging) and Ruina (slip) laws in velocity step up/down experiments when the value of c is tuned properly. In particular, for c = 0 the response is pure aging while for finite, non-zero c one observes slip law like behavior for small velocity jumps but aging law like response for larger jumps. The magnitude of the velocity jump required to see this transition between aging and slip behaviour increases as c increases. In the limit of c >> 1 the response to velocity steps becomes purely slip law like. In this limit, numerical simulations show that this law loses its appealing time dependent healing property. An approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo parameter search on data for large magnitude velocity step tests reveals that it is only possible to determine a lower bound on c using datasets that are well explained by the slip law. For a dataset with velocity steps of two orders of magnitude on simulated fault gouge we find this lower bound to be c ≈ 10.0. This is significantly larger than c ≈ 2.0 used by Nagata et al. (2012) to fit their data (mainly bare rock experiments with smaller excursions from steady state than our dataset). Similar parameter estimation exercises on slide hold slide data reveal that none of the state evolution laws considered - Dieterich, Ruina, Kato-Tullis and Nagata - match the relevant features of the data. In particular, even the aging law predicts only the correct rate of healing for long hold times but not the correct

  15. An experimentally determined set of V-T and V-V rate constants involving the OH radical. Implications for atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitelbaum, H.; Aker, P.; Sloan, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the first application of an analytical technique verifying a generalized rate law for vibrational relaxation based on a complete solution of the master equation. Experimental V-T and V-V energy transfer rate constants for the collisional deactivation of OH( v = 1-4) at 300 K by O 3 and OH are reported. It is found that the rate constant for 2OH( v = 1) → OH( v = 0) + OH( v = 2) is 1.8 × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and that for OH( v = 1) + O 3 → OH( v = 0) + O 3 is 1.0 × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, both ±30%. Altogether 40 V-T and V-V rate constants involving vibrationally excited OH are extracted from the time evolution of the OH( v) distribution produced by the chemical reaction O( 1D) + H 2 → OH( v) + H. The rate constants obey a combined Landau-Teller-exponential gap law, with the gap constants being very similar in magnitude to the Polanyi-Woodall or Lambert-Salter constants. It is also shown that measurements of OH quenching by O 3 as reported by others are correct in magnitude but might be falsely attributed to chemical reaction, throwing doubts on atmospheric models of OH chemistry. Furthermore, using the energy transfer rate constants just determined, the time-evolution of the population distribution is extrapolated backwards in time. The resulting initial distribution is found to be yet more sharply peaked than reported heretofore for the reaction O( 1D) + H 2 → OH( v) + H. Finally it is shown that commonly used rate laws for vibrational relaxation, such as the Bethe-Teller law and quasi-first-order decay laws of initially excited levels, should be abandoned.

  16. The use of earthquake rate changes as a stress meter at Kilauea volcano.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, J; Cayol, V; Okubo, P

    2000-11-23

    Stress changes in the Earth's crust are generally estimated from model calculations that use near-surface deformation as an observational constraint. But the widespread correlation of changes of earthquake activity with stress has led to suggestions that stress changes might be calculated from earthquake occurrence rates obtained from seismicity catalogues. Although this possibility has considerable appeal, because seismicity data are routinely collected and have good spatial and temporal resolution, the method has not yet proven successful, owing to the non-linearity of earthquake rate changes with respect to both stress and time. Here, however, we present two methods for inverting earthquake rate data to infer stress changes, using a formulation for the stress- and time-dependence of earthquake rates. Application of these methods at Kilauea volcano, in Hawaii, yields good agreement with independent estimates, indicating that earthquake rates can provide a practical remote-sensing stress meter.

  17. Effect of Quenching Rate on Distortion and Residual Stresses During Induction Hardening of a Full-Float Truck Axle Shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Ferguson, B. Lynn; Nemkov, Valentin; Goldstein, Robert; Jackowski, John; Fett, Greg

    2014-12-01

    Computer simulation is used to predict the residual stresses and distortion of a full-float truck axle shaft that has been induction scan hardened. Flux2D® is used to model the electromagnetic behavior and the power distributions inside the axle shaft in terms of time. The power distributions are imported and mapped into DANTE® model for thermal, phase transformation, and stress analysis. The truck axle shaft has three main geometrical regions: the flange/filet, the shaft, and the spline. Both induction heating and spray quenching processes have significant effect on the quenching results: distortion and residual stress distributions. In this study, the effects of spray quenching severity on residual stresses and distortion are investigated using modeling. The spray quenching rate can be adjusted by spray nozzle design, ratio of polymer solution, and quenchant flow rate. Different quenching rates are modeled by assigning different heat transfer coefficients as thermal boundary conditions during spray quenching. In this paper, three heat transfer coefficients, 5, 12, and 25 kW/(m2 °C), are applied while keeping all other conditions constant. With the understanding of effects of heating and quenching on residual stresses and distortion of induction hardened parts, the induction hardening process can be optimized for improved part performance.

  18. Determination of lethality rate constants and D-values for Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) spores exposed to dry heat from 115 degrees C to 170 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M J; Schubert, W W; Beaudet, R A

    2008-12-01

    Dry heat microbial reduction is the NASA-approved sterilization method to reduce the microbial bioburden on spaceflight hardware for missions with planetary protection requirements. The method involves heating the spaceflight hardware to temperatures between 104 degrees C and 125 degrees C for up to 50 hours, while controlling the humidity to very low values. Collection of lethality data at temperatures above 125 degrees C and with ambient (uncontrolled) humidity conditions would establish whether any microbial reduction credit can be offered to the flight project for processes that occur at temperatures greater than 125 degrees C. The goal of this research is to determine the survival rates of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) spores subjected to temperatures higher than 125 degrees C under both dry (controlled) and room ambient humidity (36-66% relative humidity) conditions. Spores were deposited inside thin, stainless steel thermal spore exposure vessels (TSEVs) and heated under ambient or controlled humidity conditions from 115 degrees C to 170 degrees C. After the exposures, the TSEVs were cooled rapidly, and the spores were recovered and plated. Survivor ratios, lethality rate constants, and D-values were calculated at each temperature. At 115 degrees C and 125 degrees C, the controlled humidity lethality rate constant was faster than the ambient humidity lethality rate constant. At 135 degrees C, the ambient and controlled humidity lethality rate constants were statistically identical. At 150 degrees C and 170 degrees C, the ambient humidity lethality rate constant was slightly faster than the controlled humidity lethality rate constant. These results provide evidence for possibly modifying the NASA dry heat microbial reduction specification.

  19. Determination of equilibrium and rate constants for complex formation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy supplemented by dynamic light scattering and Taylor dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuzhu; Poniewierski, Andrzej; Jelińska, Aldona; Zagożdżon, Anna; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Hou, Sen; Hołyst, Robert

    2016-10-04

    The equilibrium and rate constants of molecular complex formation are of great interest both in the field of chemistry and biology. Here, we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), supplemented by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA), to study the complex formation in model systems of dye-micelle interactions. In our case, dyes rhodamine 110 and ATTO-488 interact with three differently charged surfactant micelles: octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether C12E8 (neutral), cetyltrimethylammonium chloride CTAC (positive) and sodium dodecyl sulfate SDS (negative). To determine the rate constants for the dye-micelle complex formation we fit the experimental data obtained by FCS with a new form of the autocorrelation function, derived in the accompanying paper. Our results show that the association rate constants for the model systems are roughly two orders of magnitude smaller than those in the case of the diffusion-controlled limit. Because the complex stability is determined by the dissociation rate constant, a two-step reaction mechanism, including the diffusion-controlled and reaction-controlled rates, is used to explain the dye-micelle interaction. In the limit of fast reaction, we apply FCS to determine the equilibrium constant from the effective diffusion coefficient of the fluorescent components. Depending on the value of the equilibrium constant, we distinguish three types of interaction in the studied systems: weak, intermediate and strong. The values of the equilibrium constant obtained from the FCS and TDA experiments are very close to each other, which supports the theoretical model used to interpret the FCS data.

  20. Green-Naghdi rate of the Kirchhoff stress and deformation rate: the elasticity tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Chiara; Federico, Salvatore

    2015-06-01

    The elasticity tensor providing the power-conjugation of the Green-Naghdi rate of the Kirchhoff stress and the deformation rate is required, e.g. by the commercially available Finite Element package ABAQUS/Standard for the material user subroutine UMAT, used to input material behaviours other than those included in the libraries of the package. This elasticity tensor had been studied in the literature, but its symmetries have only been briefly discussed, and only its component form in Cartesian coordinates was known. In this work, we derived a covariant, component-free expression of this elasticity tensor and thoroughly studied its symmetries. We found that, although symmetry on both pair of feet (indices) has been deemed to be desirable in the literature, the expression of the tensor available to-date in fact possesses only symmetry on the first pair of feet (indices), whereas the second pair lacks symmetry, and therefore carries a skew-symmetric contribution. This contribution is unnecessary, as it is automatically filtered in the contraction of the elasticity tensor with the symmetric deformation rate tensor. In order to avoid carrying this unnecessary skew-symmetric contribution in the computations, we employ a tensor identity that naturally symmetrises the second pair of feet of the elasticity tensor. We demonstrated the validity and robustness of the implementation of the user-defined material based on this tensor representation by simulating a benchmark problem consisting in biaxial tests of porcine and human atrial tissue, with material properties taken from previously performed experiments. We compared the results obtained by means of our user-defined material and those obtained through an equivalent built-in material, and obtained identical results.

  1. Laser flash photolysis generation and kinetic studies of porphyrin-manganese-oxo intermediates. Rate constants for oxidations effected by porphyrin-Mn(V)-oxo species and apparent disproportionation equilibrium constants for porphyrin-Mn(IV)-oxo species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Horner, John H; Newcomb, Martin

    2005-05-11

    Porphyrin-manganese(V)-oxo and porphyrin-manganese(IV)-oxo species were produced in organic solvents by laser flash photolysis (LFP) of the corresponding porphyrin-manganese(III) perchlorate and chlorate complexes, respectively, permitting direct kinetic studies. The porphyrin systems studied were 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (TPFPP), and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-methylpyridinium)porphyrin (TMPyP). The order of reactivity for (porphyrin)Mn(V)(O) derivatives in self-decay reactions in acetonitrile and in oxidations of substrates was (TPFPP) > (TMPyP) > (TPP). Representative rate constants for reaction of (TPFPP)Mn(V)(O) in acetonitrile are k = 6.1 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for cis-stilbene and k = 1.4 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for diphenylmethane, and the kinetic isotope effect in oxidation of ethylbenzene and ethylbenzene-d(10) is k(H)/k(D) = 2.3. Competitive oxidation reactions conducted under catalytic conditions display approximately the same relative rate constants as were found in the LFP studies of (porphyrin)Mn(V)(O) derivatives. The apparent rate constants for reactions of (porphyrin)Mn(IV)(O) species show inverted reactivity order with (TPFPP) < (TMPyP) < (TPP) in reactions with cis-stilbene, triphenylamine, and triphenylphosphine. The inverted reactivity results because (porphyrin)Mn(IV)(O) disproportionates to (porphyrin)Mn(III)X and (porphyrin)Mn(V)(O), which is the primary oxidant, and the equilibrium constants for disproportionation of (porphyrin)Mn(IV)(O) are in the order (TPFPP) < (TMPyP) < (TPP). The fast comproportionation reaction of (TPFPP)Mn(V)(O) with (TPFPP)Mn(III)Cl to give (TPFPP)Mn(IV)(O) (k = 5 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)) and disproportionation reaction of (TPP)Mn(IV)(O) to give (TPP)Mn(V)(O) and (TPP)Mn(III)X (k approximately 2.5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) were observed. The relative populations of (porphyrin)Mn(V)(O) and (porphyrin)Mn(IV)(O) were determined from the ratios of observed rate constants for

  2. Comparison of experimental and calculated attachment rate constants for CFCl3 and CCl4 in the temperature range 294-500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.; Crompton, R. W.; Cheung, B.

    1989-01-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections and rate constants have been measured and calculated for the dissociative attachment processes e + CFCl3 - Cl(-) + CFCl2 and e + CCl4 - Cl(-) + CCl3. Good agreement over the electron-energy range 1-200 meV is found in energy dependence between present calculated cross sections and experimental cross sections at 300 K. The same calculation, with suitable adjustment of thermal populations, was used to calculate electron-attachment rate constants in the range 50-600 K. Experimental rate constants for CFCl3 and CCl4 were measured at temperatures of 294, 404, and 496 K (CFCl3) and 294, 400, and 500 K (CCl4) using the Cavalleri electron-density sampling method. Good agreement is found between present measurements and calculations, poor agreement with flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe (FALP) data in CFCl3 at the higher temperatures, and reasonable agreement with FALP data for CCl4.

  3. One electron oxidation potential as a predictor of rate constants of N-containing compounds with carbonate radical and triplet excited state organic matter.

    PubMed

    Arnold, William A

    2014-04-01

    Photo-generated transient species, such as the carbonate radical and triplet excited state natural organic matter, mediate the oxidation of pollutants in various sunlit or artificially irradiated systems. In this work, one-electron oxidation potentials for 70 nitrogen-containing compounds were computed, and literature data were used to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the second order reaction rate constants with these two oxidants. For carbonate radical, separate QSARs were necessary for compounds with and without resonance stabilization of the resulting radical, and predicted rate constants were, on average, within a factor of three of experimental values. With the limited data set available, results suggest that one-electron oxidation potential is also a viable descriptor variable for predictions of rate constants with triplet excited states.

