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Sample records for constrained shape optimization

  1. Constrained Aeroacoustic Shape Optimization Using the Surrogate Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Alison L.; Wang, Meng; Dennis, John E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reduction of noise generated by turbulent flow past the trailing-edge of a lifting surface is a challenge in many aeronautical and naval applications. Numerical predictions of trailing-edge noise necessitate the use of advanced simulation techniques such as large-eddy simulation (LES) in order to capture a wide range of turbulence scales which are the source of broadband noise. Aeroacoustic calculations of the flow over a model airfoil trailing edge using LES and aeroacoustic theory have been presented in Wang and Moin and were shown to agree favorably with experiments. The goal of the present work is to apply shape optimization to the trailing edge flow previously studied, in order to control aerodynamic noise.

  2. Constrained Multipoint Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using an Adjoint Formulation and Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Saunders, David

    1997-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that treats the design of complex aircraft configurations subject to high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD), geometric constraints and multiple design points is described. The design process will be greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and distributed memory computer architectures. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on a higher order CFD method. In order to facilitate the integration of these high fidelity CFD approaches into future multi-disciplinary optimization (NW) applications, new methods must be developed which are capable of simultaneously addressing complex geometries, multiple objective functions, and geometric design constraints. In our earlier studies, we coupled the adjoint based design formulations with unconstrained optimization algorithms and showed that the approach was effective for the aerodynamic design of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations. In many of the results presented in these earlier works, geometric constraints were satisfied either by a projection into feasible space or by posing the design space parameterization such that it automatically satisfied constraints. Furthermore, with the exception of reference 9 where the second author initially explored the use of multipoint design in conjunction with adjoint formulations, our earlier works have focused on single point design efforts. Here we demonstrate that the same methodology may be extended to treat

  3. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  4. Shape optimization for DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaknin, Gaddiel; Laachi, Nabil; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn; Gibou, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly using block copolymers for positioning vertical interconnect access in integrated circuits relies on the proper shape of a confined domain in which polymers will self-assemble into the targeted design. Finding that shape, i.e., solving the inverse problem, is currently mainly based on trial and error approaches. We introduce a level-set based algorithm that makes use of a shape optimization strategy coupled with self-consistent field theory to solve the inverse problem in an automated way. It is shown that optimal shapes are found for different targeted topologies with accurate placement and distances between the different components.

  5. Determination of optimal gains for constrained controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, C.M.; Mestha, L.K.

    1993-08-01

    In this report, we consider the determination of optimal gains, with respect to a certain performance index, for state feedback controllers where some elements in the gain matrix are constrained to be zero. Two iterative schemes for systematically finding the constrained gain matrix are presented. An example is included to demonstrate the procedures.

  6. Optimization of retinotopy constrained source estimation constrained by prior

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Studying how the timing and amplitude of visual evoked responses (VERs) vary between visual areas is important for understanding visual processing but is complicated by difficulties in reliably estimating VERs in individual visual areas using non-invasive brain measurements. Retinotopy constrained source estimation (RCSE) addresses this challenge by using multiple, retinotopically-mapped stimulus locations to simultaneously constrain estimates of VERs in visual areas V1, V2, and V3, taking advantage of the spatial precision of fMRI retinotopy and the temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). Nonlinear optimization of dipole locations, guided by a group-constrained RCSE solution as a prior, improved the robustness of RCSE. This approach facilitated the analysis of differences in timing and amplitude of VERs between V1, V2, and V3, elicited by stimuli with varying luminance contrast in a sample of eight adult humans. The V1 peak response was 37% larger than that of V2 and 74% larger than that of V3, and also ~10–20 msec earlier. Normalized contrast response functions were nearly identical for the three areas. Results without dipole optimization, or with other nonlinear methods not constrained by prior estimates were similar but suffered from greater between-subject variability. The increased reliability of estimates offered by this approach may be particularly valuable when using a smaller number of stimulus locations, enabling a greater variety of stimulus and task manipulations. PMID:23868690

  7. Constraining Light Colored Particles with Event Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2008-07-11

    Using recently developed techniques for computing event shapes with soft-collinear effective theory, CERN Large Electron Positron Collider event shape data are used to derive strong model-independent bounds on new colored particles. In the effective field theory computation, colored particles contribute in loops not only to the running of {alpha}{sub s} but also to the running of hard, jet, and soft functions. Moreover, the differential distribution in the effective theory explicitly probes many energy scales, so even shapes have a strong sensitivity to new particle thresholds. Using thrust data from ALEPH and OPAL, colored adjoint fermions (such as a gluino) below 51.0 GeV are ruled out to 95% confidence. This is nearly an order-of-magnitude improvement over the previous model-independent bound of 6.3 GeV.

  8. Mixed-Strategy Chance Constrained Optimal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Balaram, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel chance constrained optimal control (CCOC) algorithm that chooses a control action probabilistically. A CCOC problem is to find a control input that minimizes the expected cost while guaranteeing that the probability of violating a set of constraints is below a user-specified threshold. We show that a probabilistic control approach, which we refer to as a mixed control strategy, enables us to obtain a cost that is better than what deterministic control strategies can achieve when the CCOC problem is nonconvex. The resulting mixed-strategy CCOC problem turns out to be a convexification of the original nonconvex CCOC problem. Furthermore, we also show that a mixed control strategy only needs to "mix" up to two deterministic control actions in order to achieve optimality. Building upon an iterative dual optimization, the proposed algorithm quickly converges to the optimal mixed control strategy with a user-specified tolerance.

  9. Constrained Graph Optimization: Interdiction and Preservation Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, Aaron V

    2012-07-30

    The maximum flow, shortest path, and maximum matching problems are a set of basic graph problems that are critical in theoretical computer science and applications. Constrained graph optimization, a variation of these basic graph problems involving modification of the underlying graph, is equally important but sometimes significantly harder. In particular, one can explore these optimization problems with additional cost constraints. In the preservation case, the optimizer has a budget to preserve vertices or edges of a graph, preventing them from being deleted. The optimizer wants to find the best set of preserved edges/vertices in which the cost constraints are satisfied and the basic graph problems are optimized. For example, in shortest path preservation, the optimizer wants to find a set of edges/vertices within which the shortest path between two predetermined points is smallest. In interdiction problems, one deletes vertices or edges from the graph with a particular cost in order to impede the basic graph problems as much as possible (for example, delete edges/vertices to maximize the shortest path between two predetermined vertices). Applications of preservation problems include optimal road maintenance, power grid maintenance, and job scheduling, while interdiction problems are related to drug trafficking prevention, network stability assessment, and counterterrorism. Computational hardness results are presented, along with heuristic methods for approximating solutions to the matching interdiction problem. Also, efficient algorithms are presented for special cases of graphs, including on planar graphs. The graphs in many of the listed applications are planar, so these algorithms have important practical implications.

  10. Social Emotional Optimization Algorithm for Nonlinear Constrained Optimization Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuechun; Cui, Zhihua; Zeng, Jianchao

    Nonlinear programming problem is one important branch in operational research, and has been successfully applied to various real-life problems. In this paper, a new approach called Social emotional optimization algorithm (SEOA) is used to solve this problem which is a new swarm intelligent technique by simulating the human behavior guided by emotion. Simulation results show that the social emotional optimization algorithm proposed in this paper is effective and efficiency for the nonlinear constrained programming problems.

  11. Optimal performance of constrained control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, P. Scott, Jr.; Gavin, Henri P.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a method to compute optimal open-loop trajectories for systems subject to state and control inequality constraints in which the cost function is quadratic and the state dynamics are linear. For the case in which inequality constraints are decentralized with respect to the controls, optimal Lagrange multipliers enforcing the inequality constraints may be found at any time through Pontryagin’s minimum principle. In so doing, the set of differential algebraic Euler-Lagrange equations is transformed into a nonlinear two-point boundary-value problem for states and costates whose solution meets the necessary conditions for optimality. The optimal performance of inequality constrained control systems is calculable, allowing for comparison to previous, sub-optimal solutions. The method is applied to the control of damping forces in a vibration isolation system subjected to constraints imposed by the physical implementation of a particular controllable damper. An outcome of this study is the best performance achievable given a particular objective, isolation system, and semi-active damper constraints.

  12. Distributed Constrained Optimization with Semicoordinate Transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macready, William; Wolpert, David

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has shown how information theory extends conventional full-rationality game theory to allow bounded rational agents. The associated mathematical framework can be used to solve constrained optimization problems. This is done by translating the problem into an iterated game, where each agent controls a different variable of the problem, so that the joint probability distribution across the agents moves gives an expected value of the objective function. The dynamics of the agents is designed to minimize a Lagrangian function of that joint distribution. Here we illustrate how the updating of the Lagrange parameters in the Lagrangian is a form of automated annealing, which focuses the joint distribution more and more tightly about the joint moves that optimize the objective function. We then investigate the use of "semicoordinate" variable transformations. These separate the joint state of the agents from the variables of the optimization problem, with the two connected by an onto mapping. We present experiments illustrating the ability of such transformations to facilitate optimization. We focus on the special kind of transformation in which the statistically independent states of the agents induces a mixture distribution over the optimization variables. Computer experiment illustrate this for &sat constraint satisfaction problems and for unconstrained minimization of NK functions.

  13. Robust, Optimal Subsonic Airfoil Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2014-01-01

    A method has been developed to create an airfoil robust enough to operate satisfactorily in different environments. This method determines a robust, optimal, subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape, and imposes the necessary constraints on the design. Also, this method is flexible and extendible to a larger class of requirements and changes in constraints imposed.

  14. Optimization of constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, David D.; Teobaldi, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    Constrained density functional theory (cDFT) is a versatile electronic structure method that enables ground-state calculations to be performed subject to physical constraints. It thereby broadens their applicability and utility. Automated Lagrange multiplier optimization is necessary for multiple constraints to be applied efficiently in cDFT, for it to be used in tandem with geometry optimization, or with molecular dynamics. In order to facilitate this, we comprehensively develop the connection between cDFT energy derivatives and response functions, providing a rigorous assessment of the uniqueness and character of cDFT stationary points while accounting for electronic interactions and screening. In particular, we provide a nonperturbative proof that stable stationary points of linear density constraints occur only at energy maxima with respect to their Lagrange multipliers. We show that multiple solutions, hysteresis, and energy discontinuities may occur in cDFT. Expressions are derived, in terms of convenient by-products of cDFT optimization, for quantities such as the dielectric function and a condition number quantifying ill definition in multiple constraint cDFT.

  15. Traveltime tomography and nonlinear constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1988-10-01

    Fermat's principle of least traveltime states that the first arrivals follow ray paths with the smallest overall traveltime from the point of transmission to the point of reception. This principle determines a definite convex set of feasible slowness models - depending only on the traveltime data - for the fully nonlinear traveltime inversion problem. The existence of such a convex set allows us to transform the inversion problem into a nonlinear constrained optimization problem. Fermat's principle also shows that the standard undamped least-squares solution to the inversion problem always produces a slowness model with many ray paths having traveltime shorter than the measured traveltime (an impossibility even if the trial ray paths are not the true ray paths). In a damped least-squares inversion, the damping parameter may be varied to allow efficient location of a slowness model on the feasibility boundary. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Multiplier-continuation algorthms for constrained optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundberg, Bruce N.; Poore, Aubrey B.; Bing, Yang

    1989-01-01

    Several path following algorithms based on the combination of three smooth penalty functions, the quadratic penalty for equality constraints and the quadratic loss and log barrier for inequality constraints, their modern counterparts, augmented Lagrangian or multiplier methods, sequential quadratic programming, and predictor-corrector continuation are described. In the first phase of this methodology, one minimizes the unconstrained or linearly constrained penalty function or augmented Lagrangian. A homotopy path generated from the functions is then followed to optimality using efficient predictor-corrector continuation methods. The continuation steps are asymptotic to those taken by sequential quadratic programming which can be used in the final steps. Numerical test results show the method to be efficient, robust, and a competitive alternative to sequential quadratic programming.

  17. Second-order neural nets for constrained optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Zhu, X; Zou, L H

    1992-01-01

    Analog neural nets for constrained optimization are proposed as an analogue of Newton's algorithm in numerical analysis. The neural model is globally stable and can converge to the constrained stationary points. Nonlinear neurons are introduced into the net, making it possible to solve optimization problems where the variables take discrete values, i.e., combinatorial optimization.

  18. Optimal shapes for best draining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, J. D.

    2009-11-01

    The container shape that minimizes the volume of draining fluid remaining on the walls of the container after it has been emptied from its base is determined. The film of draining fluid is assumed to wet the walls of the container, and is sufficiently thin so that its curvature may be neglected. Surface tension is ignored. The initial value problem for the thickness of a film of Newtonian fluid is studied, and is shown to lead asymptotically to a similarity solution. From this, and from equivalent solutions for power-law fluids, the volume of the residual film is determined. The optimal container shape is not far from hemispherical, to minimize the surface area, but has a conical base to promote draining. The optimal shape for an axisymmetric mixing vessel, with a hole at the center of its base for draining, is also optimal when inverted in the manner of a washed wine glass inverted and left to drain.

  19. Constraining Cometary Crystal Shapes from IR Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean; Harker, David E.; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Murphy, James Richard

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in deriving the silicate mineralogy of comets is ascertaining how the anisotropic nature of forsterite crystals affects the spectral features' wavelength, relative intensity, and asymmetry. Forsterite features are identified in cometary comae near 10, 11.05-11.2, 16, 19, 23.5, 27.5 and 33 microns [1-10], so accurate models for forsterite's absorption efficiency (Qabs) are a primary requirement to compute IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs, lambdaF lambda vs. lambda) and constrain the silicate mineralogy of comets. Forsterite is an anisotropic crystal, with three crystallographic axes with distinct indices of refraction for the a-, b-, and c-axis. The shape of a forsterite crystal significantly affects its spectral features [13-16]. We need models that account for crystal shape. The IR absorption efficiencies of forsterite are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT [11,12]. Starting from a fiducial crystal shape of a cube, we systematically elongate/reduce one of the crystallographic axes. Also, we elongate/reduce one axis while the lengths of the other two axes are slightly asymmetric (0.8:1.2). The most significant grain shape characteristic that affects the crystalline spectral features is the relative lengths of the crystallographic axes. The second significant grain shape characteristic is breaking the symmetry of all three axes [17]. Synthetic spectral energy distributions using seven crystal shape classes [17] are fit to the observed SED of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). The Hale-Bopp crystalline residual better matches equant, b-platelets, c-platelets, and b-columns spectral shape classes, while a-platelets, a-columns and c-columns worsen the spectral fits. Forsterite condensation and partial evaporation experiments demonstrate that environmental temperature and grain shape are connected [18-20]. Thus, grain shape is a potential probe for protoplanetary disk temperatures where the cometary crystalline

  20. Using Simple Shapes to Constrain Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, Eric M.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2015-11-01

    With the use of remote thermal infrared observations and a thermophysical model (TPM), the thermal inertia of an asteroid surface can be determined. The thermal inertia, in turn, can be used to infer physical properties of the surface, specifically to estimate the average regolith grain size. Since asteroids are often non-spherical techniques for incorporating modeled (non-spherical) shapes into calculating thermal inertia have been established. However, using a sphere as input for TPM is beneficial in reducing running time and shape models are not generally available for all (or most) objects that are observed in the thermal-IR. This is particularly true, as the pace of infrared observations has recently dramatically increased, notably due to the WISE mission, while the time to acquire sufficient light curves for accurate shape inversion remains relatively long. Here, we investigate the accuracy of using both a spherical and ellipsoidal TPM, with infrared observations obtained at pre- and post-opposition (hereafter multi-epoch) geometries to constrain the thermal inertias of a large number of asteroids.We test whether using multi-epoch observations combined with a spherical and ellipsoidal shape TPM can constrain the thermal inertia of an object without a priori knowledge of its shape or spin state. The effectiveness of this technique is tested for 16 objects with shape models from DAMIT and WISE multi-epoch observations. For each object, the shape model is used as input for the TPM to generate synthetic fluxes for different values of thermal inertia. The input spherical and ellipsoidal shapes are then stepped through different spin vectors as the TPM is used to generate best-fit thermal inertia and diameter to the synthetically generated fluxes, allowing for a direct test of the approach’s effectiveness. We will discuss whether the precision of the thermal inertia constraints from the spherical TPM analysis of multi- epoch observations is comparable to works

  1. Shape optimization of corrugated airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sambhav; Bhatt, Varun Dhananjay; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The effect of corrugations on the aerodynamic performance of a Mueller C4 airfoil, placed at a 5° angle of attack and Re=10{,}000, is investigated. A stabilized finite element method is employed to solve the incompressible flow equations in two dimensions. A novel parameterization scheme is proposed that enables representation of corrugations on the surface of the airfoil, and their spontaneous appearance in the shape optimization loop, if indeed they improve aerodynamic performance. Computations are carried out for different location and number of corrugations, while holding their height fixed. The first corrugation causes an increase in lift and drag. Each of the later corrugations leads to a reduction in drag. Shape optimization of the Mueller C4 airfoil is carried out using various objective functions and optimization strategies, based on controlling airfoil thickness and camber. One of the optimal shapes leads to 50 % increase in lift coefficient and 23 % increase in aerodynamic efficiency compared to the Mueller C4 airfoil.

  2. Constraining Cometary Crystal Shapes from IR Spectral Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S.; Harker, D. E.; Kelley, M. S.; Woodward, C. E.; Murphy, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    A major challenge in deriving the silicate mineralogy of comets is ascertaining how the anisotropic nature of forsterite crystals affects the spectral features' wavelength, relative intensity, and asymmetry. Forsterite features are identified in cometary comae near 10, 11.05-11.2, 16, 19, 23.5, 27.5 and 33 μm [1-10], so accurate models for forsterite's absorption efficiency (Qabs) are a primary requirement to compute IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs, λFλ vs. λ) and constrain the silicate mineralogy of comets. Forsterite is an anisotropic crystal, with three crystallographic axes with distinct indices of refraction for the a-, b-, and c-axis. The shape of a forsterite crystal significantly affects its spectral features [13-16]. We need models that account for crystal shape. The IR absorption efficiencies of forsterite are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT [11,12]. Starting from a fiducial crystal shape of a cube, we systematically elongate/reduce one of the crystallographic axes. Also, we elongate/reduce one axis while the lengths of the other two axes are slightly asymmetric (0.8:1.2). The most significant grain shape characteristic that affects the crystalline spectral features is the relative lengths of the crystallographic axes. The second significant grain shape characteristic is breaking the symmetry of all three axes [17]. Synthetic spectral energy distributions using seven crystal shape classes [17] are fit to the observed SED of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). The Hale-Bopp crystalline residual better matches equant, b-platelets, c-platelets, and b-columns spectral shape classes, while a-platelets, a-columns and c-columns worsen the spectral fits. Forsterite condensation and partial evaporation experiments demonstrate that environmental temperature and grain shape are connected [18-20]. Thus, grain shape is a potential probe for protoplanetary disk temperatures where the cometary crystalline forsterite formed. The

  3. Constrained optimization of image restoration filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    A linear shift-invariant preprocessing technique is described which requires no specific knowledge of the image parameters and which is sufficiently general to allow the effective radius of the composite imaging system to be minimized while constraining other system parameters to remain within specified limits.

  4. Asynchronous parallel generating set search for linearly-constrained optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Robert Michael; Griffin, Joshua D.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-08-01

    Generating set search (GSS) is a family of direct search methods that encompasses generalized pattern search and related methods. We describe an algorithm for asynchronous linearly-constrained GSS, which has some complexities that make it different from both the asynchronous bound-constrained case as well as the synchronous linearly-constrained case. The algorithm has been implemented in the APPSPACK software framework and we present results from an extensive numerical study using CUTEr test problems. We discuss the results, both positive and negative, and conclude that GSS is a reliable method for solving small-to-medium sized linearly-constrained optimization problems without derivatives.

  5. A spatial shape constrained clustering method for mammographic mass segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jian-Yong; Yang, Xu-Lei; Cao, Ai-Ze

    2015-01-01

    A novel clustering method is proposed for mammographic mass segmentation on extracted regions of interest (ROIs) by using deterministic annealing incorporating circular shape function (DACF). The objective function reported in this study uses both intensity and spatial shape information, and the dominant dissimilarity measure is controlled by two weighting parameters. As a result, pixels having similar intensity information but located in different regions can be differentiated. Experimental results shows that, by using DACF, the mass segmentation results in digitized mammograms are improved with optimal mass boundaries, less number of noisy patches, and computational efficiency. An average probability of segmentation error of 7.18% for well-defined masses (or 8.06% for ill-defined masses) was obtained by using DACF on MiniMIAS database, with 5.86% (or 5.55%) and 6.14% (or 5.27%) improvements as compared to the standard DA and fuzzy c-means methods. PMID:25737739

  6. Insights into capacity-constrained optimal transport.

    PubMed

    Korman, Jonathan; McCann, Robert J

    2013-06-18

    A variant of the classical optimal transportation problem is the following: among all joint measures with fixed marginals and that are dominated by a given density, find the optimal one. Existence and uniqueness of solutions to this variant were established by Korman and McCann. In the present article, we expose an unexpected symmetry leading to explicit examples in two and more dimensions. These are inspired in part by simulations in one dimension that display singularities and topology and in part by two further developments: the identification of all extreme points in the feasible set and an approach to uniqueness based on constructing feasible perturbations. PMID:23733929

  7. Sequential unconstrained minimization algorithms for constrained optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Charles

    2008-02-01

    The problem of minimizing a function f(x):RJ → R, subject to constraints on the vector variable x, occurs frequently in inverse problems. Even without constraints, finding a minimizer of f(x) may require iterative methods. We consider here a general class of iterative algorithms that find a solution to the constrained minimization problem as the limit of a sequence of vectors, each solving an unconstrained minimization problem. Our sequential unconstrained minimization algorithm (SUMMA) is an iterative procedure for constrained minimization. At the kth step we minimize the function G_k(x)=f(x)+g_k(x), to obtain xk. The auxiliary functions gk(x):D ⊆ RJ → R+ are nonnegative on the set D, each xk is assumed to lie within D, and the objective is to minimize the continuous function f:RJ → R over x in the set C=\\overline D , the closure of D. We assume that such minimizers exist, and denote one such by \\hat x . We assume that the functions gk(x) satisfy the inequalities 0\\leq g_k(x)\\leq G_{k-1}(x)-G_{k-1}(x^{k-1}), for k = 2, 3, .... Using this assumption, we show that the sequence {f(xk)} is decreasing and converges to f({\\hat x}) . If the restriction of f(x) to D has bounded level sets, which happens if \\hat x is unique and f(x) is closed, proper and convex, then the sequence {xk} is bounded, and f(x^*)=f({\\hat x}) , for any cluster point x*. Therefore, if \\hat x is unique, x^*={\\hat x} and \\{x^k\\}\\rightarrow {\\hat x} . When \\hat x is not unique, convergence can still be obtained, in particular cases. The SUMMA includes, as particular cases, the well-known barrier- and penalty-function methods, the simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART), the proximal minimization algorithm of Censor and Zenios, the entropic proximal methods of Teboulle, as well as certain cases of gradient descent and the Newton-Raphson method. The proof techniques used for SUMMA can be extended to obtain related results for the induced proximal

  8. A shape constrained MAP-EM algorithm for colorectal segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huafeng; Li, Lihong; Song, Bowen; Han, Fangfang; Liang, Zhengrong

    2013-02-01

    The task of effectively segmenting colon areas in CT images is an important area of interest in medical imaging field. The ability to distinguish the colon wall in an image from the background is a critical step in several approaches for achieving larger goals in automated computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). The related task of polyp detection, the ability to determine which objects or classes of polyps are present in a scene, also relies on colon wall segmentation. When modeling each tissue type as a conditionally independent Gaussian distribution, the tissue mixture fractions in each voxel via the modeled unobservable random processes of the underlying tissue types can be estimated by maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization (MAP-EM) algorithm in an iterative manner. This paper presents, based on the assumption that the partial volume effect (PVE) could be fully described by a tissue mixture model, a theoretical solution to the MAP-EM segmentation algorithm. However, the MAP-EM algorithm may miss some small regions which also belong to the colon wall. Combining with the shape constrained model, we present an improved algorithm which is able to merge similar regions and reserve fine structures. Experiment results show that the new approach can refine the jagged-like boundaries and achieve better results than merely exploited our previously presented MAP-EM algorithm.

  9. Shape optimization of self-avoiding curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Shawn W.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a softened notion of proximity (or self-avoidance) for curves. We then derive a sensitivity result, based on shape differential calculus, for the proximity. This is combined with a gradient-based optimization approach to compute three-dimensional, parameterized curves that minimize the sum of an elastic (bending) energy and a proximity energy that maintains self-avoidance by a penalization technique. Minimizers are computed by a sequential-quadratic-programming (SQP) method where the bending energy and proximity energy are approximated by a finite element method. We then apply this method to two problems. First, we simulate adsorbed polymer strands that are constrained to be bound to a surface and be (locally) inextensible. This is a basic model of semi-flexible polymers adsorbed onto a surface (a current topic in material science). Several examples of minimizing curve shapes on a variety of surfaces are shown. An advantage of the method is that it can be much faster than using molecular dynamics for simulating polymer strands on surfaces. Second, we apply our proximity penalization to the computation of ideal knots. We present a heuristic scheme, utilizing the SQP method above, for minimizing rope-length and apply it in the case of the trefoil knot. Applications of this method could be for generating good initial guesses to a more accurate (but expensive) knot-tightening algorithm.

  10. Robust, optimal subsonic airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Method system, and product from application of the method, for design of a subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape and incorporating one or more constraints on the airfoil geometric parameters and flow characteristics. The resulting design is robust against variations in airfoil dimensions and local airfoil shape introduced in the airfoil manufacturing process. A perturbation procedure provides a class of airfoil shapes, beginning with an initial airfoil shape.

  11. Constrained ripple optimization of Tokamak bundle divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Rome, J.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Lyon, J.F.; Fowler, R.H.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Dory, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetic field ripple from a tokamak bundle divertor is localized to a small toroidal sector and must be treated differently from the usual (distributed) toroidal field (TF) coil ripple. Generally, in a tokamak with an unoptimized divertor design, all of the banana-trapped fast ions are quickly lost due to banana drift diffusion or to trapping between the 1/R variation in absolute value vector B ..xi.. B and local field maxima due to the divertor. A computer code has been written to optimize automatically on-axis ripple subject to these constraints, while varying up to nine design parameters. Optimum configurations have low on-axis ripple (<0.2%) so that, now, most banana-trapped fast ions are confined. Only those ions with banana tips near the outside region (absolute value theta < or equal to 45/sup 0/) are lost. However, because finite-sized TF coils have not been used in this study, the flux bundle is not expanded.

  12. A Riccati approach for constrained linear quadratic optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sideris, Athanasios; Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2011-02-01

    An active-set method is proposed for solving linear quadratic optimal control problems subject to general linear inequality path constraints including mixed state-control and state-only constraints. A Riccati-based approach is developed for efficiently solving the equality constrained optimal control subproblems generated during the procedure. The solution of each subproblem requires computations that scale linearly with the horizon length. The algorithm is illustrated with numerical examples.

  13. Torque-Matched Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of HAWT Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abadi, Ali; Ertunç, Özgür; Beyer, Florian; Delgado, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Schmitz and Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theories are integrated to a gradient based optimization algorithm to optimize the blade shape of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The Schmitz theory is used to generate an initial blade design. BEM theory is used to calculate the forces, torque and power extracted by the turbine. The airfoil shape (NREL S809) is kept the same, so that the shape optimization comprises only the chord and the pitch angle distribution. The gradient based optimization of the blade shape is constrained to the torque-rotational speed characteristic of the generator, which is going to be a part of the experimental set-up used to validate the results of the optimization study. Hence, the objective of the optimization is the maximization of the turbines power coefficient Cp while keeping the torque matched to that of the generator. The wind velocities and the rotational speeds are limited to those achievable in the wind tunnel and by the generator, respectively. After finding the optimum blade shape with the maximum Cp within the given range of parameters, the Cp of the turbine is evaluated at wind-speeds deviating from the optimum operating condition. For this purpose, a second optimization algorithm is used to find out the correct rotational speed for a given wind-speed, which is again constrained to the generator's torque rotational speed characteristic. The design and optimization procedures are later validated by high-fidelity numerical simulations. The agreement between the design and the numerical simulations is very satisfactory.

  14. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  15. A Projection Neural Network for Constrained Quadratic Minimax Optimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingshan; Wang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a projection neural network described by a dynamic system for solving constrained quadratic minimax programming problems. Sufficient conditions based on a linear matrix inequality are provided for global convergence of the proposed neural network. Compared with some of the existing neural networks for quadratic minimax optimization, the proposed neural network in this paper is capable of solving more general constrained quadratic minimax optimization problems, and the designed neural network does not include any parameter. Moreover, the neural network has lower model complexities, the number of state variables of which is equal to that of the dimension of the optimization problems. The simulation results on numerical examples are discussed to demonstrate the effectiveness and characteristics of the proposed neural network.

  16. A filter-based evolutionary algorithm for constrained optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, Lauren M.; Hart, William Eugene; Ferguson, Lauren Ann

    2004-02-01

    We introduce a filter-based evolutionary algorithm (FEA) for constrained optimization. The filter used by an FEA explicitly imposes the concept of dominance on a partially ordered solution set. We show that the algorithm is provably robust for both linear and nonlinear problems and constraints. FEAs use a finite pattern of mutation offsets, and our analysis is closely related to recent convergence results for pattern search methods. We discuss how properties of this pattern impact the ability of an FEA to converge to a constrained local optimum.

  17. Metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomeng; Wang Jing; Xing Lei

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The streak artifacts caused by metal implants have long been recognized as a problem that limits various applications of CT imaging. In this work, the authors propose an iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm based on constrained optimization. Methods: After the shape and location of metal objects in the image domain is determined automatically by the binary metal identification algorithm and the segmentation of ''metal shadows'' in projection domain is done, constrained optimization is used for image reconstruction. It minimizes a predefined function that reflects a priori knowledge of the image, subject to the constraint that the estimated projection data are within a specified tolerance of the available metal-shadow-excluded projection data, with image non-negativity enforced. The minimization problem is solved through the alternation of projection-onto-convex-sets and the steepest gradient descent of the objective function. The constrained optimization algorithm is evaluated with a penalized smoothness objective. Results: The study shows that the proposed method is capable of significantly reducing metal artifacts, suppressing noise, and improving soft-tissue visibility. It outperforms the FBP-type methods and ART and EM methods and yields artifacts-free images. Conclusions: Constrained optimization is an effective way to deal with CT reconstruction with embedded metal objects. Although the method is presented in the context of metal artifacts, it is applicable to general ''missing data'' image reconstruction problems.

  18. Thermally-Constrained Fuel-Optimal ISS Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Sagar; Svecz, Andrew; Alaniz, Abran; Jang, Jiann-Woei; Nguyen, Louis; Spanos, Pol

    2015-01-01

    Optimal Propellant Maneuvers (OPMs) are now being used to rotate the International Space Station (ISS) and have saved hundreds of kilograms of propellant over the last two years. The savings are achieved by commanding the ISS to follow a pre-planned attitude trajectory optimized to take advantage of environmental torques. The trajectory is obtained by solving an optimal control problem. Prior to use on orbit, OPM trajectories are screened to ensure a static sun vector (SSV) does not occur during the maneuver. The SSV is an indicator that the ISS hardware temperatures may exceed thermal limits, causing damage to the components. In this paper, thermally-constrained fuel-optimal trajectories are presented that avoid an SSV and can be used throughout the year while still reducing propellant consumption significantly.

  19. Optimization of multi-constrained structures based on optimality criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, P.

    1976-01-01

    A weight-reduction algorithm is developed for the optimal design of structures subject to several multibehavioral inequality constraints. The structural weight is considered to depend linearly on the design variables. The algorithm incorporates a simple recursion formula derived from the Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions for optimality, associated with a procedure to delete nonactive constraints based on the Gauss-Seidel iterative method for linear systems. A number of example problems is studied, including typical truss structures and simplified wings subject to static loads and with constraints imposed on stresses and displacements. For one of the latter structures, constraints on the fundamental natural frequency and flutter speed are also imposed. The results obtained show that the method is fast, efficient, and general when compared to other competing techniques. Extensions to the generality of the method to include equality constraints and nonlinear merit functions is discussed.

  20. Shape Optimization of Swimming Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2005-03-01

    The swimming behavior of a flexible sheet which moves by propagating deformation waves along its body was first studied by G. I. Taylor in 1951. In addition to being of theoretical interest, this problem serves as a useful model of the locomotion of gastropods and various micro-organisms. Although the mechanics of swimming via wave propagation has been studied extensively, relatively little work has been done to define or describe optimal swimming by this mechanism.We carry out this objective for a sheet that is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin film of viscous Newtonian fluid. Using a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics, we derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to optimize swimming speed and efficiency. The optimization equations are solved numerically using two different schemes: a limited memory BFGS method that uses cubic splines to represent the wave profile, and a multi-shooting Runge-Kutta approach that uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method to vary the parameters of the equations until the constraints are satisfied. The former approach is less efficient but generalizes nicely to the non-lubrication setting. For each optimization problem we obtain a one parameter family of solutions that becomes singular in a self-similar fashion as the parameter approaches a critical value. We explore the validity of the lubrication approximation near this singular limit by monitoring higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and by comparing the results with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations.

  1. Structural shape optimization in multidisciplinary system synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1988-01-01

    Structural shape optimization couples with other discipline optimization in the design of complex engineering systems. For instance, the wing structural weight and elastic deformations couple to aerodynamic loads and aircraft performance through drag. This coupling makes structural shape optimization a subtask in the overall vehicle synthesis. Decomposition methods for optimization and sensitivity analysis allow the specialized disciplinary methods to be used while the disciplines are temporarily decoupled, after which the interdisciplinary couplings are restored at the system level. Application of decomposition methods to structures-aerodynamics coupling in aircraft is outlined and illustrated with a numerical example of a transport aircraft. It is concluded that these methods may integrate structural and aerodynamic shape optimizations with the unified objective of the maximum aircraft performance.

  2. Nonparametric optimization of constrained total variation for tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Yin, Zhaofang; Ma, Xueyun

    2013-12-01

    Iterative algorithms based on constrained total-variation (TV) optimization are effective for the reconstruction of limited data from X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such algorithms can be executed by implementing alternative operations projection onto convex sets (POCS) on the constraints, and a gradient descent approach for TV objective minimization. To balance TV-gradient descent with POCS, the adaptive-steepest-descent (ASD) method utilizes a set of complicated parameters to adjust the TV-gradient-descent step-size. The optimal parameters are difficult for users to select, and moreover, users have to empirically choose different parameters when reconstructing different types of images. To deal with these drawbacks, this paper proposes a nonparametric method for constrained TV optimization. The method automatically updates the step-size of TV iteration according to the changes in the consistency term defined by the constraints without introducing artificial parameters. The proposed method avoids the time-consuming parameter optimization, and can be conveniently implemented in various applications. Experimental results on phantom data demonstrate the flexibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Evolutionary pattern search algorithms for unconstrained and linearly constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    HART,WILLIAM E.

    2000-06-01

    The authors describe a convergence theory for evolutionary pattern search algorithms (EPSAs) on a broad class of unconstrained and linearly constrained problems. EPSAs adaptively modify the step size of the mutation operator in response to the success of previous optimization steps. The design of EPSAs is inspired by recent analyses of pattern search methods. The analysis significantly extends the previous convergence theory for EPSAs. The analysis applies to a broader class of EPSAs,and it applies to problems that are nonsmooth, have unbounded objective functions, and which are linearly constrained. Further, they describe a modest change to the algorithmic framework of EPSAs for which a non-probabilistic convergence theory applies. These analyses are also noteworthy because they are considerably simpler than previous analyses of EPSAs.

  4. Large Scale Shape Optimization for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Li-Ling; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2011-12-06

    We present a shape optimization method for designing accelerator cavities with large scale computations. The objective is to find the best accelerator cavity shape with the desired spectral response, such as with the specified frequencies of resonant modes, field profiles, and external Q values. The forward problem is the large scale Maxwell equation in the frequency domain. The design parameters are the CAD parameters defining the cavity shape. We develop scalable algorithms with a discrete adjoint approach and use the quasi-Newton method to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. Two realistic accelerator cavity design examples are presented.

  5. Large Scale Non-Linear Programming for PDE Constrained Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    VAN BLOEMEN WAANDERS, BART G.; BARTLETT, ROSCOE A.; LONG, KEVIN R.; BOGGS, PAUL T.; SALINGER, ANDREW G.

    2002-10-01

    Three years of large-scale PDE-constrained optimization research and development are summarized in this report. We have developed an optimization framework for 3 levels of SAND optimization and developed a powerful PDE prototyping tool. The optimization algorithms have been interfaced and tested on CVD problems using a chemically reacting fluid flow simulator resulting in an order of magnitude reduction in compute time over a black box method. Sandia's simulation environment is reviewed by characterizing each discipline and identifying a possible target level of optimization. Because SAND algorithms are difficult to test on actual production codes, a symbolic simulator (Sundance) was developed and interfaced with a reduced-space sequential quadratic programming framework (rSQP++) to provide a PDE prototyping environment. The power of Sundance/rSQP++ is demonstrated by applying optimization to a series of different PDE-based problems. In addition, we show the merits of SAND methods by comparing seven levels of optimization for a source-inversion problem using Sundance and rSQP++. Algorithmic results are discussed for hierarchical control methods. The design of an interior point quadratic programming solver is presented.

  6. What Constrains Children's Learning of Novel Shape Terms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Catherine G.; Roberson, Debi

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 3-year-olds matched on vocabulary score were taught three new shape terms by one of three types of linguistic contrast: corrective, semantic, or referential. A 5-week training paradigm implemented four training sessions and four assessment sessions. Corrective contrast ("This is concave, it is not square," where "square" is the…

  7. Constrained optimization in human walking: cost minimization and gait plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John E A

    2005-03-01

    As walking speed increases, consistent relationships emerge between the three determinant parameters of walking, speed, step frequency and step length. However, when step length or step frequency are predetermined rather than speed, different relationships are spontaneously selected. This result is expected if walking parameters are selected to optimize to an underlying objective function, known as the constrained optimization hypothesis. The most likely candidate for the objective function is metabolic cost per distance traveled, where the hypothesis predicts that the subject will minimize the cost of travel under a given gait constraint even if this requires an unusual step length and frequency combination. In the current study this is tested directly by measuring the walking behavior of subjects constrained systematically to determined speeds, step frequencies or step lengths and comparing behavior to predictions derived directly from minimization of measured metabolic cost. A metabolic cost surface in speed-frequency space is derived from metabolic rate for 10 subjects walking at 49 speed-frequency conditions. Optimization is predicted from the iso-energetic cost contours derived from this surface. Substantial congruence is found between the predicted and observed behavior using the cost of walking per unit distance. Although minimization of cost per distance appears to dominate walking control, certain notable differences from predicted behavior suggest that other factors must also be considered. The results of these studies provide a new perspective on the integration of walking cost with neuromuscular control, and provide a novel approach to the investigation of the control features involved in gait parameter selection.

  8. Domain decomposition in time for PDE-constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Andrew T.; Stoll, Martin

    2015-08-28

    Here, PDE-constrained optimization problems have a wide range of applications, but they lead to very large and ill-conditioned linear systems, especially if the problems are time dependent. In this paper we outline an approach for dealing with such problems by decomposing them in time and applying an additive Schwarz preconditioner in time, so that we can take advantage of parallel computers to deal with the very large linear systems. We then illustrate the performance of our method on a variety of problems.

  9. Reduced order constrained optimization (ROCO): Clinical application to lung IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Stabenau, Hans; Rivera, Linda; Yorke, Ellen; Yang, Jie; Lu, Renzhi; Radke, Richard J.; Jackson, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors use reduced-order constrained optimization (ROCO) to create clinically acceptable IMRT plans quickly and automatically for advanced lung cancer patients. Their new ROCO implementation works with the treatment planning system and full dose calculation used at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). The authors have implemented mean dose hard constraints, along with the point-dose and dose-volume constraints that the authors used for our previous work on the prostate.Methods: ROCO consists of three major steps. First, the space of treatment plans is sampled by solving a series of optimization problems using penalty-based quadratic objective functions. Next, an efficient basis for this space is found via principal component analysis (PCA); this reduces the dimensionality of the problem. Finally, a constrained optimization problem is solved over this basis to find a clinically acceptable IMRT plan. Dimensionality reduction makes constrained optimization computationally efficient.Results: The authors apply ROCO to 12 stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases, generating IMRT plans that meet all clinical constraints and are clinically acceptable, and demonstrate that they are competitive with the clinical treatment plans. The authors also test how many samples and PCA modes are necessary to achieve an adequate lung plan, demonstrate the importance of long-range dose calculation for ROCO, and evaluate the performance of nonspecific normal tissue (“rind”) constraints in ROCO treatment planning for the lung. Finally, authors show that ROCO can save time for planners, and they estimate that in the clinic, planning using their approach would save a median of 105 min for the patients in the study.Conclusions: New challenges arise when applying ROCO to the lung site, which include the lack of a class solution, a larger treatment site, an increased number of parameters and beamlets, a variable number of beams and beam arrangement, and

  10. Constrained genetic algorithms for optimizing multi-use reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Chiu; Chang, Fi-John; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Dai, Shin-Yi

    2010-08-01

    To derive an optimal strategy for reservoir operations to assist the decision-making process, we propose a methodology that incorporates the constrained genetic algorithm (CGA) where the ecological base flow requirements are considered as constraints to water release of reservoir operation when optimizing the 10-day reservoir storage. Furthermore, a number of penalty functions designed for different types of constraints are integrated into reservoir operational objectives to form the fitness function. To validate the applicability of this proposed methodology for reservoir operations, the Shih-Men Reservoir and its downstream water demands are used as a case study. By implementing the proposed CGA in optimizing the operational performance of the Shih-Men Reservoir for the last 20 years, we find this method provides much better performance in terms of a small generalized shortage index (GSI) for human water demands and greater ecological base flows for most of the years than historical operations do. We demonstrate the CGA approach can significantly improve the efficiency and effectiveness of water supply capability to both human and ecological base flow requirements and thus optimize reservoir operations for multiple water users. The CGA can be a powerful tool in searching for the optimal strategy for multi-use reservoir operations in water resources management.

  11. Population Induced Instabilities in Genetic Algorithms for Constrained Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, D. S.; Parousis-Orthodoxou, K. J.

    2013-02-01

    Evolutionary computation techniques, like genetic algorithms, have received a lot of attention as optimization techniques but, although they exhibit a very promising potential in curing the problem, they have not produced a significant breakthrough in the area of systematic treatment of constraints. There are two mainly ways of handling the constraints: the first is to produce an infeasibility measure and add it to the general cost function (the well known penalty methods) and the other is to modify the mutation and crossover operation in a way that they only produce feasible members. Both methods have their drawbacks and are strongly correlated to the problem that they are applied. In this work, we propose a different treatment of the constraints: we induce instabilities in the evolving population, in a way that infeasible solution cannot survive as they are. Preliminary results are presented in a set of well known from the literature constrained optimization problems.

  12. Constrained optimization of gradient waveforms for generalized diffusion encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjölund, Jens; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Nilsson, Markus; Topgaard, Daniel; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Knutsson, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion MRI is a useful probe of tissue microstructure. The conventional diffusion encoding sequence, the single pulsed field gradient, has recently been challenged as more general gradient waveforms have been introduced. Out of these, we focus on q-space trajectory imaging, which generalizes the scalar b-value to a tensor valued entity. To take full advantage of its capabilities, it is imperative to respect the constraints imposed by the hardware, while at the same time maximizing the diffusion encoding strength. We provide a tool that achieves this by solving a constrained optimization problem that accommodates constraints on maximum gradient amplitude, slew rate, coil heating and positioning of radio frequency pulses. The method's efficacy and flexibility is demonstrated both experimentally and by comparison with previous work on optimization of isotropic diffusion sequences.

  13. Constrained optimization of gradient waveforms for generalized diffusion encoding.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, Jens; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Nilsson, Markus; Topgaard, Daniel; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Knutsson, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion MRI is a useful probe of tissue microstructure. The conventional diffusion encoding sequence, the single pulsed field gradient, has recently been challenged as more general gradient waveforms have been introduced. Out of these, we focus on q-space trajectory imaging, which generalizes the scalar b-value to a tensor valued entity. To take full advantage of its capabilities, it is imperative to respect the constraints imposed by the hardware, while at the same time maximizing the diffusion encoding strength. We provide a tool that achieves this by solving a constrained optimization problem that accommodates constraints on maximum gradient amplitude, slew rate, coil heating and positioning of radio frequency pulses. The method's efficacy and flexibility is demonstrated both experimentally and by comparison with previous work on optimization of isotropic diffusion sequences.

  14. Nonlinearly-constrained optimization using asynchronous parallel generating set search.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Joshua D.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2007-05-01

    Many optimization problems in computational science and engineering (CS&E) are characterized by expensive objective and/or constraint function evaluations paired with a lack of derivative information. Direct search methods such as generating set search (GSS) are well understood and efficient for derivative-free optimization of unconstrained and linearly-constrained problems. This paper addresses the more difficult problem of general nonlinear programming where derivatives for objective or constraint functions are unavailable, which is the case for many CS&E applications. We focus on penalty methods that use GSS to solve the linearly-constrained problems, comparing different penalty functions. A classical choice for penalizing constraint violations is {ell}{sub 2}{sup 2}, the squared {ell}{sub 2} norm, which has advantages for derivative-based optimization methods. In our numerical tests, however, we show that exact penalty functions based on the {ell}{sub 1}, {ell}{sub 2}, and {ell}{sub {infinity}} norms converge to good approximate solutions more quickly and thus are attractive alternatives. Unfortunately, exact penalty functions are discontinuous and consequently introduce theoretical problems that degrade the final solution accuracy, so we also consider smoothed variants. Smoothed-exact penalty functions are theoretically attractive because they retain the differentiability of the original problem. Numerically, they are a compromise between exact and {ell}{sub 2}{sup 2}, i.e., they converge to a good solution somewhat quickly without sacrificing much solution accuracy. Moreover, the smoothing is parameterized and can potentially be adjusted to balance the two considerations. Since many CS&E optimization problems are characterized by expensive function evaluations, reducing the number of function evaluations is paramount, and the results of this paper show that exact and smoothed-exact penalty functions are well-suited to this task.

  15. Error estimation and structural shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoguang

    This work is concerned with three topics: error estimation, data smoothing process and the structural shape optimization design and analysis. In particular, the superconvergent stress recovery technique, the dual kriging B-spline curve and surface fittings, the development and the implementation of a novel node-based numerical shape optimization package are addressed. Concept and new technique of accurate stress recovery are developed and applied in finding the lateral buckling parameters of plate structures. Some useful conclusions are made for the finite element Reissner-Mindlin plate solutions. The powerful dual kriging B-spline fitting technique is reviewed and a set of new compact formulations are developed. This data smoothing method is then applied in accurately recovering curves and surfaces. The new node-based shape optimization method is based on the consideration that the critical stress and displacement constraints are generally located along or near the structural boundary. The method puts the maximum weights on the selected boundary nodes, referred to as the design points, so that the time-consuming sensitivity analysis is related to the perturbation of only these nodes. The method also allows large shape changes to achieve the optimal shape. The design variables are specified as the moving magnitudes for the prescribed design points that are always located at the structural boundary. Theories, implementations and applications are presented for various modules by which the package is constructed. Especially, techniques involving finite element error estimation, adaptive mesh generation, design sensitivity analysis, and data smoothing are emphasized.

  16. Shape optimization of tibial prosthesis components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    NASA technology and optimal design methodologies originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) are adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopaedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the shape tailoring of the tibial components of a total knee replacement implant for optimal interaction within the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation, to improve the mechanical integrity of the implant/interface/bone system, and to prevent failures of the implant components. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is demonstrated and evaluated. The methodology and evolution of the existing aerospace technology from which this pilot optimization code was developed is also presented and discussed. Both symmetric and unsymmetric in-plane loading conditions are investigated. The results of the optimization process indicate a trend toward wider and tapered posts as well as thicker backing trays. Unique component geometries were obtained for the different load cases.

  17. Digital robust control law synthesis using constrained optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivekananda

    1989-01-01

    Development of digital robust control laws for active control of high performance flexible aircraft and large space structures is a research area of significant practical importance. The flexible system is typically modeled by a large order state space system of equations in order to accurately represent the dynamics. The active control law must satisy multiple conflicting design requirements and maintain certain stability margins, yet should be simple enough to be implementable on an onboard digital computer. Described here is an application of a generic digital control law synthesis procedure for such a system, using optimal control theory and constrained optimization technique. A linear quadratic Gaussian type cost function is minimized by updating the free parameters of the digital control law, while trying to satisfy a set of constraints on the design loads, responses and stability margins. Analytical expressions for the gradients of the cost function and the constraints with respect to the control law design variables are used to facilitate rapid numerical convergence. These gradients can be used for sensitivity study and may be integrated into a simultaneous structure and control optimization scheme.

  18. A constraint consensus memetic algorithm for solving constrained optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Noha M.; Sarker, Ruhul A.; Essam, Daryl L.; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Elsayed, Saber M.

    2014-11-01

    Constraint handling is an important aspect of evolutionary constrained optimization. Currently, the mechanism used for constraint handling with evolutionary algorithms mainly assists the selection process, but not the actual search process. In this article, first a genetic algorithm is combined with a class of search methods, known as constraint consensus methods, that assist infeasible individuals to move towards the feasible region. This approach is also integrated with a memetic algorithm. The proposed algorithm is tested and analysed by solving two sets of standard benchmark problems, and the results are compared with other state-of-the-art algorithms. The comparisons show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other similar algorithms. The algorithm has also been applied to solve a practical economic load dispatch problem, where it also shows superior performance over other algorithms.

  19. Plasma shape experiments for an optimized tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Lazarus, E. A.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper we present results from recent experiments at DIII-D which measured the plasma stability and confinement performance product, beta(tau)(sub E), in one previously studied and three new plasma shapes. One important goal of these experiments was to identify performance vs. shape trends which would identify a shape compatible with both high performance and the planned effort to decrease the power flux to the divertor floor using a closed 'slot' divertor geometry. The closed divertor hardware must be designed for a reduced set of plasma shapes, so care must be taken to choose the shape that optimizes beta(tau)(sub E) and divertor performance. The four shapes studied form a matrix of moderate and high elongations (kappa congruent to 1.8 and 2.1) and low and high triangularities (delta congruent to 0.3 and 0.9). All configurations were double-null diverted (DND), held fixed during a shot, with neutral beam heating. The shapes span a range of X-point locations compatible with the envisioned closed divertor. We find that from shape to shape, a shot's transient normalized performance, beta(sub N)H, where beta(sub N) is equivalent to beta/(I(sup p)/aB(sub T)) and H is equivalent to tau(sub E)/tau(sub E)(sup ITER-89P), increases strongly with triangularity, but depends only weakly on elongation. However, the normalized performance during quasi stationary ELMing H-mode, to which these discharges eventually relax, is insensitive to both triangularity and elongation. The moderate elongation, high triangularity DND shape is shown to be near optimum for future studies on DIII-D.

  20. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  1. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Hybridized Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses an evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution (DE) in conjunction with various hybridization strategies is described. DE is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Various hybridization strategies for DE are explored, including the use of neural networks as well as traditional local search methods. A Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the hybrid DE optimizer. The method is implemented on distributed parallel computers so that new designs can be obtained within reasonable turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. (The final paper will include at least one other aerodynamic design application). The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated.

  2. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoist, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on an evolutionary algorithm approach is presented and demonstrated. Results are presented for a number of model problems to access the effect of algorithm parameters on convergence efficiency and reliability. A transonic viscous airfoil optimization problem-both single and two-objective variations is used as the basis for a preliminary comparison with an adjoint-gradient optimizer. The evolutionary algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the inviscid flow about transonic wings including multi-objective and multi-discipline solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the evolutionary algorithm approach is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  3. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on an evolutionary algorithm approach is presented and demonstrated. Results are presented for a number of model problems to access the effect of algorithm parameters on convergence efficiency and reliability. A transonic viscous airfoil optimization problem, both single and two-objective variations, is used as the basis for a preliminary comparison with an adjoint-gradient optimizer. The evolutionary algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the inviscid flow about transonic wings including multi-objective and multi-discipline solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the evolutionary algorithm approach is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  4. Robust integrated autopilot/autothrottle design using constrained parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Uy-Loi; Voth, Christopher; Sanjay, Swamy

    1990-01-01

    A multivariable control design method based on constrained parameter optimization was applied to the design of a multiloop aircraft flight control system. Specifically, the design method is applied to the following: (1) direct synthesis of a multivariable 'inner-loop' feedback control system based on total energy control principles; (2) synthesis of speed/altitude-hold designs as 'outer-loop' feedback/feedforward control systems around the above inner loop; and (3) direct synthesis of a combined 'inner-loop' and 'outer-loop' multivariable control system. The design procedure offers a direct and structured approach for the determination of a set of controller gains that meet design specifications in closed-loop stability, command tracking performance, disturbance rejection, and limits on control activities. The presented approach may be applied to a broader class of multiloop flight control systems. Direct tradeoffs between many real design goals are rendered systematic by this method following careful problem formulation of the design objectives and constraints. Performance characteristics of the optimization design were improved over the current autopilot design on the B737-100 Transport Research Vehicle (TSRV) at the landing approach and cruise flight conditions; particularly in the areas of closed-loop damping, command responses, and control activity in the presence of turbulence.

  5. Multiplicative noise removal using variable splitting and constrained optimization.

    PubMed

    Bioucas-Dias, José M; Figueiredo, Mário A T

    2010-07-01

    Multiplicative noise (also known as speckle noise) models are central to the study of coherent imaging systems, such as synthetic aperture radar and sonar, and ultrasound and laser imaging. These models introduce two additional layers of difficulties with respect to the standard Gaussian additive noise scenario: (1) the noise is multiplied by (rather than added to) the original image; (2) the noise is not Gaussian, with Rayleigh and Gamma being commonly used densities. These two features of multiplicative noise models preclude the direct application of most state-of-the-art algorithms, which are designed for solving unconstrained optimization problems where the objective has two terms: a quadratic data term (log-likelihood), reflecting the additive and Gaussian nature of the noise, plus a convex (possibly nonsmooth) regularizer (e.g., a total variation or wavelet-based regularizer/prior). In this paper, we address these difficulties by: (1) converting the multiplicative model into an additive one by taking logarithms, as proposed by some other authors; (2) using variable splitting to obtain an equivalent constrained problem; and (3) dealing with this optimization problem using the augmented Lagrangian framework. A set of experiments shows that the proposed method, which we name MIDAL (multiplicative image denoising by augmented Lagrangian), yields state-of-the-art results both in terms of speed and denoising performance.

  6. Application of constrained optimization to active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Mukhopadhyay, V.

    1981-01-01

    Active control of aeroelastic response is a complex in which the designer usually tries to satisfy many criteria which are often conflicting. To further complicate the design problem, the state space equations describing this type of control problem are usually of high order, involving a large number of states to represent the flexible structure and unsteady aerodynamics. Control laws based on the standard Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) method are of the same high order as the aeroelastic plant. To overcome this disadvantage of the LQG mode, an approach developed for designing low order optimal control laws which uses a nonlinear programming algorithm to search for the values of the control law variables that minimize a composite performance index, was extended to the constrained optimization problem. The method involves searching for the values of the control law variables that minimize a basic performance index while satisfying several inequality constraints that describe the design criteria. The method is applied to gust load alleviation of a drone aircraft.

  7. Constrained simultaneous multi-state reconfigurable wing structure configuration optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Matthew

    A reconfigurable aircraft is capable of in-flight shape change to increase mission performance or provide multi-mission capability. Reconfigurability has always been a consideration in aircraft design, from the Wright Flyer, to the F-14, and most recently the Lockheed-Martin folding wing concept. The Wright Flyer used wing-warping for roll control, the F-14 had a variable-sweep wing to improve supersonic flight capabilities, and the Lockheed-Martin folding wing demonstrated radical in-flight shape change. This dissertation will examine two questions that aircraft reconfigurability raises, especially as reconfiguration increases in complexity. First, is there an efficient method to develop a light weight structure which supports all the loads generated by each configuration? Second, can this method include the capability to propose a sub-structure topology that weighs less than other considered designs? The first question requires a method that will design and optimize multiple configurations of a reconfigurable aerostructure. Three options exist, this dissertation will show one is better than the others. Simultaneous optimization considers all configurations and their respective load cases and constraints at the same time. Another method is sequential optimization which considers each configuration of the vehicle one after the other - with the optimum design variable values from the first configuration becoming the lower bounds for subsequent configurations. This process repeats for each considered configuration and the lower bounds update as necessary. The third approach is aggregate combination — this method keeps the thickness or area of each member for the most critical configuration, the configuration that requires the largest cross-section. This research will show that simultaneous optimization produces a lower weight and different topology for the considered structures when compared to the sequential and aggregate techniques. To answer the second question

  8. A collective neurodynamic optimization approach to bound-constrained nonconvex optimization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Li, Guocheng

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a novel collective neurodynamic optimization method for solving nonconvex optimization problems with bound constraints. First, it is proved that a one-layer projection neural network has a property that its equilibria are in one-to-one correspondence with the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker points of the constrained optimization problem. Next, a collective neurodynamic optimization approach is developed by utilizing a group of recurrent neural networks in framework of particle swarm optimization by emulating the paradigm of brainstorming. Each recurrent neural network carries out precise constrained local search according to its own neurodynamic equations. By iteratively improving the solution quality of each recurrent neural network using the information of locally best known solution and globally best known solution, the group can obtain the global optimal solution to a nonconvex optimization problem. The advantages of the proposed collective neurodynamic optimization approach over evolutionary approaches lie in its constraint handling ability and real-time computational efficiency. The effectiveness and characteristics of the proposed approach are illustrated by using many multimodal benchmark functions. PMID:24705545

  9. Shape Optimization for Trailing Edge Noise Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison; Wang, Meng; Mohammadi, Bijan; Moin, Parviz

    2001-11-01

    Noise generated by turbulent boundary layers near the trailing edge of lifting surfaces continues to pose a challenge for many applications. In this study, we explore noise reduction strategies through shape optimization. A gradient based shape design method is formulated and implemented for use with large eddy simulation of the flow over an airfoil. The cost function gradient is calculated using the method of incomplete sensitivities (Mohammadi and Pironneau 2001 ph Applied shape Optimization for Fluids, Oxford Univ. Press). This method has the advantage that effects of geometry changes on the flow field can be neglected when computing the gradient of the cost function, making it far more cost effective than solving the full adjoint problem. Validation studies are presented for a model problem of the unsteady laminar flow over an acoustically compact airfoil. A section of the surface is allowed to deform and the cost function is derived based on aeroacoustic theroy. Rapid convergence of the trailing-edge shape and significant reduction of the noise due to vortex shedding and wake instability have been achieved. The addition of constraints and issues of extension to fully turbulent flows past an acoustically noncompact airfoil are also discussed.

