Science.gov

Sample records for constriction ring syndrome

  1. Acquired Constriction Ring: A Case of Rubber Band Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rahel; Haug, Luzian; Surke, Carsten; Mathys, Lukas; Vögelin, Esther

    2017-03-13

    Rubber band syndrome is a rare entity seen in younger children mainly in communities where rubber bands are worn around the wrist for decorative purposes. When the band is worn for a long duration, it burrows through the skin and soft tissues resulting in distal edema, loss of function, and even damage to the neurovascular structures. These symptoms are difficult to relate to this rare but typical condition. We report a case of a 2¾-year-old girl with the history of a linear circumferential scar at the right wrist combined with the limited use of a swollen hand for several weeks. The child was taken to surgery with the purpose to release the red, indurated scar and eliminate the lymphatic congestion. A rubber band was found lying in a plane superficial to the flexor tendons but had cut through the superficial branch of the radial nerve and partially through the abductor pollicis longus tendon. The band was removed and the lacerated structures were repaired. The child had excellent recovery postoperatively. The cardinal features of a linear constricting scar around the wrist in the presence of a swollen hand should always alert the clinician to the possibility of a forgotten band around the wrist, which might have burrowed into the soft tissues for a period. Early recognition may be important to prevent further damage of essential structures.

  2. Endoscopic release of limb constriction rings in utero.

    PubMed

    Ronderos-Dumit, D; Briceño, F; Navarro, H; Sanchez, N

    2006-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome is a sporadic condition that may result in constriction bands, amputation and multiple craniofacial, visceral and body wall defects. It occurs in 1/1,200 to 1/15,000 live births. Most cases present with multiple congenital anomalies that are incompatible with life. A small group of fetuses shows isolated limb constrictions that may cause severe limb dysfunction or limb amputation if left untreated. Successful in utero surgical lyses of constriction rings have been reported. We report a case of constriction amniotic bands involving both legs and compromising blood flow to the distal extremity. The constriction ring was successfully released by a minimally invasive endoscopic surgical technique avoiding severe limb dysfunction or foot amputation.

  3. Still and rotating myosin clusters determine cytokinetic ring constriction

    PubMed Central

    Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Kruse, Karsten; Riveline, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinetic ring is essential for separating daughter cells during division. It consists of actin filaments and myosin motors that are generally assumed to organize as sarcomeres similar to skeletal muscles. However, direct evidence is lacking. Here we show that the internal organization and dynamics of rings are different from sarcomeres and distinct in different cell types. Using micro-cavities to orient rings in single focal planes, we find in mammalian cells a transition from a homogeneous distribution to a periodic pattern of myosin clusters at the onset of constriction. In contrast, in fission yeast, myosin clusters rotate prior to and during constriction. Theoretical analysis indicates that both patterns result from acto-myosin self-organization and reveals differences in the respective stresses. These findings suggest distinct functional roles for rings: contraction in mammalian cells and transport in fission yeast. Thus self-organization under different conditions may be a generic feature for regulating morphogenesis in vivo. PMID:27363521

  4. Ring cycle for dilating and constricting the nuclear pore

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Sozanne R.; Blobel, Günter; Melčák, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that the three “channel” nucleoporins, Nup54, Nup58, and Nup62, interact with each other through only four distinct sites and established the crystal structures of the two resulting “interactomes,” Nup54•Nup58 and Nup54•Nup62. We also reported instability of the Nup54•Nup58 interactome and previously determined the atomic structure of the relevant Nup58 segment by itself, demonstrating that it forms a twofold symmetric tetramer. Here, we report the crystal structure of the relevant free Nup54 segment and show that it forms a tetrameric, helical bundle that is structurally “conditioned” for instability by a central patch of polar hydrogen-bonded residues. Integrating these data with our previously reported results, we propose a “ring cycle” for dilating and constricting the nuclear pore. In essence, three homooligomeric rings, one consisting of eight modules of Nup58 tetramers, and two, each consisting of eight modules of Nup54 tetramers, are stacked in midplane and characterize a constricted pore of 10- to 20-nm diameter. In going to the dilated state, segments of one Nup58 and two Nup54 tetrameric modules reassort into a dodecameric module, eight of which form a single, heterooligomeric midplane ring, which is flexible in a diameter range of 40–50 nm. The ring cycle would be regulated by phenylalanine–glycine regions (“FG repeats”) of channel nups. Akin to ligand-gated channels, the dilated state of the midplane ring may be stabilized by binding of [cargo•transport-factor] complexes to FG repeats, thereby linking the ratio of constricted to dilated nuclear pores to cellular transport need. PMID:23479651

  5. A review on the safety of one-stage circumferential ring constriction release.

    PubMed

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O H; Sitorus, Ade S N

    2015-02-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the use of one-stage circumferential ring-constriction release with Z-plasties regarding the safety, aesthetic appearance, and limb function. A thorough review was conducted on all English publications in PubMed during the period of 2001 through 2011. Titles and abstracts were identified using online search engine from National Library of Medicine's PubMed database under the keywords "limb constriction ring," "limb constriction band," "amniotic band," "annular constriction," and "circumferential constriction." We used Boolean operator and field of title. Evaluation was done to search indications, timing of the first surgical intervention, time interval between surgeries, patients' gender, anatomic location of the ring, wound healing problems, and scar quality. Fourteen publications met the criteria. There were 17 patients with 25 ring constrictions in total. Sixteen ring constrictions (64%) were circumferential; nine (36%) were semi-circumferential. Mean age of 14 patients treated with one-stage release was 4.8 years. Six articles mentioned about normal development of postoperative limb function. Mean age of three patients treated with staged release was 10.5 months. Two articles mentioned regained distal muscle function postoperatively. It is confirmed that surgeons may continue the practice to release circumferential CRS in one stage.

  6. Congenital constriction ring of limbs in subjects with history of maternal substance use.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sajid; Lal, Karmoon; Fatima, Noreen Ghulam; Samo, Ayaz; Haque, Sayedul

    2015-05-01

    Congenital Constriction Ring (CCR) is a rare malformation which manifests itself in the form of ring-like constrictive bands. Due to its heterogeneous nature, its etiology remains unclear. Here, we present a series of seven independent individuals afflicted with CCR, which primarily involved the digits. The phenotypic manifestations included terminal phalangeal reduction, anonychia, digit hypoplasia, and acrosyndactyly. Mesoaxial digits in hands and preaxial digits in feet were most frequently affected. Camptodactyly and clubfoot were witnessed in four and one subject, respectively. Curiously, mothers of six of these subjects revealed that they consumed copious amounts of Multani mitti(Fuller's clay) and/or Naswar(nonsmoke-tobacco), during their respective pregnancies. Maternal substance use during pregnancy is not an unusual practice, however, its relationship with CCR as pregnancy outcome remains unexplored. Case-control studies are warranted to elucidate the relationship between the exposure to these substances and the etiology of CCR and/or other limb defects in the offspring.

  7. Buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through an axisymmetric ring constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2010-08-01

    Axisymmetric boundary-integral (BI) simulations were made for buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through a ring constriction. The algorithm uses the Hebeker representation for the solid-particle contribution. A high-order, near-singularity subtraction technique is essential for near-critical squeezing. The drop velocity and minimum drop-solid spacing were determined for different ring and hole sizes, viscosity ratios, and Bond numbers, where the latter is a dimensionless ratio of gravitational to interfacial forces. The drop velocity decelerates typically 100-fold or more, and the drop-solid spacing reduces to typically 0.1%-1% of the nondeformed drop radius as the drop passes through the constriction. The critical Bond number (below which trapping occurs) was determined for different conditions. For supercritical conditions, the nondimensional time required for the drop to pass through the ring increases for a fixed drop-to-hole size with increasing viscosity ratio and decreasing Bond number, but it has a nonmonotonic dependence on the ratio of the radii of the drop and ring cross section. Numerical results indicate that the square of the drop squeezing time is inversely proportional to the Bond number minus the critical Bond number for near-critical squeezing. The critical Bond number, determined from dynamic BI calculations, compares favorably to that obtained precisely from a static algorithm. The static algorithm uses the Young-Laplace equation to calculate the pendant and sessile portions of the drop interface coupled through the conditions of global pressure continuity and total drop volume conservation. Over a limited parameter space, the critical Bond number increases almost linearly with the drop-to-hole ratio and is a weak function of the ratio of the ring cross-sectional radius to the hole radius. Another dynamic phenomenon, in addition to drop squeezing, is a drop "dripping" around the outer edge of the ring constriction, and a critical

  8. Constriction model of actomyosin ring for cytokinesis by fission yeast using a two-state sliding filament mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yong-Woon; Mascagni, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We developed a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and α-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres. This structure justifies the use of the sliding-filament mechanism developed by Huxley and Hill, but it is probably less organized relative to that of muscle sarcomeres. Ring contraction tension was generated via the same fundamental mechanism used to generate muscle tension, but some physicochemical parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the proposed ring structure. Simulations allowed an estimate of ring constriction tension that reproduced the observed ring constriction velocity using a physiologically possible, self-consistent set of parameters. Proposed molecular-level properties responsible for the thousand-fold slower constriction velocity of the ring relative to that of muscle sarcomeres include fewer myosin molecules involved, a less organized contractile configuration, a low α-actinin concentration, and a high resistance membrane tension. Ring constriction velocity is demonstrated as an exponential function of time despite a near linear appearance. We proposed a hypothesis to explain why excess myosin heads inhibit constriction velocity rather than enhance it. The model revealed how myosin concentration and elastic resistance tension are balanced during cytokinesis in S. pombe.

  9. Constriction model of actomyosin ring for cytokinesis by fission yeast using a two-state sliding filament mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yong-Woon; Mascagni, Michael

    2014-09-28

    We developed a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and α-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres. This structure justifies the use of the sliding-filament mechanism developed by Huxley and Hill, but it is probably less organized relative to that of muscle sarcomeres. Ring contraction tension was generated via the same fundamental mechanism used to generate muscle tension, but some physicochemical parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the proposed ring structure. Simulations allowed an estimate of ring constriction tension that reproduced the observed ring constriction velocity using a physiologically possible, self-consistent set of parameters. Proposed molecular-level properties responsible for the thousand-fold slower constriction velocity of the ring relative to that of muscle sarcomeres include fewer myosin molecules involved, a less organized contractile configuration, a low α-actinin concentration, and a high resistance membrane tension. Ring constriction velocity is demonstrated as an exponential function of time despite a near linear appearance. We proposed a hypothesis to explain why excess myosin heads inhibit constriction velocity rather than enhance it. The model revealed how myosin concentration and elastic resistance tension are balanced during cytokinesis in S. pombe.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions ring chromosome 20 syndrome ring chromosome 20 syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ring chromosome 20 syndrome is a condition that affects the ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions ring chromosome 14 syndrome ring chromosome 14 syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ring chromosome 14 syndrome is a condition characterized by seizures ...

  12. A Multi-layered Protein Network Stabilizes the Escherichia coli FtsZ-ring and Modulates Constriction Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Jackson; Coltharp, Carla; Shtengel, Gleb; Yang, Xinxing; Hess, Harald; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic tubulin homolog, FtsZ, forms a ring-like structure (FtsZ-ring) at midcell. The FtsZ-ring establishes the division plane and enables the assembly of the macromolecular division machinery (divisome). Although many molecular components of the divisome have been identified and their interactions extensively characterized, the spatial organization of these proteins within the divisome is unclear. Consequently, the physical mechanisms that drive divisome assembly, maintenance, and constriction remain elusive. Here we applied single-molecule based superresolution imaging, combined with genetic and biophysical investigations, to reveal the spatial organization of cellular structures formed by four important divisome proteins in E. coli: FtsZ, ZapA, ZapB and MatP. We show that these interacting proteins are arranged into a multi-layered protein network extending from the cell membrane to the chromosome, each with unique structural and dynamic properties. Further, we find that this protein network stabilizes the FtsZ-ring, and unexpectedly, slows down cell constriction, suggesting a new, unrecognized role for this network in bacterial cell division. Our results provide new insight into the structure and function of the divisome, and highlight the importance of coordinated cell constriction and chromosome segregation. PMID:25848771

  13. Rab1 interacts with GOLPH3 and controls Golgi structure and contractile ring constriction during cytokinesis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Fraschini, Roberta; Capalbo, Luisa; Gottardo, Marco; Belloni, Giorgio; Glover, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinesis requires a tight coordination between actomyosin ring constriction and new membrane addition along the ingressing cleavage furrow. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vesicle trafficking to the equatorial site and how this process is coupled with the dynamics of the contractile apparatus are poorly defined. Here we provide evidence for the requirement of Rab1 during cleavage furrow ingression in cytokinesis. We demonstrate that the gene omelette (omt) encodes the Drosophila orthologue of human Rab1 and is required for successful cytokinesis in both mitotic and meiotic dividing cells of Drosophila melanogaster. We show that Rab1 protein colocalizes with the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex Cog7 subunit and the phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate effector GOLPH3 at the Golgi stacks. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy and 3D-SIM super-resolution microscopy reveals loss of normal Golgi architecture in omt mutant spermatocytes indicating a role for Rab1 in Golgi formation. In dividing cells, Rab1 enables stabilization and contraction of actomyosin rings. We further demonstrate that GTP-bound Rab1 directly interacts with GOLPH3 and controls its localization at the Golgi and at the cleavage site. We propose that Rab1, by associating with GOLPH3, controls membrane trafficking and contractile ring constriction during cytokinesis. PMID:28100664

  14. Drechslerella stenobrocha genome illustrates the mechanism of constricting rings and the origin of nematode predation in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique group of organisms that can capture nematodes using sophisticated trapping structures. The genome of Drechslerella stenobrocha, a constricting-ring-forming fungus, has been sequenced and reported, and provided new insights into the evolutionary origins of nematode predation in fungi, the trapping mechanisms, and the dual lifestyles of saprophagy and predation. Results The genome of the fungus Drechslerella stenobrocha, which mechanically traps nematodes using a constricting ring, was sequenced. The genome was 29.02 Mb in size and was found rare instances of transposons and repeat induced point mutations, than that of Arthrobotrys oligospora. The functional proteins involved in nematode-infection, such as chitinases, subtilisins, and adhesive proteins, underwent a significant expansion in the A. oligospora genome, while there were fewer lectin genes that mediate fungus-nematode recognition in the D. stenobrocha genome. The carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalogs in both species were similar to those of efficient cellulolytic fungi, suggesting a saprophytic origin of nematode-trapping fungi. In D. stenobrocha, the down-regulation of saprophytic enzyme genes and the up-regulation of infection-related genes during the capture of nematodes indicated a transition between dual life strategies of saprophagy and predation. The transcriptional profiles also indicated that trap formation was related to the protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway and regulated by Zn(2)–C6 type transcription factors. Conclusions The genome of D. stenobrocha provides support for the hypothesis that nematode trapping fungi evolved from saprophytic fungi in a high carbon and low nitrogen environment. It reveals the transition between saprophagy and predation of these fungi and also proves new insights into the mechanisms of mechanical trapping. PMID:24507587

  15. Rab11 is required for membrane trafficking and actomyosin ring constriction in meiotic cytokinesis of Drosophila males.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Belloni, Giorgio; Gatti, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    Rab11 is a small GTPase that regulates several aspects of vesicular trafficking. Here, we show that Rab11 accumulates at the cleavage furrow of Drosophila spermatocytes and that it is essential for cytokinesis. Mutant spermatocytes form regular actomyosin rings, but these rings fail to constrict to completion, leading to cytokinesis failures. rab11 spermatocytes also exhibit an abnormal accumulation of Golgi-derived vesicles at the telophase equator, suggesting a defect in membrane-vesicle fusion. These cytokinesis phenotypes are identical to those elicited by mutations in giotto (gio) and four wheel drive (fwd) that encode a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, respectively. Double mutant analysis and immunostaining for Gio and Rab11 indicated that gio, fwd, and rab11 function in the same cytokinetic pathway, with Gio and Fwd acting upstream of Rab11. We propose that Gio and Fwd mediate Rab11 recruitment at the cleavage furrow and that Rab11 facilitates targeted membrane delivery to the advancing furrow.

  16. Rab11 Is Required for Membrane Trafficking and Actomyosin Ring Constriction in Meiotic Cytokinesis of Drosophila Males

    PubMed Central

    Belloni, Giorgio; Gatti, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    Rab11 is a small GTPase that regulates several aspects of vesicular trafficking. Here, we show that Rab11 accumulates at the cleavage furrow of Drosophila spermatocytes and that it is essential for cytokinesis. Mutant spermatocytes form regular actomyosin rings, but these rings fail to constrict to completion, leading to cytokinesis failures. rab11 spermatocytes also exhibit an abnormal accumulation of Golgi-derived vesicles at the telophase equator, suggesting a defect in membrane–vesicle fusion. These cytokinesis phenotypes are identical to those elicited by mutations in giotto (gio) and four wheel drive (fwd) that encode a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, respectively. Double mutant analysis and immunostaining for Gio and Rab11 indicated that gio, fwd, and rab11 function in the same cytokinetic pathway, with Gio and Fwd acting upstream of Rab11. We propose that Gio and Fwd mediate Rab11 recruitment at the cleavage furrow and that Rab11 facilitates targeted membrane delivery to the advancing furrow. PMID:17914057

  17. The F-actin bundler α-actinin Ain1 is tailored for ring assembly and constriction during cytokinesis in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yujie; Christensen, Jenna R.; Homa, Kaitlin E.; Hocky, Glen M.; Fok, Alice; Sees, Jennifer A.; Voth, Gregory A.; Kovar, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The actomyosin contractile ring is a network of cross-linked actin filaments that facilitates cytokinesis in dividing cells. Contractile ring formation has been well characterized in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in which the cross-linking protein α-actinin SpAin1 bundles the actin filament network. However, the specific biochemical properties of SpAin1 and whether they are tailored for cytokinesis are not known. Therefore we purified SpAin1 and quantified its ability to dynamically bind and bundle actin filaments in vitro using a combination of bulk sedimentation assays and direct visualization by two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We found that, while SpAin1 bundles actin filaments of mixed polarity like other α-actinins, SpAin1 has lower bundling activity and is more dynamic than human α-actinin HsACTN4. To determine whether dynamic bundling is important for cytokinesis in fission yeast, we created the less dynamic bundling mutant SpAin1(R216E). We found that dynamic bundling is critical for cytokinesis, as cells expressing SpAin1(R216E) display disorganized ring material and delays in both ring formation and constriction. Furthermore, computer simulations of initial actin filament elongation and alignment revealed that an intermediate level of cross-linking best facilitates filament alignment. Together our results demonstrate that dynamic bundling by SpAin1 is important for proper contractile ring formation and constriction. PMID:27075176

  18. Cardiac tamponade due to low-volume effusive constrictive pericarditis in a patient with uncontrolled type II autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palmer, William C; Kurklinsky, Andrew; Lane, Gary; Ussavarungsi, Kamonpun; Blackshear, Joseph L

    2014-03-01

    Type II autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS), a relatively common endocrine disorder, includes primary adrenal insufficiency coupled with type 1 diabetes mellitus and/or autoimmune primary hypothyroidism. Autoimmune serositis, an associated disease, may present as symptomatic pericardial effusion. We present a case of a 54-year old male with APS who developed pericarditis leading to cardiac tamponade with a subacute loculated effusion. After urgent pericardiocentesis intrapericardial pressure dropped to 0, while central venous pressures remain elevated, consistent with acute effusive constrictive pericarditis. Contrast computerized tomography confirmed increased pericardial contrast enhancement. The patient recovered after prolonged inotropic support and glucocorticoid administration. He re-accumulated the effusion 16 days later, requiring repeat pericardiocentesis. Effusive-constrictive pericarditis, an uncommon pericardial syndrome, is characterized by simultaneous pericardial inflammation and tamponade. Prior cases of APS associated with cardiac tamponade despite low volumes of effusion have been reported, albeit without good demonstration of hemodynamic findings. We report a case of APS with recurrent pericardial effusion due to pericarditis and marked hypotension with comprehensive clinical and hemodynamic assessment. These patients may require aggressive support with pericardiocentesis, inotropes, and hormone replacement therapy. They should be followed closely for recurrent tamponade.

  19. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and cerebrovascular constriction syndrome in the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches].

    PubMed

    Ruiz López, N; Cano Hernández, B; Balbás Álvarez, S

    2016-02-01

    Postpartum headache can be due to many causes. In a patient with previous epidural analgesia, the headache can be attributed to post-dural puncture headache, even if the symptoms are not typical of this clinical entity. We report a case of a post-partum with accidental dural tap during the insertion of an epidural catheter for labour analgesia, and who referred to headaches in the third post-partum day. Initially, a post-dural puncture headache was suspected, but the subsequent onset of seizures and visual impairment meant that the diagnosis had to be reconsidered. In this case report, the clinical and pathophysiological features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, as well as the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches are described.

  20. Supernumerary ring chromosome: an etiology for Pallister-Killian syndrome?

    PubMed

    Lloveras, E; Canellas, A; Cirigliano, V; Català, V; Cerdan, C; Plaja, A

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of marker chromosomes before the introduction of array CGH (aCGH) assays was only based on their banding patterns (G, C, and NOR staining) and fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques. The use of aCGH greatly improves the identification of marker chromosomes in some cases. We describe an atypical case of Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) detected at prenatal diagnosis with a very unusual cytogenetic presentation: a supernumerary ring chromosome including two copies of 12p. A similar anomaly described in a postnatal patient suggests ring chromosome as a possible cause of PKS. Extra ring chromosomes might be a more common etiology for PKS than previously thought, given the difficulty in their characterization before the advent of aCGH.

  1. Unevenness of the apical constriction in human maxillary central incisors.

    PubMed

    Olson, David G; Roberts, Steven; Joyce, Anthony P; Collins, D Edward; McPherson, James C

    2008-02-01

    This study examined the incisoapical extent of the apical constriction in 45 human maxillary central incisors. The null hypothesis was that the apical constriction is a flat ring. Our working hypothesis was that the constriction is actually uneven or "skewed" as it traces a path around the circumference of the canal. Teeth were split and imaged with 25x magnification, and the most apical and coronal limits of the apical constriction were identified and measured. Analysis of the data indicates that a majority (>70%) of maxillary central incisors exhibit an unevenness or "skew" of the apical constriction of greater than 100 microm in the incisoapical dimension, with a maximum measured skew of 385 microm. On the basis of the results of this study, a statistically significant (P < .05) variation in the longitudinal position of the apical constriction around its circumference was confirmed in maxillary central incisors.

  2. Tuberculous Constrictive Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Ali, Aamir; Alpendurada, Francisco; Prasad, Sanjay; Raphael, Claire E; Vassiliou, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Constrictive pericarditis is characterized by constriction of the heart secondary to pericardial inflammation. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is useful imaging modality for addressing the challenges of confirming this diagnosis. It can be used to exclude other causes of right heart failure, such as pulmonary hypertension or myocardial infarction, determine whether the pericardium is causing constriction and differentiate it from restrictive cardiomyopathy, which also causes impaired cardiac filling. Case Presentation: A 77-year-old man from a country with high incidence of tuberculosis presented with severe dyspnea. Echocardiography revealed a small left ventricle with normal systolic and mildly impaired diastolic function. Left heart catheterization revealed non-obstructive coronary disease, not felt contributory to the dyspnea. Anatomy imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) showed global, severely thickened pericardium. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences for detection of oedema/ inflammation showed increased signal intensity and free breathing sequences confirmed septal flattening on inspiration. Late gadolinium imaging confirmed enhancement in the pericardium, with all findings suggestive of pericardial inflammation and constriction. Conclusions: CMR with STIR sequences, free breathing sequences and late gadolinium imaging can prove extremely useful for diagnosing constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26793674

  3. Ring chromosome 20 syndrome without deletions of the subtelomeric and CHRNA4--KCNQ2 genes loci.

    PubMed

    Elghezal, Hatem; Hannachi, Hanene; Mougou, Soumaya; Kammoun, Hassene; Triki, Chahnez; Saad, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Ring chromosome 20 (r(20)) syndrome is a rare disease characterized by refractory epilepsy, moderate mental retardation and particular electroencephalographic disorder with non-convulsive status epilepticus. Here, we report a new case of r(20) syndrome in a 12 year old female who presented minimal dysmorphism, generalised tonic-clonic and absence seizures refractory to medical therapy and behavioural troubles. Among 20 cytogenetically analysed cells, 14 (70%) exhibited a 46,XX,r(20)(p13q13.3) karyotype and 6 (30%) showed a normal 46,XX caryotype. Interphasic FISH using centromeric probe of chromosome 20 detects the presence of a chromosome 20 monosomy in 7% and a duplicated ring chromosome 20 in 8% of studied cells. Metaphase FISH using chromosome 20 telomeric probes and specific probes of CHRNA4 and KCNQ2 genes detects the absence of any deletion in the ring chromosome 20. Clinical symptoms of r(20) syndrome are attributed to telomeric partial monosomy generated by ring chromosome and causing an haploinsufficiency of two epilepsy genes CHRNA4 and KCNQ2. However, our patient presents the typical epilepsy disorder but no detectable deletion in the ring chromosome 20. We speculate that clinical features of ring chromosome 20 syndrome are caused by low mosaicism of chromosome 20 monosomy caused by the loss of the ring chromosome 20.

  4. Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kanu; Alpert, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy, two relatively uncommon clinical conditions, create a diagnostic dilemma primarily because of the many similarities in both their clinical and hemodynamic presentations. However, considerable differences exist in the pathophysiology, management, and prognosis between these two syndromes. Furthermore, the precise diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy is mandatory, as the former is often curable whereas only palliative treatments are available for the latter. In this brief review, similarities and differences in the various aspects of constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy will be discussed.

  5. Telomere shortening and telomere position effect in mild ring 17 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ring chromosome 17 syndrome is a rare disease that arises from the breakage and reunion of the short and long arms of chromosome 17. Usually this abnormality results in deletion of genetic material, which explains the clinical features of the syndrome. Moreover, similar phenotypic features have been observed in cases with complete or partial loss of the telomeric repeats and conservation of the euchromatic regions. We studied two different cases of ring 17 syndrome, firstly, to clarify, by analyzing gene expression analysis using real-time qPCR, the role of the telomere absence in relationship with the clinical symptoms, and secondly, to look for a new model of the mechanism of ring chromosome transmission in a rare case of familial mosaicism, through cytomolecular and quantitative fluorescence in-situ hybridization (Q-FISH) investigations. Results The results for the first case showed that the expression levels of genes selected, which were located close to the p and q ends of chromosome 17, were significantly downregulated in comparison with controls. Moreover, for the second case, we demonstrated that the telomeres were conserved, but were significantly shorter than those of age-matched controls; data from segregation analysis showed that the ring chromosome was transmitted only to the affected subjects of the family. Conclusions Subtelomeric gene regulation is responsible for the phenotypic aspects of ring 17 syndrome; telomere shortening influences the phenotypic spectrum of this disease and strongly contributes to the familial transmission of the mosaic ring. Together, these results provide new insights into the genotype-phenotype relationships in mild ring 17 syndrome. PMID:24393457

  6. Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycaemia in a Turner Syndrome with Ring (X).