  4. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-17

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency regimes for the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term does not significantly impact the rate constants derived using the cumulant expansion approach in any of the regimes studied. The effects of the quadratic term may become significant when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant, however, particularly at high temperatures and for proton transfer interfaces with extremely soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with extraordinarily weak hydrogen bonds. Even with the thermal averaging procedure, the effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances, and the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer in chemical and biological processes. We are grateful for support from National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (applications to enzymes) and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

  5. Inclusion of Respiratory Frequency Information in Heart Rate Variability Analysis for Stress Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Alberto; Lazaro, Jesus; Gil, Eduardo; Arza, Adriana; Garzon, Jorge Mario; Lopez-Anton, Raul; de la Camara, Concepcion; Laguna, Pablo; Aguilo, Jordi; Bailon, Raquel

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory rate and heart rate variability (HRV) are studied as stress markers in a database of young healthy volunteers subjected to acute emotional stress, induced by a modification of the Trier Social Stress Test. First, instantaneous frequency domain HRV parameters are computed using time-frequency analysis in the classical bands. Then, the respiratory rate is estimated and this information is included in HRV analysis in two ways: 1) redefining the high-frequency (HF) band to be centered at respiratory frequency; 2) excluding from the analysis those instants where respiratory frequency falls within the low-frequency (LF) band. Classical frequency domain HRV indices scarcely show statistical differences during stress. However, when including respiratory frequency information in HRV analysis, the normalized LF power as well as the LF/HF ratio significantly increase during stress ( p-value 0.05 according to the Wilcoxon test), revealing higher sympathetic dominance. The LF power increases during stress, only being significantly different in a stress anticipation stage, while the HF power decreases during stress, only being significantly different during the stress task demanding attention. Our results support that joint analysis of respiration and HRV obtains a more reliable characterization of autonomic nervous response to stress. In addition, the respiratory rate is observed to be higher and less stable during stress than during relax ( p-value 0.05 according to the Wilcoxon test) being the most discriminative index for stress stratification (AUC = 88.2 % ).

  6. Physical activity, heart rate variability-based stress and recovery, and subjective stress during a 9-month study period.

    PubMed

    Föhr, T; Tolvanen, A; Myllymäki, T; Järvelä-Reijonen, E; Peuhkuri, K; Rantala, S; Kolehmainen, M; Korpela, R; Lappalainen, R; Ermes, M; Puttonen, S; Rusko, H; Kujala, U M

    2016-03-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and objective heart rate variability (HRV)-based stress and recovery with subjective stress in a longitudinal setting. Working-age participants (n = 221; 185 women, 36 men) were overweight (body mass index, 25.3-40.1 kg/m(2) ) and psychologically distressed (≥3/12 points on the General Health Questionnaire). Objective stress and recovery were based on HRV recordings over 1-3 work days. Subjective stress was assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale and PA level with a questionnaire. Data were collected at three time points: baseline, 10 weeks post intervention, and at the 36-week follow-up. We adopted a latent growth model to investigate the initial level and change in PA, objective stress and recovery, and subjective stress at the three measurement time points. The results showed that initial levels of PA (P < 0.001) and objective stress (P = 0.001) and recovery (P < 0.01) were associated with the change in subjective stress. The results persisted after adjustment for intervention group. The present results suggest that high PA and objectively assessed low stress and good recovery have positive effects on changes in subjective stress in the long-term.

  7. Investigation of constant voltage off-state stress on Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jie; Stoffels, Steve; Lenci, Silvia; Wu, Tian-Li; Ronchi, Nicolò; You, Shuzhen; Bakeroot, Benoit; Groeseneken, Guido; Decoutere, Stefaan

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we perform an in-depth analysis of electron-trapping in AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes under constant voltage (VAC = -100 V) off-state stress conditions. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the diode after stressing show a leakage reduction and on-state degradation due to electron-trapping occurring in the vicinity of the Schottky contact. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements confirm an increase of the barrier height and the on-resistance of the stressed device. Furthermore, the on-resistance increase has been studied with different temperatures and stressing times. By TCAD simulations, a lateral extension of the “trapped region” at the AlGaN/Si3N4 interface has been visualized and can qualitatively explain the phenomenon of higher on-resistance increase at higher temperatures.

  8. Transient and residual stresses in dental porcelains as affected by cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, K; Tesk, J A

    1989-06-01

    The development of either transient or residual stress in a slab of dental porcelain during cooling was simulated by use of a super-computer. The temperature dependences of the elastic modulus, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the shear viscosity, and the cooling rate dependence of the glass transition temperature, Tg, were considered in this calculation. Internal stress and viscoelastic creep were computed for several cooling rates. Calculated results display stress profiles which agree reasonably well with reported measured profiles in quenched, tempered glasses. The calculated residual surface stress, sigma, could be fit by the following empirical formula, sigma = kl2(q/q0)n, q is the cooling rate, q0 is a reference cooling rate and l is the half-thickness of the porcelain. The method by which residual stress develops is also discussed. This discussion suggests a method for strengthening of the porcelain by the development of high-compressive residual stress on the surface.

  9. Non-Newtonian Rheology of Calc-Alkaline Obsidian at High Stresses and Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, D. B.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cordonnier, B.; Mueller, S.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of the Non-Newtonian regime at high stress and strain rates has been reported for a variety of silicate melts subject to different tests but never for natural samples bearing their original contents of magmatic water and microlite content. Here, we used a unique high-load (<500 MPa), high-temperature (<1300°C) deformation apparatus for studying in situ the Non-Newtonian flow behaviour of magmas. A series of experiments were performed on calc-alkaline obsidian lavas from Lipari (Italy), Iceland, and Cougar Creek Dome, Yellowstone (USA), and compared to depolymerized melt (NIST 710). The samples were heated to relevant magmatic effusive temperatures that yielded similar relaxation timescales and were deformed under constant stress in the range of 100 to 200 MPa. The onset of the Non-Newtonian flow regime, registered by a decreasing viscosity with time (at fixed strain rate), occurred at 120 MPa for the depolymerized melt. The Non-Newtonian flow behavior was observed up to pressures as high as approx. 180 MPa, where the samples fragmented readily (hot cracking). In contrast, all three calc-alkaline rhyolitic melt remained in a Newtonian regime up to approx. 160 MPa. The window of Non-Newtonian behavior was, however, very narrow and most samples fragmented instantaneously in the attempt of pursuing the deformation. If this is not an experimental artefact, we conclude that modeling of the flow behaviour of a ascending crystal- and bubble-free calc-alkaline rhyolitic dome magma can be performed using a simple Newtonian fluid approximation. Thus the Non-Arrhenian model of Hess and Dingwell (1996) for the compositional and temperature dependence of viscosity could be applied.

  10. Salivary cortisol, heart rate, electrodermal activity and subjective stress responses to the Mannheim Multicomponent Stress Test (MMST).

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Tatyana; Schmahl, Christian; Wüst, Stefan; Bohus, Martin

    2012-06-30

    The availability of effective laboratory paradigms for inducing psychological stress is an important requirement for experimental stress research. Reliable protocols are scarce, usually laborious and manpower-intensive. In order to develop an economical, easily applicable standardized stress protocol, we have recently tailored the Mannheim Multicomponent Stress Test (MMST). This test has been shown to induce relatively high stress responses without focusing on social-evaluative components. In this study we evaluated changes in electrodermal activity and salivary cortisol in response to the MMST. The MMST simultaneously combines cognitive (mental arithmetic), emotional (affective pictures), acoustic (white noise) and motivational stressors (loss of money). This study comprised two independent experiments. For experiment 1, 80 female subjects were recruited; 30 subjects (15 females) participated in experiment 2. Significant changes in electrodermal activity and salivary cortisol levels in response to MMST exposure were found. Subjective stress and heart rate responses were significantly increased in both experiments. These results indicate that the MMST is an economical stress paradigm which is also applicable in larger cohorts or multicenter studies for investigating stress reactions. As social-evaluative threat is not the main stress component of the MMST, this procedure represents a useful and complementary alternative to other established stress protocols.

  11. USING IN VIVO GAS UPDATE STUDIES TO ESTIMATE METABOLIC RATE CONSTANTS FOR CCL CHEMICALS: 1,1-DICHLOROPROPANE AND 2,2-DICHLOROPROPANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    USING IN VIVO GAS UPTAKE STUDIES TO ESTIMATE METABOLIC RATE CONSTANTS FOR CCL CHEMICALS: 1,1-DICHLOROPROPENE AND 2,2-DICHLOROPROPANE.
    Mitchell, C T, Evans, M V, Kenyon, E M. NHEERL, U.S. EPA, ORD, ETD, RTP, NC

    The Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 required ...

  12. Room-temperature and temperature-dependent QSRR modelling for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constants of organic chemicals using ensemble learning methods.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Mohan, D; Singh, K P

    2016-07-01

    Experimental determinations of the rate constants of the reaction of NO3 with a large number of organic chemicals are tedious, and time and resource intensive; and the development of computational methods has widely been advocated. In this study, we have developed room-temperature (298 K) and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models based on the ensemble learning approaches (decision tree forest (DTF) and decision treeboost (DTB)) for predicting the rate constant of the reaction of NO3 radicals with diverse organic chemicals, under OECD guidelines. Predictive powers of the developed models were established in terms of statistical coefficients. In the test phase, the QSRR models yielded a correlation (r(2)) of >0.94 between experimental and predicted rate constants. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined. An attempt has been made to provide the mechanistic interpretation of the selected features for QSRR development. The proposed QSRR models outperformed the previous reports, and the temperature-dependent models offered a much wider applicability domain. This is the first report presenting a temperature-dependent QSRR model for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constant at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards NO3 radicals in the atmosphere, hence, their persistence and exposure risk assessment.

  13. Improved Shock Tube Measurement of the CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar Rate Constant using UV Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CH3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-07-21

    We report an improved measurement for the rate constant of methane dissociation in argon (CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar) behind reflected shock waves. The experiment was conducted using a sub-parts per million sensitivity CH3 diagnostic recently developed in our laboratory based on ultraviolet cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of this diagnostic allowed for measurements of quantitatively resolved CH3 time histories during the initial stage of CH4 pyrolysis, where the reaction system is clean and free from influences of secondary reactions and temperature change. This high sensitivity also allowed extension of our measurement range to much lower temperatures (<1500 K). The current-reflected shock measurements were performed at temperatures between 1487 and 1866 K and pressures near 1.7 atm, resulting in the following Arrhenius rate constant expression for the title reaction: k(1.7 atm) = 3.7 × 10(16) exp(-42 200 K/T) cm(3)/mol·s, with a 2σ uncertainty factor of 1.25. The current data are in good consensus with various theoretical and review studies, but at the low temperature end they suggest a slightly higher (up to 35%) rate constant compared to these previous results. A re-evaluation of previous and current experimental data in the falloff region was also performed, yielding updated expressions for both the low-pressure limit and the high-pressure limit rate constants and improved agreement with all existing data.

  14. Quantum Mechanical Enhancement of Rate Constants and Kinetic Isotope Effects for Water-Mediated Proton Transfer in a Model Biological System.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, James W; Schultz, Chase P

    2017-02-02

    Biological systems have been shown to shuttle excess protons long distances by taking advantage of tightly organized hydrogen-bonded water bridges in hydrophobic protein cavities, and similar effects have been observed in carbon nanotubes. In this theoretical study we investigate how quantum effects of proton motion impact the rate constants for charge transfer in a model system consisting of a donor and acceptor molecule separated by a single-molecule water bridge. We calculate quantum and classical rate constants for the transfer of an excess proton over two possible paths, one with an H3O(+) intermediate, and one with an OH(-) intermediate. Quantum effects are included through ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations. We observe a 4-fold enhancement of reaction rate constants due to proton tunneling at temperatures between 280 and 320 K, as shown by transmission coefficient calculations. Deuteration of the donor and acceptor proton are shown to decrease the reaction rate constant by a factor of 50, and this is another indicator that tunneling plays an important role in this proton transfer mechanism.

  15. Collisional excitation of CO by H2O - An astrophysicist's guide to obtaining rate constants from coherent anti-Stokes Raman line shape data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon

    1993-01-01

    Rate constants for excitation of CO by collisions with H2O are needed to understand recent observations of comet spectra. These collision rates are closely related to spectral line shape parameters, especially those for Raman Q-branch spectra. Because such spectra have become quite important for thermometry applications, much effort has been invested in understanding this process. Although it is not generally possible to extract state-to-state rate constants directly from the data as there are too many unknowns, if the matrix of state-to-state rates can be expressed in terms of a rate-law model which depends only on rotational quantum numbers plus a few parameters, the parameters can be determined from the data; this has been done with some success for many systems, especially those relevant to combustion processes. Although such an analysis has not yet been done for CO-H2O, this system is expected to behave similarly to N2-H2O which has been well studies; modifications of parameters for the latter system are suggested which should provide a reasonable description of rate constants for the former.

  16. Carcass and meat quality traits of chickens fed diets concurrently supplemented with vitamins C and E under constant heat stress.