  10. Optimal Stimulus Shapes for Neuronal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Forger, Daniel B.; Paydarfar, David; Clay, John R.

    2011-01-01

    An important problem in neuronal computation is to discern how features of stimuli control the timing of action potentials. One aspect of this problem is to determine how an action potential, or spike, can be elicited with the least energy cost, e.g., a minimal amount of applied current. Here we show in the Hodgkin & Huxley model of the action potential and in experiments on squid giant axons that: 1) spike generation in a neuron can be highly discriminatory for stimulus shape and 2) the optimal stimulus shape is dependent upon inputs to the neuron. We show how polarity and time course of post-synaptic currents determine which of these optimal stimulus shapes best excites the neuron. These results are obtained mathematically using the calculus of variations and experimentally using a stochastic search methodology. Our findings reveal a surprising complexity of computation at the single cell level that may be relevant for understanding optimization of signaling in neurons and neuronal networks. PMID:21760759

  11. Optimal Performance of Buildings Isolated By Shape-Memory-Alloy-Rubber-Bearing (SMARB) Under Random Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumanta; Mishra, Sudib K.

    2014-05-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-based bearing has been proposed recently for improved base isolation by optimal choice of its transformation strength. Presently, superior performances of the Shape-Memory-Alloy-Rubber-Bearing (SMARB) over the elastomeric bearing are established in mitigating seismic vibration under constraint on maximum isolator displacement. The optimal transformation strengths are proposed through constrained optimization based on stochastic responses. Numerical simulation reveals that Lead Rubber Bearings (LRB) either fails to provide feasible parameters or leads to large floor acceleration, compromising the isolation efficiency. Contrarily, optimal SMARB can efficiently enforce such constraint without greatly affecting the isolation efficiency. Evidence of robustness of SMARB over LRB is also established.

  12. Newton's method for large bound-constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-J.; More, J. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    1999-01-01

    We analyze a trust region version of Newton's method for bound-constrained problems. Our approach relies on the geometry of the feasible set, not on the particular representation in terms of constraints. The convergence theory holds for linearly constrained problems and yields global and superlinear convergence without assuming either strict complementarity or linear independence of the active constraints. We also show that the convergence theory leads to an efficient implementation for large bound-constrained problems.

  13. Constrained Ordination Analysis with Enrichment of Bell-Shaped Response Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Thas, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Constrained ordination methods aims at finding an environmental gradient along which the species abundances are maximally separated. The species response functions, which describe the expected abundance as a function of the environmental score, are according to the ecological fundamental niche theory only meaningful if they are bell-shaped. Many classical model-based ordination methods, however, use quadratic regression models without imposing the bell-shape and thus allowing for meaningless U-shaped response functions. The analysis output (e.g. a biplot) may therefore be potentially misleading and the conclusions are prone to errors. In this paper we present a log-likelihood ratio criterion with a penalisation term to enforce more bell-shaped response shapes. We report the results of a simulation study and apply our method to metagenomics data from microbial ecology. PMID:27100464

  14. Constrained Ordination Analysis with Enrichment of Bell-Shaped Response Functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Thas, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Constrained ordination methods aims at finding an environmental gradient along which the species abundances are maximally separated. The species response functions, which describe the expected abundance as a function of the environmental score, are according to the ecological fundamental niche theory only meaningful if they are bell-shaped. Many classical model-based ordination methods, however, use quadratic regression models without imposing the bell-shape and thus allowing for meaningless U-shaped response functions. The analysis output (e.g. a biplot) may therefore be potentially misleading and the conclusions are prone to errors. In this paper we present a log-likelihood ratio criterion with a penalisation term to enforce more bell-shaped response shapes. We report the results of a simulation study and apply our method to metagenomics data from microbial ecology. PMID:27100464

  15. Shape optimization of pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, T. D.; Seiner, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Recently developed finite element computer programs were utilized to investigate the influence of the shape of a body on its scattering field with the aim of determining the optimal shape for a Pressure Gradient Microphone (PGM). Circular cylinders of various aspect ratios were evaluated to choose the length to diameter ratio best suited for a dual element PGM application. Alterations of the basic cylindrical shape by rounding the edges and recessing at the centerline were also studied. It was found that for a + or - 1 db deviation from a linear pressure gradient response, a circular cylinder of aspect ratio near 0.5 was most suitable, yielding a useful upper frequency corresponding to ka = 1.8. The maximum increase in this upper frequency limit obtained through a number of shape alterations was only about 20 percent. An initial experimental evaluation of a single element cylindrical PGM of aspect ratio 0.18 utilizing a piezoresistive type sensor was also performed and is compared to the analytical results.

  16. Multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories—nuclear shapes and potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2016-06-01

    The intrinsic nuclear shapes deviating from a sphere not only manifest themselves in nuclear collective states but also play important roles in determining nuclear potential energy surfaces (PES’s) and fission barriers. In order to describe microscopically and self-consistently nuclear shapes and PES’s with as many shape degrees of freedom as possible included, we developed multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories (MDC-CDFTs). In MDC-CDFTs, the axial symmetry and the reflection symmetry are both broken and all deformations characterized by {β }λ μ with even μ are considered. We have used the MDC-CDFTs to study PES’s and fission barriers of actinides, the non-axial octupole Y 32 correlations in N = 150 isotones and shapes of hypernuclei. In this Review we will give briefly the formalism of MDC-CDFTs and present the applications to normal nuclei.

  17. Erythrocyte shape simulation by numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Grebe, R; Zuckermann, M J

    1990-01-01

    In a recent paper we examined the morphology of erythrocytes in terms of the mean mean curvature (MMC) of their cell membranes. A computer simulation of these shapes based on the different geometries showed that the MMC increased from the sphero-stomatocyte to the spheroechinocyte via the discocyte. In this work we extend this analysis by using a numerical optimization method based on importance sampling and the principle of adiabatic cooling. The erythrocyte membrane is treated as a single closed fluid lamina exhibiting viscoelastic characteristics. The energy function of the lamina includes the following terms: (i) Curvature-elastic energy terms which depend on both local and global curvature. (ii) A term describing the compression elasticity of the lamina. (iii) A term which depends on the volume of the cell and which is related to the osmotic pressure across the membrane. In the simulation the cell is assumed to have axial symmetry and it can therefore be described by a finite set of conic sections. So far we have been able to obtain an energy minimum corresponding to a discocyte shape using a sphere as the initial configuration. Our results therefore imply that the well-known sequence of erythrocyte shapes could solely be governed by the above mentioned properties of an ideal fluid forming a closed singly connected lamina.

  18. Cooperative recurrent modular neural networks for constrained optimization: a survey of models and applications.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Mohamed S; Xia, Youshen

    2009-03-01

    Constrained optimization problems arise in a wide variety of scientific and engineering applications. Since several single recurrent neural networks when applied to solve constrained optimization problems for real-time engineering applications have shown some limitations, cooperative recurrent neural network approaches have been developed to overcome drawbacks of these single recurrent neural networks. This paper surveys in details work on cooperative recurrent neural networks for solving constrained optimization problems and their engineering applications, and points out their standing models from viewpoint of both convergence to the optimal solution and model complexity. We provide examples and comparisons to shown advantages of these models in the given applications.

  19. Cooperative recurrent modular neural networks for constrained optimization: a survey of models and applications

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Constrained optimization problems arise in a wide variety of scientific and engineering applications. Since several single recurrent neural networks when applied to solve constrained optimization problems for real-time engineering applications have shown some limitations, cooperative recurrent neural network approaches have been developed to overcome drawbacks of these single recurrent neural networks. This paper surveys in details work on cooperative recurrent neural networks for solving constrained optimization problems and their engineering applications, and points out their standing models from viewpoint of both convergence to the optimal solution and model complexity. We provide examples and comparisons to shown advantages of these models in the given applications. PMID:19003467

  20. An effective hybrid cuckoo search and genetic algorithm for constrained engineering design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagaraj, G.; Ponnambalam, S. G.; Jawahar, N.; Mukund Nilakantan, J.

    2014-10-01

    This article presents an effective hybrid cuckoo search and genetic algorithm (HCSGA) for solving engineering design optimization problems involving problem-specific constraints and mixed variables such as integer, discrete and continuous variables. The proposed algorithm, HCSGA, is first applied to 13 standard benchmark constrained optimization functions and subsequently used to solve three well-known design problems reported in the literature. The numerical results obtained by HCSGA show competitive performance with respect to recent algorithms for constrained design optimization problems.

  1. Fast Energy Minimization of large Polymers Using Constrained Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Todd D. Plantenga

    1998-10-01

    A new computational technique is described that uses distance constraints to calculate empirical potential energy minima of partially rigid molecules. A constrained minimuzation algorithm that works entirely in Cartesian coordinates is used. The algorithm does not obey the constraints until convergence, a feature that reduces ill-conditioning and allows constrained local minima to be computed more quickly than unconstrained minima. Computational speedup exceeds the 3-fold factor commonly obtained in constained molecular dynamics simulations, where the constraints must be strictly obeyed at all times.

  2. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  3. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-09-28

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  4. Numerical study of a matrix-free trust-region SQP method for equality constrained optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Ridzal, Denis; Aguilo, Miguel Antonio

    2011-12-01

    This is a companion publication to the paper 'A Matrix-Free Trust-Region SQP Algorithm for Equality Constrained Optimization' [11]. In [11], we develop and analyze a trust-region sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method that supports the matrix-free (iterative, in-exact) solution of linear systems. In this report, we document the numerical behavior of the algorithm applied to a variety of equality constrained optimization problems, with constraints given by partial differential equations (PDEs).

  5. Characterizing and modeling the free recovery and constrained recovery behavior of a polyurethane shape memory polymer

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Brent L; Lagoudas, Dimitris C; Maitland, Duncan J

    2011-01-01

    In this work, tensile tests and one-dimensional constitutive modeling are performed on a high recovery force polyurethane shape memory polymer that is being considered for biomedical applications. The tensile tests investigate the free recovery (zero load) response as well as the constrained displacement recovery (stress recovery) response at extension values up to 25%, and two consecutive cycles are performed during each test. The material is observed to recover 100% of the applied deformation when heated at zero load in the second thermomechanical cycle, and a stress recovery of 1.5 MPa to 4.2 MPa is observed for the constrained displacement recovery experiments. After performing the experiments, the Chen and Lagoudas model is used to simulate and predict the experimental results. The material properties used in the constitutive model – namely the coefficients of thermal expansion, shear moduli, and frozen volume fraction – are calibrated from a single 10% extension free recovery experiment. The model is then used to predict the material response for the remaining free recovery and constrained displacement recovery experiments. The model predictions match well with the experimental data. PMID:22003272

  6. Neural network for constrained nonsmooth optimization using Tikhonov regularization.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sitian; Fan, Dejun; Wu, Guangxi; Zhao, Lijun

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a one-layer neural network to solve nonsmooth convex optimization problems based on the Tikhonov regularization method. Firstly, it is shown that the optimal solution of the original problem can be approximated by the optimal solution of a strongly convex optimization problems. Then, it is proved that for any initial point, the state of the proposed neural network enters the equality feasible region in finite time, and is globally convergent to the unique optimal solution of the related strongly convex optimization problems. Compared with the existing neural networks, the proposed neural network has lower model complexity and does not need penalty parameters. In the end, some numerical examples and application are given to illustrate the effectiveness and improvement of the proposed neural network.

  7. Artificial bee colony algorithm for constrained possibilistic portfolio optimization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the portfolio optimization problem with real-world constraints under the assumption that the returns of risky assets are fuzzy numbers. A new possibilistic mean-semiabsolute deviation model is proposed, in which transaction costs, cardinality and quantity constraints are considered. Due to such constraints the proposed model becomes a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem and traditional optimization methods fail to find the optimal solution efficiently. Thus, a modified artificial bee colony (MABC) algorithm is developed to solve the corresponding optimization problem. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model and the corresponding algorithm.

  8. The expanded LaGrangian system for constrained optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poore, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    Smooth penalty functions can be combined with numerical continuation/bifurcation techniques to produce a class of robust and fast algorithms for constrainted optimization problems. The key to the development of these algorithms is the Expanded Lagrangian System which is derived and analyzed in this work. This parameterized system of nonlinear equations contains the penalty path as a solution, provides a smooth homotopy into the first-order necessary conditions, and yields a global optimization technique. Furthermore, the inevitable ill-conditioning present in a sequential optimization algorithm is removed for three penalty methods: the quadratic penalty function for equality constraints, and the logarithmic barrier function (an interior method) and the quadratic loss function (an interior method) for inequality constraints. Although these techniques apply to optimization in general and to linear and nonlinear programming, calculus of variations, optimal control and parameter identification in particular, the development is primarily within the context of nonlinear programming.

  9. Constraining neutron guide optimizations with phase-space considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelsen, Mads; Lefmann, Kim

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a method named the Minimalist Principle that serves to reduce the parameter space for neutron guide optimization when the required beam divergence is limited. The reduced parameter space will restrict the optimization to guides with a minimal neutron intake that are still theoretically able to deliver the maximal possible performance. The geometrical constraints are derived using phase-space propagation from moderator to guide and from guide to sample, while assuming that the optimized guides will achieve perfect transport of the limited neutron intake. Guide systems optimized using these constraints are shown to provide performance close to guides optimized without any constraints, however the divergence received at the sample is limited to the desired interval, even when the neutron transport is not limited by the supermirrors used in the guide. As the constraints strongly limit the parameter space for the optimizer, two control parameters are introduced that can be used to adjust the selected subspace, effectively balancing between maximizing neutron transport and avoiding background from unnecessary neutrons. One parameter is needed to describe the expected focusing abilities of the guide to be optimized, going from perfectly focusing to no correlation between position and velocity. The second parameter controls neutron intake into the guide, so that one can select exactly how aggressively the background should be limited. We show examples of guides optimized using these constraints which demonstrates the higher signal to noise than conventional optimizations. Furthermore the parameter controlling neutron intake is explored which shows that the simulated optimal neutron intake is close to the analytically predicted, when assuming that the guide is dominated by multiple scattering events.

  10. Optimal charging profiles for mechanically constrained lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Suthar, B; Ramadesigan, V; De, S; Braatz, RD; Subramanian, VR

    2014-01-01

    The cost and safety related issues of lithium-ion batteries require intelligent charging profiles that can efficiently utilize the battery. This paper illustrates the application of dynamic optimization in obtaining the optimal current profile for charging a lithium-ion battery using a single-particle model while incorporating intercalation-induced stress generation. In this paper, we focus on the problem of maximizing the charge stored in a given time while restricting the development of stresses inside the particle. Conventional charging profiles for lithium-ion batteries (e.g., constant current followed by constant voltage) were not derived by considering capacity fade mechanisms. These charging profiles are not only inefficient in terms of lifetime usage of the batteries but are also slower since they do not exploit the changing dynamics of the system. Dynamic optimization based approaches have been used to derive optimal charging and discharging profiles with different objective functions. The progress made in understanding the capacity fade mechanisms has paved the way for inclusion of that knowledge in deriving optimal controls. While past efforts included thermal constraints, this paper for the first time presents strategies for optimally charging batteries by guaranteeing minimal mechanical damage to the electrode particles during intercalation. In addition, an executable form of the code has been developed and provided. This code can be used to identify optimal charging profiles for any material and design parameters.

  11. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, George A.; Ruan, Dan

    2013-07-15

    distribution than conventional objective functions. In particular, E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans for the pancreas case and head-and-neck case exhibited substantially improved sparing of the spinal cord and parotid glands, respectively, while maintaining or improving sparing for other OARs and markedly improving PTV homogeneity. Plan deliverability for E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans was shown to be better than their associated clinical plans, according to the two-dimensional modulation index.Conclusions: These results suggest that our formulation may be used to improve dose-shaping and OAR-sparing for complicated disease sites, such as the pancreas or head and neck. Furthermore, our objective function and constraints are linear and constitute a linear program, which converges to the global minimum quickly, and can be easily implemented in treatment planning software. Thus, the authors expect fast translation of our method to the clinic where it may have a positive impact on plan quality for challenging disease sites.

  12. Topics in constrained optimal control: Spacecraft formation flying, constrained attitude control, and rank minimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoonsoo

    This dissertation focuses on cooperative control between multiple agents (e.g., spacecraft, UAVs). In particular, motivated by future NASA's multiple spacecraft missions, we have been guided to consider fundamental aspects of spacecraft formation flying, including collision avoidance issues; constraints on the relative position and attitude. In this venue, we have realized that one of the main challenges is dealing with nonconvex state constraints. In this dissertation, we will address such complications using classical control theory, heuristic techniques, and more recent semidefinite programming-based approaches. We then proceed to consider communication and interspacecraft sensing issues in multiple agent dynamic system setting. In this direction, we will study (1) how conventional control techniques should be augmented to meet our design objectives when the information flow between multiple agents is taken into account; (2) which information structures (e.g., information graphs) yield best performance guarantees in terms of stability, robustness, or fast agreement. In this work, we provide theoretical answers to these problems. Moreover, as many design problems involving information networks and graphs lead to combinatorial problems, which can be formulated as rank optimization problems over matrices, we consider these class of problems in this dissertation. Rank optimization problems also arise in system theory and are considered to be of paramount importance in modern control synthesis problems.

  13. Singular perturbations in shape optimization for the Dirichlet Laplacian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Serguei A.; Sokolowski, Jan

    2005-04-01

    A shape optimization problem is considered for the Dirichlet Laplacian. Asymptotic analysis is used in order to characterise the optimal shapes which are finally given by a singular perturbation of the smooth initial domain. To cite this article: S.A. Nazarov, J. Sokolowski, C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  14. Order-Constrained Solutions in K-Means Clustering: Even Better than Being Globally Optimal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinley, Douglas; Hubert, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an order-constrained K-means cluster analysis strategy, and implements that strategy through an auxiliary quadratic assignment optimization heuristic that identifies an initial object order. A subsequent dynamic programming recursion is applied to optimally subdivide the object set subject to the order constraint. We show that…

  15. Closed form solutions of constrained trajectories - Application in optimal ascent of aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping; Samsundar, John

    1992-01-01

    The present consideration of the flight trajectory of hypersonic aerospace vehicles subject to a class of path constraints notes the constrained dynamics to constitute a natural two-timescale system, so that problems of trajectory optimization and guidance can be dramatically simplified by means of the asymptotic analytical solutions thus obtained. An illustrative application in ascent trajectory optimization for an aerospace vehicle is presented.

  16. State-Constrained Optimal Control Problems of Impulsive Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Forcadel, Nicolas; Rao Zhiping Zidani, Hasnaa

    2013-08-01

    The present paper studies an optimal control problem governed by measure driven differential systems and in presence of state constraints. The first result shows that using the graph completion of the measure, the optimal solutions can be obtained by solving a reparametrized control problem of absolutely continuous trajectories but with time-dependent state-constraints. The second result shows that it is possible to characterize the epigraph of the reparametrized value function by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation without assuming any controllability assumption.

  17. On optimal strategies in event-constrained differential games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, M.; Rajan, N.; Ardema, M.

    1985-01-01

    Combat games are formulated as zero-sum differential games with unilateral event constraints. An interior penalty function approach is employed to approximate optimal strategies for the players. The method is very attractive computationally and possesses suitable approximation and convergence properties.

  18. Improved Sensitivity Relations in State Constrained Optimal Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bettiol, Piernicola; Frankowska, Hélène; Vinter, Richard B.

    2015-04-15

    Sensitivity relations in optimal control provide an interpretation of the costate trajectory and the Hamiltonian, evaluated along an optimal trajectory, in terms of gradients of the value function. While sensitivity relations are a straightforward consequence of standard transversality conditions for state constraint free optimal control problems formulated in terms of control-dependent differential equations with smooth data, their verification for problems with either pathwise state constraints, nonsmooth data, or for problems where the dynamic constraint takes the form of a differential inclusion, requires careful analysis. In this paper we establish validity of both ‘full’ and ‘partial’ sensitivity relations for an adjoint state of the maximum principle, for optimal control problems with pathwise state constraints, where the underlying control system is described by a differential inclusion. The partial sensitivity relation interprets the costate in terms of partial Clarke subgradients of the value function with respect to the state variable, while the full sensitivity relation interprets the couple, comprising the costate and Hamiltonian, as the Clarke subgradient of the value function with respect to both time and state variables. These relations are distinct because, for nonsmooth data, the partial Clarke subdifferential does not coincide with the projection of the (full) Clarke subdifferential on the relevant coordinate space. We show for the first time (even for problems without state constraints) that a costate trajectory can be chosen to satisfy the partial and full sensitivity relations simultaneously. The partial sensitivity relation in this paper is new for state constraint problems, while the full sensitivity relation improves on earlier results in the literature (for optimal control problems formulated in terms of Lipschitz continuous multifunctions), because a less restrictive inward pointing hypothesis is invoked in the proof, and because

  19. Shape-Constrained Segmentation Approach for Arctic Multiyear Sea Ice Floe Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Brucker, Ludovic; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Tilton, James C.

    2013-01-01

    The melting of sea ice is correlated to increases in sea surface temperature and associated climatic changes. Therefore, it is important to investigate how rapidly sea ice floes melt. For this purpose, a new Tempo Seg method for multi temporal segmentation of multi year ice floes is proposed. The microwave radiometer is used to track the position of an ice floe. Then,a time series of MODIS images are created with the ice floe in the image center. A Tempo Seg method is performed to segment these images into two regions: Floe and Background.First, morphological feature extraction is applied. Then, the central image pixel is marked as Floe, and shape-constrained best merge region growing is performed. The resulting tworegionmap is post-filtered by applying morphological operators.We have successfully tested our method on a set of MODIS images and estimated the area of a sea ice floe as afunction of time.

  20. Directional control of lamellipodia extension by constraining cell shape and orienting cell tractional forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Kevin Kit; Brock, Amy Lepre; Brangwynne, Cliff; Mannix, Robert J.; Wang, Ning; Ostuni, Emanuele; Geisse, Nicholas A.; Adams, Josephine C.; Whitesides, George M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for tissue morphogenesis and wound healing, but the mechanism of directional control is poorly understood. Here we show that the direction in which cells extend their leading edge can be controlled by constraining cell shape using micrometer-sized extracellular matrix (ECM) islands. When cultured on square ECM islands in the presence of motility factors, cells preferentially extended lamellipodia, filopodia, and microspikes from their corners. Square cells reoriented their stress fibers and focal adhesions so that tractional forces were concentrated in these corner regions. When cell tension was dissipated, lamellipodia extension ceased. Mechanical interactions between cells and ECM that modulate cytoskeletal tension may therefore play a key role in the control of directional cell motility.

  1. A limited-memory algorithm for bound-constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, R.H.; Peihuang, L.; Nocedal, J. |

    1996-03-01

    An algorithm for solving large nonlinear optimization problems with simple bounds is described. It is based on the gradient projection method and uses a limited-memory BFGS matrix to approximate the Hessian of the objective function. We show how to take advantage of the form of the limited-memory approximation to implement the algorithm efficiently. The results of numerical tests on a set of large problems are reported.

  2. Constrained sequential lamination: Nonconvex optimization and material microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fago, Matt

    A practical algorithm has been developed to construct, through sequential lamination, the partial relaxation of multiwell energy densities such as those characteristic of shape memory alloys. The resulting microstructures are in static and configurational equilibrium, and admit arbitrary deformations. The laminate topology evolves during deformation through branching and pruning operations, while a continuity constraint provides a simple model of metastability and hysteresis. In cases with strict separation of length scales, the method may be integrated into a finite element calculation at the subgrid level. This capability is demonstrated with a calculation of the indentation of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy by a spherical indenter. In verification tests the algorithm attained the analytic solution in the computation of three benchmark problems. In the fourth case, the four-well problem (of, e.g., Tartar), results indicate that the method for microstructural evolution imposes an energy barrier for branching, hindering microstructural development in some cases. Although this effect is undesirable for purely mathematical problems, it is reflective of the activation energies and metastabilities present in applications involving natural processes. The method was further used to model Shield's tension test experiment, with initial calculations generating reasonable transformation strains and microstructures that compared well with the sequential laminates obtained experimentally.

  3. Kinetic constrained optimization of the golf swing hub path.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, Steven M; McGinnis, Ryan S

    2014-12-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key PointsThe hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer.It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer.It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories.Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact.The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory.

  4. Thermodynamics constrains allometric scaling of optimal development time in insects.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael E; Frazier, Melanie R

    2013-01-01

    Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1) the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2) numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the "hotter is better" hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of biological processes. The

  5. Kinetic constrained optimization of the golf swing hub path.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, Steven M; McGinnis, Ryan S

    2014-12-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key PointsThe hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer.It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer.It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories.Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact.The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory. PMID:25435779

  6. Kinetic Constrained Optimization of the Golf Swing Hub Path

    PubMed Central

    Nesbit, Steven M.; McGinnis, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key Points The hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer. It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer. It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories. Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact. The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory. PMID:25435779

  7. Thermodynamics Constrains Allometric Scaling of Optimal Development Time in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Frazier, Melanie R.

    2013-01-01

    Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1) the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2) numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the “hotter is better” hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of biological processes

  8. Shape-Constrained Sparse and Low-Rank Decomposition for Auroral Substorm Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Gao, Xinbo; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Han, Bing; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    An auroral substorm is an important geophysical phenomenon that reflects the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Detecting substorms is of practical significance in order to prevent disruption to communication and global positioning systems. However, existing detection methods can be inaccurate or require time-consuming manual analysis and are therefore impractical for large-scale data sets. In this paper, we propose an automatic auroral substorm detection method based on a shape-constrained sparse and low-rank decomposition (SCSLD) framework. Our method automatically detects real substorm onsets in large-scale aurora sequences, which overcomes the limitations of manual detection. To reduce noise interference inherent in current SLD methods, we introduce a shape constraint to force the noise to be assigned to the low-rank part (stationary background), thus ensuring the accuracy of the sparse part (moving object) and improving the performance. Experiments conducted on aurora sequences in solar cycle 23 (1996-2008) show that the proposed SCSLD method achieves good performance for motion analysis of aurora sequences. Moreover, the obtained results are highly consistent with manual analysis, suggesting that the proposed automatic method is useful and effective in practice. PMID:25826810

  9. Human energy - optimal control of disturbance rejection during constrained standing.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, M; Munih, M; Ponikvar, M

    2003-01-01

    An optimal control system that enables a subject to stand without hand support in the sagittal plane was designed. The subject was considered as a double inverted pendulum structure with a voluntarily controlled degree of freedom in the upper trunk and artificially controlled degree of freedom in the ankle joints. The control system design was based on a minimization of cost function that estimated the effort of the ankle joint muscles through observation of the ground reaction force position relative to the ankle joint axis. By maintaining the centre of pressure close to the ankle joint axis the objective of the upright stance is fulfilled with minimal ankle muscle energy cost. The performance of the developed controller was evaluated in a simulation-based study. The results were compared with the responses of an unimpaired subject to different disturbances in the sagittal plane. The proposed cost function was shown to produce a reasonable approximation of human natural behaviour. PMID:12936049

  10. Constrained fatigue life optimization of a NASVYTIS multiroller traction drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Rohn, D. A.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    A contact fatigue life analysis method for multiroller traction drives is presented. The method is based on the Lundberg-Palmgren analysis method for rolling element bearing life prediction, and also uses life adjustment factors for materials, processing, lubrication, and effect of traction. The analysis method is applied in an optimization study to the multiroller traction drive, consisting of a single-stage planetary configuration with two rows of stepped planet rollers of five rollers per row. The drive was approximately 25 centimeters in diameter by 11 centimeters long, having a nominal ratio of 15:1. The theoretically predicted drive life was 2510 hours at a nominal continuous power and speed of 74.6 kW (100 hp) and 75,000 rpm.

  11. Human energy - optimal control of disturbance rejection during constrained standing.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, M; Munih, M; Ponikvar, M

    2003-01-01

    An optimal control system that enables a subject to stand without hand support in the sagittal plane was designed. The subject was considered as a double inverted pendulum structure with a voluntarily controlled degree of freedom in the upper trunk and artificially controlled degree of freedom in the ankle joints. The control system design was based on a minimization of cost function that estimated the effort of the ankle joint muscles through observation of the ground reaction force position relative to the ankle joint axis. By maintaining the centre of pressure close to the ankle joint axis the objective of the upright stance is fulfilled with minimal ankle muscle energy cost. The performance of the developed controller was evaluated in a simulation-based study. The results were compared with the responses of an unimpaired subject to different disturbances in the sagittal plane. The proposed cost function was shown to produce a reasonable approximation of human natural behaviour.

  12. A one-layer recurrent neural network for constrained nonsmooth invex optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Guocheng; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Invexity is an important notion in nonconvex optimization. In this paper, a one-layer recurrent neural network is proposed for solving constrained nonsmooth invex optimization problems, designed based on an exact penalty function method. It is proved herein that any state of the proposed neural network is globally convergent to the optimal solution set of constrained invex optimization problems, with a sufficiently large penalty parameter. In addition, any neural state is globally convergent to the unique optimal solution, provided that the objective function and constraint functions are pseudoconvex. Moreover, any neural state is globally convergent to the feasible region in finite time and stays there thereafter. The lower bounds of the penalty parameter and convergence time are also estimated. Two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the performances of the proposed neural network.

  13. Partial differential equations constrained combinatorial optimization on an adiabatic quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Rishabh

    Partial differential equation-constrained combinatorial optimization (PDECCO) problems are a mixture of continuous and discrete optimization problems. PDECCO problems have discrete controls, but since the partial differential equations (PDE) are continuous, the optimization space is continuous as well. Such problems have several applications, such as gas/water network optimization, traffic optimization, micro-chip cooling optimization, etc. Currently, no efficient classical algorithm which guarantees a global minimum for PDECCO problems exists. A new mapping has been developed that transforms PDECCO problem, which only have linear PDEs as constraints, into quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) problems that can be solved using an adiabatic quantum optimizer (AQO). The mapping is efficient, it scales polynomially with the size of the PDECCO problem, requires only one PDE solve to form the QUBO problem, and if the QUBO problem is solved correctly and efficiently on an AQO, guarantees a global optimal solution for the original PDECCO problem.

  14. A Simply Constrained Optimization Reformulation of KKT Systems Arising from Variational Inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Facchinei, F. Fischer, A. Kanzow, C. Peng, J.-M.

    1999-01-15

    The Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions can be regarded as optimality conditions for both variational inequalities and constrained optimization problems. In order to overcome some drawbacks of recently proposed reformulations of KKT systems, we propose casting KKT systems as a minimization problem with nonnegativity constraints on some of the variables. We prove that, under fairly mild assumptions, every stationary point of this constrained minimization problem is a solution of the KKT conditions. Based on this reformulation, a new algorithm for the solution of the KKT conditions is suggested and shown to have some strong global and local convergence properties.

  15. Experiences with optimizing airfoil shapes for maximum lift over drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doria, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to find airfoil shapes which maximize the ratio of lift over drag for given flow conditions. For a fixed Mach number, Reynolds number, and angle of attack, the lift and drag depend only on the airfoil shape. This then becomes a problem in optimization: find the shape which leads to a maximum value of lift over drag. The optimization was carried out using a self contained computer code for finding the minimum of a function subject to constraints. To find the lift and drag for each airfoil shape, a flow solution has to be obtained. This was done using a two dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  16. Driver Hamiltonians for constrained optimization in quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hen, Itay; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2016-06-01

    One of the current major challenges surrounding the use of quantum annealers for solving practical optimization problems is their inability to encode even moderately sized problems, the main reason for this being the rigid layout of their quantum bits as well as their sparse connectivity. In particular, the implementation of constraints has become a major bottleneck in the embedding of practical problems, because the latter is typically achieved by adding harmful penalty terms to the problem Hamiltonian, a technique that often requires an all-to-all connectivity between the qubits. Recently, a novel technique designed to obviate the need for penalty terms was suggested; it is based on the construction of driver Hamiltonians that commute with the constraints of the problem, rendering the latter constants of motion. In this work we propose general guidelines for the construction of such driver Hamiltonians given an arbitrary set of constraints. We illustrate the broad applicability of our method by analyzing several diverse examples, namely, graph isomorphism, not-all-equal three-satisfiability, and the so-called Lechner-Hauke-Zoller constraints. We also discuss the significance of our approach in the context of current and future experimental quantum annealers.

  17. Topology and boundary shape optimization as an integrated design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendsoe, Martin Philip; Rodrigues, Helder Carrico

    1990-01-01

    The optimal topology of a two dimensional linear elastic body can be computed by regarding the body as a domain of the plane with a high density of material. Such an optimal topology can then be used as the basis for a shape optimization method that computes the optimal form of the boundary curves of the body. This results in an efficient and reliable design tool, which can be implemented via common FEM mesh generator and CAD type input-output facilities.

  18. Integrated topology and shape optimization in structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bremicker, M.; Chirehdast, M.; Kikuchi, N.; Papalambros, P. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Structural optimization procedures usually start from a given design topology and vary its proportions or boundary shapes to achieve optimality under various constraints. Two different categories of structural optimization are distinguished in the literature, namely sizing and shape optimization. A major restriction in both cases is that the design topology is considered fixed and given. Questions concerning the general layout of a design (such as whether a truss or a solid structure should be used) as well as more detailed topology features (e.g., the number and connectivities of bars in a truss or the number of holes in a solid) have to be resolved by design experience before formulating the structural optimization model. Design quality of an optimized structure still depends strongly on engineering intuition. This article presents a novel approach for initiating formal structural optimization at an earlier stage, where the design topology is rigorously generated in addition to selecting shape and size dimensions. A three-phase design process is discussed: an optimal initial topology is created by a homogenization method as a gray level image, which is then transformed to a realizable design using computer vision techniques; this design is then parameterized and treated in detail by sizing and shape optimization. A fully automated process is described for trusses. Optimization of two dimensional solid structures is also discussed. Several application-oriented examples illustrate the usefulness of the proposed methodology.

  19. Optimal embedding for shape indexing in medical image databases.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoning; Tagare, Hemant D

    2005-01-01

    Fast retrieval using organ shapes is crucial in medical image databases since shape is a clinically prominent feature. In this paper, we propose that 2-D shapes in medical image databases can be indexed by embedding them into a vector space and using efficient vector space indexing. An optimal shape space embedding is proposed for this purpose. Experimental results of indexing vertebral shapes in the NHANES II database are presented. The results show that vector space indexing following embedding gives superior performance than metric indexing.

  20. Constrained growth flips the direction of optimal phenological responses among annual plants.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Magnus; Johansson, Jacob; Bolmgren, Kjell; Lundström, Niklas L P; Brännström, Åke; Jonzén, Niclas

    2016-03-01

    Phenological changes among plants due to climate change are well documented, but often hard to interpret. In order to assess the adaptive value of observed changes, we study how annual plants with and without growth constraints should optimize their flowering time when productivity and season length changes. We consider growth constraints that depend on the plant's vegetative mass: self-shading, costs for nonphotosynthetic structural tissue and sibling competition. We derive the optimal flowering time from a dynamic energy allocation model using optimal control theory. We prove that an immediate switch (bang-bang control) from vegetative to reproductive growth is optimal with constrained growth and constant mortality. Increasing mean productivity, while keeping season length constant and growth unconstrained, delayed the optimal flowering time. When growth was constrained and productivity was relatively high, the optimal flowering time advanced instead. When the growth season was extended equally at both ends, the optimal flowering time was advanced under constrained growth and delayed under unconstrained growth. Our results suggests that growth constraints are key factors to consider when interpreting phenological flowering responses. It can help to explain phenological patterns along productivity gradients, and links empirical observations made on calendar scales with life-history theory.

  1. Constrained growth flips the direction of optimal phenological responses among annual plants.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Magnus; Johansson, Jacob; Bolmgren, Kjell; Lundström, Niklas L P; Brännström, Åke; Jonzén, Niclas

    2016-03-01

    Phenological changes among plants due to climate change are well documented, but often hard to interpret. In order to assess the adaptive value of observed changes, we study how annual plants with and without growth constraints should optimize their flowering time when productivity and season length changes. We consider growth constraints that depend on the plant's vegetative mass: self-shading, costs for nonphotosynthetic structural tissue and sibling competition. We derive the optimal flowering time from a dynamic energy allocation model using optimal control theory. We prove that an immediate switch (bang-bang control) from vegetative to reproductive growth is optimal with constrained growth and constant mortality. Increasing mean productivity, while keeping season length constant and growth unconstrained, delayed the optimal flowering time. When growth was constrained and productivity was relatively high, the optimal flowering time advanced instead. When the growth season was extended equally at both ends, the optimal flowering time was advanced under constrained growth and delayed under unconstrained growth. Our results suggests that growth constraints are key factors to consider when interpreting phenological flowering responses. It can help to explain phenological patterns along productivity gradients, and links empirical observations made on calendar scales with life-history theory. PMID:26548947

  2. Determination of poroelastic properties of cartilage using constrained optimization coupled with finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The feasibility of determining biphasic material properties using a finite element model of stress relaxation coupled with two types of constrained optimization to match measured data was investigated. Comparison of these two approaches, a zero-order method and a gradient-based algorithm, validated the predicted material properties. Optimizations were started from multiple different initial guesses of material properties (design variables) to establish the robustness of the optimization. Overall, the optimal values are close to those found by Cohen et al. (1998) but these small differences produced a marked improvement in the fit to the measured stress relaxation. Despite the greater deviation in the optimized values obtained from the zero-order method, both optimization procedures produced material properties that gave equally good overall fits to the measured data. Furthermore, optimized values were all within the expected range of material properties. Modeling stress relaxation using the optimized material properties showed an excellent fit to the entire time history of the measured data.

  3. Cochlear outer hair cells undergo an apical circumference remodeling constrained by the hair bundle shape.

    PubMed

    Etournay, Raphaël; Lepelletier, Léa; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Michel, Vincent; Cayet, Nadège; Leibovici, Michel; Weil, Dominique; Foucher, Isabelle; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Christine

    2010-04-01

    Epithelial cells acquire diverse shapes relating to their different functions. This is particularly relevant for the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), whose apical and basolateral shapes accommodate the functioning of these cells as mechano-electrical and electromechanical transducers, respectively. We uncovered a circumferential shape transition of the apical junctional complex (AJC) of OHCs, which occurs during the early postnatal period in the mouse, prior to hearing onset. Geometric analysis of the OHC apical circumference using immunostaining of the AJC protein ZO1 and Fourier-interpolated contour detection characterizes this transition as a switch from a rounded-hexagon to a non-convex circumference delineating two lateral lobes at the neural side of the cell, with a negative curvature in between. This shape tightly correlates with the 'V'-configuration of the OHC hair bundle, the apical mechanosensitive organelle that converts sound-evoked vibrations into variations in cell membrane potential. The OHC apical circumference remodeling failed or was incomplete in all the mouse mutants affected in hair bundle morphogenesis that we tested. During the normal shape transition, myosin VIIa and myosin II (A and B isoforms) displayed polarized redistributions into and out of the developing lobes, respectively, while Shroom2 and F-actin transiently accumulated in the lobes. Defects in these redistributions were observed in the mutants, paralleling their apical circumference abnormalities. Our results point to a pivotal role for actomyosin cytoskeleton tensions in the reshaping of the OHC apical circumference. We propose that this remodeling contributes to optimize the mechanical coupling between the basal and apical poles of mature OHCs.

  4. Constraining the shape distribution and binary fractions of asteroids observed by NEOWISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnett, Sarah M.; Mainzer, Amy; Grav, Tommy; Masiero, Joseph; Bauer, James; Vernazza, Pierre; Ries, Judit Gyorgyey; Kramer, Emily

    2015-11-01

    Knowing the shape distribution of an asteroid population gives clues to its collisional and dynamical history. Constraining light curve amplitudes (brightness variations) offers a first-order approximation to the shape distribution, provided all asteroids in the distribution were subject to the same observing biases. Asteroids observed by the NEOWISE space mission at roughly the same heliocentric distances have essentially the same observing biases and can therefore be inter-compared. We used the archival NEOWISE photometry of a statistically significant sample of Jovian Trojans, Hildas, and Main belt asteroids to compare the amplitude (and by proxy, shape) distributions of L4 vs. L5 Trojans, Trojans vs. Hildas of the same size range, and several subpopulations of Main belt asteroids.For asteroids with near-fluid rubble pile structures, very large light curve amplitudes can only be explained by close or contact binary systems, offering the potential to catalog and characterize binaries within a population and gleaning more information on its dynamical evolution. Because the structure of most asteroids is not known to a high confidence level, objects with very high light curve amplitudes can only be considered candidate binaries. In Sonnett et al. (2015), we identified several binary candidates in the Jovian Trojan and Hilda populations. We have since been conducting a follow-up campaign to obtain densely sampled light curves of the binary candidates to allow detailed shape and binary modeling, helping identify true binaries. Here, we present preliminary results from the follow-up campaign, including rotation properties.This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology (CalTech) under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and was supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program at JPL. We make use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project

  5. A Generalized Hopfield Network for Nonsmooth Constrained Convex Optimization: Lie Derivative Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaojie; Yu, Xinghuo; Huang, Tingwen; Chen, Guo; He, Xing

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a generalized Hopfield network for solving general constrained convex optimization problems. First, the existence and the uniqueness of solutions to the generalized Hopfield network in the Filippov sense are proved. Then, the Lie derivative is introduced to analyze the stability of the network using a differential inclusion. The optimality of the solution to the nonsmooth constrained optimization problems is shown to be guaranteed by the enhanced Fritz John conditions. The convergence rate of the generalized Hopfield network can be estimated by the second-order derivative of the energy function. The effectiveness of the proposed network is evaluated on several typical nonsmooth optimization problems and used to solve the hierarchical and distributed model predictive control four-tank benchmark.

  6. Characterizations of PAPR-Constrained Radar Waveforms for Optimal Target Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2014-01-01

    We propose to design a peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) constrained transmit waveform that achieves the optimal performance (following the Neyman Pearson lemma) in detecting a target in the presence of signal-dependent interference. The direct time-domain approach allows straightforward characterizations of the correlation and PAPR properties of the designed signals, which are critically important to analyze the system performance in the presence of multiple targets and to assess the transmitter power-utilization, respectively. Therefore, instead of designing a transmit signal only for the optimal detection performance, we solve a biobjective Pareto-optimization problem, subjecting to the PAPR and total energy constraints, in order to simultaneously optimize the detection and cross-correlation performances. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate that PAPR-constrained signals produce nearly optimum detection performance even with a strict PAPR requirement, and also highlight the conflicting behavior of the detection and correlation performances.

  7. Use of constrained optimization in the conceptual design of a medium-range subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform the optimal conceptual design of a medium range transport configuration. The impact of choosing a given performance index was studied, and the required income for a 15 percent return on investment was proposed as a figure of merit. A number of design constants and constraint functions were systematically varied to document the sensitivities of the optimal design to a variety of economic and technological assumptions. A comparison was made for each of the parameter variations between the baseline configuration and the optimally redesigned configuration.

  8. Shape optimization for contact problems based on isogeometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Benjamin; Ulbrich, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We consider the shape optimization for mechanical connectors. To avoid the gap between the representation in CAD systems and the finite element simulation used by mathematical optimization, we choose an isogeometric approach for the solution of the contact problem within the optimization method. This leads to a shape optimization problem governed by an elastic contact problem. We handle the contact conditions using the mortar method and solve the resulting contact problem with a semismooth Newton method. The optimization problem is nonconvex and nonsmooth due to the contact conditions. To reduce the number of simulations, we use a derivative based optimization method. With the adjoint approach the design derivatives can be calculated efficiently. The resulting optimization problem is solved with a modified Bundle Trust Region algorithm.

  9. New general guidance method in constrained optimal control. II - Application to Space Shuttle guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugelmann, B.; Pesch, H. J.

    1990-12-01

    The application and the performance of the neighboring optimal feedback scheme presented in Part 1 of this paper is demonstrated for the heating-constrained cross-range maximization problem of a space-shuttle-orbiter-type vehicle. This problem contains five state variables, two control variables, and a state variable inequality constraint of order zero.

  10. Determination of Optimal Blank Shape by Radius Vector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Bo; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yang Soo

    2004-06-01

    A new method of optimal blank shape design for stampings of arbitrary shapes has been proposed. Similar to the sensitivity method, a past work of the present author, the basic nature of this method is iterative modification of an undeformed blank shape by adjusting the nodal positions at the boundary of the blank, until the final shape satisfies a target shape. The main difference from the sensitivity method is that both shape error measure and blank shape modification is done along the normal to a boundary direction in the current method instead of nodal moving direction as in the sensitivity method. Even though the sensitivity method has been proven to be excellent through experiment, huge computational effort is still a problem since the method requires a couple of deformation process analyses per each design stage. Differently from the sensitivity method, the present radius vector method requires only a single deformation analysis per each design step and it can handle an extraordinary motion due to a rigid-body rotation during forming. Drawings of L-shaped cup and wheel housing have been chosen as the examples to verify the present method. In every cases the optimal blank shapes have been obtained after a few times of modification. Through the investigation, the present method, which incorporates normal to boundary is found to be an excellent, or better than the sensitivity method, which incorporates moving direction, for the optimal blank design.

  11. Buckling, driven by constrained phase separation, of toroid-shaped hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriyev, Michael S.; Chang, Ya-Wen; Souslov, Anton; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Goldbart, Paul M.

    We investigate the buckling process observed in connection with the temperature-induced shrinking of an elastic toroid composed of hydrogel. Hydrogels are polymeric network media that become swollen when mixed with water, provided the temperature is low enough. As the temperature is increased beyond a certain point, such gels undergo a first-order de-swelling transition to a de-mixed state, in which the network segregates from the water, resulting in a shrunken phase. It is known that the rapid heating of swollen hydrogels beyond the de-swelling transition results in the formation of a shrunken-phase boundary region, or shell. This shell hinders the expulsion of fluid associated with the equilibration of the sample interior, and gives rise to a prolonged period of coexistence between shrunken and swollen domains in the interior of the sample. In contrast with the spherical case, toroidal samples have been observed to undergo a constrained phase separation that is accompanied by a global buckling (or ``Pringling'') deformation of the sample shape. We present a model of hydrogel toroid Pringling in which such deformations are driven by this phase separation process.

  12. Optimal embedding for shape indexing in medical image databases.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoning; Tagare, Hemant D; Fulbright, Robert K; Long, Rodney; Antani, Sameer

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of indexing shapes in medical image databases. Shapes of organs are often indicative of disease, making shape similarity queries important in medical image databases. Mathematically, shapes with landmarks belong to shape spaces which are curved manifolds with a well defined metric. The challenge in shape indexing is to index data in such curved spaces. One natural indexing scheme is to use metric trees, but metric trees are prone to inefficiency. This paper proposes a more efficient alternative. We show that it is possible to optimally embed finite sets of shapes in shape space into a Euclidean space. After embedding, classical coordinate-based trees can be used for efficient shape retrieval. The embedding proposed in the paper is optimal in the sense that it least distorts the partial Procrustes shape distance. The proposed indexing technique is used to retrieve images by vertebral shape from the NHANES II database of cervical and lumbar spine X-ray images maintained at the National Library of Medicine. Vertebral shape strongly correlates with the presence of osteophytes, and shape similarity retrieval is proposed as a tool for retrieval by osteophyte presence and severity. Experimental results included in the paper evaluate (1) the usefulness of shape similarity as a proxy for osteophytes, (2) the computational and disk access efficiency of the new indexing scheme, (3) the relative performance of indexing with embedding to the performance of indexing without embedding, and (4) the computational cost of indexing using the proposed embedding versus the cost of an alternate embedding. The experimental results clearly show the relevance of shape indexing and the advantage of using the proposed embedding.

  13. Mixed finite element formulation applied to shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Helder; Taylor, John E.; Kikuchi, Noboru

    1988-01-01

    The development presented introduces a general form of mixed formulation for the optimal shape design problem. The associated optimality conditions are easily obtained without resorting to highly elaborate mathematical developments. Also, the physical significance of the adjoint problem is clearly defined with this formulation.

  14. Genetic algorithms for multicriteria shape optimization of induction furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kůs, Pavel; Mach, František; Karban, Pavel; Doležel, Ivo

    2012-09-01

    In this contribution we deal with a multi-criteria shape optimization of an induction furnace. We want to find shape parameters of the furnace in such a way, that two different criteria are optimized. Since they cannot be optimized simultaneously, instead of one optimum we find set of partially optimal designs, so called Pareto front. We compare two different approaches to the optimization, one using nonlinear conjugate gradient method and second using variation of genetic algorithm. As can be seen from the numerical results, genetic algorithm seems to be the right choice for this problem. Solution of direct problem (coupled problem consisting of magnetic and heat field) is done using our own code Agros2D. It uses finite elements of higher order leading to fast and accurate solution of relatively complicated coupled problem. It also provides advanced scripting support, allowing us to prepare parametric model of the furnace and simply incorporate various types of optimization algorithms.

  15. Low Complexity Models to improve Incomplete Sensitivities for Shape Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, Mugurel; Mohammadi, Bijan; Moreau, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    The present global platform for simulation and design of multi-model configurations treat shape optimization problems in aerodynamics. Flow solvers are coupled with optimization algorithms based on CAD-free and CAD-connected frameworks. Newton methods together with incomplete expressions of gradients are used. Such incomplete sensitivities are improved using reduced models based on physical assumptions. The validity and the application of this approach in real-life problems are presented. The numerical examples concern shape optimization for an airfoil, a business jet and a car engine cooling axial fan.

  16. A Genetic Algorithm Based Augmented Lagrangian Method for Computationally Fast Constrained Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Soumil; Deb, Kalyanmoy

    Among the penalty based approaches for constrained optimization, Augmented Lagrangian (AL) methods are better in at least three ways: (i) they have theoretical convergence properties, (ii) they distort the original objective function minimally to allow a better search behavior, and (iii) they can find the optimal Lagrange multiplier for each constraint as a by-product of optimization. Instead of keeping a constant penalty parameter throughout the optimization process, these algorithms update the parameters adaptively so that the corresponding penalized function dynamically changes its optimum from the unconstrained minimum point to the constrained minimum point with iterations. However, the flip side of these algorithms is that the overall algorithm is a serial implementation of a number of optimization tasks, a process that is usually time-consuming. In this paper, we devise a genetic algorithm based parameter update strategy to a particular AL method. The strategy is self-adaptive in order to make the overall genetic algorithm based augmented Lagrangian (GAAL) method parameter-free. The GAAL method is applied to a number of constrained test problems taken from the EA literature. The function evaluations required by GAAL in many problems is an order or more lower than existing methods.

  17. Constrained optimization of L-lysine production based on metabolic flux using a mathematical programming method.

    PubMed

    Tada, K; Kishimoto, M; Omasa, T; Katakura, Y; Suga, K

    2001-01-01

    Constrained optimization for microbial fermentation was studied. For optimization, we used not the maximum principle but a nonlinear programming method because of the need to consider many metabolic reactions. In the case of L-lysine fermentation, the optimization problem in L-lysine production was formulated as a nonlinear programming problem. In general, the state equations based on material balances are represented as differential equations, but such equations which are dependent on time can not be applied to a nonlinear programming problem. Therefore, the state equations were made discrete in a time base, and a new single vector which is not dependent on time was substituted. From these formulae, the objective function and the constraints using nonlinear programming problem were defined as the amount of L-lysine produced, and as a metabolic reaction model and empirical equations, respectively. Computer program was developed to solve this constrained nonlinear programming problem. The applied algorithm of the computer programming was a sequential quadratic programming method (SQP method). When the constrained nonlinear programming problem is solved using the SQP method, the maximum amount of L-lysine produced and the optimal feeding rate of L-threonine could be calculated. From the calculated results, it was clear that introduction of the equality and inequality constraints was easy. L-Lysine at a concentration up to 75.3 g/l could be produced when the fermentation was carried out under optimal conditions.

  18. A sensitivity equation approach to shape optimization in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1994-01-01

    A sensitivity equation method to shape optimization problems is applied. An algorithm is developed and tested on a problem of designing optimal forebody simulators for a 2D, inviscid supersonic flow. The algorithm uses a BFGS/Trust Region optimization scheme with sensitivities computed by numerically approximating the linear partial differential equations that determine the flow sensitivities. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method.

  19. Optimal Mass Transport for Shape Matching and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n2) to O(n). For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  20. Shape optimization of a sodium cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Damien; Allaire, Grégoire; Pantz, Olivier; Pozin, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Traditional designs of sodium cooled fast reactors have a positive sodium expansion feedback. During a loss of flow transient without scram, sodium heating and boiling thus insert a positive reactivity and prevents the power from decreasing. Recent studies led at CEA, AREVA and EDF show that cores with complex geometries can feature a very low or even a negative sodium void worth.(1, 2) Usual optimization methods for core conception are based on a parametric description of a given core design(3).(4) New core concepts and shapes can then only be found by hand. Shape optimization methods have proven very efficient in the conception of optimal structures under thermal or mechanical constraints.(5, 6) First studies show that these methods could be applied to sodium cooled core conception.(7) In this paper, a shape optimization method is applied to the conception of a sodium cooled fast reactor core with low sodium void worth. An objective function to be minimized is defined. It includes the reactivity change induced by a 1% sodium density decrease. The optimization variable is a displacement field changing the core geometry from one shape to another. Additionally, a parametric optimization of the plutonium content distribution of the core is made, so as to ensure that the core is kept critical, and that the power shape is flat enough. The final shape obtained must then be adjusted to a get realistic core layout. Its caracteristics can be checked with reference neutronic codes such as ERANOS. Thanks to this method, new shapes of reactor cores could be inferred, and lead to new design ideas.

  1. Airfoil shape optimization using sensitivity analysis on viscous flow equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eleshaky, Mohamed E.; Baysal, Oktay

    1993-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method has previously been developed by the authors using the Euler equations and has been applied to supersonic-hypersonic nozzle designs. This method has also included a flowfield extrapolation (or flow prediction) method based on the Taylor series expansion of an existing CFD solution. The present paper reports on the extension of this method to the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations in order to account for the viscous effects. Also, to test the method under highly nonlinear conditions, it has been applied to the transonic flows. Initially, the success of the flow prediction method is tested. Then, the overall method is demonstrated by optimizing the shapes of two supercritical transonic airfoils at zero angle of attack. The first one is shape optimized to achieve a minimum drag while obtaining a lift above a specified value. Whereas, the second one is shape optimized for a maximum lift while attaining a drag below a specified value. The results of these two cases indicate that the present method can produce successfully optimized aerodynamic shapes.

  2. On Shape Optimization for an Evolution Coupled System

    SciTech Connect

    Leugering, G.; Novotny, A. A. Perla Menzala, G.

    2011-12-15

    A shape optimization problem in three spatial dimensions for an elasto-dynamic piezoelectric body coupled to an acoustic chamber is introduced. Well-posedness of the problem is established and first order necessary optimality conditions are derived in the framework of the boundary variation technique. In particular, the existence of the shape gradient for an integral shape functional is obtained, as well as its regularity, sufficient for applications e.g. in modern loudspeaker technologies. The shape gradients are given by functions supported on the moving boundaries. The paper extends results obtained by the authors in (Math. Methods Appl. Sci. 33(17):2118-2131, 2010) where a similar problem was treated without acoustic coupling.

  3. Improving the Hydrodynamic Performance of Diffuser Vanes via Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Tushar; Dorney, Daniel J.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Shyy, Wei

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a diffuser in a pump stage depends on its configuration and placement within the stage. The influence of vane shape on the hydrodynamic performance of a diffuser has been studied. The goal of this effort has been to improve the performance of a pump stage by optimizing the shape of the diffuser vanes. The shape of the vanes was defined using Bezier curves and circular arcs. Surrogate model based tools were used to identify regions of the vane that have a strong influence on its performance. Optimization of the vane shape, in the absence of manufacturing, and stress constraints, led to a nearly nine percent reduction in the total pressure losses compared to the baseline design by reducing the extent of the base separation.

  4. Optimizing Data Locality for Fork/Join Programs Using Constrained Work Stealing

    SciTech Connect

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2014-11-16

    We present an approach to improving data locality across different phases of fork/join programs scheduled using work stealing. The approach consists of: (1) user-specified and automated approaches to constructing a steal tree, the schedule of steal operations and (2) constrained work stealing algorithms that constrain the actions of the scheduler to mirror a given steal tree. These are combined to construct work stealing schedules that maximize data locality across computation phases while ensuring load balance within each phase. These algorithms are also used to demonstrate dynamic coarsening, an optimization to improve spatial locality and sequential overheads by combining many finer-grained tasks into coarser tasks while ensuring sufficient concurrency for locality-optimized load balance. Implementation and evaluation in Cilk demonstrate performance improvements of up to 2.5x on 80 cores. We also demonstrate that dynamic coarsening can combine the performance benefits of coarse task specification with the adaptability of finer tasks.