    PubMed

    Cappella, Michela; Graziani, Vanna; Pragliola, Antonella; Sensi, Alberto; Hussain, Khalid; Muratori, Claudia; Marchetti, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia (HH) is a group of clinically, genetically, and morphologically heterogeneous disorders characterized by dysregulation of insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cells. HH can either be congenital genetic hyperinsulinism or associated with metabolic disorder and syndromic condition. Early identification and meticulous management of these patients is vital to prevent neurological insult. There are only three reported cases of HH associated with a mosaic, r(X) Turner syndrome. We report the four cases of an infant with a mosaic r(X) Turner genotype and HH responsive to diazoxide therapy.

  7. Pallister-Killian syndrome caused by mosaicism for a supernumerary ring chromosome 12p.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Alison; Francis, David; Giouzeppos, Olivia; Amor, David J

    2009-03-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare but distinctive chromosomal syndrome distinguished by severe intellectual impairment, characteristic facial features, and variable structural anomalies. The characteristic cytogenetic abnormality in PKS is a supernumerary isochromosome 12p that confers mosaic tetrasomy. We describe a female child with PKS in whom tetrasomy 12p resulted from a supernumerary ring chromosome containing two copies of chromosome 12cen --> p13, a novel cytogenetic finding. The ring chromosome exhibited tissue-limited mosaicism, being absent in blood but detected in 38% of buccal mucosa cells and 41% of skin fibroblasts. Our patient demonstrated the typical dysmorphic characteristics of PKS, but her development was relatively advanced in comparison to children with isochromosome PKS. Her milder developmental phenotype may be attributable to differences in the mosaic distribution or the genomic content of the ring chromosome compared to mosaic isochromosome 12p.

  8. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Shrenik; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization and hemodynamic study is the gold standard for the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Careful interpretation of the hemodynamic data is essential to differentiate it from other diseases with restrictive physiology. In this hemodynamic review we shall briefly discuss the physiologic basis of various hemodynamic changes seen in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

  9. Ring chromosome 13: lack of distinct syndromes based on different breakpoints on 13q.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, J M; Petersen, M B; Vogel, F; Noer, H; Mikkelsen, M

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical syndromes based on different breakpoints on 13q nor correlate the severity of symptoms with instability of the ring. Images PMID:1433229

  10. A dimensional approach to the phantom vibration and ringing syndrome during medical internship.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Ching-Yen; Li, Peng; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan

    2013-09-01

    Phantom vibrations and ringing of mobile phones are prevalent hallucinations in the general population. They might be considered as a "normal" brain mechanism. The aim of this study was to determine if a dimensional approach to identify individuals suffering from these hallucinations was more important than a categorical approach. A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns (male: 46, mean age: 24.8 ± 1.2) was carried out using repeated investigations of the severity of phantom vibrations and ringing, as well as accompanying symptoms of anxiety and depression as measured by Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) before, at the 3rd, 6th, and 12th month during internship, and 2 weeks after internship. We utilized the cognitive and somatic subscales of the BDI, as well as the subjective, somatic and panic subscales of the BAI. The correlation between phantom vibration and ringing was lowest before the internship but became moderate during the internship and high 2 weeks after it. Compared to interns with subclinical phantom ringing and vibrations, interns with severe phantom vibrations and ringing had higher subjective and somatic anxiety and somatic depressive scores at any time point throughout the internship. Only interns with severe phantom ringing had more cognitive/affective depression. A dimensional approach to the phantom vibration and ringing syndrome is a powerful way to identify their correlation, as well as their association with anxiety and depression.

  11. Developmental regression in ring chromosome 20 syndrome: A prion disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Aughton, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    Since 1972, the occurrence of r(20) has been described in at least 22 patients. In contrast to the relatively early-onset and nonprogressive developmental delay typical of chromosomal syndromes generally, the development of patients with r(20) is often normal for many months or even years, and developmental regression has been observed in at least 3 cases. Herein I present a further instance of developmental regression associated with r(20), and suggest that such regression may owe to disruption of function of the prion protein gene [PRNP], which has been mapped to 20pter-p12. The proposita was born at 33 weeks of gestation but had a relatively uncomplicated neonatal course; her early development was normal. By age 8-2/12 years, she appeared to have some cognitive deficits; by age 9-7/12 years, she was considered to have educable mental retardation, with a behavior disorder. On physical examination at age 9-8/12 years, her weight was between p10 and p25, and her head circumference was ca. p50. She had very mild coarseness and hirsutism, but was not dysmorphic. Extensive investigation was largely unremarkable; however, fragile X chromosome analysis at age 11-6/12 years showed a 46,XX,r(20) karyotype [fra(X) negative] in each of 50 cells examined. The maternal karyotype was mos46,XX/46,XX,r(20). Molecular analysis of PRNP is in progress. Rivers et al. reported a progressive neurological disorder associated with a telomeric fusion 15p;20p, and suggested that the disorder might be secondary to the presence of a pathogenic isoform of the prion protein. I suggest that a similar mechanism may be responsible for the neurodegeneration sometimes associated with r(20) syndrome. Molecular analysis of PRNP in patients with r(20) syndrome and, when possible, pathologic examination of central nervous system tissue of these patients will be helpful in further assessing this hypothesis.

  12. Distinct 15q genotypes in Russell-Silver and ring 15 syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogan, P.K.; Seip, J.R.; Driscoll, D.J.

    1996-03-01

    Individuals with a ring 15 chromosome [r(15)] and those with Russell-Silver syndrome have short stature, developmental delay, triangular face, and clinodactyly. To assess whether the apparent phenotypic overlap of these conditions reflects a common genetic cause, the extent of deletions in chromosome 15q was determined in 5 patients with r(15), 1 patient with del 15q26.1-qter, and 5 patients with Russell-Silver syndrome. All patient with Russell-Silver syndrome were diploid for genetic markers in distal 15q, indicating that Russell-Silver syndrome in these individuals was unlikely to be related to the expression of single alleles at these or linked genetic loci. At least 3 distinct sites of chromosome breakage close to the telomere were found in the r(15) and del 15q25.1-qter patients, with 1 r(15) patient having both a terminal and an interstitial deletion. Although the patient with del 15q25.1-qter exhibited the largest deletion and the most profound growth retardation, the degree of growth impairment among the r(15) patients was not correlated with the size of the deleted interval. Rather, the parental origin of the ring chromosome in several patients was associated with phenotypes that are also seen in patients with either Prader-Willi (PWS) or Angelman (AS) syndromes, conditions that result from uniparental expression of genes on chromosome 15. The PWS-like or AS-like phenotypes could be explained by postzygotic loss of the ring chromosome, leading to uniparental inheritance of the intact chromosome in some tissues of r(15) patients. 33 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Occupational causes of constrictive bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Kreiss, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review New literature from 2009 to 2012 regarding occupational constrictive bronchiolitis challenges textbook descriptions of this disease, formerly thought to be limited to fixed airflow limitation arising in the wake of accidental overexposure to noxious chemicals. Indolent evolution of dyspnea without a recognized hazardous exposure is a more common presentation. Recent findings Biopsy-confirmed case series of constrictive bronchiolitis from US soldiers, Iranian survivors of sulfur mustard gassing, hospital-based studies, and flavoring-related cases document that indolent constrictive bronchiolitis cases can have normal spirometry or either restrictive or obstructive abnormalities. High-resolution computerized tomography studies can be normal or reflect air-trapping and mosaic attenuation on expiratory films. Thus, in the absence of noninvasive abnormalities, the diagnosis in dyspneic patients may require thoracoscopic biopsy in settings in which exposure risk has not been recognized. Many workers with occupational constrictive bronchiolitis stabilize with cessation of exposures causing bronchiolar epithelial necrosis. Summary Clinicians need a high index of suspicion for constrictive bronchiolitis in young patients with rapidly progressing exertional dyspnea, regardless of spirometric and radiologic findings. Identification of novel causes and exposure-response relations for known causes are needed to provide guidance for protecting workers at risk for this largely irreversible lung disease. PMID:23407121

  14. [Stuttering and Tourette's syndrome: a short tutorial and account of a four years experience in a stuttering clinic constriction of the vocal tract].

    PubMed

    Monfrais-Pfauwadel, M C

    2004-01-01

    The author presents a short tutorial of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome followed by a state of the art of review of the clinical links between stuttering and the different kinds of Tourette and tics disorders. The author relates her own experience of working for four consecutive years at the new stuttering diagnostic center at the "Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou ". The article ends with a practical review of the actual therapies available when such a diagnosis is made.

  15. [DiGeorge syndrome and vascular ring. An unusual association with multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Pedro; Anjos, Rui; Abecassis, Miguel; Santos, José A Oliveira; Martins, F Maymone

    2009-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge/CATCH 22 is a spectrum of association, characterized by unusual face, cleft or incompetent palate, congenital heart disease with defects of the outflow tracts, absence of the thymus and parathyroid glands, often associated with developmental and behavioral disorders. This association is caused by a microdeletion in chromosome band 22q11.2. In a 4-month-old infant, with obstructive lower respiratory distress and poor weight gain since 2 months of age, truncus arteriosus was diagnosed and surgically corrected. On the postoperative period maintained dependency on mechanical ventilation, with persistent hypoventilation of the left lung. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed complete obstruction of the left main bronchus by an extrinsic compression due to a vascular ring diagnosed by cardiac catheterization that showed a common anomalous origin of both right and left subclavian arteries and the ligamentum arteriosum. A second surgery by left lateral thoracotomy corrected the vascular ring. The maintenance of the collapse of the left main bronchus led to selective endobronchial stenting. The migration of the stent to the trachea, with acute respiratory distress, required emergent endoscopic removal of the stent. Thereafter, the evolution was uneventful. The association of DiGeorge syndrome with vascular ring is unusual. Unexpected evolution in these patients require a multidisciplinary technical approach for diagnosis and eventual emergent intervention.

  16. Purulent Pericarditis Leading to Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Akira; Craft, Jason; Mazzaferri, Ernest L.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy 61-year-old immunocompetent male who was found to have purulent bacterial pericarditis. The patient was initially diagnosed with pneumococcal pneumonia and bacteremia after presenting with chest pain and a productive cough. He was found to have a purulent pericardial effusion and underwent surgical washout and creation of a pericardial window. In short time he developed signs of right heart failure and a cardiac MRI revealed a severely thickened pericardium with evidence of constrictive pericarditis. The patient subsequently underwent pericardiectomy where the diagnosis of constriction was confirmed. Our patient recovered well and had no clinical evidence of heart failure on follow-up. This case demonstrates the importance of rapid identification of bacterial pericarditis and the high likelihood of progression to constriction. PMID:28352452

  17. Gelastic seizures in ring chromosome 20 syndrome: a case report with video illustration.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Petia; Boneva, Iliyana; Todorova, Albena; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    Although increasingly recognised, ring chromosome 20 (r[20]) syndrome is still diagnosed with delay, sometimes leading to inappropriate presurgical evaluation. The focal, presumed frontal, character of the seizures manifesting with fear and hypermotor behaviour and episodes of non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) are most typical, as well as cognitive impairment with behavioural problems and, sometimes, dysmorphic signs. We present a girl diagnosed at the age of 13 years who suffered from an atypical clinical presentation, with minimal cognitive problems, absence of dysmorphic symptoms, and hypermotor/gelastic seizures. [Published with video sequences].

  18. Constrictive chronic pericarditis in children.

    PubMed

    Gomes Ferreira, S M; Gomes Ferreira, A; do Nascimento Morais, A; Siriano Paz, W; Alves Silveira, F A

    2001-03-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is a uncommom disease in children. We have now encountered pericardial thickening as the cause of severe constrictive physiology in two patients, one also having haemodynamic features of restrictive cardiomyopathy. Both patients, who had refractory ascites and evidence of increased systemic venous pressure, underwent Doppler echocardiography, cardiac catheterisation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Resonance imaging failed to show any thickning of the pericardium, but cardiac catheterisation revealed diastolic equalisation of pressures in all four chambers, with only mild elevation of pulmonary pressure in the first patient, but nearly equalisation of diastolic pressure, and a very high pulmonary arterial pressure with a difference of 7 mm Hg between the end diastolic pressures in the two ventricles in the second patient. Doppler revealed a restrictive pattern of mitral inflow, with high E and small A velocities and a short deceleration time. The clinical background did not suggest pericardial disease in either of the patients. We conclude that a careful search is needed to uncover constrictive pericarditis when there is no previous disease which may suggest late pericardial constriction. The haemodynamic features of restrictive cardiomyopathy can co-exist with pericardial restriction, and differentiation between the two entities is critical in view of the diverse management and prognosis of the two conditions.

  19. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: Further delineation of the critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E.; El-Shanti, H.

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: further delineation of the critical region.

    PubMed

    Mears, A J; el-Shanti, H; Murray, J C; McDermid, H E; Patil, S R

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility.

  1. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Anders, Simone; Dickinson, Michael; Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  2. Theoretical analysis of ARC constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Brooks, A.W.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-12-01

    The physics of the thermionic converter is governed by strong electrode-plasma interactions (emissions surface scattering, charge exchange) and weak interactions (diffusion, radiation) at the maximum interelectrode plasma radius. The physical processes are thus mostly convective in thin sheaths in front of the electrodes and mostly diffusive and radiative in the plasma bulk. The physical boundaries are open boundaries to particle transfer (electrons emitted or absorbed by the electrodes, all particles diffusing through some maximum plasma radius) and to convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. In a first approximation the thermionic converter may be described by a one-dimensional classical transport theory. The two-dimensional effects may be significant as a result of the sheath sensitivity to radial plasma variations and of the strong sheath-plasma coupling. The current-voltage characteristic of the converter is thus the result of an integrated current density over the collector area for which the boundary conditions at each r determine the regime (ignited/unignited) of the local current density. A current redistribution strongly weighted at small radii (arc constriction) limits the converter performance and opens questions on constriction reduction possibilities. The questions addressed are the followng: (1) what are the main contributors to the loss of current at high voltage in the thermionic converter; and (2) is arc constriction observable theoretically and what are the conditions of its occurrence. The resulting theoretical problem is formulated and results are given. The converter electrical current is estimated directly from the electron and ion particle fluxes based on the spatial distribution of the electron/ion density n, temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/, electrical voltage V and on the knowledge of the transport coefficients. (WHK)

  3. [Diagnosis difficulty in occult constrictive pericarditis].

    PubMed

    Massoure, P L; le Bouffos, V; Roubertie, F; Lafitte, S; Roudaut, R

    2005-10-01

    We report the case of a 42 years woman known to have a cardiac heart failure attributed to restrictive cardiomyopathy for want of any other plausible diagnosis. Evolution and repeted investigations finally permitted to rectify the diagnosis by revealing a constrictive pericarditis, remained occult 9 years during. The differentiation of restrictive cardiomyopathy and constrictive pericarditis has been a perennial problem in clinical cardiology. Diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is based on associated signs sometimes too poor to go straight to thoracotomy. We discuss the mean to approach more precisely this uncommon pattern named occult constrictive pericarditis.

  4. [Chronic constrictive pericarditis: new imaging features].

    PubMed

    Pons, F; Poyet, R; Capilla, E; Brocq, F-X; Kerebel, S; Jego, C; Cellarier, G-R

    2012-11-01

    We report on a patient hospitalized in cardiology department to explore dyspnea and right ventricular failure evoking constrictive pericarditis. This case is of great interest to review conventional and new imaging features used for the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis versus restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  5. Uncoupling apical constriction from tissue invagination.

    PubMed

    Chung, SeYeon; Kim, Sangjoon; Andrew, Deborah J

    2017-03-06

    Apical constriction is a widely utilized cell shape change linked to folding, bending and invagination of polarized epithelia. It remains unclear how apical constriction is regulated spatiotemporally during tissue invagination and how this cellular process contributes to tube formation in different developmental contexts. Using Drosophila salivary gland (SG) invagination as a model, we show that regulation of folded gastrulation expression by the Fork head transcription factor is required for apicomedial accumulation of Rho kinase and non-muscle myosin II, which coordinate apical constriction. We demonstrate that neither loss of spatially coordinated apical constriction nor its complete blockage prevent internalization and tube formation, although such manipulations affect the geometry of invagination. When apical constriction is disrupted, compressing force generated by a tissue-level myosin cable contributes to SG invagination. We demonstrate that fully elongated polarized SGs can form outside the embryo, suggesting that tube formation and elongation are intrinsic properties of the SG.

  6. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  7. Drop trapping in axisymmetric constrictions with arbitrary contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Davis, Robert H.

    2012-06-01

    The differential Young-Laplace equations are solved numerically with an iterative solution using the method of steepest descent to determine the shape of a drop trapped under gravity in an axisymmetric ring constriction. Prior work for non-wetting drops with a contact angle of π is extended to arbitrary values of the contact angle at the three-phase contact lines. The critical Bond number, representing a dimensionless ratio of gravitational and interfacial forces, and separating static trapping at lower Bond numbers from dynamic squeezing at higher Bond numbers, decreases with decreasing contact angle, indicating that drop squeezing occurs more easily at smaller contact angle. Indeed, a critical contact angle, which depends only on the drop-to-hole and ring-cross-section-to-hole size ratios, is found, below which all drops squeeze through the hole.

  8. [Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive myocardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Espínola Zavaleta, N; Maribel Vogel, L; Isaac Tazar, J; Yánac Chávez, P; Romero Cárdenas, A; Vargas Barrón, J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of constrictive pericarditis (CP) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RC) and to compare them with the results obtained with cardiac catheterization. Clinical history, electrocardiogram and X-ray were taken in all patients, and transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography were performed. Cardiac catheterization with transmyocardial biopsy was performed on only 5 patients. Wall thickness and left ventricular dimensions were normal in all patients with CP. Wall thickness was increased in those with RC. No patients demonstrated alterations in segmental wall movement. The pericardium was thickened and abnormally bright in the 3 patients with CP. In patients with CP the percentage of atrioventricular, semilunar, pulmonary and hepatic flow changes with respiration were more than 10%. In patients with RC this flow variation was less notable. However, the percentage of systolic and diastolic flow velocity increase of hepatic veins during expiration was greater than in CP. We can conclude that M-mode, two dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is extremely useful noninvasive method to differentiate CP and RC with good correlation with cardiac catheterization.

  9. Pressure Change in an Arterial Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2015-12-01

    Consider the following ConcepTest. A platelet is drifting with the blood flowing through a horizontal artery. As the platelet enters a constriction, does the blood pressure increase, decrease, or stay the same?

  10. Pressure Change in an Arterial Constriction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2015-01-01

    Consider the following ConcepTest. A platelet is drifting with the blood flowing through a horizontal artery. As the platelet enters a constriction, does the blood pressure increase, decrease, or stay the same?

  11. Constrictive Pericarditis: A Challenging Diagnosis in Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Mariana; Carmo Mendes, Inês; Anjos, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon disease in children, usually difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a previous history of tuberculosis and right heart failure, in whom constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed. The case highlights the need to integrate all information, including clinical data, noninvasive cardiac imaging, and even invasive hemodynamic evaluation when required, in order to establish the correct diagnosis and proceed to surgical treatment.

  12. Constrictive Pericarditis: A Challenging Diagnosis in Paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Mariana; Carmo Mendes, Inês; Anjos, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon disease in children, usually difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a previous history of tuberculosis and right heart failure, in whom constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed. The case highlights the need to integrate all information, including clinical data, noninvasive cardiac imaging, and even invasive hemodynamic evaluation when required, in order to establish the correct diagnosis and proceed to surgical treatment. PMID:26425371

  13. Influence of Lectins on Constricting Ring Formation by Arthrobotrys dactyloides.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L; Walter, D E

    1991-04-01

    Incubation of Arthrobotrys dactyloides conidia in the presence of Radopholus citrophilus in lectin solutions with their corresponding sugars did not alter the stimulation of trap formation in solutions containing lectins alone. The lack of inhibition of lectin-stimulated trap formation by sugars or by lectin denaturation and the lack of lectin specificity indicate that the carbohydrate-binding regions of the particular lectins studied are not the stimulatory moieties of these macromolecules.

  14. Management of the Amniotic Band Syndrome with Cleft Palate: Literature Review and Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Ortega, Carolina; Flores-Velázquez, Joselín; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Noyola-Frías, Miguel Ángel; Santos-Díaz, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Amniotic Band Syndrome (ABS) is a group of congenital malformations that includes the majority of typical constriction rings and limb and digital amputations, together with major craniofacial, thoracic, and abdominal malformations. The syndrome is caused by early rupture of the amniotic sac. Some of the main oral manifestations include micrognathia, hyperdontia, and cleft lip with or without cleft palate, which is present in 14.6% of patients with this syndrome. The purpose of this report was to describe the clinical characteristics and the oral treatment provided to a 6-month-old male patient affected with ABS with cleft lip and palate. PMID:28246561

  15. Bilateral Implantation of Scleral-Fixated Cionni Endocapsular Rings and Toric Intraocular Lenses in a Pediatric Patient with Marfan's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gimbel, Howard V.; Camoriano, Gerardo D.; Aman-Ullah, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    The management of ectopia lentis in Marfan's syndrome is challenging. Multiple disease-associated factors conspire to deprive these patients of adequate vision. While optical correction with glasses and contact lenses is usually advocated early on, the irregular astigmatism and even partial aphakia that accompanies advanced cases generally warrant surgical intervention. Several surgical strategies have been devised to manage these challenging cases, including the combination of endocapsular or pars plana lensectomy and iris or scleral fixation of the intraocular lens (IOL) or IOL-bag complex. All of the reported cases have been implanted with IOLs that correct for myopia only. With toric lenses, it is now possible to correct for corneal astigmatism in these patients as well, provided that the capsular bag is maintained and can be properly centered. We report the combination of scleral-fixated Cionni endocapsular rings and toric IOLs in a pediatric patient with bilateral ectopia lentis secondary to Marfan's syndrome. PMID:22615696

  16. Uncoupling apical constriction from tissue invagination

    PubMed Central

    Chung, SeYeon; Kim, Sangjoon; Andrew, Deborah J

    2017-01-01

    Apical constriction is a widely utilized cell shape change linked to folding, bending and invagination of polarized epithelia. It remains unclear how apical constriction is regulated spatiotemporally during tissue invagination and how this cellular process contributes to tube formation in different developmental contexts. Using Drosophila salivary gland (SG) invagination as a model, we show that regulation of folded gastrulation expression by the Fork head transcription factor is required for apicomedial accumulation of Rho kinase and non-muscle myosin II, which coordinate apical constriction. We demonstrate that neither loss of spatially coordinated apical constriction nor its complete blockage prevent internalization and tube formation, although such manipulations affect the geometry of invagination. When apical constriction is disrupted, compressing force generated by a tissue-level myosin cable contributes to SG invagination. We demonstrate that fully elongated polarized SGs can form outside the embryo, suggesting that tube formation and elongation are intrinsic properties of the SG. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22235.001 PMID:28263180

  17. Pupil constrictions to photographs of the sun.

    PubMed

    Binda, Paola; Pereverzeva, Maria; Murray, Scott O

    2013-05-17

    The pupil constricts in response to light increments and dilates with light decrements. Here we show that a picture of the sun, introducing a small overall decrease in light level across the field of view, results in a pupillary constriction. Thus, the pictorial representation of a high-luminance object (the sun) can override the normal pupillary dilation elicited by a light decrement. In a series of experiments that control for a variety of factors known to modulate pupil size, we show that the effect (a) does not depend on the retinal position of the images and (b) is modulated by attention. It has long been known that cognitive factors can affect pupil diameter by producing pupillary dilations. Our results indicate that high-level visual analysis (beyond the simple subcortical system mediating the pupillary response to light) can also induce pupillary constriction, with an effect size of about 0.1 mm.

  18. Cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, James A

    2004-09-01

    The pericardium envelopes the cardiac chambers and under physiological conditions exerts subtle functions, including mechanical effects that enhance normal ventricular interactions that contribute to balancing left and right cardiac outputs. Because the pericardium is non-compliant, conditions that cause intrapericardial crowding elevate intrapericardial pressure, which may be the mediator of adverse cardiac compressive effects. Elevated intrapericardial pressure may result from primary disease of the pericardium itself (tamponade or constriction) or from abrupt chamber dilatation (eg, right ventricular infarction). Regardless of the mechanism leading to increased intrapericardial pressure, the resultant pericardial constraint exerts adverse effects on cardiac filling and output. Constriction and restrictive cardiomyopathy share common pathophysiological and clinical features; their differentiation can be quite challenging. This review will consider the physiology of the normal pericardium and its dynamic interactions with the heart and review in detail the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  19. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando; Sesé, Javier; Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del; Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos; Majer, Johannes

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  20. Differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Kambiz; Maraj, Suraj; Amanullah, Aman M

    2005-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy are 2 forms of diastolic dysfunction with similar presentation but different treatment options. Whereas constrictive pericarditis has the potential of being cured with pericardiectomy, restrictive cardiomyopathy is usually incurable. It is therefore crucial to differentiate between the 2 disorders. In the last few years, new diagnostic techniques have become available to differentiate these causes of diastolic dysfunction from each other. This review provides a complete, in-depth comparison of the 2 disorders with regard to their symptoms and clinical features, etiology, pathophysiology, hemodynamics, echocardiographic presentation, and finally the different available management options.

  1. Enzyme E2 from Chinese white shrimp inhibits replication of white spot syndrome virus and ubiquitinates its RING domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, An-Jing; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the ubiquitin (Ub) proteasome pathway (UPP) is closely related to immune defense. We have identified a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, E2, from the Chinese white shrimp, Fenneropenaeus chinensis (FcUbc). Injection of recombinant FcUbc protein (rFcUbc) reduced the mortality of shrimp infected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and inhibited replication of WSSV. rFcUbc, but not a mutant FcUbc (mFcUbc), bound to WSSV RING domains (WRDs) from four potential E3 ligase proteins of WSSV in vitro. Importantly, rFcUbc could ubiquitinate the RING domains (named WRD2 and WRD3) of WSSV277 and WSSV304 proteins in vitro and the two proteins in WSSV-infected Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells. Furthermore, overexpression of FcUbc increased ubiquitination of WSSV277 and WSSV304 during WSSV infection. In summary, our study demonstrates that FcUbc from Chinese white shrimp inhibited WSSV replication and could ubiquitinate WSSV RING domain-containing proteins. This is the first report about antiviral function of Ubc E2 in shrimp.

  2. Constrictive pericarditis in a renal transplant recipient with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Kuthe, S; Jha, V; Kohli, H S; Rathi, M; Gupta, K L; Sakhuja, V

    2010-07-01

    Tuberculosis is a common cause of pericarditis in the developing countries and constrictive pericarditis is a serious sequel. There are only three cases of constrictive pericarditis in kidney transplant recipients previously reported in literature. Here, we report a case of constrictive pericarditis developing in a renal transplant recipient while on antituberculous therapy for tuberculous pleural effusion.