    PubMed

    Zeferino, C P; Komiyama, C M; Pelícia, V C; Fascina, V B; Aoyagi, M M; Coutinho, L L; Sartori, J R; Moura, A S A M T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a diet supplemented simultaneously with vitamins C and E would alleviate the negative effects of heat stress, applied between 28 and 42 days of age, on performance, carcass and meat quality traits of broiler chickens. A total of 384 male broiler chickens were assigned to a completely randomized design, with a 2×3 factorial arrangement (diet with or without vitamin supplementation and two ambient temperatures plus a pair-feeding group) and 16 replicates. Chickens were kept in thermoneutral conditions up to 28 days of age. They were then housed in groups of four per cage, in three environmentally controlled chambers: two thermoneutral (22.5 and 22.6°C) and one for heat stress (32°C). Half the chickens were fed a diet supplemented with vitamins C (257 to 288 mg/kg) and E (93 to 109 mg/kg). In the thermoneutral chambers, half of the chickens were pair-fed to heat stressed chickens, receiving each day the average feed intake recorded in the heat stress chamber in the previous day. Meat physical quality analyses were performed on the pectoralis major muscle. No ambient temperature×diet supplementation interaction effects were detected on performance, carcass, or meat quality traits. The supplemented diet resulted in lower growth performance, attributed either to a carry-over effect of the lower initial BW, or to a possible catabolic effect of vitamins C and E when supplemented simultaneously at high levels. Heat stress reduced slaughter and carcass weights, average daily gain and feed intake, and increased feed conversion. Growth performance of pair-fed chickens was similar to that of heat stressed chickens. Exposure to heat stress increased carcass and abdominal fat percentages, but reduced breast, liver and heart percentages. Pair-fed chickens showed the lowest fat percentage and their breast percentage was similar to controls. Heat stress increased meat pH and negatively affected meat color and cooking loss. In pair

  17. Ratiometric analysis in hyperpolarized NMR (I): test of the two-site exchange model and the quantification of reaction rate constants.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin Z; Kadlececk, Stephen; Xu, He N; Daye, Dania; Pullinger, Benjamin; Profka, Harrilla; Chodosh, Lewis; Rizi, Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for the analysis of in vivo hyperpolarized (13) C NMR data from the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction usually make assumptions on the stability of rate constants and/or the validity of the two-site exchange model. In this study, we developed a framework to test the validity of the assumption of stable reaction rate constants and the two-site exchange model in vivo via ratiometric fitting of the time courses of the signal ratio L(t)/P(t). Our analysis provided evidence that the LDH enzymatic kinetics observed by hyperpolarized NMR are in near-equilibrium and satisfy the two-site exchange model for only a specific time window. In addition, we quantified both the forward and reverse exchange rate constants of the LDH reaction for the transgenic and mouse xenograft models of breast cancer using the ratio fitting method developed, which includes only two modeling parameters and is less sensitive to the influence of instrument settings/protocols, such as flip angles, degree of polarization and tracer dosage. We further compared the ratio fitting method with a conventional two-site exchange modeling method, i.e. the differential equation fitting method, using both the experimental and simulated hyperpolarized NMR data. The ratio fitting method appeared to fit better than the differential equation fitting method for the reverse rate constant on the mouse tumor data, with less relative errors on average, whereas the differential equation fitting method also resulted in a negative reverse rate constant for one tumor. The simulation results indicated that the accuracy of both methods depends on the width of the transport function, noise level and rate constant ratio; one method may be more accurate than the other based on the experimental/biological conditions aforementioned. We were able to categorize our tumor models into specific conditions of the computer simulation and to estimate the errors of rate quantification. We also discussed possible

  18. Anger responses to psychosocial stress predict heart rate and cortisol stress responses in men but not women.

    PubMed

    Lupis, Sarah B; Lerman, Michelle; Wolf, Jutta M

    2014-11-01

    While previous research has suggested that anger and fear responses to stress are linked to distinct sympathetic nervous system (SNS) stress responses, little is known about how these emotions predict hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity. Further, earlier research primarily relied on retrospective self-report of emotion. The current study aimed at addressing both issues in male and female individuals by assessing the role of anger and fear in predicting heart rate and cortisol stress responses using both self-report and facial coding analysis to assess emotion responses. We exposed 32 healthy students (18 female; 19.6±1.7 yr) to an acute psychosocial stress paradigm (TSST) and measured heart rate and salivary cortisol levels throughout the protocol. Anger and fear before and after stress exposure was assessed by self-report, and video recordings of the TSST were assessed by a certified facial coder to determine emotion expression (FACS). Self-reported emotions and emotion expressions did not correlate (all p>.23). Increases in self-reported fear predicted blunted cortisol responses in men (β=0.41, p=.04). Also for men, longer durations of anger expression predicted exaggerated cortisol responses (β=0.67 p=.004), and more anger incidences predicted exaggerated cortisol and heart rate responses (β=0.51, p=.033; β=0.46, p=.066, resp.). Anger and fear did not predict SNS or HPA activity for females (all p>.23). The current differential self-report and facial coding findings support the use of multiple modes of emotion assessment. Particularly, FACS but not self-report revealed a robust anger-stress association that could have important downstream health effects for men. For women, future research may clarify the role of other emotions, such as self-conscious expressions of shame, for physiological stress responses. A better understanding of the emotion-stress link may contribute to behavioral interventions targeting health-promoting ways of

  19. Smoluchowski Equations for Agglomeration in Conditions of Variable Temperature and Pressure and a New Scaling of Rate Constants: Application to Nozzle-Beam Expansion.

    PubMed

    Chaiken, J; Goodisman, J; Kornilov, O

    2015-07-09

    The Smoluchowski equations provide a rigorous and efficient means for including multiple kinetic pathways when modeling coalescence growth systems. Originally written for a constant temperature and volume system, the equations must be modified if temperature and pressure vary during the coalescence time. In this paper, the equations are generalized, and adaptations appropriate to the situation presented by supersonic nozzle beam expansions are described. Given rate constants for all the cluster-cluster reactions, solution of the Smoluchowski equations would yield the abundances of clusters of all sizes at all times. This is unlikely, but we show that if these rate constants scale with the sizes of the reacting partners, the asymptotic (large size and large time) form of the cluster size distribution can be predicted. Experimentally determined distributions for He fit the predicted asymptotic distribution very well. Deviations between predicted and observed distributions allow identification of special cluster sizes that is, magic numbers. Furthermore, fitting an observed distribution to the theoretical form yields the base agglomeration cross section, from which all cluster-cluster rate constants may be obtained by scaling. Comparing the base cross section to measures of size and reactivity gives information about the coalescence process.

  20. Evaluation of scavenging rate constants of DOPA and tyrosine enantiomers against multiple reactive oxygen species and methyl radical as measured with ESR trapping method.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Takemoto, Tsubasa

    2015-04-15

    The scavenging rates of DOPA (dl- and l-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine) and Tyr (tyrosine (dl- and l-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)alanine)) against five reactive oxygen species (ROS) and methyl radical were measured with the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method and the scavenging rate constants of DOPA and Tyr were determined. The scavenging rate constants for multiple active species increased in the order of O2(-)

  1. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  2. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  3. Rate-and-State Southern California Earthquake Forecasts: Resolving Stress Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, A. E.; Jackson, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    In previous studies, we pseudo-prospectively evaluated time-dependent Coulomb stress earthquake forecasts, based on rate-and-state friction (Toda and Enescu, 2011 and Dieterich, 1996), against an ETAS null hypothesis (Zhuang et al., 2002). At the 95% confidence interval, we found that the stress-based forecast failed to outperform the ETAS forecast during the first eight weeks following the 10/16/1999 Hector Mine earthquake, in both earthquake number and spatial distribution. The rate-and-state forecast was most effective in forecasting far-field events (earthquakes occurring at least 50km away from modeled active faults). Near active faults, where most aftershocks occurred, stress singularities arising from modeled fault section boundaries obscured the Coulomb stress field. In addition to yielding physically unrealistic stress quantities, the stress singularities arising from the slip model often failed to indicate potential fault asperity locations inferred from aftershock distributions. Here, we test the effects of these stress singularities on the rate-and-state forecast's effectiveness, as well as mitigate stress uncertainties near active faults. We decrease the area significantly impacted by stress singularities by increasing the number of fault patches and introducing tapered slip at fault section boundaries, representing displacement as a high-resolution step function. Using recent seismicity distributions to relocate fault asperities, we also invert seismicity for a fault displacement model with higher resolution than the original slip distribution, where areas of positive static Coulomb stress change coincide with earthquake locations.

  4. Oxidations of p-alkoxyacylanilides catalyzed by human cytochrome P450 1A2: structure-activity relationships and simulation of rate constants of individual steps in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yun, C H; Miller, G P; Guengerich, F P

    2001-04-10

    Human cytochrome P450 (P450) 1A2 is involved in the oxidation of many important drugs and carcinogens. The prototype substrate phenacetin is oxidized to an acetol as well as the O-dealkylation product [Yun, C.-H., Miller, G. P., and Guengerich, F. P. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 11319-11329]. In an effort to improve rates of catalysis of P450 1A2 enzymes, we considered a set of p-alkoxyacylanilide analogues of phenacetin and found that variations in the O-alkyl and N-acyl substituents altered the rates of the two oxidation reactions and the ratio of acetol/phenol products. Moving one methylene group of phenacetin from the O-alkyl group to the N-acyl moiety increased rates of both oxidations approximately 5-fold and improved the coupling efficiency (oxidation products formed/NADPH consumed) from 6% to 38%. Noncompetitive kinetic deuterium isotope effects of 2-3 were measured for all O-dealkylation reactions examined with wild-type P450 1A2 and the E225I mutant, which has 6-fold higher activity. A trend of decreasing kinetic deuterium isotope effect for E225I > wild-type > mutant D320A was observed for O-demethylation of p-methoxyacetanilide, which follows the trend for k(cat). The set of O-dealkylation and acetol formation results for wild-type P450 1A2 and the E225I mutant with several of the protiated and deuterated substrates were fit to a model developed for the basic catalytic cycle and a set of microscopic rate constants in which the only variable was the rate of product formation (substrate oxygenation, including hydrogen abstraction). In this model, k(cat) is considerably less than any of the microscopic rate constants and is affected by several individual rate constants, including the rate of formation of the oxygenating species, the rate of substrate oxidation by the oxygenating species, and the rates of generation of reduced oxygen species (H(2)O(2), H(2)O). This analysis of the effects of the individual rate constants provides a framework for consideration of

  5. COMPARISON OF IN VIVO DERIVED AND SCALED IN VITRO METABOLIC RATE CONSTANTS FOR SOME VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models is directly related to the accuracy of the metabolic rate parameters used as model inputs. When metabolic rate parameters derived from in vivo experiments are unavailable, they can be estimated from in vitro d...

  6. Effects of loading on the growth rates of deep stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.

    1990-08-01

    The goal of this research program was to determine the effects of loading on growth of stress-corrosion cracks (SCC) in line pipe steel and whether special loading procedures could actually inhibit crack growth. Of particular interest was the effect of hydrostatic retesting on the subsequent growth of existing cracks. The growth rate experiments showed that the slow-strain rate loading could successfully nucleate a group of fine cracks with depths up to 0.025 inches (0.64 mm). However, the subsequent cyclic loading at typical operating stress levels (lower than experienced during the slow- strain rate loading) produced minimal crack growth and stopped soon after the test was started. The limited growth is believed to be a real phenomenon which means this is not a suitable procedure for the measurement of average crack growth rates. These experiments indicate that cracks grown at high stress (as in the slow-strain rate phase) do not readily propagate at lower stress levels. This may be because of crack closure (compressive crack tip residual stress) induced by the initial higher stress level. If that is true, then hydrostatic retests could inhibit the growth of existing stress-corrosion cracks, especially if the hydrostatic tests are conducted at high stress levels. 15 figures, 3 tabs.

  7. Why earthquakes correlate weakly with the solid Earth tides: Effects of periodic stress on the rate and probability of earthquake occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Lockner, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    We provide an explanation why earthquake occurrence does not correlate well with the daily solid Earth tides. The explanation is derived from analysis of laboratory experiments in which faults are loaded to quasiperiodic failure by the combined action of a constant stressing rate, intended to simulate tectonic loading, and a small sinusoidal stress, analogous to the Earth tides. Event populations whose failure times correlate with the oscillating stress show two modes of response; the response mode depends on the stressing frequency. Correlation that is consistent with stress threshold failure models, e.g., Coulomb failure, results when the period of stress oscillation exceeds a characteristic time tn; the degree of correlation between failure time and the phase of the driving stress depends on the amplitude and frequency of the stress oscillation and on the stressing rate. When the period of the oscillating stress is less than tn, the correlation is not consistent with threshold failure models, and much higher stress amplitudes are required to induce detectable correlation with the oscillating stress. The physical interpretation of tn is the duration of failure nucleation. Behavior at the higher frequencies is consistent with a second-order dependence of the fault strength on sliding rate which determines the duration of nucleation and damps the response to stress change at frequencies greater than 1/tn. Simple extrapolation of these results to the Earth suggests a very weak correlation of earthquakes with the daily Earth tides, one that would require >13,000 earthquakes to detect. On the basis of our experiments and analysis, the absence of definitive daily triggering of earthquakes by the Earth tides requires that for earthquakes, tn exceeds the daily tidal period. The experiments suggest that the minimum typical duration of earthquake nucleation on the San Andreas fault system is ???1 year.

  8. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  9. Why Do Older Men Report Low Stress Ratings? Findings from the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeninger, Daria K.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Aldwin, Carolyn M.; Spiro, Avron, III

    2009-01-01

    We examined the interplay between three explanatory hypotheses for why older adults appear to rate their problems as less stressful than do younger adults: age-related differences in personality, in types of problems, and in the appraisal process--specifically, the number of primary stress appraisals. A sample of 1,054 men from the Normative Aging…

  10. New ab initio potential energy surface for BrH2 and rate constants for the H + HBr → H2 + Br abstraction reaction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Xie, Changjian; Xie, Daiqian

    2011-03-21

    A global potential energy surface (PES) for the electronic ground state of the BrH(2) system was constructed based on the multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) method including the Davidson's correction using a large basis set. In addition, the spin-orbit correction were computed using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and the unperturbed MRCI wavefunctions in the Br + H(2) channel and the transition state region. Adding the correction to the ground state potential, the lowest spin-orbit correlated adiabatic potential was obtained. The characters of the new potential are discussed. Accurate initial state specified rate constants for the H + HBr → H(2) + Br abstraction reaction were calculated using a time-dependent wave packet method. The predicted rate constants were found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental values and much better than those obtained from a previous PES.

  11. Absolute rate constant of the reaction OH + H2O2 yields HO2 + H2O from 245 to 423 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide was measured by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at total pressure between 1 and 4 torr. At 298 K the result is (1.64 + or - 0.32) x 10 to the -12th cu cm/molecule s. The observed rate constant is independent of pressure, surface-to-volume ratio, the addition of vibrational quenchers, and the source of OH. The temperature dependence has also been determined between 245 and 423 K; the resulting Arrhenius expression is k cu cm/molecule s is equal to (2.51 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the -12th exp(-126 + or - 76/T).