  5. Optimization of entry-vehicle shapes during conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkx, D.; Mooij, E.

    2014-01-01

    During the conceptual design of a re-entry vehicle, the vehicle shape and geometry can be varied and its impact on performance can be evaluated. In this study, the shape optimization of two classes of vehicles has been studied: a capsule and a winged vehicle. Their aerodynamic characteristics were analyzed using local-inclination methods, automatically selected per vehicle segment. Entry trajectories down to Mach 3 were calculated assuming trimmed conditions. For the winged vehicle, which has both a body flap and elevons, a guidance algorithm to track a reference heat-rate was used. Multi-objective particle swarm optimization was used to optimize the shape using objectives related to mass, volume and range. The optimizations show a large variation in vehicle performance over the explored parameter space. Areas of very strong non-linearity are observed in the direct neighborhood of the two-dimensional Pareto fronts. This indicates the need for robust exploration of the influence of vehicle shapes on system performance during engineering trade-offs, which are performed during conceptual design. A number of important aspects of the influence of vehicle behavior on the Pareto fronts are observed and discussed. There is a nearly complete convergence to narrow-wing solutions for the winged vehicle. Also, it is found that imposing pitch-stability for the winged vehicle at all angles of attack results in vehicle shapes which require upward control surface deflections during the majority of the entry.

  6. Shape Optimization of Rubber Bushing Using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to design rubber bushing at desired level of stiffness characteristics in order to achieve the ride quality of the vehicle. A differential evolution algorithm based approach is developed to optimize the rubber bushing through integrating a finite element code running in batch mode to compute the objective function values for each generation. Two case studies were given to illustrate the application of proposed approach. Optimum shape parameters of 2D bushing model were determined by shape optimization using differential evolution algorithm. PMID:25276848

  7. Shape optimization of rigid inclusions for elastic plates with cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    In the paper, we consider an optimal control problem of finding the most safe rigid inclusion shapes in elastic plates with cracks from the viewpoint of the Griffith rupture criterion. We make use of a general Kirchhoff-Love plate model with both vertical and horizontal displacements, and nonpenetration conditions are fulfilled on the crack faces. The dependence of the first derivative of the energy functional with respect to the crack length on regular shape perturbations of the rigid inclusion is analyzed. It is shown that there exists a solution of the optimal control problem.

  8. A geometric representation scheme suitable for shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    A geometric representation scheme is outlined which utilizes the natural design variable concept. A base configuration with distinct topological features is created. This configuration is then deformed to define components with similar topology but different geometry. The values of the deforming loads are the geometric entities used in the shape representation. The representation can be used for all geometric design studies; it is demonstrated here for structural optimization. This technique can be used in parametric design studies, where the system response is defined as functions of geometric entities. It can also be used in shape optimization, where the geometric entities of an original design are modified to maximize performance and satisfy constraints. Two example problems are provided. A cantilever beam is elongated to meet new design specifications and then optimized to reduce volume and satisfy stress constraints. A similar optimization problem is presented for an automobile crankshaft section. The finite element method is used to perform the analyses.

  9. A Bi-Projection Neural Network for Solving Constrained Quadratic Optimization Problems.

    PubMed

    Xia, Youshen; Wang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a bi-projection neural network for solving a class of constrained quadratic optimization problems is proposed. It is proved that the proposed neural network is globally stable in the sense of Lyapunov, and the output trajectory of the proposed neural network will converge globally to an optimal solution. Compared with existing projection neural networks (PNNs), the proposed neural network has a very small model size owing to its bi-projection structure. Furthermore, an application to data fusion shows that the proposed neural network is very effective. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed neural network is much faster than the existing PNNs.

  10. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  11. Transonic Wing Shape Optimization Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on a genetic algorithm approach is demonstrated. The algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the flow about transonic wings including multi-objective solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the genetic algorithm is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  12. Profile Optimization Method for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization in Viscous Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2003-01-01

    Simulation results obtained by using FUN2D for robust airfoil shape optimization in transonic viscous flow are included to show the potential of the profile optimization method for generating fairly smooth optimal airfoils with no off-design performance degradation.

  13. Configuration-shape-size optimization of space structures by material redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbelt, D. N.; Crivelli, L. A.; Felippa, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    This project investigates the configuration-shape-size optimization (CSSO) of orbiting and planetary space structures. The project embodies three phases. In the first one the material-removal CSSO method introduced by Kikuchi and Bendsoe (KB) is further developed to gain understanding of finite element homogenization techniques as well as associated constrained optimization algorithms that must carry along a very large number (thousands) of design variables. In the CSSO-KB method an optimal structure is 'carved out' of a design domain initially filled with finite elements, by allowing perforations (microholes) to develop, grow and merge. The second phase involves 'materialization' of space structures from the void, thus reversing the carving process. The third phase involves analysis of these structures for construction and operational constraints, with emphasis in packaging and deployment. The present paper describes progress in selected areas of the first project phase and the start of the second one.

  14. Automatic 3D kidney segmentation based on shape constrained GC-OAAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2011-03-01

    The kidney can be classified into three main tissue types: renal cortex, renal medulla and renal pelvis (or collecting system). Dysfunction of different renal tissue types may cause different kidney diseases. Therefore, accurate and efficient segmentation of kidney into different tissue types plays a very important role in clinical research. In this paper, we propose an automatic 3D kidney segmentation method which segments the kidney into the three different tissue types: renal cortex, medulla and pelvis. The proposed method synergistically combines active appearance model (AAM), live wire (LW) and graph cut (GC) methods, GC-OAAM for short. Our method consists of two main steps. First, a pseudo 3D segmentation method is employed for kidney initialization in which the segmentation is performed slice-by-slice via a multi-object oriented active appearance model (OAAM) method. An improved iterative model refinement algorithm is proposed for the AAM optimization, which synergistically combines the AAM and LW method. Multi-object strategy is applied to help the object initialization. The 3D model constraints are applied to the initialization result. Second, the object shape information generated from the initialization step is integrated into the GC cost computation. A multi-label GC method is used to segment the kidney into cortex, medulla and pelvis. The proposed method was tested on 19 clinical arterial phase CT data sets. The preliminary results showed the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  15. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization procedure based on discrete sensitivity analysis is extended to treat three-dimensional geometries. The function of sensitivity analysis is to directly couple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with numerical optimization techniques, which facilitates the construction of efficient direct-design methods. The development of a practical three-dimensional design procedures entails many challenges, such as: (1) the demand for significant efficiency improvements over current design methods; (2) a general and flexible three-dimensional surface representation; and (3) the efficient solution of very large systems of linear algebraic equations. It is demonstrated that each of these challenges is overcome by: (1) employing fully implicit (Newton) methods for the CFD analyses; (2) adopting a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of two- and three-dimensional surfaces; and (3) using preconditioned conjugate gradient-like linear system solvers. Whereas each of these extensions independently yields an improvement in computational efficiency, the combined effect of implementing all the extensions simultaneously results in a significant factor of 50 decrease in computational time and a factor of eight reduction in memory over the most efficient design strategies in current use. The new aerodynamic shape optimization procedure is demonstrated in the design of both two- and three-dimensional inviscid aerodynamic problems including a two-dimensional supersonic internal/external nozzle, two-dimensional transonic airfoils (resulting in supercritical shapes), three-dimensional transport wings, and three-dimensional supersonic delta wings. Each design application results in realistic and useful optimized shapes.

  16. Optimal Shapes of Surface Slip Driven Self-Propelled Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej

    2012-09-01

    We study the efficiency of self-propelled swimmers at low Reynolds numbers, assuming that the local energetic cost of maintaining a propulsive surface slip velocity is proportional to the square of that velocity. We determine numerically the optimal shape of a swimmer such that the total power is minimal while maintaining the volume and the swimming speed. The resulting shape depends strongly on the allowed maximum curvature. When sufficient curvature is allowed the optimal swimmer exhibits two protrusions along the symmetry axis. The results show that prolate swimmers such as Paramecium have an efficiency that is ˜20% higher than that of a spherical body, whereas some microorganisms have shapes that allow even higher efficiency.

  17. Elliptical Cavity Shape Optimization for Acceleration and HOM Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang; Robert Rimmer; Genfa Wu

    2005-05-01

    We report a survey of center cell shapes developed for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) multi-cell cavities for different projects. Using a set of normalized parameters, we compare the designs for different frequencies and particle velocities for the fundamental mode. Using dispersion curves of High Order Modes (HOM) (frequency verse phase advance) calculated by MAFIA for a single cell, we further optimize the cavity shape to avoid a light cone line crossing at the dangerous resonance frequencies determined by the beam bunch structure and eliminate the trapped (or high R/Q) modes with a low group velocity. We developed this formulation to optimize a 5-cell, 750MHz cavity shape, with good real-estate accelerating gradient and a strong HOM damping waveguide structure for the JLab 1MW ERL-FEL project.

  18. A free boundary approach to shape optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Bucur, D; Velichkov, B

    2015-09-13

    The analysis of shape optimization problems involving the spectrum of the Laplace operator, such as isoperimetric inequalities, has known in recent years a series of interesting developments essentially as a consequence of the infusion of free boundary techniques. The main focus of this paper is to show how the analysis of a general shape optimization problem of spectral type can be reduced to the analysis of particular free boundary problems. In this survey article, we give an overview of some very recent technical tools, the so-called shape sub- and supersolutions, and show how to use them for the minimization of spectral functionals involving the eigenvalues of the Dirichlet Laplacian, under a volume constraint. PMID:26261362

  19. A free boundary approach to shape optimization problems

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, D.; Velichkov, B.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of shape optimization problems involving the spectrum of the Laplace operator, such as isoperimetric inequalities, has known in recent years a series of interesting developments essentially as a consequence of the infusion of free boundary techniques. The main focus of this paper is to show how the analysis of a general shape optimization problem of spectral type can be reduced to the analysis of particular free boundary problems. In this survey article, we give an overview of some very recent technical tools, the so-called shape sub- and supersolutions, and show how to use them for the minimization of spectral functionals involving the eigenvalues of the Dirichlet Laplacian, under a volume constraint. PMID:26261362

  20. Constrained numerical gradients and composite gradients: Practical tools for geometry optimization and potential energy surface navigation.

    PubMed

    Stenrup, Michael; Lindh, Roland; Fdez Galván, Ignacio

    2015-08-15

    A method is proposed to easily reduce the number of energy evaluations required to compute numerical gradients when constraints are imposed on the system, especially in connection with rigid fragment optimization. The method is based on the separation of the coordinate space into a constrained and an unconstrained space, and the numerical differentiation is done exclusively in the unconstrained space. The decrease in the number of energy calculations can be very important if the system is significantly constrained. The performance of the method is tested on systems that can be considered as composed of several rigid groups or molecules, and the results show that the error with respect to conventional optimizations is of the order of the convergence criteria. Comparison with another method designed for rigid fragment optimization proves the present method to be competitive. The proposed method can also be applied to combine numerical and analytical gradients computed at different theory levels, allowing an unconstrained optimization with numerical differentiation restricted to the most significant degrees of freedom. This approach can be a practical alternative when analytical gradients are not available at the desired computational level and full numerical differentiation is not affordable.

  1. Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    2004-01-01

    A genetic algorithm approach suitable for solving multi-objective optimization problems is described and evaluated using a series of aerodynamic shape optimization problems. Several new features including two variations of a binning selection algorithm and a gene-space transformation procedure are included. The genetic algorithm is suitable for finding pareto optimal solutions in search spaces that are defined by any number of genes and that contain any number of local extrema. A new masking array capability is included allowing any gene or gene subset to be eliminated as decision variables from the design space. This allows determination of the effect of a single gene or gene subset on the pareto optimal solution. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm optimization approach is flexible in application and reliable. The binning selection algorithms generally provide pareto front quality enhancements and moderate convergence efficiency improvements for most of the problems solved.

  2. Joint Robust Transmit/Receive Adaptive Beamforming for MIMO Radar Using Probability-Constrained Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiyu; Vorobyov, Sergiy A.

    2016-01-01

    A joint robust transmit/receive adaptive beamforming for multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) radar based on probability-constrained optimization approach is developed in the case of Gaussian and arbitrary distributed mismatch present in both the transmit and receive signal steering vectors. A tight lower bound of the probability constraint is also derived by using duality theory. The formulated probability-constrained robust beamforming problem is nonconvex and NP-hard. However, we reformulate its cost function into a bi-quadratic function while the probability constraint splits into transmit and receive parts. Then, a block coordinate descent method based on second-order cone programming is developed to address the biconvex problem. Simulation results show an improved robustness of the proposed beamforming method as compared to the worst-case and other existing state-of-the-art joint transmit/receive robust adaptive beamforming methods for MIMO radar.

  3. A Near-Optimal Distributed QoS Constrained Routing Algorithm for Multichannel Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank Yeong-Sung; Hsiao, Chiu-Han; Yen, Hong-Hsu; Hsieh, Yu-Jen

    2013-01-01

    One of the important applications in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is video surveillance that includes the tasks of video data processing and transmission. Processing and transmission of image and video data in WSNs has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. This is known as Wireless Visual Sensor Networks (WVSNs). WVSNs are distributed intelligent systems for collecting image or video data with unique performance, complexity, and quality of service challenges. WVSNs consist of a large number of battery-powered and resource constrained camera nodes. End-to-end delay is a very important Quality of Service (QoS) metric for video surveillance application in WVSNs. How to meet the stringent delay QoS in resource constrained WVSNs is a challenging issue that requires novel distributed and collaborative routing strategies. This paper proposes a Near-Optimal Distributed QoS Constrained (NODQC) routing algorithm to achieve an end-to-end route with lower delay and higher throughput. A Lagrangian Relaxation (LR)-based routing metric that considers the “system perspective” and “user perspective” is proposed to determine the near-optimal routing paths that satisfy end-to-end delay constraints with high system throughput. The empirical results show that the NODQC routing algorithm outperforms others in terms of higher system throughput with lower average end-to-end delay and delay jitter. In this paper, for the first time, the algorithm shows how to meet the delay QoS and at the same time how to achieve higher system throughput in stringently resource constrained WVSNs.

  4. Optimization of bow shape for a non ballast water ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van He, Ngo; Ikeda, Yoshiho

    2013-09-01

    In this research, a commercial CFD code "Fluent" was applied to optimization of bulbous bow shape for a non ballast water ships (NBS). The ship was developed at the Laboratory of the authors in Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. At first, accuracy of the CFD code was validated by comparing the CFD results with experimental results at towing tank of Osaka Prefecture University. In the optimizing process, the resistances acting on ships in calm water and in regular head waves were defined as the object function. Following features of bulbous bow shapes were considered as design parameters: volume of bulbous bow, height of its volume center, angle of bow bottom, and length of bulbous bow. When referring to the computed results given by the CFD like resistance, pressure and wave pattern made by ships in calm water and in waves, an optimal bow shape for ships was discovered by comparing the results in the series of bow shapes. In the computation on waves, the ship is in fully captured condition because shorter waves, λ/ L pp <0.6, are assumed.

  5. Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control.

    PubMed

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-02-21

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or "photonic reagents," that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed. PMID:24559348

  6. Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-02-01

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or "photonic reagents," that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed.

  7. Shape Optimization and Supremal Minimization Approaches in Landslides Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hassani, Riad Ionescu, Ioan R. Lachand-Robert, Thomas

    2005-10-15

    The steady-state unidirectional (anti-plane) flow for a Bingham fluid is considered. We take into account the inhomogeneous yield limit of the fluid, which is well adjusted to the description of landslides. The blocking property is analyzed and we introduce the safety factor which is connected to two optimization problems in terms of velocities and stresses. Concerning the velocity analysis the minimum problem in Bv({omega}) is equivalent to a shape-optimization problem. The optimal set is the part of the land which slides whenever the loading parameter becomes greater than the safety factor. This is proved in the one-dimensional case and conjectured for the two-dimensional flow. For the stress-optimization problem we give a stream function formulation in order to deduce a minimum problem in W{sup 1,{infinity}}({omega}) and we prove the existence of a minimizer. The L{sup p}({omega}) approximation technique is used to get a sequence of minimum problems for smooth functionals. We propose two numerical approaches following the two analysis presented before.First, we describe a numerical method to compute the safety factor through equivalence with the shape-optimization problem.Then the finite-element approach and a Newton method is used to obtain a numerical scheme for the stress formulation. Some numerical results are given in order to compare the two methods. The shape-optimization method is sharp in detecting the sliding zones but the convergence is very sensitive to the choice of the parameters. The stress-optimization method is more robust, gives precise safety factors but the results cannot be easily compiled to obtain the sliding zone.

  8. A multiobjective shape optimization study for a subsonic submerged inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskinoglu, Ezgi S.

    The purpose of the present work is to summarize the findings of a multiobjective shape optimization study conducted for a subsonic submerged air vehicle inlet. The objective functions of the optimization problem are distortion and swirl indices defined by the distribution of flow parameters over the exit cross-section of the inlet. The geometry alteration is performed by placing a protrusion in the shape of a fin on the baseline inlet surface. Thus, the design variables of the optimization problem are chosen to be the geometrical parameters defining the fin protrusion; namely fin height, length and incidence angle. The Trade Off (also known as epsilon-constraint) method is employed for finding the Pareto optimal set formed by the nondominated solutions of the feasible design space. Since the flow domain solution is required for every step along the line search, an automated optimization loop is constructed by integrating the optimizer with a surface modeler, a mesh generator and a flow solver through which the flow parameters over the compressor face are computed. In addition, the trade study for fin protrusion, the analyses and the comparison of the baseline and Pareto optimal solutions are presented and observations concerning grid resolution and convergence behaviour are discussed. The results display an irregular and discontinuous Pareto optimal set. Optimum inlet designs are scattered in two regions from which one representative inlet design is chosen and analyzed. As a result, it is concluded that an inlet designer has two options within the framework of this optimization study: an inlet design with high swirl but low distortion or an inlet design with low swirl but higher distortion.

  9. Firefly algorithm for cardinality constrained mean-variance portfolio optimization problem with entropy diversity constraint.

    PubMed

    Bacanin, Nebojsa; Tuba, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Portfolio optimization (selection) problem is an important and hard optimization problem that, with the addition of necessary realistic constraints, becomes computationally intractable. Nature-inspired metaheuristics are appropriate for solving such problems; however, literature review shows that there are very few applications of nature-inspired metaheuristics to portfolio optimization problem. This is especially true for swarm intelligence algorithms which represent the newer branch of nature-inspired algorithms. No application of any swarm intelligence metaheuristics to cardinality constrained mean-variance (CCMV) portfolio problem with entropy constraint was found in the literature. This paper introduces modified firefly algorithm (FA) for the CCMV portfolio model with entropy constraint. Firefly algorithm is one of the latest, very successful swarm intelligence algorithm; however, it exhibits some deficiencies when applied to constrained problems. To overcome lack of exploration power during early iterations, we modified the algorithm and tested it on standard portfolio benchmark data sets used in the literature. Our proposed modified firefly algorithm proved to be better than other state-of-the-art algorithms, while introduction of entropy diversity constraint further improved results.

  10. Firefly Algorithm for Cardinality Constrained Mean-Variance Portfolio Optimization Problem with Entropy Diversity Constraint

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Portfolio optimization (selection) problem is an important and hard optimization problem that, with the addition of necessary realistic constraints, becomes computationally intractable. Nature-inspired metaheuristics are appropriate for solving such problems; however, literature review shows that there are very few applications of nature-inspired metaheuristics to portfolio optimization problem. This is especially true for swarm intelligence algorithms which represent the newer branch of nature-inspired algorithms. No application of any swarm intelligence metaheuristics to cardinality constrained mean-variance (CCMV) portfolio problem with entropy constraint was found in the literature. This paper introduces modified firefly algorithm (FA) for the CCMV portfolio model with entropy constraint. Firefly algorithm is one of the latest, very successful swarm intelligence algorithm; however, it exhibits some deficiencies when applied to constrained problems. To overcome lack of exploration power during early iterations, we modified the algorithm and tested it on standard portfolio benchmark data sets used in the literature. Our proposed modified firefly algorithm proved to be better than other state-of-the-art algorithms, while introduction of entropy diversity constraint further improved results. PMID:24991645

  11. PAPR-Constrained Pareto-Optimal Waveform Design for OFDM-STAP Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2014-01-01

    We propose a peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) constrained Pareto-optimal waveform design approach for an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar signal to detect a target using the space-time adaptive processing (STAP) technique. The use of an OFDM signal does not only increase the frequency diversity of our system, but also enables us to adaptively design the OFDM coefficients in order to further improve the system performance. First, we develop a parametric OFDM-STAP measurement model by considering the effects of signaldependent clutter and colored noise. Then, we observe that the resulting STAP-performance can be improved by maximizing the output signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) with respect to the signal parameters. However, in practical scenarios, the computation of output SINR depends on the estimated values of the spatial and temporal frequencies and target scattering responses. Therefore, we formulate a PAPR-constrained multi-objective optimization (MOO) problem to design the OFDM spectral parameters by simultaneously optimizing four objective functions: maximizing the output SINR, minimizing two separate Cramer-Rao bounds (CRBs) on the normalized spatial and temporal frequencies, and minimizing the trace of CRB matrix on the target scattering coefficients estimations. We present several numerical examples to demonstrate the achieved performance improvement due to the adaptive waveform design.

  12. Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    2005-01-01

    A genetic algorithm approach suitable for solving multi-objective problems is described and evaluated using a series of aerodynamic shape optimization problems. Several new features including two variations of a binning selection algorithm and a gene-space transformation procedure are included. The genetic algorithm is suitable for finding Pareto optimal solutions in search spaces that are defined by any number of genes and that contain any number of local extrema. A new masking array capability is included allowing any gene or gene subset to be eliminated as decision variables from the design space. This allows determination of the effect of a single gene or gene subset on the Pareto optimal solution. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm optimization approach is flexible in application and reliable. The binning selection algorithms generally provide Pareto front quality enhancements and moderate convergence efficiency improvements for most of the problems solved.

  13. Optimization of pocket milling operation of rectangular shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Andijani, A.

    1994-12-31

    An optimization model to setup machine parameters (feed, speed, width, and depth of cut) for pocket milling on a vertical mill is developed. We propose an approach to determine the optimal set of operating conditions that minimize the total milling cost. The part to be milled has a square or a rectangular shape. The pocket milling mathematical model in this paper is an explicit, multi-variable, nonlinear objective function, and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. We provide a study of some optimization algorithms that are suitable for the optimization of the pocket milling operation. We describe the general and the relative features for each algorithm. However, the final choice of the best algorithm depends upon individual preference, experience, and the case being investigated. An illustrative example is presented.

  14. Estimating Contrast Transfer Function and Associated Parameters by Constrained Nonlinear Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Jiang, Wen; Chen, Dong-Hua; Adiga, Umesh; Ng, Esmond G.; Chiu, Wah

    2008-07-28

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of macromolecules from two-dimensional single-particle electron images requires determination and correction of the contrast transfer function (CTF) and envelope function. A computational algorithm based on constrained non-linear optimization is developed to estimate the essential parameters in the CTF and envelope function model simultaneously and automatically. The application of this estimation method is demonstrated with focal series images of amorphous carbon film as well as images of ice-embedded icosahedral virus particles suspended across holes.

  15. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.

  16. Optimization strategy to find shapes of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, S.; Rohrmann, Ph.; Hause, A.; Mitschke, F.

    2014-07-01

    Frequently, a certain solution of a nonlinear wave equation is of interest, but no analytic form is known, and one must work with approximations. We introduce a search strategy to find solutions of the propagation of soliton molecules in a dispersion-managed optical fiber and to determine their shape with some precision. The strategy compares shapes before and after propagation and invokes an optimization routine to minimize the difference. The scheme is designed to be implemented in an experiment so that all fiber parameters are taken into account. Here, we present a full numerical study and a verification of convergence; we validate the method with cases of known solutions. We also compare the performance of two optimization procedures, the Nelder-Mead simplex method and a genetic algorithm.

  17. Interpretable exemplar-based shape classification using constrained sparse linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdsson, Gunnar A.; Yang, Zhen; Tran, Trac D.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-03-01

    Many types of diseases manifest themselves as observable changes in the shape of the affected organs. Using shape classification, we can look for signs of disease and discover relationships between diseases. We formulate the problem of shape classification in a holistic framework that utilizes a lossless scalar field representation and a non-parametric classification based on sparse recovery. This framework generalizes over certain classes of unseen shapes while using the full information of the shape, bypassing feature extraction. The output of the method is the class whose combination of exemplars most closely approximates the shape, and furthermore, the algorithm returns the most similar exemplars along with their similarity to the shape, which makes the result simple to interpret. Our results show that the method offers accurate classification between three cerebellar diseases and controls in a database of cerebellar ataxia patients. For reproducible comparison, promising results are presented on publicly available 2D datasets, including the ETH-80 dataset where the method achieves 88.4% classification accuracy.

  18. Optimized pulse shapes for a resonator-induced phase gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Andrew W.; Gambetta, Jay M.

    2015-03-01

    The resonator-induced phase gate is a multiqubit controlled-phase gate for fixed-frequency superconducting qubits. Through off-resonant driving of a bus resonator, statically coupled qubits acquire a state-dependent phase. However, photon loss leads to dephasing during the gate, and any residual entanglement between the resonator and qubits after the gate leads to decoherence. Here we consider how to shape the drive pulse to minimize these unwanted effects. First, we review how the gate's entangling and dephasing rates depend on the system parameters and validate closed-form solutions against direct numerical solution of a master equation. Next, we propose spline pulse shapes that reduce residual qubit-bus entanglement, are robust to imprecise knowledge of the resonator shift, and can be shortened by using higher-degree polynomials. Finally, we present a procedure that optimizes over the subspace of pulses that leave the resonator unpopulated. This finds shaped drive pulses that further reduce the gate duration. Assuming realistic parameters, we exhibit shaped pulses that have the potential to realize ˜212 ns spline pulse gates and ˜120 ns optimized gates with ˜6 ×10-4 average gate infidelity. These examples do not represent fundamental limits of the gate and, in principle, even shorter gates may be achievable.

  19. Risk-Constrained Dynamic Programming for Optimal Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Kuwata, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    A chance-constrained dynamic programming algorithm was developed that is capable of making optimal sequential decisions within a user-specified risk bound. This work handles stochastic uncertainties over multiple stages in the CEMAT (Combined EDL-Mobility Analyses Tool) framework. It was demonstrated by a simulation of Mars entry, descent, and landing (EDL) using real landscape data obtained from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Although standard dynamic programming (DP) provides a general framework for optimal sequential decisionmaking under uncertainty, it typically achieves risk aversion by imposing an arbitrary penalty on failure states. Such a penalty-based approach cannot explicitly bound the probability of mission failure. A key idea behind the new approach is called risk allocation, which decomposes a joint chance constraint into a set of individual chance constraints and distributes risk over them. The joint chance constraint was reformulated into a constraint on an expectation over a sum of an indicator function, which can be incorporated into the cost function by dualizing the optimization problem. As a result, the chance-constraint optimization problem can be turned into an unconstrained optimization over a Lagrangian, which can be solved efficiently using a standard DP approach.

  20. Reinforcement learning solution for HJB equation arising in constrained optimal control problem.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Wu, Huai-Ning; Huang, Tingwen; Liu, Derong

    2015-11-01

    The constrained optimal control problem depends on the solution of the complicated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation (HJBE). In this paper, a data-based off-policy reinforcement learning (RL) method is proposed, which learns the solution of the HJBE and the optimal control policy from real system data. One important feature of the off-policy RL is that its policy evaluation can be realized with data generated by other behavior policies, not necessarily the target policy, which solves the insufficient exploration problem. The convergence of the off-policy RL is proved by demonstrating its equivalence to the successive approximation approach. Its implementation procedure is based on the actor-critic neural networks structure, where the function approximation is conducted with linearly independent basis functions. Subsequently, the convergence of the implementation procedure with function approximation is also proved. Finally, its effectiveness is verified through computer simulations.

  1. Reinforcement learning solution for HJB equation arising in constrained optimal control problem.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Wu, Huai-Ning; Huang, Tingwen; Liu, Derong

    2015-11-01

    The constrained optimal control problem depends on the solution of the complicated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation (HJBE). In this paper, a data-based off-policy reinforcement learning (RL) method is proposed, which learns the solution of the HJBE and the optimal control policy from real system data. One important feature of the off-policy RL is that its policy evaluation can be realized with data generated by other behavior policies, not necessarily the target policy, which solves the insufficient exploration problem. The convergence of the off-policy RL is proved by demonstrating its equivalence to the successive approximation approach. Its implementation procedure is based on the actor-critic neural networks structure, where the function approximation is conducted with linearly independent basis functions. Subsequently, the convergence of the implementation procedure with function approximation is also proved. Finally, its effectiveness is verified through computer simulations. PMID:26356598

  2. Interactive method for planning constrained, fuel-optimal orbital proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovitz, Adrian; Grunwald, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    An interactive graphical method for planning fuel-efficient rendezvous trajectories in the multi-spacecraft environment of the space station is presented. The method allows the operator to compose a multi-burn transfer trajectory between arbitrary initial chaser and target trajectories. The available task time of the mission is limited and the maneuver is subject to various operational constraints, such as departure, arrival, plume impingement and spatial constraints. The maneuvers are described in terms of the relataive motion experienced in a Space-Station centered coordinate system. The optimization method is based on the primer vector and its extension to non-optimal trajectories. The visual feedback of trajectory shapes, operational constraints, and optimization functions, provided by user-transparaent and continuously active background computations, allows the operator to make fast, iterative design changes which rapidly converge to fuel-efficient solutions. The optimization functions are presented. A variety of simple design examples has been presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the method. In many cases the addition of a properly positioned intermediate waypoint resulted in fuel savings of up to 30%. Furthermore, due to the counter-intuitive character of the optimization functions, most fuel-optimal solutions could not have been found without the aid of the optimization tools. Operating the system was found to be very easy, and did not require any previous in-depth knowledge of orbital dynamics or trajectory. The planning tool is an example of operator assisted optimization of nonlinear cost-functions.

  3. Optimal shape of entrances for a frictionless nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belin, Christophe; Joly, Laurent; Detcheverry, François

    2016-09-01

    The nearly frictionless flow of water in narrow carbon nanotubes is a genuine nanofluidic phenomenon with many prospects of applications in membrane technology. When inner dissipation is vanishing, the limiting factor to high flux lies in the viscous dissipation occurring at the tube mouth. As shown by Gravelle et al. [Gravelle, Joly, Detcheverry, Ybert, Cottin-Bizonne, and Bocquet, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 16367 (2013), 10.1073/pnas.1306447110], these so-called end effects can be reduced by adding a conical entrance. In this work, we take a step further and search for the optimal entrance shape. We use finite element calculations to compute the hydrodynamic resistance of a frictionless tube with superellipse-shaped entrances and propose an approximate analytical model. If perfect slip applies on its wall, an optimal entrance which is only 10 tube radii in length is sufficient to reduce end effects by an order of magnitude, a performance almost three times better than the optimal cone. In the case of partial slip, the resistance decreases with the entrance length before reaching a plateau at an optimal length controlled by liquid-solid slip. Our results are discussed in connection with biological and artificial systems.

  4. Constraining the shaping mechanism of the Red Rectangle through the spectro-polarimetry of its central star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez González, M. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Manso Sainz, R.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Leone, F.

    2015-02-01

    We carried out high-sensitivity spectro-polarimetric observations of the central star of the Red Rectangle protoplanetary nebula with the aim of constraining the mechanism that gives its biconical shape. The stellar light of the central binary system is linearly polarised since it is scattered on the dust particles of the nebula. Surprisingly, the linear polarisation in the continuum is aligned with one of the spikes of the biconical outflow. Also, the observed Balmer lines, as well as the Ca ii K lines, are polarised. These observational constraints are used to confirm or reject current theoretical models for the shaping mechanism of the Red Rectangle. We propose that the observed polarisation is not very likely to be generated by a uniform biconical stellar wind. Also, the hypothesis of a precessing jet does not completely match observations since it requires a larger aperture jet than for the nebula.

  5. Simultaneous beam sampling and aperture shape optimization for SPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Ye, Yinyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital linear accelerators, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle, can be optimized simultaneously. SPORT promises to deliver remarkable radiation dose distributions in an efficient manner, yet there exists no optimization algorithm for its implementation. The purpose of this work is to develop an algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: The authors build a mathematical model with the fundamental station point parameters as the decision variables. To solve the resulting large-scale optimization problem, the authors devise an effective algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques: column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search. Column generation adds the most beneficial stations sequentially until the plan quality improvement saturates and provides a good starting point for the subsequent optimization. It also adds the new stations during the algorithm if beneficial. For each update resulted from column generation, the subgradient method improves the selected stations locally by reshaping the apertures and updating the beam angles toward a descent subgradient direction. The algorithm continues to improve the selected stations locally and globally by a pattern search algorithm to explore the part of search space not reachable by the subgradient method. By combining these three techniques together, all plausible combinations of station parameters are searched efficiently to yield the optimal solution. Results: A SPORT optimization framework with seamlessly integration of three complementary algorithms, column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search, was established. The proposed technique was applied to two previously treated clinical cases: a head and

  6. In-Space Radiator Shape Optimization using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Patrick V.; Kittredge, Ken; Tinker, Michael; SanSoucie, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will require the development of more advanced in-space radiators. These radiators should be highly efficient and lightweight, deployable heat rejection systems. Typical radiators for in-space heat mitigation commonly comprise a substantial portion of the total vehicle mass. A small mass savings of even 5-10% can greatly improve vehicle performance. The objective of this paper is to present the development of detailed tools for the analysis and design of in-space radiators using evolutionary computation techniques. The optimality criterion is defined as a two-dimensional radiator with a shape demonstrating the smallest mass for the greatest overall heat transfer, thus the end result is a set of highly functional radiator designs. This cross-disciplinary work combines topology optimization and thermal analysis design by means of a genetic algorithm The proposed design tool consists of the following steps; design parameterization based on the exterior boundary of the radiator, objective function definition (mass minimization and heat loss maximization), objective function evaluation via finite element analysis (thermal radiation analysis) and optimization based on evolutionary algorithms. The radiator design problem is defined as follows: the input force is a driving temperature and the output reaction is heat loss. Appropriate modeling of the space environment is added to capture its effect on the radiator. The design parameters chosen for this radiator shape optimization problem fall into two classes, variable height along the width of the radiator and a spline curve defining the -material boundary of the radiator. The implementation of multiple design parameter schemes allows the user to have more confidence in the radiator optimization tool upon demonstration of convergence between the two design parameter schemes. This tool easily allows the user to manipulate the driving temperature regions thus permitting detailed design of in

  7. Finite-horizon control-constrained nonlinear optimal control using single network adaptive critics.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Ali; Balakrishnan, Sivasubramanya N

    2013-01-01

    To synthesize fixed-final-time control-constrained optimal controllers for discrete-time nonlinear control-affine systems, a single neural network (NN)-based controller called the Finite-horizon Single Network Adaptive Critic is developed in this paper. Inputs to the NN are the current system states and the time-to-go, and the network outputs are the costates that are used to compute optimal feedback control. Control constraints are handled through a nonquadratic cost function. Convergence proofs of: 1) the reinforcement learning-based training method to the optimal solution; 2) the training error; and 3) the network weights are provided. The resulting controller is shown to solve the associated time-varying Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and provide the fixed-final-time optimal solution. Performance of the new synthesis technique is demonstrated through different examples including an attitude control problem wherein a rigid spacecraft performs a finite-time attitude maneuver subject to control bounds. The new formulation has great potential for implementation since it consists of only one NN with single set of weights and it provides comprehensive feedback solutions online, though it is trained offline.

  8. Finite-horizon control-constrained nonlinear optimal control using single network adaptive critics.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Ali; Balakrishnan, Sivasubramanya N

    2013-01-01

    To synthesize fixed-final-time control-constrained optimal controllers for discrete-time nonlinear control-affine systems, a single neural network (NN)-based controller called the Finite-horizon Single Network Adaptive Critic is developed in this paper. Inputs to the NN are the current system states and the time-to-go, and the network outputs are the costates that are used to compute optimal feedback control. Control constraints are handled through a nonquadratic cost function. Convergence proofs of: 1) the reinforcement learning-based training method to the optimal solution; 2) the training error; and 3) the network weights are provided. The resulting controller is shown to solve the associated time-varying Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and provide the fixed-final-time optimal solution. Performance of the new synthesis technique is demonstrated through different examples including an attitude control problem wherein a rigid spacecraft performs a finite-time attitude maneuver subject to control bounds. The new formulation has great potential for implementation since it consists of only one NN with single set of weights and it provides comprehensive feedback solutions online, though it is trained offline. PMID:24808214

  9. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in a similar manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminated plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary design optimization application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

  10. Wall shape optimization for a thermosyphon loop featuring corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen Esquivel, Patricio I.; ten Thije Boonkkamp, Jan H. M.; Dam, Jacques A. M.; Mattheij, Robert M. M.

    2012-06-01

    In the present paper we address the problem of optimal wall-shape design of a single phase laminar thermosyphon loop. The model takes the buoyancy forces into account via the Boussinesq approximation. We focus our study on showing the effects of wall shape on the flow and on the temperature inside the thermosyphon. To this extend we determine the dependency of the flow rate and the increase in temperature, on the geometrical characteristics of the loop. The geometry considered is a set of axially symmetric corrugated pipes described by a set of parameters; namely the pipe inner radius, the period of the corrugation, the amplitude of the corrugation, and the ratio of expansion and contraction regions of a period of the pipe. The governing equations are solved using the Finite Element Method, in combination with an adaptive mesh refinement technique in order to capture the effects of wall shape. We characterize the effects of the amplitude and of the ratio of expansion and contraction. In particular we show that for a given fixed amplitude it is possible to find an optimal ratio of expansion and contraction that minimizes the temperature inside the thermosyphon. The results show that by adequately choosing the design parameters, the performance of the thermosyphon loop can be improved.

  11. Optimizing water permeability through the hourglass shape of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Gravelle, Simon; Joly, Laurent; Detcheverry, François; Ybert, Christophe; Cottin-Bizonne, Cécile; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-10-01

    The ubiquitous aquaporin channels are able to conduct water across cell membranes, combining the seemingly antagonist functions of a very high selectivity with a remarkable permeability. Whereas molecular details are obvious keys to perform these tasks, the overall efficiency of transport in such nanopores is also strongly limited by viscous dissipation arising at the connection between the nanoconstriction and the nearby bulk reservoirs. In this contribution, we focus on these so-called entrance effects and specifically examine whether the characteristic hourglass shape of aquaporins may arise from a geometrical optimum for such hydrodynamic dissipation. Using a combination of finite-element calculations and analytical modeling, we show that conical entrances with suitable opening angle can indeed provide a large increase of the overall channel permeability. Moreover, the optimal opening angles that maximize the permeability are found to compare well with the angles measured in a large variety of aquaporins. This suggests that the hourglass shape of aquaporins could be the result of a natural selection process toward optimal hydrodynamic transport. Finally, in a biomimetic perspective, these results provide guidelines to design artificial nanopores with optimal performances. PMID:24067650

  12. Optimizing water permeability through the hourglass shape of aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Gravelle, Simon; Joly, Laurent; Detcheverry, François; Ybert, Christophe; Cottin-Bizonne, Cécile; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous aquaporin channels are able to conduct water across cell membranes, combining the seemingly antagonist functions of a very high selectivity with a remarkable permeability. Whereas molecular details are obvious keys to perform these tasks, the overall efficiency of transport in such nanopores is also strongly limited by viscous dissipation arising at the connection between the nanoconstriction and the nearby bulk reservoirs. In this contribution, we focus on these so-called entrance effects and specifically examine whether the characteristic hourglass shape of aquaporins may arise from a geometrical optimum for such hydrodynamic dissipation. Using a combination of finite-element calculations and analytical modeling, we show that conical entrances with suitable opening angle can indeed provide a large increase of the overall channel permeability. Moreover, the optimal opening angles that maximize the permeability are found to compare well with the angles measured in a large variety of aquaporins. This suggests that the hourglass shape of aquaporins could be the result of a natural selection process toward optimal hydrodynamic transport. Finally, in a biomimetic perspective, these results provide guidelines to design artificial nanopores with optimal performances. PMID:24067650

  13. Testing and Estimating Shape-Constrained Nonparametric Density and Regression in the Presence of Measurement Error 1

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Raymond J.; Delaigle, Aurore; Hall, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In many applications we can expect that, or are interested to know if, a density function or a regression curve satisfies some specific shape constraints. For example, when the explanatory variable, X, represents the value taken by a treatment or dosage, the conditional mean of the response, Y , is often anticipated to be a monotone function of X. Indeed, if this regression mean is not monotone (in the appropriate direction) then the medical or commercial value of the treatment is likely to be significantly curtailed, at least for values of X that lie beyond the point at which monotonicity fails. In the case of a density, common shape constraints include log-concavity and unimodality. If we can correctly guess the shape of a curve, then nonparametric estimators can be improved by taking this information into account. Addressing such problems requires a method for testing the hypothesis that the curve of interest satisfies a shape constraint, and, if the conclusion of the test is positive, a technique for estimating the curve subject to the constraint. Nonparametric methodology for solving these problems already exists, but only in cases where the covariates are observed precisely. However in many problems, data can only be observed with measurement errors, and the methods employed in the error-free case typically do not carry over to this error context. In this paper we develop a novel approach to hypothesis testing and function estimation under shape constraints, which is valid in the context of measurement errors. Our method is based on tilting an estimator of the density or the regression mean until it satisfies the shape constraint, and we take as our test statistic the distance through which it is tilted. Bootstrap methods are used to calibrate the test. The constrained curve estimators that we develop are also based on tilting, and in that context our work has points of contact with methodology in the error-free case. PMID:21687809

  14. Optimal foot shape for a passive dynamic biped.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Maxine; Hubbard, Mont

    2007-09-21

    Passive walking dynamics describe the motion of a biped that is able to "walk" down a shallow slope without any actuation or control. Instead, the walker relies on gravitational and inertial effects to propel itself forward, exhibiting a gait quite similar to that of humans. These purely passive models depend on potential energy to overcome the energy lost when the foot impacts the ground. Previous research has demonstrated that energy loss at heel-strike can vary widely for a given speed, depending on the nature of the collision. The point of foot contact with the ground (relative to the hip) can have a significant effect: semi-circular (round) feet soften the impact, resulting in much smaller losses than point-foot walkers. Collisional losses are also lower if a single impulse is broken up into a series of smaller impulses that gradually redirect the velocity of the center of mass rather than a single abrupt impulse. Using this principle, a model was created where foot-strike occurs over two impulses, "heel-strike" and "toe-strike," representative of the initial impact of the heel and the following impact as the ball of the foot strikes the ground. Having two collisions with the flat-foot model did improve efficiency over the point-foot model. Representation of the flat-foot walker as a rimless wheel helped to explain the optimal flat-foot shape, driven by symmetry of the virtual spoke angles. The optimal long period foot shape of the simple passive walking model was not very representative of the human foot shape, although a reasonably anthropometric foot shape was predicted by the short period solution.

  15. Enceladus's internal ocean and ice shell constrained from Cassini gravity, shape, and libration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čadek, Ondřej; Tobie, Gabriel; Van Hoolst, Tim; Massé, Marion; Choblet, Gaël.; Lefèvre, Axel; Mitri, Giuseppe; Baland, Rose-Marie; Běhounková, Marie; Bourgeois, Olivier; Trinh, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    The intense plume activity at the South Pole of Enceladus together with the recent detection of libration hints at an internal water ocean underneath the outer ice shell. However, the interpretation of gravity, shape, and libration data leads to contradicting results regarding the depth of ocean/ice interface and the total volume of the ocean. Here we develop an interior structure model consisting of a rocky core, an internal ocean, and an ice shell, which satisfies simultaneously the gravity, shape, and libration data. We show that the data can be reconciled by considering isostatic compensation including the effect of a few hundred meter thick elastic lithosphere. Our model predicts that the core radius is 180-185 km, the ocean density is at least 1030 kg/m3, and the ice shell is 18-22 km thick on average. The ice thicknesses are reduced at poles decreasing to less than 5 km in the south polar region.

  16. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    DOE PAGES

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2015-11-20

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved usingmore » a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.« less

  17. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2015-11-20

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved using a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.

  18. A shape constrained parametric active contour model for breast contour detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhun; Muralidhar, Gautam S; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative measures of breast morphology can help a breast cancer survivor to understand outcomes of reconstructive surgeries. One bottleneck of quantifying breast morphology is that there are only a few reliable automation algorithms for detecting the breast contour. This study proposes a novel approach for detecting the breast contour, which is based on a parametric active contour model. In addition to employing the traditional parametric active contour model, the proposed approach enforces a mathematical shape constraint based on the catenary curve, which has been previously shown to capture the overall shape of the breast contour reliably. The mathematical shape constraint regulates the evolution of the active contour and helps the contour evolve towards the breast, while minimizing the undesired effects of other structures such as, the nipple/areola and scars. The efficacy of the proposed approach was evaluated on anterior posterior photographs of women who underwent or were scheduled for breast reconstruction surgery including autologous tissue reconstruction. The proposed algorithm shows promising results for detecting the breast contour.

  19. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization of supersonic delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization procedure AeSOP(sub 3D) is described. This procedure incorporates some of the most promising concepts from the area of computational aerodynamic analysis and design, specifically, discrete sensitivity analysis, a fully implicit 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology, and 3D Bezier-Bernstein surface parameterizations. The new procedure is demonstrated in the preliminary design of supersonic delta wings. Starting from a symmetric clipped delta wing geometry, a Mach 1.62 asymmetric delta wing and two Mach 1. 5 cranked delta wings were designed subject to various aerodynamic and geometric constraints.

  20. SU-F-BRF-02: Automated Lung Segmentation Method Using Atlas-Based Sparse Shape Composition with a Shape Constrained Deformable Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J; Yan, Z; Zhang, S; Zhang, B; Lasio, G; Prado, K; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated lung segmentation method, which combines the atlas-based sparse shape composition with a shape constrained deformable model in thoracic CT for patients with compromised lung volumes. Methods: Ten thoracic computed tomography scans for patients with large lung tumors were collected and reference lung ROIs in each scan was manually segmented to assess the performance of the method. We propose an automated and robust framework for lung tissue segmentation by using single statistical atlas registration to initialize a robust deformable model in order to perform fine segmentation that includes compromised lung tissue. First, a statistical image atlas with sparse shape composition is constructed and employed to obtain an approximate estimation of lung volume. Next, a robust deformable model with shape prior is initialized from this estimation. Energy terms from ROI edge potential and interior ROI region based potential as well as the initial ROI are combined in this model for accurate and robust segmentation. Results: The proposed segmentation method is applied to segment right lung on three CT scans. The quantitative results of our segmentation method achieved mean dice score of (0.92–0.95), mean accuracy of (0.97,0.98), and mean relative error of (0.10,0.16) with 95% CI. The quantitative results of previously published RASM segmentation method achieved mean dice score of (0.74,0.96), mean accuracy of (0.66,0.98), and mean relative error of (0.04, 0.38) with 95% CI. The qualitative and quantitative comparisons show that our proposed method can achieve better segmentation accuracy with less variance compared with a robust active shape model method. Conclusion: The atlas-based segmentation approach achieved relatively high accuracy with less variance compared to RASM in the sample dataset and the proposed method will be useful in image analysis applications for lung nodule or lung cancer diagnosis and radiotherapy assessment in thoracic

  1. Constrained Optimization of Average Arrival Time via a Probabilistic Approach to Transport Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Namazi-Rad, Mohammad-Reza; Dunbar, Michelle; Ghaderi, Hadi; Mokhtarian, Payam

    2015-01-01

    To achieve greater transit-time reduction and improvement in reliability of transport services, there is an increasing need to assist transport planners in understanding the value of punctuality; i.e. the potential improvements, not only to service quality and the consumer but also to the actual profitability of the service. In order for this to be achieved, it is important to understand the network-specific aspects that affect both the ability to decrease transit-time, and the associated cost-benefit of doing so. In this paper, we outline a framework for evaluating the effectiveness of proposed changes to average transit-time, so as to determine the optimal choice of average arrival time subject to desired punctuality levels whilst simultaneously minimizing operational costs. We model the service transit-time variability using a truncated probability density function, and simultaneously compare the trade-off between potential gains and increased service costs, for several commonly employed cost-benefit functions of general form. We formulate this problem as a constrained optimization problem to determine the optimal choice of average transit time, so as to increase the level of service punctuality, whilst simultaneously ensuring a minimum level of cost-benefit to the service operator. PMID:25992902

  2. Pseudo-time methods for constrained optimization problems governed by PDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for solving optimization problems governed by partial differential equations. Existing methods are gradient information in marching toward the minimum, where the constrained PDE is solved once (sometimes only approximately) per each optimization step. Such methods can be viewed as a marching techniques on the intersection of the state and costate hypersurfaces while improving the residuals of the design equations per each iteration. In contrast, the method presented here march on the design hypersurface and at each iteration improve the residuals of the state and costate equations. The new method is usually much less expensive per iteration step since, in most problems of practical interest, the design equation involves much less unknowns that that of either the state or costate equations. Convergence is shown using energy estimates for the evolution equations governing the iterative process. Numerical tests show that the new method allows the solution of the optimization problem in a cost of solving the analysis problems just a few times, independent of the number of design parameters. The method can be applied using single grid iterations as well as with multigrid solvers.

  3. Optimization and static output-feedback control for half-car active suspensions with constrained information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Changzheng; Yu, Shenbo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the static output-feedback control problem of active suspension systems with information structure constraints is investigated. In order to simultaneously improve the ride comfort and stability, a half car model is used. Other constraints such as suspension deflection, actuator saturation, and controller constrained information are also considered. A novel static output-feedback design method based on the variable substitution is employed in the controller design. A single-step linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem is solved to derive the initial feasible solution with a sparsity constraint. The initial infeasibility issue of the static output-feedback is resolved by using state-feedback information. Specifically, an optimization algorithm is proposed to search for less conservative results based on the feasible controller gain matrix. Finally, the validity of the designed controller for different road profiles is illustrated through numerical examples. The simulation results indicate that the optimized static output-feedback controller can achieve better suspension performances when compared with the feasible static output-feedback controller.

  4. Adaptive optimal control of unknown constrained-input systems using policy iteration and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Modares, Hamidreza; Lewis, Frank L; Naghibi-Sistani, Mohammad-Bagher

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an online policy iteration (PI) algorithm to learn the continuous-time optimal control solution for unknown constrained-input systems. The proposed PI algorithm is implemented on an actor-critic structure where two neural networks (NNs) are tuned online and simultaneously to generate the optimal bounded control policy. The requirement of complete knowledge of the system dynamics is obviated by employing a novel NN identifier in conjunction with the actor and critic NNs. It is shown how the identifier weights estimation error affects the convergence of the critic NN. A novel learning rule is developed to guarantee that the identifier weights converge to small neighborhoods of their ideal values exponentially fast. To provide an easy-to-check persistence of excitation condition, the experience replay technique is used. That is, recorded past experiences are used simultaneously with current data for the adaptation of the identifier weights. Stability of the whole system consisting of the actor, critic, system state, and system identifier is guaranteed while all three networks undergo adaptation. Convergence to a near-optimal control law is also shown. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated with a simulation example. PMID:24808590

  5. Thermodynamic optimization of mixed refrigerant Joule- Thomson systems constrained by heat transfer considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, J. F.; Klein, S. A.; Nellis, G. F.

    2015-12-01

    Mixed refrigerant (MR) working fluids can significantly increase the cooling capacity of a Joule-Thomson (JT) cycle. The optimization of MRJT systems has been the subject of substantial research. However, most optimization techniques do not model the recuperator in sufficient detail. For example, the recuperator is usually assumed to have a heat transfer coefficient that does not vary with the mixture. Ongoing work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has shown that the heat transfer coefficients for two-phase flow are approximately three times greater than for a single phase mixture when the mixture quality is between 15% and 85%. As a result, a system that optimizes a MR without also requiring that the flow be in this quality range may require an extremely large recuperator or not achieve the performance predicted by the model. To ensure optimal performance of the JT cycle, the MR should be selected such that it is entirely two-phase within the recuperator. To determine the optimal MR composition, a parametric study was conducted assuming a thermodynamically ideal cycle. The results of the parametric study are graphically presented on a contour plot in the parameter space consisting of the extremes of the qualities that exist within the recuperator. The contours show constant values of the normalized refrigeration power. This ‘map’ shows the effect of MR composition on the cycle performance and it can be used to select the MR that provides a high cooling load while also constraining the recuperator to be two phase. The predicted best MR composition can be used as a starting point for experimentally determining the best MR.

  6. Analysis of Constrained Optimization Variants of the Map-Seeking Circuit Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Harker; C.R. Vogel; T. Gedeon

    2005-09-05

    The map-seeking circuit algorithm (MSC) was developed by Arathorn to efficiently solve the combinatorial problem of correspondence maximization, which arises in applications like computer vision, motion estimation, image matching, and automatic speech recognition [D. W. Arathorn, Map-Seeking Circuits in Visual Cognition: A Computational Mechanism for Biological and Machine Vision, Stanford University Press, 2002]. Given an input image, a template image, and a discrete set of transformations, the goal is to find a composition of transformations which gives the best fit between the transformed input and the template. We imbed the associated combinatorial search problem within a continuous framework by using superposition, and we analyze a resulting constrained optimization problem. We present several numerical schemes to compute local solutions, and we compare their performance on a pair of test problems: an image matching problem and the challenging problem of automatically solving a Rubik's cube.

  7. The discrete adjoint approach to aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajah, Siva Kumaran

    A viscous discrete adjoint approach to automatic aerodynamic shape optimization is developed, and the merits of the viscous discrete and continuous adjoint approaches are discussed. The viscous discrete and continuous adjoint gradients for inverse design and drag minimization cost functions are compared with finite-difference and complex-step gradients. The optimization of airfoils in two-dimensional flow for inverse design and drag minimization is illustrated. Both the discrete and continuous adjoint methods are used to formulate two new design problems. First, the time-dependent optimal design problem is established, and both the time accurate discrete and continuous adjoint equations are derived. An application to the reduction of the time-averaged drag coefficient while maintaining time-averaged lift and thickness distribution of a pitching airfoil in transonic flow is demonstrated. Second, the remote inverse design problem is formulated. The optimization of a three-dimensional biconvex wing in supersonic flow verifies the feasibility to reduce the near field pressure peak. Coupled drag minimization and remote inverse design cases produce wings with a lower drag and a reduced near field peak pressure signature.

  8. Ontogenetic allometry constrains cranial shape of the head-first burrowing worm lizard Cynisca leucura (Squamata: Amphisbaenidae).

    PubMed

    Hipsley, Christy A; Rentinck, Marc-Nicolas; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Müller, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Amphisbaenians are fossorial, predominantly limbless squamate reptiles with distinct cranial shapes corresponding to specific burrowing behaviors. Due to their cryptic lifestyles and the scarcity of museum specimens, little is known of their intraspecific variation, particularly regarding cranial osteology. This represents a critical lack of information, because the majority of morphological investigations of squamate relationships are based on cranial characters. We investigated cranial variation in the West African Coast Worm Lizard Cynisca leucura, a round-headed member of the Amphisbaenidae. Using geometric morphometric analyses of three-dimensional computed tomographic scans, we found that cranial osteology of C. leucura is highly conserved, with the majority of shape changes occurring during growth as the cranium becomes more slender and elongate, accompanied by increasing interdigitation among the dermal roofing bones. Elements of the ventral portion of the cranium remain loosely connected in adults, possibly as a protective mechanism against repeated compression and torsion during burrow excavation. Intraspecific variation was strongly correlated with size change from juveniles to adults, indicating a dominant role of ontogenetic allometry in determining cranial shape. We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism, either during growth or among adults. Given the fossorial habits of C. leucura, we hypothesize that cranial allometry is under strong stabilizing selection to maintain adequate proportions for head-first digging, thereby constraining the ability of individuals to respond to differing selection pressures, including sexual selection and variation in diet or microhabitat. For species in which digging imposes less mechanical stress (e.g., in softer sand), allometric associations during growth may be weakened, allowing changes to the ontogenetic trajectory and subsequent morphological traits. Such developmental dissociation between size and shape, known

  9. Performance Trades Study for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    From time to time, existing aircraft need to be redesigned for new missions with modified operating conditions such as required lift or cruise speed. This research is motivated by the needs of conceptual and preliminary design teams for smooth airfoil shapes that are similar to the baseline design but have improved drag performance over a range of flight conditions. The proposed modified profile optimization method (MPOM) modifies a large number of design variables to search for nonintuitive performance improvements, while avoiding off-design performance degradation. Given a good initial design, the MPOM generates fairly smooth airfoils that are better than the baseline without making drastic shape changes. Moreover, the MPOM allows users to gain valuable information by exploring performance trades over various design conditions. Four simulation cases of airfoil optimization in transonic viscous ow are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the MPOM as a performance trades study tool. Simulation results are obtained by solving fully turbulent Navier-Stokes equations and the corresponding discrete adjoint equations using an unstructured grid computational fluid dynamics code FUN2D.

  10. Computer aided segmentation of kidneys using locally shape constrained deformable models on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdt, Marius; Sakas, Georgios

    2010-03-01

    This work presents a novel approach for model based segmentation of the kidney in images acquired by Computed Tomography (CT). The developed computer aided segmentation system is expected to support computer aided diagnosis and operation planning. We have developed a deformable model based approach based on local shape constraints that prevents the model from deforming into neighboring structures while allowing the global shape to adapt freely to the data. Those local constraints are derived from the anatomical structure of the kidney and the presence and appearance of neighboring organs. The adaptation process is guided by a rule-based deformation logic in order to improve the robustness of the segmentation in areas of diffuse organ boundaries. Our work flow consists of two steps: 1.) a user guided positioning and 2.) an automatic model adaptation using affine and free form deformation in order to robustly extract the kidney. In cases which show pronounced pathologies, the system also offers real time mesh editing tools for a quick refinement of the segmentation result. Evaluation results based on 30 clinical cases using CT data sets show an average dice correlation coefficient of 93% compared to the ground truth. The results are therefore in most cases comparable to manual delineation. Computation times of the automatic adaptation step are lower than 6 seconds which makes the proposed system suitable for an application in clinical practice.