  3. Constrictive pericarditis in a renal transplant recipient with tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sreejith, P.; Kuthe, S.; Jha, V.; Kohli, H. S.; Rathi, M.; Gupta, K. L.; Sakhuja, V.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a common cause of pericarditis in the developing countries and constrictive pericarditis is a serious sequel. There are only three cases of constrictive pericarditis in kidney transplant recipients previously reported in literature. Here, we report a case of constrictive pericarditis developing in a renal transplant recipient while on antituberculous therapy for tuberculous pleural effusion. PMID:21072157

  4. A case of immunoglobulin G4-related constrictive pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-Qi; Fang, Fang; Zhen, Wen-Jun; Ouyang, Xiao-Kang; Wang, Huai-Bin; Wang, Zi

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old man was admitted with a complaint of upper abdominal distension and shortness of breath. The constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed based on the transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and chest CT scan. Pathology revealed it is immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related constrictive pericarditis. Likely, this is the first case of IgG4-related constrictive pericarditis reported in China. PMID:26904579

  5. Constrictive pericarditis--a curable diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Syed, Faisal F; Schaff, Hartzell V; Oh, Jae K

    2014-09-01

    Constrictive pericarditis can result from a stiff pericardium that prevents satisfactory diastolic filling. The distinction between constrictive pericarditis and other causes of heart failure, such as restrictive cardiomyopathy, is important because pericardiectomy can cure constrictive pericarditis. Diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is based on characteristic haemodynamic and anatomical features determined using echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, cardiac MRI, and CT. The Mayo Clinic echocardiography and cardiac catheterization haemodynamic diagnostic criteria for constrictive pericarditis are based on the unique features of ventricular interdependence and dissociation of intrathoracic and intracardiac pressures seen when the pericardium is constricted. A complete pericardiectomy can restore satisfactory diastolic filling by removing the constrictive pericardium in patients with constrictive pericarditis. However, if inflammation of the pericardium is the predominant constrictive mechanism, anti-inflammatory therapy might alleviate this transient condition without a need for surgery. Early diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is, therefore, of paramount clinical importance. An improved understanding of how constrictive pericarditis develops after an initiating event is critical to prevent this diastolic heart failure. In this Review, we discuss the aetiology, pathophysiology, and diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis, with a specific emphasis on how to differentiate this disease from conditions with similar clinical presentations.

  6. The proportion of cells with functional X disomy is associated with the severity of mental retardation in mosaic ring X Turner syndrome females.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Wakui, K; Nakamura, T; Ohashi, H; Watanabe, Y; Yoshino, M; Kida, T; Okamoto, N; Matsumura, M; Muroya, K; Ogata, T; Goto, Y; Fukushima, Y

    2002-01-01

    Turner syndrome females (45,X) do not have mental retardation (MR), whereas some mosaic ring X Turner syndrome females, with 45,X/46,X,r(X), have severe MR. The MR is believed to be caused by a failure of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) of the small ring X chromosome, which leads to functional X disomy (FXD), To explore this hypothesis, we examined the proportion of FXD cells in the peripheral blood of four ring X Turner syndrome females with various levels of MR, using two newly developed XCI assays based on DNA methylation of X-linked genes. As a result, the two patients with extremely severe MR showed complete FXD patterns, whereas the remaining two patients with relatively milder MR showed partial FXD patterns. These results indicate that the proportion of FXD cells may be associated with the severity of MR in mosaic ring X Turner syndrome females, although this association should be confirmed by examining brain cells during development. One of the cases with severe MR and a complete FXD pattern neither lacked the XIST gene nor had uniparental X isodisomy, and we discuss the mechanism of the failure of XCI in this case.

  7. Constrictive Pericarditis as a Never Ending Story: What's New?

    PubMed

    Sohn, Dae-Won

    2012-03-01

    Nowadays, we have a better understanding of the natural history of constrictive pericarditis such as transient constriction. In addition, we have acquired the correct understanding of hemodynamic features that are unique to constrictive pericarditis. This understanding has allowed us to diagnose constrictive pericarditis reliably with Doppler echocardiography and differentiation between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy is no longer a clinical challenge. The advent of imaging modalities such as CT or MR is another advance in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. We can accurately measure pericardial thickness and additional information such as the status of coronary artery and the presence of myocardial fibrosis can be obtained. We no longer perform cardiac catheterization for the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. However, these advances are useless unless we suspect and undergo work-up for constrictive pericarditis. In constrictive pericarditis, the most important diagnostic tool is clinical suspicion. In a patient with signs and symptoms of increased systemic venous pressure i.e. right sided heart failure, that are disproportionate to pulmonary or left sided heart disease, possibility of constrictive pericarditis should always be included in the differential diagnosis.

  8. Effects of silver ions (Ag+) on contractile ring function and microtubule dynamics during first cleavage in Ilyanassa obsoleta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Stephens, A. P.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Schwarting, S. S.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The terminal phase of cell division involves tight constriction of the cleavage furrow contractile ring, stabilization/elongation of the intercellular bridge, and final separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, the fertilized eggs of the mollusk, Ilyanassa obsoleta, form two contractile rings at right angles to each other in the same cytoplasm that constrict to tight necks and partition the egg into a trefoil shape. The cleavage furrow contractile ring (CF) normally constricts around many midbody microtubules (MTs) and results in cleavage; the polar lobe constriction contractile ring (PLC) normally constricts around very few MTs and subsequently relaxes without cleavage. In the presence of Ag+ ions, the PLC 1) begins MT-dependent rapid constriction sooner than controls, 2) encircles more MTs than control egg PLCs, 3) elongates much more than control PLCs, and 4) remains tightly constricted and effectively cleaves the polar lobe from the egg. If Ag(+)-incubated eggs are returned to normal seawater at trefoil, tubulin fluorescence disappears from the PLC neck and the neck relaxes. If nocodazole, a drug that depolymerizes MTs, is added to Ag(+)-incubated eggs during early PLC constriction, the PLC is not stabilized and eventually relaxes. However, if nocodazole is added to Ag(+)-incubated eggs at trefoil, tubulin fluorescence disappears from the PLC neck but the neck remains constricted. These results suggest that Ag+ accelerates and gradually stabilizes the PLC constriction by a mechanism that is initially MT-dependent, but that progressively becomes MT-independent.

  9. Primary systemic amyloidosis presenting as constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas; Fishman, Joel E; Alfonso, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent presentation of cardiac amyloidosis is with endomyocardial deposition, and resultant restrictive cardiomyopathy. We present a case of primary systemic amyloidosis causing constrictive pericarditis (CP) and congestive heart failure without clinical evidence of endomyocardial deposition. A comprehensive evaluation by noninvasive and invasive studies facilitated the differentiation of CP from restrictive cardiomyopathy and the patient was effectively treated with pericardectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of primary systemic amyloidosis causing selective CP with successful antemortem diagnosis and treatment in a young man.

  10. Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Mookadam, Farouk; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Raslan, Serageldin F; Panse, Prasad M; Tajik, A Jamil

    2011-07-01

    The differentiation between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy can be clinically challenging. Pericardial constriction results from scarring and consequent loss of pericardial elasticity leading to impaired ventricular filling. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is characterized by a nondilated rigid ventricle, severe diastolic dysfunction and restrictive filling producing hemodynamic changes, similar to those in constrictive pericarditis. While constrictive pericarditis is usually curable by surgical treatment, restrictive cardiomyopathy requires medical therapy and in appropriate patients, the definitive treatment is cardiac transplantation. Sufficient differences exist between the two conditions to allow noninvasive differentiation, but no single diagnostic tool can be relied upon to make this distinction. Newer echocardiographic techniques such as speckle-track imaging, velocity vector imaging, as well as cardiac computed tomography and cardiac MRI can help differentiate constriction from restriction with high sensitivity and specificity. Outcomes are better with early diagnosis of constriction in particular and early surgical resection.

  11. Constrictive/restrictive cardiac physiology: pericarditis or right ventricular infarction?

    PubMed

    Gavrila, Dan; Horwitz, Phillip A

    2007-11-15

    Here we report on the case of a 71 year old man who presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of right heart failure and was diagnosed with and successfully treated for constrictive pericarditis. Radiographic, hemodynamic, and intra-operative pathological findings typical of constrictive pericarditis are presented. The potential for right ventricular infarction which can mimic the hemodynamic findings in constrictive pericarditis is also discussed. Pericardiectomy was recommended and was successful in improving the patient's systemic vascular congestion and symptoms.

  12. Redefining Effusive-Constrictive Pericarditis with Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Philip; Doubell, Anton F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Effusive-constrictive pericarditis (ECP) is traditionally diagnosed by using the expensive and invasive technique of direct pressure measurements in the pericardial space and the right atrium. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic role of echocardiography in tuberculous ECP. Methods Intrapericardial and right atrial pressures were measured pre- and post-pericardiocentesis, and right ventricular and left ventricular pressures were measured post-pericardiocentesis in patients with tuberculous pericardial effusions. Echocardiography was performed post-pericardiocentesis. Traditional, pressure-based diagnostic criteria were compared with post-pericardiocentesis systolic discordance and echocardiographic evidence of constriction. Results Thirty-two patients with tuberculous pericardial disease were included. Sixteen had ventricular discordance (invasively measured), 16 had ECP as measured by intrapericardial and right atrial invasive pressure measurements and 17 had ECP determined echocardiographically. The sensitivity and specificity of pressure-guided measurements (compared with discordance) for the diagnosis of ECP were both 56%. The positive and negative predictive values were both 56%. The sensitivity of echocardiography (compared with discordance) for the diagnosis of ECP was 81% and the specificity 75%, while the positive and the negative predictive values were 76% and 80%, respectively. Conclusion Echocardiography shows a better diagnostic performance than invasive, pressure-based measurements for the diagnosis of ECP when both these techniques are compared with the gold standard of invasively measured systolic discordance. PMID:28090260

  13. Futility of pericardiectomy for postirradiation constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Y.; von Segesser, L.K.; Turina, M. )

    1990-03-01

    Two patients underwent pericardiectomy for postirradiation constrictive pericarditis. Both had received radiotherapy (more than 6,000 rads) for treatment of Hodgkin's disease 17 (patient 2) and 20 years (patient 1) earlier. At the time of operation, the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III-IV or IV. Preoperative catheterization showed the following pressures for patients 1 and 2, respectively: right atrial, 30 and 14 mm Hg; right ventricular end-diastolic, 28 and 14 mm Hg; wedge, 29 and 13 mm Hg; and left ventricular end-diastolic, 27 and 14 mm Hg. Complete epicardiectomy and pericardiectomy was attempted in both patients. However, hospital mortality was 100%; patient 1 died of multiorgan failure after six days, and patient 2 died of biventricular failure after 3 months. A review of the literature revealed 44 cases of pericardiectomy for postirradiation constrictive pericarditis and a late survival rate of less than 50%. The poor results in these patients compared with patients having pericardiectomy for other reasons seem to be due mainly to the various kinds of radiation-induced damage to the heart as a whole, including untimely coronary artery disease, myocardial fibrosis, atrioventricular conduction disturbances, and valve dysfunction, with the result that complete relief by epicardiectomy and pericardiectomy may not be technically feasible. 13 references.

  14. The role of microtubules in contractile ring function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    During cytokinesis, a cortical contractile ring forms around a cell, constricts to a stable tight neck and terminates in separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, Ilyanassa obsoleta embryos form two contractile rings simultaneously. The cleavage furrow (CF), in the animal hemisphere between the spindle poles, constricts to a stable tight neck and separates the daughter cells. The third polar lobe constriction (PLC-3), in the vegetal hemisphere below the spindle, constricts to a transient tight neck, but then relaxes, allowing the polar lobe cytoplasm to merge with one daughter cell. Eggs exposed to taxol, a drug that stabilizes microtubules, before the CF or the PLC-3 develop, fail to form CFs, but form stabilized tight PLCs. Eggs exposed to taxol at the time of PLC-3 formation develop varied numbers of constriction rings in their animal hemispheres and one PLC in their vegetal hemisphere, none of which relax. Eggs exposed to taxol after PLC-3 initiation form stabilized tight CFs and PLCs. At maximum constriction, control embryos display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in their CFs, but not in their PLCs, and reveal, via electron microscopy, many microtubules extending through their CFs, but not through their PLCs. Embryos which form stabilized tightly constricted CFs and PLCs in the presence of taxol display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in both constrictions and show many polymerized microtubules extending through both CFs and PLCs. These results suggest that the extension of microtubules through a tight contractile ring may be important for stabilizing that constriction and facilitating subsequent cytokinesis.

  15. Is it constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy? A systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Morshedi-Meibodi, Ali; Menuet, Robert; McFadden, Michael; Ventura, Hector O; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2004-01-01

    In this case review, the authors propose a fluent diagnostic algorithm for the consideration and therapeutic approach to either constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Additionally, while focusing on the differential diagnosis of these clinically vexing entities, the authors outline the therapeutic expectations from surgical pericardiectomy in constrictive pericarditis.

  16. Furrow Constriction in Animal Cell Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Turlier, Hervé; Audoly, Basile; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the process of physical cleavage at the end of cell division; it proceeds by ingression of an acto-myosin furrow at the equator of the cell. Its failure leads to multinucleated cells and is a possible cause of tumorigenesis. Here, we calculate the full dynamics of furrow ingression and predict cytokinesis completion above a well-defined threshold of equatorial contractility. The cortical acto-myosin is identified as the main source of mechanical dissipation and active forces. Thereupon, we propose a viscous active nonlinear membrane theory of the cortex that explicitly includes actin turnover and where the active RhoA signal leads to an equatorial band of myosin overactivity. The resulting cortex deformation is calculated numerically, and reproduces well the features of cytokinesis such as cell shape and cortical flows toward the equator. Our theory gives a physical explanation of the independence of cytokinesis duration on cell size in embryos. It also predicts a critical role of turnover on the rate and success of furrow constriction. Scaling arguments allow for a simple interpretation of the numerical results and unveil the key mechanism that generates the threshold for cytokinesis completion: cytoplasmic incompressibility results in a competition between the furrow line tension and the cell poles’ surface tension. PMID:24411243

  17. Understanding cell passage through constricted microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartas-Ayala, Marco A.; Karnik, Rohit

    2012-11-01

    Recently, several microfluidic platforms have been proposed to characterize cells based on their behaviour during cell passage through constricted channels. Variables like transit time have been analyzed in disease states like sickle cell anemia, malaria and sepsis. Nevertheless, it is hard to make direct comparisons between different platforms and cell types. We present experimental results of the relationship between solid deformable particle properties, i.e. stiffness and relative particle size, and flow properties, i.e. particle's velocity. We measured the hydrodynamic variables during the flow of HL-60 cells, a white myeloid cell type, in narrow microfluidic square channels using a microfluidic differential manometer. We measured the flow force required to move cells of different sizes through microchannels and quantified friction forces opposing cell passage. We determined the non-dimensional parameters that influence the flow of cells and we used them to obtain a non dimensional expression that can be used to predict the forces needed to drive cells through microchannels. We found that the friction force needed to flow HL-60 through a microfluidic channel is the sum of two parts. The first part is a static friction force that is proportional to the force needed to keep the force compressed. The second part is a factor that is proportional to the cell velocity, hence a dynamic term, and slightly sensitive to the compressive force. We thank CONACYT (Mexican Science and Technology Council) for supporting this project, grant 205899.

  18. Expanding the ocular phenotype of 14q terminal deletions: A novel presentation of microphthalmia and coloboma in ring 14 syndrome with associated 14q32.31 deletion and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salter, Claire G; Baralle, Diana; Collinson, Morag N; Self, James E

    2016-04-01

    A variety of ocular anomalies have been described in the rare ring 14 and 14q terminal deletion syndromes, yet the character, prevalence, and extent of these anomalies are not well defined. Identification of these ocular anomalies can be central to providing diagnoses and facilitating optimal individual patient management. We report a child with a 14q32.31 terminal deletion and ring chromosome formation, presenting with severe visual impairment secondary to significant bilateral coloboma and microphthalmia. This patient is compared to previously reported patients with similar ocular findings and deletion sizes to further refine a locus for coloboma in the 14q terminal region. Those with ring formation and linear deletions are compared and the possibility of ring formation affecting the proximal 14q region is discussed. This report highlights the severity of ocular anomalies that can be associated with ring 14 and 14q terminal deletion syndromes and reveals the limited documentation of ocular examination in these two related syndromes. This suggests that many children with these genetic changes do not undergo an ophthalmology examination as part of their clinical assessment, yet it is only when this evaluation becomes routine that the true prevalence and extent of ocular involvement can be defined. This report therefore advocates for a thorough ophthalmological exam in children with ring 14 or 14q terminal deletion syndrome.

  19. Origin of the constricted hysteresis loop in cobalt ferrites revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-guo; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Weng-Hong; Wu, Guang-Heng

    2011-08-01

    A series of Co ferrites (Co xFe 3- xO 4 ( x=0-1)) were prepared using solid-state method in this work. The aging effect of their structures and constrictions of hysteresis loops under low magnetic field were investigated. It was found that during the aging process, the migration of trivalent (bivalent) ions between tetrahedral (A-site) and octahedral (B-site) coordination induced a shrinking of the lattice, which would expand again due to the precipitation of Fe 3+ after a much longer aging time. The first process caused a pronounced constriction of the loops, due to the uniaxial anisotropy led by this migration. The depression of constriction could attribute to both the expansion of lattice and the change of ionic ratios as a result of the second-phase-precipitation. The impacts of Co content, aging time and temperature upon the constriction were also discussed.

  20. Penile constriction injury: An experience of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit Somaji; Patil, Sunil Raghunath; Kumar, Vikash; Kasat, Gaurav Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Penile injury due to constriction by a foreign object is a rare known complication, commonly seen in pediatric age group. We report four cases of penile constriction injury in adults due to various foreign objects and different indications. Between October 2014 and March 2016, four patients (mean age 42.5 years) presented with penile constriction injury with duration at presentation ranging from 18 h to 2 months. One patient had complete transection of the corpus and penile urethra. Three patients were managed successfully with daily dressings followed by split-skin grafting in one patient. One patient required delayed primary suturing after the resolution of local edema. The outcome was satisfactory in all patients with retained erectile function. Early medical attention and management is the key to success in penile constriction injury cases and to avoid complications and morbidity. Prompt removal can be challenging in cases of metal foreign bodies. PMID:28058007

  1. Pathological fracture of the femur in Alagille syndrome that was treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation and an Ilizarov ring fixator: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alagille syndrome is a multisystem disorder, which is characterized by hypoplasia of the intrahepatic bile ducts, malformations of the cardiovascular system, eyes, and vertebral column, and abnormal facies. Several of the characteristics of Alagille syndrome may result in an especially high risk of fracture. The majority of patients suffer from chronic cholestasis, which can have a variety of adverse effects on bone metabolism. In Alagille syndrome, fractures primarily occur in the lower limb long bones in the absence of significant trauma. Case presentation A 9-year-old Japanese girl with Alagille syndrome was admitted to our institution with marked hyperbilirubinemia and a pathological fracture of the femur. She had been diagnosed with biliary atresia at the age of 1 month and treated with surgical bile duct reconstruction, vitamins D and K, and ursodeoxycholic acid. However, her liver dysfunction and hyperbilirubinemia worsened. The pathological fracture of the femur was treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation (LIPUS) and an Ilizarov ring fixator. Seventy-four days after surgery, the patient had anatomically and functionally recovered. There was no leg-length discrepancy and no angular malalignment of the lower extremities as measured clinically and radiographically. The range of motion of the hip, knee, and ankle of the patient’s operative leg matched the range of motion in the nonoperative leg. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on use of the Ilizarov frame and LIPUS in diaphyseal femoral fractures in Alagille syndrome. This case report provides evidence that this procedure is successful for managing such diaphyseal fractures in Alagille syndrome. PMID:25004954

  2. Heart in An Eggshell Calcification: Idiopathic Calcific Constrictive Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bong Gun; Kang, Gu Hyun; Park, Yong Hwan; Chun, Woo Jung; Oh, Ju Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is caused by fibrosis and calcification of the pericardium, which inhibits diastolic filling of the heart. Chest roentgenogram can show the calcification as a mass or sheet over the heart and computed tomography scan allows anatomic delineation of the pericardium and determines the extent of calcification. We reported a case of eggshell calcification of idiopathic chronic constrictive pericarditis diagnosed by echocardiography and multi-detector computed tomography.

  3. Wall shear stress estimates in coronary artery constrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Wall shear stress estimates from laminar boundary layer theory were found to agree fairly well with the magnitude of shear stress levels along coronary artery constrictions obtained from solutions of the Navier Stokes equations for both steady and pulsatile flow. The relatively simple method can be used for in vivo estimates of wall shear stress in constrictions by using a vessel shape function determined from a coronary angiogram, along with a knowledge of the flow rate.

  4. The Relationship Between Pharyngeal Constriction and Post-swallow Residue.

    PubMed

    Stokely, Shauna L; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Leigh, Chelsea; Molfenter, Sonja M; Steele, Catriona M

    2015-06-01

    Pharyngeal constriction has been proposed as a parameter that may distinguish functional from impaired swallows. We employed anatomically normalized pixel-based measures of pharyngeal area at maximum constriction, and the ratio of this measure to area at rest, and explored the association between these measures and post-swallow residue using the normalized residue ratio scale (NRRS). Videofluoroscopy data for 5 ml boluses of 22 % (w/v) liquid barium were analyzed from 20 healthy young adults and 40 patients with suspected neurogenic dysphagia. The frames of maximum pharyngeal constriction and post-swallow hyoid rest were extracted. Pixel-based measures of pharyngeal area were made using ImageJ and size-normalized using the squared C2-C4 vertebral distance as a reference scalar. Post-swallow residue and the areas of the vallecular and pyriform sinus spaces were measured on the hyoid rest frame to calculate the NRRSv and NRRSp. The dataset was divided into swallows with residue within or exceeding the upper confidence interval boundary seen in the healthy participants. Mixed model repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare pharyngeal area (rest, constriction) and the pharyngeal constriction ratio, between individuals with and without residue. Measures of pharyngeal area at maximum constriction were significantly larger (i.e., less constricted, p = 0.000) in individuals with post-swallow residue in either the valleculae or the pyriform sinus. These results support the idea that interventions targeted toward improving pharyngeal constriction have the potential to be effective in reducing post-swallow residue.

  5. Constriction and septation during cell division in caulobacters.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, J S; Hagenzieker, J G

    1981-07-01

    Morphogenesis of the division site in caulobacters had been described as constrictive in Caulobacter spp. and septate in Asticcacaulis excentricus. However, subsequent studies of other gram-negative genera had implied that constrictive division was an artefact resulting from inadequate preservation of septa; exploration of alternatives to osmium fixation, particularly with aldehydes, was recommended. In this study, the appearance of sectioned division sites was reinvestigated in caulobacter cells prepared by 20 different procedures varying with respect to fixation agents, media, schedules, and temperatures, to dehydrating agents, and to embedding resins. Three types of division site morphogenesis were observed: constriction in C. bacteroides and C. crescentus, partial septation in C. leidyi, and complete, undivided septation in A. excentricus and A. biprosthecum. The anatomy of the division site depended on the bacterial strain, not on the method of preparation of the cells for sectioning. These studies confirm the earlier observations on osmium-fixed caulobacter cells and lead to the general conclusion that gram-negative bacteria with tapered poles probably divide by constriction, whereas septation results in blunt cell poles. A pattern of spiral, rather than circular, insertion of new envelope subunits at the cell equator is proposed as a basic developmental difference between constrictive and septate fission in gram-negative bacteria. Since caulobacter prosthecae can develop as extensions of tapered poles formed by constriction, whereas subpolar or lateral prosthecae occur in species with blunt poles resulting from septation, the site of formation of a thick septum appears unsuitable as a site of subsequent envelope outgrowth.

  6. Muscle load and constriction of the rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed Central

    Speden, R N

    1975-01-01

    This isolated, perfused ear artery of the rabbit has been used to examine the effect of alterations in muscle load on the construction of arteries. The equilibrium muscle load, taken as the difference in wall stress between the relaxed and constricted artery at the same external radius, was varied by changing the transmural pressure and by constricting the artery. 2. The equilibrium muscle load increased initially and then declined with decreasing external radius when the transmural pressure was kept constant. The maximum muscle load was reached when the relaxed external radius had been reduced by 11% at 80 mmHg and by 4-5% (relative to the radius at 80 mmHg) at 160 mmHg. 3. Arteries from young rabbits (3-6 months in age) which were partially constricted by adrenaline or spontaneous activity responded better to 60 sec of 4 Hz field stimulation at transmural pressures above 100 mmHg than did relaxed arteries. Neither field stimulation nor high concentrations of noradrenaline ( is greater than 800 ng/ml.) were able to constrict most arteries effectively at pressures above 160-170 mmHg unless partial constriction was present. The partial constriction reduced the load placed on the muscle by the same transmural pressure. Constrictio n during field stimulation was due largely to the release of neurotransmitter. 4. Ear arteries from young and older rabbits differed little in their ability to constrict against different transmural pressures. The one major difference was a lesser maximum constriction of arteries from older rabbits (18-24 months in age). However, arteries from older rabbits constricted well at the higher transmural pressures only because wall thickening largely compensated for a decreased ability of the muscle to develop active tension. 5. It is concluded that a decrease in internal radius to wall thickness ratio by either sufficient partial vasoconstriction or by wall thickening favours constriction of arteries because the load placed on the muscle by the

  7. Hypoxia-induced 15-HETE enhances the constriction of internal carotid arteries by down-regulating potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanmei; Chen, Li; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Weizhi; Zhu, Daling; Zhu, Yulan

    2010-08-15

    Severe hypoxia induces the constriction of internal carotid arteries (ICA), which worsens ischemic stroke in the brain. A few metabolites are presumably involved in hypoxic vasoconstriction, however, less is known about how such molecules provoke this vasoconstriction. We have investigated the influence of 15-hydroxyeicosatetrienoic acid (15-HETE) produced by 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX) on vasoconstriction during hypoxia. As showed in our results, 15-LOX level increases in ICA endothelia and smooth muscles. 15-HETE enhances the tension of ICA ring in a dose-dependent manner, as well as attenuates the activities and expression of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv 1.5 and Kv 2.1). Therefore, the down-regulation of Kv channels by 15-HETE during hypoxia may weaken the repolarization of action potentials and causes a dominant influx of calcium ions to enhance smooth muscle tension and ICA constriction.

  8. Complex Mosaic Ring Chromosome 11 Associated with Hemizygous Loss of 8.6 Mb of 11q24.2qter in Atypical Jacobsen Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galvão Gomes, Alexandra; Paiva Grangeiro, Carlos H; Silva, Luiz R; Oliveira-Gennaro, Flávia G; Pereira, Ciro S; Joaquim, Tatiana M; Panepucci, Rodrigo A; Squire, Jeremy A; Martelli, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving terminal chromosome 11q. The haploinsufficiency of multiple genes contributes to the overall clinical phenotype, which can include the variant Paris-Trousseau syndrome, a transient thrombocytopenia related to FLI1 hemizygous deletion. We investigated a boy with features of JBS using classic cytogenetic methods, FISH and high-resolution array CGH. The proband was found to have a mosaic ring chromosome 11 resulting in a hemizygous 11q terminal deletion of 8.6 Mb, leading to a copy number loss of 52 genes. The patient had a hemizygous deletion in the FLI1 gene region without apparent thrombocytopenia, and he developed diabetes mellitus type I, which has not previously been described in the spectrum of disorders associated with JBS. The relationship of some of the genes within the context of the phenotype caused by a partial deletion of 11q has provided insights concerning the developmental anomalies presented in this patient with atypical features of JBS.

  9. Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy: the case for high-resolution dynamic tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Robert M.; Otoadese, Eramosele A.; Oren, Ron M.