  12. Photochemistry of UV-excited trifluoroacetylacetone and hexafluoroacetylacetone II: Quantum yield and rate constants of hydrogen fluoride photoelimination forming fluorinated methylfuranones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disselkoen, Kyle R.; Alsum, Joel R.; Thielke, Timothy A.; Muyskens, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    The photochemistry of gas-phase 1,1,1-trifluoroacetylacetone (TFAA) and 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFAA) excited with ultraviolet light involves a significant photoelimination channel producing HF and difluoromethylfuranone or pentafluoromethylfuranone, respectively. We report collisional self-quenching of the experimentally-determined relative quantum yield, and determine rate constants of 0.27 ± 0.03 and 0.33 ± 0.04 μs-1, for HFAA and TFAA respectively. A strong collision model is consistent with the observed quenching. The data suggest that this elimination is the primary photochemical fate at low pressure in both cases. The TFAA rate constant is larger than that for HFAA, in spite of TFAA having half as many fluorine atoms as HFAA.

  13. The chemistry of bromine in the stratosphere: Influence of a new rate constant for the reaction BrO + HO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirre, Michel; Marceau, Francois J.; Lebras, Georges; Maguin, Francoise; Poulet, Gille; Ramaroson, Radiela

    1994-01-01

    The impact of new laboratory data for the reaction BrO + HO2 yields HOBr + O2 in the depletion of global stratospheric ozone has been estimated using a one-dimensional photochemical model taking into account the heterogeneous reaction on sulphate aerosols which converts N2O5 into HNO3. Assuring an aerosol loading 2 times as large as the 'background' and a reaction probability of 0.1 for the above heterogeneous reaction, the 6 fold increase in the measured rate constant for the reaction of BrO with HO2 increases the computed depletion of global ozone produced by 20 ppt of total bromine from 2.01 percent to 2.36 percent. The use of the higher rate constant increases the HOBr mixing ratio and makes the bromine partitioning and the ozone depletion very sensitive to the branching ratio of the potential channel forming HBr in the BrO + HO2 reaction.

  14. Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability features for real-life stress detection. Case study: students under stress due to university examination

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study investigates the variations of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) due to a real-life stressor and proposes a classifier based on nonlinear features of HRV for automatic stress detection. Methods 42 students volunteered to participate to the study about HRV and stress. For each student, two recordings were performed: one during an on-going university examination, assumed as a real-life stressor, and one after holidays. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed by using Poincaré Plot, Approximate Entropy, Correlation dimension, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, Recurrence Plot. For statistical comparison, we adopted the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and for development of a classifier we adopted the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Results Almost all HRV features measuring heart rate complexity were significantly decreased in the stress session. LDA generated a simple classifier based on the two Poincaré Plot parameters and Approximate Entropy, which enables stress detection with a total classification accuracy, a sensitivity and a specificity rate of 90%, 86%, and 95% respectively. Conclusions The results of the current study suggest that nonlinear HRV analysis using short term ECG recording could be effective in automatically detecting real-life stress condition, such as a university examination. PMID:22059697

  15. A study on the influence of fast amide exchange on the accuracy of (15)N relaxation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Jurt, Simon; Zerbe, Oliver

    2012-12-01

    (15)N relaxation rates of amide moieties provide insight both into global as well as local backbone dynamics of peptides and proteins. As the differences in the relaxation rates in general are small, their accurate determination is of prime importance. One potential source of error is fast amide exchange. It is well known that in its presence the effects of saturation transfer and H/D exchange may result in erroneous apparent relaxation rates R (1) and R (2). Here, the extent of these errors is rigorously examined. Theoretical considerations reveal that even when saturation effects are absent, H/D exchange will easily result in significant deviations from the true values. In particular overestimations of up to 10 % in R (1) and up to 5 % in R (2) are observed. An alternative scheme for fitting the relaxation data to the corresponding exponentials is presented that in the best cases not only delivers more accurate relaxation rates but also allows extracting estimates for the exchange rates. The theoretical computations were tested and verified for the case of ubiquitin.

  16. Energy disposal and thermal rate constants for the OH + HBr and OH + DBr reactions: quasiclassical trajectory calculations on an accurate potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G S; Ornellas, Fernando R; Bowman, Joel M

    2014-12-26

    We report reaction cross sections, energy disposal, and rate constants for the OH + HBr → Br + H2O and OH + DBr → Br + HDO reactions from quasiclassical trajectory calculations using an ab initio potential energy surface [ de Oliveira-Filho , A. G. S. ; Ornellas , F. R. ; Bowman , J. M. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2014 , 5 , 706 - 712 ]. Comparison with available experiments are made and generally show good agreement.

  17. A subsequent fit of time series and amplitude histogram of patch-clamp records reveals rate constants up to 1 per microsecond.

    PubMed

    Schröder, I; Harlfinger, P; Huth, T; Hansen, U P

    2005-01-01

    Fast gating in time series of patch-clamp current demands powerful tools to reveal the rate constants of the adequate Hidden Markov model. Here, two approaches are presented to improve the temporal resolution of the direct fit of the time series. First, the prediction algorithm is extended to include intermediate currents between the nominal levels as caused by the anti-aliasing filter. This approach can reveal rate constants that are about 4 times higher than the corner frequency of the anti-aliasing filter. However, this approach is restricted to time series with very low noise. Second, the direct fit of the time series is combined with a beta fit, i.e., a fit of the deviations of the amplitude histogram from the Gaussian distribution. Since the "theoretical" amplitude histograms for higher-order Bessel filters cannot be calculated by analytical tools, they are generated from simulated time series. In a first approach, a simultaneous fit of the time series and of the Beta fit is tested. This simultaneous fit, however, inherits the drawbacks of both approaches, not the benefits. More successful is a subsequent fit: The fit of the time series yields a set of rate constants. The subsequent Beta fit uses the slow rate constants of the fit of the time series as fixed parameters and the optimization algorithm is restricted to the fast ones. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by means of time series obtained from simulation and from the dominant K+ channel in Chara. This shows that temporal resolution can reach the microsecond range.

  18. Electron Attachment to POCl3: Measurement and Theoretical Analysis of Rate Constants and Branching Ratios as a Function of Gas Pressure and Temperature, Electron Temperature, and Electron Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-31

    the pulse along the flow tube axis variation in the total rate constant with temperature.2 In con- with the Langmuir probe . In the electron-He+-Ar...calculations 5 reported in Ref. 4 and should cylindrical Langmuir probe . The plasma velocity is measured be reliable within ±0.1 eV. Electron attachment...increasing temperature decreased diffusion. the amount of parent ion substantially in flowing - afterglow In the present work, POCI3 gas was added

  19. Upper limit on the rate constant for isotope exchange between molecular oxygen and ozone at 298 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Morton, J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1987-01-01

    The gas phase bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between molecular oxygen and ozone has been investigated directly for the first time. Its rate coefficient is found to be less than 2 x 10 to the -25th cu cm/sec at 298 K, over six orders of magnitude below recent estimates. Much faster exchange was observed over condensed ozone at 77 K, suggesting isotopic scrambling is catalyzed under these conditions. The low rate coefficient implies that homogeneous exchange between ground state oxygen and ozone molecules cannot play a significant role in heavy ozone chemistry.

  20. Rough-to-smooth transition of an equilibrium neutral constant stress layer. [atmospheric flow over rough terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    A model is proposed for low-level atmospheric flows over terrains of changing roughness length, such as those found at the windward end of landing strips adjoining rough terrain. The proposed model is used to develop a prediction technique for calculating transition wind and shear-stress profiles in the region following surface roughness discontinuity. The model for the transition region comprises two layers: a logarithmic layer and a buffer layer. The flow is assumed to be steady, two-dimensional, and incompressible, with neutral hydrostatic stability. A diagram is presented for a typical wind profile in the transition region, obtained from the logarithmic and velocity defect profiles using shear stress calculated by relevant equations.

  1. Comparison of experimental and calculated attachment rate constants for CFCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/ in the temperature range 294--500 K

    SciTech Connect

    Orient, O.J.; Chutjian, A.; Crompton, R.W.; Cheung, B.

    1989-05-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections and rate constants have been measured and calculated for the dissociative attachment processes e+CFCl/sub 3/..-->..Cl/sup -/+CFCl/sub 2/ and e+CCl/sub 4/..-->..Cl/sup -/+CCl/sub 3/. Good agreement over the electron-energy range 1--200 meV is found in energy dependence between present calculated cross sections and experimental (krypton photoionization) cross sections at 300 K. The same calculation, with suitable adjustment of thermal populations, was used to calculate electron-attachment rate constants k(epsilon-c-bar) in the range 50--600 K. Experimental rate constants for CFCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/ were measured at temperatures of 294, 404, and 496 K (CFCl/sub 3/) and 294, 400, and 500 K (CCl/sub 4/) using the Cavalleri electron-density sampling method. Good agreement is found between present measurements and calculations, poor agreement with flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe (FALP) data in CFCl/sub 3/ at the higher temperatures, and reasonable agreement with FALP data for CCl/sub 4/.

  2. Rate constant for the reaction of NO sub 2 with sulfur(IV) over the pH range 5. 3-13

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, C.L.; Altstein, N.; Hule, R.E. )

    1988-05-01

    Rate constants have been determined for the reactions of NO{sub 2} with SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} and HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} in aqueous solutions. A pulse radiolysis apparatus with signal averaging, which has allowed us to monitor the decay of NO{sub 2} directly and to measure rate constants for the reaction of NO{sub 2} with SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} and HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} over the pH range 5.3-13. The rate constant increases from about 1.2 {times} 10{sup 7} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} near pH 5 to 2.9 {times} 10{sup 7} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at pH 13. The reaction appears to involve the formation of an intermediate complex that may undergo subsequent reaction with NO{sub 2} to yield the ultimate products or may react with other substrates present. The formation of a long-lived intermediate would have implications on the chemistry of flue gas scrubbers and on luminol-based NO{sub 2} detectors.

  3. Learning Rates and Known-to-Unknown Flash-Card Ratios: Comparing Effectiveness While Holding Instructional Time Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Bethany E.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Black, Michelle P.; Yaw, Jared; Booher, Joshua; Delisle, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Using alternating treatments designs, we compared learning rates across 2 computer-based flash-card interventions (3?min each): a traditional drill intervention with 15 unknown words and an interspersal intervention with 12 known words and 3 unknown words. Each student acquired more words under the traditional drill intervention. Discussion…

  4. Suppression of endurance degradation by applying constant voltage stress in one-transistor and one-resistor resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Ting; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chu, Tian-Jian; Chen, Hsin-Lu; Chen, Min-Chen; Yang, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lo, Ikai; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M.

    2017-01-01

    In this letter we demonstrate an operation method that effectively suppresses endurance degradation. After many operations, the off-state of resistance random access memory (RRAM) degrades. This degradation is caused by reduction of active oxygen ions participating in the set process, as determined by current fitting of current-voltage (I-V) curves obtained from the endurance test between the interval of seventy to one hundred million operations. To address this problem, we propose the application of constant voltage stress after every five million operations during the endurance test. The experimental result shows that this method can maintain oxygen ions at the proper depth in the electrode and improve RRAM reliability.

  5. Structural effects on the beta-scission reaction of alkoxyl radicals. Direct measurement of the absolute rate constants for ring opening of benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2005-02-18

    [reaction: see text] The absolute rate constants for beta-scission of a series of benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals and of the 2-(4-methylphenyl)-2-butoxyl radical have been measured directly by laser flash photolysis. The benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals undergo ring opening with rates which parallel the ring strain of the corresponding cycloalkanes. In the 1-X-indan-1-oxyl radical series, ring opening is observed when X = H, Me, whereas exclusive C-X bond cleavage occurs when X = Et. The factors governing the fragmentation regioselectivity are discussed.

  6. The carbonate profile of two recent Ionian Sea cores: Evidence that the sedimentation rate is constant over the last millennia

    SciTech Connect

    Castagnoli, G.C.; Bonino, G.; Caprioglio, F.; Provenzale, A.; Serio, M.; Guang-Mei, Zhu Istituto di Fisica Generale dell'Universiat', Torino )

    1990-10-01

    The authors confirm and extend the results previously reported on the carbonate profile of the GT14 Ionian Sea core (Cini Castagnoli et al., 1990). A second, much longer core (2.81 meters) named GT89/3, has been taken about 1 km apart from the previous one. The carbonate profiles of the two cores are impressively similar; the details of the CaCO{sub 3} variations in the two sediments match on the scale of the sampling interval {Delta}d = 2.5 mm used for both cores. The authors show that {Delta}d corresponds to the mud deposited in a time interval {Delta}t = 3.87 {plus minus} 0.04 years, a value which is constant throughout the entire length of the cores. This precision is achieved by the tephroanalysis of the two cores. In this approach the markers of well-known historical eruptions in the Vesuvius area are recognized (Pompei, AD 79, Pollena, AD 472, Ischia, AD 1301), providing a precise dating which accurately tunes that obtained by the radiometric method. The correlation between the carbonate profile of the GT14 core and the tree-ring radiocarbon record has been discussed in (Cini Castagnoli et al., 1990); here the authors extend these results and show that the same correlation holds at least up to 1690 BC. Due to the longer length of the GT89/3 time series, they also show that three periodic components at about 206 yr, 228 yr and 179 yr may now be resolved in the carbonate series, in close agreement with the results already found for the radiocarbon record.

  7. PVDFSTRESS: A PC-based computer program to reduce Bauer PVDF stress-rate gauge data

    SciTech Connect

    Wackerbarth, D E; Anderson, M U; Graham, R A

    1992-02-01

    A computer program has been developed to reduce and analyze data from a standardized piezoelectric polymer (PVDF) shock-wave stress rate gauge. The program is menu driven with versatile graphic capabilities, input/output file options, hard copy options, and unique data processing capabilities. This program was designed to analyze digital current-mode'' data recorded from a Bauer PVDF stress-rate gauge and reduce it to a stress-versus-time record. The program was also designed to combine two simulanteously recorded data channels.