  11. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in the same manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminate plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling) analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

  12. A GENERALIZED STOCHASTIC COLLOCATION APPROACH TO CONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION FOR RANDOM DATA IDENTIFICATION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Clayton G; Gunzburger, Max D

    2013-01-01

    We present a scalable, parallel mechanism for stochastic identification/control for problems constrained by partial differential equations with random input data. Several identification objectives will be discussed that either minimize the expectation of a tracking cost functional or minimize the difference of desired statistical quantities in the appropriate $L^p$ norm, and the distributed parameters/control can both deterministic or stochastic. Given an objective we prove the existence of an optimal solution, establish the validity of the Lagrange multiplier rule and obtain a stochastic optimality system of equations. The modeling process may describe the solution in terms of high dimensional spaces, particularly in the case when the input data (coefficients, forcing terms, boundary conditions, geometry, etc) are affected by a large amount of uncertainty. For higher accuracy, the computer simulation must increase the number of random variables (dimensions), and expend more effort approximating the quantity of interest in each individual dimension. Hence, we introduce a novel stochastic parameter identification algorithm that integrates an adjoint-based deterministic algorithm with the sparse grid stochastic collocation FEM approach. This allows for decoupled, moderately high dimensional, parameterized computations of the stochastic optimality system, where at each collocation point, deterministic analysis and techniques can be utilized. The advantage of our approach is that it allows for the optimal identification of statistical moments (mean value, variance, covariance, etc.) or even the whole probability distribution of the input random fields, given the probability distribution of some responses of the system (quantities of physical interest). Our rigorously derived error estimates, for the fully discrete problems, will be described and used to compare the efficiency of the method with several other techniques. Numerical examples illustrate the theoretical

  13. A variant constrained genetic algorithm for solving conditional nonlinear optimal perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qin; Sha, Jianxin; Shu, Hang; Lu, Xiaoqing

    2014-01-01

    A variant constrained genetic algorithm (VCGA) for effective tracking of conditional nonlinear optimal perturbations (CNOPs) is presented. Compared with traditional constraint handling methods, the treatment of the constraint condition in VCGA is relatively easy to implement. Moreover, it does not require adjustments to indefinite parameters. Using a hybrid crossover operator and the newly developed multi-ply mutation operator, VCGA improves the performance of GAs. To demonstrate the capability of VCGA to catch CNOPS in non-smooth cases, a partial differential equation, which has "onoff" switches in its forcing term, is employed as the nonlinear model. To search global CNOPs of the nonlinear model, numerical experiments using VCGA, the traditional gradient descent algorithm based on the adjoint method (ADJ), and a GA using tournament selection operation and the niching technique (GA-DEB) were performed. The results with various initial reference states showed that, in smooth cases, all three optimization methods are able to catch global CNOPs. Nevertheless, in non-smooth situations, a large proportion of CNOPs captured by the ADJ are local. Compared with ADJ, the performance of GA-DEB shows considerable improvement, but it is far below VCGA. Further, the impacts of population sizes on both VCGA and GA-DEB were investigated. The results were used to estimate the computation time of VCGA and GA-DEB in obtaining CNOPs. The computational costs for VCGA, GA-DEB and ADJ to catch CNOPs of the nonlinear model are also compared.

  14. High resolution quantitative phase imaging of live cells with constrained optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Khare, Kedar; John, Renu

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) aims at studying weakly scattering and absorbing biological specimens with subwavelength accuracy without any external staining mechanisms. Use of a reference beam at an angle is one of the necessary criteria for recording of high resolution holograms in most of the interferometric methods used for quantitative phase imaging. The spatial separation of the dc and twin images is decided by the reference beam angle and Fourier-filtered reconstructed image will have a very poor resolution if hologram is recorded below a minimum reference angle condition. However, it is always inconvenient to have a large reference beam angle while performing high resolution microscopy of live cells and biological specimens with nanometric features. In this paper, we treat reconstruction of digital holographic microscopy images as a constrained optimization problem with smoothness constraint in order to recover only complex object field in hologram plane even with overlapping dc and twin image terms. We solve this optimization problem by gradient descent approach iteratively and the smoothness constraint is implemented by spatial averaging with appropriate size. This approach will give excellent high resolution image recovery compared to Fourier filtering while keeping a very small reference angle. We demonstrate this approach on digital holographic microscopy of live cells by recovering the quantitative phase of live cells from a hologram recorded with nearly zero reference angle.

  15. A Novel Multiple Objective Optimization Framework for Constraining Conductance-Based Neuron Models by Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Druckmann, Shaul; Banitt, Yoav; Gidon, Albert; Schürmann, Felix; Markram, Henry; Segev, Idan

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel framework for automatically constraining parameters of compartmental models of neurons, given a large set of experimentally measured responses of these neurons. In experiments, intrinsic noise gives rise to a large variability (e.g., in firing pattern) in the voltage responses to repetitions of the exact same input. Thus, the common approach of fitting models by attempting to perfectly replicate, point by point, a single chosen trace out of the spectrum of variable responses does not seem to do justice to the data. In addition, finding a single error function that faithfully characterizes the distance between two spiking traces is not a trivial pursuit. To address these issues, one can adopt a multiple objective optimization approach that allows the use of several error functions jointly. When more than one error function is available, the comparison between experimental voltage traces and model response can be performed on the basis of individual features of interest (e.g., spike rate, spike width). Each feature can be compared between model and experimental mean, in units of its experimental variability, thereby incorporating into the fitting this variability. We demonstrate the success of this approach, when used in conjunction with genetic algorithm optimization, in generating an excellent fit between model behavior and the firing pattern of two distinct electrical classes of cortical interneurons, accommodating and fast-spiking. We argue that the multiple, diverse models generated by this method could serve as the building blocks for the realistic simulation of large neuronal networks. PMID:18982116

  16. Ares-I Bending Filter Design using a Constrained Optimization Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Charles; Jang, Jiann-Woei; Hall, Robert; Bedrossian, Nazareth

    2008-01-01

    The Ares-I launch vehicle represents a challenging flex-body structural environment for control system design. Software filtering of the inertial sensor output is required to ensure adequate stable response to guidance commands while minimizing trajectory deviations. This paper presents a design methodology employing numerical optimization to develop the Ares-I bending filters. The design objectives include attitude tracking accuracy and robust stability with respect to rigid body dynamics, propellant slosh, and flex. Under the assumption that the Ares-I time-varying dynamics and control system can be frozen over a short period of time, the bending filters are designed to stabilize all the selected frozen-time launch control systems in the presence of parameter uncertainty. To ensure adequate response to guidance command, step response specifications are introduced as constraints in the optimization problem. Imposing these constrains minimizes performance degradation caused by the addition of the bending filters. The first stage bending filter design achieves stability by adding lag to the first structural frequency to phase stabilize the first flex mode while gain stabilizing the higher modes. The upper stage bending filter design gain stabilizes all the flex bending modes. The bending filter designs provided here have been demonstrated to provide stable first and second stage control systems in both Draper Ares Stability Analysis Tool (ASAT) and the MSFC MAVERIC 6DOF nonlinear time domain simulation.

  17. Blunt-body drag reduction through base cavity shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite-Díez, Manuel; Jiménez-González, José Ignacio; Gutiérrez-Montes, Cándido; Martínez-Bazán, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    We present a numerical study on the drag reduction of a turbulent incompressible flow around two different blunt bodies, of height H and length L, at a Reynolds number Re = ρU∞ H / μ = 2000 , where U∞ is the turbulent incompressible free-stream velocity, ρ is their density and μ their viscosity. The study is based on the optimization of the geometry of a cavity placed at the rear part of the body with the aim of increasing the base pressure. Thus, we have used an optimization algorithm, which implements the adjoint method, to compute the two-dimensional incompressible turbulent steady flow sensitivity field of axial forces on both bodies, and consequently modify the shape of the cavity to reduce the induced drag force. In addition, we have performed three dimensional numerical simulations using an IDDES model in order to analyze the drag reduction effect of the optimized cavities at higher Reynolds numbers.The results show average drag reductions of 17 and 25 % for Re=2000, as well as more regularized and less chaotic wake flows in both bodies. Supported by the Spanish MINECO, Junta de Andalucía and EU Funds under projects DPI2014-59292-C3-3-P and P11-TEP7495.

  18. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  19. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  20. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  1. Optimized conical shaped charge design using the SCAP (Shaped Charge Analysis Program) code

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1988-09-01

    The Shaped Charge Analysis Program (SCAP) is used to analytically model and optimize the design of Conical Shaped Charges (CSC). A variety of existing CSCs are initially modeled with the SCAP code and the predicted jet tip velocities, jet penetrations, and optimum standoffs are compared to previously published experimental results. The CSCs vary in size from 0.69 inch (1.75 cm) to 9.125 inch (23.18 cm) conical liner inside diameter. Two liner materials (copper and steel) and several explosives (Octol, Comp B, PBX-9501) are included in the CSCs modeled. The target material was mild steel. A parametric study was conducted using the SCAP code to obtain the optimum design for a 3.86 inch (9.8 cm) CSC. The variables optimized in this study included the CSC apex angle, conical liner thickness, explosive height, optimum standoff, tamper/confinement thickness, and explosive width. The non-dimensionalized jet penetration to diameter ratio versus the above parameters are graphically presented. 12 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Dynamics of asteroid family halos constrained by spin/shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, Miroslav

    2016-10-01

    A number of asteroid families cannot be identified solely on the basis of the Hierarchical Clustering Method (HCM), because they have additional 'former' members in the surroundings which constitute a so called halo (e.g. Broz & Morbidelli 2013). They are usually mixed up with the background population which has to be taken into account too.Luckily, new photometric observations allow to derive new spin/shape models, which serve as independent constraints for dynamical models. For example, a recent census of the Eos family shows 43 core and 27 halo asteroids (including background) with known spin orientations.To this point, we present a complex spin-orbital model which includes full N-body dynamics and consequently accounts for all mean-motion, secular, or three-body gravitational resonances, the Yarkovsky drift, YORP effect, collisional reorientations and also spin-orbital interactions. These are especially important for the Koronis family. In this project, we make use of data from the DAMIT database and ProjectSoft Blue Eye 600 observatory.

  3. Shape-constrained multi-atlas based segmentation with multichannel registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yongfu; Jiang, Tianzi; Fan, Yong

    2012-02-01

    Multi-atlas based segmentation methods have recently attracted much attention in medical image segmentation. The multi-atlas based segmentation methods typically consist of three steps, including image registration, label propagation, and label fusion. Most of the recent studies devote to improving the label fusion step and adopt a typical image registration method for registering atlases to the target image. However, the existing registration methods may become unstable when poor image quality or high anatomical variance between registered image pairs involved. In this paper, we propose an iterative image segmentation and registration procedure to simultaneously improve the registration and segmentation performance in the multi-atlas based segmentation framework. Particularly, a two-channel registration method is adopted with one channel driven by appearance similarity between the atlas image and the target image and the other channel optimized by similarity between atlas label and the segmentation of the target image. The image segmentation is performed by fusing labels of multiple atlases. The validation of our method on hippocampus segmentation of 30 subjects containing MR images with both 1.5T and 3.0T field strength has demonstrated that our method can significantly improve the segmentation performance with different fusion strategies and obtain segmentation results with Dice overlap of 0.892+/-0.024 for 1.5T images and 0.902+/-0.022 for 3.0T images to manual segmentations.

  4. Shape optimized headers and methods of manufacture thereof

    DOEpatents

    Perrin, Ian James

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed herein is a shape optimized header comprising a shell that is operative for collecting a fluid; wherein an internal diameter and/or a wall thickness of the shell vary with a change in pressure and/or a change in a fluid flow rate in the shell; and tubes; wherein the tubes are in communication with the shell and are operative to transfer fluid into the shell. Disclosed herein is a method comprising fixedly attaching tubes to a shell; wherein the shell is operative for collecting a fluid; wherein an internal diameter and/or a wall thickness of the shell vary with a change in pressure and/or a change in a fluid flow rate in the shell; and wherein the tubes are in communication with the shell and are operative to transfer fluid into the shell.

  5. Shape optimization of an accommodative intra-ocular lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouve, François; Hanna, Khalil

    2005-03-01

    Cataract surgery consists in replacing the clouded or opacified crystalline lens by an Intra-Ocular Lens (IOL) having the same mean dioptrical power. Clear vision is then achieved at a given distance and glasses are needed in many situations. A new kind of IOL, potentially accommodative, is proposed. Its design is based on the deep understanding of the accommodation mechanism and on the mathematical modeling and the numerical simulation of the IOL's comportment in vivo. A preliminary version of this IOL is now commercialized by the company HumanOptics under the name '1CU'. In a second phase, shape optimization techniques equipped with strong mechanical and physiological constraints, are used to enhance the IOL performance and build a new design. To cite this article: F. Jouve, K. Hanna, C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  6. Incorporating a Constrained Optimization Algorithm into Remote- Sensing/Precision Agriculture Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, George; Khatib, Nader; Kim, Byoungsoo

    with information to improve their crop's vigor has been a major topic of interest. With world population growing exponentially, arable land being consumed by urbanization, and an unfavorable farm economy, the efficiency of farming must increase to meet future food requirements and to make farming a sustainable occupation for the farmer. "Precision Agriculture" refers to a farming methodology that applies nutrients and moisture only where and when they are needed in the field. The goal is to increase farm revenue by increasing crop yield and decreasing applications of costly chemical and water treatments. In addition, this methodology will decrease the environmental costs of farming, i.e., reduce air, soil, and water pollution. Sensing/Precision Agriculture has not grown as rapidly as early advocates envisioned. Technology for a successful Remote Sensing/Precision Agriculture system is now available. Commercial satellite systems can image (multi-spectral) the Earth with a resolution of approximately 2.5 m. Variable precision dispensing systems using GPS are available and affordable. Crop models that predict yield as a function of soil, chemical, and irrigation parameter levels have been formulated. Personal computers and internet access are in place in most farm homes and can provide a mechanism to periodically disseminate, e.g. bi-weekly, advice on what quantities of water and chemicals are needed in individual regions of the field. What is missing is a model that fuses the disparate sources of information on the current states of the crop and soil, and the remaining resource levels available with the decisions farmers are required to make. This must be a product that is easy for the farmer to understand and to implement. A "Constrained Optimization Feed-back Control Model" to fill this void will be presented. The objective function of the model will be used to maximize the farmer's profit by increasing yields while decreasing environmental costs and decreasing

  7. Multidimensionally-constrained relativistic mean-field study of spontaneous fission: Coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Lu, Bing-Nan; Nikšić, Tamara; Vretenar, Dario; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2016-04-01

    Background: Studies of fission dynamics, based on nuclear energy density functionals, have shown that the coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom has a pronounced effect on the nonperturbative collective inertia and, therefore, on dynamic (least-action) spontaneous fission paths and half-lives. Purpose: The aim is to analyze the effects of particle-number fluctuation degrees of freedom on symmetric and asymmetric spontaneous fission (SF) dynamics, and to compare the findings with the results of recent studies based on the self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method. Methods: Collective potentials and nonperturbative cranking collective inertia tensors are calculated using the multidimensionally-constrained relativistic-mean-field (MDC-RMF) model. Pairing correlations are treated in the BCS approximation using a separable pairing force of finite range. Pairing fluctuations are included as a collective variable using a constraint on particle-number dispersion. Fission paths are determined with the dynamic programming method by minimizing the action in multidimensional collective spaces. Results: The dynamics of spontaneous fission of 264Fm and 250Fm are explored. Fission paths, action integrals, and corresponding half-lives computed in the three-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates, using the relativistic functional DD-PC1 and a separable pairing force of finite range, are compared with results obtained without pairing fluctuations. Results for 264Fm are also discussed in relation with those recently obtained using the HFB model. Conclusions: The inclusion of pairing correlations in the space of collective coordinates favors axially symmetric shapes along the dynamic path of the fissioning system, amplifies pairing as the path traverses the fission barriers, significantly reduces the action integral, and shortens the

  8. CONSTANd : A Normalization Method for Isobaric Labeled Spectra by Constrained Optimization.

    PubMed

    Maes, Evelyne; Hadiwikarta, Wahyu Wijaya; Mertens, Inge; Baggerman, Geert; Hooyberghs, Jef; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    In quantitative proteomics applications, the use of isobaric labels is a very popular concept as they allow for multiplexing, such that peptides from multiple biological samples are quantified simultaneously in one mass spectrometry experiment. Although this multiplexing allows that peptide intensities are affected by the same amount of instrument variability, systematic effects during sample preparation can also introduce a bias in the quantitation measurements. Therefore, normalization methods are required to remove this systematic error. At present, a few dedicated normalization methods for isobaric labeled data are at hand. Most of these normalization methods include a framework for statistical data analysis and rely on ANOVA or linear mixed models. However, for swift quality control of the samples or data visualization a simple normalization technique is sufficient. To this aim, we present a new and easy-to-use data-driven normalization method, named CONSTANd. The CONSTANd method employs constrained optimization and prior information about the labeling strategy to normalize the peptide intensities. Further, it allows maintaining the connection to any biological effect while reducing the systematic and technical errors. As a result, peptides can not only be compared directly within a multiplexed experiment, but are also comparable between other isobaric labeled datasets from multiple experimental designs that are normalized by the CONSTANd method, without the need to include a reference sample in every experimental setup. The latter property is especially useful when more than six, eight or ten (TMT/iTRAQ) biological samples are required to detect differential peptides with sufficient statistical power and to optimally make use of the multiplexing capacity of isobaric labels. PMID:27302888

  9. Shape and Albedo from Shading (SAfS) for Pixel-Level dem Generation from Monocular Images Constrained by Low-Resolution dem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Chung Liu, Wai; Grumpe, Arne; Wöhler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Lunar topographic information, e.g., lunar DEM (Digital Elevation Model), is very important for lunar exploration missions and scientific research. Lunar DEMs are typically generated from photogrammetric image processing or laser altimetry, of which photogrammetric methods require multiple stereo images of an area. DEMs generated from these methods are usually achieved by various interpolation techniques, leading to interpolation artifacts in the resulting DEM. On the other hand, photometric shape reconstruction, e.g., SfS (Shape from Shading), extensively studied in the field of Computer Vision has been introduced to pixel-level resolution DEM refinement. SfS methods have the ability to reconstruct pixel-wise terrain details that explain a given image of the terrain. If the terrain and its corresponding pixel-wise albedo were to be estimated simultaneously, this is a SAfS (Shape and Albedo from Shading) problem and it will be under-determined without additional information. Previous works show strong statistical regularities in albedo of natural objects, and this is even more logically valid in the case of lunar surface due to its lower surface albedo complexity than the Earth. In this paper we suggest a method that refines a lower-resolution DEM to pixel-level resolution given a monocular image of the coverage with known light source, at the same time we also estimate the corresponding pixel-wise albedo map. We regulate the behaviour of albedo and shape such that the optimized terrain and albedo are the likely solutions that explain the corresponding image. The parameters in the approach are optimized through a kernel-based relaxation framework to gain computational advantages. In this research we experimentally employ the Lunar-Lambertian model for reflectance modelling; the framework of the algorithm is expected to be independent of a specific reflectance model. Experiments are carried out using the monocular images from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO

  10. Optimal Index Policies for Anomaly Localization in Resource-Constrained Cyber Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Kobi; Zhao, Qing; Swami, Ananthram

    2014-08-01

    The problem of anomaly localization in a resource-constrained cyber system is considered. Each anomalous component of the system incurs a cost per unit time until its anomaly is identified and fixed. Different anomalous components may incur different costs depending on their criticality to the system. Due to resource constraints, only one component can be probed at each given time. The observations from a probed component are realizations drawn from two different distributions depending on whether the component is normal or anomalous. The objective is a probing strategy that minimizes the total expected cost, incurred by all the components during the detection process, under reliability constraints. We consider both independent and exclusive models. In the former, each component can be abnormal with a certain probability independent of other components. In the latter, one and only one component is abnormal. We develop optimal simple index policies under both models. The proposed index policies apply to a more general case where a subset (more than one) of the components can be probed simultaneously and have strong performance as demonstrated by simulation examples. The problem under study also finds applications in spectrum scanning in cognitive radio networks and event detection in sensor networks.

  11. On the optimal identification of tag sets in time-constrained RFID configurations.

    PubMed

    Vales-Alonso, Javier; Bueno-Delgado, María Victoria; Egea-López, Esteban; Alcaraz, Juan José; Pérez-Mañogil, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    In Radio Frequency Identification facilities the identification delay of a set of tags is mainly caused by the random access nature of the reading protocol, yielding a random identification time of the set of tags. In this paper, the cumulative distribution function of the identification time is evaluated using a discrete time Markov chain for single-set time-constrained passive RFID systems, namely those ones where a single group of tags is assumed to be in the reading area and only for a bounded time (sojourn time) before leaving. In these scenarios some tags in a set may leave the reader coverage area unidentified. The probability of this event is obtained from the cumulative distribution function of the identification time as a function of the sojourn time. This result provides a suitable criterion to minimize the probability of losing tags. Besides, an identification strategy based on splitting the set of tags in smaller subsets is also considered. Results demonstrate that there are optimal splitting configurations that reduce the overall identification time while keeping the same probability of losing tags.

  12. Shape Optimization by Bayesian-Validated Computer-Simulation Surrogates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patera, Anthony T.

    1997-01-01

    A nonparametric-validated, surrogate approach to optimization has been applied to the computational optimization of eddy-promoter heat exchangers and to the experimental optimization of a multielement airfoil. In addition to the baseline surrogate framework, a surrogate-Pareto framework has been applied to the two-criteria, eddy-promoter design problem. The Pareto analysis improves the predictability of the surrogate results, preserves generality, and provides a means to rapidly determine design trade-offs. Significant contributions have been made in the geometric description used for the eddy-promoter inclusions as well as to the surrogate framework itself. A level-set based, geometric description has been developed to define the shape of the eddy-promoter inclusions. The level-set technique allows for topology changes (from single-body,eddy-promoter configurations to two-body configurations) without requiring any additional logic. The continuity of the output responses for input variations that cross the boundary between topologies has been demonstrated. Input-output continuity is required for the straightforward application of surrogate techniques in which simplified, interpolative models are fitted through a construction set of data. The surrogate framework developed previously has been extended in a number of ways. First, the formulation for a general, two-output, two-performance metric problem is presented. Surrogates are constructed and validated for the outputs. The performance metrics can be functions of both outputs, as well as explicitly of the inputs, and serve to characterize the design preferences. By segregating the outputs and the performance metrics, an additional level of flexibility is provided to the designer. The validated outputs can be used in future design studies and the error estimates provided by the output validation step still apply, and require no additional appeals to the expensive analysis. Second, a candidate-based a posteriori

  13. Multi-Objective Differential Evolution for Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow in Deregulated Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roselyn, J. Preetha; Devaraj, D.; Dash, Subhransu Sekhar

    2013-11-01

    Voltage stability is an important issue in the planning and operation of deregulated power systems. The voltage stability problems is a most challenging one for the system operators in deregulated power systems because of the intense use of transmission line capabilities and poor regulation in market environment. This article addresses the congestion management problem avoiding offline transmission capacity limits related to voltage stability by considering Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (VSCOPF) problem in deregulated environment. This article presents the application of Multi Objective Differential Evolution (MODE) algorithm to solve the VSCOPF problem in new competitive power systems. The maximum of L-index of the load buses is taken as the indicator of voltage stability and is incorporated in the Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The proposed method in hybrid power market which also gives solutions to voltage stability problems by considering the generation rescheduling cost and load shedding cost which relieves the congestion problem in deregulated environment. The buses for load shedding are selected based on the minimum eigen value of Jacobian with respect to the load shed. In the proposed approach, real power settings of generators in base case and contingency cases, generator bus voltage magnitudes, real and reactive power demands of selected load buses using sensitivity analysis are taken as the control variables and are represented as the combination of floating point numbers and integers. DE/randSF/1/bin strategy scheme of differential evolution with self-tuned parameter which employs binomial crossover and difference vector based mutation is used for the VSCOPF problem. A fuzzy based mechanism is employed to get the best compromise solution from the pareto front to aid the decision maker. The proposed VSCOPF planning model is implemented on IEEE 30-bus system, IEEE 57 bus practical system and IEEE 118 bus system. The pareto optimal

  14. Elastic Model Transitions: a Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, T. Jason; Ottander, John A.

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes both quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) algorithms to determine physical displacements. This approach is applicable to the simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize multiple LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data for discrete segments of the launch vehicle trajectory presents a problem of how to properly transition between models while preserving motion across the transition. In addition, energy may vary between flex models when using a truncated mode set. The LSQI-DSM algorithm can accommodate significant changes in energy between FEM models and carries elastic motion across FEM model transitions. Compared with previous approaches, the LSQI-DSM algorithm shows improvements ranging from a significant reduction to a complete removal of transients across FEM model transitions as well as maintaining elastic motion from the prior state.

  15. Use of marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) for accelerated 2D MRI relaxometry and diffusometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamini, Dan; Basser, Peter J.

    2016-10-01

    Measuring multidimensional (e.g., 2D) relaxation spectra in NMR and MRI clinical applications is a holy grail of the porous media and biomedical MR communities. The main bottleneck is the inversion of Fredholm integrals of the first kind, an ill-conditioned problem requiring large amounts of data to stabilize a solution. We suggest a novel experimental design and processing framework to accelerate and improve the reconstruction of such 2D spectra that uses a priori information from the 1D projections of spectra, or marginal distributions. These 1D marginal distributions provide powerful constraints when 2D spectra are reconstructed, and their estimation requires an order of magnitude less data than a conventional 2D approach. This marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is demonstrated here with a polyvinylpyrrolidone-water phantom that has 3 distinct peaks in the 2D D-T1 space. The stability, sensitivity to experimental parameters, and accuracy of this new approach are compared with conventional methods by serially subsampling the full data set. While the conventional, unconstrained approach performed poorly, the new method had proven to be highly accurate and robust, only requiring a fraction of the data. Additionally, synthetic T1 -T2 data are presented to explore the effects of noise on the estimations, and the performance of the proposed method with a smooth and realistic 2D spectrum. The proposed framework is quite general and can also be used with a variety of 2D MRI experiments (D-T2,T1 -T2, D -D, etc.), making these potentially feasible for preclinical and even clinical applications for the first time.

  16. Use of marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) for accelerated 2D MRI relaxometry and diffusometry.

    PubMed

    Benjamini, Dan; Basser, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    Measuring multidimensional (e.g., 2D) relaxation spectra in NMR and MRI clinical applications is a holy grail of the porous media and biomedical MR communities. The main bottleneck is the inversion of Fredholm integrals of the first kind, an ill-conditioned problem requiring large amounts of data to stabilize a solution. We suggest a novel experimental design and processing framework to accelerate and improve the reconstruction of such 2D spectra that uses a priori information from the 1D projections of spectra, or marginal distributions. These 1D marginal distributions provide powerful constraints when 2D spectra are reconstructed, and their estimation requires an order of magnitude less data than a conventional 2D approach. This marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is demonstrated here with a polyvinylpyrrolidone-water phantom that has 3 distinct peaks in the 2D D-T1 space. The stability, sensitivity to experimental parameters, and accuracy of this new approach are compared with conventional methods by serially subsampling the full data set. While the conventional, unconstrained approach performed poorly, the new method had proven to be highly accurate and robust, only requiring a fraction of the data. Additionally, synthetic T1-T2 data are presented to explore the effects of noise on the estimations, and the performance of the proposed method with a smooth and realistic 2D spectrum. The proposed framework is quite general and can also be used with a variety of 2D MRI experiments (D-T2,T1-T2,D-D, etc.), making these potentially feasible for preclinical and even clinical applications for the first time. PMID:27543810

  17. Robust Constrained Optimization Approach to Control Design for International Space Station Centrifuge Rotor Auto Balancing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postma, Barry Dirk

    2005-01-01

    This thesis discusses application of a robust constrained optimization approach to control design to develop an Auto Balancing Controller (ABC) for a centrifuge rotor to be implemented on the International Space Station. The design goal is to minimize a performance objective of the system, while guaranteeing stability and proper performance for a range of uncertain plants. The Performance objective is to minimize the translational response of the centrifuge rotor due to a fixed worst-case rotor imbalance. The robustness constraints are posed with respect to parametric uncertainty in the plant. The proposed approach to control design allows for both of these objectives to be handled within the framework of constrained optimization. The resulting controller achieves acceptable performance and robustness characteristics.

  18. Elastic Model Transitions: A Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Mike R.; Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, Jason; Ottander, John

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes a hybrid approach for determining physical displacements by augmenting the original quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) algorithm with Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) and modifying the energy constraints. The approach presented is applicable to simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize discrete LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets (eigenvalues and eigenvectors) that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data presents a problem of how to properly transition elastic states from the prior to the new model while preserving motion across the transition and ensuring there is no truncation or excitation of the system. A previous approach utilizes a LSQI algorithm with an energy constraint to effect smooth transitions between eigenvector sets with no requirement that the models be of similar dimension or have any correlation. This approach assumes energy is conserved across the transition, which results in significant non-physical transients due to changing quasi-steady state energy between mode sets, a phenomenon seen when utilizing a truncated mode set. The computational burden of simulating a full mode set is significant so a subset of modes is often selected to reduce run time. As a result of this truncation, energy between mode sets may not be constant and solutions across transitions could produce non-physical transients. In an effort to abate these transients an improved methodology was developed based on the aforementioned approach, but this new approach can handle significant changes in energy across mode set transitions. It is proposed that physical velocities due to elastic behavior be solved for using the LSQI algorithm, but solve for displacements using a two-step process that independently addresses the quasi-steady-state and non

  19. Stable least-squares matching for oblique images using bound constrained optimization and a robust loss function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Han; Ding, Yulin; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Bo; Xie, Linfu; Chen, Min

    2016-08-01

    Least-squares matching is a standard procedure in photogrammetric applications for obtaining sub-pixel accuracies of image correspondences. However, least-squares matching has also been criticized for its instability, which is primarily reflected by the requests for the initial correspondence and favorable image quality. In image matching between oblique images, due to the blur, illumination differences and other effects, the image attributes of different views are notably different, which results in a more severe convergence problem. Aiming at improving the convergence rate and robustness of least-squares matching of oblique images, we incorporated prior geometric knowledge in the optimization process, which is reflected as the bounded constraints on the optimizing parameters that constrain the search for a solution to a reasonable region. Furthermore, to be resilient to outliers, we substituted the square loss with a robust loss function. To solve the composite problem, we reformulated the least-squares matching problem as a bound constrained optimization problem, which can be solved with bounds constrained Levenberg-Marquardt solver. Experimental results consisting of images from two different penta-view oblique camera systems confirmed that the proposed method shows guaranteed final convergences in various scenarios compared to the approximately 20-50% convergence rate of classical least-squares matching.

  20. Shape optimization of road tunnel cross-section by simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobótka, Maciej; Pachnicz, Michał

    2016-06-01

    The paper concerns shape optimization of a tunnel excavation cross-section. The study incorporates optimization procedure of the simulated annealing (SA). The form of a cost function derives from the energetic optimality condition, formulated in the authors' previous papers. The utilized algorithm takes advantage of the optimization procedure already published by the authors. Unlike other approaches presented in literature, the one introduced in this paper takes into consideration a practical requirement of preserving fixed clearance gauge. Itasca Flac software is utilized in numerical examples. The optimal excavation shapes are determined for five different in situ stress ratios. This factor significantly affects the optimal topology of excavation. The resulting shapes are elongated in the direction of a principal stress greater value. Moreover, the obtained optimal shapes have smooth contours circumscribing the gauge.

  1. Shape Optimization for Navier-Stokes Equations with Algebraic Turbulence Model: Existence Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bulicek, Miroslav Haslinger, Jaroslav Malek, Josef Stebel, Jan

    2009-10-15

    We study a shape optimization problem for the paper machine headbox which distributes a mixture of water and wood fibers in the paper making process. The aim is to find a shape which a priori ensures the given velocity profile on the outlet part. The mathematical formulation leads to an optimal control problem in which the control variable is the shape of the domain representing the header, the state problem is represented by a generalized stationary Navier-Stokes system with nontrivial mixed boundary conditions. In this paper we prove the existence of solutions both to the generalized Navier-Stokes system and to the shape optimization problem.

  2. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, R. D.; Arango, C. A.; Reyes, A.

    2016-07-01

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies.

  3. Optimizing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by genetic algorithm controlled pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenlong; Sokolov, Alexei

    2010-10-01

    The hybrid coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has been successful applied to fast chemical sensitive detections. As the development of femto-second pulse shaping techniques, it is of great interest to find the optimum pulse shapes for CARS. The optimum pulse shapes should minimize the non-resonant four wave mixing (NRFWM) background and maximize the CARS signal. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to make a heuristic searching for optimized pulse shapes, which give the best signal the background ratio. The GA is shown to be able to rediscover the hybrid CARS scheme and find optimized pulse shapes for customized applications by itself.

  4. Memory and energy optimization strategies for multithreaded operating system on the resource-constrained wireless sensor node.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Hou, Kun Mean; de Vaulx, Christophe; Xu, Jun; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhou, Haiying; Shi, Hongling; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Memory and energy optimization strategies are essential for the resource-constrained wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes. In this article, a new memory-optimized and energy-optimized multithreaded WSN operating system (OS) LiveOS is designed and implemented. Memory cost of LiveOS is optimized by using the stack-shifting hybrid scheduling approach. Different from the traditional multithreaded OS in which thread stacks are allocated statically by the pre-reservation, thread stacks in LiveOS are allocated dynamically by using the stack-shifting technique. As a result, memory waste problems caused by the static pre-reservation can be avoided. In addition to the stack-shifting dynamic allocation approach, the hybrid scheduling mechanism which can decrease both the thread scheduling overhead and the thread stack number is also implemented in LiveOS. With these mechanisms, the stack memory cost of LiveOS can be reduced more than 50% if compared to that of a traditional multithreaded OS. Not is memory cost optimized, but also the energy cost is optimized in LiveOS, and this is achieved by using the multi-core "context aware" and multi-core "power-off/wakeup" energy conservation approaches. By using these approaches, energy cost of LiveOS can be reduced more than 30% when compared to the single-core WSN system. Memory and energy optimization strategies in LiveOS not only prolong the lifetime of WSN nodes, but also make the multithreaded OS feasible to run on the memory-constrained WSN nodes. PMID:25545264

  5. Memory and Energy Optimization Strategies for Multithreaded Operating System on the Resource-Constrained Wireless Sensor Node

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Hou, Kun Mean; de Vaulx, Christophe; Xu, Jun; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhou, Haiying; Shi, Hongling; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Memory and energy optimization strategies are essential for the resource-constrained wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes. In this article, a new memory-optimized and energy-optimized multithreaded WSN operating system (OS) LiveOS is designed and implemented. Memory cost of LiveOS is optimized by using the stack-shifting hybrid scheduling approach. Different from the traditional multithreaded OS in which thread stacks are allocated statically by the pre-reservation, thread stacks in LiveOS are allocated dynamically by using the stack-shifting technique. As a result, memory waste problems caused by the static pre-reservation can be avoided. In addition to the stack-shifting dynamic allocation approach, the hybrid scheduling mechanism which can decrease both the thread scheduling overhead and the thread stack number is also implemented in LiveOS. With these mechanisms, the stack memory cost of LiveOS can be reduced more than 50% if compared to that of a traditional multithreaded OS. Not is memory cost optimized, but also the energy cost is optimized in LiveOS, and this is achieved by using the multi-core “context aware” and multi-core “power-off/wakeup” energy conservation approaches. By using these approaches, energy cost of LiveOS can be reduced more than 30% when compared to the single-core WSN system. Memory and energy optimization strategies in LiveOS not only prolong the lifetime of WSN nodes, but also make the multithreaded OS feasible to run on the memory-constrained WSN nodes. PMID:25545264

  6. Design optimization of structures with shape memory alloy member actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachikara, Michele

    A capability was developed to build a perform mass-minimization of a truss with SMA actuation to determine optimal element diameters and actuator applied temperature changes. The Nonlinear Programming/Approximation Concepts (NLP/AC) approach was used. This method is based on using a sequence of approximate optimization problems rather than optimizing with the full nonlinear analyses. Some special approximations based on new intermediate variables were used. Results are presented and analyzed.

  7. Optimization of Stability Constrained Geometrically Nonlinear Shallow Trusses Using an Arc Length Sparse Method with a Strain Energy Density Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for the optimization of stability constrained geometrically nonlinear shallow trusses with snap through behavior is demonstrated using the arc length method and a strain energy density approach within a discrete finite element formulation. The optimization method uses an iterative scheme that evaluates the design variables' performance and then updates them according to a recursive formula controlled by the arc length method. A minimum weight design is achieved when a uniform nonlinear strain energy density is found in all members. This minimal condition places the design load just below the critical limit load causing snap through of the structure. The optimization scheme is programmed into a nonlinear finite element algorithm to find the large strain energy at critical limit loads. Examples of highly nonlinear trusses found in literature are presented to verify the method.

  8. Optimized Shapes of Ocsillating Resonators for Generating High-Amplitude Pressure Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the resonator geometry strongly influences the resonant frequencies of an acoustical resonator and the generated nonlinear standing pressure waveform. Maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of an oscillating resonator by optimizing the cavity contour is investigated numerically. A quasi-Newton type scheme is used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes to achieve the maximum pressure compression ratio. The acoustical field is solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects are obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation methods. Results are presented from optimizing cone, horn-cone, and cosine resonator geometries. Significant performance improvement is found in the optimized shapes over others previously published. Different optimized shapes are found when starting with different initial guesses, indicating multiple local extrema. The numerical model is validated by comparing with the experimental results of a horn-cone shaped resonator.

  9. Controls-structures integrated design optimization with shape variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koganti, Gopichand; Hou, Gene

    1993-01-01

    The shape design variables have been introduced into the set of design variables of the Controls-Structure Integrated (CSI) Design of space-structures. The importance of the shape variations in improving the design (obtained with only control and sizing variables) has been aptly illustrated. Two different types of design variables that describe the shape variations of the structure have been introduced. In the first case, the nodal coordinates have been considered as design variables. This has the inherent difficulty of having too many design variables. This not only is time consuming but also memory intensive and may not yield a manufacturable shape to the structure. The second approach has been introduced to overcome this difficulty. The structure is allowed to vary in a particular pre defined pattern. The coefficients of these patterns are considered as the shape design variables. The eigenvalue and eigenvector sensitivity equations with respect to these coefficient design variables have been developed and are used to approximate the eigenvalues and eigenvectors in a perturbed design.

  10. PI controller design of a wind turbine: evaluation of the pole-placement method and tuning using constrained optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Tibaldi, Carlo; Hansen, Morten H.

    2016-09-01

    PI/PID controllers are the most common wind turbine controllers. Normally a first tuning is obtained using methods such as pole-placement or Ziegler-Nichols and then extensive aeroelastic simulations are used to obtain the best tuning in terms of regulation of the outputs and reduction of the loads. In the traditional tuning approaches, the properties of different open loop and closed loop transfer functions of the system are not normally considered. In this paper, an assessment of the pole-placement tuning method is presented based on robustness measures. Then a constrained optimization setup is suggested to automatically tune the wind turbine controller subject to robustness constraints. The properties of the system such as the maximum sensitivity and complementary sensitivity functions (Ms and Mt ), along with some of the responses of the system, are used to investigate the controller performance and formulate the optimization problem. The cost function is the integral absolute error (IAE) of the rotational speed from a disturbance modeled as a step in wind speed. Linearized model of the DTU 10-MW reference wind turbine is obtained using HAWCStab2. Thereafter, the model is reduced with model order reduction. The trade-off curves are given to assess the tunings of the poles- placement method and a constrained optimization problem is solved to find the best tuning.

  11. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  12. Automated Finite Element Modeling of Wing Structures for Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Michael Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The displacement formulation of the finite element method is the most general and most widely used technique for structural analysis of airplane configurations. Modem structural synthesis techniques based on the finite element method have reached a certain maturity in recent years, and large airplane structures can now be optimized with respect to sizing type design variables for many load cases subject to a rich variety of constraints including stress, buckling, frequency, stiffness and aeroelastic constraints (Refs. 1-3). These structural synthesis capabilities use gradient based nonlinear programming techniques to search for improved designs. For these techniques to be practical a major improvement was required in computational cost of finite element analyses (needed repeatedly in the optimization process). Thus, associated with the progress in structural optimization, a new perspective of structural analysis has emerged, namely, structural analysis specialized for design optimization application, or.what is known as "design oriented structural analysis" (Ref. 4). This discipline includes approximation concepts and methods for obtaining behavior sensitivity information (Ref. 1), all needed to make the optimization of large structural systems (modeled by thousands of degrees of freedom and thousands of design variables) practical and cost effective.

  13. A class of collinear scaling algorithms for bound-constrained optimization: Derivation and computational results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, K. A.; Tabor, Wayne L.

    2009-08-01

    A family of algorithms for the approximate solution of the bound-constrained minimization problem is described. These algorithms employ the standard barrier method, with the inner iteration based on trust region methods. Local models are conic functions rather than the usual quadratic functions, and are required to match first and second derivatives of the barrier function at the current iterate. The various members of the family are distinguished by the choice of a vector-valued parameter, which is the zero vector in the degenerate case that quadratic local models are used. Computational results are used to compare the efficiency of various members of the family on a selection of test functions.

  14. Multi-objective aerodynamic shape optimization of small livestock trailers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkeson, C. A.; Toropov, V. V.; Thompson, H. M.; Wilson, M. C. T.; Foxley, N. A.; Gaskell, P. H.

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a formal optimization study of the design of small livestock trailers, within which the majority of animals are transported to market in the UK. The benefits of employing a headboard fairing to reduce aerodynamic drag without compromising the ventilation of the animals' microclimate are investigated using a multi-stage process involving computational fluid dynamics (CFD), optimal Latin hypercube (OLH) design of experiments (DoE) and moving least squares (MLS) metamodels. Fairings are parameterized in terms of three design variables and CFD solutions are obtained at 50 permutations of design variables. Both global and local search methods are employed to locate the global minimum from metamodels of the objective functions and a Pareto front is generated. The importance of carefully selecting an objective function is demonstrated and optimal fairing designs, offering drag reductions in excess of 5% without compromising animal ventilation, are presented.

  15. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L; Ye, Y; Boyd, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) and aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly improves

  16. Respecting shape memory to optimize peritoneal dialysis catheter outcomes.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Victoria R; Shrestha, Badri M; Wilkie, Martin E

    2014-11-01

    Disruption of the shape memory of a peritoneal dialysis catheter at the time of insertion may be a factor responsible for tip migration and catheter dysfunction. The use of postimplantation radiology to confirm the preservation of both the swan neck angle and the inclination angle may have a role in standardizing insertion technique with the potential to reduce the impact of operator variation on catheter outcomes. PMID:25360492

  17. Co-Optimization of Blunt Body Shapes for Moving Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor); Garcia, Joseph A (Inventor); Kinney, David J. (Inventor); Bowles, Jeffrey V (Inventor); Mansour, Nagi N (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and associated system for multi-disciplinary optimization of various parameters associated with a space vehicle that experiences aerocapture and atmospheric entry in a specified atmosphere. In one embodiment, simultaneous maximization of a ratio of landed payload to vehicle atmospheric entry mass, maximization of fluid flow distance before flow separation from vehicle, and minimization of heat transfer to the vehicle are performed with respect to vehicle surface geometric parameters, and aerostructure and aerothermal vehicle response for the vehicle moving along a specified trajectory. A Pareto Optimal set of superior performance parameters is identified.

  18. A new module for constrained multi-fragment geometry optimization in internal coordinates implemented in the MOLCAS package.

    PubMed

    Vysotskiy, Victor P; Boström, Jonas; Veryazov, Valera

    2013-11-15

    A parallel procedure for an effective optimization of relative position and orientation between two or more fragments has been implemented in the MOLCAS program package. By design, the procedure does not perturb the electronic structure of a system under the study. The original composite system is divided into frozen fragments and internal coordinates linking those fragments are the only optimized parameters. The procedure is capable to handle fully independent (no border atoms) fragments as well as fragments connected by covalent bonds. In the framework of the procedure, the optimization of relative position and orientation of the fragments are carried out in the internal "Z-matrix" coordinates using numerical derivatives. The total number of required single points energy evaluations scales with the number of fragments rather than with the total number of atoms in the system. The accuracy and the performance of the procedure have been studied by test calculations for a representative set of two- and three-fragment molecules with artificially distorted structures. The developed approach exhibits robust and smooth convergence to the reference optimal structures. As only a few internal coordinates are varied during the procedure, the proposed constrained fragment geometry optimization can be afforded even for high level ab initio methods like CCSD(T) and CASPT2. This capability has been demonstrated by applying the method to two larger cases, CCSD(T) and CASPT2 calculations on a positively charged benzene lithium complex and on the oxygen molecule interacting to iron porphyrin molecule, respectively.

  19. A new module for constrained multi-fragment geometry optimization in internal coordinates implemented in the MOLCAS package.

    PubMed

    Vysotskiy, Victor P; Boström, Jonas; Veryazov, Valera

    2013-11-15

    A parallel procedure for an effective optimization of relative position and orientation between two or more fragments has been implemented in the MOLCAS program package. By design, the procedure does not perturb the electronic structure of a system under the study. The original composite system is divided into frozen fragments and internal coordinates linking those fragments are the only optimized parameters. The procedure is capable to handle fully independent (no border atoms) fragments as well as fragments connected by covalent bonds. In the framework of the procedure, the optimization of relative position and orientation of the fragments are carried out in the internal "Z-matrix" coordinates using numerical derivatives. The total number of required single points energy evaluations scales with the number of fragments rather than with the total number of atoms in the system. The accuracy and the performance of the procedure have been studied by test calculations for a representative set of two- and three-fragment molecules with artificially distorted structures. The developed approach exhibits robust and smooth convergence to the reference optimal structures. As only a few internal coordinates are varied during the procedure, the proposed constrained fragment geometry optimization can be afforded even for high level ab initio methods like CCSD(T) and CASPT2. This capability has been demonstrated by applying the method to two larger cases, CCSD(T) and CASPT2 calculations on a positively charged benzene lithium complex and on the oxygen molecule interacting to iron porphyrin molecule, respectively. PMID:24006272

  20. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony

    2015-03-31

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  1. Finite dimensional approximation of a class of constrained nonlinear optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, Max D.; Hou, L. S.

    1994-01-01

    An abstract framework for the analysis and approximation of a class of nonlinear optimal control and optimization problems is constructed. Nonlinearities occur in both the objective functional and in the constraints. The framework includes an abstract nonlinear optimization problem posed on infinite dimensional spaces, and approximate problem posed on finite dimensional spaces, together with a number of hypotheses concerning the two problems. The framework is used to show that optimal solutions exist, to show that Lagrange multipliers may be used to enforce the constraints, to derive an optimality system from which optimal states and controls may be deduced, and to derive existence results and error estimates for solutions of the approximate problem. The abstract framework and the results derived from that framework are then applied to three concrete control or optimization problems and their approximation by finite element methods. The first involves the von Karman plate equations of nonlinear elasticity, the second, the Ginzburg-Landau equations of superconductivity, and the third, the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible, viscous flows.

  2. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s-1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  3. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s‑1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  4. Three-Dimensional Viscous Alternating Direction Implicit Algorithm and Strategies for Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization based on quasi-analytical sensitivities has been extended for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications. The flow analysis has been rendered by a fully implicit, finite-volume formulation of the Euler and Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations. Initially, the viscous laminar flow analysis for a wing has been compared with an independent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code which has been extensively validated. The new procedure has been demonstrated in the design of a cranked arrow wing at Mach 2.4 with coarse- and fine-grid based computations performed with Euler and TLNS equations. The influence of the initial constraints on the geometry and aerodynamics of the optimized shape has been explored. Various final shapes generated for an identical initial problem formulation but with different optimization path options (coarse or fine grid, Euler or TLNS), have been aerodynamically evaluated via a common fine-grid TLNS-based analysis. The initial constraint conditions show significant bearing on the optimization results. Also, the results demonstrate that to produce an aerodynamically efficient design, it is imperative to include the viscous physics in the optimization procedure with the proper resolution. Based upon the present results, to better utilize the scarce computational resources, it is recommended that, a number of viscous coarse grid cases using either a preconditioned bi-conjugate gradient (PbCG) or an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) method, should initially be employed to improve the optimization problem definition, the design space and initial shape. Optimized shapes should subsequently be analyzed using a high fidelity (viscous with fine-grid resolution) flow analysis to evaluate their true performance potential. Finally, a viscous fine-grid-based shape optimization should be conducted, using an ADI method, to accurately obtain the final optimized shape.

  5. Design optimization of piezoelectric actuator patterns for static shape control of smart plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dongchang; Tong, Liyong

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents an investigation into design optimization of actuator patterns for static shape control of composite plates with piezoelectric actuator patches. An energy optimization based method for finding the optimal control voltages that can actuate a structure shape close to the desired one within a given error is described. Moreover, a voltage limitation for each actuator is also imposed to keep its control voltage within a practical range. An evolutionary actuator pattern optimization scheme is presented in which trivial actuators with the smallest voltages are electrically or physically removed step by step until the given tolerable error is reached. Finally, illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present equivalent element and the design optimization scheme. Numerical results show that satisfactory static shape control can be achieved even after a number of actuators are removed.

  6. From the Cover: Shape insensitive optimal adhesion of nanoscale fibrillar structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huajian; Yao, Haimin

    2004-05-01

    Gecko and many insects have adopted nanoscale fibrillar structures on their feet as adhesion devices. Here, we consider adhesion between a single fiber and a substrate by van der Waals or electrostatic interactions. For a given contact area A, the theoretical pull-off force of the fiber is thA where th is the theoretical strength of adhesion. We show that it is possible to design an optimal shape of the tip of the fiber to achieve the theoretical pull-off force. However, such design tends to be unreliable at the macroscopic scale because the pull-off force is sensitive to small variations in the tip shape. We find that a robust design of shape-insensitive optimal adhesion becomes possible only when the diameter of the fiber is reduced to length scales on the order of 100 nm. In general, optimal adhesion could be achieved by a combination of size reduction and shape optimization. The smaller the size, the less important the shape. At large contact sizes, optimal adhesion could still be achieved if the shape can be manufactured to a sufficiently high precision. The robust design of optimal adhesion at nanoscale provides a plausible explanation for the convergent evolution of hairy attachment systems in biology.

  7. A one-layer recurrent neural network for constrained nonconvex optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Guocheng; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a one-layer recurrent neural network is proposed for solving nonconvex optimization problems subject to general inequality constraints, designed based on an exact penalty function method. It is proved herein that any neuron state of the proposed neural network is convergent to the feasible region in finite time and stays there thereafter, provided that the penalty parameter is sufficiently large. The lower bounds of the penalty parameter and convergence time are also estimated. In addition, any neural state of the proposed neural network is convergent to its equilibrium point set which satisfies the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions of the optimization problem. Moreover, the equilibrium point set is equivalent to the optimal solution to the nonconvex optimization problem if the objective function and constraints satisfy given conditions. Four numerical examples are provided to illustrate the performances of the proposed neural network.

  8. A non-penalty recurrent neural network for solving a class of constrained optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explain a methodology to analyze convergence of some differential inclusion-based neural networks for solving nonsmooth optimization problems. For a general differential inclusion, we show that if its right hand-side set valued map satisfies some conditions, then solution trajectory of the differential inclusion converges to optimal solution set of its corresponding in optimization problem. Based on the obtained methodology, we introduce a new recurrent neural network for solving nonsmooth optimization problems. Objective function does not need to be convex on R(n) nor does the new neural network model require any penalty parameter. We compare our new method with some penalty-based and non-penalty based models. Moreover for differentiable cases, we implement circuit diagram of the new neural network.

  9. Extended Information Ratio for Portfolio Optimization Using Simulated Annealing with Constrained Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Tsujimura, Yasuhiro; Kambayashi, Yasushi

    The portfolio optimizations are to determine the proportion-weighted combination in the portfolio in order to achieve investment targets. This optimization is one of the multi-dimensional combinatorial optimizations and it is difficult for the portfolio constructed in the past period to keep its performance in the future period. In order to keep the good performances of portfolios, we propose the extended information ratio as an objective function, using the information ratio, beta, prime beta, or correlation coefficient in this paper. We apply the simulated annealing (SA) to optimize the portfolio employing the proposed ratio. For the SA, we make the neighbor by the operation that changes the structure of the weights in the portfolio. In the numerical experiments, we show that our portfolios keep the good performances when the market trend of the future period becomes different from that of the past period.

  10. Fixed structure compensator design using a constrained hybrid evolutionary optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhojit; Samanta, Susovon

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an efficient technique for designing a fixed order compensator for compensating current mode control architecture of DC-DC converters. The compensator design is formulated as an optimization problem, which seeks to attain a set of frequency domain specifications. The highly nonlinear nature of the optimization problem demands the use of an initial parameterization independent global search technique. In this regard, the optimization problem is solved using a hybrid evolutionary optimization approach, because of its simple structure, faster execution time and greater probability in achieving the global solution. The proposed algorithm involves the combination of a population search based optimization approach i.e. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and local search based method. The op-amp dynamics have been incorporated during the design process. Considering the limitations of fixed structure compensator in achieving loop bandwidth higher than a certain threshold, the proposed approach also determines the op-amp bandwidth, which would be able to achieve the same. The effectiveness of the proposed approach in meeting the desired frequency domain specifications is experimentally tested on a peak current mode control dc-dc buck converter.

  11. Fixed structure compensator design using a constrained hybrid evolutionary optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhojit; Samanta, Susovon

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an efficient technique for designing a fixed order compensator for compensating current mode control architecture of DC-DC converters. The compensator design is formulated as an optimization problem, which seeks to attain a set of frequency domain specifications. The highly nonlinear nature of the optimization problem demands the use of an initial parameterization independent global search technique. In this regard, the optimization problem is solved using a hybrid evolutionary optimization approach, because of its simple structure, faster execution time and greater probability in achieving the global solution. The proposed algorithm involves the combination of a population search based optimization approach i.e. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and local search based method. The op-amp dynamics have been incorporated during the design process. Considering the limitations of fixed structure compensator in achieving loop bandwidth higher than a certain threshold, the proposed approach also determines the op-amp bandwidth, which would be able to achieve the same. The effectiveness of the proposed approach in meeting the desired frequency domain specifications is experimentally tested on a peak current mode control dc-dc buck converter. PMID:24768082

  12. Shape Optimization for Navier-Stokes Equations with Algebraic Turbulence Model: Numerical Analysis and Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Haslinger, Jaroslav; Stebel, Jan

    2011-04-15

    We study the shape optimization problem for the paper machine headbox which distributes a mixture of water and wood fibers in the paper making process. The aim is to find a shape which a priori ensures the given velocity profile on the outlet part. The mathematical formulation leads to the optimal control problem in which the control variable is the shape of the domain representing the header, the state problem is represented by the generalized Navier-Stokes system with nontrivial boundary conditions. This paper deals with numerical aspects of the problem.

  13. An a posteriori error estimator for shape optimization: application to EIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, M.; Pantz, O.; Trabelsi, K.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we account for the numerical error introduced by the Finite Element approximation of the shape gradient to construct a guaranteed shape optimization method. We present a goal-oriented strategy inspired by the complementary energy principle to construct a constant-free, fully-computable a posteriori error estimator and to derive a certified upper bound of the error in the shape gradient. The resulting Adaptive Boundary Variation Algorithm (ABVA) is able to identify a genuine descent direction at each iteration and features a reliable stopping criterion for the optimization loop. Some preliminary numerical results for the inverse identification problem of Electrical Impedance Tomography are presented.

  14. Optimal control landscape for the generation of unitary transformations with constrained dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Michael; Wu, Rebing; Rabitz, Herschel; Lidar, Daniel

    2010-06-15

    The reliable and precise generation of quantum unitary transformations is essential for the realization of a number of fundamental objectives, such as quantum control and quantum information processing. Prior work has explored the optimal control problem of generating such unitary transformations as a surface-optimization problem over the quantum control landscape, defined as a metric for realizing a desired unitary transformation as a function of the control variables. It was found that under the assumption of nondissipative and controllable dynamics, the landscape topology is trap free, which implies that any reasonable optimization heuristic should be able to identify globally optimal solutions. The present work is a control landscape analysis, which incorporates specific constraints in the Hamiltonian that correspond to certain dynamical symmetries in the underlying physical system. It is found that the presence of such symmetries does not destroy the trap-free topology. These findings expand the class of quantum dynamical systems on which control problems are intrinsically amenable to a solution by optimal control.

  15. Time and frequency constrained sonar signal design for optimal detection of elastic objects.

    PubMed

    Hamschin, Brandon; Loughlin, Patrick J

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the task of model-based transmit signal design for optimizing detection is considered. Building on past work that designs the spectral magnitude for optimizing detection, two methods for synthesizing minimum duration signals with this spectral magnitude are developed. The methods are applied to the design of signals that are optimal for detecting elastic objects in the presence of additive noise and self-noise. Elastic objects are modeled as linear time-invariant systems with known impulse responses, while additive noise (e.g., ocean noise or receiver noise) and acoustic self-noise (e.g., reverberation or clutter) are modeled as stationary Gaussian random processes with known power spectral densities. The first approach finds the waveform that preserves the optimal spectral magnitude while achieving the minimum temporal duration. The second approach yields a finite-length time-domain sequence by maximizing temporal energy concentration, subject to the constraint that the spectral magnitude is close (in a least-squares sense) to the optimal spectral magnitude. The two approaches are then connected analytically, showing the former is a limiting case of the latter. Simulation examples that illustrate the theory are accompanied by discussions that address practical applicability and how one might satisfy the need for target and environmental models in the real-world.

  16. A method for stochastic constrained optimization using derivative-free surrogate pattern search and collocation

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Audet, Charles; Marsden, Alison L.

    2010-06-20

    Recent advances in coupling novel optimization methods to large-scale computing problems have opened the door to tackling a diverse set of physically realistic engineering design problems. A large computational overhead is associated with computing the cost function for most practical problems involving complex physical phenomena. Such problems are also plagued with uncertainties in a diverse set of parameters. We present a novel stochastic derivative-free optimization approach for tackling such problems. Our method extends the previously developed surrogate management framework (SMF) to allow for uncertainties in both simulation parameters and design variables. The stochastic collocation scheme is employed for stochastic variables whereas Kriging based surrogate functions are employed for the cost function. This approach is tested on four numerical optimization problems and is shown to have significant improvement in efficiency over traditional Monte-Carlo schemes. Problems with multiple probabilistic constraints are also discussed.