    1995-05-01

    The syndrome of constrictive pericarditis (CP) presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. This study was undertaken to determine whether cine computed tomography (CT), a cardiac imaging technique with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, can reliably demonstrate the unique abnormalities of pericardial anatomy and ventricular physiology present in patients with this condition. A second goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of diseased thickened pericardium, by itself, imparts cardiac impairment due to abnormalities of ventricular diastolic function. Methods: Twelve patients with CP suspected clinically, in whom invasive hemodynamic study was consistent with the diagnosis of CP, underwent cine CT. They were subdivided into Group 1 (CP, N equals 5) and Group 2 (No CP, N equals 7) based on histopathologic evaluation of tissue obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy. A third group consisted of asymptomatic patients with incidentally discovered thickened pericardium at the time of cine CT scanning: Group 3 (ThP, N equals 7). Group 4 (Nl, N equals 7) consisted of healthy volunteer subjects. Results: Pericardial thickness measurements with cine CT clearly distinguished Group 1 (mean equals 10 +/- 2 mm) from Group 2 (mean equals 2 +/- 1 mm), with diagnostic accuracy of 100% compared to histopathological findings. In addition, patients in Group 1 had significantly more brisk early diastolic filling of both left and right ventricles than those in Group 2, which clearly distinguished all patients with, from all patients without CP. Patients in Group 3 had pericardial thicknesses similar to those in Group 1 (mean equals 9 +/- 1 mm, p equals NS), but had patterns of diastolic ventricular filling that were nearly identical to Group 4 (Nl). Conclusions: The abnormalities of anatomy and ventricular function present in the syndrome of constrictive pericarditis are clearly and decisively identified by cine CT. This allows a reliable distinction

  10. Dynamics of droplet entrapment in a constricted microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekouei, Mehdi; Bithi, Swastika; Vanapalli, Siva

    2016-11-01

    Droplet migration and clogging in confined geometries is a problem of fundamental importance in oil recovery and droplet microfluidics. A confined droplet flowing through a conduit can either be arrested at the constriction or squeeze through it. The dynamics of the trapped and squeezed states are expected to depend on capillary number, drop size, viscosity ratio. Although there have been a number of studies on the dynamics of droplets passing through a constriction, investigations of dynamics of trapped droplets in constricted microchannels is lacking. In this work, we performed three-dimensional simulations of droplet trapping and squeezing process in a constricted microchannel. We also conducted experiments to validate the key results of the simulations. We investigated the impact of different system parameters on the onset of droplet immobilization at the constriction. We found that the continuous phase flows through the corners of the droplet, i.e. gutter flows to play an important role in determining the transition between trapping and squeezing. Therefore we evaluated the effect of different system parameters on gutter flows and found that the hydrodynamic resistance of gutters depends on the viscosity, size and confinement of the droplet.

  11. Asymmetrical quartz crystallographic fabrics formed during constrictional deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. A.; Beane, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    Numerical simulations predict unique quartz crystallographic fabric patterns for plane strain, flattening, and constriction. Multiple studies support the predictions for plane strain and flattening. To test predictions for constriction, this paper analyzes five examples of quartz crystallographic fabrics from a 1-km-wide domain of L tectonites in the Pigeon Point high-strain zone, Klamath Mountains, California, U.S.A. These samples were deformed under greenschist- to amphibolite-facies conditions. Quartz c-axis fabrics are similar to the predicted double-girdle fabrics except that amphibolite-facies samples exhibit c-axis maxima and are distinctly asymmetrical about the elongation lineations. Activation of different slip systems combined with small deviations from pure constriction account for the c-axis maxima, and noncoaxial flow accounts for the fabric asymmetry. The simple-shear component is randomly oriented in geographic coordinates throughout the domain of L tectonites. These data confirm that numerical simulations predict the quartz c-axis fabric geometry developed during constriction for some deformation conditions, and they confirm the quartz a-axis patterns predicted for constriction for the first time. These data also demonstrate that the relationship between quartz crystallographic fabrics and strain geometry is not straightforward, and they indicate that a-axis fabrics may be more useful indicators of strain geometry variations.

  12. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap

  13. Fractional charge and spin states in topological insulator constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the properties of two-dimensional topological insulator constrictions both in the integer and fractional regimes. In the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, the constriction functions as a spin filter with near-perfect efficiency and can be switched by electric fields only. Domain walls between different topological phases can be created in the constriction as an interface between tunneling, magnetic fields, charge density wave, or electron-electron interaction dominated regions. These domain walls host non-Abelian bound states with fractional charge and spin and result in degenerate ground states with parafermions. If a proximity gap is induced bound states give rise to an exotic Josephson current with 8 π periodicity.

  14. On transport in quantum Hall systems with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, S.

    2007-10-01

    We study edge transport in a simple model of a constricted quantum Hall system with a lowered local filling factor. The current backscattered from the constriction is explained from a matching of the properties of the edge-current excitations in the constriction (ν2) and bulk (ν1) regions. We develop a hydrodynamic theory for bosonic edge modes inspired by this model, finding that a competition between two tunneling process, related by a quasiparticle-quasihole symmetry, determines the fate of the low-bias transmission conductance. A novel generalisation of the Kane-Fisher quantum impurity model is found, describing transitions from a weak-coupling theory at partial transmission to strong-coupling theories for perfect transmission and reflection as well as a new symmetry dictated fixed point. These results provide satisfactory explanations for recent experimental results at filling factors of 1/3 and 1.

  15. Asymmetric focal pericardial thickening causing physiologically significant constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Nauman; Kern, Morton J; Patel, Pranav M

    2012-04-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with refractory ascites and edema. Echocardiography revealed normal left ventricular function with a restrictive diastolic filling pattern. Tissue Doppler velocities of the mitral annulus were normal. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a focal region of pericardial thickening anterior to the right ventricle and normal thickness pericardium in the other segments. However, abnormal delayed enhancement MRI (consistent with inflammation) was present in both the thickened and the normal pericardial segments. Invasive hemodynamics confirmed constrictive physiology and the patient underwent successful pericardiectomy. This case highlights the utility of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis and the underappreciated fact that the pericardium need not be globally thickened to cause hemodynamically significant constrictive physiology.

  16. Size, but not experience, affects the ontogeny of constriction performance in ball pythons (Python regius).

    PubMed

    Penning, David A; Dartez, Schuyler F

    2016-03-01

    Constriction is a prey-immobilization technique used by many snakes and is hypothesized to have been important to the evolution and diversification of snakes. However, very few studies have examined the factors that affect constriction performance. We investigated constriction performance in ball pythons (Python regius) by evaluating how peak constriction pressure is affected by snake size, sex, and experience. In one experiment, we tested the ontogenetic scaling of constriction performance and found that snake diameter was the only significant factor determining peak constriction pressure. The number of loops applied in a coil and its interaction with snake diameter did not significantly affect constriction performance. Constriction performance in ball pythons scaled differently than in other snakes that have been studied, and medium to large ball pythons are capable of exerting significantly higher pressures than those shown to cause circulatory arrest in prey. In a second experiment, we tested the effects of experience on constriction performance in hatchling ball pythons over 10 feeding events. By allowing snakes in one test group to gain constriction experience, and manually feeding snakes under sedation in another test group, we showed that experience did not affect constriction performance. During their final (10th) feedings, all pythons constricted similarly and with sufficiently high pressures to kill prey rapidly. At the end of the 10 feeding trials, snakes that were allowed to constrict were significantly smaller than their non-constricting counterparts.

  17. Tidal and subtidal hydrodynamics and energetics in a constricted estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzuelo, Carmen; López-Ruiz, Alejandro; Díez-Minguito, Manuel; Ortega-Sánchez, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of coastal plain estuaries are mainly associated with variable tidal forcing and local winds in combination with bathymetric complexity and coastline irregularity. Specific features, such as constricted areas, can potentially affect and energize the hydrodynamics of these types of systems. Particularly, tidal range and tidal currents can be significantly amplified where the incoming tidal wave becomes constricted. In this work, the impact of a narrow constriction on a mesotidal estuary was analysed at tidal and subtidal time scales. Tidal hydrodynamics, energy fluxes and energy dissipation were determined for the entire Cádiz Bay (southwestern Spain) using the Delft3D numerical model. Field observations were used to analyse tidal propagation and energy dissipation along the bay constriction and to calibrate and test the numerical model. The results indicate that the presence of the constriction transformed and distorted the tide and increased the tidal range and flow velocities along the channel, with implications on energy dissipation. The tidal currents were oriented along-channel at the central part of the constriction, although abrupt bathymetric changes at the channel inner boundary provoked a sudden rotation of the flow. Although the energy fluxes were higher for spring tides and were strongly influenced by winds, the energy dissipation was controlled by bed shear stresses and vertical dispersion. The significance of this energy dissipation was that it destabilized the water column, which resulted in a weakly stratified system with implications on water quality. At a subtidal scale, the residual water volume exchange was the result of the combined effects of the neap/spring tides, wind and waves, whereas tides were dominant at the tidal scale.

  18. Motion of an elastic capsule in a constricted microchannel.

    PubMed

    Rorai, Cecilia; Touchard, Antoine; Zhu, Lailai; Brandt, Luca

    2015-05-01

    We study the motion of an elastic capsule through a microchannel characterized by a localized constriction. We consider a capsule with a stress-free spherical shape and impose its steady-state configuration in an infinitely long straight channel as the initial condition for our calculations. We report how the capsule deformation, velocity, retention time, and maximum stress of the membrane are affected by the capillary number, Ca , and the constriction shape. We estimate the deformation by measuring the variation of the three-dimensional surface area and a series of alternative quantities easier to extract from experiments. These are the Taylor parameter, the perimeter and the area of the capsule in the spanwise plane. We find that the perimeter is the quantity that best reproduces the behavior of the three-dimensional surface area. This is maximum at the centre of the constriction and shows a second peak after it, whose location depends on the Ca number. We observe that, in general, area-deformation-correlated quantities grow linearly with Ca , while velocity-correlated quantities saturate for large Ca but display a steeper increase for small Ca . The velocity of the capsule divided by the velocity of the flow displays, surprisingly, two different qualitative behaviors for small and large capillary numbers. Finally, we report that longer constrictions and spanwise wall bounded (versus spanwise periodic) domains cause larger deformations and velocities. If the deformation and velocity in the spanwise wall bounded domains are rescaled by the initial equilibrium deformation and velocity, their behavior is undistinguishable from that in a periodic domain. In contrast, a remarkably different behavior is reported in sinusoidally shaped and smoothed rectangular constrictions indicating that the capsule dynamics is particularly sensitive to abrupt changes in the cross section. In a smoothed rectangular constriction larger deformations and velocities occur over a larger

  19. The brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger family, maps within the Smith-Magenis syndrome region at 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Inazawa, Johji

    1997-03-31

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SAIS) is caused by a microdeletion of 17p11.2 and comprises developmental and growth delay, facial abnormalities, unusual behavior and sleep problems. This phenotype may be due to haploinsufficiency of several contiguous genes. The human brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger protein family, has been isolated and mapped to l7p11.2. FISH analyses of metaphase or interphase chromosomes of 6 patients with SMS show that ZNF179 was deleted in one of the 2 homologs (17p11.2), indicating a possible association of the defect of this gene with the pathogenesis of SMS. Furthermore, using a prophase FISH ordering system, we sublocalized ZNF179 proximally to LLGL which lies on the critical region for SMS. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  20. A rare combination of amniotic constriction band with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa Hitesh; Shah, Hitesh

    2015-11-11

    Amniotic constriction bands and osteogenesis imperfecta are disorders arising from a collagen defect. We report a rare association of amniotic bands with osteogenesis imperfecta in a child. The child was born with multiple amniotic bands involving the right leg, both hands and both feet. Multiple fractures of long bones of lower limbs occurred in childhood due to trivial trauma. Deformities of the femur and tibia due to malunion with osteopenia and blue sclerae were present. The patient was treated with z plasty of constriction band of the right tibia and bisphosphonate for osteogenesis imperfecta. This rare association of both collagen diseases may provide further insight for the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  1. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Sorajja, Paul

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac catheterization historically has been the principal diagnostic modality for the evaluation of constrictive pericarditis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and cardiac tamponade. In many instances, the hemodynamic consequences of these disorders can be accurately delineated with non-invasive methods. However, cardiac catheterization should be considered when there is a discrepancy between the clinical and non-invasive imaging data, and particularly may be required for the evaluation of patients with complex hemodynamic disorders. This report describes the methods and clinical utility of invasive hemodynamic catheterization for the evaluation of constriction, restriction, and cardiac tamponade.

  2. Advances in the differentiation of constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zwas, D R; Gotsman, I; Admon, D; Keren, A

    2012-09-01

    The diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis should be considered in any patient with unexplained right heart failure. The differentiation between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy is based on a combination of clinical presentation, history and imaging, and on occasion, on the basis of invasive hemodynamic studies or biopsy. Pertinent anatomic and physiologic findings on cardiac imaging modalities including echocardiography, computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed, and in many cases the diagnosis can be determined on the basis of imaging. Hemodynamic studies may clarify the diagnosis, and biopsy may find treatable causes of disease.

  3. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: interlaboratory ring trial to evaluate real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detection methods.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Bonilauri, Paolo; Dauber, Malte; Errington, Jane; LeBlanc, Neil; Revilla-Fernández, Sandra; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Isaksson, Mats; Stadejek, Tomasz; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2012-09-01

    To compare the real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays used for the diagnosis of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a Europe-wide interlaboratory ring trial was conducted. A variety of PRRSV strains including North American (NA) and European (EU) genotype isolates were analyzed by the participants. Great differences regarding qualitative diagnostics as well as analytical sensitivity were observed between the individual RT-qPCR systems, especially when investigating strains from the EU genotype. None of the assays or commercial kits used in the ring trial could identify all different PRRSV strains with an optimal analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. The genetic variability of the PRRSV strains, which is supposed to hinder the diagnostic of the RT-PCR because of mutations at the primer binding sites, was also confirmed by sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. In summary, a major problem in PRRSV diagnostics by RT-qPCR is false-negative results. To achieve maximum safety in the molecular diagnosis of PRRSV, the combined usage of different assays or kits is highly recommended.

  4. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-03

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival.

  5. Theoretical study on the constricted flow phenomena in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.; Chakravarty, S.

    2012-12-01

    The present study is dealt with the constricted flow characteristics of blood in arteries by making use of an appropriate mathematical model. The constricted artery experiences the generated wall shear stress due to flow disturbances in the presence of constriction. The disturbed flow in the stenosed arterial segment causes malfunction of the cardiovascular system leading to serious health problems in the form of heart attack and stroke. The flowing blood contained in the stenosed artery is considered to be non-Newtonian while the flow is treated to be two-dimensional. The present pursuit also accounts for the motion of the arterial wall and its effect on local fluid mechanics. The flow analysis applies the time-dependent, two-dimensional incompressible nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations for non-Newtonian fluid representing blood. An extensive quantitative analysis presented at the end of the paper based on large scale numerical computations of the quantities of major physiological significance enables one to estimate the constricted flow characteristics in the arterial system under consideration which deviates significantly from that of normal physiological flow conditions.

  6. Clustering of microscopic particles in constricted blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bächer, Christian; Schrack, Lukas; Gekle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A mixed suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) and microparticles flows through a cylindrical channel with a constriction mimicking a stenosed blood vessel. Our three-dimensional Lattice-Boltzmann simulations show that the RBCs are depleted right ahead of and after the constriction. Although the RBC mean concentration (hematocrit) is 16.5% or 23.7%, their axial concentration profile is very similar to that of isolated tracer particles flowing along the central axis. Most importantly, however, we find that the stiff microparticles exhibit the opposite behavior. Arriving on a marginated position near the channel wall, they can pass through the constriction only if they find a suitable gap to dip into the dense plug of RBCs occupying the channel center. This leads to a prolonged dwell time and, as a consequence, to a pronounced increase in microparticle concentration right in front of the constriction. For biochemically active particles such as drug delivery agents or activated platelets this clustering may have important physiological consequences, e.g., for the formation of microthrombi.

  7. Shooting quasiparticles from Andreev bound states in a superconducting constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Riwar, R.-P.; Houzet, M.; Meyer, J. S.; Nazarov, Y. V.

    2014-12-15

    A few-channel superconducting constriction provides a set of discrete Andreev bound states that may be populated with quasiparticles. Motivated by recent experimental research, we study the processes in an a.c. driven constriction whereby a quasiparticle is promoted to the delocalized states outside the superconducting gap and flies away. We distinguish two processes of this kind. In the process of ionization, a quasiparticle present in the Andreev bound state is transferred to the delocalized states leaving the constriction. The refill process involves two quasiparticles: one flies away while another one appears in the Andreev bound state. We notice an interesting asymmetry of these processes. The electron-like quasiparticles are predominantly emitted to one side of the constriction while the hole-like ones are emitted to the other side. This produces a charge imbalance of accumulated quasiparticles, that is opposite on opposite sides of the junction. The imbalance may be detected with a tunnel contact to a normal metal lead.

  8. Constrictive pericarditis following open-heart surgery in a child

    PubMed Central

    Deepti, Siddharthan; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Talwar, Sachin; Kothari, Shyam Sunder

    2016-01-01

    A 6-year- old child developed constrictive pericarditis 2 years after undergoing an open-heart surgery for a congenital cardiac disorder. No other cause of pericarditis was identified. The clinical condition improved after pericardiectomy. The case is reported for its rarity. PMID:27011697

  9. [Constrictive pericarditis in children under 2 years of age].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lia; Anjos, Rui; Martins, Fernando Maymone; Telo, Margarida

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of constrictive pericarditis, in children under 2 years of age, of non-tuberculosis aetiology, diagnosed from June 97 to May 98 are reported. This entity is rare in paediatrics and it may progress to severe condition. Surgical treatment has a low risk and is generally associated with good prognosis. Aetiology, clinic presentation, differential diagnosis with restrictive cardiomyopathy and treatment are discussed.

  10. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. )

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  11. COGNITIVE CONSTRICTION IN AGING AND ATTITUDES TOWARD INTERNATIONAL ISSUES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BACK, KURT W.; GERGEN, KENNETH J.

    THE MAJOR FOCUS OF THIS STUDY WAS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONSTRICTION OF TIME PERSPECTIVE AND PREFERENCES FOR CERTAIN TYPES OF SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS OF INTERNATIONAL, NATIONAL, AND LOCAL AFFAIRS. THREE GROUPS WERE FORMED ACCORDING TO AGE--UNDER 40, 40-59, AND 60 AND OVER. TABLES SHOW, IN PERCENTAGES, THE RESPONSES TO SUCH QUESTIONS AS WHAT THE…

  12. Protective constriction of coronary vein grafts with knitted nitinol

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Loven; Franz, Thomas; Human, Paul; Wolf, Michael F.; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Scherman, Jacques; Zilla, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Different flow patterns and shear forces were shown to cause significantly more luminal narrowing and neointimal tissue proliferation in coronary than in infrainguinal vein grafts. As constrictive external mesh support of vein grafts led to the complete suppression of intimal hyperplasia (IH) in infrainguinal grafts, we investigated whether mesh constriction is equally effective in the coronary position. METHODS Eighteen senescent Chacma baboons (28.8 ± 3.6 kg) received aorto-coronary bypass grafts to the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Three groups of saphenous vein grafts were compared: untreated controls (CO); fibrin sealant-sprayed controls (CO + FS) and nitinol mesh-constricted grafts (ME + FS). Meshes consisted of pulse-compliant, knitted nitinol (eight needles; 50 μm wire thickness; 3.4 mm resting inner diameter, ID) spray attached to the vein grafts with FS. After 180 days of implantation, luminal dimensions and IH were analysed using post-explant angiography and macroscopic and histological image analysis. RESULTS At implantation, the calibre mismatch between control grafts and the LAD expressed as cross-sectional quotient (Qc) was pronounced [Qc = 0.21 ± 0.07 (CO) and 0.18 ± 0.05 (CO + FS)]. Mesh constriction resulted in a 29 ± 7% reduction of the outer diameter of the vein grafts from 5.23 ± 0.51 to 3.68 ± 0 mm, significantly reducing the calibre discrepancy to a Qc of 0.41 ± 0.17 (P < 0.02). After 6 months of implantation, explant angiography showed distinct luminal irregularities in control grafts (ID difference between widest and narrowest segment 74 ± 45%), while diameter variations were mild in mesh-constricted grafts. In all control grafts, thick neointimal tissue was present [600 ± 63 μm (CO); 627 ± 204 μm (CO + FS)] as opposed to thin, eccentric layers of 249 ± 83 μm in mesh-constricted grafts (ME + FS; P < 0.002). The total wall thickness had increased by 363 ± 39% (P < 0.00001) in CO and 312 ± 61% (P < 0

  13. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Michael; Gao, Guo-Jie; Thomas, Jeffrey; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity.

  14. Nanoplough-constrictions on thin YBCO films made with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Elkaseh, A A O; Büttner, U; Meincken, M; Hardie, G L; Srinivasu, V V; Perold, W J

    2007-09-01

    Utilizing atomic force microscope (AFM) with a diamond tip, we were able to successfully plough nano-constrictions on epitaxially grown YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films deposited on MgO substrates. The thickness, width, and length of the obtained constrictions were in the range of a few 100 nm. Furthermore, we managed to produce a new S-type constriction, of which the dimensions are easier to control than for conventional constrictions.

  15. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  16. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Maschwitz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  17. Expansion of Severely Constricted Visual Field Using Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Trese, Matthew G J; Khan, Naheed W; Branham, Kari; Conroy, Erin Brown; Moroi, Sayoko E

    2016-05-01

    Google Glass (Google, Mountain View, CA) is a wearable technology with a computer and camera mounted on an eyeglass frame. The camera captures wide-angle video and projects it onto a prism located in the right superior temporal quadrant of the wearer's visual field. The authors present a case of an individual who used Google Glass' video projection feature to expand his severely constricted right visual field. This patient reported improved ambulatory navigation. Using Google Glass, the patient's peripheral vision, measured using Goldmann kinetic perimetry, expanded impressively. Based on these preliminary results, the authors propose further characterization on the potential utility of such head-mount display technology as a tool to improve the lives of patients with severely constricted visual fields. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:486-489.].

  18. History dependence of vital capacity in constricted lungs.

    PubMed

    Olson, Thomas P; Wilson, Theodore A; Johnson, Bruce D; Hyatt, Robert E

    2010-07-01

    Measurements of dynamic force-length behavior of maximally activated strips of smooth muscle during oscillatory length changes show that force decreases well below the isometric force during the shortening phase of the oscillation. The magnitude of the decrease depends on the rate of shortening; for slower shortening, the decrease is smaller and force is larger. Modeling of expiratory flow, based on these data, predicts that vital capacity in constricted lungs depends on the rate of expiration. In maximally constricted lungs, forced vital capacity (FVC) is predicted to be 16% smaller than control, and vital capacity for a very slow expiration (SVC), 31% less than control. These predictions were tested by measuring FVC and SVC in constricted normal subjects. In the first group of 9 subjects, four maneuvers were made following the delivery of two doses of methacholine in the order: SVC, FVC, FVC, SVC. In a second group of 11 subjects, two maneuvers were performed at each dose in the order: FVC, SVC. At the highest dose of methacholine, FVC for both trials in group 1 and for the one trial in group 2 were all approximately 13% less than control, a slightly smaller decrease than predicted. SVC for the 1st trial in group 1 was 27% less than control, also slightly smaller than predicted. The difference between FVC and SVC for this trial, 13%, was close to the predicted difference of 15%. However, SVC for the 2nd trial in group 1 (preceded by 3 vital capacity maneuvers) and for group 2 (preceded by 1) were no different from FVC. We conclude that vital capacity in constricted lungs depends on the dynamic force-length properties of smooth muscle and that the history dependence of the dynamic properties of smooth muscle is more complicated than has been inferred from oscillatory force-length behavior.

  19. Computer Simulations of Coronary Blood Flow Through a Constriction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    and Prevention. This is generally caused by a constriction of a coronary artery through a process known as atherosclerosis , or an increased amount...surface for all stenoses. Shear rate is important in cardiovascular medicine because it affects atherosclerosis (Giddens, Zarins &Glagov, 1993...localization and detection of atherosclerosis . Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, 115(4B):588–594. Koskinas, K.C., Chatzizisis, Y.S., Antoniadis

  20. Role of calcium in the constriction of isolated cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium entry blockers (CEB) have been used in the experimental treatment or prevention of many cerebrovascular disorders including stroke, post-ischemic hypoperfusion after cardiac arrest, cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and migraine headache. However, the mechanism of action of these drugs on the cerebral circulation is poorly understood. This study examined the effects of calcium antagonists, Ca/sup 2 +/-deficient solutions, and vasocostrictors on cerebrovascular tone and /sup 45/Ca fluxes, to determine the role of calcium in cerebral arterial constriction. A Scatchard plot of /sup 45/Ca binding to BMCA showed that Ca/sup 2 +/ was bound at either low or high affinity binding sties. The four vasoconstrictors (potassium, serotonin, PGF/sub 2 ..cap alpha../, or SQ-26,655) each increased low affinity /sup 45/Ca uptake into BMCA. The results demonstrate that: (1) Potassium and serotonin constrict BMCA mainly by promoting Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through CEB-sensitive channels; (2) PGF/sub 2 ..cap alpha../ and SQ-26,655 constrict BMCA in part by promoting Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through CEB-sensitive channels, and in part by releasing Ca/sup 2 +/ from depletable internal stores; (3) The major action of CEB on BMCA is to block vasoconstrictor-induced Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake through both potential-operated (K/sup +/-stimulated) and receptor-operated channels.

  1. Nuclear constriction segregates mobile nuclear proteins away from chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Irianto, Jerome; Pfeifer, Charlotte R.; Bennett, Rachel R.; Xia, Yuntao; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Liu, Andrea J.; Greenberg, Roger A.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2016-01-01

    As a cell squeezes its nucleus through adjacent tissue, penetrates a basement membrane, or enters a small blood capillary, chromatin density and nuclear factors could in principle be physically perturbed. Here, in cancer cell migration through rigid micropores and in passive pulling into micropipettes, local compaction of chromatin is observed coincident with depletion of mobile factors. Heterochromatin/euchromatin was previously estimated from molecular mobility measurements to occupy a volume fraction f of roughly two-thirds of the nuclear volume, but based on the relative intensity of DNA and histones in several cancer cell lines drawn into narrow constrictions, f can easily increase locally to nearly 100%. By contrast, mobile proteins in the nucleus, including a dozen that function as DNA repair proteins (e.g., BRCA1, 53BP1) or nucleases (e.g., Cas9, FokI), are depleted within the constriction, approaching 0%. Such losses—compounded by the occasional rupture of the nuclear envelope—can have important functional consequences. Studies of a nuclease that targets a locus in chromosome-1 indeed show that constricted migration delays DNA damage. PMID:27798234

  2. Size quantization of Dirac fermions in graphene constrictions

    PubMed Central

    Terrés, B.; Chizhova, L. A.; Libisch, F.; Peiro, J.; Jörger, D.; Engels, S.; Girschik, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Rotkin, S. V.; Burgdörfer, J.; Stampfer, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum point contacts are cornerstones of mesoscopic physics and central building blocks for quantum electronics. Although the Fermi wavelength in high-quality bulk graphene can be tuned up to hundreds of nanometres, the observation of quantum confinement of Dirac electrons in nanostructured graphene has proven surprisingly challenging. Here we show ballistic transport and quantized conductance of size-confined Dirac fermions in lithographically defined graphene constrictions. At high carrier densities, the observed conductance agrees excellently with the Landauer theory of ballistic transport without any adjustable parameter. Experimental data and simulations for the evolution of the conductance with magnetic field unambiguously confirm the identification of size quantization in the constriction. Close to the charge neutrality point, bias voltage spectroscopy reveals a renormalized Fermi velocity of ∼1.5 × 106 m s−1 in our constrictions. Moreover, at low carrier density transport measurements allow probing the density of localized states at edges, thus offering a unique handle on edge physics in graphene devices. PMID:27198961

  3. Constrictive pericarditis versus restrictive cardiomyopathy: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M; Leff, Carrie B; Marsalese, Dominic L

    2004-01-01

    This is the case of a patient who presented with severe right-sided heart failure due to diastolic dysfunction that caused a dilemma of differential diagnosis between restrictive cardiomyopathy and constrictive pericarditis. Restrictive cardiomyopathy was diagnosed based on noninvasive and invasive hemodynamic testing. However, the patient did not respond to therapy and succumbed to worsening heart failure and multiple comorbidities. Clinical features of right heart failure with edema, ascites, jugular venous distention, and tender hepatomegaly are commonly seen in clinical practice. When systolic function is determined to be normal, diastolic causes of heart failure must be ruled out. These include myocardial disorders with a broad range of pathologies leading to restrictive physiology, of which amyloidosis is a prototype. Pericardial disorders leading to diastolic heart failure are usually in the form of constrictive physiology, when pericardial tamponade is ruled out. Differentiation between restrictive and constrictive pathologies is often difficult and requires careful attention to hemodynamic and Doppler echocardiographic features. We report a case of severe right heart failure illustrating some of the complexities in decision-making and the importance of meticulous hemodynamic and ancillary testing in the diagnosis and treatment of this often fatal condition.