  8. Energetics of stress: linking plasma cortisol levels to metabolic rate in mammals.

    PubMed

    Haase, Catherine G; Long, Andrea K; Gillooly, James F

    2016-01-01

    Physiological stress may result in short-term benefits to organismal performance, but also long-term costs to health or longevity. Yet, we lack an understanding of the variation in stress hormone levels (i.e. glucocorticoids) that exist within and across species. Here, we present comparative analyses that link the primary stress hormone in most mammals (i.e. cortisol) to metabolic rate. We show that baseline concentrations of plasma cortisol vary with mass-specific metabolic rate among cortisol-dominant mammals, and both baseline and elevated concentrations scale predictably with body mass. The results quantitatively link a classical measure of physiological stress to whole-organism energetics, providing a point of departure for cross-species comparisons of stress levels among mammals.

  9. Effect of ethanol of heart rate and blood pressure in nonstressed and stressed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sparrow, M.G.; Roggendorf, H.; Vogel, W.H.

    1987-06-29

    The effect of ethanol on the cardiovascular system (ECG, heart rate, blood pressure) was studied in anesthetized, nonstressed or stressed rats. In anesthetized rats, ethanol showed no effect on heart rate or ECG. In nonstressed rats, ethanol sedated the animals but increased heart rate significantly. This ethanol induced tachycardia seemed the result of a direct stimulation of the sympathetic nerves to the heart. Blood pressure was not significantly affected by ethanol in these nonstressed rats. In stressed rats, marked behavioral excitation and significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure were noted. Ethanol pretreatment calmed the animals considerably during restraint. Ethanol did reduce slightly the stress-induced tachycardia but markedly reduced or antagonized stress-induced blood pressure increases. No major changes in the ECG were noted during these studies with the exception of a few individual animals which showed pathologic ECG responses to ethanol. These data show that ethanol affects cardiovascular functions differently in anesthetized, non stressed or stressed rats, and that ethanol can significantly reduce or antagonize stress-induced behavioral excitation, tachycardia and hypertension. 32 references, 4 tables.

  10. Fracture in Westerly granite under AE feedback and constant strain rate loading: Nucleation, quasi-static propagation, and the transition to unstable fracture propagation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.D.; Young, R.P.; Lockner, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    New observations of fracture nucleation are presented from three triaxial compression experiments on intact samples of Westerly granite, using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. By conducting the tests under different loading conditions, the fracture process is demonstrated for quasi-static fracture (under AE Feedback load), a slowly developing unstable fracture (loaded at a 'slow' constant strain rate of 2.5 ?? 10-6/s) and an unstable fracture that develops near instantaneously (loaded at a 'fast' constant strain rate of 5 ?? 10-5/s). By recording a continuous ultrasonic waveform during the critical period of fracture, the entire AE catalogue can be captured and the exact time of fracture defined. Under constant strain loading, three stages are observed: (1) An initial nucleation or stable growth phase at a rate of ??? 1.3 mm/s, (2) a sudden increase to a constant or slowly accelerating propagation speed of ??? 18 mm/s, and (3) unstable, accelerating propagation. In the ??? 100 ms before rupture, the high level of AE activity (as seen on the continuous record) prevented the location of discrete AE events. A lower bound estimate of the average propagation velocity (using the time-to-rupture and the existing fracture length) suggests values of a few m/s. However from a low gain acoustic record, we infer that in the final few ms, the fracture propagation speed increased to 175 m/s. These results demonstrate similarities between fracture nucleation in intact rock and the nucleation of dynamic instabilities in stick slip experiments. It is suggested that the ability to constrain the size of an evolving fracture provides a crucial tool in further understanding the controls on fracture nucleation. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2006.

  11. Heart rate response to post-learning stress predicts memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Larra, Mauro F; Schulz, André; Schilling, Thomas M; Ferreira de Sá, Diana S; Best, Daniel; Kozik, Bartlomiej; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Stressful experiences are often well remembered, an effect that has been explained by beta-adrenergic influences on memory consolidation. Here, we studied the impact of stress induced heart rate (HR) responses on memory consolidation in a post-learning stress paradigm. 206 male and female participants saw 52 happy and angry faces immediately before being exposed to the Cold Pressor Test or a non-stressful control procedure. Memory for the faces and their respective expression was tested twice, after 30 min and on the next day. High HR responders (in comparison to low HR responders as well as to the non-stressful control group) showed enhanced recognition memory one day after learning. Our results show that beta-adrenergic activation elicited shortly after learning enhances memory consolidation and that the stress induced HR response is a predictor for this effect.

  12. The role of physical activity and heart rate variability for the control of work related stress.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Laís; Rodrigues, Fábio B; Souza, Jeniffer W S; Campbell, Carmen S G; Leicht, Anthony S; Boullosa, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise are often used as tools to reduce stress and therefore the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Meanwhile, heart rate variability (HRV) has been utilized to assess both stress and PA or exercise influences. The objective of the present review was to examine the current literature in regards to workplace stress, PA/exercise and HRV to encourage further studies. We considered original articles from known databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge) over the last 10 years that examined these important factors. A total of seven studies were identified with workplace stress strongly associated with reduced HRV in workers. Longitudinal workplace PA interventions may provide a means to improve worker stress levels and potentially cardiovascular risk with mechanisms still to be clarified. Future studies are recommended to identify the impact of PA, exercise, and fitness on stress levels and HRV in workers and their subsequent influence on cardiovascular health.

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Interstitial Free Steel Via Slow Strain Rate Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murkute, Pratik; Ramkumar, J.; Mondal, K.

    2016-07-01

    An interstitial free steel is subjected to slow strain rate tests to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior at strain rates ranging from 10-4 to 10-6s-1 in air and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The ratios of time to failure, failure strain, and ultimate tensile stress at different strain rates in air to that in corrosive were considered as SCC susceptibility. Serrated stress-strain curve observed at lowest strain rate is explained by the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. Maximum susceptibility to SCC at lowest strain rate is attributed to the soluble γ-FeOOH in the rust analyzed by Fourier Transformed Infrared spectroscopy. Mechanism for SCC relates to the anodic dissolution forming the groove, where hydrogen embrittlement can set in and finally fracture happens due to triaxiality.

  14. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  15. Rotational state dependence of rate constants for the reaction of ions with asymmetric top molecules at very low temperatures: application to the N+/H2O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; McCarroll, R.

    1990-12-01

    The adiabatic rotational state method is applied to the study of reactions between ions and polar asymmetric top molecules at very low temperatures. Detailed results of the calculated rate coefficients for the reaction of N+ with H2O are presented. A strong dependence of the rate coefficients on the initial rotational state is observed at low temperatures. In the case of a thermal distribution of rotational states, where the rate constants are summed over a Boltzman distribution, the replacement of the asymmetric top by an average symmetric top, which leads to a considerable simplification of the calculations, appears to be satisfactory. On the other hand, for a non thermal distribution, no such simplifying assumption can be made. In particular, the rate coefficient for a specific initial rotational state is quite sensitive to the orientation of the dipole moment.

  16. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model.

    PubMed

    Damos, Petros; Soulopoulou, Polyxeni

    2015-01-01

    Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging) since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off), but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard rate model

  17. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model

    PubMed Central

    Damos, Petros; Soulopoulou, Polyxeni

    2015-01-01

    Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging) since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off), but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard rate model

  18. Similar metabolic rate-temperature relationships after acclimation at constant and fluctuating temperatures in caterpillars of a sub-Antarctic moth.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Haupt, Tanya M; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-02-01

    Temperature compensation in whole-animal metabolic rate is one of the responses thought, controversially, to characterize insects from low temperature environments. Temperature compensation may either involve a change in absolute values of metabolic rates or a change in the slope of the metabolic rate - temperature relationship. Moreover, assessments of compensation may be complicated by animal responses to fluctuating temperatures. Here we examined whole animal metabolic rates, at 0 °C, 5 °C, 10 °C and 15 °C, in caterpillars of the sub-Antarctic moth, Pringleophaga marioni Viette (Tineidae), following one week acclimations to 5 °C, 10 °C and 15 °C, and fluctuating temperatures of 0-10 °C, 5-15 °C, and 10-20 °C. Over the short term, temperature compensation was found following acclimation to 5 °C, but the effect size was small (3-14%). By comparison with caterpillars of 13 other lepidopteran species, no effect of temperature compensation was present, with the relationship between metabolic rate and temperature having a Q10 of 2 among species, and no effect of latitude on temperature-corrected metabolic rate. Fluctuating temperature acclimations for the most part had little effect compared with constant temperatures of the same mean value. Nonetheless, fluctuating temperatures of 5-15 °C resulted in lower metabolic rates at all test temperatures compared with constant 10 °C acclimation, in keeping with expectations from the literature. Absence of significant responses, or those of large effect, in metabolic rates in response to acclimation, may be a consequence of the unpredictable temperature variation over the short-term on sub-Antarctic Marion Island, to which P. marioni is endemic.

  19. Structure/property relations of aluminum under varying rates and stress states

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Matthew T; Horstemeyer, Mark F; Whittington, Wilburn R; Solanki, Kiran N

    2010-11-19

    In this work we analyze the plasticity, damage, and fracture characteristics of three different processed aluminum alloys (rolled 5083-H13, cast A356-T6, and extruded 6061-T6) under varying stress states (tension, compression, and torsion) and strain rates (0.001/, 1/s., and 1000/s). The stress state difference had more of a flow stress effect than the applied strain rates for those given in this study (0.001/sec up to 1000/sec). The stress state and strain rate also had a profound effect on the damage evolution of each aluminum alloy. Tension and torsional straining gave much greater damage nucleation rates than compression. Although the damage of all three alloys was found to be void nucleation dominated, the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys incurred void damage via micron scale particles where the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy incurred void damage from two scales, micron-scale particles and nanoscale precipitates. Having two length scales of particles that participated in the damage evolution made the 6061-T6 incur a strain rate sensitive damage rate that was different than the other two aluminum alloys. Under tension, as the strain rate increased, the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy's void nucleation rate decreased, but the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys void nucleation rate increased.

  20. Anger responses to psychosocial stress predict heart rate and cortisol stress responses in men but not women

    PubMed Central

    Lupis, Sarah B.; Lerman, Michelle; Wolf, Jutta M.

    2014-01-01

    While previous research has suggested that anger and fear responses to stress are linked to distinct sympathetic nervous system (SNS) stress responses, little is known about how these emotions predict hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity. Further, earlier research primarily relied on retrospective self-report of emotion. The current study aimed at addressing both issues in male and female individuals by assessing the role of anger and fear in predicting heart rate and cortisol stress responses using both self-report and facial coding analysis to assess emotion responses. We exposed 32 healthy students (18 female; 19.6+/−1.7 yrs.) to an acute psychosocial stress paradigm (TSST) and measured heart rate and salivary cortisol levels throughout the protocol. Anger and fear before and after stress exposure was assessed by self-report, and video recordings of the TSST were assessed by a certified facial coder to determine emotion expression (FACS). Self-reported emotions and emotion expressions did not correlate (all p > .23). Increases in self-reported fear predicted blunted cortisol responses in men (β = 0.41, p = .04). Also for men, longer durations of anger expression predicted exaggerated cortisol responses (β = 0.67 p = .004), and more anger incidences predicted exaggerated cortisol and heart rate responses (β = 0.51, p = .033; β = 0.46, p = .066, resp.). Anger and fear did not predict SNS or HPA activity for females (all p > .23). The current differential self-report and facial coding findings support the use of multiple modes of emotion assessment. Particularly, FACS but not self-report revealed a robust anger-stress association that could have important downstream health effects for men. For women, future research may clarify the role of other emotions, such as self-conscious expressions of shame, for physiological stress responses. A better understanding of the emotion-stress link may contribute to behavioral interventions targeting health

  1. Review of Rate Constants and Exploration of Correlations of the Halogen Transfer Reaction of Tri-substituted Carbon-centered Radicals with Molecular Halogens

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2012-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction (R 3C + X2 R 3CX + X ; X = F, Cl, Br, and I) are reviewed. Because of curved Arrhenius plots and negative EX values, empirical structure-reactivity correlations are sought for log kX,298 rather than EX. The well-known poor correlation with measures of reaction enthalpy is demonstrated. The best quantitative predictor for R 3C is p, the sum of the Hammett p constants for the three substituents, R . Electronegative substituents with lone pairs, such as halogen or oxygen, thus appear to destabilize the formation of a polarized pre-reaction complex and/or TS ( +R---X---X -) by -inductive/field electron withdrawal while simultaneously stabilizing them by -resonance electron donation. The best quantitative predictor of the reactivity order of the halogens, I2 > Br2 >> Cl2 F2, is the polarizability of the halogen, (X-X). For the data set of 60 rate constants which span 6.5 orders of magnitude, a modestly successful correlation of log kX,298 is achieved with only two parameters, p and (X-X), with a mean unsigned deviation of 0.59 log units. How much of this residual variance is the result of inaccuracies in the data compared with over-simplification of the correlation approach remains to be seen.

  2. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor kinetic rate constants correlate with cellular histone acetylation but not transcription and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Lauffer, Benjamin E L; Mintzer, Robert; Fong, Rina; Mukund, Susmith; Tam, Christine; Zilberleyb, Inna; Flicke, Birgit; Ritscher, Allegra; Fedorowicz, Grazyna; Vallero, Roxanne; Ortwine, Daniel F; Gunzner, Janet; Modrusan, Zora; Neumann, Lars; Koth, Christopher M; Lupardus, Patrick J; Kaminker, Joshua S; Heise, Christopher E; Steiner, Pascal

    2013-09-13

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are critical in the control of gene expression, and dysregulation of their activity has been implicated in a broad range of diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, and neurological diseases. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) employing different zinc chelating functionalities such as hydroxamic acids and benzamides have shown promising results in cancer therapy. Although it has also been suggested that HDACi with increased isozyme selectivity and potency may broaden their clinical utility and minimize side effects, the translation of this idea to the clinic remains to be investigated. Moreover, a detailed understanding of how HDACi with different pharmacological properties affect biological functions in vitro and in vivo is still missing. Here, we show that a panel of benzamide-containing HDACi are slow tight-binding inhibitors with long residence times unlike the hydroxamate-containing HDACi vorinostat and trichostatin-A. Characterization of changes in H2BK5 and H4K14 acetylation following HDACi treatment in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y revealed that the timing and magnitude of histone acetylation mirrored both the association and dissociation kinetic rates of the inhibitors. In contrast, cell viability and microarray gene expression analysis indicated that cell death induction and changes in transcriptional regulation do not correlate with the dissociation kinetic rates of the HDACi. Therefore, our study suggests that determining how the selective and kinetic inhibition properties of HDACi affect cell function will help to evaluate their therapeutic utility.