  17. PDE constrained optimization of electrical defibrillation in a 3D ventricular slice geometry.

    PubMed

    Chamakuri, Nagaiah; Kunisch, Karl; Plank, Gernot

    2016-04-01

    A computational study of an optimal control approach for cardiac defibrillation in a 3D geometry is presented. The cardiac bioelectric activity at the tissue and bath volumes is modeled by the bidomain model equations. The model includes intramural fiber rotation, axially symmetric around the fiber direction, and anisotropic conductivity coefficients, which are extracted from a histological image. The dynamics of the ionic currents are based on the regularized Mitchell-Schaeffer model. The controls enter in the form of electrodes, which are placed at the boundary of the bath volume with the goal of dampening undesired arrhythmias. The numerical optimization is based on Newton techniques. We demonstrated the parallel architecture environment for the computation of potentials on multidomains and for the higher order optimization techniques.

  18. Implementation of a multiblock sensitivity analysis method in numerical aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacasse, James M.

    1995-01-01

    A multiblock sensitivity analysis method is applied in a numerical aerodynamic shape optimization technique. The Sensitivity Analysis Domain Decomposition (SADD) scheme which is implemented in this study was developed to reduce the computer memory requirements resulting from the aerodynamic sensitivity analysis equations. Discrete sensitivity analysis offers the ability to compute quasi-analytical derivatives in a more efficient manner than traditional finite-difference methods, which tend to be computationally expensive and prone to inaccuracies. The direct optimization procedure couples CFD analysis based on the two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with a gradient-based numerical optimization technique. The linking mechanism is the sensitivity equation derived from the CFD discretized flow equations, recast in adjoint form, and solved using direct matrix inversion techniques. This investigation is performed to demonstrate an aerodynamic shape optimization technique on a multiblock domain and its applicability to complex geometries. The objectives are accomplished by shape optimizing two aerodynamic configurations. First, the shape optimization of a transonic airfoil is performed to investigate the behavior of the method in highly nonlinear flows and the effect of different grid blocking strategies on the procedure. Secondly, shape optimization of a two-element configuration in subsonic flow is completed. Cases are presented for this configuration to demonstrate the effect of simultaneously reshaping interfering elements. The aerodynamic shape optimization is shown to produce supercritical type airfoils in the transonic flow from an initially symmetric airfoil. Multiblocking effects the path of optimization while providing similar results at the conclusion. Simultaneous reshaping of elements is shown to be more effective than individual element reshaping due to the inclusion of mutual interference effects.

  19. Application of Jetstream to a Suite of Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telidetzki, Karla

    The impact of dimensionality on three aerodynamic optimization cases is studied to determine the effect of the number of geometric design variables. The cases investigated are: (1) drag minimization of an airfoil in transonic inviscid flow, (2) drag minimization through optimizing the twist distribution of a rectangular wing in subsonic inviscid flow, and (3) drag minimization through optimizing the twist distribution and section shapes of a wing in transonic turbulent flow. The optimization algorithm achieves significant drag reductions in all three cases. Valuable insight into the impact of dimensionality is gained, showing that increasing the number of design variables can provide greater flexibility. This flexibility can come at a cost to the convergence of the optimization algorithm, whether that be due to an inability to reduce the optimality significantly, the increased geometric flexibility challenging the mesh movement algorithm, or the unique aerodynamic shapes being unable to achieve converged flow solutions.

  20. Effect of Local Junction Losses in the Optimization of T-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    T-shaped channels are extensively used in flow distribution applications such as irrigation, chemical dispersion, gas pipelines and space heating and cooling. The geometry of T-shaped channels can be optimized to reduce the overall pressure drop in stem and branch sections. Results of such optimizations are in the form of geometric parameters such as the length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. The traditional approach of this optimization accounts for the pressure drop across the stem and branch sections, however, ignores the pressure drop in the T-junction. In this paper, we conduct geometry optimization while including the effect of local junction losses in laminar flows. From the results, we are able to identify a non-dimensional parameter that can be used to predict the optimal geometric configurations. This parameter can also be used to identify the conditions in which the local junction losses can be ignored during the optimization.

  1. Shape Optimization of Cylindrical Shell for Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Jay H.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper an analytic method is used to solve for the cross spectral density of the interior acoustic response of a cylinder with nonuniform thickness subjected to turbulent boundary layer excitation. The cylinder is of honeycomb core construction with the thickness of the core material expressed as a cosine series in the circumferential direction. The coefficients of this series are used as the design variable in the optimization study. The objective function is the space and frequency averaged acoustic response. Results confirm the presence of multiple local minima as previously reported and demonstrate the potential for modest noise reduction.

  2. A linearized theory method of constrained optimization for supersonic cruise wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. S.; Carlson, H. W.; Middleton, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    A linearized theory wing design and optimization procedure which allows physical realism and practical considerations to be imposed as constraints on the optimum (least drag due to lift) solution is discussed and examples of application are presented. In addition to the usual constraints on lift and pitching moment, constraints are imposed on wing surface ordinates and wing upper surface pressure levels and gradients. The design procedure also provides the capability of including directly in the optimization process the effects of other aircraft components such as a fuselage, canards, and nacelles.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Surface and Volumetric Cooling using Optimal T- and Y-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The T- and Y-shaped flow channels can be optimized for reduced pressure drop and pumping power. The results of the optimization are in the form of geometric parameters such as length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. While these flow channels are optimized for minimum pressure drop, they can also be used for surface and volumetric cooling applications such as heat exchangers, air conditioning and electronics cooling. In this paper, we studied the heat transfer characteristics of multiple T- and Y-shaped flow channel configurations using numerical simulations. All configurations are subjected to same pumping power and heat generation constraints and their heat transfer performance is studied.

  4. A sparse superlinearly convergent SQP with applications to two-dimensional shape optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.

    1998-04-15

    Discretization of optimal shape design problems leads to very large nonlinear optimization problems. For attaining maximum computational efficiency, a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm should achieve superlinear convergence while preserving sparsity and convexity of the resulting quadratic programs. Most classical SQP approaches violate at least one of the requirements. We show that, for a very large class of optimization problems, one can design SQP algorithms that satisfy all these three requirements. The improvements in computational efficiency are demonstrated for a cam design problem.

  5. A policy iteration approach to online optimal control of continuous-time constrained-input systems.

    PubMed

    Modares, Hamidreza; Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad-Bagher; Lewis, Frank L

    2013-09-01

    This paper is an effort towards developing an online learning algorithm to find the optimal control solution for continuous-time (CT) systems subject to input constraints. The proposed method is based on the policy iteration (PI) technique which has recently evolved as a major technique for solving optimal control problems. Although a number of online PI algorithms have been developed for CT systems, none of them take into account the input constraints caused by actuator saturation. In practice, however, ignoring these constraints leads to performance degradation or even system instability. In this paper, to deal with the input constraints, a suitable nonquadratic functional is employed to encode the constraints into the optimization formulation. Then, the proposed PI algorithm is implemented on an actor-critic structure to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation associated with this nonquadratic cost functional in an online fashion. That is, two coupled neural network (NN) approximators, namely an actor and a critic are tuned online and simultaneously for approximating the associated HJB solution and computing the optimal control policy. The critic is used to evaluate the cost associated with the current policy, while the actor is used to find an improved policy based on information provided by the critic. Convergence to a close approximation of the HJB solution as well as stability of the proposed feedback control law are shown. Simulation results of the proposed method on a nonlinear CT system illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:23706414

  6. Peptide identification via constrained multi-objective optimization: Pareto-based genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Malard, Joel M.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cannon, William R.; Mooney, Ryan W.; Baxter, Douglas J.

    2005-12-10

    Automatic data-base independent peptide identification from collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data is made difficult by large plateaus in the fitness landscapes of scoring functions and the fuzzy nature of the constraints that is due to noise in the data. Two different scoring functions are combined into a parallel multi-objective optimization framework.

  7. Constrained Optimization Problems in Cost and Managerial Accounting--Spreadsheet Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amlie, Thomas T.

    2009-01-01

    A common problem addressed in Managerial and Cost Accounting classes is that of selecting an optimal production mix given scarce resources. That is, if a firm produces a number of different products, and is faced with scarce resources (e.g., limitations on labor, materials, or machine time), what combination of products yields the greatest profit…

  8. Increasing color saturation by optimizing light spectra constrained on color rendering properties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haining; Dong, Jianfei; Zhang, Guoqi

    2016-02-01

    Enhancing the color saturation of objects via illumination with specially designed light spectra is promising in many commercial and scientific applications. Existing literature has focused on studying the colors that can be rendered by white light with various correlated color temperatures, and by the mixed light from various monochromatic light-emitting diodes. However, very little literature has been devoted to methods that can actively configure the light spectrum to enhance the color saturation of an arbitrary object. This paper proposes an optimization-based method to extend the gamut that can be achieved by a given polychromatic lamp toward a chosen direction, i.e., to increase the saturation of a specific color. Moreover, to trade-off the increased saturation of a color sample with the reduced colorfulness of other samples, constraints with tunable thresholds are imposed to the optimization problem to bound the variation of a contrast color sample. In addition, the effect of uncontrollable ambient light can be taken into account by mild modifications of the optimization problem. Simulation results show that the optimized light spectrum can effectively enhance the saturation of any specific color, while maintaining the other rendered colors as intact as possible. Visual experiments have also been conducted with 22 human subjects, whose responses agree with the simulation results. PMID:26831770

  9. Increasing color saturation by optimizing light spectra constrained on color rendering properties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haining; Dong, Jianfei; Zhang, Guoqi

    2016-02-01

    Enhancing the color saturation of objects via illumination with specially designed light spectra is promising in many commercial and scientific applications. Existing literature has focused on studying the colors that can be rendered by white light with various correlated color temperatures, and by the mixed light from various monochromatic light-emitting diodes. However, very little literature has been devoted to methods that can actively configure the light spectrum to enhance the color saturation of an arbitrary object. This paper proposes an optimization-based method to extend the gamut that can be achieved by a given polychromatic lamp toward a chosen direction, i.e., to increase the saturation of a specific color. Moreover, to trade-off the increased saturation of a color sample with the reduced colorfulness of other samples, constraints with tunable thresholds are imposed to the optimization problem to bound the variation of a contrast color sample. In addition, the effect of uncontrollable ambient light can be taken into account by mild modifications of the optimization problem. Simulation results show that the optimized light spectrum can effectively enhance the saturation of any specific color, while maintaining the other rendered colors as intact as possible. Visual experiments have also been conducted with 22 human subjects, whose responses agree with the simulation results.

  10. A multiple-realizations chance-constrained model for optimizing nutrient removal in constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Tze Ling; Eheart, J. Wayland

    2008-04-01

    High nutrient loads in surface waters are a cause of hypoxia in coastal ecosystems. Constructed wetlands offer a means of nutrient removal, but their design is complicated by environmental fluctuations. In the present work, a chance-constrained model is developed on the basis of satisfying performance constraints for a subset of the period of hydrologic and meteorological record. The model incorporates a nonsteady state wetland model and is used to determine the most cost-efficient wetland design given the nutrient removal requirements. Three candidate wetlands are considered. For two of them a comparison is made between operating the wetlands individually versus operating them concurrently. Results show that the factors limiting wetland performance are low flow availability and low inflow nutrient concentrations. Further, for the case considered, a two-wetland design is found to be more cost-effective than a single-wetland design. On average, wetlands have huge potential for nutrient removal but have a higher risk of failure than conventional treatment and could, under unfavorable conditions, be more expensive.

  11. A Generalized Framework for Constrained Design Optimization of General Supersonic Configurations Using Adjoint Based Sensitivity Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) sent out an NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for proposals soliciting research and technical development. The proposed research program was aimed at addressing the desired milestones and outcomes of ROA (ROA-2006) Subtopic A.4.1.1 Advanced Computational Methods. The second milestone, SUP.1.06.02 Robust, validated mesh adaptation and error quantification for near field Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), was addressed by the proposed research. Additional research utilizing the direct links to geometry through a CAD interface enabled by this work will allow for geometric constraints to be applied and address the final milestone, SUP2.07.06 Constrained low-drag supersonic aerodynamic design capability. The original product of the proposed research program was an integrated system of tools that can be used for the mesh mechanics required for rapid high fidelity analysis and for design of supersonic cruise vehicles. These Euler and Navier-Stokes volume grid manipulation tools were proposed to efficiently use parallel processing. The mesh adaptation provides a systematic approach for achieving demonstrated levels of accuracy in the solutions. NASA chose to fund only the mesh generation/adaptation portion of the proposal. So this report describes the completion of the proposed tasks for mesh creation, manipulation and adaptation as it pertains to sonic boom prediction of supersonic configurations.

  12. Shape optimization of the caudal fin of the three-dimensional self-propelled swimming fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, ZhiQiang; Wu, ChuiJie

    2013-02-01

    Shape optimization of the caudal fin of the three-dimensional self-propelled swimming fish, to increase the swimming efficiency and the swimming speed and control the motion direction more easily, is investigated by combining optimization algorithms, unsteady computational fluid dynamics and dynamic control in this study. The 3D computational fluid dynamics package contains the immersed boundary method, volume of fluid method, the adaptive multi-grid finite volume method and the control strategy of fish swimming. Through shape optimizations of various swimming speeds, the results show that the optimal caudal fins of different swimming modes are not exactly the same shape. However, the optimal fish of high swimming speed, whose caudal fin shape is similar to the crescent, also have higher efficiency and better maneuverability than the other optimal bionic fish at low and moderate swimming speeds. Finally, the mechanisms of vorticity creation of different optimal bionic fish are studied by using boundary vorticity-flux theory, and three-dimensional wake structures of self-propelled swimming of these fish are comparatively analyzed. The study of vortex dynamics reveals the nature of efficient swimming of the 3D bionic fish with the lunate caudal fin.

  13. Blind Channel Equalization Using Constrained Generalized Pattern Search Optimization and Reinitialization Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaouche, Abdelouahib; Dayoub, Iyad; Rouvaen, Jean Michel; Tatkeu, Charles

    2008-12-01

    We propose a global convergence baud-spaced blind equalization method in this paper. This method is based on the application of both generalized pattern optimization and channel surfing reinitialization. The potentially used unimodal cost function relies on higher- order statistics, and its optimization is achieved using a pattern search algorithm. Since the convergence to the global minimum is not unconditionally warranted, we make use of channel surfing reinitialization (CSR) strategy to find the right global minimum. The proposed algorithm is analyzed, and simulation results using a severe frequency selective propagation channel are given. Detailed comparisons with constant modulus algorithm (CMA) are highlighted. The proposed algorithm performances are evaluated in terms of intersymbol interference, normalized received signal constellations, and root mean square error vector magnitude. In case of nonconstant modulus input signals, our algorithm outperforms significantly CMA algorithm with full channel surfing reinitialization strategy. However, comparable performances are obtained for constant modulus signals.

  14. How does network design constrain optimal operation of intermittent water supply?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieb, Anna; Wilkening, Jon; Rycroft, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Urban water distribution systems do not always supply water continuously or reliably. As pipes fill and empty, pressure transients may contribute to degraded infrastructure and poor water quality. To help understand and manage this undesirable side effect of intermittent water supply--a phenomenon affecting hundreds of millions of people in cities around the world--we study the relative contributions of fixed versus dynamic properties of the network. Using a dynamical model of unsteady transition pipe flow, we study how different elements of network design, such as network geometry, pipe material, and pipe slope, contribute to undesirable pressure transients. Using an optimization framework, we then investigate to what extent network operation decisions such as supply timing and inflow rate may mitigate these effects. We characterize some aspects of network design that make them more or less amenable to operational optimization.

  15. Analytical optimal controls for the state constrained addition and removal of cryoprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Chicone, Carmen C.; Critser, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Cryobiology is a field with enormous scientific, financial and even cultural impact. Successful cryopreservation of cells and tissues depends on the equilibration of these materials with high concentrations of permeating chemicals (CPAs) such as glycerol or 1,2 propylene glycol. Because cells and tissues are exposed to highly anisosmotic conditions, the resulting gradients cause large volume fluctuations that have been shown to damage cells and tissues. On the other hand, there is evidence that toxicity to these high levels of chemicals is time dependent, and therefore it is ideal to minimize exposure time as well. Because solute and solvent flux is governed by a system of ordinary differential equations, CPA addition and removal from cells is an ideal context for the application of optimal control theory. Recently, we presented a mathematical synthesis of the optimal controls for the ODE system commonly used in cryobiology in the absence of state constraints and showed that controls defined by this synthesis were optimal. Here we define the appropriate model, analytically extend the previous theory to one encompassing state constraints, and as an example apply this to the critical and clinically important cell type of human oocytes, where current methodologies are either difficult to implement or have very limited success rates. We show that an enormous increase in equilibration efficiency can be achieved under the new protocols when compared to classic protocols, potentially allowing a greatly increased survival rate for human oocytes, and pointing to a direction for the cryopreservation of many other cell types. PMID:22527943

  16. The L_infinity constrained global optimal histogram equalization technique for real time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qiongwei; Niu, Yi; Liu, Lin; Jiao, Yang; Shi, Guangming

    2015-08-01

    Although the current imaging sensors can achieve 12 or higher precision, the current display devices and the commonly used digital image formats are still only 8 bits. This mismatch causes significant waste of the sensor precision and loss of information when storing and displaying the images. For better usage of the precision-budget, tone mapping operators have to be used to map the high-precision data into low-precision digital images adaptively. In this paper, the classic histogram equalization tone mapping operator is reexamined in the sense of optimization. We point out that the traditional histogram equalization technique and its variants are fundamentally improper by suffering from local optimum problems. To overcome this drawback, we remodel the histogram equalization tone mapping task based on graphic theory which achieves the global optimal solutions. Another advantage of the graphic-based modeling is that the tone-continuity is also modeled as a vital constraint in our approach which suppress the annoying boundary artifacts of the traditional approaches. In addition, we propose a novel dynamic programming technique to solve the histogram equalization problem in real time. Experimental results shows that the proposed tone-preserved global optimal histogram equalization technique outperforms the traditional approaches by exhibiting more subtle details in the foreground while preserving the smoothness of the background.

  17. An algorithmic calibration approach to identify globally optimal parameters for constraining the DayCent model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafique, Rashid; Kumar, Sandeep; Luo, Yiqi; Kiely, Gerard; Asrar, Ghassem R.

    2015-02-01

    he accurate calibration of complex biogeochemical models is essential for the robust estimation of soil greenhouse gases (GHG) as well as other environmental conditions and parameters that are used in research and policy decisions. DayCent is a popular biogeochemical model used both nationally and internationally for this purpose. Despite DayCent’s popularity, its complex parameter estimation is often based on experts’ knowledge which is somewhat subjective. In this study we used the inverse modelling parameter estimation software (PEST), to calibrate the DayCent model based on sensitivity and identifi- ability analysis. Using previously published N2 O and crop yield data as a basis of our calibration approach, we found that half of the 140 parameters used in this study were the primary drivers of calibration dif- ferences (i.e. the most sensitive) and the remaining parameters could not be identified given the data set and parameter ranges we used in this study. The post calibration results showed improvement over the pre-calibration parameter set based on, a decrease in residual differences 79% for N2O fluxes and 84% for crop yield, and an increase in coefficient of determination 63% for N2O fluxes and 72% for corn yield. The results of our study suggest that future studies need to better characterize germination tem- perature, number of degree-days and temperature dependency of plant growth; these processes were highly sensitive and could not be adequately constrained by the data used in our study. Furthermore, the sensitivity and identifiability analysis was helpful in providing deeper insight for important processes and associated parameters that can lead to further improvement in calibration of DayCent model.

  18. Correction of linear-array lidar intensity data using an optimal beam shaping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Yang, Xingyu; Zhang, Bingqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-08-01

    The linear-array lidar has been recently developed and applied for its superiority of vertically non-scanning, large field of view, high sensitivity and high precision. The beam shaper is the key component for the linear-array detection. However, the traditional beam shaping approaches can hardly satisfy our requirement for obtaining unbiased and complete backscattered intensity data. The required beam distribution should roughly be oblate U-shaped rather than Gaussian or uniform. Thus, an optimal beam shaping approach is proposed in this paper. By employing a pair of conical lenses and a cylindrical lens behind the beam expander, the expanded Gaussian laser was shaped to a line-shaped beam whose intensity distribution is more consistent with the required distribution. To provide a better fit to the requirement, off-axis method is adopted. The design of the optimal beam shaping module is mathematically explained and the experimental verification of the module performance is also presented in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the optimal beam shaping approach can effectively correct the intensity image and provide ~30% gain of detection area over traditional approach, thus improving the imaging quality of linear-array lidar.

  19. Shape optimization of plate with static and dynamic constraints via virtual laminated element.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Xu, Xing; Ling, Dao-Sheng

    2003-01-01

    The virtual laminated element method (VLEM) can resolve structural shape optimization problems with a new method. According to the characteristics of VLEM, only some characterised layer thickness values need be defined as design variables instead of boundary node coordinates or some other parameters determining the system boundary. One of the important features of this method is that it is not necessary to regenerate the FE(finite element) grid during the optimization process so as to avoid optimization failures resulting from some distortion grid elements. The thickness distribution in thin plate optimization problems in other studies before is of stepped shape. However, in this paper, a continuous thickness distribution can be obtained after optimization using VLEM, and is more reasonable. Furthermore, an approximate reanalysis method named "behavior model technique" can be used to reduce the amount of structural reanalysis. Some typical examples are offered to prove the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed method.

  20. On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been provEn effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. Several approaches that have proven effective for other evolutionary algorithms are modified and implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for standard test optimization problems and for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

  1. Clinically Constrained Optimization of flexTPI Acquisition Parameters for the Tissue Sodium Concentration Bioscale

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Ian C.; Lu, Aiming; Thulborn, Keith R.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid transverse relaxation of the sodium magnetic resonance (MR) signal during spatial encoding causes a loss of image resolution, an effect known as T2-blurring. Conventional wisdom suggests that spatial resolution is maximized by keeping the readout duration as short as possible to minimize T2-blurring. Flexible twisted projection imaging (flexTPI) performed with an ultra-short echo time, relative to T2, and a long repetition time, relative to T1, has been shown to be effective for quantitative sodium MR imaging. A minimized readout duration requires a very large number of projections and, consequentially, results in an impractically long total acquisition time to meet these conditions. When the total acquisition time is limited to a clinically practical duration (e.g., 10 minutes), the optimal parameters for maximal spatial resolution of a flexTPI acquisition do not correspond to the shortest possible readout. Simulation and experimental results for resolution optimized acquisition parameters of quantitative sodium flexTPI of parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid are presented for the human brain at 9.4T and 3T. The effect of signal loss during data collection on sodium quantification bias and image signal-to-noise ratio are discussed. PMID:21446034

  2. Noninvasive Estimation of Respiratory Mechanics in Spontaneously Breathing Ventilated Patients: A Constrained Optimization Approach.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Francesco; Albanese, Antonio; Karamolegkos, Nikolaos; Wang, Dong; Seiver, Adam; Chbat, Nicolas W

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a method for breath-by-breath noninvasive estimation of respiratory resistance and elastance in mechanically ventilated patients. For passive patients, well-established approaches exist. However, when patients are breathing spontaneously, taking into account the diaphragmatic effort in the estimation process is still an open challenge. Mechanical ventilators require maneuvers to obtain reliable estimates for respiratory mechanics parameters. Such maneuvers interfere with the desired ventilation pattern to be delivered to the patient. Alternatively, invasive procedures are needed. The method presented in this paper is a noninvasive way requiring only measurements of airway pressure and flow that are routinely available for ventilated patients. It is based on a first-order single-compartment model of the respiratory system, from which a cost function is constructed as the sum of squared errors between model-based airway pressure predictions and actual measurements. Physiological considerations are translated into mathematical constraints that restrict the space of feasible solutions and make the resulting optimization problem strictly convex. Existing quadratic programming techniques are used to efficiently find the minimizing solution, which yields an estimate of the respiratory system resistance and elastance. The method is illustrated via numerical examples and experimental data from animal tests. Results show that taking into account the patient effort consistently improves the estimation of respiratory mechanics. The method is suitable for real-time patient monitoring, providing clinicians with noninvasive measurements that could be used for diagnosis and therapy optimization.

  3. Optimization of a constrained linear monochromator design for neutral atom beams.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A focused ground state, neutral atom beam, exploiting its de Broglie wavelength by means of atom optics, is used for neutral atom microscopy imaging. Employing Fresnel zone plates as a lens for these beams is a well established microscopy technique. To date, even for favorable beam source conditions a minimal focus spot size of slightly below 1μm was reached. This limitation is essentially given by the intrinsic spectral purity of the beam in combination with the chromatic aberration of the diffraction based zone plate. Therefore, it is important to enhance the monochromaticity of the beam, enabling a higher spatial resolution, preferably below 100nm. We propose to increase the monochromaticity of a neutral atom beam by means of a so-called linear monochromator set-up - a Fresnel zone plate in combination with a pinhole aperture - in order to gain more than one order of magnitude in spatial resolution. This configuration is known in X-ray microscopy and has proven to be useful, but has not been applied to neutral atom beams. The main result of this work is optimal design parameters based on models for this linear monochromator set-up followed by a second zone plate for focusing. The optimization was performed for minimizing the focal spot size and maximizing the centre line intensity at the detector position for an atom beam simultaneously. The results presented in this work are for, but not limited to, a neutral helium atom beam.

  4. Shape optimization of a pressure vessel under plastic flow, plastic instability, weight and fatigue life criteria

    SciTech Connect

    El Abdi, R.; Touratier, M.; Convert, P.; Lalanne, B.

    1994-06-01

    The structural shape optimization of a complex shell under complex criteria is presented. The shell is one of various cases of a turboshaft, and optimization criteria are associated with the cost, the technology, and above all the working conditions for the turboshaft. Optimization criteria involved are of course the weight of the structure, but also the plastic flow, plastic instability and fatigue life. The fatigue life criterion is an extension to the three-dimensional state of the one-dimensional Lemaitre-Chaboche rule, taking into account the elasto-plastic Neuber correction. All computations have been made with the ANSYS finite element program in which an optimization module exists. 20 refs.

  5. Multiobjective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Pareto Differential Evolution and Generalized Response Surface Metamodels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary algorithm that has proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult single-objective optimization problems. The DE algorithm has been recently extended to multiobjective optimization problem by using a Pareto-based approach. In this paper, a Pareto DE algorithm is applied to multiobjective aerodynamic shape optimization problems that are characterized by computationally expensive objective function evaluations. To improve computational expensive the algorithm is coupled with generalized response surface meta-models based on artificial neural networks. Results are presented for some test optimization problems from the literature to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  6. Optimal Shape Design of Compact Heat Exchangers Based on Adjoint Analysis of Momentum and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Suzuki, Yuji; Kasagi, Nobuhide

    An adjoint-based shape optimization method of heat exchangers, which takes into account the heat transfer performance with the pressure loss penalty, is proposed, and its effectiveness is examined through a series of numerical simulation. Undulated heat transfer surface is optimized under an isothermal heated condition based on the variational method with the first derivative of the cost function, which is determined by an adjoint analysis of momentum and heat transfer. When applied to a modeled heat-exchanger passage with a pair of oblique wavy walls, the present optimization method refines the duct shape so as to enhance the heat transfer while suppressing the flow separation. It is shown that the j/f factor is further increased by 4% from the best value of the initial obliquely wavy duct. The effects of the initial wave amplitude upon the shape evolution process are also investigated.

  7. Using High Resolution Design Spaces for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This paper explains why high resolution design spaces encourage traditional airfoil optimization algorithms to generate noisy shape modifications, which lead to inaccurate linear predictions of aerodynamic coefficients and potential failure of descent methods. By using auxiliary drag constraints for a simultaneous drag reduction at all design points and the least shape distortion to achieve the targeted drag reduction, an improved algorithm generates relatively smooth optimal airfoils with no severe off-design performance degradation over a range of flight conditions, in high resolution design spaces parameterized by cubic B-spline functions. Simulation results using FUN2D in Euler flows are included to show the capability of the robust aerodynamic shape optimization method over a range of flight conditions.

  8. Optimal shapes of surface-slip driven self-propelled swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2012-11-01

    If one defines the swimming efficiency of a microorganism as the power needed to move it against viscous drag, divided by the total dissipated power, one usually finds values no better than 1%. In order to find out how close this is to the theoretically achievable optimum, we first introduced a new efficiency measure at the level of a single cilium or an infinite ciliated surface and numerically determined the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. In the following we also determined the optimal shape of a swimmer such that the total power is minimal while maintaining the volume and the swimming speed. The resulting shape depends strongly on the allowed maximum curvature. When sufficient curvature is allowed the optimal swimmer exhibits two protrusions along the symmetry axis. The results show that prolate swimmers such as Paramecium have an efficiency that is ~ 20% higher than that of a spherical body, whereas some microorganisms have shapes that allow even higher efficiency.

  9. String-averaging incremental subgradients for constrained convex optimization with applications to reconstruction of tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massambone de Oliveira, Rafael; Salomão Helou, Elias; Fontoura Costa, Eduardo

    2016-11-01

    We present a method for non-smooth convex minimization which is based on subgradient directions and string-averaging techniques. In this approach, the set of available data is split into sequences (strings) and a given iterate is processed independently along each string, possibly in parallel, by an incremental subgradient method (ISM). The end-points of all strings are averaged to form the next iterate. The method is useful to solve sparse and large-scale non-smooth convex optimization problems, such as those arising in tomographic imaging. A convergence analysis is provided under realistic, standard conditions. Numerical tests are performed in a tomographic image reconstruction application, showing good performance for the convergence speed when measured as the decrease ratio of the objective function, in comparison to classical ISM.

  10. Application of shape-based similarity query for aerodynamic optimization of wind tunnel primary nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolář, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The aerodynamic shape optimization of the supersonic flat nozzle is the aim of proposed paper. The nozzle discussed, is applied as a primary nozzle of the inlet part of supersonic wind tunnel. Supersonic nozzles of the measure area inlet parts need to guarantee several requirements of flow properties and quality. Mach number and minimal differences between real and required velocity and turbulence profiles at the nozzle exit are the most important parameters to meet. The aerodynamic shape optimization of the flat 2D nozzle in CFD is employed to reach as uniform exit velocity profile as possible, with the mean Mach number 1.4. Optimization process does not use any of standard routines of global or local optimum searching. Instead, newly formed routine, which exploits shape-based oriented sequence of nozzles, is used to research within whole discretized parametric space. The movement within optimization process is not driven by gradient or evolutionary too, instead, the Path of Minimal Shape Deformation is followed. Dynamic mesh approach is used to deform the shape and mesh from the actual nozzle to the subsequent one. Dynamic deformation of mesh allows to speed up whole converging process as an initialization of flow at the newly formed mesh is based on afore-computed shape. Shape-based similarity query in field of supersonic nozzles is discussed and applied. Evolutionary technique with genetic algorithm is used to search for minimal deformational path. As a result, the best variant from the set of solved shapes is analyzed at the base of momentum coefficient and desired Mach number at the nozzle exit.

  11. Optimization of the heating surface shape in the contact melting problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Cheng, Shangmo

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of contact melting by the migrating heat source with an arbitrary shaped isothermal heating surface is presented. After the substantiated simplification, the governing equations are transformed to the convenient equations for engineering calculations relationships. Analytical solutions are used for numerical prediction of optimal shape of the heating surface. The problem is investigated for the constant and for temperature dependent physical properties of the melt.

  12. Optimal shaping of acoustic resonators for the generation of high-amplitude standing waves.

    PubMed

    Červenka, Milan; Šoltés, Martin; Bednařík, Michal

    2014-09-01

    Within this paper, optimal shaping of acoustic resonators for the generation of high-amplitude standing waves through the use of evolutionary algorithms is discussed. The resonator shapes are described using sets of control points interconnected with cubic-splines. Positions of the control points are calculated by means of an evolutionary algorithm in order to maximize acoustic pressure amplitude at a given point of the resonator cavity. As an objective function for the optimization procedure, numerical solution of one-dimensional linear wave equation taking into account boundary-layer dissipation is used. Resonator shapes maximizing acoustic pressure amplitude are found in case of a piston, shaker, or loudspeaker driving. It is shown that the optimum resonator shapes depend on the method of driving. In all the cases, acoustic field attains higher amplitude in the optimized resonators than in simple-shaped non-optimized resonators of similar dimensions. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data in the case of a loudspeaker driving, good agreement of which is achieved.

  13. Optimization and control of the plasma shape and current profile in noncircular cross-section tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.W.; Bernard, L.C.; Chan, V.S.; Davidson, R.H.; Dobrott, D.R.; Helton, F.J.; Miller, R.L.; Pfeiffer, W.; Waltz, R.E.; Wang, T.S.

    1980-06-01

    High-..beta.. equilibria which are stable to all ideal MHD modes are found by optimizing the plasma shape and current profile for doublets, up-down asymmetric dees, and symmetric dees. The ideal MHD stability of these equilibria for low toroidal mode number n is analyzed with a global MHD stability code, GATO. The stability to high-n modes is analyzed with a localized ballooning code, BLOON. The attainment of high ..beta.. is facilitated by an automated optimization search on shape and current parameters. The equilibria are calculated with a free-boundary equilibrium code using coils appropriate for the Doublet III experimental device. The optimal equilibria are characterized by broad current profiles with values of ..beta../sub poloidal/ approx. =1. Experimental realization of the shapes and current profiles giving the highest ..beta.. limits is explored with a 1 1/2-D transport code, which simulates the time evolution of the 2-D MHD equilibrium while calculating consistent current profiles from a 1-D transport model. Transport simulations indicate that nearly optimal shapes may be obtained provided that the currents in the field-shaping coils are appropriately programmed and the plasma current profile is sufficiently broad. Obtaining broad current profiles is possible by current ramping, neutral beam heating, and electron cyclotron heating. With combinations of these techniques it is possible to approach the optimum ..beta.. predicted by the MHD theory.

  14. Optimization of field-free molecular alignment by phase-shaped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hertz, E.; Rouzee, A.; Guerin, S.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.

    2007-03-15

    We theoretically demonstrate the optimization of field-free molecular alignment by phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulses. The effect is assessed in O{sub 2} at T=60 K under realistic conditions of intensity and pulse shaping. The spectral laser phase is sampled through 128 control parameters and a self-learning evolutionary algorithm combined with a nonperturbative regime calculation is used in order to design the specific phase that maximizes the degree of alignment. The postpulse molecular alignment appears significantly enhanced compared to a Fourier-transform-limited pulse of same energy. The analysis of the target state reveals that the solution is close to the optimal one.

  15. Block-coordinate Gauss-Newton optimization and constrained monotone regression for image registration in the presence of outlier objects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Kiryung

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we propose the block-coordinate Gauss- Newton/regression method in order to conduct a correlation-based registration considering the intensity difference between images in the presence of outlier objects. In the proposed method, the parameters are decomposed into two blocks, one of which is for the spatial registration and the other for the intensity compensation. The two blocks are sequentially updated by the Gauss-Newton update and the polynomial regression, respectively. Because of the separated blocks, we can perform a joint optimization with low computational complexity and high implementation flexibility. For example, we apply separately appropriate scaling techniques to the parameter blocks for a stable and fast convergence of the algorithm. Furthermore, we apply the constrained monotone regression with a robust outlier detection scheme for the intensity compensation block. From numerical results, it is shown that the proposed algorithm more effectively performs a correlation-based registration considering the intensity difference alleviating the influence of the outlier objects compared to the traditional registration algorithms that perform the joint optimization.

  16. Bio-inspired varying subspace based computational framework for a class of nonlinear constrained optimal trajectory planning problems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Li, N

    2014-09-01

    Biological species have produced many simple but efficient rules in their complex and critical survival activities such as hunting and mating. A common feature observed in several biological motion strategies is that the predator only moves along paths in a carefully selected or iteratively refined subspace (or manifold), which might be able to explain why these motion strategies are effective. In this paper, a unified linear algebraic formulation representing such a predator-prey relationship is developed to simplify the construction and refinement process of the subspace (or manifold). Specifically, the following three motion strategies are studied and modified: motion camouflage, constant absolute target direction and local pursuit. The framework constructed based on this varying subspace concept could significantly reduce the computational cost in solving a class of nonlinear constrained optimal trajectory planning problems, particularly for the case with severe constraints. Two non-trivial examples, a ground robot and a hypersonic aircraft trajectory optimization problem, are used to show the capabilities of the algorithms in this new computational framework.

  17. A Numerical Comparison of Barrier and Modified Barrier Methods for Large-Scale Bound-Constrained Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Stephen G.; Polyak, R.; Sofer, Ariela

    1994-01-01

    When a classical barrier method is applied to the solution of a nonlinear programming problem with inequality constraints, the Hessian matrix of the barrier function becomes increasingly ill-conditioned as the solution is approached. As a result, it may be desirable to consider alternative numerical algorithms. We compare the performance of two methods motivated by barrier functions. The first is a stabilized form of the classical barrier method, where a numerically stable approximation to the Newton direction is used when the barrier parameter is small. The second is a modified barrier method where a barrier function is applied to a shifted form of the problem, and the resulting barrier terms are scaled by estimates of the optimal Lagrange multipliers. The condition number of the Hessian matrix of the resulting modified barrier function remains bounded as the solution to the constrained optimization problem is approached. Both of these techniques can be used in the context of a truncated-Newton method, and hence can be applied to large problems, as well as on parallel computers. In this paper, both techniques are applied to problems with bound constraints and we compare their practical behavior.

  18. Cross-layer protocols optimized for real-time multimedia services in energy-constrained mobile ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2003-07-01

    Mobile ad hoc networking (MANET) supports self-organizing, mobile infrastructures and enables an autonomous network of mobile nodes that can operate without a wired backbone. Ad hoc networks are characterized by multihop, wireless connectivity via packet radios and by the need for efficient dynamic protocols. All routers are mobile and can establish connectivity with other nodes only when they are within transmission range. Importantly, ad hoc wireless nodes are resource-constrained, having limited processing, memory, and battery capacity. Delivery of high quality-ofservice (QoS), real-time multimedia services from Internet-based applications over a MANET is a challenge not yet achieved by proposed Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) ad hoc network protocols in terms of standard performance metrics such as end-to-end throughput, packet error rate, and delay. In the distributed operations of route discovery and maintenance, strong interaction occurs across MANET protocol layers, in particular, the physical, media access control (MAC), network, and application layers. The QoS requirements are specified for the service classes by the application layer. The cross-layer design must also satisfy the battery-limited energy constraints, by minimizing the distributed power consumption at the nodes and of selected routes. Interactions across the layers are modeled in terms of the set of concatenated design parameters including associated energy costs. Functional dependencies of the QoS metrics are described in terms of the concatenated control parameters. New cross-layer designs are sought that optimize layer interdependencies to achieve the "best" QoS available in an energy-constrained, time-varying network. The protocol design, based on a reactive MANET protocol, adapts the provisioned QoS to dynamic network conditions and residual energy capacities. The cross-layer optimization is based on stochastic dynamic programming conditions derived from time-dependent models of

  19. Shape optimization of single- and two-element airfoils on multiblock grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacasse, James M.; Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    A multiblock, discrete sensitivity analysis method is used to couple a direct optimization method and a flow analysis method. The domain is divided into smaller subdomains for which the sensitivities are obtained separately. Then, an effective sensitivity equation is solved to complete the coupling of all the sensitivity information. The flow analysis is based on the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations solved by an implicit, upwind-biased, finite-volume method. The method of feasible directions is used for the present gradient-based optimization approach. First, a transonic airfoil is optimized to investigate the behavior of the method in highly nonlinear flows as well as the effect of different blocking strategies on the procedure. A supercritical airfoil is produced from an initially symmetric airfoil with multiblocking affecting the path but not the final shape. Secondly, a two-element airfoil is shape optimized in subsonic flow to demonstrate the present method's capability of shaping aerodynamically interfering elements simultaneously. For a very low and a very high Reynolds number cases, the shape of the main airfoil and the flap are optimized to yield improved lift-to-drag ratios.

  20. On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. These approaches are implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

  1. Scheduling Multilevel Deadline-Constrained Scientific Workflows on Clouds Based on Cost Optimization

    DOE PAGES

    Malawski, Maciej; Figiela, Kamil; Bubak, Marian; Deelman, Ewa; Nabrzyski, Jarek

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a cost optimization model for scheduling scientific workflows on IaaS clouds such as Amazon EC2 or RackSpace. We assume multiple IaaS clouds with heterogeneous virtual machine instances, with limited number of instances per cloud and hourly billing. Input and output data are stored on a cloud object store such as Amazon S3. Applications are scientific workflows modeled as DAGs as in the Pegasus Workflow Management System. We assume that tasks in the workflows are grouped into levels of identical tasks. Our model is specified using mathematical programming languages (AMPL and CMPL) and allows us to minimize themore » cost of workflow execution under deadline constraints. We present results obtained using our model and the benchmark workflows representing real scientific applications in a variety of domains. The data used for evaluation come from the synthetic workflows and from general purpose cloud benchmarks, as well as from the data measured in our own experiments with Montage, an astronomical application, executed on Amazon EC2 cloud. We indicate how this model can be used for scenarios that require resource planning for scientific workflows and their ensembles.« less

  2. Exploring the relationship between vibrational mode locality and coupling using constrained optimization.

    PubMed

    Molina, Andrew; Smereka, Peter; Zimmerman, Paul M

    2016-03-28

    The use of alternate coordinate systems as a means to improve the efficiency and accuracy of anharmonic vibrational structure analysis has seen renewed interest in recent years. While normal modes (which diagonalize the mass-weighted Hessian matrix) are a typical choice, the delocalized nature of this basis makes it less optimal when anharmonicity is in play. When a set of modes is not designed to treat anharmonicity, anharmonic effects will contribute to inter-mode coupling in an uncontrolled fashion. These effects can be mitigated by introducing locality, but this comes at its own cost of potentially large second-order coupling terms. Herein, a method is described which partially localizes vibrations to connect the fully delocalized and fully localized limits. This allows a balance between the treatment of harmonic and anharmonic coupling, which minimizes the error that arises from neglected coupling terms. Partially localized modes are investigated for a range of model systems including a tetramer of hydrogen fluoride, water dimer, ethene, diphenylethane, and stilbene. Generally, partial localization reaches ∼75% of maximal locality while introducing less than ∼30% of the harmonic coupling of the fully localized system. Furthermore, partial localization produces mode pairs that are spatially separated and thus weakly coupled to one another. It is likely that this property can be exploited in the creation of model Hamiltonians that omit the coupling parameters of the distant (and therefore uncoupled) pairs. PMID:27036431

  3. Optimal design of a shape memory alloy actuated composite structure with iterative finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widdle, Richard D., Jr.; Grimshaw, Matthew T.; Shome, Moushumi

    2009-03-01

    A method is described for solving an inverse design problem to find the unassembled, stress-free component shapes of a structure thatis integrally actuated with shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators. Morphing and multifunctional structures are of interest in the aerospace industry becasue of the potential for improving structural and aerodynamic performance across multiple operating conditions. The focus of this work is on structures that are morphed with SMA flexural actuators. For the case where the geometry is known for unassembled components, assembly can be simulated to find the assembled shapes of the morphing structure. In the usual design case, however, only the desired shapes as assembled are known in multiple actuation states, and the corresponding unassembled shapes must be determined by an iterative solution process. An iterative finite element analysis approach to this problem is reported here. First an initial guess for the unassembled shapes is made and assembly is simulated with the finite element method. The resulting shapes are found for both SMA phases and compared with the desired shapes. A gradient-based optimization method is employed to update the initial geometry and iteration continues until the desired shapes are achieved. A simplified method of modeling the SMA material behavior is used for computational efficiently. It is found that this approach provides a practical way to solve the inverse design problem for structures that are integrally actuated with SMA material.

  4. Potential of the pseudo-inverse method as a constrained static optimization for musculo-tendon forces prediction.

    PubMed

    Moissenet, Florent; Chèze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2012-06-01

    Inverse dynamics combined with a constrained static optimization analysis has often been proposed to solve the muscular redundancy problem. Typically, the optimization problem consists in a cost function to be minimized and some equality and inequality constraints to be fulfilled. Penalty-based and Lagrange multipliers methods are common optimization methods for the equality constraints management. More recently, the pseudo-inverse method has been introduced in the field of biomechanics. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability and the efficiency of this new method to solve the muscular redundancy problem, by comparing respectively the musculo-tendon forces prediction and its cost-effectiveness against common optimization methods. Since algorithm efficiency and equality constraints fulfillment highly belong to the optimization method, a two-phase procedure is proposed in order to identify and compare the complexity of the cost function, the number of iterations needed to find a solution and the computational time of the penalty-based method, the Lagrange multipliers method and pseudo-inverse method. Using a 2D knee musculo-skeletal model in an isometric context, the study of the cost functions isovalue curves shows that the solution space is 2D with the penalty-based method, 3D with the Lagrange multipliers method and 1D with the pseudo-inverse method. The minimal cost function area (defined as the area corresponding to 5% over the minimal cost) obtained for the pseudo-inverse method is very limited and along the solution space line, whereas the minimal cost function area obtained for other methods are larger or more complex. Moreover, when using a 3D lower limb musculo-skeletal model during a gait cycle simulation, the pseudo-inverse method provides the lowest number of iterations while Lagrange multipliers and pseudo-inverse method have almost the same computational time. The pseudo-inverse method, by providing a better suited cost function and an

  5. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using A Real-Number-Encoded Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for aerodynamic shape optimization using a genetic algorithm with real number encoding is presented. The algorithm is used to optimize three different problems, a simple hill climbing problem, a quasi-one-dimensional nozzle problem using an Euler equation solver and a three-dimensional transonic wing problem using a nonlinear potential solver. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm is easy to implement and extremely reliable, being relatively insensitive to design space noise.

  6. Resistance spot welding of ultra-fine grained steel sheets produced by constrained groove pressing: Optimization and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Khodabakhshi, F.; Kazeminezhad, M. Kokabi, A.H.

    2012-07-15

    Constrained groove pressing as a severe plastic deformation method is utilized to produce ultra-fine grained low carbon steel sheets. The ultra-fine grained sheets are joined via resistance spot welding process and the characteristics of spot welds are investigated. Resistance spot welding process is optimized for welding of the sheets with different severe deformations and their results are compared with those of as-received samples. The effects of failure mode and expulsion on the performance of ultra-fine grained sheet spot welds have been investigated in the present paper and the welding current and time of resistance spot welding process according to these subjects are optimized. Failure mode and failure load obtained in tensile-shear test, microhardness, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope images have been used to describe the performance of spot welds. The region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. The results show that optimum welding parameters (welding current and welding time) for ultra-fine grained sheets are shifted to lower values with respect to those for as-received specimens. In ultra-fine grained sheets, one new region is formed named recrystallized zone in addition to fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal. It is shown that microstructures of different zones in ultra-fine grained sheets are finer than those of as-received sheets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resistance spot welding process is optimized for joining of UFG steel sheets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum welding current and time are decreased with increasing the CGP pass number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness at BM, HAZ, FZ and recrystallized zone is enhanced due to CGP.

  7. Shape Optimization of Supersonic Turbines Using Response Surface and Neural Network Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papila, Nilay; Shyy, Wei; Griffin, Lisa W.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Turbine performance directly affects engine specific impulse, thrust-to-weight ratio, and cost in a rocket propulsion system. A global optimization framework combining the radial basis neural network (RBNN) and the polynomial-based response surface method (RSM) is constructed for shape optimization of a supersonic turbine. Based on the optimized preliminary design, shape optimization is performed for the first vane and blade of a 2-stage supersonic turbine, involving O(10) design variables. The design of experiment approach is adopted to reduce the data size needed by the optimization task. It is demonstrated that a major merit of the global optimization approach is that it enables one to adaptively revise the design space to perform multiple optimization cycles. This benefit is realized when an optimal design approaches the boundary of a pre-defined design space. Furthermore, by inspecting the influence of each design variable, one can also gain insight into the existence of multiple design choices and select the optimum design based on other factors such as stress and materials considerations.

  8. Constraining the Physical Properties of Meteor Stream Particles by Light Curve Shapes Using the Virtual Meteor Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschny, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Barentsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Different authors have produced models for the physical properties of meteoroids based on the shape of a meteor's light curve, typically from short observing campaigns. We here analyze the height profiles and light curves of approx.200 double-station meteors from the Leonids and Perseids using data from the Virtual Meteor Observatory, to demonstrate that with this web-based meteor database it is possible to analyze very large datasets from different authors in a consistent way. We compute the average heights for begin point, maximum luminosity, and end heights for Perseids and Leonids. We also compute the skew of the light curve, usually called the F-parameter. The results compare well with other author's data. We display the average light curve in a novel way to assess the light curve shape in addition to using the F-parameter. While the Perseids show a peaked light curve, the average Leonid light curve has a more flat peak. This indicates that the particle distribution of Leonid meteors can be described by a Gaussian distribution; the Perseids can be described with a power law. The skew for Leonids is smaller than for Perseids, indicating that the Leonids are more fragile than the Perseids.

  9. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, R D; Arango, C A; Reyes, A

    2016-07-21

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies. PMID:27448862

  10. Sensitivity Analysis For Determination The Optimal Blank Shape For Hydromechanical Deep Drawing Of Steel Cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, S. A.; Hossinzade, M.

    2011-08-01

    In the deep drawing of cups, the earing defects are caused by planar anisotropy in the sheet. Several methods have been developed to predicting the optimal blank to avoid the formation of ears. In the deep drawing processes, the use of an optimal blank shape not only saves the material but also it may reduce the occurrence of defects e.g. wrinkling and tearing. In addition, finding the desirable flange contour, eliminate the trimming step in the deep drawing of parts with flange. In this study, a systematic method based on sensitivity analysis has been used to find the optimal blank to obtain a desirable flange contour for a cylindrical cup by hydromechanical deep drawing process. With the aid of a well-known dynamic explicit analysis code ABAQUS; optimum initial blank shape has been obtained. With the predicted optimal blank, both computer simulation and experiment are performed and the effect of blank shape on the some parameters such as thickness distribution and blank holder force during the forming process were investigated. It is shown that formed cup with an optimum blank shape has a better thickness distribution in the both rolled and perpendicular of rolled direction. And it was shown that the blank holder force of modified blank is higher than circular blank.

  11. Three-dimensional canard-wing shape optimization in aircraft cruise and maneuver environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Silva, B. M. E.; Carmichael, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a numerical technique for canard-wing shape optimization at two operating conditions. For purposes of simplicity, a mean surface wing paneling code is employed for the aerodynamic calculations. The optimization procedures are based on the method of feasible directions. The shape functions for describing the thickness, camber, and twist are based on polynomial representations. The primary design requirements imposed restrictions on the canard and wing volumes and on the lift coefficients at the operating conditions. Results indicate that significant improvements in minimum drag and lift-to-drag ratio are possible with reasonable aircraft geometries. Calculations were done for supersonic speeds with Mach numbers ranging from 1 to 6. Planforms were mainly of a delta shape with aspect ratio of 1.

  12. Efficient Gradient-Based Shape Optimization Methodology Using Inviscid/Viscous CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    The formerly developed preconditioned-biconjugate-gradient (PBCG) solvers for the analysis and the sensitivity equations had resulted in very large error reductions per iteration; quadratic convergence was achieved whenever the solution entered the domain of attraction to the root. Its memory requirement was also lower as compared to a direct inversion solver. However, this memory requirement was high enough to preclude the realistic, high grid-density design of a practical 3D geometry. This limitation served as the impetus to the first-year activity (March 9, 1995 to March 8, 1996). Therefore, the major activity for this period was the development of the low-memory methodology for the discrete-sensitivity-based shape optimization. This was accomplished by solving all the resulting sets of equations using an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) approach. The results indicated that shape optimization problems which required large numbers of grid points could be resolved with a gradient-based approach. Therefore, to better utilize the computational resources, it was recommended that a number of coarse grid cases, using the PBCG method, should initially be conducted to better define the optimization problem and the design space, and obtain an improved initial shape. Subsequently, a fine grid shape optimization, which necessitates using the ADI method, should be conducted to accurately obtain the final optimized shape. The other activity during this period was the interaction with the members of the Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Methods Branch of Langley Research Center during one stage of their investigation to develop an adjoint-variable sensitivity method using the viscous flow equations. This method had algorithmic similarities to the variational sensitivity methods and the control-theory approach. However, unlike the prior studies, it was considered for the three-dimensional, viscous flow equations. The major accomplishment in the second period of this project

  13. Demonstration of Automatically-Generated Adjoint Code for Use in Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence; Carle, Alan; Fagan, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Gradient-based optimization requires accurate derivatives of the objective function and constraints. These gradients may have previously been obtained by manual differentiation of analysis codes, symbolic manipulators, finite-difference approximations, or existing automatic differentiation (AD) tools such as ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORTRAN). Each of these methods has certain deficiencies, particularly when applied to complex, coupled analyses with many design variables. Recently, a new AD tool called ADJIFOR (Automatic Adjoint Generation in FORTRAN), based upon ADIFOR, was developed and demonstrated. Whereas ADIFOR implements forward-mode (direct) differentiation throughout an analysis program to obtain exact derivatives via the chain rule of calculus, ADJIFOR implements the reverse-mode counterpart of the chain rule to obtain exact adjoint form derivatives from FORTRAN code. Automatically-generated adjoint versions of the widely-used CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an algebraic wing grid generation code were obtained with just a few hours processing time using the ADJIFOR tool. The codes were verified for accuracy and were shown to compute the exact gradient of the wing lift-to-drag ratio, with respect to any number of shape parameters, in about the time required for 7 to 20 function evaluations. The codes have now been executed on various computers with typical memory and disk space for problems with up to 129 x 65 x 33 grid points, and for hundreds to thousands of independent variables. These adjoint codes are now used in a gradient-based aerodynamic shape optimization problem for a swept, tapered wing. For each design iteration, the optimization package constructs an approximate, linear optimization problem, based upon the current objective function, constraints, and gradient values. The optimizer subroutines are called within a design loop employing the approximate linear problem until an optimum shape is found, the design loop

  14. Optimal input shaping for Fisher identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberger, Michael J.

    This dissertation examines the fundamental challenge of optimally shaping input trajectories to maximize parameter identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models. Identifiability is a property from information theory that determines the solvability of parameter estimation for mathematical models using input-output measurements. This dissertation creates a framework that exploits the Fisher information metric to quantify the level of battery parameter identifiability, optimizes this metric through input shaping, and facilitates faster and more accurate estimation. The popularity of lithium-ion batteries is growing significantly in the energy storage domain, especially for stationary and transportation applications. While these cells have excellent power and energy densities, they are plagued with safety and lifespan concerns. These concerns are often resolved in the industry through conservative current and voltage operating limits, which reduce the overall performance and still lack robustness in detecting catastrophic failure modes. New advances in automotive battery management systems mitigate these challenges through the incorporation of model-based control to increase performance, safety, and lifespan. To achieve these goals, model-based control requires accurate parameterization of the battery model. While many groups in the literature study a variety of methods to perform battery parameter estimation, a fundamental issue of poor parameter identifiability remains apparent for lithium-ion battery models. This fundamental challenge of battery identifiability is studied extensively in the literature, and some groups are even approaching the problem of improving the ability to estimate the model parameters. The first approach is to add additional sensors to the battery to gain more information that is used for estimation. The other main approach is to shape the input trajectories to increase the amount of information that can be gained from input

  15. Shape optimization of stress concentration-free lattice for self-expandable Nitinol stent-grafts.

    PubMed

    Masoumi Khalil Abad, Ehsan; Pasini, Damiano; Cecere, Renzo

    2012-04-01

    In a mechanical component, stress-concentration is one of the factors contributing to reduce fatigue life. This paper presents a design methodology based on shape optimization to improve the fatigue safety factor and increase the radial stiffness of Nitinol self-expandable stent-grafts. A planar lattice free of stress concentrators is proposed for the synthesis of a stent with smooth cell shapes. Design optimization is systematically applied to minimize the curvature and reduce the bending strain of the elements defining the lattice cells. A novel cell geometry with improved fatigue life and radial supportive force is introduced for Nitinol self-expandable stent-grafts used for treating abdominal aortic aneurism. A parametric study comparing the optimized stent-graft to recent stent designs demonstrates that the former exhibits a superior anchoring performance and a reduction of the risk of fatigue failure. PMID:22304844

  16. Overview of Sensitivity Analysis and Shape Optimization for Complex Aerodynamic Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of some of the more recent advances in steady aerodynamic shape-design sensitivity analysis and optimization, based on advanced computational fluid dynamics. The focus here is on those methods particularly well- suited to the study of geometrically complex configurations and their potentially complex associated flow physics. When nonlinear state equations are considered in the optimization process, difficulties are found in the application of sensitivity analysis. Some techniques for circumventing such difficulties are currently being explored and are included here. Attention is directed to methods that utilize automatic differentiation to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for both complex configurations and complex flow physics. Various examples of shape-design sensitivity analysis for unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics algorithms are demonstrated for different formulations of the sensitivity equations. Finally, the use of advanced, unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics in multidisciplinary analyses and multidisciplinary sensitivity analyses within future optimization processes is recommended and encouraged.

  17. Shape optimization of axisymmetric solids with the finite cell method using a fixed grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Zhu, Ji-Hong; Xu, Zhao; Cai, Shou-Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a design procedure extending the B-spline based finite cell method into shape optimization is developed for axisymmetric solids involving the centrifugal force effect. We first replace the traditional conforming mesh in the finite element method with structured cells that are fixed during the whole design process with a view to avoid the sophisticated re-meshing and eventual mesh distortion. Then, B-spline shape functions are further implemented to yield a high-order continuity field along the cell boundary in stress analysis. By means of the implicit description of the shape boundary, stress sensitivity is analytically derived with respect to shape design variables. Finally, we illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed protocol by several numerical test cases as well as a whole design procedure carried out on an aeronautic turbine disk.