  4. Size quantization of Dirac fermions in graphene constrictions.

    PubMed

    Terrés, B; Chizhova, L A; Libisch, F; Peiro, J; Jörger, D; Engels, S; Girschik, A; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Rotkin, S V; Burgdörfer, J; Stampfer, C

    2016-05-20

    Quantum point contacts are cornerstones of mesoscopic physics and central building blocks for quantum electronics. Although the Fermi wavelength in high-quality bulk graphene can be tuned up to hundreds of nanometres, the observation of quantum confinement of Dirac electrons in nanostructured graphene has proven surprisingly challenging. Here we show ballistic transport and quantized conductance of size-confined Dirac fermions in lithographically defined graphene constrictions. At high carrier densities, the observed conductance agrees excellently with the Landauer theory of ballistic transport without any adjustable parameter. Experimental data and simulations for the evolution of the conductance with magnetic field unambiguously confirm the identification of size quantization in the constriction. Close to the charge neutrality point, bias voltage spectroscopy reveals a renormalized Fermi velocity of ∼1.5 × 10(6) m s(-1) in our constrictions. Moreover, at low carrier density transport measurements allow probing the density of localized states at edges, thus offering a unique handle on edge physics in graphene devices.

  5. Characterization of superconducting nanowire single-photon detector with artificial constrictions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling; Liu, Dengkuan; Wu, Junjie; He, Yuhao; Lv, Chaolin; You, Lixing Zhang, Weijun; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhen Xie, Xiaoming

    2014-06-15

    Statistical studies on the performance of different superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one chip suggested that random constrictions existed in the nanowire that were barely registered by scanning electron microscopy. With the aid of advanced e-beam lithography, artificial geometric constrictions were fabricated on SNSPDs as well as single nanowires. In this way, we studied the influence of artificial constrictions on SNSPDs in a straight forward manner. By introducing artificial constrictions with different wire widths in single nanowires, we concluded that the dark counts of SNSPDs originate from a single constriction. Further introducing artificial constrictions in SNSPDs, we studied the relationship between detection efficiency and kinetic inductance and the bias current, confirming the hypothesis that constrictions exist in SNSPDs.

  6. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  7. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  8. Architecture of the ring formed by the tubulin homologue FtsZ in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Szwedziak, Piotr; Wang, Qing; Bharat, Tanmay A M; Tsim, Matthew; Löwe, Jan

    2014-12-09

    Membrane constriction is a prerequisite for cell division. The most common membrane constriction system in prokaryotes is based on the tubulin homologue FtsZ, whose filaments in E. coli are anchored to the membrane by FtsA and enable the formation of the Z-ring and divisome. The precise architecture of the FtsZ ring has remained enigmatic. In this study, we report three-dimensional arrangements of FtsZ and FtsA filaments in C. crescentus and E. coli cells and inside constricting liposomes by means of electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography. In vivo and in vitro, the Z-ring is composed of a small, single-layered band of filaments parallel to the membrane, creating a continuous ring through lateral filament contacts. Visualisation of the in vitro reconstituted constrictions as well as a complete tracing of the helical paths of the filaments with a molecular model favour a mechanism of FtsZ-based membrane constriction that is likely to be accompanied by filament sliding.

  9. [Constrictive pericarditis as complication of viral respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Darocha, Szymon; Paczek, Anna; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Szturmowicz, Monika; Kober, Jarosław; Kurzyna, Marcin; Oniszh, Karina; Langfort, Renata; Litwiński, Paweł; Torbicki, Adam

    2012-01-01

    A 24 year-old man with 3-months medical history of recurrent respiratory infections and pericardial effusion, despite treatment with nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, was admitted to the hospital with dyspnea on exertion. On admission he presented the symptoms of right heart insufficiency. Computed tomography of the chest demonstrated a thickened pericardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterisation established the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. Serologic tests suggested viral aetiology. The patient was referred to cardiothoracic surgery, partial pericardiectomy was performed with marked haemodynamic improvement.

  10. Role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Sengupta, Partho P; Mookadam, Farouk; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy; Tajik, A Jamil; Khandheria, Bijoy K

    2009-01-01

    The clinical recognition of constrictive pericarditis (CP) is important but challenging. In addition to Doppler echocardiography, newer echocardiographic techniques for deciphering myocardial deformation have facilitated the noninvasive recognition of CP and its differentiation from restrictive cardiomyopathy. In a patient with heart failure and a normal ejection fraction, echocardiographic demonstration of exaggerated interventricular interdependence, relatively preserved left ventricular longitudinal deformation, and attenuated circumferential deformation is diagnostic of CP. This review is a concise update on the pathophysiology and hemodynamic features of CP, the transmural and torsional mechanics of CP, and the merits and pitfalls of the various echocardiographic techniques used in the diagnosis of CP.

  11. Transition from positive to negative magnetoresistance induced by a constriction in semiconductor nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.; Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the magnetotransport through an indium antimonide (InSb) nanowire grown in [111] direction, with a geometric constriction and in an external magnetic field applied along the nanowire axis. We have found that the magnetoresistance is negative for the narrow constriction, nearly zero for the constriction of some intermediate radius, and takes on positive values for the constriction with the radius approaching that of the nanowire. For all magnitudes of the magnetic field, the radius of constriction at which the change of the magnetoresistance sign takes place has been found to be almost the same as long as other geometric parameters of the nanowire are fixed. The sign reversing of the magnetoresistance is explained as a combined effect of two factors: the influence of the constriction on the transverse states and the spin Zeeman effect.

  12. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  13. Mixed constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy in a 36-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Naveed; Khalid, Ayesha; Razaque, Sabeen; Ahmed, Waqas; Habib-ur-Rahman; Ahmed, Munir

    2012-05-01

    Mixed lesion of Restrictive Cardiomyopathy and Constrictive Pericarditis is a rarely reported clinical entity which poses a diagnostic and therapeutic enigma to physicians. The management of both conditions differs markedly. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy is managed either conservatively or cardiac transplant may be offered. On the other hand, Constrictive Pericarditis can be surgically treated by pericardiectomy. We report a rare case of decompensated heart failure presenting with mixed features of both constrictive and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  14. Mechanical Response of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2013-11-01

    Most work on RBC dynamic response to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity gradients. Relatively little experimental work has examined how RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as in an abrupt contraction. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,000 RBCs. We show that approximately 90% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, almost 40% of the cells exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity gradients. We present detailed statistical analyses on the dynamics of each motion and demonstrate that the behavior is highly sensitive to the location of the RBC within the channel. Finally, we show that the tumbling and rolling motions can be rationalized qualitatively in terms of rigid body rotation, whereas twisting motion cannot, suggesting that twisting is a consequence of the viscoelastic nature of the RBCs.

  15. Twisting of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (~30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We examine the mechanical origin of twisting using, as a limiting case, the equations of motion for rigid ellipsoids, and we demonstrate that the observed rotation is qualitatively consistent with rigid body theory.

  16. [Constrictive pericarditis: etiology, diagnostic work-up, and therapy].

    PubMed

    Föll, Daniela; Geibel-Zehender, Annette; Bode, Christoph

    2010-03-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is characterized by a fibrous thickened pericardial layer which prevents the cardiac chambers from regular filling. Today, this disease is often caused by previous cardiac surgery or mediastinal radiotherapy, whereas tuberculosis as a cause is less important nowadays. Due to the reduced diastolic filling the cardiac output is diminished and the veins are engorged. The patients present with ascites, liver congestion, and dilated jugular veins. A pericardial effusion, the ECG or an echocardiography may give first hints for the diagnosis. The chest X-ray examination might detect pericardial calcifications (see Figure 2). Doppler echocardiography and cardiac catheterization, especially during breathing maneuvers, are diagnostic, as they demonstrate the diastolic filling disturbance ("dip-plateau sign", see Figure 1), the equal increase of left and right ventricular end-diastolic and mean atrial pressures, and the strong dependency of ventricular filling from respiration. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging might reveal the thickened pericardial layer (see Figures 3 and 4). The most important differential diagnosis is restrictive cardiomyopathy, which has similar clinical and hemodynamic findings. A comprehensive diagnostic work-up is necessary, as the constrictive pericarditis may be cured by a timely performed pericardial resection.

  17. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  18. Hydrocephalus in pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Hanieh, A

    1994-07-01

    A review of the clinical records and CT scan findings of 11 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome showed ventricular dilation in the majority. In 7 cases the ventriculomegaly was sufficiently severe as to be classified as hydrocephalus and warrant ventricular shunting. The common co-existence of hydrocephalus and multiple premature sutural fusion in Pfeiffer syndrome is a further factor in the apparently worse prognosis of this condition when compared to Crouzon and Apert syndrome. Primary cerebral anomalies as a causative factor for the development of hydrocephalus are infrequently recorded. Extensive craniosynostosis with cranial base distortion and constriction would appear to contribute to the production of hydrocephalus.

  19. Stenosis map for volume visualization of constricted tubular structures: Application to coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jihye; Kim, Yeo Koon; Chun, Eun Ju; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Bohyoung

    2016-02-01

    Although direct volume rendering (DVR) has become a commodity, effective rendering of interesting features is still a challenge. In one of active DVR application fields, the medicine, radiologists have used DVR for the diagnosis of lesions or diseases that should be visualized distinguishably from other surrounding anatomical structures. One of most frequent and important radiologic tasks is the detection of lesions, usually constrictions, in complex tubular structures. In this paper, we propose a 3D spatial field for the effective visualization of constricted tubular structures, called as a stenosis map which stores the degree of constriction at each voxel. Constrictions within tubular structures are quantified by using newly proposed measures (i.e. line similarity measure and constriction measure) based on the localized structure analysis, and classified with a proposed transfer function mapping the degree of constriction to color and opacity. We show the application results of our method to the visualization of coronary artery stenoses. We present performance evaluations using twenty eight clinical datasets, demonstrating high accuracy and efficacy of our proposed method. The ability of our method to saliently visualize the constrictions within tubular structures and interactively adjust the visual appearance of the constrictions proves to deliver a substantial aid in radiologic practice.

  20. Flow of a Casson fluid through a locally-constricted porous channel: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amlimohamadi, Haleh; Akram, Maryammosadat; Sadeghy, Kayvan

    2016-05-01

    Flow of a Casson fluid through a two-dimensional porous channel containing a local constriction is numerically investigated assuming that the resistance offered by the porous medium obeys the Darcy's law. Treating the constriction as another porous medium which obeys the Darcy-Forcheimer model, the equations governing fluid flow in the main channel and the constriction itself are numerically solved using the finite-volume method (FVM) based on the pseudo-transient SIMPLE algorithm. It is shown that an increase in the porosity of the channel decreases the shear stress exerted on the constriction. On the other hand, an increase in the fluid's yield stress is predicted to increase the maximum shear stress experienced by the constriction near its crest. The porosity of the constriction itself is predicted to have a negligible effect on the plaque's shear stress. But, the momentum of the weak flow passing through the constriction is argued to lower the bulk fluid from separating downstream of the constriction.

  1. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Jie Jason; Holcomb, Michael C.; Thomas, Jeffrey H.; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-10-01

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. However, systematic methods of studying how mechanical stress and feedback help to harmonize cellular activities within a tissue have yet to be developed. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity. Our particle-based AGF model will be useful in analyzing mechanical feedback effects in a wide variety of morphogenesis and organogenesis phenomena.

  2. Constrictive pericarditis presenting with an outpouching of the right ventricle free wall simulating an aneurysmal dilatation.

    PubMed

    Ocak, I; Turkbey, B; Lacomis, J M

    2011-03-01

    We present a case of constrictive pericarditis resulting in an outpouching of the right ventricular free wall, simulating a right ventricular free wall aneurysm. The present case is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported right ventricular free wall aneurysm-like outpouching adjacent to surrounding regions of thickened pericardium in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

  3. A Potential Echocardiographic Classification for Constrictive Pericarditis Based on Analysis of Abnormal Septal Motion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Michael; Lin, Zaw; Celemajer, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon condition that could be easily confused with congestive heart failure. In symptomatic patients, septal "wobble" on echocardiography may be an important sign of constrictive physiology. This study was planned to investigate the effects of constriction on septal motion as identified by echocardiography. Methods In this retrospective observational study, nine consecutive patients with constriction underwent careful echocardiographic analysis of the interventricular septum (IVS) with slow motion 2-dimensional echocardiography and inspiratory manoeuvres. Six patients who had undergone cardiac magnetic resonance imaging underwent similar analysis. Findings were correlated with haemodynamic data in five patients who had undergone cardiac catheterisation studies. Results In mild cases of constriction a single wobble of the IVS was seen during normal respiration. In more moderate cases a double motion of the septum (termed "double wobble") was seen where the septum bowed initially into the left ventricle (LV) cavity in diastole then relaxed to the middle only to deviate again into the LV cavity late in diastole after atrial contraction. In severe cases, the septum bowed into the LV cavity for the full duration of diastole (pan-diastolic motion). We describe how inspiration also helped to characterize the severity of constriction especially in mild to moderate cases. Conclusion Echocardiography appears a simple tool to help diagnose constriction and grade its severity. Larger studies are needed to confirm whether the type of wobble motions helps to grade the severity of constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26448822

  4. [Clinical case of the month. Constrictive pericarditis with a macroscopically normal pericardium: apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Hoffer, E; Materne, P; Limet, R; Boland, J

    2007-04-01

    The diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is not easy to make. This rare condition can be suggested by clinical, echocardiograohic, hemodynamic, and radiological signs. It must be distinguished from restrictive cardiomyopathy as therapeutic options are radically different. We present an ambiguous case of constrictive pericarditis with macroscopically normal pericardium recognized 10 years after open-chest cardiac surgery: a large pericardiectomy rapidly induced clinical improvement.

  5. Restrictive cardiomyopathy versus constrictive pericarditis: making the distinction using tissue Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    McCall, Rebecca; Stoodley, Paul W; Richards, David A B; Thomas, Liza

    2008-07-01

    Although the primary cause of constrictive pericarditis is entirely different to that of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the two often present with very similar clinical findings. As such, making the distinction between the two is a diagnostic challenge. We report a case that highlights how tissue Doppler imaging may simplify the distinction between pericardial constriction and myocardial restriction.

  6. [Diagnostic difficulties in a case of constricted tubular visual field].

    PubMed

    Dogaru, Oana-Mihaela; Rusu, Monica; Hâncu, Dacia; Horvath, Kárin

    2013-01-01

    In the paper below we present the clinical case of a 48 year old female with various symptoms associated with functional visual disturbance -constricted tubular visual fields, wich lasts from 6 years; the extensive clinical and paraclinical ophthalmological investigations ruled out the presence of an organic disorder. In the present, we suspect a diagnosis of hysteria, still uncertain, wich represented over time a big challenge in psychology and ophthalmology. The mechanisms and reasons for hysteria are still not clear and it could represent a fascinating research theme. The tunnel, spiral or star-shaped visual fields are specific findings in hysteria for patients who present visual disturbance. The question of whether or not a patient with hysterical visual impairment can or cannot "see" is still unresolved.

  7. Ordered and random structures in pulsatile flow through constricted tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, B. B.

    The poststenotic flow field in a rigid tube was investigated under pulsatile conditions. The waveform employed in the present experiment was sinusoidal and three contoured constrictions with 50, 75, and 90% area reduction were investigated. The fluid dynamic similarity parameters were chosen to represent conditions found in large arteries of humans and of experimental animals, using a Reynolds number range of 200 to 1000 and a frequency parameter value of 5.3. The analysis techniques of autoregressive modeling, correlation methods, and phase-shift averaging were employed in order to extract the maximum information about flow behavior. Analysis focuses on identification and representation of coherent flow disturbances, and examination of the influence of core flow behavior on the cyclic wall shear stress.

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure constricts the mouse ductus arteriosus in utero.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Christopher W; Delaney, Cassidy; Streeter, Taylor; Yarboro, Michael T; Poole, Stanley; Brown, Naoko; Slaughter, James C; Cotton, Robert B; Reese, Jeff; Shelton, Elaine L

    2016-09-01

    Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is common during pregnancy. Fetal exposure to SSRIs is associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN); however, a direct link between the two has yet to be established. Conversely, it is well known that PPHN can be caused by premature constriction of the ductus arteriosus (DA), a fetal vessel connecting the pulmonary and systemic circulations. We hypothesized that SSRIs could induce in utero DA constriction. Using isolated vessels and whole-animal models, we sought to determine the effects of two commonly prescribed SSRIs, fluoxetine and sertraline, on the fetal mouse DA. Cannulated vessel myography studies demonstrated that SSRIs caused concentration-dependent DA constriction and made vessels less sensitive to prostaglandin-induced dilation. Moreover, in vivo studies showed that SSRI-exposed mice had inappropriate DA constriction in utero. Taken together, these findings establish that SSRIs promote fetal DA constriction and provide a potential mechanism by which SSRIs could contribute to PPHN.

  9. Constrictive pericarditis. Early experience in 12 patients in light of modern cardiology.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Y; Wurzel, M; Vishne, T H; Garty, B Z; Adler, Y

    2000-11-01

    The last several decades have witnessed major advances in the understanding and management of constrictive pericarditis. The aim of the present study was to compare the diagnosis, treatment and outcome of constrictive pericarditis of 40 years ago to today. The study population consisted of 12 patients with a diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis who presented at the Institute of Cardiology of Beilinson Hospital, from 1961 to 1970. Their main physical findings, electrocardiographic and chest X-ray changes, and hemodynamic study results are discussed in relation to the surgical outcome of patients with constrictive pericarditis today. New noninvasive imaging modalities, such as M mode, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are presented, and their advantages and disadvantages in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis and its differentiation from restrictive cardiomyopathy are explained.

  10. Fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in constricted channel flows and their effect on the onset of separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip

    1992-07-01

    The development of fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in high Reynolds number flow in a symmetrically constricted channel is investigated. Attention is restricted to the case of 'strongly' constricted channels considered by Smith and Daniels (1981) for which the scaled constriction height is asymptotically large. Such flows are known to develop a Goldstein singularity and subsequently become separated at some downstream station past the point of maximum channel constriction. It is shown that these flows can support fully nonlinear Goertler vortices, of the form elucidated by Hall and Lakin (1988), for constrictions which have an appreciable region of local concave curvature upstream of the position at which separation occurs. The effect on the onset of separation due to the nonlinear Goertler modes is discussed. A brief discussion of other possible nonlinear states which may also have a dramatic effect in delaying (or promoting) separation is given.

  11. Mechanisms of Contractile-Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Damien; Zhao, Ran; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Most eukaryotes including fungi, amoebas, and animal cells assemble an actin/myosin-based contractile ring during cytokinesis. The majority of proteins implied in ring formation, maturation, and constriction are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting that common mechanisms exist among these divergent eukaryotes. Here, we review the recent advances in positioning and assembly of the actomyosin ring in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and animal cells. In particular, major findings have been made recently in understanding ring formation in genetically tractable S. pombe, revealing a dynamic and robust search, capture, pull, and release mechanism. PMID:20708088

  12. Changes in compressed neurons from dogs with acute and severe cauda equina constrictions following intrathecal injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-conjugated polymer nanoparticles☆

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Junming; Shi, Jiangang; Shi, Guodong; Liu, Yanling; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Chaoyang; Chen, Dechun; Xing, Shunming; Shen, Lianbing; Jia, Lianshun; Ye, Xiaojian; He, Hailong; Li, Jiashun

    2013-01-01

    This study established a dog model of acute multiple cauda equina constriction by experimental constriction injury (48 hours) of the lumbosacral central processes in dorsal root ganglia neurons. The repair effect of intrathecal injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor with 15 mg encapsulated biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles on this injury was then analyzed. Dorsal root ganglion cells (L7) of all experimental dogs were analyzed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry at 1, 2 and 4 weeks following model induction. Intrathecal injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor can relieve degeneration and inflammation, and elevate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in sensory neurons of compressed dorsal root ganglion. Simultaneously, intrathecal injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor obviously improved neurological function in the dog model of acute multiple cauda equina constriction. Results verified that sustained intraspinal delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor encapsulated in biodegradable nanoparticles promoted the repair of histomorphology and function of neurons within the dorsal root ganglia in dogs with acute and severe cauda equina syndrome. PMID:25206593

  13. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  14. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  15. Comparison of new Doppler echocardiographic methods to differentiate constrictive pericardial heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, N; Garcia, M J; Rodriguez, L; Murray, R D; Apperson-Hansen, C; Stugaard, M; Thomas, J D; Klein, A L

    2001-01-01

    This study assesses how the newer modalities of tissue Doppler echocardiography and color M-mode flow propagation compare with respiratory variation of Doppler flow in distinguishing between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy. We studied 30 patients referred for further evaluation of diastolic function who had a diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy established by diagnostic tests, including clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, cardiac catheterization, endomyocardial biopsy, and surgical findings. Nineteen patients had constrictive pericarditis and 11 had restrictive cardiomyopathy. We performed 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography combined with pulsed-wave Doppler of the pulmonary veins and mitral inflow with respiratory monitoring, tissue Doppler echocardiography of the lateral mitral annulus, and color M-mode flow propagation of left ventricular filling. Respiratory variation of the mitral inflow peak early (peak E) velocity of > or =10% predicted constrictive pericarditis with 84% sensitivity and 91% specificity and variation in the pulmonary venous peak diastolic (peak D) flow velocity of > or =18% distinguished constriction with 79% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Using tissue Doppler echocardiography, a peak early velocity of longitudinal expansion (peak Ea) of > or =8.0 cm/s differentiated patients with constriction from restriction with 89% sensitivity and 100% specificity. A slope of > or =100 cm/s for the first aliasing contour in color M-mode flow propagation predicted patients with constriction with 74% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Thus, the newer methods of tissue Doppler echocardiography and color M-mode flow propagation are equivalent and complimentary with Doppler respiratory variation in distinguishing between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy. The additive role of the new methods needs to be established in difficult cases of constrictive

  16. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  17. [The role of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis].

    PubMed

    Raissuni, Z; Lachhab, A; Haddour, L; Doghmi, N; Cherti, M

    2014-02-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is a rare heart disease. The diagnosis remains a challenge. In fact, this illness can mimic restrictive cardiomyopathy. Echo-Doppler evaluation helps to establish the diagnosis of constriction; however, this technique is limited in its ability to image the entire pericardium because of its limited acoustic windows by air or bone of thorax. In addition, it is an operator-dependent exploration. Scanner and magnetic resonance imaging provide a large field of view and excellent images, showing the increased pericardial thickness and septal motion abnormalities. This review will consider the emerging role of these imaging modalities in the constrictive pericarditis diagnosis.

  18. Modeling of blood vessel constriction in 2-D case using molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. S., M. Rendi; Suprijadi, Viridi, S.

    2014-03-01

    Blood vessel constriction is simulated with particle-based method using a molecular dynamics authoring software known as Molecular Workbench (WM). Blood flow and vessel wall, the only components considered in constructing a blood vessel, are all represented in particle form with interaction potentials: Lennard-Jones potential, push-pull spring potential, and bending spring potential. Influence of medium or blood plasma is accommodated in plasma viscosity through Stokes drag force. It has been observed that pressure p is increased as constriction c is increased. Leakage of blood vessel starts at 80% constriction, which shows existence of maximum pressure that can be overcome by vessel wall.

  19. Constrictive pericardial disease: prognostic significance of a nonvisualized left ventricular wall

    SciTech Connect

    Rienmueller, R.; Doppman, J.L.; Lissner, J.; Kemkes, B.M.; Strauer, B.E.

    1985-09-01

    Twenty-six patients with pericardial constriction confirmed by catheterization were studied by dynamic computed tomography (CT). The posterolateral wall of the left ventricular myocardium was not detected in five patients (19.2%). None had evidence of previous myocardial infarction on electrocardiogram or levocardiogram. In 16 patients, a pericardiectomy was performed to remove pericardial constriction. All five patients with nondetectable posterolateral walls of the left ventricle died at or immediately following surgery because of acute myocardial failure. Nonvisualization of the posterolateral wall of the left ventricle in patients with constrictive pericarditis suggests the presence of myocardial fibrosis or atrophy. Surgery is an extremely high risk in these patients.

  20. ZapE is a novel cell division protein interacting with FtsZ and modulating the Z-ring dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marteyn, Benoit S; Karimova, Gouzel; Fenton, Andrew K; Gazi, Anastasia D; West, Nicholas; Touqui, Lhousseine; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Betton, Jean-Michel; Poyraz, Oemer; Ladant, Daniel; Gerdes, Kenn; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-03-04

    Bacterial cell division requires the formation of a mature divisome complex positioned at the midcell. The localization of the divisome complex is determined by the correct positioning, assembly, and constriction of the FtsZ ring (Z-ring). Z-ring constriction control remains poorly understood and (to some extent) controversial, probably due to the fact that this phenomenon is transient and controlled by numerous factors. Here, we characterize ZapE, a novel ATPase found in Gram-negative bacteria, which is required for growth under conditions of low oxygen, while loss of zapE results in temperature-dependent elongation of cell shape. We found that ZapE is recruited to the Z-ring during late stages of the cell division process and correlates with constriction of the Z-ring. Overexpression or inactivation of zapE leads to elongation of Escherichia coli and affects the dynamics of the Z-ring during division. In vitro, ZapE destabilizes FtsZ polymers in an ATP-dependent manner. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cell division has mainly been characterized in vitro. In this report, we could identify ZapE as a novel cell division protein which is not essential in vitro but is required during an infectious process. The bacterial cell division process relies on the assembly, positioning, and constriction of FtsZ ring (the so-called Z-ring). Among nonessential cell division proteins recently identified, ZapE is the first in which detection at the Z-ring correlates with its constriction. We demonstrate that ZapE abundance has to be tightly regulated to allow cell division to occur; absence or overexpression of ZapE leads to bacterial filamentation. As zapE is not essential, we speculate that additional Z-ring destabilizing proteins transiently recruited during late cell division process might be identified in the future.