  3. Correction of dead-time and pile-up in a detector array for constant and rapidly varying counting rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Wright, T.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of dead-time and pile-up in counting experiments may become a significant source of uncertainty if not properly taken into account. Although analytical solutions to this problem have been proposed for simple set-ups with one or two detectors, these are limited when it comes to arrays where time correlation between the detector modules is used, and also in situations of variable counting rates. In this paper we describe the dead-time and pile-up corrections applied to the n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC), a 4π γ-ray detector made of 40 BaF2 modules operating at the CERN n_TOF facility. Our method is based on the simulation of the complete signal detection and event reconstruction processes and can be applied as well in the case of rapidly varying counting rates. The method is discussed in detail and then we present its successful application to the particular case of the measurement of 238U(n, γ) reactions with the TAC detector.

  4. Rate Constants of PSII Photoinhibition and its Repair, and PSII Fluorescence Parameters in Field Plants in Relation to their Growth Light Environments.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kazunori; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nakaji, Masayoshi; Kanel, Dhana Raj; Terashima, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    The extent of photoinhibition of PSII is determined by a balance between the rate of photodamage to PSII and that of repair of the damaged PSII. It has already been indicated that the rate constants of photodamage (kpi) and repair (krec) of the leaves differ depending on their growth light environment. However, there are no studies using plants in the field. We examined these rate constants and fluorescence parameters of several field-grown plants to determine inter-relationships between these values and the growth environment. The kpi values were strongly related to the excess energy, EY, of the puddle model and non-regulated energy dissipation, Y(NO), of the lake model, both multiplied by the photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPFD) level during the photoinhibitory treatment. In contrast, the krec values corrected against in situ air temperature were very strongly related to the daily PPFD level. The plants from the fields showed higher NPQ than the chamber-grown plants, probably because these field plants acclimated to stronger lightflecks than the averaged growth PPFD. Comparing chamber-grown plants and the field plants, we showed that kpi is determined by the incident light level and the photosynthetic capacities such as in situ rate of PSII electron transport and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) [e.g. Y(NO)×PPFD] and that krec is mostly determined by the growth light and temperature levels.

  5. The effect of shock loading on the performance of a thermophilic anaerobic contact reactor at constant organic loading rate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The influences of organic loading disturbances on the process performance of a thermophilic anaerobic contact reactor treating potato-processing wastewater were investigated. For this purpose, while the reactor was operated at steady state conditions with organic loading rate of 5.5 kg COD/m3 · day, an instant acetate concentration increase (1 g/L) was introduced to the reactor. During the shock loading test of acetate, it was observed that the overall process performance was adversely affected by all the shock loading, however, the system reached steady state conditions less than 24 hours of operation indicating that thermophilic anaerobic contact reactor is resistant to shock loading and be capable of returning its normal conditions within a short time period. PMID:24872886

  6. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng

    FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL) specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10-7-5.748 × 10-7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa √{ m } . The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface.

  7. Predicting the decline in daily maximum transpiration rate of two pine stands during drought based on constant minimum leaf water potential and plant hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Duursma, R A; Kolari, P; Perämäki, M; Nikinmaa, E; Hari, P; Delzon, S; Loustau, D; Ilvesniemi, H; Pumpanen, J; Mäkelä, A

    2008-02-01

    The effect of drought on forest water use is often estimated with models, but comprehensive models require many parameters, and simple models may not be sufficiently flexible. Many tree species, Pinus species in particular, have been shown to maintain a constant minimum leaf water potential above the critical threshold for xylem embolism during drought. In such cases, prediction of the relative decline in daily maximum transpiration rate with decreasing soil water content is relatively straightforward. We constructed a soil-plant water flow model assuming constant plant conductance and daily minimum leaf water potential, but variable conductance from soil to root. We tested this model against independent data from two sites: automatic shoot chamber data and sap flow measurements from a boreal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand; and sap flow measurements from a maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) stand. To focus on soil limitations to water uptake, we expressed daily maximum transpiration rate relative to the rate that would be obtained in wet soil with similar environmental variables. The comparison was successful, although the maritime pine stand showed carry-over effects of the drought that we could not explain. For the boreal Scots pine stand, daily maximum transpiration was best predicted by water content of soil deeper than 5 cm. A sensitivity analysis revealed that model predictions were relatively insensitive to the minimum leaf water potential, which can be accounted for by the importance of soil resistance of drying soil. We conclude that a model with constant plant conductance and minimum leaf water potential can accurately predict the decline in daily maximum transpiration rate during drought for these two pine stands, and that including further detail about plant compartments would add little predictive power, except in predicting recovery from severe drought.

  8. Using Optical Oxygen Sensors and Injection Experiments to Determine in situ Microbial Rate Constants for Methane Oxidation and Heterotrophic Respiration in a Boreal Bog and Fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldo, N.; Moorberg, C.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.; Neumann, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere, and play a key role in feedback cycles to climate change. In recognition of this, many researchers are developing process-based models of wetland methane emissions at various scales. In these models, the three key biogeochemical reactions are methane production, methane oxidation, and heterotrophic respiration, and they are modeled using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The majority of Michaelis-Menten rate constants used in models are based on experiments involving slurries of peat incubated in vials. While these slurries provide a highly controlled setting, they are different from in situ conditions in multiple ways; notably they lack live plants and the centimeter-scale heterogeneities that exist in the field. To determine rate constants in a system more representative of in situ conditions, we extracted peat cores intact from a bog and fen located in the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest near Fairbanks, Alaska and part of the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) research program. Into those cores we injected water with varying concentrations of methane and oxygen at multiple depths. We used planar oxygen sensors installed on the peat cores to collect high resolution, two dimensional oxygen concentration data during the injections and used oxygen consumption rates under various conditions to calculate rate constants. Results were compared to a similar but smaller set of injection experiments conducted against planar oxygen sensors installed in the bog. Results will inform parametrization of microbial processes in wetland models, improving estimates of methane emissions both under current climate conditions and in the future.

  9. Effect of cell size and shear stress on bacterium growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadlallah, Hadi; Jarrahi, Mojtaba; Herbert, Éric; Peerhossaini, Hassan; PEF Team

    2015-11-01

    Effect of shear stress on the growth rate of Synechocystis and Chlamydomonas cells is studied. An experimental setup was prepared to monitor the growth rate of the microorganisms versus the shear rate inside a clean room, under atmospheric pressure and 20 °C temperature. Digital magnetic agitators are placed inside a closed chamber provided with airflow, under a continuous uniform light intensity over 4 weeks. In order to study the effect of shear stress on the growth rate, different frequencies of agitation are tested, 2 vessels filled with 150 ml of each specie were placed on different agitating system at the desired frequency. The growth rate is monitored daily by measuring the optical density and then correlate it to the cellular concentration. The PH was adjusted to 7 in order to maintain the photosynthetic activity. Furthermore, to measure the shear stress distribution, the flow velocity field was measured using PIV. Zones of high and low shear stress were identified. Results show that the growth rate is independent of the shear stress magnitude, mostly for Synechocystis, and with lower independency for Chlamydomonas depending on the cell size for each species.

  10. Effects of Recovery Behavior and Strain-Rate Dependence of Stress-Strain Curve on Prediction Accuracy of Thermal Stress Analysis During Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, Yuichi; Shiga, Hidetoshi; Sato, Takeshi; Kambe, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    Recovery behavior (recovery) and strain-rate dependence of the stress-strain curve (strain-rate dependence) are incorporated into constitutive equations of alloys to predict residual stress and thermal stress during casting. Nevertheless, few studies have systematically investigated the effects of these metallurgical phenomena on the prediction accuracy of thermal stress in a casting. This study compares the thermal stress analysis results with in situ thermal stress measurement results of an Al-Si-Cu specimen during casting. The results underscore the importance for the alloy constitutive equation of incorporating strain-rate dependence to predict thermal stress that develops at high temperatures where the alloy shows strong strain-rate dependence of the stress-strain curve. However, the prediction accuracy of the thermal stress developed at low temperatures did not improve by considering the strain-rate dependence. Incorporating recovery into the constitutive equation improved the accuracy of the simulated thermal stress at low temperatures. Results of comparison implied that the constitutive equation should include strain-rate dependence to simulate defects that develop from thermal stress at high temperatures, such as hot tearing and hot cracking. Recovery should be incorporated into the alloy constitutive equation to predict the casting residual stress and deformation caused by the thermal stress developed mainly in the low temperature range.

  11. Body downsizing caused by non-consumptive social stress severely depresses population growth rate.

    PubMed

    Edeline, Eric; Haugen, Thrond O; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Claessen, David; Winfield, Ian J; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn

    2010-03-22

    Chronic social stress diverts energy away from growth, reproduction and immunity, and is thus a potential driver of population dynamics. However, the effects of social stress on demographic density dependence remain largely overlooked in ecological theory. Here we combine behavioural experiments, physiology and population modelling to show in a top predator (pike Esox lucius) that social stress alone may be a primary driver of demographic density dependence. Doubling pike density in experimental ponds under controlled prey availability did not significantly change prey intake by pike (i.e. did not significantly change interference or exploitative competition), but induced a neuroendocrine stress response reflecting a size-dependent dominance hierarchy, depressed pike energetic status and lowered pike body growth rate by 23 per cent. Assuming fixed size-dependent survival and fecundity functions parameterized for the Windermere (UK) pike population, stress-induced smaller body size shifts age-specific survival rates and lowers age-specific fecundity, which in Leslie matrices projects into reduced population rate of increase (lambda) by 37-56%. Our models also predict that social stress flattens elasticity profiles of lambda to age-specific survival and fecundity, thus making population persistence more dependent on old individuals. Our results suggest that accounting for non-consumptive social stress from competitors and predators is necessary to accurately understand, predict and manage food-web dynamics.

  12. Body downsizing caused by non-consumptive social stress severely depresses population growth rate

    PubMed Central

    Edeline, Eric; Haugen, Thrond O.; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Claessen, David; Winfield, Ian J.; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Vøllestad, L. Asbjørn

    2010-01-01

    Chronic social stress diverts energy away from growth, reproduction and immunity, and is thus a potential driver of population dynamics. However, the effects of social stress on demographic density dependence remain largely overlooked in ecological theory. Here we combine behavioural experiments, physiology and population modelling to show in a top predator (pike Esox lucius) that social stress alone may be a primary driver of demographic density dependence. Doubling pike density in experimental ponds under controlled prey availability did not significantly change prey intake by pike (i.e. did not significantly change interference or exploitative competition), but induced a neuroendocrine stress response reflecting a size-dependent dominance hierarchy, depressed pike energetic status and lowered pike body growth rate by 23 per cent. Assuming fixed size-dependent survival and fecundity functions parameterized for the Windermere (UK) pike population, stress-induced smaller body size shifts age-specific survival rates and lowers age-specific fecundity, which in Leslie matrices projects into reduced population rate of increase (λ) by 37–56%. Our models also predict that social stress flattens elasticity profiles of λ to age-specific survival and fecundity, thus making population persistence more dependent on old individuals. Our results suggest that accounting for non-consumptive social stress from competitors and predators is necessary to accurately understand, predict and manage food-web dynamics. PMID:19923130

  13. Modification of Physiological and Subjective Responses to Stress through Heart Rate Biofeedback

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    was not significantly correlated with cold pressor pain rtings (Shapiro, 1977). Given a single session of biofeedback training, subjects were able to...found. Both groups showed a reliable increase in pain ratings on the second cold pressor stress. These data suggest that single session heart rate

  14. Personality Factors and Stress Ratings of Life Changes in a College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Charles H., Jr.

    Previous research has shown a statistically significant correlation between life change stress and physical illness. To examine the relationship between locus of control and the rating of life events and to examine the relationship between responsiveness to threat and ratings, a sample of 274 college students answered a series of four…

  15. Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constant for the CH3 Recombination Reaction: A Loss Process in Outer Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, R. J.; Payne, W. A.; Thorn, R. P., Jr.; Romani, P. N.; Stief, L. J.; Nesbitt, F. L.; Iannone, M. A.; Tardy, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    The methyl free radical (CH3) has been observed in the atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune by the ISO satellite. There are discrepancies between the column densities for the CH3 radical derived from the ISO observations and the column densities derived from atmospheric photochemical models. For Neptune the model column density is 1.5 times that derived from ISO. For Saturn the model is 6 times that from ISO. The recombination of methyl radicals is the major loss process for methyl in these atmospheres. The serious disagreement between observed and calculated levels of CH3 has led to suggestions that the atmospheric models greatly underestimated the loss of CH3 due to poor knowledge of the rate of the reaction (1) CH3 + CH3 + M goes to C2H6 + M at the low temperatures and pressures of these atmospheric systems. Although the reaction CH3 + CH3 + M goes to C2H6 + M has been extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally, the laboratory conditions have been, with only a few exceptions, higher temperatures (T greater than 298K), higher pressures (P greater than or equal to 10 Torr - 13.3 mbar) or M=Ar rather than H2 or He as the bath gas.