  18. Optimal Geometry Aspect Ratio of Ellipse-Shaped- Surrounding-Gate Nanowire Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Theoretically ideally round shape of the surrounding gate may not always guarantee because of limitations of the fabrication process in surrounding-gate nanowire field effect transistors (FETs). These limitations may lead to the formation of an ellipse-shaped surrounding gate with major and minor axes of different lengths. In this paper, we for the first time study the electrical characteristics of ellipse-shaped-surrounding-gate silicon nanowire FETs with different ratio of the major and minor axes. By simultaneously simulating engineering acceptable magnitudes of the threshold voltage roll-off, the drain induced barrier lowering, the subthreshold swing, and the on-/off-state current ratio, an optimal geometry aspect ratio between the channel length and the major and minor axes of the ellipse-shaped-surrounding-gate nanowire FET is concluded. PMID:27398546

  19. Optimal design for fluidic systems: Topology and shape optimization with the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingen, Georg

    The objective of this work is the development of a formal design approach for fluidic systems, providing conceptually novel design layouts with the provision of only boundary conditions and some basic parameters. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is chosen as a flow model due to its simplicity, inherent use of immersed boundary methods, parallelizability, and general flexibility. Immersed Boundary Methods in the form of a Brinkmann penalization are used to continuously vary the flow from fluid to solid, leading to a material distribution based boundary representation. An analytical adjoint sensitivity analysis is derived for the lattice Boltzmann method, enabling the combination of the lattice Boltzmann method with optimization techniques. This results in the first application of design optimization with the lattice Boltzmann method. In particular, the first LBM topology optimization framework for 2D and 3D problems is developed and validated with numerical design optimization problems for drag and pressure drop minimization. To improve the parallel scalability of the LBM sensitivity analysis and permit the solution of large 2D and 3D problems, iterative solvers are studied and a parallel GMRES Schur Complement method is applied to the solution of the linear adjoint problem in the LBM sensitivity analysis. This leads to improved parallel scalability through reduced memory use and algorithmic speedup. The potential of the developed design approach for fluidic systems is illustrated with the optimization of a 3D dual-objective fixed-geometry valve. The use of a parametric level-set method coupled with the LBM material distribution based topology optimization framework is shown to provide further versatility for design applications. Finally, the use of a penalty formulation of the fluid volume constraint permits the topology optimization of flows at moderate Reynolds numbers for a steady-state pipe bend application. Concluding, this work has led to the development of

  20. An Algorithm for Real-Time Optimal Photocurrent Estimation Including Transient Detection for Resource-Constrained Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemcov, Michael; Crill, Brendan; Ryan, Matthew; Staniszewski, Zak

    2016-06-01

    Mega-pixel charge-integrating detectors are common in near-IR imaging applications. Optimal signal-to-noise ratio estimates of the photocurrents, which are particularly important in the low-signal regime, are produced by fitting linear models to sequential reads of the charge on the detector. Algorithms that solve this problem have a long history, but can be computationally intensive. Furthermore, the cosmic ray background is appreciable for these detectors in Earth orbit, particularly above the Earth’s magnetic poles and the South Atlantic Anomaly, and on-board reduction routines must be capable of flagging affected pixels. In this paper, we present an algorithm that generates optimal photocurrent estimates and flags random transient charge generation from cosmic rays, and is specifically designed to fit on a computationally restricted platform. We take as a case study the Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization, and Ices Explorer (SPHEREx), a NASA Small Explorer astrophysics experiment concept, and show that the algorithm can easily fit in the resource-constrained environment of such a restricted platform. Detailed simulations of the input astrophysical signals and detector array performance are used to characterize the fitting routines in the presence of complex noise properties and charge transients. We use both Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera-3 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer to develop an empirical understanding of the susceptibility of near-IR detectors in low earth orbit and build a model for realistic cosmic ray energy spectra and rates. We show that our algorithm generates an unbiased estimate of the true photocurrent that is identical to that from a standard line fitting package, and characterize the rate, energy, and timing of both detected and undetected transient events. This algorithm has significant potential for imaging with charge-integrating detectors in astrophysics, earth science, and remote

  1. Effects of Loading and Constraining Conditions on the Thermomechanical Fatigue Life of NiTi Shape Memory Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scirè Mammano, G.; Dragoni, E.

    2014-07-01

    The availability of engineering strength data on shape memory alloys (SMAs) under cyclic thermal activation (thermomechanical fatigue) is central to the rational design of smart actuators based on these materials. Test results on SMAs under thermomechanical fatigue are scarce in the technical literature, and even the few data that are available are mainly limited to constant-stress loading. Since the SMA elements used within actuators are normally biased by elastic springs or by antagonist SMA elements, their stress states are far from being constant in operation. The mismatch between actual working conditions and laboratory settings leads to suboptimal designs and undermines the prediction of the actuator lifetime. This paper aims at bridging the gap between experiment and reality by completing an experimental campaign involving four fatigue test conditions, which cover most of the typical situations occurring in practice: constant stress, constant-strain, constant stress with limited maximum strain, and linear stress-strain variation with limited maximum strain. The results from the first three test settings, recovered from the previously published works, are critically reviewed and compared with the outcome of the newly performed tests under the fourth arrangement (linear stress-strain variation). General design recommendations emerging from the experimental data are put forward for engineering use.

  2. Optimized mirror shape tuning using beam weightings based on distance, angle of incidence, reflectivity, and power.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Yashchuk, Valeriy V

    2016-05-01

    For glancing-incidence optical systems, such as short-wavelength optics used for nano-focusing, incorporating physical factors in the calculations used for shape optimization can improve performance. Wavefront metrology, including the measurement of a mirror's shape or slope, is routinely used as input for mirror figure optimization on mirrors that can be bent, actuated, positioned, or aligned. Modeling shows that when the incident power distribution, distance from focus, angle of incidence, and the spatially varying reflectivity are included in the optimization, higher Strehl ratios can be achieved. Following the works of Maréchal and Mahajan, optimization of the Strehl ratio (for peak intensity with a coherently illuminated system) occurs when the expectation value of the phase error's variance is minimized. We describe an optimization procedure based on regression analysis that incorporates these physical parameters. This approach is suitable for coherently illuminated systems of nearly diffraction-limited quality. Mathematically, this work is an enhancement of the methods commonly applied for ex situ alignment based on uniform weighting of all points on the surface (or a sub-region of the surface). It follows a similar approach to the optimization of apodized and non-uniformly illuminated optical systems. Significantly, it reaches a different conclusion than a more recent approach based on minimization of focal plane ray errors. PMID:27250372

  3. Initial billet and forging dies shape optimization: Application on an axisymetrical forging with a hammer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanjuan; Labergere, Carl; Lafon, Pascal

    2011-05-01

    In metal forming process, the forging die design is the most important step for products quality control. Reasonable dies shape can not only reduce raw material cost but also improving material flow and eliminating defects. The main objective of this paper is to obtain some optimal parameters of the initial billet and forging dies shape according to the simulation results of a two-step metal forming process (platting step and forging step). To develop this metal forming process optimization system several numerical tools are required: geometric modelling (CATIA V5™), FEM analysis (ABAQUS®), work-flow control and optimization computation (MODEFRONTIER®). This study is done in three stages: simulating the two-step metal forming process, building surrogate meta-models to relate response and variables and optimizing the process by using advanced optimization algorithms. In this paper, a two-step axisymmetric metal forming project was studied as an example. By using our simulation model, we get 581 correct real simulation results totally. According to all these real values, we build the surrogate meta-models and obtain Pareto points for a two-objective optimization process. The choice of a solution in all Pareto points will be done by the engineer who can choose his best values according to their criterions of project.

  4. Optimized mirror shape tuning using beam weightings based on distance, angle of incidence, reflectivity, and power.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Yashchuk, Valeriy V

    2016-05-01

    For glancing-incidence optical systems, such as short-wavelength optics used for nano-focusing, incorporating physical factors in the calculations used for shape optimization can improve performance. Wavefront metrology, including the measurement of a mirror's shape or slope, is routinely used as input for mirror figure optimization on mirrors that can be bent, actuated, positioned, or aligned. Modeling shows that when the incident power distribution, distance from focus, angle of incidence, and the spatially varying reflectivity are included in the optimization, higher Strehl ratios can be achieved. Following the works of Maréchal and Mahajan, optimization of the Strehl ratio (for peak intensity with a coherently illuminated system) occurs when the expectation value of the phase error's variance is minimized. We describe an optimization procedure based on regression analysis that incorporates these physical parameters. This approach is suitable for coherently illuminated systems of nearly diffraction-limited quality. Mathematically, this work is an enhancement of the methods commonly applied for ex situ alignment based on uniform weighting of all points on the surface (or a sub-region of the surface). It follows a similar approach to the optimization of apodized and non-uniformly illuminated optical systems. Significantly, it reaches a different conclusion than a more recent approach based on minimization of focal plane ray errors.

  5. Lateral Penumbra Modelling Based Leaf End Shape Optimization for Multileaf Collimator in Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2016-01-01

    Lateral penumbra of multileaf collimator plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Growing evidence has revealed that, for a single-focused multileaf collimator, lateral penumbra width is leaf position dependent and largely attributed to the leaf end shape. In our study, an analytical method for leaf end induced lateral penumbra modelling is formulated using Tangent Secant Theory. Compared with Monte Carlo simulation and ray tracing algorithm, our model serves well the purpose of cost-efficient penumbra evaluation. Leaf ends represented in parametric forms of circular arc, elliptical arc, Bézier curve, and B-spline are implemented. With biobjective function of penumbra mean and variance introduced, genetic algorithm is carried out for approximating the Pareto frontier. Results show that for circular arc leaf end objective function is convex and convergence to optimal solution is guaranteed using gradient based iterative method. It is found that optimal leaf end in the shape of Bézier curve achieves minimal standard deviation, while using B-spline minimum of penumbra mean is obtained. For treatment modalities in clinical application, optimized leaf ends are in close agreement with actual shapes. Taken together, the method that we propose can provide insight into leaf end shape design of multileaf collimator. PMID:27110274

  6. Lateral Penumbra Modelling Based Leaf End Shape Optimization for Multileaf Collimator in Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2016-01-01

    Lateral penumbra of multileaf collimator plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Growing evidence has revealed that, for a single-focused multileaf collimator, lateral penumbra width is leaf position dependent and largely attributed to the leaf end shape. In our study, an analytical method for leaf end induced lateral penumbra modelling is formulated using Tangent Secant Theory. Compared with Monte Carlo simulation and ray tracing algorithm, our model serves well the purpose of cost-efficient penumbra evaluation. Leaf ends represented in parametric forms of circular arc, elliptical arc, Bézier curve, and B-spline are implemented. With biobjective function of penumbra mean and variance introduced, genetic algorithm is carried out for approximating the Pareto frontier. Results show that for circular arc leaf end objective function is convex and convergence to optimal solution is guaranteed using gradient based iterative method. It is found that optimal leaf end in the shape of Bézier curve achieves minimal standard deviation, while using B-spline minimum of penumbra mean is obtained. For treatment modalities in clinical application, optimized leaf ends are in close agreement with actual shapes. Taken together, the method that we propose can provide insight into leaf end shape design of multileaf collimator. PMID:27110274

  7. Shape optimization of three-dimensional stamped and solid automotive components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botkin, M. E.; Yang, R.-J.; Bennett, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The shape optimization of realistic, 3-D automotive components is discussed. The integration of the major parts of the total process: modeling, mesh generation, finite element and sensitivity analysis, and optimization are stressed. Stamped components and solid components are treated separately. For stamped parts a highly automated capability was developed. The problem description is based upon a parameterized boundary design element concept for the definition of the geometry. Automatic triangulation and adaptive mesh refinement are used to provide an automated analysis capability which requires only boundary data and takes into account sensitivity of the solution accuracy to boundary shape. For solid components a general extension of the 2-D boundary design element concept has not been achieved. In this case, the parameterized surface shape is provided using a generic modeling concept based upon isoparametric mapping patches which also serves as the mesh generator. Emphasis is placed upon the coupling of optimization with a commercially available finite element program. To do this it is necessary to modularize the program architecture and obtain shape design sensitivities using the material derivative approach so that only boundary solution data is needed.

  8. Multi-objective shape optimization of runner blade for Kaplan turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, A.; Chirkov, D.; Lyutov, A.; Chemy, S.; Skorospelov, V.; Pylev, I.

    2014-03-01

    Automatic runner shape optimization based on extensive CFD analysis proved to be a useful design tool in hydraulic turbomachinery. Previously the authors developed an efficient method for Francis runner optimization. It was successfully applied to the design of several runners with different specific speeds. In present work this method is extended to the task of a Kaplan runner optimization. Despite of relatively simpler blade shape, Kaplan turbines have several features, complicating the optimization problem. First, Kaplan turbines normally operate in a wide range of discharges, thus CFD analysis of each variant of the runner should be carried out for several operation points. Next, due to a high specific speed, draft tube losses have a great impact on the overall turbine efficiency, and thus should be accurately evaluated. Then, the flow in blade tip and hub clearances significantly affects the velocity profile behind the runner and draft tube behavior. All these features are accounted in the present optimization technique. Parameterization of runner blade surface using 24 geometrical parameters is described in details. For each variant of runner geometry steady state three-dimensional turbulent flow computations are carried out in the domain, including wicket gate, runner, draft tube, blade tip and hub clearances. The objectives are maximization of efficiency in best efficiency and high discharge operation points, with simultaneous minimization of cavitation area on the suction side of the blade. Multiobjective genetic algorithm is used for the solution of optimization problem, requiring the analysis of several thousands of runner variants. The method is applied to optimization of runner shape for several Kaplan turbines with different heads.

  9. Optimal design at inner core of the shaped pyramidal truss structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol

    2013-12-16

    Sandwich material is a type of composite material with lightweight, high strength, good dynamic properties and high bending stiffness-to-weight ratio. This can be found well such structures in the nature (for example, internal structure of bones, plants, etc.). New trend which prefers eco-friendly products and energy efficiency is emerging in industries recently. Demand for materials with high strength and light weight is also increasing. In line with these trends, researches about manufacturing methods of sandwich material have been actively conducted. In this study, a sandwich structure named as “Shaped Pyramidal Truss Structure” is proposed to improve mechanical strength and to apply a manufacturing process suitable for massive production. The new sandwich structure was designed to enhance compressive strength by changing the cross-sectional shape at the central portion of the core. As the next step, optimization of the shape was required. Optimization technique used here was the SZGA(Successive Zooming Genetic Algorithm), which is one of GA(Genetic Algorithm) methods gradually reducing the area of design variable. The objective function was defined as moment of inertia of the cross-sectional shape of the strut. The control points of cubic Bezier curve, which was assumed to be the shape of the cross section, were used as design variables. By using FEM simulation, it was found that the structure exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to the simple design of the prior art.

  10. A theoretical analysis of an optimal chainring shape to maximize crank power during isokinetic pedaling.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Jeffery W; Neptune, Richard R

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have sought to improve cycling performance by altering various aspects of the pedaling motion using novel crank-pedal mechanisms and non-circular chainrings. However, most designs have been based on empirical data and very few have provided significant improvements in cycling performance. The purpose of this study was to use a theoretical framework that included a detailed musculoskeletal model driven by individual muscle actuators, forward dynamic simulations and design optimization to determine if cycling performance (i.e., maximal power output) could be improved by optimizing the chainring shape to maximize average crank power during isokinetic pedaling conditions. The optimization identified a consistent non-circular chainring shape at pedaling rates of 60, 90 and 120 rpm with an average eccentricity of 1.29 that increased crank power by an average of 2.9% compared to a conventional circular chainring. The increase in average crank power was the result of the optimal chainrings slowing down the crank velocity during the downstroke (power phase) to allow muscles to generate power longer and produce more external work. The data also showed that chainrings with higher eccentricity increased negative muscle work following the power phase due to muscle activation-deactivation dynamics. Thus, the chainring shape that maximized average crank power balanced these competing demands by providing enough eccentricity to increase the external work generated by muscles during the power phase while minimizing negative work during the subsequent recovery phase.

  11. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  12. PATH OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED CATHETER FOR ENDOCARDIAL RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Jennifer H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time path optimization and control strategy for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated cardiac ablation catheters, potentially enabling the creation of more precise lesions with reduced procedure times and improved patient outcomes. Catheter tip locations and orientations are optimized using parallel genetic algorithms to produce continuous ablation paths with near normal tissue contact through physician-specified points. A nonlinear multivariable control strategy is presented to compensate for SMA hysteresis, bandwidth limitations, and coupling between system inputs. Simulated and experimental results demonstrate efficient generation of ablation paths and optimal reference trajectories. Closed-loop control of the SMA-actuated catheter along optimized ablation paths is validated experimentally. PMID:25684857

  13. Aerodynamic shape optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for wing and wing-body design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for airfoils and wings in which the shape and the surrounding body-fitted mesh are both generated analytically, and the control is the mapping function. Recently, the method has been implemented for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations using an alternative formulation which employs numerically generated grids, so that it can more easily be extended to treat general configurations. Here results are presented both for the optimization of a swept wing using an analytic mapping, and for the optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using a general mesh.

  14. Optimal Viscosity and Particle Shape of Hyaluronic Acid Filler as a Scaffold for Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Won, Chang-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The authors previously reported that cultured human fibroblasts suspended in a hyaluronic acid filler can produce human dermal matrices with extended in vivo stability in animal and clinical studies. The present study was undertaken to determine the optimal viscosity and particle shape of hyaluronic acid filler as a scaffold for cultured human dermal fibroblasts to enhance the maximal viability of injected cells. The fibroblasts were suspended in either 1 of 3 hyaluronic acid viscosities at 2 different particle shapes. The viscosities used in this study were low (600,000-800,000 centipoises), moderate (2,000,000-4,000,000 centipoises), and high (8,000,000-12,000,000 centipoises). The particle shape was evaluated by testing round and irregular shapes. The fibroblast mixed bioimplants were injected into the back of individual athymic nude mice. The levels of type I collagen were measured using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining at 16 weeks after the injections. Results of FACS demonstrated that the mean cell ratio with human collagens in the moderate viscosity group was greater than those of control, low, and high viscosity groups. An immunohistochemical study showed similar results. The moderate viscosity group demonstrated the highest positive staining of human collagens. However, there were no significant differences between groups of irregular and round shape particles. A hyaluronic acid bioimplant with moderate viscosity is superior to that with low or high viscosity in the viability for human fibroblasts. However, the particle shape does not influence the viability of the fibroblasts.

  15. Optimizing micropattern geometries for cell shape and migration with genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2016-07-11

    Adhesive micropatterns have become a standard tool to control cell shape and function in cell culture. However, the variety of possible patterns is infinitely large and experiments often restrict themselves to established designs. Here we suggest a systematic method to establish novel micropatterns for desired functions using genetic algorithms. The evolutionary fitness of a certain pattern is computed using a cellular Potts model that describes cell behavior on micropattern. We first predict optimal patterns for a desired cell shape. We then optimize ratchet geometries to bias cell migration in a certain direction and find that asymmetric triangles are superior over the symmetric ones often used in experiments. Finally we design geometries which reverse the migration direction of cells when cell density increases due to cell division. PMID:27334659

  16. Optimization of integration limit in the charge comparison method based on signal shape function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhonghai; Zeng, Jun; Zhu, Tonghua; Wang, Yudong; Yang, Chaowen; Zhou, Rong

    2014-10-01

    A novel method is proposed to analyze neutron and gamma-ray signal shapes in liquid scintillation detectors. Specifically, the signal shape functions for a BC501 detector were characterized and a statistical model was used to analyze the discrimination of neutrons and gamma rays. The model varied the starting points of tail integration in the charge comparison method (CCM), and an optimized starting point was determined. Experimental measurements were performed to verify the model, and the results indicated good agreement. For a BC501 scintillator with 8.07 ns and 74.63 ns decay time constants we found optimal time to start the tail integration at 24 ns past the decay maximum.

  17. A study of shape optimization on the metallic nanoparticles for thin-film solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The shape of metallic nanoparticles used to enhance the performance of thin-film solar cells is described by Gielis' superformula and optimized by an evolutionary algorithm. As a result, we have found a lens-like nanoparticle capable of improving the short circuit current density to 19.93 mA/cm2. Compared with a two-scale nanospherical configuration recently reported to synthesize the merits of large and small spheres into a single structure, the optimized nanoparticle enables the solar cell to achieve a further 7.75% improvement in the current density and is much more fabrication friendly due to its simple shape and tolerance to geometrical distortions. PMID:24168131

  18. Controlling the Attitude Maneuvers of Flexible Spacecraft by Using Time-Optimal Shaped Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S.; Koguchi, H.

    1999-04-01

    A three-dimensional rest-to-rest attitude maneuver of flexible spacecraft equipped with on-off reaction jets is studied. Equations of motion of the spacecraft are developed by using Lagrangian formulation. The finite element method is used to discretize elastic deformations of a particular model of satellite with flexible solar panels by modelling the panels as flat plate structures in bending. Under unshaped inputs, the maneuvers induce an undesirable motion of the satellite as well as vibration of the solar panels. Time-optimal and fuel-efficient input shapers are then applied to reduce the residual oscillation of its motion at several natural frequencies in order to get an expected pointing precision of the satellite. Once the shaped inputs are given to the satellite, the performance improves significantly. Results indicate that, the fuel-efficient shaped inputs give smaller maximum deflections of flexible members compared with the time-optimal ones.

  19. Optimal sensor configuration for flexible structures with multi-dimensional mode shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Minwoo; Pakzad, Shamim N.

    2015-05-01

    A framework for deciding the optimal sensor configuration is implemented for civil structures with multi-dimensional mode shapes, which enhances the applicability of structural health monitoring for existing structures. Optimal sensor placement (OSP) algorithms are used to determine the best sensor configuration for structures with a priori knowledge of modal information. The signal strength at each node is evaluated by effective independence and modified variance methods. Euclidean norm of signal strength indices associated with each node is used to expand OSP applicability into flexible structures. The number of sensors for each method is determined using the threshold for modal assurance criterion (MAC) between estimated (from a set of observations) and target mode shapes. Kriging is utilized to infer the modal estimates for unobserved locations with a weighted sum of known neighbors. A Kriging model can be expressed as a sum of linear regression and random error which is assumed as the realization of a stochastic process. This study presents the effects of Kriging parameters for the accurate estimation of mode shapes and the minimum number of sensors. The feasible ranges to satisfy MAC criteria are investigated and used to suggest the adequate searching bounds for associated parameters. The finite element model of a tall building is used to demonstrate the application of optimal sensor configuration. The dynamic modes of flexible structure at centroid are appropriately interpreted into the outermost sensor locations when OSP methods are implemented. Kriging is successfully used to interpolate the mode shapes from a set of sensors and to monitor structures associated with multi-dimensional mode shapes.

  20. Experimental and simulation optimization analysis of the Whipple shields against shaped charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G.; Hameed, A.; Horsfall, I.; Barton, P.; Malik, A. Q.

    2012-06-01

    Occasionally, the Whipple shields are used for the protection of a space station and a satellite against the meteoroids and orbital debris. In the Whipple shields each layer of the shield depletes part of high speed projectile energy either by breaking the projectile or absorbing its energy. Similarly, this investigation uses the Whipple shields against the shaped charge to protect the light armour such as infantry fighting vehicles with a little modification in their design. The unsteady multiple interactions of shaped charge jet with the Whipple shield package against the steady homogeneous target is scrutinized to optimize the shield thickness. Simulations indicate that the shield thickness of 0.75 mm offers an optimum configuration against the shaped charge. Experiments also support this evidence.

  1. Elastically Shaped Wing Optimization and Aircraft Concept for Improved Cruise Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh; Reynolds, Kevin; Kless, James; Aftosmis, Michael; Urnes, James, Sr.; Ippolito, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted tn 2010 by the NASA Innovation Fund Award project entitled "Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept". The study presents three themes in support of meeting national and global aviation challenges of reducing fuel burn for present and future aviation systems. The first theme addresses the drag reduction goal through innovative vehicle configurations via non-planar wing optimization. Two wing candidate concepts have been identified from the wing optimization: a drooped wing shape and an inflected wing shape. The drooped wing shape is a truly biologically inspired wing concept that mimics a seagull wing and could achieve about 5% to 6% drag reduction, which is aerodynamically significant. From a practical perspective, this concept would require new radical changes to the current aircraft development capabilities for new vehicles with futuristic-looking wings such as this concept. The inflected wing concepts could achieve between 3% to 4% drag reduction. While the drag reduction benefit may be less, the inflected-wing concept could have a near-term impact since this concept could be developed within the current aircraft development capabilities. The second theme addresses the drag reduction goal through a new concept of elastic wing shaping control. By aeroelastically tailoring the wing shape with active control to maintain optimal aerodynamics, a significant drag reduction benefit could be realized. A significant reduction in fuel burn for long-range cruise from elastic wing shaping control could be realized. To realize the potential of the elastic wing shaping control concept, the third theme emerges that addresses the drag reduction goal through a new aerodynamic control effector called a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap. Conventional aerodynamic control surfaces are discrete independent surfaces that cause geometric discontinuities at the trailing edge region. These discontinuities promote

  2. Trajectory Design Employing Convex Optimization for Landing on Irregularly Shaped Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin M.; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Mission proposals that land spacecraft on asteroids are becoming increasingly popular. However, in order to have a successful mission the spacecraft must reliably and softly land at the intended landing site with pinpoint precision. The problem under investigation is how to design a propellant optimal powered descent trajectory that can be quickly computed onboard the spacecraft, without interaction from the ground control. The propellant optimal control problem in this work is to determine the optimal finite thrust vector to land the spacecraft at a specified location, in the presence of a highly nonlinear gravity field, subject to various mission and operational constraints. The proposed solution uses convex optimization, a gravity model with higher fidelity than Newtonian, and an iterative solution process for a fixed final time problem. In addition, a second optimization method is wrapped around the convex optimization problem to determine the optimal flight time that yields the lowest propellant usage over all flight times. Gravity models designed for irregularly shaped asteroids are investigated. Success of the algorithm is demonstrated by designing powered descent trajectories for the elongated binary asteroid Castalia.

  3. Optimal elastomeric scaffold leaflet shape for pulmonary heart valve leaflet replacement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Bayoumi, Ahmed S; Chen, Peter; Hobson, Christopher M; Wagner, William R; Mayer, John E; Sacks, Michael S

    2013-02-22

    Surgical replacement of the pulmonary valve (PV) is a common treatment option for congenital pulmonary valve defects. Engineered tissue approaches to develop novel PV replacements are intrinsically complex, and will require methodical approaches for their development. Single leaflet replacement utilizing an ovine model is an attractive approach in that candidate materials can be evaluated under valve level stresses in blood contact without the confounding effects of a particular valve design. In the present study an approach for optimal leaflet shape design based on finite element (FE) simulation of a mechanically anisotropic, elastomeric scaffold for PV replacement is presented. The scaffold was modeled as an orthotropic hyperelastic material using a generalized Fung-type constitutive model. The optimal shape of the fully loaded PV replacement leaflet was systematically determined by minimizing the difference between the deformed shape obtained from FE simulation and an ex-vivo microCT scan of a native ovine PV leaflet. Effects of material anisotropy, dimensional changes of PV root, and fiber orientation on the resulting leaflet deformation were investigated. In-situ validation demonstrated that the approach could guide the design of the leaflet shape for PV replacement surgery.

  4. Robotic U-shaped assembly line balancing using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund Nilakantan, J.; Ponnambalam, S. G.

    2016-02-01

    Automation in an assembly line can be achieved using robots. In robotic U-shaped assembly line balancing (RUALB), robots are assigned to workstations to perform the assembly tasks on a U-shaped assembly line. The robots are expected to perform multiple tasks, because of their capabilities. U-shaped assembly line problems are derived from traditional assembly line problems and are relatively new. Tasks are assigned to the workstations when either all of their predecessors or all of their successors have already been assigned to workstations. The objective function considered in this article is to maximize the cycle time of the assembly line, which in turn helps to maximize the production rate of the assembly line. RUALB aims at the optimal assignment of tasks to the workstations and selection of the best fit robot to the workstations in a manner such that the cycle time is minimized. To solve this problem, a particle swarm optimization algorithm embedded with a heuristic allocation (consecutive) procedure is proposed. The consecutive heuristic is used to allocate the tasks to the workstation and to assign a best fit robot to that workstation. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using a wide variety of data sets. The results indicate that robotic U-shaped assembly lines perform better than robotic straight assembly lines in terms of cycle time.

  5. Under-Track CFD-Based Shape Optimization for a Low-Boom Demonstrator Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintzer, Mathias; Ordaz, Irian; Fenbert, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed outer mold line shaping of a Mach 1.6, demonstrator-sized low-boom concept is presented. Cruise trim is incorporated a priori as part of the shaping objective, using an equivalent-area-based approach. Design work is performed using a gradient-driven optimization framework that incorporates a three-dimensional, nonlinear flow solver, a parametric geometry modeler, and sensitivities derived using the adjoint method. The shaping effort is focused on reducing the under-track sonic boom level using an inverse design approach, while simultaneously satisfying the trim requirement. Conceptual-level geometric constraints are incorporated in the optimization process, including the internal layout of fuel tanks, landing gear, engine, and crew station. Details of the model parameterization and design process are documented for both flow-through and powered states, and the performance of these optimized vehicles presented in terms of inviscid L/D, trim state, pressures in the near-field and at the ground, and predicted sonic boom loudness.

  6. Gradient-Based Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using ADI Method for Large-Scale Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization methodology, that is intended for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications, has been developed. It is based on the quasi-analytical sensitivities. The flow analysis is rendered by a fully implicit, finite volume formulation of the Euler equations.The aerodynamic sensitivity equation is solved using the alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) algorithm for memory efficiency. A flexible wing geometry model, that is based on surface parameterization and platform schedules, is utilized. The present methodology and its components have been tested via several comparisons. Initially, the flow analysis for for a wing is compared with those obtained using an unfactored, preconditioned conjugate gradient approach (PCG), and an extensively validated CFD code. Then, the sensitivities computed with the present method have been compared with those obtained using the finite-difference and the PCG approaches. Effects of grid refinement and convergence tolerance on the analysis and shape optimization have been explored. Finally the new procedure has been demonstrated in the design of a cranked arrow wing at Mach 2.4. Despite the expected increase in the computational time, the results indicate that shape optimization, which require large numbers of grid points can be resolved with a gradient-based approach.

  7. The Optimization of a Shaped-Charge Design Using Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,DAVID R.; VAUGHAN,COURTENAY T.

    1999-11-01

    Current supercomputers use large parallel arrays of tightly coupled processors to achieve levels of performance far surpassing conventional vector supercomputers. Shock-wave physics codes have been developed for these new supercomputers at Sandia National Laboratories and elsewhere. These parallel codes run fast enough on many simulations to consider using them to study the effects of varying design parameters on the performance of models of conventional munitions and other complex systems. Such studies maybe directed by optimization software to improve the performance of the modeled system. Using a shaped-charge jet design as an archetypal test case and the CTH parallel shock-wave physics code controlled by the Dakota optimization software, we explored the use of automatic optimization tools to optimize the design for conventional munitions. We used a scheme in which a lower resolution computational mesh was used to identify candidate optimal solutions and then these were verified using a higher resolution mesh. We identified three optimal solutions for the model and a region of the design domain where the jet tip speed is nearly optimal, indicating the possibility of a robust design. Based on this study we identified some of the difficulties in using high-fidelity models with optimization software to develop improved designs. These include developing robust algorithms for the objective function and constraints and mitigating the effects of numerical noise in them. We conclude that optimization software running high-fidelity models of physical systems using parallel shock wave physics codes to find improved designs can be a valuable tool for designers. While current state of algorithm and software development does not permit routine, ''black box'' optimization of designs, the effort involved in using the existing tools may well be worth the improvement achieved in designs.

  8. The impact of uncertainty on shape optimization of idealized bypass graft models in unsteady flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Marsden, Alison L.

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that the fluid mechanics of bypass grafts impacts biomechanical responses and is linked to intimal thickening and plaque deposition on the vessel wall. In spite of this, quantitative information about the fluid mechanics is not currently incorporated into surgical planning and bypass graft design. In this work, we use a derivative-free optimization technique for performing systematic design of bypass grafts. The optimization method is coupled to a three-dimensional pulsatile Navier-Stokes solver. We systematically account for inevitable uncertainties that arise in cardiovascular simulations, owing to noise in medical image data, variable physiologic conditions, and surgical implementation. Uncertainties in the simulation input parameters as well as shape design variables are accounted for using the adaptive stochastic collocation technique. The derivative-free optimization framework is coupled with a stochastic response surface technique to make the problem computationally tractable. Two idealized numerical examples, an end-to-side anastomosis, and a bypass graft around a stenosis, demonstrate that accounting for uncertainty significantly changes the optimal graft design. Results show that small changes in the design variables from their optimal values should be accounted for in surgical planning. Changes in the downstream (distal) graft angle resulted in greater sensitivity of the wall-shear stress compared to changes in the upstream (proximal) angle. The impact of cost function choice on the optimal solution was explored. Additionally, this work represents the first use of the stochastic surrogate management framework method for robust shape optimization in a fully three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes design problem.

  9. Interactive Inverse Design Optimization of Fuselage Shape for Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood; Le, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a tool called BOSS (Boom Optimization using Smoothest Shape modifications). BOSS utilizes interactive inverse design optimization to develop a fuselage shape that yields a low-boom aircraft configuration. A fundamental reason for developing BOSS is the need to generate feasible low-boom conceptual designs that are appropriate for further refinement using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based preliminary design methods. BOSS was not developed to provide a numerical solution to the inverse design problem. Instead, BOSS was intended to help designers find the right configuration among an infinite number of possible configurations that are equally good using any numerical figure of merit. BOSS uses the smoothest shape modification strategy for modifying the fuselage radius distribution at 100 or more longitudinal locations to find a smooth fuselage shape that reduces the discrepancies between the design and target equivalent area distributions over any specified range of effective distance. For any given supersonic concept (with wing, fuselage, nacelles, tails, and/or canards), a designer can examine the differences between the design and target equivalent areas, decide which part of the design equivalent area curve needs to be modified, choose a desirable rate for the reduction of the discrepancies over the specified range, and select a parameter for smoothness control of the fuselage shape. BOSS will then generate a fuselage shape based on the designer's inputs in a matter of seconds. Using BOSS, within a few hours, a designer can either generate a realistic fuselage shape that yields a supersonic configuration with a low-boom ground signature or quickly eliminate any configuration that cannot achieve low-boom characteristics with fuselage shaping alone. A conceptual design case study is documented to demonstrate how BOSS can be used to develop a low-boom supersonic concept from a low-drag supersonic concept. The paper also contains a study

  10. Tetrahedral Element Shape Optimization via the Jacobian Determinant and Condition Number

    SciTech Connect

    FREITAG,LORI A.; KNUPP,PATRICK

    1999-09-27

    We present a new shape measure for tetrahedral elements that is optimal in the sense that it gives the distance of a tetrahedron from the set of inverted elements. This measure is constructed from the condition number of the linear transformation between a unit equilateral tetrahedron and any tetrahedron with positive volume. We use this shape measure to formulate two optimization objective functions that are differentiated by their goal: the first seeks to improve the average quality of the tetrahedral mesh; the second aims to improve the worst-quality element in the mesh. Because the element condition number is not defined for tetrahedral with negative volume, these objective functions can be used only when the initial mesh is valid. Therefore, we formulate a third objective function using the determinant of the element Jacobian that is suitable for mesh untangling. We review the optimization techniques used with each objective function and present experimental results that demonstrate the effectiveness of the mesh improvement and untangling methods. We show that a combined optimization approach that uses both condition number objective functions obtains the best-quality meshes.

  11. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of a Dual-Stream Supersonic Plug Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Gray, Justin S.; Park, Michael A.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape optimization was performed on an isolated axisymmetric plug nozzle sized for a supersonic business jet. The dual-stream concept was tailored to attenuate nearfield pressure disturbances without compromising nozzle performance. Adjoint-based anisotropic mesh refinement was applied to resolve nearfield compression and expansion features in the baseline viscous grid. Deformed versions of the adapted grid were used for subsequent adjoint-driven shape optimization. For design, a nonlinear gradient-based optimizer was coupled to the discrete adjoint formulation of the Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes equations. All nozzle surfaces were parameterized using 3rd order B-spline interpolants and perturbed axisymmetrically via free-form deformation. Geometry deformations were performed using 20 design variables shared between the outer cowl, shroud and centerbody nozzle surfaces. Interior volume grid deformation during design was accomplished using linear elastic mesh morphing. The nozzle optimization was performed at a design cruise speed of Mach 1.6, assuming core and bypass pressure ratios of 6.19 and 3.24, respectively. Ambient flight conditions at design were commensurate with 45,000-ft standard day atmosphere.

  12. Numerical study on the performance of rotational supercavitating evaporator with optimized blade shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Y.; Li, Q.; Li, F. C.; Kulagin, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    Based on supercavitation effect, a novel device named Rotational Supercavitating Evaporator (RSCE) has been designed for desalination. In order to improve the performance of RSCE, the optimal design of three-dimensional blade shape is performed by utilizing the empirical formulae which have been validated before. Numerical simulation is then conducted on the supercavitating flow in RSCE with the optimized blade, and the supercavity dimension generated by rotational cavitator is obtained, which is further compared with the above- mentioned empirical formulae obtained by two-dimensional calculations. The results show that the supercavity length obtained by numerical simulation on the optimized blade increases with the increase of radius at first, and then decreases at larger radii, which is much smaller than the result of empirical formula at each radius.

  13. Characteristic analysis and shape optimal design of a ring-type traveling wave ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Jong-Suk; Yi, Kyung-Pyo; Chung, Tae-Kyung; Jung, Hyun-Kyo

    2013-07-01

    The contact mechanism should be analyzed for an estimation of the performance of a traveling wave ultra-sonic motor (TWUSM), because the operation of this type of motor depends on the frictional force between the rotor and the stator. However, the nonlinearity of the contact mechanism of the TWUSM makes it difficult to proposed a proper contact model, a characteristic analysis method and an optimal design method. To address these problems, a characteristic analysis and optimal design method using a cylindrical dynamic contact model (CDCM), an analytical method, a numerical method and an evolutionary strategy algorithm (ESA) is proposed in this research. The feasibility and usefulness of the proposed characteristic analysis and optimal design method are verified through experimental data. Furthermore, the importance of the shape of the teeth and the reason for the improvement of motor performances by the chamfering at the teeth are proposed and verified in this paper.

  14. Optimal rocket thrust profile shaping using third degree spline function interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, I. L.

    1974-01-01

    Optimal solid-rocket thrust profiles for the parallel-burn, solid-rocket-assisted space shuttle are investigated. Solid-rocket thrust profiles are simulated by using third-degree spline functions, with the values of the thrust ordinates defined as parameters. The profiles are optimized parametrically, using the Davidon-Fletcher-Powell penalty function method, by minimizing propellant weight subject to state and control inequality constraints and to terminal boundary conditions. This study shows that optimizing a control variable parametrically by using third-degree spline function interpolation allows the control to be shaped so that inequality constraints are strictly adhered to and all corners are eliminated. The absence of corners, which is realistic in nature, makes this method attractive from the viewpoint of solid rocket grain design.

  15. An asynchronous metamodel-assisted memetic algorithm for CFD-based shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoleontos, Evgenia A.; Asouti, Varvara G.; Giannakoglou, Kyriakos C.

    2012-02-01

    This article presents an asynchronous metamodel-assisted memetic algorithm for the solution of CFD-based optimization problems. This algorithm is appropriate for use on multiprocessor platforms and may solve computationally expensive optimization problems in reduced wall-clock time, compared to conventional evolutionary or memetic algorithms. It is, in fact, a hybridization of non-generation-based (asynchronous) evolutionary algorithms, assisted by surrogate evaluation models, a local search method and the Lamarckian learning process. For the objective function gradient computation, in CFD applications, the adjoint method is used. Issues concerning the 'smart' implementation of local search in multi-objective problems are discussed. In this respect, an algorithmic scheme for reducing the number of calls to the adjoint equations to just one, irrespective of the number of objectives, is proposed. The algorithm is applied to the CFD-based shape optimization of the tubes of a heat exchanger and of a turbomachinery cascade.

  16. Extending amulti-scale parameter regionalization (MPR) method by introducing parameter constrained optimization and flexible transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Daniel; Herrnegger, Mathew; Schulz, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    A multi-scale parameter-estimation method, as presented by Samaniego et al. (2010), is implemented and extended for the conceptual hydrological model COSERO. COSERO is a HBV-type model that is specialized for alpine-environments, but has been applied over a wide range of basins all over the world (see: Kling et al., 2014 for an overview). Within the methodology available small-scale information (DEM, soil texture, land cover, etc.) is used to estimate the coarse-scale model parameters by applying a set of transfer-functions (TFs) and subsequent averaging methods, whereby only TF hyper-parameters are optimized against available observations (e.g. runoff data). The parameter regionalisation approach was extended in order to allow for a more meta-heuristical handling of the transfer-functions. The two main novelties are: 1. An explicit introduction of constrains into parameter estimation scheme: The constraint scheme replaces invalid parts of the transfer-function-solution space with valid solutions. It is inspired by applications in evolutionary algorithms and related to the combination of learning and evolution. This allows the consideration of physical and numerical constraints as well as the incorporation of a priori modeller-experience into the parameter estimation. 2. Spline-based transfer-functions: Spline-based functions enable arbitrary forms of transfer-functions: This is of importance since in many cases the general relationship between sub-grid information and parameters are known, but not the form of the transfer-function itself. The contribution presents the results and experiences with the adopted method and the introduced extensions. Simulation are performed for the pre-alpine/alpine Traisen catchment in Lower Austria. References: Samaniego, L., Kumar, R., Attinger, S. (2010): Multiscale parameter regionalization of a grid-based hydrologic model at the mesoscale, Water Resour. Res., doi: 10.1029/2008WR007327 Kling, H., Stanzel, P., Fuchs, M., and

  17. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  18. A Preconditioning Method for Shape Optimization Governed by the Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Vatsa, Veer N.

    1998-01-01

    We consider a classical aerodynamic shape optimization problem subject to the compressible Euler flow equations. The gradient of the cost functional with respect to the shape variables is derived with the adjoint method at the continuous level. The Hessian (second order derivative of the cost functional with respect to the shape variables) is approximated also at the continuous level, as first introduced by Arian and Ta'asan (1996). The approximation of the Hessian is used to approximate the Newton step which is essential to accelerate the numerical solution of the optimization problem. The design space is discretized in the maximum dimension, i.e., the location of each point on the intersection of the computational mesh with the airfoil is taken to be an independent design variable. We give numerical examples for 86 design variables in two different flow speeds and achieve an order of magnitude reduction in the cost functional at a computational effort of a full solution of the analysis partial differential equation (PDE).

  19. Evaluation of the chondral modeling theory using fe-simulation and numeric shape optimization

    PubMed Central

    Plochocki, Jeffrey H; Ward, Carol V; Smith, Douglas E

    2009-01-01

    The chondral modeling theory proposes that hydrostatic pressure within articular cartilage regulates joint size, shape, and congruence through regional variations in rates of tissue proliferation.The purpose of this study is to develop a computational model using a nonlinear two-dimensional finite element analysis in conjunction with numeric shape optimization to evaluate the chondral modeling theory. The model employed in this analysis is generated from an MR image of the medial portion of the tibiofemoral joint in a subadult male. Stress-regulated morphological changes are simulated until skeletal maturity and evaluated against the chondral modeling theory. The computed results are found to support the chondral modeling theory. The shape-optimized model exhibits increased joint congruence, broader stress distributions in articular cartilage, and a relative decrease in joint diameter. The results for the computational model correspond well with experimental data and provide valuable insights into the mechanical determinants of joint growth. The model also provides a crucial first step toward developing a comprehensive model that can be employed to test the influence of mechanical variables on joint conformation. PMID:19438771

  20. Packing Optimization of Sorbent Bed Containing Dissimilar and Irregular Shaped Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Nathan; Guttromson, Jayleen; Piowaty, Hailey

    2011-01-01

    The Fire Cartridge is a packed bed air filter with two different and separate layers of media designed to provide respiratory protection from combustion products after a fire event on the International Space Station (ISS). The first layer of media is a carbon monoxide catalyst and the second layer of media is universal carbon. During development of Fire Cartridge prototypes, the two media beds were noticed to have shifted inside the cartridge. The movement of media within the cartridge can cause mixing of the bed layers, air voids, and channeling, which could cause preferential air flow and allow contaminants to pass through without removal. An optimally packed bed mitigates these risks and ensures effective removal of contaminants from the air. In order to optimally pack each layer, vertical, horizontal, and orbital agitations were investigated and a packed bulk density was calculated for each method. Packed bulk density must be calculated for each media type to accommodate variations in particle size, shape, and density. Additionally, the optimal vibration parameters must be re-evaluated for each batch of media due to variations in particle size distribution between batches. For this application it was determined that orbital vibrations achieve an optimal pack density and the two media layers can be packed by the same method. Another finding was media with a larger size distribution of particles achieve an optimal bed pack easier than media with a smaller size distribution of particles.

  1. Optimal control of charge transfer for slow H+ + D collisions with shaped laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2014-03-01

    We show that optimally shaped laser pulses can beneficially influence charge transfer in slow H(+)+D collisions. Time-dependent wave packet optimal control simulations are performed based on a two-state adiabatic Hamiltonian. Optimal control is performed using either an adaptive or a fixed target to obtain the desired laser control field. In the adaptive target scheme, the target state is updated according to the renormalized fragmentary yield in the exit channel throughout the optimization process. In the fixed target scheme, the target state in the exit channel is a normalized outgoing Gaussian wave packet located at a large internuclear separation. Both approaches produced excellent optimal outcomes, far exceeding that achieved in the field-free collisional charge transfer. The adaptive target scheme proves to be more efficient, and often with complex final wave packet. In contrast, the fixed target scheme, although more slowly convergent, is found to produce high fidelity for the desired target wave packet. The control mechanism in both cases utilizes bound vibrational states of the transient HD(+) complex.

  2. Optimal control of charge transfer for slow H+ + D collisions with shaped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2014-03-01

    We show that optimally shaped laser pulses can beneficially influence charge transfer in slow H++D collisions. Time-dependent wave packet optimal control simulations are performed based on a two-state adiabatic Hamiltonian. Optimal control is performed using either an adaptive or a fixed target to obtain the desired laser control field. In the adaptive target scheme, the target state is updated according to the renormalized fragmentary yield in the exit channel throughout the optimization process. In the fixed target scheme, the target state in the exit channel is a normalized outgoing Gaussian wave packet located at a large internuclear separation. Both approaches produced excellent optimal outcomes, far exceeding that achieved in the field-free collisional charge transfer. The adaptive target scheme proves to be more efficient, and often with complex final wave packet. In contrast, the fixed target scheme, although more slowly convergent, is found to produce high fidelity for the desired target wave packet. The control mechanism in both cases utilizes bound vibrational states of the transient HD+ complex.

  3. Shape optimization of a printed-circuit heat exchanger to enhance thermal-hydraulic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. M.; Kim, K. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) is recently considered as a recuperator for the high temperature gas cooled reactor. In this work, the zigzag-channels of a PCHE have been optimized by using three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis and response surface approximation (RSA) modeling technique to enhance thermal-hydraulic performance. Shear stress transport turbulence model is used as a turbulence closure. The objective function is defined as a linear combination of the functions related to heat transfer and friction loss of the PCHE, respectively. Three geometric design variables viz., the ratio of the radius of the fillet to hydraulic diameter of the channels, the ratio of wavelength to hydraulic diameter of the channels, and the ratio of wave height to hydraulic diameter of the channels, are used for the optimization. Design points are selected through Latin-hypercube sampling. The optimal design is determined through the RSA model which uses RANS derived calculations at the design points. The results show that the optimum shape enhances considerably the thermal-hydraulic performance than a reference shape. (authors)

  4. Simultaneous power and beam-shape optimization of an OPSL resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Sauer, Sebastian; Garlich, Torsten; Seelert, Wolf; Brecher, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In the assembly of optical resonators of optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSL), the highly reflective resonator mirror is the most crucial component. In previous cooperation, Coherent and Fraunhofer IPT have developed a robust active alignment strategy to optimize the output power of the OPSL resonator using search strategies for finding the laser threshold as well as hill-climbing algorithms for maximizing the output power. Beam-shape as well as the laser mode have major influence on the quality and the duration of subsequent beam-shaping and fiber-coupling steps. Therefore, the alignment algorithm optimizing the output power has been extended recently by simultaneous image processing for ensuring a Gaussian beam as the result of alignment. The paper describes the enhanced approach of automated alignment by additionally scanning along the optical resonator and subsequently evaluating and optimizing the roundness of the beam as well as minimizing the beam radius through twisting and tilting of the mirror. A quality metric combining these measures is defined substituting an M² measurement. The paper also describes the approach for automated assembly including the measuring setup, micromanipulation and dispensing devices.

  5. Efficient algorithms for future aircraft design: Contributions to aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicken, Jason Edward

    Advances in numerical optimization have raised the possibility that efficient and novel aircraft configurations may be "discovered" by an algorithm. To begin exploring this possibility, a fast and robust set of tools for aerodynamic shape optimization is developed. Parameterization and mesh-movement are integrated to accommodate large changes in the geometry. This integrated approach uses a coarse B-spline control grid to represent the geometry and move the computational mesh; consequently, the mesh-movement algorithm is two to three orders faster than a node-based linear elasticity approach, without compromising mesh quality. Aerodynamic analysis is performed using a flow solver for the Euler equations. The governing equations are discretized using summation-by-parts finite-difference operators and simultaneous approximation terms, which permit C0 mesh continuity at block interfaces. The discretization results in a set of nonlinear algebraic equations, which are solved using an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur strategy. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is adopted. The gradient is evaluated using adjoint variables for the flow and mesh equations in a sequential approach. The flow adjoint equations are solved using a novel variant of the Krylov solver GCROT. This variant of GCROT is flexible to take advantage of non-stationary preconditioners and is shown to outperform restarted flexible GMRES. The aerodynamic optimizer is applied to several studies of induced-drag minimization. An elliptical lift distribution is recovered by varying spanwise twist, thereby validating the algorithm. Planform optimization based on the Euler equations produces a nonelliptical lift distribution, in contrast with the predictions of lifting-line theory. A study of spanwise vertical shape optimization confirms that a winglet-up configuration is more efficient than a winglet-down configuration. A split-tip geometry is used to explore nonlinear wake-wing interactions: the

  6. Adjoint-based shape optimization of fin geometry for enhanced solid/liquid phase-change process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Suzuki, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the control of heat transfer processes, which play a critical role in various engineering devices/systems, has gained renewed attention. The present study aims to establish an adjoint-based shape optimization method for high-performance heat transfer processes involving phase-change phenomena. A possible example includes the application to the thermal management technique using phase-change material. Adjoint-based shape optimization scheme is useful to optimal shape design and optimal control of systems, for which the base function of the solution is unknown and the solution includes an infinite number of degrees of freedom. Here we formulate the shape-optimization scheme based on adjoint heat conduction analyses, focusing on the shape optimization of fin geometry. In the computation of the developed scheme, a meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method that is suited for dealing with complex boundary geometry is employed, and the enthalpy method is adopted for analyzing the motion of the phase-change interface. We examine in detail the effect of the initial geometry and the node distribution in the MLPG analysis upon the final solution of the shape optimization. Also, we present a new strategy for the computation using bubble mesh.

  7. Energy-Optimal Electrical-Stimulation Pulses Shaped by the Least-Action Principle

    PubMed Central

    Krouchev, Nedialko I.; Danner, Simon M.; Vinet, Alain; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) devices interact with excitable neural tissue toward eliciting action potentials (AP’s) by specific current patterns. Low-energy ES prevents tissue damage and loss of specificity. Hence to identify optimal stimulation-current waveforms is a relevant problem, whose solution may have significant impact on the related medical (e.g. minimized side-effects) and engineering (e.g. maximized battery-life) efficiency. This has typically been addressed by simulation (of a given excitable-tissue model) and iterative numerical optimization with hard discontinuous constraints - e.g. AP’s are all-or-none phenomena. Such approach is computationally expensive, while the solution is uncertain - e.g. may converge to local-only energy-minima and be model-specific. We exploit the Least-Action Principle (LAP). First, we derive in closed form the general template of the membrane-potential’s temporal trajectory, which minimizes the ES energy integral over time and over any space-clamp ionic current model. From the given model we then obtain the specific energy-efficient current waveform, which is demonstrated to be globally optimal. The solution is model-independent by construction. We illustrate the approach by a broad set of example situations with some of the most popular ionic current models from the literature. The proposed approach may result in the significant improvement of solution efficiency: cumbersome and uncertain iteration is replaced by a single quadrature of a system of ordinary differential equations. The approach is further validated by enabling a general comparison to the conventional simulation and optimization results from the literature, including one of our own, based on finite-horizon optimal control. Applying the LAP also resulted in a number of general ES optimality principles. One such succinct observation is that ES with long pulse durations is much more sensitive to the pulse’s shape whereas a rectangular pulse is most

  8. Aerodynamic Shape Sensitivity Analysis and Design Optimization of Complex Configurations Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed and is extended to model geometrically complex configurations. The advantage of unstructured grids (when compared with a structured-grid approach) is their inherent ability to discretize irregularly shaped domains with greater efficiency and less effort. Hence, this approach is ideally suited for geometrically complex configurations of practical interest. In this work the nonlinear Euler equations are solved using an upwind, cell-centered, finite-volume scheme. The discrete, linearized systems which result from this scheme are solved iteratively by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient-like algorithm known as GMRES for the two-dimensional geometry and a Gauss-Seidel algorithm for the three-dimensional; similar procedures are used to solve the accompanying linear aerodynamic sensitivity equations in incremental iterative form. As shown, this particular form of the sensitivity equation makes large-scale gradient-based aerodynamic optimization possible by taking advantage of memory efficient methods to construct exact Jacobian matrix-vector products. Simple parameterization techniques are utilized for demonstrative purposes. Once the surface has been deformed, the unstructured grid is adapted by considering the mesh as a system of interconnected springs. Grid sensitivities are obtained by differentiating the surface parameterization and the grid adaptation algorithms with ADIFOR (which is an advanced automatic-differentiation software tool). To demonstrate the ability of this procedure to analyze and design complex configurations of practical interest, the sensitivity analysis and shape optimization has been performed for a two-dimensional high-lift multielement airfoil and for a three-dimensional Boeing 747-200 aircraft.

  9. Multi-objective selection and optimization of shaped materials and laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jasveer

    Most of the current optimization techniques for the design of light-weight structures are unable to generate structural alternatives at the concept stage of design. This research tackles the challenge of developing methods for the early stage of design involving structures made up of conventional materials and composite laminates. For conventional materials, the recently introduced shape transformer approach is used. This work extends the method to deal with the case of torsional stiffness design, and generalizes it to single and multi-criteria selection of lightweight shafts subjected to a combination of bending, shear, and torsional load. The prominent feature of the work is the useful integration of shape and material to model and visualize multi-objective selection problems. The scheme is centered on concept selection in structural design, and hinges on measures that govern the shape properties of a cross-section regardless of its size. These measures, referred to as shape transformers, can classify shapes in a way similar to material classification. The procedure is demonstrated by considering torsional stiffness as a constraint. Performance charts are developed for both single and multi-criteria cases to let the reader visualize in a glance the whole range of cross-sectional shapes for each material. Each design chart is explained with a brief example. The above mentioned approach is also extended to incorporate orthotropic composite laminates. Design charts are obtained for the selection of five generic design variables: shape, size, material, layup, and number of plies. These charts also aid in comparing the performances of two commonly used laminates in bending and torsion - angle plies and cross plies. For a generic composite laminate, due to the number of variables involved, these kinds of design charts are very difficult. However, other tactics like using an analytical model for function evaluation can be used at conceptual stage of design. This is

  10. Parallel solution of optimal shape design problem governed by Helmholtz/potential flow equations

    SciTech Connect

    Maekinen, R.A.E.; Toivanen, J.

    1995-12-01

    Computation of a wave scattered by a flying obstacle is a problem of great practical importance. We consider in this paper the numerical solution of a shape optimization problem for a lifting 2D airfoil in a distributed computing environment. A mathematical model describing of the Helmholtz equation {Delta}u + {omega}{sup 2}u = 0 with suitable boundary conditions on the profile and in the infinity. For potential flow the pressure distribution p on the profile is obtained by solving two Laplace equations on the computational domain.

  11. Tuning of laser pulse shapes in grating-based compressors for optimal electron acceleration in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Cs.; Faure, J.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esare y, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-01-22

    The temporal shape (rise time, fall time, skewness) of 50 - 200-fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses has been controlled by appropriate adjustment of a grating-pair compressor. It was found that the skewness of the laser pulse envelope is particularly sensitive to the third-order component of the spectral phase. Introducing such a third-order phase offset by detuning the grating pair relative to the optimum pulse compression settings allowed the generation of skewed pulses. As an example of an application, these skewed pulses were used to optimize a laser-plasma electron accelerator.

  12. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunya; Song, Baowei; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB), is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line, and the section is defined with symmetrical airfoil NACA 0012. Computational investigations are carried out to study the hydrodynamic performance of the glider using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code Fluent. The Kriging-based genetic algorithm, called Efficient Global Optimization (EGO), is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The result demonstrates that the BWB underwater glider has excellent hydrodynamic performance, and the lift to drag ratio of initial design is increased by 7% in the EGO process.

  13. Surrogate modelling and optimization using shape-preserving response prediction: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifsson, Leifur; Koziel, Slawomir

    2016-03-01

    Computer simulation models are ubiquitous in modern engineering design. In many cases, they are the only way to evaluate a given design with sufficient fidelity. Unfortunately, an added computational expense is associated with higher fidelity models. Moreover, the systems being considered are often highly nonlinear and may feature a large number of designable parameters. Therefore, it may be impractical to solve the design problem with conventional optimization algorithms. A promising approach to alleviate these difficulties is surrogate-based optimization (SBO). Among proven SBO techniques, the methods utilizing surrogates constructed from corrected physics-based low-fidelity models are, in many cases, the most efficient. This article reviews a particular technique of this type, namely, shape-preserving response prediction (SPRP), which works on the level of the model responses to correct the underlying low-fidelity models. The formulation and limitations of SPRP are discussed. Applications to several engineering design problems are provided.