  1. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Noninvasive detection of airway constriction in awake guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Tidal volume measured by the barometric method is very sensitive to increases in compression and expansion of alveolar gas, such as would be expected to occur during airway narrowing or closure. By comparing a barometric method tidal volume signal (VT') with a reference tidal volume (VT) obtained with a head-out pressure plethysmograph, a simple index related to gas compressibility effects was calculated (VT/VT'). Changes in this index were compared with decreases in dynamic compliance (Cdyn) during histamine aerosol challenge of 15 Charles River Hartley guinea pigs. Decreases in VT/VT' occurred during all aerosol challenges and were correlated with decreases in Cdyn. Decreases in VT/VT' were most marked at Cdyn values of less than 50% of base line. At Cdyn of less than 15% of base line, VT' was 3.1-4.8 times the VT reference signal. No increase in total pulmonary resistance was noted, and Cdyn and VT/VT' returned to base line after histamine exposure was stopped. The authors conclude that gas compressibility effects become substantial during histamine-induced airway constriction in the guinea pig and that the VT/VT' ratio appears to provide a simple noninvasive method of detecting these changes.

  3. Snap-off in constricted capillary with elastic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, P.; Alvarado, V.; Carvalho, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Snap-off of bubbles and drops in constricted capillaries occurs in many different situations, from bio-fluid to multiphase flow in porous media. The breakup process has been extensively analyzed both by theory and experiments, but most work has been limited to pure interfaces, at which the surface stress is isotropic and fully defined by the interfacial tension and interface curvature. Complex interfaces may present viscous and elastic behavior leading to a complex stress state that may change the dynamics of the interface deformation and breakup. We extend the available asymptotic model based on lubrication approximation to include elastic interfacial stress. Drop breakup time is determined as a function of the capillary geometry and liquid properties, including the interfacial elastic modulus. Results show that the interfacial elasticity has a stabilizing effect by slowing down the growth of the liquid collar, leading to a larger break-up time. This stabilizing effect has been observed experimentally in different, but related flows [Alvarado et al., "Interfacial visco-elasticity of crude oil-brine: An alternative EOR mechanism in smart waterflooding," in SPE-169127 Improved Oil Recovery Symposium (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2014)].

  4. The big squeeze: scaling of constriction pressure in two of the world's largest snakes, Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus.

    PubMed

    Penning, David A; Dartez, Schuyler F; Moon, Brad R

    2015-11-01

    Snakes are important predators that have radiated throughout many ecosystems, and constriction was important in their radiation. Constrictors immobilize and kill prey by using body loops to exert pressure on their prey. Despite its importance, little is known about constriction performance or its full effects on prey. We studied the scaling of constriction performance in two species of giant pythons (Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus) and propose a new mechanism of prey death by constriction. In both species, peak constriction pressure increased significantly with snake diameter. These and other constrictors can exert pressures dramatically higher than their prey's blood pressure, suggesting that constriction can stop circulatory function and perhaps kill prey rapidly by over-pressurizing the brain and disrupting neural function. We propose the latter 'red-out effect' as another possible mechanism of prey death from constriction. These effects may be important to recognize and treat properly in rare cases when constrictors injure humans.

  5. Prenatal Diagnosis of Amniotic Band Syndrome in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy using 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Araujo, Edward; Caetano, Ana Carolina Rabachini; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome is characterized by a build-up of bands and strings of fibrous tissue that adhere to the fetus and can compress parts of the fetus, thus causing malformations and even limb amputation while the fetus is still in the uterus. The clinical manifestations are extremely variable and their extent may range from a single abnormality, like a constriction ring, to multiple abnormalities. Such abnormalities are generally diagnosed at the end of the first or the beginning of the second trimester using two-dimensional ultrasonography (2DUS). Three-dimensional ultrasonography (3DUS) in rendering mode allows spatial analysis of the fetus and amniotic band, thus enabling better comprehension of this pathological condition and better counseling for the parents. There has not previously been any evidence to show that 3DUS would be useful in cases of late diagnosis (third trimester) of amniotic band syndrome. In the present case, a primigravid woman underwent her second obstetric ultrasound scan in the 34th week, from which we observed two bands in contact with the right forearm, but with normal movement of this limb and its fingers. 3DUS made it possible to see the spatial relationship of these bands to the fetal body, thereby confirming their adherence to the limb. After the birth, the prenatal diagnosis of amniotic band syndrome without limb constriction was confirmed. A surgical procedure was carried out on the third day after birth to excise the bands, and the newborn was then discharged in a good general condition. PMID:22616039

  6. Apical constriction: themes and variations on a cellular mechanism driving morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam C.; Goldstein, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Apical constriction is a cell shape change that promotes tissue remodeling in a variety of homeostatic and developmental contexts, including gastrulation in many organisms and neural tube formation in vertebrates. In recent years, progress has been made towards understanding how the distinct cell biological processes that together drive apical constriction are coordinated. These processes include the contraction of actin-myosin networks, which generates force, and the attachment of actin networks to cell-cell junctions, which allows forces to be transmitted between cells. Different cell types regulate contractility and adhesion in unique ways, resulting in apical constriction with varying dynamics and subcellular organizations, as well as a variety of resulting tissue shape changes. Understanding both the common themes and the variations in apical constriction mechanisms promises to provide insight into the mechanics that underlie tissue morphogenesis. PMID:24803648

  7. B-type natriuretic peptide level in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd; Hollman, Jay

    2006-12-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis who had a B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level of 129 pg/dl despite a left ventricular end diastolic pressure of 35 mmHg. We discuss a possible explanation for the relatively low BNP level given this patient's markedly elevated intracavitary pressures in the setting of constrictive pericarditis.

  8. Differentiation Therapy With Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Thrombocytopenia

  9. Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy using mitral annular velocity by tissue Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jong-Won; Ommen, Steve R; Tajik, A Jamil; Barnes, Marion E; Ammash, Naser M; Gertz, Morie A; Seward, James B; Oh, Jae K

    2004-08-01

    This study evaluated the diagnostic role of early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E') by tissue Doppler echocardiography for differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy (primary restrictive cardiomyopathy and cardiac amyloidosis). The study group consisted of 75 patients (53 men, 22 women; mean age 62 years, range 27 to 87). Of these, 23 patients had surgically confirmed constrictive pericarditis, 38 had biopsy-proved systemic amyloidosis and typical echocardiographic features of cardiac involvement, and 14 had primary restrictive cardiomyopathy. Standard mitral inflow characteristics were measured. Tissue Doppler echocardiography was used to measure E' at the septal annulus. E' was significantly higher in patients with constrictive pericarditis than in those with primary restrictive cardiomyopathy or cardiac amyloidosis (12.3 vs 5.1 cm/second, p <0.001). An E' cut-off value > or =8 cm/second resulted in 95% sensitivity and 96% specificity for the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. There was no overlap of E' between patients who had constrictive pericarditis and those who had cardiac amyloidosis. In a subgroup analysis of restrictive cardiomyopathy, E' of patients who had cardiac amyloidosis was significantly lower than that of patients who had primary restrictive cardiomyopathy (4.6 vs 6.3 cm/second, p <0.001). Thus, E' velocity can distinguish between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy with a specific cut-off value in patients with clinical and echocardiographic evidence of diastolic heart failure.

  10. Quantitative visualization of asymmetric gas flow in constricted microchannels by using pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Yung; Chen, Ying-Hsuan; Wan, Shaw-An; Wang, Yu-Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Asymmetric flow in constricted microchannel devices was quantitatively investigated using a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique. For microchannel devices with constriction ratios of 2 : 1 and 5 : 1, detailed pressure maps for the region around the constriction structure were obtained and enabled visualization of the flow field. Symmetric flow was observed in the microchannel device with a constriction ratio of 2 : 1 at the Reynolds number range 2-165. In the microchannel with a constriction ratio of 5 : 1, a deflected flow pattern was clearly identified from PSP measurements at Reynolds numbers exceeding 107. Furthermore, PSP measurements showed a pressure difference of up to 2.5 kPa between the two lateral locations corresponding to y  =  ±0.15 W (W is the microchannel width) downstream of the constriction at a Reynolds number of 279. The pressure difference resulted from asymmetric bifurcation of the flow.

  11. Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy: The case for high-resolution dynamic tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.M.; Otoadese, T.; Oren, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    The syndrome of constrictive pericarditis (CP) presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. This study was undertaken to determine whether cine computed tomography (CT), a cardiac imaging technique with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, can reliably demonstrate the unique abnormalities of pericardial anatomy and ventricular physiology present in patients with this condition. A second goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of diseased thickened pericardium, but itself, imparts cardiac impairment due to abnormalities of ventricular diastolic function. Twelve patients with CP suspected clinically, in whom invasive hemodynamic study was consistent with the diagnosis of CP, underwent cine CT. They were subdivided into Group 1 (CP, N = 5) and Group 2 (No CP, N = 7) based on histopathologic evaluation of tissue obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy. A third group consisted of asymptomatic patients with incidentally discovered thickened pericardium at the time of cine CT scanning: Group 3 (ThP, N = 7). Group 4 (Nl, N = 7) consisted of healthy volunteer subjects. Pericardial thickness measurements with cine CT clearly distinguished Group 1 (mean = 10 {+-} 2 mm) from Group 2 (mean = 2 {+-} 1 mm), with diagnostic accuracy of 100% compared to histopathological findings. In addition, patients in Group 1 had significantly more brisk early diastolic filling of both left and right ventricles than those in Group 2, which clearly distinguished all patients with and from all patients without CP. Patients in Group 3 had pericardial thicknesses similar to those in Group 1 (mean = 9 {+-} 1 mm, p = NS), but had patterns of diastolic ventricular filling that were nearly identical to Group 4 (NI).

  12. Kayser-Fleischer Rings

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know about Wilson Disease Kayser-Fleischer Rings Definition Kayser-Fleischer Ring: Clinical sign. Brownish-yellow ring ... Diet & Nutrition Kayser-Fleischer Rings Wilson Disease FAQs Definitions Transplantation For Patients & Families Resources Membership Events Centers ...

  13. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  14. Mast cell mediators in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-H.; Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. In this study, we further investigated the underlying mediator(s) for this type of airway constriction. At first, to examine effects caused by blocking agents, 67 young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into 7 groups: saline + CA; methysergide (serotonin receptor antagonist) + CA; MK-886 (leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) + CA; mepyramine (histamine H{sub 1} receptor antagonist) + CA; indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) + CA; cromolyn sodium (mast cell stabilizer) + CA; and compound 48/80 (mast cell degranulating agent) + CA. Then, we tested whether leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) or histamine enhances CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. We measured dynamic respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s (FEV{sub 0.1}) during either baseline or recovery period. In addition, we detected histamine level, an index of pulmonary mast cell degranulation, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. Citric acid aerosol inhalation caused decreases in Crs and FEV{sub 0.1}, indicating airway constriction in the control group. This airway constriction was significantly attenuated by MK-886, mepyramine, cromolyn sodium, and compound 48/80, but not by either methysergide or indomethacin. Both LTC{sub 4} and histamine infusion significantly increased the magnitude of CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation caused significant increase in histamine level in the BAL sample, which was significantly suppressed by compound 48/80. These results suggest that leukotrienes and histamine originating from mast cells play an important role in CA inhalation-induced noncholinergic airway constriction.

  15. Baclofen reversed thermal place preference in rats with chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Salte, K; Lea, G; Franek, M; Vaculin, S

    2016-06-20

    Chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve was used as an animal model of neuropathic pain. Instead of frequently used reflex-based tests we used an operant thermal place preference test to evaluate signs of neuropathic pain and the effect of baclofen administration in rats with neuropathy. Chronic constriction injury was induced by four loose ligations of the sciatic nerve. Thermal place preference (45 °C vs. 22 °C and 45 °C vs. 11 °C) was measured after the ligation and after the administration of baclofen in sham and experimental rats. Rats with the chronic constriction injury spent significantly less time on the colder plate compared to sham operated animals at the combination 45 °C vs. 11 °C. After administration of baclofen (10 mg/kg s.c.), the aversion to the colder plate in rats with chronic constriction injury disappeared. At the combination 45 °C vs. 22 °C, no difference in time spent on colder and/or warmer plate was found between sham and experimental animals. These findings show the importance of cold allodynia evaluation in rats with chronic constriction injury and the effectiveness of baclofen in this neuropathic pain model.

  16. Vangl2 cooperates with Rab11 and Myosin V to regulate apical constriction during vertebrate gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Ossipova, Olga; Chuykin, Ilya; Chu, Chih-Wen; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2015-01-01

    Core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins are well known to regulate polarity in Drosophila and vertebrate epithelia; however, their functions in vertebrate morphogenesis remain poorly understood. In this study, we describe a role for PCP signaling in the process of apical constriction during Xenopus gastrulation. The core PCP protein Vangl2 is detected at the apical surfaces of cells at the blastopore lip, and it functions during blastopore formation and closure. Further experiments show that Vangl2, as well as Daam1 and Rho-associated kinase (Rock), regulate apical constriction of bottle cells at the blastopore and ectopic constriction of ectoderm cells triggered by the actin-binding protein Shroom3. At the blastopore lip, Vangl2 is required for the apical accumulation of the recycling endosome marker Rab11. We also show that Rab11 and the associated motor protein Myosin V play essential roles in both endogenous and ectopic apical constriction, and might be involved in Vangl2 trafficking to the cell surface. Overexpression of Rab11 RNA was sufficient to partly restore normal blastopore formation in Vangl2-deficient embryos. These observations suggest that Vangl2 affects Rab11 to regulate apical constriction during blastopore formation.

  17. Essential role for smooth muscle BK channels in alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengchong; Xi, Qi; Ahmed, Abu; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Dopico, Alejandro M.

    2004-12-01

    Binge drinking is associated with increased risk for cerebrovascular spasm and stroke. Acute exposure to ethanol at concentrations obtained during binge drinking constricts cerebral arteries in several species, including humans, but the mechanisms underlying this action are largely unknown. In a rodent model, we used fluorescence microscopy, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and pharmacological studies in intact cerebral arteries to pinpoint the molecular effectors of ethanol cerebrovascular constriction. Clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol elevated wall intracellular Ca2+ concentration and caused a reversible constriction of cerebral arteries (EC50 = 27 mM; Emax = 100 mM) that depended on voltage-gated Ca2+ entry into myocytes. However, ethanol did not directly increase voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in isolated myocytes. Constriction occurred because of an ethanol reduction in the frequency (-53%) and amplitude (-32%) of transient Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents. Ethanol inhibition of BK transients was caused by a reduction in Ca2+ spark frequency (-49%), a subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal that evokes the BK transients, and a direct inhibition of BK channel steady-state activity (-44%). In contrast, ethanol failed to modify Ca2+ waves, a major vasoconstrictor mechanism. Selective block of BK channels largely prevented ethanol constriction in pressurized arteries. This study pinpoints the Ca2+ spark/BK channel negative-feedback mechanism as the primary effector of ethanol vasoconstriction.

  18. Modeling the dynamics of airway constriction: effects of agonist transport and binding.

    PubMed

    Amin, Samir D; Majumdar, Arnab; Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2010-08-01

    Recent advances have revealed that during exogenous airway challenge, airway diameters cannot be adequately predicted by their initial diameters. Furthermore, airway diameters can also vary greatly in time on scales shorter than a breath. To better understand these phenomena, we developed a multiscale model that allowed us to simulate aerosol challenge in the airways during ventilation. The model incorporates agonist-receptor binding kinetics to govern the temporal response of airway smooth muscle contraction on individual airway segments, which, together with airway wall mechanics, determines local airway caliber. Global agonist transport and deposition are coupled with pressure-driven flow, linking local airway constrictions with global flow dynamics. During the course of challenge, airway constriction alters the flow pattern, redistributing the agonist to less constricted regions. This results in a negative feedback that may be a protective property of the normal lung. As a consequence, repetitive challenge can cause spatial constriction patterns to evolve in time, resulting in a loss of predictability of airway diameters. Additionally, the model offers new insights into several phenomena including the intra- and interbreath dynamics of airway constriction throughout the tree structure.

  19. Apical domain polarization localizes actin-myosin activity to drive ratchet-like apical constriction.

    PubMed

    Mason, Frank M; Tworoger, Michael; Martin, Adam C

    2013-08-01

    Apical constriction promotes epithelia folding, which changes tissue architecture. During Drosophila gastrulation, mesoderm cells exhibit repeated contractile pulses that are stabilized such that cells apically constrict like a ratchet. The transcription factor Twist is required to stabilize cell shape. However, it is unknown how Twist spatially coordinates downstream signals to prevent cell relaxation. We find that during constriction, Rho-associated kinase (Rok) is polarized to the middle of the apical domain (medioapical cortex), separate from adherens junctions. Rok recruits or stabilizes medioapical myosin II (Myo-II), which contracts dynamic medioapical actin cables. The formin Diaphanous mediates apical actin assembly to suppress medioapical E-cadherin localization and form stable connections between the medioapical contractile network and adherens junctions. Twist is not required for apical Rok recruitment, but instead polarizes Rok medioapically. Therefore, Twist establishes radial cell polarity of Rok/Myo-II and E-cadherin and promotes medioapical actin assembly in mesoderm cells to stabilize cell shape fluctuations.

  20. Effusive-constrictive pericarditis as the manifestation of an unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Marta, Liliana; Alves, Miguel; Peres, Marisa; Ferreira, Ricardo; Ferreira, Hugo; Leal, Margarida; Nobre, Ângelo

    2015-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is a clinical condition characterized by the appearance of signs and symptoms of right heart failure due to loss of pericardial compliance. Cardiac surgery is now one of the most frequent causes in developed countries, while tuberculosis remains the most prevalent cause in developing countries. Malignancy is a rare cause but usually has a poor prognosis. The diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis remains a clinical challenge and requires a combination of noninvasive diagnostic methods (echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography); in some cases, cardiac catheterization is needed to confirm the diagnosis. The authors present the case of a 51-year-old man, hospitalized due to cardiac tamponade. Diagnostic investigation was suggestive of tuberculous etiology. Despite directed medical therapy, the patient developed effusive-constrictive physiology. He underwent pericardiectomy and anatomopathologic study suggested a neoplastic etiology. The patient died in the postoperative period from biventricular failure.

  1. Myeloid mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency inhibits aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yu Yao; Frieler, Ryan A; Zheng, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Wu Chang; Sun, Xue Nan; Yang, Qing Zhen; Ma, Shu Min; Huang, Baozhuan; Berger, Stefan; Wang, Wang; Wu, Yong; Yu, Ying; Duan, Sheng Zhong; Mortensen, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade has been shown to suppress cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling in animal models of pressure overload (POL). This study aims to determine whether MR deficiency in myeloid cells modulates aortic constriction-induced cardiovascular injuries. Myeloid MR knockout (MMRKO) mice and littermate control mice were subjected to abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) or sham operation. We found that AAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were significantly attenuated in MMRKO mice. Expression of genes important in generating reactive oxygen species was decreased in MMRKO mice, while that of manganese superoxide dismutase increased. Furthermore, expression of genes important in cardiac metabolism was increased in MMRKO hearts. Macrophage infiltration in the heart was inhibited and expression of inflammatory genes was decreased in MMRKO mice. In addition, aortic fibrosis and inflammation were attenuated in MMRKO mice. Taken together, our data indicated that MR deficiency in myeloid cells effectively attenuated aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, as well as aortic fibrosis and inflammation.

  2. Revisiting the Nelson-Morfey scaling law for flow noise from duct constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kårekull, Oscar; Efraimsson, Gunilla; Åbom, Mats

    2015-11-01

    The semi-empirical scaling law by Nelson and Morfey [1] predicts the noise generation from constrictions in ducts with low Mach number flows. The results presented here demonstrate that the original model loses accuracy for constrictions of high pressure loss. A generalization based on a momentum flux assumption of the dipole forces is suggested and is evaluated against measurement results for orifice geometries of higher pressure loss than earlier evaluated. A prediction model including constrictions at flow duct terminations is also suggested. Improved accuracy for the predictions of the new model is found for orifice geometries of high pressure loss inside and at the end of ducts. The extended model is finally evaluated by measurements on a regular ventilation air terminal device.

  3. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  4. Neurohumoral regulation of spontaneous constrictions in suburothelial venules of the rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuki; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Mitsui, Retsu; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2014-02-01

    Venules of the bladder suburothelium develop spontaneous phasic constrictions that may play a critical role in maintaining venular drainage of tissue metabolites. We aimed to investigate neurohumoral regulation of the spontaneous venular constrictions (SVCs). Changes in venular diameter of the rat bladder suburothelium were monitored using a video tracking system, whilst the effects of electrical field stimulation (EFS) and bath-applied bioactive substances were investigated. The innervation of the suburothelial microvasculature was examined by immunohistochemistry. EFS (10Hz for 30s) induced an increase in the frequency of SVCs that was prevented by phentolamine (1μM). In phentolamine-pretreated venules, EFS suppressed SVCs with a venular dilatation in a manner attenuated by propranolol (1μM) or l-nitro arginine (LNA, 10μM). BRL37344 (1μM), a β3 adrenoceptor agonist, dilated venules and reduced the frequency of SVCs in an LNA-sensitive manner. ACh (1-10μM) increased the frequency of SVCs. ATP (1μM) transiently constricted venules and then caused LNA-sensitive cessation of SVCs associated with a dilatation. Substance P (100nM) caused a venular constriction, whilst calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, 100nM) caused a dilatation of venules and suppression of SVCs that were not inhibited by LNA. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated sympathetic as well as substance P- and CGRP-containing nerves running along the venules. Spontaneous constrictions of suburothelial venules are accelerated by sympathetic α-adrenergic stimulation, but suppressed upon β-adrenergic stimulation. In addition, suburothelial venular constrictions appear to be modulated by several bioactive substances that could be released from urothelium or suburothelial sensory nerves.

  5. Mitochondrial Fission of Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Yu; Jin, Jing; Li, Shan-Liang; Yan, Jie; Zhen, Chang-Lin; Gao, Jin-Lai; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Yan-Qiu; Shen, Xin; Zhang, Liang-Shuan; Wei, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Chen-Guang; Bai, Yun-Long; Dong, De-Li

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles and continuously undergo fission and fusion processes. Mitochondrial fission is involved in multiple physiological or pathological processes, but the role of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells in artery constriction is unknown. The role of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells in arterial function was investigated by measuring the tension of rat mesenteric arteries and thoracic aorta and by evaluating mitochondrial fission, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Mitochondrial fission inhibitors mdivi-1 and dynasore antagonized phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced constriction of rat mesenteric arteries. Mdivi-1 relaxed phenylephrine-induced constriction, and mdivi-1 pretreatment prevented phenylephrine-induced constriction in mice, rat aorta, and human mesenteric arteries. Phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced increase of mitochondrial fission in smooth muscle cells of rat aorta and the increase was inhibited by mdivi-1. Mdivi-1 inhibited high K(+)-induced increases of mitochondrial fission, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Prechelation of cytosolic Ca(2+) prevented high K(+)-induced cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i increase, mitochondrial fission, and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species overproduction. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mito-TEMPO antagonized phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced constriction of rat mesenteric arteries. Nitroglycerin and ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase) inhibitor Y27632, the 2 vasodilators with different vasorelaxant mechanisms, relaxed high K(+)-induced vasoconstriction and inhibited high K(+)-induced mitochondrial fission. In conclusion, the mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells is involved in artery constriction.

  6. Late onset radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis and cardiomyopathy after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiao-feng; Yang, Yan-min; Sun, Xiao-lu; Liao, Zhong-kai; Huang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a serious side effect of cancer treatment, including coronary artery disease, valvular cardiac dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, aortopathy, and chronic constrictive pericarditis. Herein, this case we present was diagnosed as radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis and cardiomyopathy by means of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and transthoracic echocardiogram, finally confirmed by pathology after performing heart transplant operation. Conclusions: This case supports a notion that RIHD often causes multiple heart impairment and CMR is helpful to diagnose cardiomyopathy after radiation. PMID:28151876

  7. Mixed constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy in a child: treatment guided by tissue Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alicia; Vincent, Robert N; Johnson, Gregory; Kanter, Kirk R; Fyfe, Derek A

    2006-01-01

    Mixed lesions of restrictive cardiomyopathy and constrictive pericarditis have been reported rarely and represent a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. Restrictive cardiomyopathy has a poor prognosis with an average 2-year survival rate of less than 50% from the time of diagnosis. Heart transplantation is usually the only treatment option available. On the other hand, constrictive pericarditis may be surgically treated by pericardiectomy with low mortality. When these two lesions coexist, the inappropriate selection of treatment may be disastrous. We report a case of this mixed lesion in a child in which tissue Doppler echocardiography provided important information indicating that pericardectomy might be successful.

  8. Lenalidomide in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  10. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  11. Factors involved in the antinatriuretic effects of acute constriction of the thoracic and abdominal inferior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction in the absence of alterations in renal perfusion pressure. A comparison is made of the effects of equivalent degrees of TIVC and abdominal inferior vena cava constriction on arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics, and electrolyte excretion.

  12. Metric Analysis of the Hard Palate in Children with Down Syndrome--A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagyalakshmi, Gopalan; Renukarya, Annappa Jai; Rajangam, Sayee

    2007-01-01

    The hard palate is viewed as playing an important role in the passive articulation of speech. Its probable role in the defective articulation of speech in individuals with Down syndrome has been examined in the present study. In individuals with Down syndrome, the hard palate is highly arched, constricted, and narrow and stair type with malformed…

  13. Nuclei migrate through constricted spaces using microtubule motors and actin networks in C. elegans hypodermal cells.

    PubMed

    Bone, Courtney R; Chang, Yu-Tai; Cain, Natalie E; Murphy, Shaun P; Starr, Daniel A

    2016-11-15

    Cellular migrations through constricted spaces are a crucial aspect of many developmental and disease processes including hematopoiesis, inflammation and metastasis. A limiting factor in these events is nuclear deformation. Here, we establish an in vivo model in which nuclei can be visualized while moving through constrictions and use it to elucidate mechanisms for nuclear migration. C. elegans hypodermal P-cell larval nuclei traverse a narrow space that is about 5% their width. This constriction is blocked by fibrous organelles, structures that pass through P cells to connect the muscles to cuticle. Fibrous organelles are removed just prior to nuclear migration, when nuclei and lamins undergo extreme morphological changes to squeeze through the space. Both actin and microtubule networks are organized to mediate nuclear migration. The LINC complex, consisting of the SUN protein UNC-84 and the KASH protein UNC-83, recruits dynein and kinesin-1 to the nuclear surface. Both motors function in P-cell nuclear migration, but dynein, functioning through UNC-83, plays a more central role as nuclei migrate towards minus ends of polarized microtubule networks. Thus, the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton are coordinated to move nuclei through constricted spaces.

  14. Losartan and Ozagrel reverse retinal arteriolar constriction in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungjun; Harris, Norman R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Reductions in retinal blood flow are observed early in diabetes. Venules may influence arteriolar constriction and flow; therefore, we hypothesized that diabetes would induce the constriction of arterioles that are in close proximity to venules, with the constriction mediated by thromboxane and angiotensin II. Methods Using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, retinal measurements were performed 3 weeks following the age at which glucose levels exceeded 200 mg/dl, with accompanying experiments on age-matched normoglycemic NOD mice. The measurements included retinal arteriolar diameters and red blood cell velocities, and were repeated following an injection of the thromboxane synthase inhibitor Ozagrel. Mice were subdivided into equal groups given drinking water with or without the angiotensin II receptor antagonist Losartan. Results Retinal arterioles were constricted in hyperglycemic mice, with a significant reduction in flow. However, not all arterioles were equally affected; the vasoconstriction was limited to arterioles that were in closer proximity to venules. The arteriolar vasoconstriction (mean arteriolar diameters = 51 ± 1 μm vs 61 ± 1 μm in controls; p<0.01) was eliminated by both Ozagrel (61 ± 2 μm) and Losartan (63 ± 2 μm). Conclusion Venule-dependent arteriolar vasoconstriction in NOD mice is mediated by thromboxane and/or angiotensin II. PMID:18574741

  15. Nanopatterning and Hot Spot Modeling of YBCO Ultrathin Film Constrictions for THz Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladret, Romain G.; Degardin, Annick F.; Kreisler, Alain J.