  16. Label-Free Kinetics: Exploiting Functional Hemi-Equilibrium to Derive Rate Constants for Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Riddy, Darren M; Valant, Celine; Rueda, Patricia; Charman, William N; Sexton, Patrick M; Summers, Roger J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Langmead, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Drug receptor kinetics is as a key component in drug discovery, development, and efficacy; however, determining kinetic parameters has historically required direct radiolabeling or competition with a labeled tracer. Here we present a simple approach to determining the kinetics of competitive antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors by exploiting the phenomenon of hemi-equilibrium, the state of partial re-equilibration of agonist, antagonist, and receptor in some functional assays. Using functional [Ca(2+)]i-flux and extracellular kinases 1 and 2 phosphorylation assays that have short incubation times and therefore are prone to hemi-equilibrium "behaviors," we investigated a wide range of structurally and physicochemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists. Using a combined operational and hemi-equilibrium model of antagonism to both simulate and analyze data, we derived estimates of association and dissociation rates for the test set of antagonists, identifying both rapidly dissociating (4-DAMP, himbacine) and slowly dissociating (tiotropium, glycopyrrolate) ligands. The results demonstrate the importance of assay incubation time and the degree of receptor reserve in applying the analytical model. There was an excellent correlation between estimates of antagonist pK(B), k(on), and k(off) from functional assays and those determined by competition kinetics using whole-cell [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine binding, validating this approach as a rapid and simple method to functionally profile receptor kinetics of competitive antagonists in the absence of a labeled tracer.

  17. Modeling the Effects of Constant and Variable Temperatures on the Vital Rates of an Age-, Stage-, and Sex-Structured Population by Means of the SANDY Approach.

    PubMed

    Nachman, G; Gotoh, T

    2015-06-01

    We present a general and flexible mathematical model (called SANDY) that can be used to describe many biological phenomena, including the phenology of arthropods. In this paper, we demonstrate how the model can be fitted to vital rates (i.e., rates associated with development, survival, hatching, and oviposition) of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae (Koch)) exposed to different constant temperatures ranging from 15°C to 37.5°C. SANDY was incorporated into an age-, stage- and sex-structured dynamic model, which was fitted to cohort life-tables of T. urticae conducted at five constant temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30, and 35°C). Age- and temperature-dependent vital rates for the three main stages (eggs, immatures, and adults) constituting the life-cycle of mites were adequately described by the SANDY model. The modeling approach allows for simulating the growth of a population in a variable environment. We compared the predicted net reproductive rate (R0) and intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) at fluctuating temperatures with empirical values obtained from life-table experiments conducted at temperatures that changed with a daily amplitude (±0, ±3, ±6, ±9, and ±12°C) around an average of 22°C. Results show that R0 decreases with increasing amplitude, while rm is more robust to variable temperatures. An advantage of SANDY is that the same simple mathematical expression can be applied to describe all the vital rates. Besides, the approach is not confined to modeling the influence of a single factor on population growth but allows for incorporating the combined effect of several limiting factors, provided that the combined effect of the factors is multiplicative.

  18. Effects of far infrared rays irradiated from ceramic material (BIOCERAMIC) on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure, and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chen, Chien-Ho; Tsai, Shih-Ying; Hsiao, George; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2012-10-31

    The present study examined the effects of BIOCERAMIC on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility using in vivo and in vitro animal models. We investigated the effects of BIOCERAMIC on the in vivo cardiovascular hemodynamic parameters of rats by monitoring their heart rates, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Thereafter, we assayed its effects on the heart rate in an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation, and on cardiac contractility under oxidative stress. BIOCERAMIC caused significant decreases in heart rates and systolic and mean blood pressure in the stress-conditioned heart rate rat models (P < 0.05), as well as in the experimental models of an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation (P < 0.05), and normalized cardiac contractility under oxidative stress (P < 0.05). BIOCERAMIC may, therefore, normalize the effects of psychological stress and oxidative stress conditions.

  19. Low-energy reaction rate constants for the Ni+-assisted decomposition of acetaldehyde: observation of C-H and C-C activation.

    PubMed

    Dee, S Jason; Castleberry, Vanessa A; Villarroel, Otsmar J; Laboren, Ivanna E; Bellert, Darrin J

    2010-02-04

    Rate constants for the low-energy Ni(+)-assisted dissociative reaction of acetaldehyde have been measured under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. The rate constants are acquired through monitoring the time dependence of fragment Ni(+)CO formation. The decomposition of the precursor Ni(+)-acetaldehyde cluster ion proceeds via consecutive, parallel reaction coordinates that originate with the Ni(+)-assisted cleavage of either a C-C or an aldehyde C-H bond. The energies used to initiate these reactions are well below that required to cleave sigma-bonds in the isolated acetaldehyde molecule. Direct measurement of the reaction kinetics over a range of energies indicates that the rate-limiting step in the dissociative mechanism changes at cluster ion internal energies = 17,200 +/- 400 cm(-1). Arguments are presented that this energy marks the closure of the dissociative coordinate that initiates with C-H sigma-bond activation and thus provides a measure of the activation energy of this dissociative pathway.

  20. Computational study on the mechanisms and rate constants of the Cl-initiated oxidation of methyl vinyl ether in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Han, Dandan; Cao, Haijie; Li, Mingyue; Li, Xin; Zhang, Shiqing; He, Maoxia; Hu, Jingtian

    2015-01-29

    The Cl-initiated oxidation reactions of methyl vinyl ether (MVE) are analyzed by using the high-level composite method CBS-QB3. Detailed chemistry for the reactions of MVE with chlorine atoms is proposed according to the calculated thermodynamic data. The primary eight channels, including two Cl-addition reactions and six H-abstraction reactions, are discussed. In accordance with the further investigation of the two dominant additional routes, formyl chloride and formaldehyde are the major products. Over the temperature range of 200-400 K and the pressure range of 100-2000 Torr, the rate constants of primary reactions are calculated by employing the MESMER program. H-abstraction channels are negligible according to the value of rate constants. During the studied temperature range, the Arrhenius equation is obtained as ktot = 5.64 × 10(-11) exp(215.1/T). The total rate coefficient is ktot = 1.25 × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 298 K and 760 Torr. Finally, the atmospheric lifetime of MVE with respect to Cl is estimated to be 2.23 h.

  1. Heart rate complexity: A novel approach to assessing cardiac stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Brindle, Ryan C; Ginty, Annie T; Phillips, Anna C; Fisher, James P; McIntyre, David; Carroll, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Correlation dimension (D2), a measure of heart rate (HR) complexity, has been shown to decrease in response to acute mental stress and relate to adverse cardiovascular health. However, the relationship between stress-induced changes in D2 and HR has yet to be established. The present studies aimed to assess this relationship systematically while controlling for changes in respiration and autonomic activity. In Study 1 (N = 25) D2 decreased during stress and predicted HR reactivity even after adjusting for changes in respiration rate, and cardiac vagal tone. This result was replicated in Study 2 (N = 162) and extended by including a measure of cardiac sympathetic activity; correlation dimension remained an independent predictor of HR reactivity in a hierarchical linear model containing measures of cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic activity and their interaction. These results suggest that correlation dimension may provide additional information regarding cardiac stress reactivity above that provided by traditional measures of cardiac autonomic function.

  2. Time-Dependent Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Si + OH → SiO + H Reaction: Cross Sections and Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Rivero Santamaría, Alejandro; Dayou, Fabrice; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus; Monnerville, Maurice

    2017-02-15

    The dynamics of the Si((3)P) + OH(X(2)Π) → SiO(X(1)Σ(+)) + H((2)S) reaction is investigated by means of the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach using an ab initio potential energy surface recently developed by Dayou et al. ( J. Chem. Phys. 2013 , 139 , 204305 ) for the ground X(2)A' electronic state. Total reaction probabilities have been calculated for the first 15 rotational states j = 0-14 of OH(v=0,j) at a total angular momentum J = 0 up to a collision energy of 1 eV. Integral cross sections and state-selected rate constants for the temperature range 10-500 K were obtained within the J-shifting approximation. The reaction probabilities display highly oscillatory structures indicating the contribution of long-lived quasibound states supported by the deep SiOH/HSiO wells. The cross sections behave with collision energies as expected for a barrierless reaction and are slightly sensitive to the initial rotational excitation of OH. The thermal rate constants show a marked temperature dependence below 200 K with a maximum value around 15 K. The TDWP results globally agree with the results of earlier quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations carried out by Rivero-Santamaria et al. ( Chem. Phys. Lett. 2014 , 610-611 , 335 - 340 ) with the same potential energy surface. In particular, the thermal rate constants display a similar temperature dependence, with TDWP values smaller than the QCT ones over the whole temperature range.

  3. Absolute rate constants for the quenching of reactive excited states by melanin and related 5,6-dihydroxyindole metabolites: implications for their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Erb, C; Flammer, J; Nau, W M

    2000-05-01

    The triplet-excited state of benzophenone and the singlet-excited state of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (Fluorazophore-P) have been employed as kinetic probes to obtain information on the antioxidant activity of the skin and eye pigment melanin and its biogenetic precursors 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The excited states were generated by the laser-flash photolysis technique and their reaction kinetics was examined by time-resolved transient absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. The reaction between triplet benzophenone and DHI produced with unit efficiency the corresponding 6O-centered semiquinone radical, which was characterized by its characteristic transient absorption. The quenching rate constants for DHI (3.1-8.4 x 10(9) M-1 s-1) and DHICA (3.3-5.5 x 10(9) M-1 s-1) were near the diffusion-controlled limit, indicating excellent antioxidant properties. Kinetic solvent effects were observed. The reactivity of synthetic melanin, assessed through the quenching rate constant of Fluorazophore-P and normalized to the number of monomer units, was more than one order of magnitude lower (2.7 x 10(8) M-1 s-1) than that of its precursors. The trend of the quenching rate constants, i.e. DHI > DHICA approximately alpha-tocopherol > melanin, along with the preferential solubility of DHICA in aqueous environments, serves to account for several experimental results from biochemical studies on the inhibition of lipid peroxidation by these natural antioxidants.

  4. Influence of pH and ionic strength on electrostatic properties of ferredoxin, FNR, and hydrogenase and the rate constants of their interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, A. N.; Khrushchev, S. S.; Kovalenko, I. B.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein transfers electrons from photosystem I (PSI) to ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as other metabolic pathways. In some photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria and green unicellular algae under anaerobic conditions Fd transfers electrons not only to FNR but also to hydrogenase—an enzyme which catalyzes reduction of atomic hydrogen to H2. One of the questions posed by this competitive relationship between proteins is which characteristics of thylakoid stroma media allow switching of the electron flow between the linear path PSI-Fd-FNR-NADP+ and the path PSI-Fd-hydrogenase-H2. The study was conducted using direct multiparticle simulation approach. In this method protein molecules are considered as individual objects that experience Brownian motion and electrostatic interaction with the surrounding media and each other. Using the model we studied the effects of pH and ionic strength (I) upon complex formation between ferredoxin and FNR and ferredoxin and hydrogenase. We showed that the rate constant of Fd-FNR complex formation is constant in a wide range of physiologically significant pH values. Therefore it can be argued that regulation of FNR activity doesn’t involve pH changes in stroma. On the other hand, in the model rate constant of Fd-hydrogenase interaction dramatically depends upon pH: in the range 7-9 it increases threefold. It may seem that because hydrogenase reduces protons it should be more active when pH is acidic. Apparently, regulation of hydrogenase’s affinity to both her reaction partners (H+ and Fd) is carried out by changes in its electrostatic properties. In the dark, the protein is inactive and in the light it is activated and starts to interact with both Fd and H+. Therefore, we can conclude that in chloroplasts the rate of hydrogen production is regulated by pH through the changes in the affinity between hydrogenase and ferredoxin.

  5. Ab initio and RRKM calculations for multichannel rate constants of the C{sub 2}H{sub 3}+O{sub 2} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mebel, A.M.; Diau, E.W.G.; Lin, M.C.; Morokuma, K.

    1996-10-09

    A potential energy surface for the reaction of vinyl radical with molecular oxygen has been studied using the ab initio G2M(RCC, MP2) method. The most favorable reaction pathway leading to the major CHO+CH{sub 2}O products is described. The C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O+O products can be formed by elimination of the oxygen atom from C{sub 2}H{sub 3}OO via TS 23, which is by 7.8 kcal/mol lower in energy than the reactants, but by 6.5 kcal/mol higher than TS 9`. The hydrogen migration in 1` gives rise to another significant product channel: C{sub 2}H{sub 3}+O{sub 2} {yields} 1` {yields} TS 25` {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+O{sub 2}H, with TS 25` lying below C{sub 2}H{sub 3}+O{sub 2} by 3.5 kcal/mol. Multichannel RRKM calculations have been carried out for the total and individual rate constants for various channels using the G2M(RCC, MP2) energetics and molecular parameters of the intermediates and transition states. The computed low pressure reaction rate constant is in quantitative agreement with experiment. At atmospheric pressure, the title reaction is dominated by the stabilization of vinylperoxy radical C{sub 2}H{sub 3}OO at room temperature. In the 500-900 K temperature range, the CHO+CH{sub 2}O channel has the highest rate constant, and at T >= 900 K, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O+O are the major products. At very high temperatures, the channel producing C{sub 2}H{sub 2} + O{sub 2}H becomes competitive. 15 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Direct measurements of the total rate constant of the reaction NCN + H and implications for the product branching ratio and the enthalpy of formation of NCN.

    PubMed

    Fassheber, Nancy; Dammeier, Johannes; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2014-06-21

    The overall rate constant of the reaction (2), NCN + H, which plays a key role in prompt-NO formation in flames, has been directly measured at temperatures 962 K < T < 2425 K behind shock waves. NCN radicals and H atoms were generated by the thermal decomposition of NCN3 and C2H5I, respectively. NCN concentration-time profiles were measured by sensitive narrow-line-width laser absorption at a wavelength of λ = 329.1302 nm. The obtained rate constants are best represented by the combination of two Arrhenius expressions, k2/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 3.49 × 10(14) exp(-33.3 kJ mol(-1)/RT) + 1.07 × 10(13) exp(+10.0 kJ mol(-1)/RT), with a small uncertainty of ±20% at T = 1600 K and ±30% at the upper and lower experimental temperature limits.The two Arrhenius terms basically can be attributed to the contributions of reaction channel (2a) yielding CH + N2 and channel (2b) yielding HCN + N as the products. A more refined analysis taking into account experimental and theoretical literature data provided a consistent rate constant set for k2a, its reverse reaction k1a (CH + N2 → NCN + H), k2b as well as a value for the controversial enthalpy of formation of NCN, ΔfH = 450 kJ mol(-1). The analysis verifies the expected strong temperature dependence of the branching fraction ϕ = k2b/k2 with reaction channel (2b) dominating at the experimental high-temperature limit. In contrast, reaction (2a) dominates at the low-temperature limit with a possible minor contribution of the HNCN forming recombination channel (2d) at T < 1150 K.