  14. Aerodynamic shape optimization of a HSCT type configuration with improved surface definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Almuttil M.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1994-01-01

    Two distinct parametrization procedures of generating free-form surfaces to represent aerospace vehicles are presented. The first procedure is the representation using spline functions such as nonuniform rational b-splines (NURBS) and the second is a novel (geometrical) parametrization using solutions to a suitably chosen partial differential equation. The main idea is to develop a surface which is more versatile and can be used in an optimization process. Unstructured volume grid is generated by an advancing front algorithm and solutions obtained using an Euler solver. Grid sensitivity with respect to surface design parameters and aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients based on potential flow is obtained using an automatic differentiator precompiler software tool. Aerodynamic shape optimization of a complete aircraft with twenty four design variables is performed. High speed civil transport aircraft (HSCT) configurations are targeted to demonstrate the process.

  15. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  16. Numerical simulation study on active and passive hydroforming process optimization of box shaped part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. P.; Dong, J. L.; He, T. D.; Wang, B.

    2016-08-01

    Low qualified rate and inferior quality frequently occurring in the general deep drawing process of a certain box-shaped part, now use hydroforming to optimize forming process, in order to study the effect of hydroforming for improving the quality and formability, purposed five process schemes: general deep drawing, active hydroforming, passive hydroforming, general deep drawing combined with active hydroforming, passive combined with active hydroforming. Each process was simulated by finite element simulation and results were analysed. The results indicate the passive combined with active hydroforming is the best scheme which can obtain smallest thickness thinning and satisfactory formability, then optimized hydroforming pressure, blank holder force subsequently by adjust the simulation parameters. Research result proves that active/passive hydroforming is a new method for complex parts forming.

  17. Shape optimization for layer detection in geothermal reservoirs: new insights and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Simin; Wellmann, Florian; Marquart, Gabriele; Herty, Michael; Clauser, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow and heat transport in geothermal reservoirs is strongly controlled by the spatial distribution of relevant petrophysical properties. We investigate here if we can solve the inverse problem to determine the location of boundaries between regions with distinctively different properties on the basis of temperature measurements in geothermal reservoir studies. More specifically, we aim to obtain the shape of a layer boundary, described with a level-set function, through a shape optimisation method. In order to reduce computational cost, we implement our method on the basis of the adjoint equation for temperature and avoid the full calculation of the sensitivity matrix in each optimisation step. The method was tested to determine the interface position in a set of two-layer models with differently shaped interfaces, based on synthetic observation data of temperature. We extend previous work in this direction with the investigation of both head conduction and advection and investigate in synthetic case studies the efficiency of the method, and, more importantly, the possibility to determine shapes even in cases of strongly advective heat transport. To more realistically simulate the measurements, we also take into consideration the noise on data, and the case when only shallower borehole data is available. The results show that with our method it is indeed possible to obtain shapes of layers and we discuss the relevance of parameter ratios which enable this detection, including an analysis for the potential error of the obtained layer. The results presented also show how the quality of optimization might be affected by some factors such as number and location of boreholes, and the regularization parameter, but their detailed relationship is still one of our fugure work. Another next step will be the extension to multiple layers, and an application to case studies.

  18. Shape optimization of a sheet swimming over a thin liquid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, Jon; Hosoi, A. E.

    Motivated by the propulsion mechanisms adopted by gastropods, annelids and other invertebrates, we consider shape optimization of a flexible sheet that moves by propagating deformation waves along its body. The self-propelled sheet is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin layer of viscous Newtonian fluid. We use a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics and derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to simultaneously optimize swimming speed, efficiency and fluid loss. We find that as the parameters controlling these quantities approach critical values, the optimal solutions become singular in a self-similar fashion and sometimes leave the realm of validity of the lubrication model. We explore these singular limits by computing higher-order corrections to the zeroth order theory and find that wave profiles that develop cusp-like singularities are appropriately penalized, yielding non-singular optimal solutions. These corrections are themselves validated by comparison with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations, and, to the extent possible, using recent rigorous a priori error bounds.

  19. Shape optimization of a sheet swimming over a thin liquid layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2008-12-10

    Motivated by the propulsion mechanisms adopted by gastropods, annelids and other invertebrates, we consider shape optimization of a flexible sheet that moves by propagating deformation waves along its body. The self-propelled sheet is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin layer of viscous Newtonian fluid. We use a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics and derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to simultaneously optimize swimming speed, efficiency and fluid loss. We find that as the parameters controlling these quantities approach critical values, the optimal solutions become singular in a self-similar fashion and sometimes leave the realm of validity of the lubrication model. We explore these singular limits by computing higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and find that wave profiles that develop cusp-like singularities are appropriately penalized, yielding non-singular optimal solutions. These corrections are themselves validated by comparison with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations, and, to the extent possible, using recent rigorous a-priori error bounds.

  20. Arterial cannula shape optimization by means of the rotational firefly algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesch, K.; Kaczorowska, K.

    2016-03-01

    This article presents global optimization results of arterial cannula shapes by means of the newly modified firefly algorithm. The search for the optimal arterial cannula shape is necessary in order to minimize losses and prepare the flow that leaves the circulatory support system of a ventricle (i.e. blood pump) before it reaches the heart. A modification of the standard firefly algorithm, the so-called rotational firefly algorithm, is introduced. It is shown that the rotational firefly algorithm allows for better exploration of search spaces which results in faster convergence and better solutions in comparison with its standard version. This is particularly pronounced for smaller population sizes. Furthermore, it maintains greater diversity of populations for a longer time. A small population size and a low number of iterations are necessary to keep to a minimum the computational cost of the objective function of the problem, which comes from numerical solution of the nonlinear partial differential equations. Moreover, both versions of the firefly algorithm are compared to the state of the art, namely the differential evolution and covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategies.

  1. Mitigation of Adverse Effects Caused by Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions Through Optimal Wall Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, May-Fun; Lee, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the adverse effects of shock wave boundary layer interactions in high speed inlets include reduced total pressure recovery and highly distorted flow at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP). This paper presents a design method for flow control which creates perturbations in geometry. These perturbations are tailored to change the flow structures in order to minimize shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) inside supersonic inlets. Optimizing the shape of two dimensional micro-size bumps is shown to be a very effective flow control method for two-dimensional SWBLI. In investigating the three dimensional SWBLI, a square duct is employed as a baseline. To investigate the mechanism whereby the geometric elements of the baseline, i.e. the bottom wall, the sidewall and the corner, exert influence on the flow's aerodynamic characteristics, each element is studied and optimized separately. It is found that arrays of micro-size bumps on the bottom wall of the duct have little effect in improving total pressure recovery though they are useful in suppressing the incipient separation in three-dimensional problems. Shaping sidewall geometry is effective in re-distributing flow on the side wall and results in a less distorted flow at the exit. Subsequently, a near 50% reduction in distortion is achieved. A simple change in corner geometry resulted in a 2.4% improvement in total pressure recovery.

  2. Highly efficient photometrics tailoring by means of optimized bell-shaped lens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manca, Michele; Quercetti, Francesco; Gattari, Massimo; Cingolani, Roberto; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    An innovative optical panel provided with an hexagonal array of refractive lenses having a properly optimized doublecurvature profile has been simulated by ray-tracing and fabricated by injection-moulding. Such lenses are constituted by a concave profile (having negative curvature radius) on their bottom and a convex profile (having positive curvature radius) on their top. We demonstrate that, if compared to refractive elements with conventional geometry, bell-shaped microlenses allow to collect incident rays within a wider angular range (so reducing the number of rays lost by TIR ) and to properly re-direct them. When installed on fluorescent tubes-based professional lighting systems, such refractive elements allow to reduce undesirable glare as prescribed by EN12464-1 Interior Lighting Design Standards and to finely control photometric outputs of luminaries. Besides, bell-shaped microlenses-based films were also simulated to be applied onto a bottom-emitting lambertian OLED. We demonstrate that, by properly tailoring both concave and convex profile shape, it is possible to increase the outcoupling efficiency, as well as the luminous flux emitted by the exit surface, by a factor up to 1.95 and, at the same time, to produce far-field photometric outputs characterized by uniform isocandela distribution maps with an aperture angle up to 60°.

  3. Folding patterns and shape optimization using SMA-based self-folding laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraza-Hernandez, Edwin A.; Frei, Katherine R.; Hartl, Darren J.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2014-03-01

    Origami engineering, a discipline encompassing the creation of practical three-dimensional structures from two- dimensional entities via folding operations, has the potential to impact multiple fields of manufacturing and design. In some circumstances, it may be practical to have self-folding capabilities instead of creating folds by external manipulations (as in morphing structures in outer space or on the ocean floor). This paper considers the use of a self-folding laminate composite consisting of two outer layers of thermally actuated shape memory alloy (SMA) wire meshes separated by an inner compliant insulating layer. Methods for designing folding patterns and determining temperature fields to obtain desired shapes and behaviors are proposed. Sheets composed of the self-folding laminate are modeled via finite element analysis (FEA) and the proposed methods are implemented to test their capabilities. One method uses a previously developed and freely available software called Freeform Origami for folding pattern design. The second method entails the use of optimization to determine the localized activation temperatures required to obtain desired shapes or to perform specific functions. The proposed methods are demonstrated to be applicable for the design of folding patterns and determination of activation temperatures for the self-folding laminate by showing successful examples of their implementation. This exploratory study provides new tools that can be integrated into the design framework of self-folding origami structures.

  4. Proportional Topology Optimization: A New Non-Sensitivity Method for Solving Stress Constrained and Minimum Compliance Problems and Its Implementation in MATLAB

    PubMed Central

    Biyikli, Emre; To, Albert C.

    2015-01-01

    A new topology optimization method called the Proportional Topology Optimization (PTO) is presented. As a non-sensitivity method, PTO is simple to understand, easy to implement, and is also efficient and accurate at the same time. It is implemented into two MATLAB programs to solve the stress constrained and minimum compliance problems. Descriptions of the algorithm and computer programs are provided in detail. The method is applied to solve three numerical examples for both types of problems. The method shows comparable efficiency and accuracy with an existing optimality criteria method which computes sensitivities. Also, the PTO stress constrained algorithm and minimum compliance algorithm are compared by feeding output from one algorithm to the other in an alternative manner, where the former yields lower maximum stress and volume fraction but higher compliance compared to the latter. Advantages and disadvantages of the proposed method and future works are discussed. The computer programs are self-contained and publicly shared in the website www.ptomethod.org. PMID:26678849

  5. Proportional Topology Optimization: A New Non-Sensitivity Method for Solving Stress Constrained and Minimum Compliance Problems and Its Implementation in MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Biyikli, Emre; To, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    A new topology optimization method called the Proportional Topology Optimization (PTO) is presented. As a non-sensitivity method, PTO is simple to understand, easy to implement, and is also efficient and accurate at the same time. It is implemented into two MATLAB programs to solve the stress constrained and minimum compliance problems. Descriptions of the algorithm and computer programs are provided in detail. The method is applied to solve three numerical examples for both types of problems. The method shows comparable efficiency and accuracy with an existing optimality criteria method which computes sensitivities. Also, the PTO stress constrained algorithm and minimum compliance algorithm are compared by feeding output from one algorithm to the other in an alternative manner, where the former yields lower maximum stress and volume fraction but higher compliance compared to the latter. Advantages and disadvantages of the proposed method and future works are discussed. The computer programs are self-contained and publicly shared in the website www.ptomethod.org. PMID:26678849

  6. Proportional Topology Optimization: A New Non-Sensitivity Method for Solving Stress Constrained and Minimum Compliance Problems and Its Implementation in MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Biyikli, Emre; To, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    A new topology optimization method called the Proportional Topology Optimization (PTO) is presented. As a non-sensitivity method, PTO is simple to understand, easy to implement, and is also efficient and accurate at the same time. It is implemented into two MATLAB programs to solve the stress constrained and minimum compliance problems. Descriptions of the algorithm and computer programs are provided in detail. The method is applied to solve three numerical examples for both types of problems. The method shows comparable efficiency and accuracy with an existing optimality criteria method which computes sensitivities. Also, the PTO stress constrained algorithm and minimum compliance algorithm are compared by feeding output from one algorithm to the other in an alternative manner, where the former yields lower maximum stress and volume fraction but higher compliance compared to the latter. Advantages and disadvantages of the proposed method and future works are discussed. The computer programs are self-contained and publicly shared in the website www.ptomethod.org.

  7. Aerodynamic shape optimization directed toward a supersonic transport using sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    This investigation was conducted from March 1994 to August 1995, primarily, to extend and implement the previously developed aerodynamic design optimization methodologies for the problems related to a supersonic transport design. These methods had demonstrated promise to improve the designs (more specifically, the shape) of aerodynamic surfaces, by coupling optimization algorithms (OA) with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithms via sensitivity analyses (SA) with surface definition methods from Computer Aided Design (CAD). The present extensions of this method and their supersonic implementations have produced wing section designs, delta wing designs, cranked-delta wing designs, and nacelle designs, all of which have been reported in the open literature. Despite the fact that these configurations were highly simplified to be of any practical or commercial use, they served the algorithmic and proof-of-concept objectives of the study very well. The primary cause for the configurational simplifications, other than the usual simplify-to-study the fundamentals reason, were the premature closing of the project. Only after the first of the originally intended three-year term, both the funds and the computer resources supporting the project were abruptly cut due to their severe shortages at the funding agency. Nonetheless, it was shown that the extended methodologies could be viable options in optimizing the design of not only an isolated single-component configuration, but also a multiple-component configuration in supersonic and viscous flow. This allowed designing with the mutual interference of the components being one of the constraints all along the evolution of the shapes.

  8. SU-E-T-574: Novel Chance-Constrained Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Planning to Account for Range and Patient Setup Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    An, Y; Liang, J; Liu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose to apply a probabilistic framework, namely chanceconstrained optimization, in the intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning subject to range and patient setup uncertainties. The purpose is to hedge against the influence of uncertainties and improve robustness of treatment plans. Methods: IMPT plans were generated for a typical prostate patient. Nine dose distributions are computed — the nominal one and one each for ±5mm setup uncertainties along three cardinal axes and for ±3.5% range uncertainty. These nine dose distributions are supplied to the solver CPLEX as chance constraints to explicitly control plan robustness under these representative uncertainty scenarios with certain probability. This probability is determined by the tolerance level. We make the chance-constrained model tractable by converting it to a mixed integer optimization problem. The quality of plans derived from this method is evaluated using dose-volume histogram (DVH) indices such as tumor dose homogeneity (D5% – D95%) and coverage (D95%) and normal tissue sparing like V70 of rectum, V65, and V40 of bladder. We also compare the results from this novel method with the conventional PTV-based method to further demonstrate its effectiveness Results: Our model can yield clinically acceptable plans within 50 seconds. The chance-constrained optimization produces IMPT plans with comparable target coverage, better target dose homogeneity, and better normal tissue sparing compared to the PTV-based optimization [D95% CTV: 67.9 vs 68.7 (Gy), D5% – D95% CTV: 11.9 vs 18 (Gy), V70 rectum: 0.0 % vs 0.33%, V65 bladder: 2.17% vs 9.33%, V40 bladder: 8.83% vs 21.83%]. It also simultaneously makes the plan more robust [Width of DVH band at D50%: 2.0 vs 10.0 (Gy)]. The tolerance level may be varied to control the tradeoff between plan robustness and quality. Conclusion: The chance-constrained optimization generates superior IMPT plan compared to the PTV-based optimization with

  9. Free-form Airfoil Shape Optimization Under Uncertainty Using Maximum Expected Value and Second-order Second-moment Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huyse, Luc; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Free-form shape optimization of airfoils poses unexpected difficulties. Practical experience has indicated that a deterministic optimization for discrete operating conditions can result in dramatically inferior performance when the actual operating conditions are different from the - somewhat arbitrary - design values used for the optimization. Extensions to multi-point optimization have proven unable to adequately remedy this problem of "localized optimization" near the sampled operating conditions. This paper presents an intrinsically statistical approach and demonstrates how the shortcomings of multi-point optimization with respect to "localized optimization" can be overcome. The practical examples also reveal how the relative likelihood of each of the operating conditions is automatically taken into consideration during the optimization process. This is a key advantage over the use of multipoint methods.

  10. Active shape models with invariant optimal features: application to facial analysis.

    PubMed

    Sukno, Federico M; Ordás, Sebastián; Butakoff, Constantine; Cruz, Santiago; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2007-07-01

    This work is framed in the field of statistical face analysis. In particular, the problem of accurate segmentation of prominent features of the face in frontal view images is addressed. We propose a method that generalizes linear Active Shape Models (ASMs), which have already been used for this task. The technique is built upon the development of a nonlinear intensity model, incorporating a reduced set of differential invariant features as local image descriptors. These features are invariant to rigid transformations, and a subset of them is chosen by Sequential Feature Selection for each landmark and resolution level. The new approach overcomes the unimodality and Gaussianity assumptions of classical ASMs regarding the distribution of the intensity values across the training set. Our methodology has demonstrated a significant improvement in segmentation precision as compared to the linear ASM and Optimal Features ASM (a nonlinear extension of the pioneer algorithm) in the tests performed on AR, XM2VTS, and EQUINOX databases. PMID:17496371

  11. Improved Hierarchical Optimization-Based Classification of Hyperspectral Images Using Shape Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Tilton, James C.

    2012-01-01

    A new spectral-spatial method for classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. The HSegClas method is based on the integration of probabilistic classification and shape analysis within the hierarchical step-wise optimization algorithm. First, probabilistic support vector machines classification is applied. Then, at each iteration two neighboring regions with the smallest Dissimilarity Criterion (DC) are merged, and classification probabilities are recomputed. The important contribution of this work consists in estimating a DC between regions as a function of statistical, classification and geometrical (area and rectangularity) features. Experimental results are presented on a 102-band ROSIS image of the Center of Pavia, Italy. The developed approach yields more accurate classification results when compared to previously proposed methods.

  12. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using A Combined Distributed/Shared Memory Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson; Holst, Terry

    1999-01-01

    Current parallel computational approaches involve distributed and shared memory paradigms. In the distributed memory paradigm, each processor has its own independent memory. Message passing typically uses a function library such as MPI or PVM. In the shared memory paradigm, such as that used on the SGI Origin 2000 machine, compiler directives are used to instruct the compiler to schedule multiple threads to perform calculations. In this paradigm, it must be assured that processors (threads) do not simultaneously access regions of memory in such away that errors would occur. This paper utilizes the latest version of the SGI MPI function library to combine the two parallelization paradigms to perform aerodynamic shape optimization of a generic wing/body.

  13. A unified free-form representation applied to the shape optimization of the hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Huang, Yunbao; Jing, Longfei; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-01-01

    The hohlraum is very crucial for indirect laser driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. Usually, its shape is designed as sphere, cylinder, or rugby with some kind of fixed functions, such as ellipse or parabola. Recently, a spherical hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes (LEHs) has been presented with high flux symmetry [Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014); 21, 052704 (2014)]. However, there is only one shape parameter, i.e., the hohlraum to capsule radius ratio, being optimized. In this paper, we build the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs with a unified free-form representation, in which, by varying additional shape parameters: (1) available hohlraum shapes can be uniformly and accurately represented, (2) it can be used to understand why the spherical hohlraum has higher flux symmetry, (3) it allows us to obtain a feasible shape design field satisfying flux symmetry constraints, and (4) a synthetically optimized hohlraum can be obtained with a tradeoff of flux symmetry and other hohlraum performance. Finally, the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs is modeled, analyzed, and then optimized based on the unified free-form representation. The results show that a feasible shape design field with flux asymmetry no more than 1% can be obtained, and over the feasible design field, the spherical hohlraum is validated to have the highest flux symmetry, and a synthetically optimal hohlraum can be found with closing flux symmetry but larger volume between laser spots and centrally located capsule.

  14. Preliminary Assessment of Optimal Longitudinal-Mode Control for Drag Reduction through Distributed Aeroelastic Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey; Nguyen, Nhan; Lohn, Jason; Dolan, John

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of advanced lightweight materials is resulting in a new generation of lighter, flexible, more-efficient airframes that are enabling concepts for active aeroelastic wing-shape control to achieve greater flight efficiency and increased safety margins. These elastically shaped aircraft concepts require non-traditional methods for large-scale multi-objective flight control that simultaneously seek to gain aerodynamic efficiency in terms of drag reduction while performing traditional command-tracking tasks as part of a complete guidance and navigation solution. This paper presents results from a preliminary study of a notional multi-objective control law for an aeroelastic flexible-wing aircraft controlled through distributed continuous leading and trailing edge control surface actuators. This preliminary study develops and analyzes a multi-objective control law derived from optimal linear quadratic methods on a longitudinal vehicle dynamics model with coupled aeroelastic dynamics. The controller tracks commanded attack-angle while minimizing drag and controlling wing twist and bend. This paper presents an overview of the elastic aircraft concept, outlines the coupled vehicle model, presents the preliminary control law formulation and implementation, presents results from simulation, provides analysis, and concludes by identifying possible future areas for research

  15. Interpolation of longitudinal shape and image data via optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving "mass" (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury.

  16. Optimization of a T-shaped optical grating for specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szarvas, Tamás; Kis, Zsolt

    2016-07-01

    A detailed analysis of the optical reflectivity of a monolithic, T-shaped surface relief grating structure is carried out. It is shown that by changing the groove depths and widths, the frequency-dependent reflectivity of the diffraction grating can be greatly modified to obtain various specific optical elements. The basic T-shaped grating structure is optimized for three specific applications: a perfect mirror with a wide maximal reflection plateau, a bandpass filter, and a dichroic beam splitter. These specific mirrors could be used to steer the propagation of bichromatic laser fields, in situations where multilayer dielectric mirrors cannot be applied due to their worse thermomechanical properties. Colored maps are presented to show the reflection dependency on the variation of several critical structure parameters. To check the accuracy of the numerical results, four independent methods are used: finite-difference time-domain, finite-difference frequency-domain, method of lines, and rigorous coupled-wave analysis. The results of the independent numerical methods agree very well with each other indicating their correctness.

  17. Sonic boom focusing prediction and delta wing shape optimization for boom mitigation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasdeo, Nitin

    nose angle and dihedral angle on mitigating the sonic-boom ground signature. Optimal shape design for low sonic boom ground signature and least degradation of aerodynamic performance are the main goals of the present work. Response surface methodology is used for carrying out wing shape optimization. Far-field computations are carried out to predict the sonic boom signature on the ground using the full-potential code and the Thomas ray code.

  18. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Supersonic Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Jameson, Antony

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the application of a control theory-based aerodynamic shape optimization method to the problem of supersonic aircraft design. The design process is greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and a parallel implementation on distributed memory computers. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is then implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on higher order computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD). In our earlier studies, the serial implementation of this design method was shown to be effective for the optimization of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations using both the potential equation and the Euler equations. In our most recent paper, the Euler method was extended to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. Furthermore, during the same conference, we also presented preliminary results demonstrating that this basic methodology could be ported to distributed memory parallel computing architectures. In this paper, our concern will be to demonstrate that the combined power of these new technologies can be used routinely in an industrial design environment by applying it to the case study of the design of typical supersonic transport configurations. A particular difficulty of this test case is posed by the propulsion/airframe integration.

  19. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Supersonic Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Jameson, Antony

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the application of a control theory-based aerodynamic shape optimization method to the problem of supersonic aircraft design. The design process is greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and a parallel implementation on distributed memory computers. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods (13, 12, 44, 38). The resulting problem is then implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on higher order computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD). In our earlier studies, the serial implementation of this design method (19, 20, 21, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42, 43, 9) was shown to be effective for the optimization of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations using both the potential equation and the Euler equations (39, 25). In our most recent paper, the Euler method was extended to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. Furthermore, during the same conference, we also presented preliminary results demonstrating that the basic methodology could be ported to distributed memory parallel computing architectures [241. In this paper, our concem will be to demonstrate that the combined power of these new technologies can be used routinely in an industrial design environment by applying it to the case study of the design of typical supersonic transport configurations. A particular difficulty of this test case is posed by the propulsion/airframe integration.

  20. CAD based design sensitivity analysis and shape optimization of scaffolds for bio-root regeneration in swine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiangyou; Yang, Bo; Sheng, Lei; Chen, Jinlong; Li, Hui; Xie, Li; Chen, Gang; Yu, Mei; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    Tooth root supports dental crown and bears occlusal force. While proper root shape and size render the force being evenly delivered and dispersed into jawbone. Yet it remains unclear what shape and size of a biological tooth root (bio-root), which is mostly determined by the scaffold geometric design, is suitable for stress distributing and mastication performing. Therefore, this study hypothesized scaffold fabricated in proper shape and size is better for regeneration of tooth root with approving biomechanical functional features. In this study, we optimized shape and size of scaffolds for bio-root regeneration using computer aided design (CAD) modeling and finite element analysis (FEA). Statical structural analysis showed the total deformation (TD) and equivalent von-mises stress (EQV) of the restored tooth model mainly concentrated on the scaffold and the post, in accordance with the condition in a natural post restored tooth. Design sensitivity analysis showed increasing the height and upper diameter of the scaffold can tremendously reduce the TD and EQV of the model, while increasing the bottom diameter of scaffold can, to some extent, reduce the EQV in post. However, increase on post height had little influence on the whole model, only slightly increased the native EQV stress in post. Through response surface based optimization, we successfully screened out the optimal shape of the scaffold used in tissue engineering of tooth root. The optimal scaffold adopted a slightly tapered shape with the upper diameter of 4.9 mm, bottom diameter of 3.4 mm; the length of the optimized scaffold shape was 9.4 mm. While the analysis also suggested a height of about 9 mm for a metal post with a diameter of 1.4 mm suitable for crown restoration in bio-root regeneration. In order to validate the physiological function of the shape optimized scaffold in vivo, we transplanted the shape optimized treated dentin matrix (TDM) scaffold, seeding with dental stem cells, into alveolar

  1. CAD based design sensitivity analysis and shape optimization of scaffolds for bio-root regeneration in swine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiangyou; Yang, Bo; Sheng, Lei; Chen, Jinlong; Li, Hui; Xie, Li; Chen, Gang; Yu, Mei; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    Tooth root supports dental crown and bears occlusal force. While proper root shape and size render the force being evenly delivered and dispersed into jawbone. Yet it remains unclear what shape and size of a biological tooth root (bio-root), which is mostly determined by the scaffold geometric design, is suitable for stress distributing and mastication performing. Therefore, this study hypothesized scaffold fabricated in proper shape and size is better for regeneration of tooth root with approving biomechanical functional features. In this study, we optimized shape and size of scaffolds for bio-root regeneration using computer aided design (CAD) modeling and finite element analysis (FEA). Statical structural analysis showed the total deformation (TD) and equivalent von-mises stress (EQV) of the restored tooth model mainly concentrated on the scaffold and the post, in accordance with the condition in a natural post restored tooth. Design sensitivity analysis showed increasing the height and upper diameter of the scaffold can tremendously reduce the TD and EQV of the model, while increasing the bottom diameter of scaffold can, to some extent, reduce the EQV in post. However, increase on post height had little influence on the whole model, only slightly increased the native EQV stress in post. Through response surface based optimization, we successfully screened out the optimal shape of the scaffold used in tissue engineering of tooth root. The optimal scaffold adopted a slightly tapered shape with the upper diameter of 4.9 mm, bottom diameter of 3.4 mm; the length of the optimized scaffold shape was 9.4 mm. While the analysis also suggested a height of about 9 mm for a metal post with a diameter of 1.4 mm suitable for crown restoration in bio-root regeneration. In order to validate the physiological function of the shape optimized scaffold in vivo, we transplanted the shape optimized treated dentin matrix (TDM) scaffold, seeding with dental stem cells, into alveolar

  2. A Constrained Differential Evolution Algorithm for Reservoir Management: Optimal Placement and Control of Wells for Geological Carbon Storage with Uncertainty in Reservoir Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Bianchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of large volume of CO2 into deep geological reservoirs for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is expected to cause significant pressure perturbations in subsurface. Large-scale pressure increases in injection reservoirs during GCS operations, if not controlled properly, may limit dynamic storage capacity and increase risk of environmental impacts. The high pressure may impact caprock integrity, induce fault slippage, and cause leakage of brine and/or CO2 into shallow fresh groundwater resources. Thus, monitoring and controlling pressure buildup are critically important for environmentally safe implementation of GCS projects. Extraction of native brine during GCS operations is a pressure management approach to reduce significant pressure buildup. Extracted brine can be transferred to the surface for utilization or re-injected into overlying/underlying saline aquifers. However, pumping, transportation, treatment and disposal of extracted brine can be challenging and costly. Therefore, minimizing volume of extracted brine, while maximizing CO2 storage, is an essential objective of the pressure management with brine extraction schemes. Selection of optimal well locations and extraction rates are critical for maximizing storage and minimizing brine extraction during GCS. However, placing of injection and extraction wells is not intuitive because of heterogeneity in reservoir properties and complex reservoir geometry. Efficient computerized algorithms combining reservoir models and optimization methods are needed to make proper decisions on well locations and control parameters. This study presents a global optimization methodology for pressure management during geologic CO2 sequestration. A constrained differential evolution (CDE) algorithm is introduced for solving optimization problems involving well placement and injection/extraction control. The CDE methodology is tested and applied for realistic CO2 storage scenarios with the presence of uncertainty in

  3. Pulse shaping for Ge-spectrometers optimized for ballistic deficit and electronic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, A. I.; Bednyakov, V. A.

    2005-02-01

    For large-volume high-purity Ge detectors, working at low counting rates, a new two-level shaping is proposed which is based on a cusp-like form of the bottom part of the shaping and a parabolic-like form of the top shaping part. Due to the side wings of the cusp the good noise characteristics of the shaping are conserved. At the same time, the parabolic part of the pulse shape allows rather satisfactory compensation of the ballistic deficit. Calculation shows that the noise factor can be improved within 10-12% as compared to standard quasi-Gaussian shaping.

  4. Parameter and Prediction uncertainty in an optimized terrestrial carbon cycle model: Effects of constraining variables and data record length

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Wilfred M; King, Anthony Wayne; Dragoni, Danilo

    2011-01-01

    Many parameters in terrestrial biogeochemical models are inherently uncertain, leading to uncertainty in predictions of key carbon cycle variables. At observation sites, this uncertainty can be quantified by applying model-data fusion techniques to estimate model parameters using eddy covariance observations and associated biometric data sets as constraints. Uncertainty is reduced as data records become longer and different types of observations are added. We estimate parametric and associated predictive uncertainty at the Morgan Monroe State Forest in Indiana, USA. Parameters in the Local Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon (LoTEC) are estimated using both synthetic and actual constraints. These model parameters and uncertainties are then used to make predictions of carbon flux for up to 20 years. We find a strong dependence of both parametric and prediction uncertainty on the length of the data record used in the model-data fusion. In this model framework, this dependence is strongly reduced as the data record length increases beyond 5 years. If synthetic initial biomass pool constraints with realistic uncertainties are included in the model-data fusion, prediction uncertainty is reduced by more than 25% when constraining flux records are less than 3 years. If synthetic annual aboveground woody biomass increment constraints are also included, uncertainty is similarly reduced by an additional 25%. When actual observed eddy covariance data are used as constraints, there is still a strong dependence of parameter and prediction uncertainty on data record length, but the results are harder to interpret because of the inability of LoTEC to reproduce observed interannual variations and the confounding effects of model structural error.

  5. Optimal locations for absolute gravity measurements and sensitivity of GRACE observations for constraining glacial isostatic adjustment on the northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Wang, Hansheng

    2012-09-01

    Gravity rate of change is an important quantity in the investigation of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). However, measurements with absolute and relative gravimeters are laborious and time-consuming, especially in the vast GIA-affected regions of high latitudes with insufficient infrastructure. Results of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have thus provided tremendous new insight as they fully cover those areas. To better constrain the GIA model (i.e. improve the glaciation history and Earth parameters) with new gravity data, we analyse the currently determined errors in gravity rate of change from absolute gravity (AG) and GRACE measurements in North America and Fennoscandia to test their sensitivity for different ice models, lithospheric thickness, background viscosity and lateral mantle viscosity variations. We provide detailed sensitivity maps for these four parameters and highlight areas that need more AG measurements to further improve our understanding of GIA. The best detectable parameter with both methods in both regions is the sensitivity to ice model changes, which covers large areas in the sensitivity maps. Also, most of these areas are isolated from sensitive areas of the other three parameters. The latter mainly overlap with ice model sensitivity and each other. Regarding existing AG stations, more stations are strongly needed in northwestern and Arctic Canada. In contrast, a quite dense network of stations already exists in Fennoscandia. With an extension to a few sites in northwestern Russia, a complete station network is provided to study the GIA parameters. The data of dense networks would yield a comprehensive picture of gravity change, which can be further used for studies of the Earth's interior and geodynamic processes.

  6. Optimal Inlet Shape Design of N2B Hybrid Wing Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoungjin; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    The N2B hybrid wing body aircraft was conceptually designed to meet environmental and performance goals for the N+2 generation transport set by the Subsonic Fixed Wing project of NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program. In the present study, flow simulations are conducted around the N2B configuration by a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver using unstructured meshes. Boundary conditions at engine fan face and nozzle exhaust planes are provided by the NPSS thermodynamic engine cycle model. The flow simulations reveal challenging design issues arising from boundary layer ingestion offset inlet and airframe-propulsion integration. Adjoint-based optimal designs are then conducted for the inlet shape to minimize the airframe drag force and flow distortion at fan faces. Design surfaces are parameterized by NURBS, and the cowl lip geometry is modified by a spring analogy approach. By the drag minimization design, flow separation on the cowl surfaces are almost removed, and shock wave strength got remarkably reduced. For the distortion minimization design, a circumferential distortion indicator DPCP(sub avg) is adopted as the design objective and diffuser bottom and side wall surfaces are perturbed for the design. The distortion minimization results in a 12.5 % reduction in the objective function.

  7. Mechanical properties identification and design optimization of nitinol shape memory alloy microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, M.; Hamedi, M.; Salmani Nohouji, H.; Arghavani, J.

    2014-02-01

    Microactuators are essential elements of MEMS and are widely used in these devices. Microgrippers, micropositioners, microfixtures, micropumps and microvalves are well-known applications of microstructures. In this paper, the design optimization of shape memory alloy microactuators is discussed. Four different configurations of microactuator with variable geometrical parameters, generating different levels of displacement and force, are designed and analysed. In order to determine the optimum values of parameters for each microactuator, statistical design of experiments (DOE) is used. For this purpose, the Souza et al constitutive model (1988 Eur. J. Mech. A 17 789-806) is adapted for use in finite element analysis software. Mechanical properties of the SMA are identified by performing experimental tests on Ti-49.8%Ni. Finally, the specific energy of each microactuator is determined using the calibrated model and regression analysis. Moreover, the characteristic curve of each microactuator is obtained and with this virtual tool one can choose a microactuator with the desired force and displacement. The methodology discussed in this paper can be used as a reference to design appropriate microactuators for different MEMS applications producing various ranges of displacement and force.

  8. Determination of Optimal Velocity Ranges Based on the Shape Profiles of Two Passive Surface Water Flux Meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padowski, J. C.; Klammler, H.; Jawitz, J. W.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M.

    2004-12-01

    A method is presented for direct measurement of cumulative surface water flux (discharge) and solute flux using a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Both the water velocity and the shape, or bluntness, of the device are important for determining the flow profile around a submerged body. Theoretically, the PSFM should provide the most precise cumulative flux measurements when the shape of the device is as blunt as possible without creating a separation region or a downstream wake. This study examined how the shape of the PSFM affects the accuracy of the cumulative flux data and determined the optimal velocity ranges under which each shape profile could be used. In this experiment, blunt (cylindrical) and streamlined (Joukowsky profile) shapes were tested. Both of these devices were examined under a range of velocities in a laboratory flume. Results showed that the blunt shape provided more accurate water and solute flux measurements at lower velocities, whereas the streamlined shape provided more accurate measurements at higher velocities. These findings indicate that the shape profile of the PSFM may be adjusted to provide the most accurate cumulative water and solute flux measurements when deployed in known flow regimes.

  9. Stability and optimization of P-phase precipitates in nickel-titanium-palladium shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppa, Anne Catherine

    The motivation for this research is the understanding of phase transformations that lead to an increase in the shape memory effect (SME) transformation temperature in a Ni-Ti-Pd shape memory alloy (SMA). The research addressed three major parts of this transformation---(1) The phase stability of the P-phase precipitate previously discovered with an emphasis on its stoichiometric limits by changing the Ni and Pd content with the Ti11(Ni,Pd)13 ratio; (2) The effects of P-phase precipitation on the martensitic transformation temperature in near-equiatomic Ti(Ni,Pd) alloys; and (3) The effects of dilute additions of Hf (0.1-1 at.%) to the precipitation and shape memory transformation temperature in Ni-Ti-Pd. P-phase stabilization: The compositional limits of the P-phase have been systematically studied by varying the Pd and Ni content in the P-phase's Ti11(Ni+Pd)13 stoichiometry. Each alloy was solutionized at 1050°C followed by water quenching, and aging at 400°C for 100 hours. Four distinct phases were identified---Ti 2Pd3, B2 Ni-Ti, P- and P1-phases dependent on alloy composition---by electron and x-ray diffraction. The latter precipitate phases become more stable with increasing Ni at the expense of Pd content. Atom probe tomography revealed the P-phase composition to be 45.8Ti-29.2Ni-25Pd (at.%) or Ti 11(Ni7Pd6) as compared to the P1-phase 44.7Ti- 45.8Ni-9.4Pd (at.%) or Ti5Ni5Pd. Optimization of P-phase precipitation: The effect of aging time and temperature on precipitation and subsequent martensitic transformation temperatures for a series of Ni-(50.5-49.2)Ti-32Pd (at.%) shape memory alloys has been studied. Structure-property relationships were developed through detailed microstructural characterization involving transmission electron microscopy, diffraction analysis, and atom probe tomography with links to microhardness measurements and transformation temperatures established by differential scanning calorimetry. The Ti-rich alloy contained relatively coarse

  10. Computing global minimizers to a constrained B-spline image registration problem from optimal l1 perturbations to block match data

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Edward; Castillo, Richard; Fuentes, David; Guerrero, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Block matching is a well-known strategy for estimating corresponding voxel locations between a pair of images according to an image similarity metric. Though robust to issues such as image noise and large magnitude voxel displacements, the estimated point matches are not guaranteed to be spatially accurate. However, the underlying optimization problem solved by the block matching procedure is similar in structure to the class of optimization problem associated with B-spline based registration methods. By exploiting this relationship, the authors derive a numerical method for computing a global minimizer to a constrained B-spline registration problem that incorporates the robustness of block matching with the global smoothness properties inherent to B-spline parameterization. Methods: The method reformulates the traditional B-spline registration problem as a basis pursuit problem describing the minimal l1-perturbation to block match pairs required to produce a B-spline fitting error within a given tolerance. The sparsity pattern of the optimal perturbation then defines a voxel point cloud subset on which the B-spline fit is a global minimizer to a constrained variant of the B-spline registration problem. As opposed to traditional B-spline algorithms, the optimization step involving the actual image data is addressed by block matching. Results: The performance of the method is measured in terms of spatial accuracy using ten inhale/exhale thoracic CT image pairs (available for download at www.dir-lab.com) obtained from the COPDgene dataset and corresponding sets of expert-determined landmark point pairs. The results of the validation procedure demonstrate that the method can achieve a high spatial accuracy on a significantly complex image set. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is demonstrated to achieve a high spatial accuracy and is generalizable in that in can employ any displacement field parameterization described as a least squares fit to block match

  11. Sensor networks for optimal target localization with bearings-only measurements in constrained three-dimensional scenarios.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Salinas, David; Pascoal, Antonio; Aranda, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of determining the optimal geometric configuration of an acoustic sensor network that will maximize the angle-related information available for underwater target positioning. In the set-up adopted, a set of autonomous vehicles carries a network of acoustic units that measure the elevation and azimuth angles between a target and each of the receivers on board the vehicles. It is assumed that the angle measurements are corrupted by white Gaussian noise, the variance of which is distance-dependent. Using tools from estimation theory, the problem is converted into that of minimizing, by proper choice of the sensor positions, the trace of the inverse of the Fisher Information Matrix (also called the Cramer-Rao Bound matrix) to determine the sensor configuration that yields the minimum possible covariance of any unbiased target estimator. It is shown that the optimal configuration of the sensors depends explicitly on the intensity of the measurement noise, the constraints imposed on the sensor configuration, the target depth and the probabilistic distribution that defines the prior uncertainty in the target position. Simulation examples illustrate the key results derived.

  12. Sensor Networks for Optimal Target Localization with Bearings-Only Measurements in Constrained Three-Dimensional Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Salinas, David; Pascoal, Antonio; Aranda, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of determining the optimal geometric configuration of an acoustic sensor network that will maximize the angle-related information available for underwater target positioning. In the set-up adopted, a set of autonomous vehicles carries a network of acoustic units that measure the elevation and azimuth angles between a target and each of the receivers on board the vehicles. It is assumed that the angle measurements are corrupted by white Gaussian noise, the variance of which is distance-dependent. Using tools from estimation theory, the problem is converted into that of minimizing, by proper choice of the sensor positions, the trace of the inverse of the Fisher Information Matrix (also called the Cramer-Rao Bound matrix) to determine the sensor configuration that yields the minimum possible covariance of any unbiased target estimator. It is shown that the optimal configuration of the sensors depends explicitly on the intensity of the measurement noise, the constraints imposed on the sensor configuration, the target depth and the probabilistic distribution that defines the prior uncertainty in the target position. Simulation examples illustrate the key results derived. PMID:23941912

  13. Simultaneous topology, shape and size optimization of truss structures by fully stressed design based on evolution strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrari, Ali; Atai, Ali A.; Deb, Kalyanmoy

    2015-08-01

    The most effective scheme of truss optimization considers the combined effect of topology, shape and size (TSS); however, most available studies on truss optimization by metaheuristics concentrated on one or two of the above aspects. The presence of diverse design variables and constraints in TSS optimization may account for such limited applicability of metaheuristics to this field. In this article, a recently proposed algorithm for simultaneous shape and size optimization, fully stressed design based on evolution strategy (FSD-ES), is enhanced to handle TSS optimization problems. FSD-ES combines advantages of the well-known deterministic approach of fully stressed design with potential global search of the state-of-the-art evolution strategy. A comparison of results demonstrates that the proposed optimizer reaches the same or similar solutions faster and/or is able to find lighter designs than those previously reported in the literature. Moreover, the proposed variant of FSD-ES requires no user-based tuning effort, which is desired in a practical application. The proposed methodology has been tested on a number of problems and is now ready to be applied to more complex TSS problems.

  14. A Computational Approach to Model Vascular Adaptation During Chronic Hemodialysis: Shape Optimization as a Substitute for Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Hammes, Mary

    2015-11-01

    End-stage-renal disease patients depend on successful long-term hemodialysis via vascular access, commonly facilitated via a Brachiocephalic Fistula (BCF). The primary cause of BCF failure is Cephalic Arch Stenosis (CAS). It is believed that low Wall Shear Stress (WSS) regions, which occur because of the high flow rates through the natural bend in the cephalic vein, create hemodynamic circumstances that trigger the onset and development of Intimal Hyperplasia (IH) and subsequent CAS. IH is hypothesized to be a natural effort to reshape the vessel, aiming to bring the WSS values back to a physiologically acceptable range. We seek to explore the correlation between regions of low WSS and subsequent IH and CAS in patient-specific geometries. By utilizing a shape optimization framework, a method is proposed to predict cardiovascular adaptation that could potentially be an alternative to vascular growth and remodeling. Based on an objective functional that seeks to alter the vessel shape in such a way as to readjust the WSS to be within the normal physiological range, CFD and shape optimization are then coupled to investigate whether the optimal shape evolution is correlated with actual patient-specific geometries thereafter. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  15. Optimal Environmental Conditions and Anomalous Ecosystem Responses: Constraining Bottom-up Controls of Phytoplankton Biomass in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacox, Michael G.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Bograd, Steven J.

    2016-06-01

    In Eastern Boundary Current systems, wind-driven upwelling drives nutrient-rich water to the ocean surface, making these regions among the most productive on Earth. Regulation of productivity by changing wind and/or nutrient conditions can dramatically impact ecosystem functioning, though the mechanisms are not well understood beyond broad-scale relationships. Here, we explore bottom-up controls during the California Current System (CCS) upwelling season by quantifying the dependence of phytoplankton biomass (as indicated by satellite chlorophyll estimates) on two key environmental parameters: subsurface nitrate concentration and surface wind stress. In general, moderate winds and high nitrate concentrations yield maximal biomass near shore, while offshore biomass is positively correlated with subsurface nitrate concentration. However, due to nonlinear interactions between the influences of wind and nitrate, bottom-up control of phytoplankton cannot be described by either one alone, nor by a combined metric such as nitrate flux. We quantify optimal environmental conditions for phytoplankton, defined as the wind/nitrate space that maximizes chlorophyll concentration, and present a framework for evaluating ecosystem change relative to environmental drivers. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by (i) elucidating anomalous CCS responses in 1998–1999, 2002, and 2005, and (ii) providing a basis for assessing potential biological impacts of projected climate change.

  16. Optimal Environmental Conditions and Anomalous Ecosystem Responses: Constraining Bottom-up Controls of Phytoplankton Biomass in the California Current System

    PubMed Central

    Jacox, Michael G.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Bograd, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    In Eastern Boundary Current systems, wind-driven upwelling drives nutrient-rich water to the ocean surface, making these regions among the most productive on Earth. Regulation of productivity by changing wind and/or nutrient conditions can dramatically impact ecosystem functioning, though the mechanisms are not well understood beyond broad-scale relationships. Here, we explore bottom-up controls during the California Current System (CCS) upwelling season by quantifying the dependence of phytoplankton biomass (as indicated by satellite chlorophyll estimates) on two key environmental parameters: subsurface nitrate concentration and surface wind stress. In general, moderate winds and high nitrate concentrations yield maximal biomass near shore, while offshore biomass is positively correlated with subsurface nitrate concentration. However, due to nonlinear interactions between the influences of wind and nitrate, bottom-up control of phytoplankton cannot be described by either one alone, nor by a combined metric such as nitrate flux. We quantify optimal environmental conditions for phytoplankton, defined as the wind/nitrate space that maximizes chlorophyll concentration, and present a framework for evaluating ecosystem change relative to environmental drivers. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by (i) elucidating anomalous CCS responses in 1998–1999, 2002, and 2005, and (ii) providing a basis for assessing potential biological impacts of projected climate change. PMID:27278260

  17. Optimal Environmental Conditions and Anomalous Ecosystem Responses: Constraining Bottom-up Controls of Phytoplankton Biomass in the California Current System.

    PubMed

    Jacox, Michael G; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    In Eastern Boundary Current systems, wind-driven upwelling drives nutrient-rich water to the ocean surface, making these regions among the most productive on Earth. Regulation of productivity by changing wind and/or nutrient conditions can dramatically impact ecosystem functioning, though the mechanisms are not well understood beyond broad-scale relationships. Here, we explore bottom-up controls during the California Current System (CCS) upwelling season by quantifying the dependence of phytoplankton biomass (as indicated by satellite chlorophyll estimates) on two key environmental parameters: subsurface nitrate concentration and surface wind stress. In general, moderate winds and high nitrate concentrations yield maximal biomass near shore, while offshore biomass is positively correlated with subsurface nitrate concentration. However, due to nonlinear interactions between the influences of wind and nitrate, bottom-up control of phytoplankton cannot be described by either one alone, nor by a combined metric such as nitrate flux. We quantify optimal environmental conditions for phytoplankton, defined as the wind/nitrate space that maximizes chlorophyll concentration, and present a framework for evaluating ecosystem change relative to environmental drivers. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by (i) elucidating anomalous CCS responses in 1998-1999, 2002, and 2005, and (ii) providing a basis for assessing potential biological impacts of projected climate change. PMID:27278260

  18. Vibration of isotropic and composite plates using computed shape function and its application to elastic support optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jackson

    2009-10-01

    Vibration of plates with various boundary and internal support conditions is analyzed, based on classical thin-plate theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz approach. To satisfy the support conditions, a new set of admissible functions, namely the computed shape functions, is applied to each of the two orthogonal in-plane directions. Similar to conventional finite element shape functions, parameters associated with each term of the proposed functions represent the actual displacements of the plates, thus making the method easily applicable to a wide range of support conditions, including continuous or partial edge supports and discrete internal supports. The method can also be applied to plates consisting of rectangular segments, like an L-shape plate, which sub-domains can be formulated using the computed shape functions and subsequently assembled in the usual finite element manner. Unlike many other admissible functions proposed in the literature, however, the computed shape functions presented herein are C 1—continuous and involve no complicated mathematical functions; they can be easily computed a priori by means of a continuous beam computer program and only the conventional third-order beam shape functions are involved in subsequent formulation. In all the examples given herein, only a few terms of these functions are sufficient to obtain accurate frequencies, thus demonstrating its computational effectiveness and accuracy. The method is further extended to the study of optimal location and stiffness of discrete elastic supports for maximizing the fundamental frequency of plates. Unlike rigid point supports with infinite stiffness, which optimal locations have been studied by many researchers, only discrete supports with a finite stiffness is considered in this paper. The optimal location and stiffness of discrete supports are determined for isotropic plates and laminated plates with various stacking sequences, which results are presented for the first time in

  19. Geometry Control System for Exploratory Shape Optimization Applied to High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design of Unconventional Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Hugo

    This thesis represents a step forward to bring geometry parameterization and control on par with the disciplinary analyses involved in shape optimization, particularly high-fidelity aerodynamic shape optimization. Central to the proposed methodology is the non-uniform rational B-spline, used here to develop a new geometry generator and geometry control system applicable to the aerodynamic design of both conventional and unconventional aircraft. The geometry generator adopts a component-based approach, where any number of predefined but modifiable (parametric) wing, fuselage, junction, etc., components can be arbitrarily assembled to generate the outer mold line of aircraft geometry. A unique Python-based user interface incorporating an interactive OpenGL windowing system is proposed. Together, these tools allow for the generation of high-quality, C2 continuous (or higher), and customized aircraft geometry with fast turnaround. The geometry control system tightly integrates shape parameterization with volume mesh movement using a two-level free-form deformation approach. The framework is augmented with axial curves, which are shown to be flexible and efficient at parameterizing wing systems of arbitrary topology. A key aspect of this methodology is that very large shape deformations can be achieved with only a few, intuitive control parameters. Shape deformation consumes a few tenths of a second on a single processor and surface sensitivities are machine accurate. The geometry control system is implemented within an existing aerodynamic optimizer comprising a flow solver for the Euler equations and a sequential quadratic programming optimizer. Gradients are evaluated exactly with discrete-adjoint variables. The algorithm is first validated by recovering an elliptical lift distribution on a rectangular wing, and then demonstrated through the exploratory shape optimization of a three-pronged feathered winglet leading to a span efficiency of 1.22 under a height

  20. Optimal Transducer Arrangement for Temperature Distribution Measurement in Arbitrary Convex-Shaped Space by Acoustic Computerized Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayumu Minamide,; Naoto Wakatsuki,; Koichi Mizutani,

    2010-07-01

    We study the optimal transducer arrangement for measuring temperature distribution in an arbitrary convex-shaped space by acoustic computerized tomography (A-CT) using flexibly arranged transducers. The transducer arrangement is optimized by the combined use of two methods, namely, real-coded genetic algorithm (RCGA) and simulated annealing (SA). By RCGA, the optimized arrangement is globally searched and then locally searched by SA. A fitness function of these methods is defined to evaluate the distribution of projection data in θ-r space. By use of this function, we aim to obtain better projection data sets by two-dimensionally interpolating the projection data. By numerical simulations, we confirmed the adequacy of our method and the optimized transducer arrangement.

  1. Shape Optimization for Additive Manufacturing of Removable Partial Dentures--A New Paradigm for Prosthetic CAD/CAM.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Suenaga, Hanako; Li, Wei; Sasaki, Keiichi; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    With ever-growing aging population and demand for denture treatments, pressure-induced mucosa lesion and residual ridge resorption remain main sources of clinical complications. Conventional denture design and fabrication are challenged for its labor and experience intensity, urgently necessitating an automatic procedure. This study aims to develop a fully automatic procedure enabling shape optimization and additive manufacturing of removable partial dentures (RPD), to maximize the uniformity of contact pressure distribution on the mucosa, thereby reducing associated clinical complications. A 3D heterogeneous finite element (FE) model was constructed from CT scan, and the critical tissue of mucosa was modeled as a hyperelastic material from in vivo clinical data. A contact shape optimization algorithm was developed based on the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique. Both initial and optimized dentures were prototyped by 3D printing technology and evaluated with in vitro tests. Through the optimization, the peak contact pressure was reduced by 70%, and the uniformity was improved by 63%. In vitro tests verified the effectiveness of this procedure, and the hydrostatic pressure induced in the mucosa is well below clinical pressure-pain thresholds (PPT), potentially lessening risk of residual ridge resorption. This proposed computational optimization and additive fabrication procedure provides a novel method for fast denture design and adjustment at low cost, with quantitative guidelines and computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for a specific patient. The integration of digitalized modeling, computational optimization, and free-form fabrication enables more efficient clinical adaptation. The customized optimal denture design is expected to minimize pain/discomfort and potentially reduce long-term residual ridge resorption.

  2. Shape Optimization for Additive Manufacturing of Removable Partial Dentures - A New Paradigm for Prosthetic CAD/CAM

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With ever-growing aging population and demand for denture treatments, pressure-induced mucosa lesion and residual ridge resorption remain main sources of clinical complications. Conventional denture design and fabrication are challenged for its labor and experience intensity, urgently necessitating an automatic procedure. This study aims to develop a fully automatic procedure enabling shape optimization and additive manufacturing of removable partial dentures (RPD), to maximize the uniformity of contact pressure distribution on the mucosa, thereby reducing associated clinical complications. A 3D heterogeneous finite element (FE) model was constructed from CT scan, and the critical tissue of mucosa was modeled as a hyperelastic material from in vivo clinical data. A contact shape optimization algorithm was developed based on the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique. Both initial and optimized dentures were prototyped by 3D printing technology and evaluated with in vitro tests. Through the optimization, the peak contact pressure was reduced by 70%, and the uniformity was improved by 63%. In vitro tests verified the effectiveness of this procedure, and the hydrostatic pressure induced in the mucosa is well below clinical pressure-pain thresholds (PPT), potentially lessening risk of residual ridge resorption. This proposed computational optimization and additive fabrication procedure provides a novel method for fast denture design and adjustment at low cost, with quantitative guidelines and computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for a specific patient. The integration of digitalized modeling, computational optimization, and free-form fabrication enables more efficient clinical adaptation. The customized optimal denture design is expected to minimize pain/discomfort and potentially reduce long-term residual ridge resorption. PMID:26161878

  3. APPLICATION OF A BIP CONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION MODEL COMBINED WITH NASA's ATLAS MODEL TO OPTIMIZE THE SOCIETAL BENEFITS OF THE USA's INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION AND UTILIZATION INITIATIVE OF 1/14/04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Glover, Fred W.; Woodcock, Gordon R.; Laguna, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The 1/14/04 USA Space Exploratiofltilization Initiative invites all Space-faring Nations, all Space User Groups in Science, Space Entrepreneuring, Advocates of Robotic and Human Space Exploration, Space Tourism and Colonization Promoters, etc., to join an International Space Partnership. With more Space-faring Nations and Space User Groups each year, such a Partnership would require Multi-year (35 yr.-45 yr.) Space Mission Planning. With each Nation and Space User Group demanding priority for its missions, one needs a methodology for obiectively selecting the best mission sequences to be added annually to this 45 yr. Moving Space Mission Plan. How can this be done? Planners have suggested building a Reusable, Sustainable, Space Transportation Infrastructure (RSSn) to increase Mission synergism, reduce cost, and increase scientific and societal returns from this Space Initiative. Morgenthaler and Woodcock presented a Paper at the 55th IAC, Vancouver B.C., Canada, entitled Constrained Optimization Models For Optimizing Multi - Year Space Programs. This Paper showed that a Binary Integer Programming (BIP) Constrained Optimization Model combined with the NASA ATLAS Cost and Space System Operational Parameter Estimating Model has the theoretical capability to solve such problems. IAA Commission III, Space Technology and Space System Development, in its ACADEMY DAY meeting at Vancouver, requested that the Authors and NASA experts find several Space Exploration Architectures (SEAS), apply the combined BIP/ATLAS Models, and report the results at the 56th Fukuoka IAC. While the mathematical Model is in Ref.[2] this Paper presents the Application saga of that effort.

  4. Terahertz harvesting with shape-optimized InAlAs/InGaAs self-switching nanodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes-Mestizo, Irving; Méndez-García, Victor H.; Briones, Joel; Perez-Caro, Manuel; Droopad, Ravi; McMurtry, Stefan; Hehn, Michel; Montaigne, François; Briones, Edgar

    2015-11-01

    In this letter, self-switching nanochannels have been proposed as an enabling technology for energy gathering in the terahertz (THz) regime. Such devices combine their diode-like behavior and high-speed of operation in order to generate DC electrical power from high-frequency signals. By using finite-element simulations, we have improved the sensitivity of L-shaped and V-shaped nanochannels based on InAlAs/InGaAs samples. Since those devices combine geometrical effects with their rectifying properties at zero-bias, we have improved their performance by optimizing their shape. Results show nominal sensitivities at zero-bias in the order of 40 V-1 and 20 V-1, attractive values for harvesting applications with square-law rectifiers.