    2013-06-01

    High-TC hot electron bolometers (HEB) are promising THz mixers due to their expected wide bandwidth, large mixing gain, and low intrinsic noise. To achieve this goal, 0.6-μm-size constrictions were patterned on YBaCuO-based, 10-40-nm-thick films grown on (100) MgO substrates, which as previously reported, exhibited good DC superconducting properties. In this paper, we have simulated the DC and mixer characteristics of YBaCuO HEBs with a hot spot model usually dedicated to low-TC devices. For a 100 nm × 100 nm × 10 nm constriction, the expected double sideband noise temperature TN is 2000 K for 5 μW local oscillator (LO) power (G = -13.5 dB conversion gain). For a larger (but more realistic according to YBaCuO aging effects) 600 nm × 1000 nm × 35 nm constriction, TN = 1300 K at 200 μW LO power (G = -12 dB). This approach is expected to allow optimizing the operation of the HEB constriction coupled to a THz planar antenna.

  16. Constrictive pericarditis and pleuropulmonary fibrosis secondary to cabergoline treatment for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, M; MacIver, D H

    2004-01-01

    A 63 year old man with a six year history of Parkinson’s disease presented with signs of right heart failure following a knee replacement. Constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed and a radical pericardectomy performed. Six months later, the patient remained unwell with raised inflammatory markers. An inflammatory fibrotic reaction caused by cabergoline was diagnosed. He improved after cessation of cabergoline. PMID:15253989

  17. Thoracoscopic pericardiectomy for constrictive pericarditis in a pediatric patient with mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Christov, Georgi; Burch, Michael; Andrews, Rachel; Hurst, Jane; Ashworth, Michael; Mustafa, Muhammad; Muthialu, Nagarajan

    2013-10-01

    Mulibrey nanism is a rare autosomal recessive disease with multisystem involvement. Clinical deterioration is most often related to cardiac involvement in the form of restrictive or constrictive disorders, and pericardiectomy may be required. We report a case of Mulibrey nanism in a patient of non-Finnish origin, where a thoracoscopic pericardiectomy helped in good palliation and clinical recovery.

  18. Constrictive pericarditis causing a positive TI-201 SPECT stress test for myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.J.; Lightfoote, J.; Grusd, R.S. )

    1990-08-01

    A case of constritive pericarditis was demonstrated by a positive thallium SPECT stress test for myocardial ischemia. After pericardiectomy, the repeat thallium stress test was normal. The disappearance of the criteria for a positive test suggests that constrictive pericarditis can cause myocardial ischemia, which can be demonstrated by thallium SPECT stress testing.

  19. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  20. Does pupil constriction under blue and green monochromatic light exposure change with age?

    PubMed Central

    Daneault, Véronique; Vandewalle, Gilles; Hébert, Marc; Teikari, Petteri; Mure, Ludovic S.; Doyon, Julien; Gronfier, Claude; Cooper, Howard M.; Dumont, Marie; Carrier, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Many non-visual functions are regulated by light through a photoreceptive system involving melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells that are maximally sensitive to blue light. Several studies have suggested that the ability of light to modulate circadian entrainment and to induce acute effects on melatonin secretion, subjective alertness and gene expression, decreases during aging, particularly for blue light. This could contribute to the documented changes in sleep and circadian regulatory processes with aging. However, age-related modification in the impact of light on steady-state pupil constriction, which regulates the amount of light reaching the retina, is not demonstrated. We measured pupil size in 16 young (22.8±4y) and 14 older (61±4.4y) healthy subjects during 45s exposures to blue (480nm) and green (550nm) monochromatic lights at low (7×1012 photons/cm2/s), medium (3×1013 photons/cm2/s), and high (1014 photons/cm2/s) irradiance levels. Results showed that young subjects had consistently larger pupils than older subjects, for dark adaptation and during all light exposures. Steady-state pupil constriction was greater under blue than green light exposure in both age groups and increased with increasing irradiance. Surprisingly, when expressed in relation to baseline pupil size, no significant age-related differences were observed in pupil constriction. The observed reduction in pupil size in older individuals, both in darkness and during light exposure, may reduce retinal illumination and consequently affect non-visual responses to light. The absence of a significant difference between age groups for relative steady-state pupil constriction suggests that other factors such as tonic, sympathetic control of pupil dilation, rather than light sensitivity per se, account for the observed age difference in pupil size regulation. Compared to other nonvisual functions, the light sensitivity of steady-state pupil constriction appears to remain relatively

  1. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  2. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  3. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  4. Unveiling unusual features of formation of septal partition and constriction in mycobacteria--an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Anand, Deepak; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2012-02-01

    The ultrastructural functions of the electron-dense glycopeptidolipid-containing outermost layer (OL), the arabinogalactan-mycolic acid-containing electron-transparent layer (ETL), and the electron-dense peptidoglycan layer (PGL) of the mycobacterial cell wall in septal growth and constriction are not clear. Therefore, using transmission electron microscopy, we studied the participation of the three layers in septal growth and constriction in the fast-growing saprophytic species Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow-growing pathogenic species Mycobacterium xenopi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in order to document the processes in a comprehensive and comparative manner and to find out whether the processes are conserved across different mycobacterial species. A complete septal partition is formed first by the fresh synthesis of the septal PGL (S-PGL) and septal ETL (S-ETL) from the envelope PGL (E-PGL) in M. smegmatis and M. xenopi. The S-ETL is not continuous with the envelope ETL (E-ETL) due to the presence of the E-PGL between them. The E-PGL disappears, and the S-ETL becomes continuous with the E-ETL, when the OL begins to grow and invaginate into the S-ETL for constriction. However, in M. tuberculosis, the S-PGL and S-ETL grow from the E-PGL and E-ETL, respectively, without a separation between the E-ETL and S-ETL by the E-PGL, in contrast to the process in M. smegmatis and M. xenopi. Subsequent growth and invagination of the OL into the S-ETL of the septal partition initiates and completes septal constriction in M. tuberculosis. A model for the conserved sequential process of mycobacterial septation, in which the formation of a complete septal partition is followed by constriction, is presented. The probable physiological significance of the process is discussed. The ultrastructural features of septation and constriction in mycobacteria are unusually different from those in the well-studied organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

  5. Loss of the Hyaluronan Receptor RHAMM Prevents Constrictive Artery Wall Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xue; Pearce, Jeffrey D.; Wilson, David B.; English, William P.; Edwards, Matthew S.; Geary, Randolph L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Constrictive extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling contributes significantly to restenosis after arterial reconstruction but its molecular regulation is poorly defined. Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates within ECM at sites of injury where it is thought to facilitate smooth muscle cell (SMC) trafficking and collagen remodeling analogous to its role in cutaneous wound healing. SMC receptors for HA include receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility (RHAMM), which mediates HA-induced migration. We hypothesized RHAMM would also mediate SMC-matrix interactions to alter extent of constrictive remodeling. Methods We studied the role of RHAMM in SMC attachment to collagen, migration, and contraction of collagen gels using blocking antibodies and SMC from RHAMM−/− knockout mice (rKO). We then determined the role of RHAMM in constrictive artery wall remodeling by comparing changes in wall geometry in rKO versus wild-type +/+ (WT) controls 1 month after carotid ligation. Results HA increased SMC attachment to collagen-coated plates but blocking RHAMM reduced adhesion (p=0.025). rKO SMC also demonstrated reduced adhesion (% adherent: 36.1±2.2 vs. 76.3±1.9, p< 0.05). SMC contraction of collagen gels was enhanced by HA and further increased by RHAMM blockade (p< 0.01) or knockout (gel diameter, mm: rKO, 6.7±0.1 vs. WT, 9.8±0.1, p=0.015). RHAMM promoted constrictive remodeling in vivo as carotid artery size was significantly larger in rKO mice 1 month after ligation. Neointimal thickening however was not affected in rKO (p=NS vs WT) but lumen size was significantly larger (lumen area, μm2: 52.4±1.4 × 103 vs. 10.4±1.8 × 103, p=0.01) because artery size constricted less (EEL area, μm2: rKO, 92.4±4.7×103 vs. WT, 51.3±5.9 × 103, p=0.015). Adventitial thickening and collagen deposition were also more extensive in ligated rKO carotids (adventitial thickness, μm: 218±12.2 vs. 109±7.9, p=0.01). Conclusion HA activation of RHAMM significantly impacts SMC

  6. Enhanced central and conduit pulmonary arterial reservoir function offsets reduced ductal systolic outflow during constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Smolich, Joseph J; Penny, Daniel J; Mynard, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus (DA) has disparate effects on mean and phasic hemodynamics, as mean DA blood flow is preserved until constriction is severe, but DA systolic and diastolic blood velocities change with only mild constriction. To determine the basis of this disparity and its physiological significance, seven anesthetized late-gestation fetal sheep were instrumented with pulmonary trunk (PT), DA, and left pulmonary artery (PA) micromanometer catheters and transit-time flow probes. Blood flow profile and wave intensity analyses were performed at baseline and during mild, moderate, and severe DA constriction (defined as pulmonary-aortic mean pressure differences of 4, 8, and 14 mmHg, respectively), produced with an adjustable snare. With DA constriction, mean DA flow was initially maintained but decreased with severe constriction (P < 0.05) in conjunction with a reduction (P < 0.05) in PT flow (i.e., right ventricular output). By contrast, DA systolic flow fell progressively during DA constriction (P < 0.001), due to decreased transmission of both early and midsystolic proximal flow-enhancing forward-running compression waves into the DA. However, DA constriction was also accompanied by greater systolic storage of blood in the PT and main PA (P < 0.025), and increased retrograde diastolic flow from compliant major branch PA (P < 0.001). Transductal discharge of these central and conduit PA blood reservoirs in diastole offset systolic DA flow reductions. These data suggest that, during DA constriction in the fetus, enhanced central and conduit PA reservoir function constitutes an important compensatory mechanism that contributes to preservation of mean DA flow via a systolic-to-diastolic redistribution of phasic DA flow.

  7. Novel filaments 5 nm in diameter constitute the cytosolic ring of the plastid division apparatus.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, S; Takahara, M; Kuroiwa, T

    2001-03-01

    The plastid division apparatus (called the plastid-dividing ring) has been detected in several plant and algal species at the constricted region of plastids by transmission electron microscopy. The apparatus is composed of two or three rings: an outer ring in the cytosol, an inner ring in the stroma, and a middle ring in the intermembrane space. The components of these rings are not clear. FtsZ, which forms the bacterial cytokinetic ring, has been proposed as a component of both the inner and outer rings. Here, we present the ultrastructure of the outer ring at high resolution. To visualize the outer ring by negative staining, we isolated dividing chloroplasts from a synchronized culture of a red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and lysed them with nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. Nonidet P-40 extracted primarily stroma, thylakoids, and the inner and middle rings, leaving the envelope and outer ring largely intact. Negative staining revealed that the outer ring consists of a bundle of 5-nm filaments in which globular proteins are spaced 4.8 nm apart. Immunoblotting using an FtsZ-specific antibody failed to show immunoreactivity in the fraction containing the filament. Moreover, the filament structure and properties are unlike those of known cytoskeletal filaments. The bundle of filaments forms a very rigid structure and does not disassemble in 2 M urea. We also identified a dividing phase-specific 56-kD protein of chloroplasts as a candidate component of the ring. Our results suggest that the main architecture of the outer ring did not descend from cyanobacteria during the course of endosymbiosis but was added by the host cell early in plant evolution.

  8. The pleckstrin-homology domain of dynamin is dispensable for membrane constriction and fission

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Srishti; Pucadyil, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Classical dynamins bind the plasma membrane–localized phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate using the pleckstrin-homology domain (PHD) and engage in rapid membrane fission during synaptic vesicle recycling. This domain is conspicuously absent among extant bacterial and mitochondrial dynamins, however, where loop regions manage membrane recruitment. Inspired by the core design of bacterial and mitochondrial dynamins, we reengineered the classical dynamin by replacing its PHD with a polyhistidine or polylysine linker. Remarkably, when recruited via chelator or anionic lipids, respectively, the reengineered dynamin displayed the capacity to constrict and sever membrane tubes. However, when analyzed at single-event resolution, the tube-severing process displayed long-lived, highly constricted prefission intermediates that contributed to 10-fold reduction in bulk rates of membrane fission. Our results indicate that the PHD acts as a catalyst in dynamin-induced membrane fission and rationalize its adoption to meet the physiologic requirement of a fast-acting membrane fission apparatus. PMID:28035046

  9. An optofluidic constriction chip for monitoring metastatic potential and drug response of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez Vazquez, R; Nava, G; Veglione, M; Yang, T; Bragheri, F; Minzioni, P; Bianchi, E; Di Tano, M; Chiodi, I; Osellame, R; Mondello, C; Cristiani, I

    2015-04-01

    Cellular mechanical properties constitute good markers to characterize tumor cells, to study cell population heterogeneity and to highlight the effect of drug treatments. In this work, we describe the fabrication and validation of an integrated optofluidic chip capable of analyzing cellular deformability on the basis of the pressure gradient needed to push a cell through a narrow constriction. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to discriminate between tumorigenic and metastatic breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB231) and between human melanoma cells with different metastatic potential (A375P and A375MC2). Moreover, we show that this chip allows highlighting the effect of drugs interfering with microtubule organization (paclitaxel, combretastatin A-4 and nocodazole) on cancer cells, which leads to changes in the pressure-gradient required to push cells through the constriction. Our single-cell microfluidic device for mechanical evaluation is compact and easy to use, allowing for an extensive use in different laboratory environments.

  10. Two-dimensional speckle tracking cardiac mechanics and constrictive pericarditis: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta; Teixeira, Rogério; Costa, Marco; Gonçalves, Lino; Klein, Allan L

    2016-10-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography has a pivotal role in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis (CP). In addition to the classic M-mode, two-dimensional and Doppler indices, newer methodologies designed to evaluate myocardial mechanics, such as two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2DSTE), provide additional diagnostic and clinical information in the context of CP. Research has demonstrated that cardiac mechanics can improve echocardiographic diagnostic accuracy of CP and aid in differentiating between constrictive and restrictive ventricular physiology. 2DSTE can also be used to assess the success of pericardiectomy and its impact on atrial and ventricular mechanics. In the course of this review, we describe cardiac mechanics in patients with CP and summarize the influence of pericardiectomy on atrial and ventricular mechanics assessed using 2DSTE.

  11. Experimental study of sound production for constricted channels: application to simplified vocal tract geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estienne, O.; van Hirtum, A.; Bailliet, H.; Pelorson, X.

    Previous experiments on vocal tract mechanical models for fricatives consonants production -like /s/, /f/,/ch/ for unvoiced ones -has shown the importance of the geometrical configuration on the complex aeroacoustical noise signal produced [3]: the shape of the constriction, the shape and area function of the vocal tract downstream of the constriction, the presence of obstacles like teeth and upstream flow conditions are key points of the frication. From these results, and other observations made on human subjects by Narayanan et al. [2] by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Howe and McGowan [1] established an aeroacoustical model for the pronunciation of the sibilant /s/ based on the assumption of a jet passing in the gap formed between lower and upper teeth. Predicted spectrum and SPL agreed reasonably well with measurements made previously by different authors, but Howe and McGowan noted that further experimental work is necessary to validate their assumption on turbulent jet interaction with teeth.

  12. Effect of couple stresses on the pulsatile flow through a constricted annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.; Srikanth, D.

    2008-11-01

    In this Note, the pulsatile flow of an incompressible couple stress fluid through an annulus with mild constriction at the outer wall is considered. This configuration is intended as a simple model for studying blood flow in a stenosed artery when a catheter is inserted into it. An analytical expression in terms of Bessel functions of the first and second kind is obtained for the velocity component. The impedance (resistance to the flow) and wall shear stress are calculated and their variation with respect to the couple stress fluid parameter, height of the constriction and size of the catheter on the impedance and wall shear stress is studied graphically. It is observed that increase in the catheter size increases the resistance to the flow as well as the wall shear stress while the trend is reversed in case of couple stress fluid parameter. To cite this article: D. Srinivasacharya, D. Srikanth, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  13. The effect of gradually constricted channel on the I-V characteristics of graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, Fernando; Nobrega, K. Z.; Dartora, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    Ideal graphene is a gapless semiconductor consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms regularly arranged in a honeycomb lattice having infinite spatial extent in the (x,y)-plane, in which electrons behave as Dirac massless fermions. Even neglecting interactions with the anchoring substrate, a graphene sheet in real world has finite extent, leading to distinctive features in the conductivity of a given sample. In this letter we study the effect of a gradual channel constriction in graphene nanoribbons on their I-V characteristics, using non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The constriction width and the border cutting angle are the main parameters to be varied. We found that transmission through the channel is considerably affected by these parameters, presenting sharp peaks at specific energies, which can be attributed to a resonance due to the tuning of energy eigenvalues.

  14. [Restrictive cardiomyopathy versus constrictive pericarditis in patients with diastolic dysfunction: MR imaging features].

    PubMed

    Croisille, P

    2010-05-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathies are characterized by diastolic dysfunction while systolic function is usually preserved. MRI is helpful by its ability to characterize tissues, especially the demonstration of interstitial or nodular fibrosis based on the underlying etiology. In the presence of constrictive pericarditis from pericardial inflammation, fibrosis or calcifications, diastolic expansion is impaired resulting in poor diastolic ventricular filling, resulting in a characteristic type of diastolic impairment, adiastole. MRI can demonstrate the underlying anatomical lesion: pericardial thickening, though the presence of a pericardium or normal thickness does not entirely exclude the possibility of constriction. As such, the presence of additional imaging features such as abnormal right ventricular shape, vena cava dilatation, and paradoxical movement of the intraventricular septum, during operator-guided deep respiration.

  15. Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Presenting as Constrictive Pericarditis: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nabati, Maryam; Yosofnezhad, Keyvan; Taghavi, Morteza; Abbasi, Ali; Ghaemian, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis (CP) is an uncommon post inflammatory disorder. It is described as pericardial thickening, myocardial constriction, and impaired diastolic filling. The most common etiologies are idiopathy, mediastinal radiotherapy, and prior cardiac surgery. Less common etiologies include viral infections, collagen vascular disorders, renal failure, sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, and blunt chest trauma. CP can less commonly be caused by malignancy. We report a very rare case of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) presenting twice with attacks of decompensated heart failure. Echocardiography revealed that CP was responsible for the patient's symptoms as the first manifestation of NHL. Chest computed tomography scan and biopsy findings were compatible with the diagnosis of NHL. The patient received R-CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin®, and prednisone or prednisolone, combined with the monoclonal antibody rituximab) chemotherapy. Three months later, there was significant improvement in the patient’s symptoms and considerable decrease in pericardial thickness. PMID:27928262

  16. Diastolic heart failure: restrictive cardiomyopathy, constrictive pericarditis, and cardiac tamponade: clinical and echocardiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Asher, Craig R; Klein, Allan L

    2002-01-01

    An understanding of the basic principles of diastolic function is important in order to recognize diseases that may result in diastolic dysfunction and diastolic heart failure. Although uncommon, restrictive cardiomyopathy, constrictive pericarditis, and cardiac tamponade are among the disorders that may affect primarily diastolic function with preservation of systolic function. Diastolic heart failure may manifest with chronic nonspecific symptoms or may present with acute hemodynamic compromise. Echocardiography plays a vital role in the diagnosis of diastolic dysfunction and differentiation of these disease processes. It also provides a basis for clinical decisions regarding management and surgical referral. This review summarizes the clinical features, pathophysiology, and hemodynamic and echocardiographic signs of restrictive cardiomyopathy, constrictive pericarditis, and cardiac tamponade.

  17. Thermal constriction resistance of sphere/layered flat contacts: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, N.J. ); Yovanovich, M.M. )

    1989-05-01

    The effect of surface layers on the thermal constriction resistance of contacts is of interest to the thermal analyst. This paper investigates analytically and experimentally the thermomechanical problem of a sphere in elastic contact with a flat plate coated with a layer. An approximate solution is developed that utilizes the solution to the thermal portion of the problem and the Hertzian limits of the mechanical portion. The approximation shows good agreement with the full solution for two examples that represent extremes in elastic properties for common metallics. Thermal constriction resistance measurements for a steel sphere contacting a nickel flat coated with a silver layer are compared to theoretical predictions. Resistance predictions from both full and approximate solutions show good agreement with measurements for light loads within the elastic load range. For heavy loads, the resistance is over-predicted due to plastic yielding of the nickel substrate.

  18. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  19. Diaphragm arterioles are less responsive to alpha1- adrenergic constriction than gastrocnemius arterioles.

    PubMed

    Aaker, Aaron; Laughlin, M H

    2002-05-01

    The sympathetic nervous system has greater influence on vascular resistance in low-oxidative, fast-twitch skeletal muscle than in high-oxidative skeletal muscle (17). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that arterioles isolated from low-oxidative, fast-twitch skeletal muscle [the white portion of gastrocnemius (WG)] possess greater responsiveness to adrenergic constriction than arterioles isolated from high-oxidative skeletal muscle [red portion of the gastrocnemius muscle (RG) and diaphragm (Dia)]. Second-order arterioles (2As) were isolated from WG, RG, and Dia of rats and reactivity examined in vitro. Results reveal that Dia 2As constrict less to norepinephrine (NE) (10(-9) to 10 (-4) M) than 2As from RG and WG, which exhibited similar NE-induced constrictions. This difference was not endothelium dependent, because responses of denuded 2As were similar to those of intact arterioles. The blunted NE-induced constrictor response of Dia 2As appears to be the result of differences in alpha1-receptor effects because 1) arterioles from Dia also responded less to selective alpha1-receptor stimulation with phenylephrine than RG and WG arterioles; 2) arterioles from Dia, RG, and WG dilated similarly to isoproterenol (10(-9) to 10(-4) M) and did not respond to selective alpha2-receptor stimulation with UK-14304; and 3) endothelin-1 produced similar constriction in 2As from Dia, RG, and WG. We conclude that differences in oxidative capacity and/or fiber type composition of muscle tissue do not explain different NE responsiveness of Dia 2As compared with 2As from gastrocnemius muscle. Differences in alpha1-adrenergic constrictor responsiveness among arterioles in skeletal muscle may contribute to nonuniform muscle blood flow responses observed during exercise and serve to maintain blood flow to Dia during exercise-induced increases in sympathetic nerve activity.

  20. Correlation of relaxation dynamics and conductivity spectra with cation constriction in ion-conducting glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2002-06-01

    Relaxation dynamics of Ag+ ions and scaling of the conductivity spectra in lead bismuthate glasses of different compositions have been investigated in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 2 MHz and in the temperature range from 83 K to just below glass transition temperature. We have observed that relaxation dynamics and the frequency exponent depend on the cation constriction. We have also observed that the scaling of the conductivity spectra obeys time-temperature superposition principle, but it is dependent on composition.

  1. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L.; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W.; Bukiya, Anna N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from “energy drinks”) continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40–70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS−/−) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  2. [Painless myocardial ischemia in patient with extensive constrictive atherosclerosis of coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Oshchepkova, E V; Lazareva, N V

    2012-01-01

    We describe in this article a clinical case of a patient with arterial hypertension, painless myocardial ischemia and extensive constrictive atherosclerosis of coronary arteries. Coronary heart disease (painless ischemia) was suspected basing on results of transesophageal electrostimulation coupled with stress echocardiography and was confirmed by coronary angiography. This description is followed by discussion of possibilities of different instrumental methods in diagnostics of painless ischemia, classification of painless ischemia, treatment, and prognosis.

  3. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  4. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  5. Sick sinus syndrome as a complication of mediastinal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjola-Sintonen, S.; Toetterman, K.J.K.; Kupari, M. )

    1990-06-01

    A 33-year-old man who had received mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease 12 years earlier developed a symptomatic sick sinus syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. The sick sinus syndrome and a finding of an occult constrictive pericarditis were considered to be due to the previous mediastinal irradiation. A ventricular pacemaker was chosen because mediastinal radiotherapy also increases the risk of developing atrioventricular conduction defects.

  6. FtsZ does not initiate membrane constriction at the onset of division

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Daniel O.; Skoglund, Ulf; Söderström, Bill

    2016-01-01

    The source of constriction required for division of a bacterial cell remains enigmatic. FtsZ is widely believed to be a key player, because in vitro experiments indicate that it can deform liposomes when membrane tethered. However in vivo evidence for such a role has remained elusive as it has been challenging to distinguish the contribution of FtsZ from that of peptidoglycan-ingrowth. To differentiate between these two possibilities we studied the early stages of division in Escherichia coli, when FtsZ is present at the division site but peptidoglycan synthesizing enzymes such as FtsI and FtsN are not. Our approach was to use correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM) to monitor the localization of fluorescently labeled FtsZ, FtsI or FtsN correlated with the septal ultra-structural geometry in the same cell. We noted that the presence of FtsZ at the division septum is not sufficient to deform membranes. This observation suggests that, although FtsZ can provide a constrictive force, the force is not substantial at the onset of division. Conversely, the presence of FtsN always correlated with membrane invagination, indicating that allosteric activation of peptidoglycan ingrowth is the trigger for constriction of the cell envelope during cell division in E. coli. PMID:27609565

  7. Chirality dependent pinning and depinning of magnetic vortex domain walls at nano-constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanan P, Vineeth; Kumar, P. S. Anil

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of magnetic domain wall (DW) based memory and logic devices critically depend on the control over DW assisted magnetization reversal processes. Here we investigate the magnetization reversal by DW injection, pinning and depinning at a geometrical constriction in permalloy nanowire (NW) driven by external in-plane magnetic field, using local electrical probes. The observations of two distinct depinning field values are identified with the help of micromagnetic simulations, as being due to vortex DWs of different chiralities. Statistical analysis gave an estimate of chirality dependent pinning probability of DWs at this constriction. The stochastic nature of the DW based reversal driven by magnetic field is revealed here. The asymmetry in the depinning field of the DWs to move to either side of constriction indicates the asymmetric nature of the barrier potential seen by the DWs. The results demonstrate the difficulties in achieving deterministic switching behavior of DW assisted reversal, and provide a platform to understand the main bottlenecks in the technological implementation of DWs.

  8. Constrictive pericarditis, still a diagnostic challenge: comprehensive review of clinical management.

    PubMed

    Schwefer, Markus; Aschenbach, Rene; Heidemann, Jan; Mey, Celia; Lapp, Harald

    2009-09-01

    The diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis (CP) continues to be a challenge in the modern era. Understanding the pathophysiology and integrating the results of invasive and non-invasive techniques are important in the differential diagnosis of CP and e.g. restrictive cardiomyopathy. New echocardiographic techniques such as tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and 2D-speckle tracking, dual-source CT (computed tomographic imaging) and especially tagged cine-MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) with the analysis of phase contrast angiography sequences are promising novel approaches. Pericardiectomy in experienced centers with complete decortication (if technically feasible) is the treatment of choice for CP and it results in symptomatic relief in most patients. However, some patients may not benefit from pericardiectomy and this may be due to myocardial compliance abnormalities, myocardial atrophy after prolonged constriction, residual constriction or other myocardial processes. An important predictor of long-term outcome after pericardiectomy is the etiology of the pericardial disease. The overall mortality in the current literature is nearly 5-6%. Survival with post-surgical CP is worse than with idiopathic CP, but significantly better than with post-radiation CP.