  7. Stress Altered Stem Cells with Decellularized Allograft to Improve Rate of Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The research detailed in this annual report is to study how to improve the rate of peripheral nerve regeneration. The slow rate of...atrophy. For our research, we will study the rate at which nerves regenerate in a rat model. We will excise the peripheral nerve, and study how...that show stem-cell like qualities after undergoing physical and chemical stresses. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Peripheral Nerve Repair, Nerve Injury

  8. A systematic evaluation of the dose-rate constant determined by photon spectrometry for 21 different models of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Jay Chen, Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic comparison of the dose-rate constant (Λ) determined by the photon spectrometry technique (PST) with the consensus value (CONΛ) recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for 21 low-energy photon-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. A total of 63 interstitial brachytherapy sources (21 different models with 3 sources per model) containing either 125I (14 models), 103Pd (6 models) or 131Cs (1 model) were included in this study. A PST described by Chen and Nath (2007 Med. Phys. 34 1412-30) was used to determine the dose-rate constant (PSTΛ) for each source model. Source-dependent variations in PSTΛ were analyzed systematically against the spectral characteristics of the emitted photons and the consensus values recommended by the AAPM brachytherapy subcommittee. The values of PSTΛ for the encapsulated sources of 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs varied from 0.661 to 0.678 cGyh-1 U-1, 0.959 to 1.024 cGyh-1U-1 and 1.066 to 1.073 cGyh-1U-1, respectively. The relative variation in PSTΛ among the six 103Pd source models, caused by variations in photon attenuation and in spatial distributions of radioactivity among the source models, was less than 3%. Greater variations in PSTΛ were observed among the 14 125I source models; the maximum relative difference was over 6%. These variations were caused primarily by the presence of silver in some 125I source models and, to a lesser degree, by the variations in photon attenuation and in spatial distribution of radioactivity among the source models. The presence of silver generates additional fluorescent x-rays with lower photon energies which caused the PSTΛ value to vary from 0.959 to 1.019 cGyh-1U-1 depending on the amount of silver used by a given source model. For those 125I sources that contain no silver, their PSTΛ was less variable and had values within 1% of 1.024 cGyh-1U-1. For the 16 source models that currently have an AAPM recommended

  9. Estimation of rate constant for VE excitation of the С2(D1Σ) state in Не-СО-О2 discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorian, G.; Cenian, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses the experimental results pointing to the efficient channel of the CO vibrational to the C2 electronic energy-transfer. The radiation spectra D1Σu - X1Σg , known as Mulliken bands, are investigated and the relation of their kinetics to a vibrational excitation of CO molecules in the He-CO-O2 plasma is discussed. The rate constant for VE process ( CO(v >= 25) + C2 → CO(v - 25) + C2(D1Σu) ) is estimated, kVE ~ 10-14 см3/с.

  10. Exact solution to the general Riemann problem in nonuniform and nonstationary media: A simplified analysis of a shock wave accelerated at a constant rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Koichi

    2010-12-01

    Exact solutions to special cases of the general Riemann problem, in which two nonuniform and nonstationary flows are initially separated by a discontinuity at the origin, are proposed. By describing the evolution of flows using a family of the group-invariant solutions derived by Ovsiannikov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk S.S.S.R. 111, 439 (1958)] the flows ahead of and behind a shock wave accelerated at a constant rate are formulated analytically. Transition relations across a contact discontinuity and a characteristic wave in a nonuniform and nonstationary flow are formulated as well. The entire flow field is solved by combining these waves.

  11. Virtual Instrument for Determining Rate Constant of Second-Order Reaction by pX Based on LabVIEW 8.0.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hu; Li, Jiang-Yuan; Tang, Yong-Huai

    2009-01-01

    The virtual instrument system based on LabVIEW 8.0 for ion analyzer which can measure and analyze ion concentrations in solution is developed and comprises homemade conditioning circuit, data acquiring board, and computer. It can calibrate slope, temperature, and positioning automatically. When applied to determine the reaction rate constant by pX, it achieved live acquiring, real-time displaying, automatical processing of testing data, generating the report of results; and other functions. This method simplifies the experimental operation greatly, avoids complicated procedures of manual processing data and personal error, and improves veracity and repeatability of the experiment results.

  12. Beyond transition state theory: accurate description of nuclear quantum effects on the rate and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions using Feynman path integrals.

    PubMed

    Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects have been shown to play a significant role in molecules as large as enzymes even at physiological temperatures. I discuss how these quantum phenomena can be accounted for rigorously using Feynman path integrals in calculations of the equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects as well as of the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Because these calculations are extremely computationally demanding, special attention is devoted to increasing the computational efficiency by orders of magnitude by employing efficient path integral estimators.

  13. An Effective Continuum Model for the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Change in a Porous Medium Driven by Solute Diffusion: II. Constant Liquid Withdrawal Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2001-08-15

    This report describes the development of an effective continuum model to describe the nucleation and subsequent growth of a gas phase from a supersaturated, slightly compressible binary liquid in a porous medium, driven by solute diffusion.This report also focuses on the processes resulting from the withdrawal of the liquid at a constant rate. As before, the model addresses two stages before the onset of bulk gas flow, nucleation and gas phase growth. Because of negligible gradients due to gravity or viscous forces, the critical gas saturation, is only a function of the nucleation fraction.

  14. Equilibrium and rate constants, and reaction mechanism of the HF dissociation in the HF(H2O)7 cluster by ab initio rare event simulations.

    PubMed

    Elena, Alin Marin; Meloni, Simone; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-12-12

    We perform restrained hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to compute the equilibrium constant of the dissociation reaction of HF in HF(H2O)7. We find that the HF is a stronger acid in the cluster than in the bulk, and its acidity is higher at lower T. The latter phenomenon has a vibrational entropic origin, resulting from a counterintuitive balance of intra- and intermolecular terms. We find also a temperature dependence of the reactions mechanism. At low T (≤225 K) the dissociation reaction follows a concerted path, with the H atoms belonging to the relevant hydrogen bond chain moving synchronously. At higher T (300 K), the first two hydrogen atoms move together, forming an intermediate metastable state having the structure of an eigen ion (H9O4(+)), and then the third hydrogen migrates completing the reaction. We also compute the dissociation rate constant, kRP. At very low T (≤75 K) kRP depends strongly on the temperature, whereas it gets almost constant at higher T’s. With respect to the bulk, the HF dissociation in the HF(H2O)7 is about 1 order of magnitude faster. This is due to a lower free energy barrier for the dissociation in the cluster.

  15. Combined heart rate variability and dynamic measures for quantitatively characterizing the cardiac stress status during cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chang, Ya-Ju; Chuang, Li-Ling; Chien, Chun-Tse

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to seek for different ways of measuring cardiac stress in terms of heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate (HR) dynamics, and to develop a novel index that can effectively summarize the information reflected by these measures to continuously and quantitatively characterize the cardiac stress status during physical exercise. Standard deviation, spectral measure of HRV as well as a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) based fractal-like behavior measure of HR dynamics were all evaluated on the RR time series derived from windowed electrocardiogram (ECG) data for the subjects undergoing cycling exercise. We recruited eleven young healthy subjects in our tests. Each subject was asked to maintain a fixed speed under a constant load during the pedaling test. We obtained the running estimates of the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal interval (SDNN), the high-fidelity power spectral density (PSD) of HRV, and the DFA scaling exponent α, respectively. A trend analysis and a multivariate linear regression analysis of these measures were then performed. Numerical experimental results produced by our analyses showed that a decrease in both SDNN and α was seen during the cycling exercise, while there was no significant correlation between the standard lower frequency to higher frequency (LF-to-HF) spectral power ratio of HRV and the exercise intensity. In addition, while the SDNN and α were both negatively correlated with the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale value, it seemed that the LF-to-HF power ratio might not have substantial impact on the Borg value, suggesting that the SDNN and α may be further used as features to detect the cardiac stress status during the physical exercise. We further approached this detection problem by applying a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to both feature candidates for the task of cardiac stress stratification. As a result, a time-varying parameter, referred to as the cardiac

  16. Relationship between obesity, negative affect and basal heart rate in predicting heart rate reactivity to psychological stress among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Park, Andres E; Huynh, Pauline; Schell, Anne M; Baker, Laura A

    2015-08-01

    Reduced cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors have been found to be associated with both obesity and negative affect in adults, but have been less well studied in children and adolescent populations. These findings have most often been interpreted as reflecting reduced sympathetic nervous system response, perhaps associated with heightened baseline sympathetic activation among the obese and those manifesting negative affect. However, obesity and negative affect may themselves be correlated, raising the question of whether they both independently affect cardiovascular reactivity. The present study thus examined the separate effects of obesity and negative affect on both cardiovascular and skin conductance responses to stress (e.g., during a serial subtraction math task) in adolescents, while controlling for baseline levels of autonomic activity during rest. Both obesity and negative affect had independent and negative associations with cardiovascular reactivity, such that reduced stress responses were apparent for obese adolescents and those with high levels of negative affect. In contrast, neither obesity nor negative affect was related to skin conductance responses to stress, implicating specifically noradrenergic mechanisms rather than sympathetic mechanisms generally as being deficient. Moreover, baseline heart rate was unrelated to obesity in this sample, which suggests that heightened baseline of sympathetic activity is not necessary for the reduced cardiovascular reactivity to stress.

  17. Extreme stress gradient effects on microstructural fatigue crack propagation rates in Ni microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Tohidi, F.; Pierron, O. N.

    2015-05-18

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of microstructurally small cracks growing under extreme stress gradients was investigated in Ni microbeams under fully reversed cyclic loading. A technique to calculate the crack growth rates in microbeams with two different normalized stress gradients (17% and 50% μm{sup −1}) is developed and validated. Decreasing crack propagation rates are observed over the first 2 μm, and the rates are more than 1 order of magnitude slower for the devices with 50% μm{sup −1} stress gradients. This fundamental knowledge is critical to predict the fatigue reliability of advanced metallic microcomponents under bending such as in microelectromechanical systems or flexible/stretchable electronics.

  18. Calculated rate constants of the chemical reactions involving the main byproducts SO2F, SOF2, SO2F2 of SF6 decomposition in power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuwei; Rong, Mingzhe; Yang, Kang; Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Dingxin; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-04-01

    SF6 is widely used in electrical equipment as an insulating gas. In the presence of an electric arc, partial discharge (PD) or spark, SF6 dissociation products (such as SF2, SF3 and SF4) react with the unavoidable gas impurities (such as water vapor and oxygen), electrodes and surrounding solid insulation materials, forming several toxic and corrosive byproducts. The main stable decomposition products are SO2F, SO2F2 and SOF2, which have been confirmed experimentally to have a direct relationship with discharge faults, and are thus expected to be useful in the fault diagnosis of power equipment. Various studies have been performed of the main SF6 decomposition species and their concentrations under different types of faults. However, most of the experiments focused on the qualitative analysis of the relationship between the stable products and discharge faults. Although some theoretical research on the formation of main SF6 derivatives have been carried out using chemical kinetics models, the basic data (chemical reactions and their rate constants) adopted in the model are inaccurate and incomplete. The complex chemical reactions of SF6 with the impurities are ignored in most cases. The rate constants of some reactions obtained at ambient temperature or in a narrow temperature range are adopted in the models over a far greater range, for example up to 12 000 K, due to the difficulty in the experimental measurement and theoretical estimation of rate coefficients, particularly at high temperatures. Therefore, improved theoretical models require not only the consideration of additional SF6 decomposition reactions in the presence of impurities but also on improved values of rate constants. This paper is devoted to determining the rate constants of the chemical reactions relating to the main byproducts of SF6 decomposition in SF6 gas-insulated power equipment: SO2F, SOF2 and SO2F2. Quantum chemistry calculations with density functional theory, conventional

  19. Review of rate constants and exploration of correlations of the halogen transfer reaction of trisubstituted carbon-centered radicals with molecular halogens.

    PubMed

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2012-03-16

    Rate constants for the reaction (R'(3)C(•) + X(2) → R'(3)CX + X(•); X = F, Cl, Br, I) are reviewed. Because of curved Arrhenius plots and negative E(X) values, empirical structure-reactivity correlations are sought for log k(X,298) rather than E(X). The well-known poor correlation with measures of reaction enthalpy is demonstrated. The best quantitative predictor for R'(3)C(•) is Σσ(p), the sum of the Hammett σ(p) constants for the three substituents, R'. Electronegative substituents with lone pairs, such as halogen and oxygen, thus appear to destabilize the formation of a polarized prereaction complex and/or TS ((δ+)R- - -X- - -X(δ-)) by σ inductive/field electron withdrawal while simultaneously stabilizing them by π resonance electron donation. The best quantitative predictor of the reactivity order of the halogens, I(2) > Br(2) ≫ Cl(2) ≈ F(2), is the polarizability of the halogen, α(X(2)). For the data set of 60 rate constants which span 6.5 orders of magnitude, a modestly successful correlation of log k(X,298) is achieved with only two parameters, Σσ(p) and α(X(2)), with a mean unsigned deviation of 0.59 log unit. How much of this residual variance is the result of inaccuracies in the data in comparison with oversimplification of the correlation approach remains to be seen.

  20. The reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane - Temperature dependence of the rate constant and implications for germane photochemistry in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the formation and loss processes for GeH4 are required in order to provide data to help determine the major chemical form in which germanium exists in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. The reaction of hydrogen atoms with germane is one of the most important of these reactions. The absolute rate constant for this reaction as a function of temperature and pressure is studied. Flash photolysis of dilute mixtures of GeH4 in argon, combined with time-resolved detection of H atoms via Lyman alpha resonance fluorescence, is employed to measure the reaction rate. The reaction is shown to be moderately rapid, independent of total pressure, but possessing a positive temperature dependence.