  5. Numerical simulation for optimizing mode shaping and supercontinuum flatness of liquid filled seven-core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Liang; Wei, Li; Guoying, Feng

    2015-05-01

    A seven-core photonic crystal fiber filled with commercial index-matching liquids is designed to optimize mode shaping and supercontinuum flatness. Numerical simulation of supercontinuum generation in these liquid-filled seven-core PCFs is conducted at 25 °C. The definition of spectral flatness measure is used to quantitatively describe SC flatness. Numerical simulations are performed to study the propagation of femtosecond pulse in the liquid-filled seven-core PCFs. Results show that mode shaping and supercontinuum flatness can be easily optimized and modified using the index-matching liquids in seven-core PCF without varying the structure of the air rings around the guiding cores. Simulations also show that 50 fs pulses with a center wavelength of 1064 nm generate relatively flat SC spectra in the 25 cm-long liquid-filled PCF. A flat spectral bandwidth of 400 nm (900-1300 nm) is achieved with an applied pump power of 30 kW. The simulation results demonstrate that using index-matching liquids to fill the inner ring of the seven-core PCF optimizes mode shaping and generates flat SC spectrum in specified wavelength region. Results further demonstrate that the SC flatness increased with increasing PCF dispersion corresponding to pump wavelength, on the premise that generated enough spectrum width, when the pump worked in the normal dispersion region. Temperature barely affects the spectrum flatness, but can affect spectrum broadening.

  6. A credibility-based chance-constrained optimization model for integrated agricultural and water resources management: A case study in South Central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongwei; Du, Peng; Chen, Yizhong; He, Li

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a credibility-based chance-constrained optimization model for integrated agricultural irrigation and water resources management. The model not only deals with parameter uncertainty represented as fuzzy sets, but also provides a credibility level which indicates the confidence level of the generated optimal management strategies. The model is used on a real-world case study in South Central China. Results from the case study reveal that: (1) a reduction in credibility level would result in an increasing planting area of watermelon, but impaired the planting acreage of high-quality rice and silk; (2) groundwater allocation would be prioritized for reducing surface water utilization cost; (3) the actual phosphorus and nitrogen emissions reached their limit values in most of the zones over the planning horizon (i.e., phosphorus and nitrogen emissions reaching 969 tonnes and 3814 tonnes under λ = 1.00, respectively; phosphorus and nitrogen emissions reaching 972 tonnes and 3891 tonnes under λ = 0.70, respectively). When the credibility level reduces from 1.00 to 0.70, system benefit would rise by 32.60% and groundwater consumption would be reduced by 79.51%. However, the pollutant discharge would not increase as expected, which would be reduced by 40.14% on the contrary. If system benefit is not of major concern, an aggressive strategy is suggested by selecting a rather low credibility level (say, 0.70). This strategy is suggested for guaranteeing protection of local groundwater resources and mitigation of local environmental deterioration by sacrificing part of system benefit.

  7. Shape optimization of 3D continuum structures via force approximation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garret N.; Kodiyalam, Srinivas

    1988-01-01

    The existing need to develop methods whereby the shape design efficiency can be improved through the use of high quality approximation methods is addressed. An efficient approximation method for stress constraints in 3D shape design problems is proposed based on expanding the nodal forces in Taylor series with respect to shape variations. The significance of this new method is shown through elementary beam theory calculations and via numerical computations using 3D solid finite elements. Numerical examples including the classical cantilever beam structure and realistic automotive parts like the engine connecting rod are designed for optimum shape using the proposed method. The numerical results obtained from these methods are compared with other published results, to assess the efficiency and the convergence rate of the proposed method.

  8. Investigating preferences for color-shape combinations with gaze driven optimization method based on evolutionary algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Tim; Zanker, Johannes M.

    2013-01-01

    Studying aesthetic preference is notoriously difficult because it targets individual experience. Eye movements provide a rich source of behavioral measures that directly reflect subjective choice. To determine individual preferences for simple composition rules we here use fixation duration as the fitness measure in a Gaze Driven Evolutionary Algorithm (GDEA), which has been demonstrated as a tool to identify aesthetic preferences (Holmes and Zanker, 2012). In the present study, the GDEA was used to investigate the preferred combination of color and shape which have been promoted in the Bauhaus arts school. We used the same three shapes (square, circle, triangle) used by Kandinsky (1923), with the three color palette from the original experiment (A), an extended seven color palette (B), and eight different shape orientation (C). Participants were instructed to look for their preferred circle, triangle or square in displays with eight stimuli of different shapes, colors and rotations, in an attempt to test for a strong preference for red squares, yellow triangles and blue circles in such an unbiased experimental design and with an extended set of possible combinations. We Tested six participants extensively on the different conditions and found consistent preferences for color-shape combinations for individuals, but little evidence at the group level for clear color/shape preference consistent with Kandinsky's claims, apart from some weak link between yellow and triangles. Our findings suggest substantial inter-individual differences in the presence of stable individual associations of color and shapes, but also that these associations are robust within a single individual. These individual differences go some way toward challenging the claims of the universal preference for color/shape combinations proposed by Kandinsky, but also indicate that a much larger sample size would be needed to confidently reject that hypothesis. Moreover, these experiments highlight the

  9. Investigating preferences for color-shape combinations with gaze driven optimization method based on evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Tim; Zanker, Johannes M

    2013-01-01

    Studying aesthetic preference is notoriously difficult because it targets individual experience. Eye movements provide a rich source of behavioral measures that directly reflect subjective choice. To determine individual preferences for simple composition rules we here use fixation duration as the fitness measure in a Gaze Driven Evolutionary Algorithm (GDEA), which has been demonstrated as a tool to identify aesthetic preferences (Holmes and Zanker, 2012). In the present study, the GDEA was used to investigate the preferred combination of color and shape which have been promoted in the Bauhaus arts school. We used the same three shapes (square, circle, triangle) used by Kandinsky (1923), with the three color palette from the original experiment (A), an extended seven color palette (B), and eight different shape orientation (C). Participants were instructed to look for their preferred circle, triangle or square in displays with eight stimuli of different shapes, colors and rotations, in an attempt to test for a strong preference for red squares, yellow triangles and blue circles in such an unbiased experimental design and with an extended set of possible combinations. We Tested six participants extensively on the different conditions and found consistent preferences for color-shape combinations for individuals, but little evidence at the group level for clear color/shape preference consistent with Kandinsky's claims, apart from some weak link between yellow and triangles. Our findings suggest substantial inter-individual differences in the presence of stable individual associations of color and shapes, but also that these associations are robust within a single individual. These individual differences go some way toward challenging the claims of the universal preference for color/shape combinations proposed by Kandinsky, but also indicate that a much larger sample size would be needed to confidently reject that hypothesis. Moreover, these experiments highlight the

  10. Optimization of the parameters affecting the shape and position of crystal-melt interface in YAG single crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadian, Morteza; Seyedein, S. H.; Aboutalebi, M. R.; Maroosi, A.

    2009-01-01

    In Czochralski method, the shape of crystal-melt interface and its position play a major role on the quality of single crystals. In the Czochralski crystal growth process having a nearly flat interface, a single crystal with less structural defect, uniform physical properties and homogenous chemical composition is obtained. In the present study, firstly a 2-D fluid flow and solidification model was developed to simulate the YAG single crystal growth process using a finite volume method. The fluid flow and solidification heat transfer model was further tested by available experimental data. The verified fluid flow and solidification heat transfer model was used to build an artificial neural network and trained to optimize the parameters affecting the shape and position of the interface. Finally, the trained neural network was employed to optimize the operating parameters such as pulling rate, rotation speed of the crystal, ambient gas and temperature of crucible wall to obtain a closely flat crystal-melt interface. The optimized variables were eventually used in fluid flow model to evaluate the performance of the optimization model.

  11. An optimal set of landmarks for metopic craniosynostosis diagnosis from shape analysis of pediatric CT scans of the head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Carlos S.; Safdar, Nabile; Myers, Emmarie; Kittisarapong, Tanakorn; Rogers, Gary F.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2013-02-01

    Craniosynostosis (premature fusion of skull sutures) is a severe condition present in one of every 2000 newborns. Metopic craniosynostosis, accounting for 20-27% of cases, is diagnosed qualitatively in terms of skull shape abnormality, a subjective call of the surgeon. In this paper we introduce a new quantitative diagnostic feature for metopic craniosynostosis derived optimally from shape analysis of CT scans of the skull. We built a robust shape analysis pipeline that is capable of obtaining local shape differences in comparison to normal anatomy. Spatial normalization using 7-degree-of-freedom registration of the base of the skull is followed by a novel bone labeling strategy based on graph-cuts according to labeling priors. The statistical shape model built from 94 normal subjects allows matching a patient's anatomy to its most similar normal subject. Subsequently, the computation of local malformations from a normal subject allows characterization of the points of maximum malformation on each of the frontal bones adjacent to the metopic suture, and on the suture itself. Our results show that the malformations at these locations vary significantly (p<0.001) between abnormal/normal subjects and that an accurate diagnosis can be achieved using linear regression from these automatic measurements with an area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic of 0.97.

  12. MATERIAL SHAPE OPTIMIZATION FOR FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES APPLYING A DAMAGE FORMULATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Junji; Ramm, Ekkehard; Terada, Kenjiro; Kyoya, Takashi

    The present contribution deals with an optimization strategy of fiber reinforced composites. Although the methodical concept is very general we concentrate on Fiber Reinforced Concrete with a complex failure mechanism resulting from material brittleness of both constituents matrix and fibers. The purpose of the present paper is to improve the structural ductility of the fiber reinforced composites applying an optimization method with respect to the geometrical layout of continuous long textile fibers. The method proposed is achieved by applying a so-called embedded reinforcement formulation. This methodology is extended to a damage formulation in order to represent a realistic structural behavior. For the optimization problem a gradient-based optimization scheme is assumed. An optimality criteria method is applied because of its numerically high efficiency and robustness. The performance of the method is demonstrated by a series of numerical examples; it is verified that the ductility can be substantially improved.

  13. Shape slack: a design-manufacturing co-optimization methodology using tolerance information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shayak; Agarwal, Kanak B.; Nassif, Sani; Orshansky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The move to low-k1 lithography makes it increasingly difficult to print feature sizes that are a small fraction of the wavelength of light. With further delay in the delivery of extreme ultraviolet lithography, these difficulties will motivate the research community to explore increasingly broad solutions. We propose that there is significant research potential in studying the essential premise of the design/manufacturing handoff paradigm. Today this premise revolves around design rules that define what implementations are legal, and raw shapes, which define design intent, and are treated as a fixed requirement for lithography. In reality, layout features may vary within certain tolerances without violating any design constraints. The knowledge of such tolerances can help improve the manufacturability of layout features while still meeting design requirements. We propose a methodology to convert electrical slack in a design to shape slack or tolerances on individual layout shapes. We show how this can be done for two important implementation fabrics: (a) cell-library-based digital logic and (b) static random access memory. We further develop a tolerance-driven optical proximity correction algorithm that utilizes this shape slack information during mask preparation to ensure that all features prints within their shape slacks in presence of lithographic process variations. Experiments on 45 nm silicon on insulator cells using accurate process models show that this approach reduces postlithography delay errors by 50%, and layout hotspots by 47% compared to conventional methods.

  14. Optimized conformal parameterization of cortical surfaces using shape based matching of landmark curves.

    PubMed

    Lui, Lok Ming; Thiruvenkadam, Sheshadri; Wang, Yalin; Chan, Tony; Thompson, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we find meaningful parameterizations of cortical surfaces utilizing prior anatomical information in the form of anatomical landmarks (sulci curves) on the surfaces. Specifically we generate close to conformal parametrizations that also give a shape-based correspondence between the landmark curves. We propose a variational energy that measures the harmonic energy of the parameterization maps, and the shape dissimilarity between mapped points on the landmark curves. The novelty is that the computed maps are guaranteed to give a shape-based diffeomorphism between the landmark curves. We achieve this by intrinsically modelling our search space of maps as flows of smooth vector fields that do not flow across the landmark curves, and by using the local surface geometry on the curves to define a shape measure. Such parameterizations ensure consistent correspondence between anatomical features, ensuring correct averaging and comparison of data across subjects. The utility of our model is demonstrated in experiments on cortical surfaces with landmarks delineated, which show that our computed maps give a shape-based alignment of the sulcal curves without significantly impairing conformality. PMID:18979783

  15. Length optimization of an S-shaped transition between offset optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Marcuse, D

    1978-03-01

    We derive expressions for the radiation loss of an S-shaped waveguide transition used to connect two straight integrated optics waveguides that are offset with respect to each other. It is assumed that the diffused integrated optics waveguides are produced with the help of an electron beam machine that allows beam positioning in the y direction only in discrete steps. We thus must consider staircase approximations to the desired smooth S-shaped curves. A waveguide whose axis consists of a staircase suffers radiation losses due to the quasi-periodic deformation of its axis. A second loss contribution comes from the S-shape of the waveguide axis. The sum of these loss contributions assumes a minimum that defines the optimum length of the transition waveguide.

  16. Development of a Computer-Aided-Design-Based Geometry and Mesh Movement Algorithm for Three-Dimensional Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Anh Hoang

    This thesis focuses on the development of a Computer-Aided-Design (CAD)-based geometry parameterization method and a corresponding surface mesh movement algorithm suitable for three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization. The geometry parameterization method includes a geometry control tool to aid in the construction and manipulation of a CAD geometry through a vendor-neutral application interface, CAPRI. It automates the tedious part of the construction phase involving data entry and provides intuitive and effective design variables that allow for both the flexibility and the precision required to control the movement of the geometry. The surface mesh movement algorithm, on the other hand, transforms an initial structured surface mesh to fit the new geometry using a discrete representation of the new CAD surface provided by CAPRI. Using a unique mapping procedure, the algorithm not only preserves the characteristics of the original surface mesh, but also guarantees that the new mesh points are on the CAD geometry. The new surface mesh is then smoothed in the parametric space before it is transformed back into three-dimensional space. The procedure is efficient in that all the processing is done in the parametric space, incurring minimal computational cost. The geometry parameterization and mesh movement tools are integrated into a three-dimensional shape optimization framework, with a linear-elasticity volume-mesh movement algorithm, a Newton-Krylov flow solver for the Euler equations, and a gradient-based optimizer. The validity and accuracy of the CAD-based optimization algorithm are demonstrated through a number of verification and optimization cases.

  17. Mechanical Characterization and Shape Optimization of Fascicle-Like 3D Skeletal Muscle Tissues Contracted with Electrical and Optical Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Neal, Devin; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Bashir, Rashid; Chan, Vincent; Asada, Haruhiko Harry

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we present a quantitative approach to construct effective 3D muscle tissues through shape optimization and load impedance matching with electrical and optical stimulation. We have constructed long, thin, fascicle-like skeletal muscle tissue and optimized its form factor through mechanical characterization. A new apparatus was designed and built, which allowed us to measure force-displacement characteristics with diverse load stiffnesses. We have found that (1) there is an optimal form factor that maximizes the muscle stress, (2) the energy transmitted to the load can be maximized with matched load stiffness, and (3) optical stimulation using channelrhodopsin2 in the muscle tissue can generate a twitch force as large as its electrical counterpart for well-developed muscle tissue. Using our tissue construct method, we found that an optimal initial diameter of 500 μm outperformed tissues using 250 μm by more than 60% and tissues using 760 μm by 105%. Using optimal load stiffness, our tissues have generated 12 pJ of energy per twitch at a peak generated stress of 1.28 kPa. Additionally, the difference in optically stimulated twitch performance versus electrically stimulated is a function of how well the overall tissue performs, with average or better performing strips having less than 10% difference. The unique mechanical characterization method used is generalizable to diverse load conditions and will be used to match load impedance to muscle tissue impedance for a wide variety of applications.

  18. Does the hourglass shape of aquaporins optimize water permeability This research was supported by the ERC program, project Micromegas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravelle, Simon; Joly, Laurent; Detcheverry, François; Ybert, Christophe; Cottin-Bizonne, Cecile; Bocquet, Lyderic; Liquide et interfaces Team

    2013-11-01

    The ubiquitous aquaporin channels are able to conduct water across cell membranes, combining the seemingly antagonist functions of a very high selectivity with a remarkable permeability. While molecular details are obvious keys to perform these tasks, the overall efficiency of transport in such nanopores is also strongly limited by viscous dissipation arising at the connection between the nanoconstriction and the nearby bulk reservoirs. In this contribution, we focus on these so-called entrance effects and specifically examine whether the characteristic hourglass shape of aquaporins may arise from a geometrical optimum for such hydrodynamic dissipation. Using a combination of finite element calculations and analytical modeling, we show that conical entrances with suitable opening angle can indeed provide a large increase of the overall channel permeability. Moreover, the optimal opening angles that maximize the permeability are found to compare well with the angles measured in a large variety of aquaporins. This suggests that the hourglass shape of aquaporins could be the result of a natural selection process toward optimal hydrodynamic transport. Finally, in a biomimetic perspective, these results provide guidelines to design artificial nanopores with optimal performances.

  19. Metabolism of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger: model definition, steady-state analysis and constrained optimization of citric acid production rate.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vasquez, F; González-Alcón, C; Torres, N V

    2000-10-01

    In an attempt to provide a rational basis for the optimization of citric acid production by A. niger, we developed a mathematical model of the metabolism of this filamentous fungus when in conditions of citric acid accumulation. The present model is based in a previous one, but extended with the inclusion of new metabolic processes and updated with currently available kinetic data. Among the different alternatives to represent the system behavior we have chosen the S-system representation within power-law formalism. This type of representation allows us to verify not only the ability of the model to exhibit a stable steady state of the integrated system but also the robustness and quality of the representation. The model analysis is shown to be self-consistent, with a stable steady state, and in good agreement with experimental evidence. Moreover, the model representation is sufficiently robust, as indicated by sensitivity and steady-state and dynamic analyses. From the steady-state results we concluded that the range of accuracy of the S-system representation is wide enough to model realistic deviations from the nominal steady state. The dynamic analysis indicated a reasonable response time, which provided further indication that the model is adequate. The extensive assessment of the reliability and quality of the model put us in a position to address questions of optimization of the system with respect to increased citrate production. We carried out the constrained optimization of A. niger metabolism with the goal of predicting an enzyme activity profile yielding the maximum rate of citrate production, while, at the same time, keeping all enzyme activities within predetermined, physiologically acceptable ranges. The optimization is based on a method described and tested elsewhere that utilizes the fact that the S-system representation of a metabolic system becomes linear at steady state, which allows application of linear programming techniques. Our results show

  20. Metabolism of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger: model definition, steady-state analysis and constrained optimization of citric acid production rate.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vasquez, F; González-Alcón, C; Torres, N V

    2000-10-01

    In an attempt to provide a rational basis for the optimization of citric acid production by A. niger, we developed a mathematical model of the metabolism of this filamentous fungus when in conditions of citric acid accumulation. The present model is based in a previous one, but extended with the inclusion of new metabolic processes and updated with currently available kinetic data. Among the different alternatives to represent the system behavior we have chosen the S-system representation within power-law formalism. This type of representation allows us to verify not only the ability of the model to exhibit a stable steady state of the integrated system but also the robustness and quality of the representation. The model analysis is shown to be self-consistent, with a stable steady state, and in good agreement with experimental evidence. Moreover, the model representation is sufficiently robust, as indicated by sensitivity and steady-state and dynamic analyses. From the steady-state results we concluded that the range of accuracy of the S-system representation is wide enough to model realistic deviations from the nominal steady state. The dynamic analysis indicated a reasonable response time, which provided further indication that the model is adequate. The extensive assessment of the reliability and quality of the model put us in a position to address questions of optimization of the system with respect to increased citrate production. We carried out the constrained optimization of A. niger metabolism with the goal of predicting an enzyme activity profile yielding the maximum rate of citrate production, while, at the same time, keeping all enzyme activities within predetermined, physiologically acceptable ranges. The optimization is based on a method described and tested elsewhere that utilizes the fact that the S-system representation of a metabolic system becomes linear at steady state, which allows application of linear programming techniques. Our results show

  1. Optical simulation of laser beam phase-shaping focusing optimization in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ricardo; Vieira, Pedro; Coelho, João. M. P.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we report the development of an optical simulator that can be used in the development of methodologies for compensate/decrease the light scattering effect of most biological tissues through phase-shaping methods. In fact, scattering has long been a major limitation for the medical applications of lasers where in-depth tissues concerns due to the turbid nature of most biological media in the human body. In developing the simulator, two different approaches were followed: one using multiple identical beams directed to the same target area and the other using a phase-shaped beam. In the multiple identical beams approach (used mainly to illustrate the limiting effect of scattering on the beam's propagation) there was no improvement in the beam focus at 1 mm compared to a single beam layout but, in phase-shaped beam approach, a 8x improvement on the radius of the beam at the same depth was achieved. The models were created using the optical design software Zemax and numerical algorithms created in Matlab programming language to shape the beam wavefront. A dedicated toolbox allowed communication between both programs. The use of the two software's proves to be a simple and powerful solution combining the best of the two and allowing a significant potential for adapting the simulations to new systems and thus allow to assess their response and define critical engineering parameters prior to laboratorial implementation.

  2. Multi locus analysis of Pristionchus pacificus on La Réunion Island reveals an evolutionary history shaped by multiple introductions, constrained dispersal events and rare out-crossing.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Katy; McGaughran, Angela; Villate, Laure; Herrmann, Matthias; Witte, Hanh; Bartelmes, Gabi; Rochat, Jacques; Sommer, Ralf J

    2012-01-01

    Pristionchus pacificus, recently established as a model organism in evolutionary biology, is a cosmopolitan nematode that has a necromenic association with scarab beetles. The diverse array of host beetle species and habitat types occupied by P. pacificus make it a good model for investigating local adaptation to novel environments. Presence of P. pacificus on La Réunion Island, a young volcanic island with a dynamic geological history and a wide variety of ecozones, facilitates such investigation in an island biogeographic setting. Microsatellite data from 20 markers and 223 strains and mitochondrial sequence data from 272 strains reveal rich genetic diversity among La Réunion P. pacificus isolates, shaped by differentially timed introductions from diverse sources and in association with different beetle species. Distinctions between volcanic zones and between arid western and wet eastern climatic zones have likely limited westward dispersal of recently colonized lineages and maintained a genetic distinction between eastern and western clades. The highly selfing lifestyle of P. pacificus contributes to the strong fine-scale population structure detected, with each beetle host harbouring strongly differentiated assemblages of strains. Periodic out-crossing generates admixture between genetically diverse lineages, creating a diverse array of allelic combinations likely to increase the evolutionary potential of the species and facilitate adaptation to local environments and beetle hosts.

  3. Trajectory Design Employing Convex Optimization for Landing on Irregularly Shaped Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin M.; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Mission proposals that land on asteroids are becoming popular. However, in order to have a successful mission the spacecraft must reliably and softly land at the intended landing site. The problem under investigation is how to design a fuel-optimal powered descent trajectory that can be quickly computed on- board the spacecraft, without interaction from ground control. An optimal trajectory designed immediately prior to the descent burn has many advantages. These advantages include the ability to use the actual vehicle starting state as the initial condition in the trajectory design and the ease of updating the landing target site if the original landing site is no longer viable. For long trajectories, the trajectory can be updated periodically by a redesign of the optimal trajectory based on current vehicle conditions to improve the guidance performance. One of the key drivers for being completely autonomous is the infrequent and delayed communication between ground control and the vehicle. Challenges that arise from designing an asteroid powered descent trajectory include complicated nonlinear gravity fields, small rotating bodies and low thrust vehicles. There are two previous studies that form the background to the current investigation. The first set looked in-depth at applying convex optimization to a powered descent trajectory on Mars with promising results.1, 2 This showed that the powered descent equations of motion can be relaxed and formed into a convex optimization problem and that the optimal solution of the relaxed problem is indeed a feasible solution to the original problem. This analysis used a constant gravity field. The second area applied a successive solution process to formulate a second order cone program that designs rendezvous and proximity operations trajectories.3, 4 These trajectories included a Newtonian gravity model. The equivalence of the solutions between the relaxed and the original problem is theoretically established. The

  4. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Parapat, Riny Y; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    Correction for 'Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805. PMID:26961853

  5. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapat, Riny Y.; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Correction for `Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805.

  6. Design of FIR digital filters for pulse shaping and channel equalization using time-domain optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, R. C.; Vaughn, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    Three algorithms are developed for designing finite impulse response digital filters to be used for pulse shaping and channel equalization. The first is the Minimax algorithm which uses linear programming to design a frequency-sampling filter with a pulse shape that approximates the specification in a minimax sense. Design examples are included which accurately approximate a specified impulse response with a maximum error of 0.03 using only six resonators. The second algorithm is an extension of the Minimax algorithm to design preset equalizers for channels with known impulse responses. Both transversal and frequency-sampling equalizer structures are designed to produce a minimax approximation of a specified channel output waveform. Examples of these designs are compared as to the accuracy of the approximation, the resultant intersymbol interference (ISI), and the required transmitted energy. While the transversal designs are slightly more accurate, the frequency-sampling designs using six resonators have smaller ISI and energy values.

  7. Iterative most-likely point registration (IMLP): a robust algorithm for computing optimal shape alignment.

    PubMed

    Billings, Seth D; Boctor, Emad M; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-01-01

    We present a probabilistic registration algorithm that robustly solves the problem of rigid-body alignment between two shapes with high accuracy, by aptly modeling measurement noise in each shape, whether isotropic or anisotropic. For point-cloud shapes, the probabilistic framework additionally enables modeling locally-linear surface regions in the vicinity of each point to further improve registration accuracy. The proposed Iterative Most-Likely Point (IMLP) algorithm is formed as a variant of the popular Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which iterates between point-correspondence and point-registration steps. IMLP's probabilistic framework is used to incorporate a generalized noise model into both the correspondence and the registration phases of the algorithm, hence its name as a most-likely point method rather than a closest-point method. To efficiently compute the most-likely correspondences, we devise a novel search strategy based on a principal direction (PD)-tree search. We also propose a new approach to solve the generalized total-least-squares (GTLS) sub-problem of the registration phase, wherein the point correspondences are registered under a generalized noise model. Our GTLS approach has improved accuracy, efficiency, and stability compared to prior methods presented for this problem and offers a straightforward implementation using standard least squares. We evaluate the performance of IMLP relative to a large number of prior algorithms including ICP, a robust variant on ICP, Generalized ICP (GICP), and Coherent Point Drift (CPD), as well as drawing close comparison with the prior anisotropic registration methods of GTLS-ICP and A-ICP. The performance of IMLP is shown to be superior with respect to these algorithms over a wide range of noise conditions, outliers, and misalignments using both mesh and point-cloud representations of various shapes.

  8. Iterative Most-Likely Point Registration (IMLP): A Robust Algorithm for Computing Optimal Shape Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Seth D.; Boctor, Emad M.; Taylor, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a probabilistic registration algorithm that robustly solves the problem of rigid-body alignment between two shapes with high accuracy, by aptly modeling measurement noise in each shape, whether isotropic or anisotropic. For point-cloud shapes, the probabilistic framework additionally enables modeling locally-linear surface regions in the vicinity of each point to further improve registration accuracy. The proposed Iterative Most-Likely Point (IMLP) algorithm is formed as a variant of the popular Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which iterates between point-correspondence and point-registration steps. IMLP’s probabilistic framework is used to incorporate a generalized noise model into both the correspondence and the registration phases of the algorithm, hence its name as a most-likely point method rather than a closest-point method. To efficiently compute the most-likely correspondences, we devise a novel search strategy based on a principal direction (PD)-tree search. We also propose a new approach to solve the generalized total-least-squares (GTLS) sub-problem of the registration phase, wherein the point correspondences are registered under a generalized noise model. Our GTLS approach has improved accuracy, efficiency, and stability compared to prior methods presented for this problem and offers a straightforward implementation using standard least squares. We evaluate the performance of IMLP relative to a large number of prior algorithms including ICP, a robust variant on ICP, Generalized ICP (GICP), and Coherent Point Drift (CPD), as well as drawing close comparison with the prior anisotropic registration methods of GTLS-ICP and A-ICP. The performance of IMLP is shown to be superior with respect to these algorithms over a wide range of noise conditions, outliers, and misalignments using both mesh and point-cloud representations of various shapes. PMID:25748700

  9. The continuous adjoint approach to the k-ω SST turbulence model with applications in shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvadias, I. S.; Papoutsis-Kiachagias, E. M.; Dimitrakopoulos, G.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the gradient of aerodynamic objective functions with respect to design variables, in problems governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the k-ω SST turbulence model, is computed using the continuous adjoint method, for the first time. Shape optimization problems for minimizing drag, in external aerodynamics (flows around isolated airfoils), or viscous losses in internal aerodynamics (duct flows) are considered. Sensitivity derivatives computed with the proposed adjoint method are compared to those computed with finite differences or a continuous adjoint variant based on the frequently used assumption of frozen turbulence; the latter proves the need for differentiating the turbulence model. Geometries produced by optimization runs performed with sensitivities computed by the proposed method and the 'frozen turbulence' assumption are also compared to quantify the gain from formulating and solving the adjoint to the turbulence model equations.

  10. Optimal piezoelectric beam shape for single and broadband vibration energy harvesting: Modeling, simulation and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Nordin, N. H. Diyana

    2015-03-01

    Harvesting energy from the surroundings has become a new trend in saving our environment. Among the established ones are solar panels, wind turbines and hydroelectric generators which have successfully grown in meeting the world's energy demand. However, for low powered electronic devices; especially when being placed in a remote area, micro scale energy harvesting is preferable. One of the popular methods is via vibration energy scavenging which converts mechanical energy (from vibration) to electrical energy by the effect of coupling between mechanical variables and electric or magnetic fields. As the voltage generated greatly depends on the geometry and size of the piezoelectric material, there is a need to define an optimum shape and configuration of the piezoelectric energy scavenger. In this research, mathematical derivations for unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester are presented. Simulation is done using MATLAB and COMSOL Multiphysics software to study the effect of varying the length and shape of the beam to the generated voltage. Experimental results comparing triangular and rectangular shaped piezoelectric beam are also presented.

  11. Constructivism, Optimality Theory and Language Acquisition. The Shapes We Make in Each Other's Heads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whincop, Chris

    1996-01-01

    This paper identifies a feature of human brain neural nets that may be described as the principle of ease of processing (PEP), and that, it is argued, is the primary force guiding a learner towards a target grammar. It is suggested that the same principle lies at the heart of Optimality Theory, which characterizes the course of language…

  12. Generation of Link Mechanism by Shape-Topology Optimization of Trusses Considering Geometrical Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaki, Makoto; Nishiwaki, Shinji

    A two-stage general optimization approach is presented for generating link mechanisms from a highly connected ground structure. The structure is modeled as a pinjointed truss, which is to be optimized so that a large displacement is generated in the specified direction at the output node. The design variables are the cross-sectional areas of the members and the nodal locations. The equilibrium path of an unstable mechanism is traced by the displacement control method. In the first step, the unnecessary members are removed by solving the optimization problem for minimizing the total structural volume under constraints on the maximum load, the displacement at the specified node, and the stiffnesses at the initial and final states. In the second step, the deviation of the displacement of the output node from the specified direction is minimized. It is shown in the numerical examples that several mechanisms can be naturally found as a result of the two-stage optimization starting from randomly selected initial solutions.

  13. Optimizing stability, transport, and divertor operation through plasma shaping for steady-state scenario development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C T; Ferron, J R; Luce, T C; Petrie, T W; Politzer, P A; Rhodes, T L; Doyle, E J; Makowski, M A; Kessel, C; DeBoo, J C; Groebner, R J; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B; Greenfield, C M; La Haye, R J; Murakami, M; Hyatt, A W; Challis, C; Prater, R; Jackson, G L; Park, J; Reimerdes, H; Turnbull, A D; McKee, G R; Shafer, M W; Groth, M; Porter, G D; West, W P

    2008-12-19

    Recent studies on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] have elucidated key aspects of the dependence of stability, confinement, and density control on the plasma magnetic configuration, leading to the demonstration of nearly noninductive operation for >1 s with pressure 30% above the ideal no-wall stability limit. Achieving fully noninductive tokamak operation requires high pressure, good confinement, and density control through divertor pumping. Plasma geometry affects all of these. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics modeling of external kink stability suggests that it may be optimized by adjusting the shape parameter known as squareness ({zeta}). Optimizing kink stability leads to an increase in the maximum stable pressure. Experiments confirm that stability varies strongly with {zeta}, in agreement with the modeling. Optimization of kink stability via {zeta} is concurrent with an increase in the H-mode edge pressure pedestal stability. Global energy confinement is optimized at the lowest {zeta} tested, with increased pedestal pressure and lower core transport. Adjusting the magnetic divertor balance about a double-null configuration optimizes density control for improved noninductive auxiliary current drive. The best density control is obtained with a slight imbalance toward the divertor opposite the ion grad(B) drift direction, consistent with modeling of these effects. These optimizations have been combined to achieve noninductive current fractions near unity for over 1 s with normalized pressure of 3.5<{beta}{sub N}<3.9, bootstrap current fraction of >65%, and a normalized confinement factor of H{sub 98(y,2)}{approx}1.5.

  14. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors.

  15. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. PMID:24345525

  16. Genetic algorithm optimization of the forming process in case of a U-shaped part made from tailor welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurelian, Albut

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an optimization method to minimize the springback phenomenon, which generate the main dimensional errors in case of sheet metal forming. The present work deals with numerical simulation related to draw bending and springback of U-shaped part made from tailor welded blanks. The base materials from tailor welded blanks have different springback behaviours, fact that must be taken in consideration in the optimisation process. The Dynaform 5.8.1 software was used to simulate the forming process, in which the blank holder is segmented in two parts in order to apply different holding force for each material. In this research the blank holder forces and the deformation speed take different numerical values. The factorial simulations test plan was made using the Design Experts 7.0 software to cover completely the variation domain. The part obtained after each simulation is analyzed and measured to quantify the errors caused by springback. Parameters as: angle between flange and sidewall, angle between sidewall and part bottom are recorded in a data base. The initial simulations plan together with the obtained results is used to understand the influence of the variable parameters on the springback behaviour of the U-shaped part made from tailor welded blanks. The gained knowledge is used to generate the objective function required by the genetic algorithm optimization method.

  17. Wing shape optimization for maximum cross-country speed, with mathematical programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helwig, G.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program was developed to calculate numerically the speed and circling polars of an aircraft when the lift and drag characteristics of the wing airfoils are known. The planform of the wing is described by variables which are optimized so that the cross-country speed of the glider is maximum for the particular type of thermal model. Two thermal models are compared and shown that with a greater wing area than now normally used the performance can be increased.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles for power absorption: Optimizing size, shape and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, M.A.; Torres, T.E.; Andres-Verges, M.; Costo, R.; Presa, P. de la; Serna, C.J.; Morales, M.P.; Marquina, C.; Ibarra, M.R.; Goya, G.F.

    2009-10-15

    We present a study on the magnetic properties of naked and silica-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with sizes between 5 and 110 nm. Their efficiency as heating agents was assessed through specific power absorption (SPA) measurements as a function of particle size and shape. The results show a strong dependence of the SPA with the particle size, with a maximum around 30 nm, as expected for a Neel relaxation mechanism in single-domain particles. The SiO{sub 2} shell thickness was found to play an important role in the SPA mechanism by hindering the heat outflow, thus decreasing the heating efficiency. It is concluded that a compromise between good heating efficiency and surface functionality for biomedical purposes can be attained by making the SiO{sub 2} functional coating as thin as possible. - Graphical Abstract: The magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles from 5 to 110 nm are presented, and their efficiency as heating agents discussed as a function of particle size, shape and surface functionalization.

  19. Revising the retrieval technique of a long-term stratospheric HNO3 data set: from a constrained matrix inversion to the optimal estimation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, I.; Muscari, G.; de Zafra, R. L.

    2011-07-01

    The Ground-Based Millimeter-wave Spectrometer (GBMS) was designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in the early 1990s and since then has carried out many measurement campaigns of stratospheric O3, HNO3, CO and N2O at polar and mid-latitudes. Its HNO3 data set shed light on HNO3 annual cycles over the Antarctic continent and contributed to the validation of both generations of the satellite-based JPL Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Following the increasing need for long-term data sets of stratospheric constituents, we resolved to establish a long-term GMBS observation site at the Arctic station of Thule (76.5° N, 68.8° W), Greenland, beginning in January 2009, in order to track the long- and short-term interactions between the changing climate and the seasonal processes tied to the ozone depletion phenomenon. Furthermore, we updated the retrieval algorithm adapting the Optimal Estimation (OE) method to GBMS spectral data in order to conform to the standard of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) microwave group, and to provide our retrievals with a set of averaging kernels that allow more straightforward comparisons with other data sets. The new OE algorithm was applied to GBMS HNO3 data sets from 1993 South Pole observations to date, in order to produce HNO3 version 2 (v2) profiles. A sample of results obtained at Antarctic latitudes in fall and winter and at mid-latitudes is shown here. In most conditions, v2 inversions show a sensitivity (i.e., sum of column elements of the averaging kernel matrix) of 100 ± 20 % from 20 to 45 km altitude, with somewhat worse (better) sensitivity in the Antarctic winter lower (upper) stratosphere. The 1σ uncertainty on HNO3 v2 mixing ratio vertical profiles depends on altitude and is estimated at ~15 % or 0.3 ppbv, whichever is larger. Comparisons of v2 with former (v1) GBMS HNO3 vertical profiles, obtained employing the constrained matrix inversion method, show that

  20. Numerical Optimization of Trapezoidal Thermoelectric Elements for Double-Pipe-Shaped Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, Sae; Ito, Keita O.; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2016-03-01

    Electric power and efficiency are numerically evaluated for thermoelectric (TE) module designs by assuming that the hot fluid is carried in a pipe with a hexagonal cross-sectional shape and that trapezoidal columnar TE elements are attached to the external surface of the pipe. The thermal heat balance and successive TE phenomena are studied by combining commercial software and our original TE program. The upper length, height, and thickness of the trapezoidal TE elements are assumed to be constant. By varying the base length, the maximum power and maximum efficiency were evaluated for the case where the radiation heat ratio is minimized. It was demonstrated that the choice of a hexagonal cross-section for the TE module is the best one under the assumed material properties and for the allowed space between the two pipes.

  1. A non-invasive heuristic approach to shape optimization in forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landkammer, P.; Steinmann, P.

    2016-02-01

    The aim is to determine—relating to a given forming process—the optimal material (undeformed) configuration of a workpiece when knowing the target spatial (deformed) configuration. Therefore, the nodal positions of a discretized setting based on the finite element method (FEM) are the discrete free parameters of the form finding problem. As a verification, inputting the determined optimal material nodal positions, a subsequent re-computation of the forming process should then result in exactly the target spatial nodal positions. A new, non-invasive iterative algorithm, which is purely based on the nodal data of each iteration, is proposed to determine the discretized optimal material configuration. Specifically, the L^2-smoothed deformation gradient at each discretization node is used to update the discretized material configuration by a transformation of the difference vectors between the currently computed and the target spatial nodal positions. The iterative strategy can be easily coupled in a non-invasive fashion via subroutines with arbitrary external FEM software. Since only the computed positions of the discretization nodes are required for an update step within the form finding algorithm, the procedure does not depend on the specific material modelling and is moreover applicable to arbitrary element types, e. g. solid- or solid-shell-elements. Furthermore the convergence rate for solving the form finding problem is nearly linear. This is demonstrated by examples that are realized by a coupling of Matlab (iterative update procedure) and MSC.Marc (external FEM software). Solving the form finding problem to determine an optimum workpiece design is of great interest especially for metal forming applications.

  2. Pseudo-time method for optimal shape design using the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iollo, Angelo; Kuruvila, Geojoe; Ta'asan, Shlomo

    1995-01-01

    We exploit a novel idea for the optimization of flows governed by the Euler equations. The algorithm consists of marching on the design hypersurface while improving the distance to the state and costate hypersurfaces. We consider the problem of matching the pressure distribution to a desired one, subject to the euler equations, both for subsonic and supersonic flows. The rate of convergence to the minimum for the cases considered is 3 to 4 times slower than that of the analysis problem. Results are given for Ringleb flow and a shockless recompression case.

  3. Shape optimization of staggered ribs in a rotating equilateral triangular cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Mi-Ae; Park, Min-Jung; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2014-04-01

    A rotating equilateral triangular cooling channel with staggered square ribs inside the leading edge of a turbine blade has been optimized in this work based on surrogate modeling. The fluid flow and heat transfer in the channel have been analyzed using three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations under uniform heat flux condition. Shear stress transport turbulence model has been used as a turbulence closure. Computational results for area-averaged Nusselt number have been validated compared to the experimental data. The objectives related to the heat transfer rate and pressure drop has been linearly combined with a weighting factor to define the objective function. The angle of the rib, the rib pitch-to-hydraulic diameter ratio, and the rib width-to-hydraulic diameter ratio have been selected as the design variables. Twenty-two design points have been generated by Latin Hypercube sampling, and the values of the objective function have been calculated by the RANS analysis at these points. The surrogate model for the objective function has been constructed using the radial basis neural network method. Through the optimization, the objective function value has been improved by 21.5 % compared to that of the reference geometry.

  4. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Complex Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Farmer, James; Martinelli, Luigi; Saunders, David

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for complex aircraft configurations. Here control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which allows for a drastic reduction in computational costs over previous design methods (13, 12, 43, 38). In our earlier studies (19, 20, 22, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42) it was shown that this method could be used to devise effective optimization procedures for airfoils, wings and wing-bodies subject to either analytic or arbitrary meshes. Design formulations for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations have been demonstrated, showing that such methods can be devised for various governing equations (39, 25). In our most recent works (40, 42) the method was extended to treat wing-body configurations with a large number of mesh points, verifying that significant computational savings can be gained for practical design problems. In this paper the method is extended for the Euler equations to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. New elements include a multiblock-multigrid flow solver, a multiblock-multigrid adjoint solver, and a multiblock mesh perturbation scheme. Two design examples are presented in which the new method is used for the wing redesign of a transonic business jet.

  5. The impact of realistic source shape and flexibility on source mask optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Hajime; Mizuno, Yasushi; Hirayanagi, Noriyuki; Kita, Naonori; Matsui, Ryota; Izumi, Hirohiko; Tajima, Keiichi; Siebert, Joachim; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2013-04-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) is widely used to make state-of-the-art semiconductor devices in high volume manufacturing. To realize mature SMO solutions in production, the Intelligent Illuminator, which is an illumination system on Nikon scanner, is useful because it can provide generation of freeform sources with high fidelity to the target. Proteus SMO, which employs co-optimization method and an insertion of validation with mask 3D effect and resist properties for an accurate prediction of wafer printing, can take into account the properties of Intelligent Illuminator. We investigate an impact of the source properties on the SMO to pattern of a static-random access memory. Quality of a source made on the scanner compared to the SMO target is evaluated with in-situ measurement and aerial image simulation using its measurement data. Furthermore we discuss an evaluation of a universality of the source to use it in multiple scanners with a validation with estimated value of scanner errors.

  6. Constrained Adaptive Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Mark A.; Massimino, Andrew K.; Needell, Deanna; Woolf, Tina

    2016-10-01

    Suppose that we wish to estimate a vector $\\mathbf{x} \\in \\mathbb{C}^n$ from a small number of noisy linear measurements of the form $\\mathbf{y} = \\mathbf{A x} + \\mathbf{z}$, where $\\mathbf{z}$ represents measurement noise. When the vector $\\mathbf{x}$ is sparse, meaning that it has only $s$ nonzeros with $s \\ll n$, one can obtain a significantly more accurate estimate of $\\mathbf{x}$ by adaptively selecting the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ based on the previous measurements provided that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is sufficiently large. In this paper we consider the case where we wish to realize the potential of adaptivity but where the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ are subject to physical constraints. In particular, we examine the case where the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ are constrained to belong to a finite set of allowable measurement vectors. We demonstrate both the limitations and advantages of adaptive sensing in this constrained setting. We prove that for certain measurement ensembles, the benefits offered by adaptive designs fall far short of the improvements that are possible in the unconstrained adaptive setting. On the other hand, we also provide both theoretical and empirical evidence that in some scenarios adaptivity does still result in substantial improvements even in the constrained setting. To illustrate these potential gains, we propose practical algorithms for constrained adaptive sensing by exploiting connections to the theory of optimal experimental design and show that these algorithms exhibit promising performance in some representative applications.

  7. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part II: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    It was shown in Part I that an ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be used to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings. It can be used for both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting several additional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimisation process. In Part I a relevant model of such structure, as a function of arrangement of the additional elements was derived and validated. The model allows calculating natural frequencies and mode-shapes of the whole structure. The aim of this companion paper, Part II, is to present the second stage of the method. This is an optimization process that results in arrangement of the elements guaranteeing desired plate frequency response, and enhancement of controllability and observability measures. For that purpose appropriate cost functions, and constraints followed from technological feasibility are defined. Then, a memetic algorithm is employed to obtain a numerical solution with parameters of the arrangement. The optimization results are initially presented for simple cases to validate the method. Then, more complex scenarios are analysed with very special demands concerning the frequency response to present the full potential of the method. Subsequently, a laboratory experiment is presented and discussed. Finally, other areas of applications of the proposed method are shown and conclusions for future research are drawn.

  8. Constraining inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Adshead, Peter; Easther, Richard E-mail: richard.easther@yale.edu

    2008-10-15

    We analyze the theoretical limits on slow roll reconstruction, an optimal algorithm for recovering the inflaton potential (assuming a single-field slow roll scenario) from observational data. Slow roll reconstruction is based upon the Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of the inflationary dynamics. We show that at low inflationary scales the Hamilton-Jacobi equations simplify considerably. We provide a new classification scheme for inflationary models, based solely on the number of parameters needed to specify the potential, and provide forecasts for the bounds on the slow roll parameters from future data sets. A minimal running of the spectral index, induced solely by the first two slow roll parameters ({epsilon} and {eta}), appears to be effectively undetectable by realistic cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. However, since the ability to detect any running increases with the lever arm in comoving wavenumber, we conjecture that high redshift 21 cm data may allow tests of second-order consistency conditions on inflation. Finally, we point out that the second-order corrections to the spectral index are correlated with the inflationary scale, and thus the amplitude of the CMB B mode.

  9. Optimization and testing of a continuous rotary motor based on shape memory wires and overrunning clutches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scirè Mammano, Giovanni; Dragoni, Eugenio

    2015-04-01

    A relatively unexplored but extremely attractive field for the application of the shape memory technology is the area of rotary actuators, especially for generating continuous rotations. This paper deals with a novel design of a rotary motor based on SMA wires and overrunning clutches which features high output torque and boundless angular stroke in a compact package. The concept uses a long SMA wire wound round a low-friction cylindrical drum upon which the wire can contract and extend with minimum effort and limited space demand. Fitted to the output shaft by means of an overrunning clutch the output shaft rotates unidirectionally despite the sequence of contractions-elongation cycles of the wire. Following a design procedure developed in a former paper, a six-stage miniature prototype is built and tested showing excellent performance in terms of torque, speed and power density. Characteristic performances of the motor are as follows: size envelope = 48×22×30 mm3; maximum torque = 20 Nmm; specific torque = 6.31×10-4 Nmm/mm3; rotation per module = 15 deg; continuous speed (unloaded) = 4 rpm.

  10. The optimization of j-groove shape in the draft tube of a francis turbine to suppress the draft surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Q. S.; Choi, Y. D.

    2013-12-01

    Suppression of draft surge caused by vortex and cavitation surge in the draft tube is very important to improve the turbine performance when the turbine is operated in the range of partial load condition. In present work, a series of CFD analysis have been conducted in the range of partial load, design condition and over load of a Francis turbine model with a kind of J-Grooves. The pressure contours, circumferential velocity vectors and vortex core regions in the draft tube are compared by the conditions with or without J-Grooves. Study results show that the J-Grooves can suppress the abnormal phenomena to some extents on the condition of maintaining the efficiency. In the second stage, the shape of J-Groove is optimized step by step considering the groove length, depth and width normalized by the diameter of outlet of turbine runner.

  11. Design optimization of a smooth headlamp reflector to SAE/DOT beam-shape requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatz, Narkis E.; Bortz, John C.; Dassanayake, Mahendra S.

    1999-10-01

    The optical design of Ford Motor Company's 1992 Mercury Grand Marquis headlamp utilized a Sylvania 9007 filament source, a paraboloidal reflector and an array of cylindrical lenses (flutes). It has been of interest to Ford to determine the practicality of closely reproducing the on- road beam pattern performance of this headlamp, with an alternate optical arrangement whereby the control of the beam would be achieved solely by means of the geometry of the surface of the reflector, subject to a requirement of smooth-surface continuity; replacing the outer lens with a clear plastic cover having no beam-forming function. To this end the far-field intensity distribution produced by the 9007 bulb was measured at the low-beam setting. These measurements were then used to develop a light-source model for use in ray tracing simulations of candidate reflector geometries. An objective function was developed to compare candidate beam patterns with the desired beam pattern. Functional forms for the 3D reflector geometry were developed with free parameters to be subsequently optimized. A solution was sought meeting the detailed US SAE/DOT constraints for minimum and maximum permissible levels of illumination in the different portions of the beam pattern. Simulated road scenes were generated by Ford Motor Company to compare the illumination properties of the new design with those of the original Grand Marquis headlamp.

  12. Optimal Shape Design of Mail-Slot Nacelle on N3-X Hybrid Wing-Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoungjin; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2013-01-01

    System studies show that a N3-X hybrid wing-body aircraft with a turboelectric distributed propulsion system using a mail-slot inlet/nozzle nacelle can meet the environmental and performance goals for N+3 generation transports (three generations beyond the current air transport technology level) set by NASA's Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. In this study, a Navier-Stokes flow simulation of N3-X on hybrid unstructured meshes was conducted, including the mail-slot propulsor. The geometry of the mail-slot propulsor was generated by a CAD (Computer-Aided Design)-free shape parameterization. A novel body force model generation approach was suggested for a more realistic and efficient simulation of the flow turning, pressure rise and loss effects of the fan blades and the inlet-fan interactions. Flow simulation results of the N3-X demonstrates the validity of the present approach. An optimal Shape design of the mail-slot nacelle surface was conducted to reduce strength of shock waves and flow separations on the cowl surface.

  13. The optimal shape of elastomer mushroom-like fibers for high and robust adhesion.

    PubMed

    Aksak, Burak; Sahin, Korhan; Sitti, Metin

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, significant effort has been put into mimicking the ability of the gecko lizard to strongly and reversibly cling to surfaces, by using synthetic structures. Among these structures, mushroom-like elastomer fiber arrays have demonstrated promising performance on smooth surfaces matching the adhesive strengths obtained with the natural gecko foot-pads. It is possible to improve the already impressive adhesive performance of mushroom-like fibers provided that the underlying adhesion mechanism is understood. Here, the adhesion mechanism of bio-inspired mushroom-like fibers is investigated by implementing the Dugdale-Barenblatt cohesive zone model into finite elements simulations. It is found that the magnitude of pull-off stress depends on the edge angle θ and the ratio of the tip radius to the stalk radius β of the mushroom-like fiber. Pull-off stress is also found to depend on a dimensionless parameter χ, the ratio of the fiber radius to a length-scale related to the dominance of adhesive stress. As an estimate, the optimal parameters are found to be β = 1.1 and θ = 45°. Further, the location of crack initiation is found to depend on χ for given β and θ. An analytical model for pull-off stress, which depends on the location of crack initiation as well as on θ and β, is proposed and found to agree with the simulation results. Results obtained in this work provide a geometrical guideline for designing robust bio-inspired dry fibrillar adhesives.

  14. Design-oriented thermoelastic analysis, sensitivities, and approximations for shape optimization of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Manav

    Aerospace structures operate under extreme thermal environments. Hot external aerothermal environment at high Mach number flight leads to high structural temperatures. At the same time, cold internal cryogenic-fuel-tanks and thermal management concepts like Thermal Protection System (TPS) and active cooling result in a high temperature gradient through the structure. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) of such structures requires a design-oriented approach to this problem. The broad goal of this research effort is to advance the existing state of the art towards MDO of large scale aerospace structures. The components required for this work are the sensitivity analysis formulation encompassing the scope of the physical phenomena being addressed, a set of efficient approximations to cut-down the required CPU cost, and a general purpose design-oriented numerical analysis tool capable of handling problems of this scope. In this work finite element discretization has been used to solve the conduction partial differential equations and the Poljak method has been used to discretize the integral equations for internal cavity radiation. A methodology has been established to couple the conduction finite element analysis to the internal radiation analysis. This formulation is then extended for sensitivity analysis of heat transfer and coupled thermal-structural problems. The most CPU intensive operations in the overall analysis have been identified, and approximation methods have been proposed to reduce the associated CPU cost. Results establish the effectiveness of these approximation methods, which lead to very high savings in CPU cost without any deterioration in the results. The results presented in this dissertation include two cases: a hexahedral cavity with internal and external radiation with conducting walls, and a wing box which is geometrically similar to the orbiter wing.

  15. Multiple One-Dimensional Search (MODS) algorithm for fast optimization of laser-matter interaction by phase-only fs-laser pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan-Sosa, M.; Portilla, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Moreno, L.; Solis, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we have developed and implemented a powerful search strategy for optimization of nonlinear optical effects by means of femtosecond pulse shaping, based on topological concepts derived from quantum control theory. Our algorithm [Multiple One-Dimensional Search (MODS)] is based on deterministic optimization of a single solution rather than pseudo-random optimization of entire populations as done by commonly used evolutionary algorithms. We have tested MODS against a genetic algorithm in a nontrivial problem consisting in optimizing the Kerr gating signal (self-interaction) of a shaped laser pulse in a detuned Michelson interferometer configuration. The obtained results show that our search method (MODS) strongly outperforms the genetic algorithm in terms of both convergence speed and quality of the solution. These findings demonstrate the applicability of concepts of quantum control theory to nonlinear laser-matter interaction problems, even in the presence of significant experimental noise.

  16. Power-constrained supercomputing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Peter E.

    As we approach exascale systems, power is turning from an optimization goal to a critical operating constraint. With power bounds imposed by both stakeholders and the limitations of existing infrastructure, achieving practical exascale computing will therefore rely on optimizing performance subject to a power constraint. However, this requirement should not add to the burden of application developers; optimizing the runtime environment given restricted power will primarily be the job of high-performance system software. In this dissertation, we explore this area and develop new techniques that extract maximum performance subject to a particular power constraint. These techniques include a method to find theoretical optimal performance, a runtime system that shifts power in real time to improve performance, and a node-level prediction model for selecting power-efficient operating points. We use a linear programming (LP) formulation to optimize application schedules under various power constraints, where a schedule consists of a DVFS state and number of OpenMP threads for each section of computation between consecutive message passing events. We also provide a more flexible mixed integer-linear (ILP) formulation and show that the resulting schedules closely match schedules from the LP formulation. Across four applications, we use our LP-derived upper bounds to show that current approaches trail optimal, power-constrained performance by up to 41%. This demonstrates limitations of current systems, and our LP formulation provides future optimization approaches with a quantitative optimization target. We also introduce Conductor, a run-time system that intelligently distributes available power to nodes and cores to improve performance. The key techniques used are configuration space exploration and adaptive power balancing. Configuration exploration dynamically selects the optimal thread concurrency level and DVFS state subject to a hardware-enforced power bound

  17. Ant mound as an optimal shape in constructal design: solar irradiation and circadian brood/fungi-warming sorties.

    PubMed

    Kasimova, R G; Tishin, D; Obnosov, Yu V; Dlussky, G M; Baksht, F B; Kacimov, A R

    2014-08-21

    Sizes, shapes, ambient and in-dome temperature, incoming solar radiation and illumination are measured on a Formica rufa anthill in a mixed forest of the Volga-Kama National Reserve in Russia. These data are used in a conceptual model of insolation of a right conical surface by direct-beam, descending atmospheric and ascending ground-reflected radiation. Unlike a standard calculation of the energy flux intercepted by a solar panel, the anthill is a 3-D structure and double-integration of the cosine of the angle between the solar beams and normal to the surface is carried out for a "cozy trapezium", where the insects expose themselves and the brood to "morning" sunbathing pulses (Jones and Oldroyd, 2007). Several constructal design problems are formulated with the criteria involving either a pure solar energy gained by the dome or this energy, as a mathematical criterion, penalized by additive terms of mechanical energy (potential and friction) lost by the ants in their diurnal forays from a "heartland" of the nest to the sun-basking zone on the surface. The unique and global optima are analytically found, with the optimal tilt angle of the cone explicitly expressed through the zenith angle of the Sun and meteorological constants for the isotropic sky model. PMID:24681404

  18. Ant mound as an optimal shape in constructal design: solar irradiation and circadian brood/fungi-warming sorties.

    PubMed

    Kasimova, R G; Tishin, D; Obnosov, Yu V; Dlussky, G M; Baksht, F B; Kacimov, A R

    2014-08-21

    Sizes, shapes, ambient and in-dome temperature, incoming solar radiation and illumination are measured on a Formica rufa anthill in a mixed forest of the Volga-Kama National Reserve in Russia. These data are used in a conceptual model of insolation of a right conical surface by direct-beam, descending atmospheric and ascending ground-reflected radiation. Unlike a standard calculation of the energy flux intercepted by a solar panel, the anthill is a 3-D structure and double-integration of the cosine of the angle between the solar beams and normal to the surface is carried out for a "cozy trapezium", where the insects expose themselves and the brood to "morning" sunbathing pulses (Jones and Oldroyd, 2007). Several constructal design problems are formulated with the criteria involving either a pure solar energy gained by the dome or this energy, as a mathematical criterion, penalized by additive terms of mechanical energy (potential and friction) lost by the ants in their diurnal forays from a "heartland" of the nest to the sun-basking zone on the surface. The unique and global optima are analytically found, with the optimal tilt angle of the cone explicitly expressed through the zenith angle of the Sun and meteorological constants for the isotropic sky model.

  19. Shape Metamorphism Using p-Laplacian Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Ge; Esser, Mehmet; Parvin, Bahram; Bebis, George

    2004-05-19

    We present a new approach for shape metamorphism, which is a process of gradually changing a source shape (known) through intermediate shapes (unknown) into a target shape (known). The problem, when represented with implicit scalar function, is under-constrained, and regularization is needed. Using the p-Laplacian equation (PLE), we generalize a series of regularization terms based on the gradient of the implicit function, and we show that the present methods lack additional constraints for a more stable solution. The novelty of our approach is in the deployment of a new regularization term when p --> infinity which leads to the infinite Laplacian equation (ILE). We show that ILE minimizes the supremum of the gradient and prove that it is optimal for metamorphism since intermediate solutions are equally distributed along their normal direction. Applications of the proposed algorithm for 2D and 3D objects are demonstrated.

  20. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.