  9. [Work-up and management of constrictive pericarditis: a critical review].

    PubMed

    Pinamonti, Bruno; Habjan, Sara; De Luca, Antonio; Proclemer, Alberto; Morea, Gaetano; Abate, Elena; Vitrella, Giancarlo; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-03-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is a rare pericardial disorder that causes an impairment of cardiac filling and frequently heart failure. The clinical presentation is non-specific and the differential diagnosis includes myocardial diseases, particularly restrictive cardiomyopathy. Echocardiography has a central role in the initial diagnosis. Some peculiar signs, such as abnormal inspiratory shift of the interventricular septum, increased respiratory variations of transmitral, transtricuspid and hepatic vein flow velocities and the normality of early diastolic relaxation velocity (e') at tissue Doppler, increase the likelihood of the disease. These signs are an expression of increased ventricular interdependence and dissociation between intrathoracic and intracardiac pressures typical of pericardial constriction. For further diagnosis, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are used to identify the presence of pericardial thickening. Invasive cardiac catheterization is indicated in dubious cases and in the assessment of the severity of hemodynamic abnormalities, especially in cases with surgical indication. Pericardiectomy is indicated in symptomatic patients meeting the diagnostic criteria of constrictive pericarditis and is able to improve the prognosis.

  10. Constriction structures related to viscous collision, southern Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvino, Adrian F.; Boger, Steven D.; Fay, Clement

    2016-09-01

    Macroscopic structures are investigated in a zone of highly contorted migmatites from the southern Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica. Here, L-tectonite fabrics, rods, mullions, boudin pods, elongate enclaves, and fold hinges, are persistent linear features all plunging gently to the northeast. In contrast, amoeboid folds, ptygmatic folds and folded boudins with different orientations are the characteristic structures in transverse sections (perpendicular to the lineation). No consistent shear sense is recognised in any dimension. Together with strain and shape analysis, these observations strongly suggest that the deformation pattern is one of folding and stretching by constriction. Previous timing constraints indicate that this deformation overlapped with the waning stages of anatexis during decompression at approximately 510 Ma, up to 30 million years after initial orogeny at 540 Ma. The zone affected by constriction is several kilometres wide and has a contorted flower-like shape confined between two broad domal antiforms. In this context, the constricted zone is interpreted as a relatively late tectonic feature that could have formed via deep-seated viscous collision in response to orogenic collapse and doming.

  11. Possible oriented transition of multiple-emulsion globules with asymmetric internal structures in a microfluidic constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingtao; Li, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xiaoyong; Guan, Jing

    2014-05-01

    When a globule with a complete symmetry (such as simple spherical droplets and concentric double emulsions) is transiting in a constriction tube, there is only one pattern of the transition. However, for a multiple-emulsion globule with asymmetric internal structures, there are many possible patterns with different pressure drops Δp due to various initial orientations of the inner droplets. In this paper, a boundary integral method developed recently is employed to investigate numerically the possible oriented transition of a globule with two unequal inner droplets in an axisymmetric microfluidic constriction. The transition is driven by an axisymmetric Poiseuille flow with a fixed volume flow rate, and the rheological behaviors of the globule are observed carefully. When the big inner droplet is initially located in the front of the globule, the maximum pressure drop during the transition is always lower than that when it is initially placed in the rear. Thus, a tropism—whereby a globule more easily gets through the constriction when its bigger inner droplet locates in its front initially—might exist, in which the orientating stimulus is the required pressure drops. The physical explanation of this phenomenon has also been analyzed in this paper.

  12. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  13. Combination of Mandibular Constriction and Intraoral Vertical Ramus Osteotomies for a Transverse Jaw Discrepancy

    PubMed Central

    Mitsugi, Masaharu; Hirose, Hisamitsu; Tatemoto, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the treatment of patients developing a transverse jaw width discrepancy who exhibited class III malocclusion and/or facial asymmetry by a combination of mandibular constriction (MC) and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomies (IVROs). Subjects and methods: In a retrospective study, functional results, postoperative complications, and skeletal stability were analyzed for all the patients who had undergone MC and IVRO, with more than 2 years of follow-up. A mandibular midline osteotomy for constriction with lag screw technique and IVROs was used for MC and setback. Results: Sixteen patients were included in the present study. The average degree of MC was 6.34 mm. Both the occlusal relationship and facial appearance in all patients were significantly improved by the surgical orthodontic treatment, with no harmful clinical symptoms. In addition, our original MC using lag screw technique provided the most reliable results in terms of skeletal stability. Conclusions: This study showed that MC using lag screw technique gives a very stable mandibular width constriction, and the combination of MC and IVROs offers a promising treatment alternative for patients with mandibular prognathism developing a transverse jaw width discrepancy. PMID:26495234

  14. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-07

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  15. Successful application of a PressureWire retrogradely across an ATS prosthetic aortic valve to diagnose constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sonny; Mariani, Justin A; Newcomb, Andrew; Stokes, Michael B; Burns, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the left ventricular pressure measured across an aortic valve prosthesis is occasionally necessary when noninvasive imaging and Doppler echocardiographic data are inconclusive or differ from the clinical findings for specific scenarios, such as diagnosing constrictive or restrictive physiology. We present a case in which we safely and effectively replicate the previous successful application of a PressureWire in diagnosing constrictive pericarditis in a patient with a bileafltet mechanical aortic and mitral valves.

  16. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  17. On certain Hecke rings

    PubMed Central

    Evens, Sam; Bressler, Paul

    1987-01-01

    We examine rings that embed into the smash product of the group algebra of the Weyl group with the field of meromorphic functions on the Cartan subalgebra and are generated by elements that satisfy braid relations. We prove that every such ring is isomorphic to either the Hecke algebra, the nil Hecke ring, or the group algebra of the Weyl group. PMID:16593804

  18. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  19. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  20. Soft normed rings.

    PubMed

    Uluçay, Vakkas; Şahin, Mehmet; Olgun, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft normed rings by soft set theory. The notions of soft normed rings, soft normed ideals, soft complete normed rings are introduced and also several related properties and examples are given.

  1. Chronic constriction injury-induced nociception is relieved by nanomedicine-mediated decrease of rat hippocampal tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Elizabeth; Spengler, Robert N; Bonoiu, Adela C; Mahajan, Supriya D; Davidson, Bruce A; Ding, Hong; Kumar, Rajiv; Prasad, Paras N; Knight, Paul R; Ignatowski, Tracey A

    2015-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain syndrome that arises from nerve injury. Current treatments only offer limited relief, clearly indicating the need for more effective therapeutic strategies. Previously, we demonstrated that proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a key mediator of neuropathic pain pathogenesis; TNF is elevated at sites of neuronal injury, in the spinal cord, and supraspinally during the initial development of pain. The inhibition of TNF action along pain pathways outside higher brain centers results in transient decreases in pain perception. The objective of this study was to determine whether specific blockade of TNF in the hippocampus, a site of pain integration, could prove efficacious in reducing sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced pain behavior. Small inhibitory RNA directed against TNF mRNA was complexed to gold nanorods (GNR-TNF siRNA; TNF nanoplexes) and injected into the contralateral hippocampus of rats 4 days after unilateral CCI. Withdrawal latencies to a noxious thermal stimulus (hyperalgesia) and withdrawal to innocuous forces (allodynia) were recorded up to 10 days and compared with baseline values and sham-operated rats. Thermal hyperalgesia was dramatically decreased in CCI rats receiving hippocampal TNF nanoplexes; and mechanical allodynia was transiently relieved. TNF levels (bioactive protein, TNF immunoreactivity) in hippocampal tissue were decreased. The observation that TNF nanoplex injection into the hippocampus alleviated neuropathic pain-like behavior advances our previous findings that hippocampal TNF levels modulate pain perception. These data provide evidence that targeting TNF in the brain using nanoparticle-protected siRNA may be an effective strategy for treatment of neuropathic pain.

  2. Is alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction an effective protocol in the treatment of Class III malocclusion? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Santos, Nathalia de Lima; dos Santos, Camila Rangel Barreto; Baião, Felipe Carvalho Souza; Pinheiro, Murilo Costa Rangel; Matos, Manoel; Souza, Ianderlei Andrade; de Paula, Rafael Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: the treatment of Class III malocclusion in early age is one of the greatest challenges for orthodontists, and the establishment of more effective treatment method is a constant concern for these professionals. Thus, the objective of this systematic review is to verify the effectiveness of the therapy protocol for alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC) in the early treatment of Class III malocclusion. Methods: searches were performed in the following electronic databases: Cochrane Library, Medline (EBSCO and PubMed), SciELO, LILACS and Scopus. The following inclusion criteria were used: in vivo studies conducted with early intervention (patient in craniofacial development phase) with the use of the Alt-RAMEC protocol. Reviews, case reports, editorials, and studies with syndromic patients or under use of systemic drug were excluded. Duplicates were also excluded. The studies were assessed for methodological quality using the Cochrane tool for assessment of risk of bias, and classified as high or low risk of bias. Results: 53 articles were found. Duplicates exclusion was thus performed and 35 articles remained. After inclusion analysis, only 5 matched the criteria. Two articles were classified as low risk of bias and three as high risk of bias. It was observed that the Alt-RAMEC enable protraction in less time and with better results, promoting greater effectiveness in the protraction treatment of Class III malocclusion. Conclusions: Although there is positive evidence of the effectiveness of early treatment with the Alt-RAMEC protocol in patients with Class III malocclusion, further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness using long-term methodology. PMID:28125138

  3. Molecular organization of cytokinesis nodes and contractile rings by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of live fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Caroline; Huang, Fang; Tebbs, Irene R.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in animals, fungi, and amoebas depends on the constriction of a contractile ring built from a common set of conserved proteins. Many fundamental questions remain about how these proteins organize to generate the necessary tension for cytokinesis. Using quantitative high-speed fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM), we probed this question in live fission yeast cells at unprecedented resolution. We show that nodes, protein assembly precursors to the contractile ring, are discrete structural units with stoichiometric ratios and distinct distributions of constituent proteins. Anillin Mid1p, Fes/CIP4 homology-Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) Cdc15p, IQ motif containing GTPase-activating protein (IQGAP) Rng2p, and formin Cdc12p form the base of the node that anchors the ends of myosin II tails to the plasma membrane, with myosin II heads extending into the cytoplasm. This general node organization persists in the contractile ring where nodes move bidirectionally during constriction. We observed the dynamics of the actin network during cytokinesis, starting with the extension of short actin strands from nodes, which sometimes connected neighboring nodes. Later in cytokinesis, a broad network of thick bundles coalesced into a tight ring around the equator of the cell. The actin ring was ∼125 nm wide and ∼125 nm thick. These observations establish the organization of the proteins in the functional units of a cytokinetic contractile ring. PMID:27647921

  4. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  5. On the solar dust ring(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.

    Based on a mechanism to form the solar dust ring, it is proved that the observed peak in infrared F-corona cannot be explained by silicate type grains alone. Preliminary analysis on the recent infrared data of the F-corona by Maihara et al. (1984) has suggested that the ring particles have different physical properties compared with the dust grains, which produce the background F-corona.

  6. Pericarditis - constrictive

    MedlinePlus

    ... slowly and gets worse Fatigue Long-term swelling ( edema ) of the legs and ankles Swollen abdomen Weakness ... Damage to the coronary arteries Heart failure Pulmonary edema Scarring of the heart muscle When to Contact ...

  7. Three Quantum Dots Embedded in Aharonov-Bohm Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, Ryan; Hãttel, Andreas; Goswami, Srijit; Eberl, Karl; Eriksson, Mark; van der Weide, Daniel; Blick, Robert

    2004-03-01

    Coherent coupling of two quantum dots embedded in a ring-geometry has been demonstrated by Holleitner et al.(A.W. Holleitner, H. Qin, C.R. Decker, K. Eberl, and R.H. Blick, phCoherent Coupling of Two Quantum Dots Embedded in an Aharonov-Bohm Ring), Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 256802 (2001) Recording of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in such a circuit has proven that the phases of electron wave functions can be manipulated directly. We have since enhanced the complexity of this system by embedding three quantum dots in such a ring-geometry. As before, our quantum dots are formed by laterally constricting a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in an Al_xGa_1-xAs/GaAs heterostructure. The new, essential ingredient of this experiment is an additional third port--added to the ring for individually addressing the third quantum dot. This circuit allows us to investigate phenomena associated with phase-switching between separate ports. We will discuss first results and give a simple model of circuit operation.

  8. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  9. Sources of activator calcium for potassium- and serotonin-induced constriction of isolated bovine cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    Previous in vitro studies with the calcium channel blockers (CCB) indirectly suggest that K/sup +/ and serotonin (5HT) constrict bovine middle cerebral arteries (BMCA) by promoting the influx of extracellular calcium (Ca) through CCB-sensitive channels. In this study, the authors directly determined the sources of activator Ca for K/sup +/- and 5HT-induced constriction of BMCA, using radiolabelled /sup 4/)2%Ca and /sup 3/H-sorbitol. EGTA-resistant Ca uptake, an estimate of Ca influx into vascular smooth muscle, was determined by exposure to Ca-deficient 2 mM EGTA solutions at 1/sup 0/C. The total Ca content of BMCA was 4.4 nmole/mg (wet wt.) after equilibration at 37/sup 0/C. The total exchangeable Ca content was 1.64 nmole/mg after 1 hr of /sup 45/Ca loading; the Ca content of the extracellular water was 0.30 nmole/mg, as estimated from the /sup 3/H-sorbitol space (0.25 ul/mg). The EGTA-resistant Ca uptake at 1 hr was 134 pmole/mg. K/sup +/ and 5HT significantly increased EGTA-resistant Ca uptake during 5 min of /sup 45/Ca loading; for K/sup +/, Ca uptake increased from 71 to 202 pmole/mg, and for 5HT, from 65 to 102 pmole/mg. Verapamil (10/sup -5/ M) or nifedipine (3.3 x 10/sup -7/ M) significantly blocked the increase in EGTA-resistant Ca uptake induced by K/sup +/ or 5HT. These results provide direct evidence that K/sup +/ or 5HT may constrict BMCA by promoting the influx of extracellular Ca through CCB-sensitive channels.

  10. ACUTE CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS FOLLOWING LUNG TRANSPLANTATION FOR LYMPHANGIOLEIOMYOMATOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Martha E.; Mulligan, Michael; Raghu, Ganesh

    2009-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic progressive lung disease with many extra-pulmonary manifestations which may complicate allograft function after transplantation. We present a LAM patient, one-year status-post bilateral lung transplant, with new dyspnea and declining spirometry without rejection, infection or recurrence. Investigation revealed acute constrictive pericarditis which has not previously been reported in LAM lung transplant patients. This represents a novel complication likely due to progression of extra-pulmonary LAM that should be considered in LAM transplant patients with dyspnea. PMID:19134542

  11. A critical velocity of squeezing a droplet through a circular constriction: implications on ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Drapaca, Corina

    2016-11-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for about 87 percent of all stroke cases. In these cases, models of squeezing a droplet through a smaller constriction channel can help better understand the pathology and capillary restoring after a Stroke. In the present research, we analytical expressed the minimum impulse of squeezing a droplet through a circular channel as well as its critical velocity. By comparison with a previously defined critical velocity, we find the difference between these two. Applications of this research in the understanding of ischemic stroke are also discussed. Zhifeng Zhang thanks the support of Robert A. Sebrosky Graduate Fellowship in Engineering Science and Mechanics, the Pennsylvania State University.

  12. Influence of celecoxib on the vasodilating properties of human mesenteric arteries constricted with endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    GRZEŚK, GRZEGORZ; SZADUJKIS-SZADURSKA, KATARZYNA; MATUSIAK, GRZEGORZ; MALINOWSKI, BARTOSZ; GAJDUS, MARTA; WICIŃSKI, MICHAŁ; SZADUJKIS-SZADURSKI, LESZEK

    2014-01-01

    The mitogenic and vasoconstrictive properties of the vascular system are attributed to endothelin-1 (ET-1). ET-1 serum concentration increases in a number of pathological conditions, particularly in those associated with blood vessel constriction. ET-1 is also associated with the underlying pathomechanisms of primary pulmonary hypertension, arterial hypertension and eclampsia. The aim of this study was to compare the vasodilating properties of selected phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and celecoxib in human mesenteric arteries constricted with ET-1, and investigate the role of the endothelium in relaxation. Perfused human mesenteric arteries were collected and stored under the same conditions as organs for transplantation. The mesenteric arteries (with and without the endothelium) were constricted by the addition of ET-1 and treated with one of the following: sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitor), zaprinast (PDE5 and 6 inhibitor), rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and celecoxib [cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor]. Based on the observed changes of the perfusion pressure, concentration response curves (CRCs) were prepared for the respective inhibitors and the EC50 (concentration causing an effect equal to half of the maximum effect), pD2 (negative common logarithm of EC50) and relative potency (RP) were calculated. The results suggested that all the inhibitors triggered a concentration-dependent decrease in the perfusion pressure in isolated human superior mesenteric arteries with endothelium constricted by the addition of ET-1. In the arteries without endothelium, CRCs for celecoxib and rolipram were shifted to the right without a significant decrease in the maximum dilating effect. Moreover, CRCs for sildenafil and zaprinast were shifted to the right with a simultaneous significant decrease in the maximum dilating effect and with an increased inclination angle in reference to the concentration axis. In the presence of the endothelium, all of the evaluated PDE inhibitors, as well

  13. Case report. Adult Class II malocclusion with constricted arches, excessive vertical overlap and malposed teeth.

    PubMed

    Bonk, R T

    1993-03-01

    The patient presented with constriction of both arches, moderate crowding, posterior crossbite, severe deep bite, TMJ symptoms and facial pain. The Crozat appliance therapy effectively uprighted the posterior segments and developed the arches. Alignment, leveling and development of a good functional occlusion was accomplished efficiently with the straight-wire appliance. Facial balance and good lip support was maintained. No stripping was present and the periodontal health remains excellent. An improvement was made in the patient's smile and TMJ health. The teeth have been stable during the three year period following the initial placement of retainers. And the patient is very pleased with the treatment results.

  14. Slowing of Vortex Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the slowing of vortex rings in water which are created with very thin cores. We find that these rings propagate with no measurable change in diameter or core size. The drag appears to be the result of viscous forces on the core. A simple model for this drag describes experimental data in terms of a drag coefficient, which depends only on Reynolds number. Barenghi's group at Newcastle found that the translational velocity of a ring in an inviscid fluid perturbed by Kelvin waves decreases with increasing amplitude of Kelvin waves. This suggests that the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid may well depend on the amplitude of Kelvin waves at the time of formation. Rings with substantial amplitude of Kelvin waves will be expected to move more slowly than rings with little or no Kelvin wave amplitude. We present experimental data confirming this suggestion.

  15. Small hepatic veins Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Marzano, Chiara; Papa, Alessia; Pasquale, Chiara; Gasperini, Maria Ludovica; Gigante, Antonietta; Valla, Dominique Charles; Plessier, Aurélie; Amoroso, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by hepatic venous outflow obstruction at any level from the small hepatic veins to the atrio-caval junction, in the absence of heart failure or constrictive pericarditis. Various imaging modalities are available for investigating the gross hepatic vascular anatomy but there are rare forms of this disease where the obstruction is limited to the small intrahepatic veins, with normal appearance of the large hepatic veins at imaging. In this cases only a liver biopsy can demonstrate the presence of a small vessels outflow block. We report two cases of small hepatic veins Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  16. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  17. The physical nature of the phenomenon of positive column plasma constriction in low-pressure noble gas direct current discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbatov, P. F.

    2014-02-15

    The essence of the positive-column plasma constriction for static (the diffusion mode) and dynamic ionization equilibrium (the stratificated and constricted modes) is analyzed. Two physical parameters, namely, the effective ionization rate of gas atoms and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient of electrons and ions, determine the transverse distribution of discharge species and affect the current states of plasma. Transverse constriction of the positive column takes place as the gas ionization level (discharge current) and pressure increase. The stratified mode (including the constricted one) is observed between the two adjacent types of self-sustained discharge phases when they coexist together at the same time or in the same place as a coherent binary mixture. In the case, a occurrence of the discharge phase with more high electron density presently involve a great decrease in the cross-section of the current channel for d.c. discharges. Additional physical factors, such as cataphoresis and electrophoresis phenomena and spatial gas density inhomogeneity correlated with a circulatory flow in d.c. discharges, are mainly responsible for the current hysteresis and partially constricted discharge.

  18. Saturn's E ring revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Klinglesmith, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    Images of the E ring of Saturn obtained by the image processing of photographs of the 1966 edge-on presentation of the planet's ring plane are presented. Two methods of image enhancement were used: scanning with an image quantizer operated in the derivative mode to enhance contrast and computerized subtraction of a circularly symmetric image of the overexposed Saturn disk. Further photographic and CCD observation confirming the existence of the ring extending to twice the diameter of the A ring, which was not detected by the Pioneer 11 imaging photopolarimeter, is indicated.

  19. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  20. Modified spiral wound retaining ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, A. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A spiral wound retaining ring with angled ends is described. The ring is crimped at the same angle as the ring ends to maintain a constant thickness dimension. The angling of the ends of the ring and crimp allow the ends to be positioned closer together while maintaining enough clearance to enable insertion and removal of the ring. By reducing the separation distance between the ends a stronger ring results since the double layer area of the ring is maximized.

  1. Loss of naive T cells and repertoire constriction predict poor response to vaccination in old primates.

    PubMed

    Cicin-Sain, Luka; Smyk-Pearson, Susan; Smyk-Paerson, Sue; Currier, Noreen; Byrd, Laura; Koudelka, Caroline; Robinson, Tammie; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn; Tackitt, Shane; Legasse, Alfred; Fischer, Miranda; Nikolich-Zugich, Dragana; Park, Byung; Hobbs, Theodore; Doane, Cynthia J; Mori, Motomi; Axthelm, Michael K; Axthelm, Michael T; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2010-06-15

    Aging is usually accompanied by diminished immune protection upon infection or vaccination. Although aging results in well-characterized changes in the T cell compartment of long-lived, outbred, and pathogen-exposed organisms, their relevance for primary Ag responses remain unclear. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and to what extent the loss of naive T cells, their partial replacement by oligoclonal memory populations, and the consequent constriction of TCR repertoire limit the Ag responses in aging primates. We show in this study that aging rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) exhibit poor CD8 T cell and B cell responses in the blood and poor CD8 responses in the lungs upon vaccination with the modified vaccinia strain Ankara. The function of APCs appeared to be maintained in aging monkeys, suggesting that the poor response was likely intrinsic to lymphocytes. We found that the loss of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the appearance of persisting T cell clonal expansions predicted poor CD8 responses in individual monkeys. There was strong correlation between early CD8 responses in the transitory CD28+ CD62L- CD8+ T cell compartment and the peak Ab titers upon boost in individual animals, as well as a correlation of both parameters of immune response to the frequency of naive CD8+ T cells in old but not in adult monkeys. Therefore, our results argue that T cell repertoire constriction and naive cell loss have prognostic value for global immune function in aging primates.

  2. Intraneural dexamethasone applied simultaneously to rat sciatic nerve constriction delays the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Medeiros, Daniel C; Vieira, Rafael P; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2012-02-21

    Although neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain sensitization in models of neuropathic pain have been widely studied, there are some aspects that require further investigation. Thus, we aimed to evaluate whether the local intraneural or perineural injections of dexamethasone, an efficacious anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drug, delays the development of both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in an experimental model of neuropathic pain in rats. Hargreaves and electronic von Frey tests were applied. The chronic constriction injury (CCI) of right sciatic nerve was performed. Single intraneural dexamethasone administration at the moment of constriction delayed the development of sensitization for thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. However, perineural administration of dexamethasone, at the highest dose, did not delay experimental pain development. These results show that inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is an essential trigger for the pathological changes that lead to both hyperalgesia and allodynia. In conclusion, this approach opens new opportunities to study cellular and molecular neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain derived from peripheral neuropathies.

  3. Spontaneous spin polarization and charge localization in metal nanowires: the role of a geometric constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes-Huerto, R.; Ballone, P.

    2010-07-01

    An idealized jellium model of conducting nanowires with a geometric constriction is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) in the local spin density (LSD) approximation. The results reveal a fascinating variety of spin and charge patterns arising in wires of sufficiently low (rs >= 15) average electron density, pinned at the indentation by an apparent attractive interaction with the constriction. The spin-resolved frequency-dependent conductivity shows a marked asymmetry in the two spin channels, reflecting the spontaneous spin polarization around the wire neck. The relevance of the computational results is discussed in relation to the so-called 0.7 anomaly found by experiments in the low-frequency conductivity of nanowires at near-breaking conditions (see 2008 J. Phys.: Condens Matter 20, special issue on the 0.7 anomaly). Although our mean-field approach cannot account for the intrinsic many-body effects underlying the 0.7 anomaly, it still provides a diagnostic tool to predict impending transitions in the electronic structure.

  4. Droplet shaped anode double layer and electron sheath formation in magnetically constricted anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, S.; Ranjan, M.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-01-01

    Anode double layer and droplet shaped fireball are found in a magnetically constricted anode. The disc shaped anode is constricted using permanent magnets. The device has only one anode and vacuum chamber acts as cathode. Plasma is created through glow discharge by applying high voltage between the anode and the cathode. Large size droplet shaped glow is obtained near the anode and is shown to have a double layer structure. Discharge is operated in pressure range from 5 ×10-3 mbar to 5 ×10-2 mbar keeping discharge current between 1 and 10 mA . Typical plasma density obtained near anode is 1 ×1010 cm-3 . The profile of plasma potential clearly shows two distinct regions with potential difference of 15.6 V at the boundary of anode glow. The potential difference is close to the ionization potential of Argon gas, which is used during the experiment. This distinct region is visible as bright anode glow and dark "bulk plasma" fill the chamber. This indicates the presence of the double layer formation. The role of magnetic field is also discussed in the formation of the glow, its shape, and the plasma potential profile.

  5. Deformation of a single mouse oocyte in a constricted microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Luo, ZhengYuan; Guven, Sinan; Gozen, Irep; Chen, Pu; Tasoglu, Savas; Anchan, Raymond M; Bai, BoFeng; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-10-01

    Single oocyte manipulation in microfluidic channels via precisely controlled flow is critical in microfluidic-based in vitro fertilization. Such systems can potentially minimize the number of transfer steps among containers for rinsing as often performed during conventional in vitro fertilization and can standardize protocols by minimizing manual handling steps. To study shape deformation of oocytes under shear flow and its subsequent impact on their spindle structure is essential for designing microfluidics for in vitro fertilization. Here, we developed a simple yet powerful approach to (i) trap a single oocyte and induce its deformation through a constricted microfluidic channel, (ii) quantify oocyte deformation in real-time using a conventional microscope, and (iii) retrieve the oocyte from the microfluidic device to evaluate changes in their spindle structures. We found that oocytes can be significantly deformed under high flow rates, e.g., 10 μl/min in a constricted channel with a width and height of 50 and 150 μm, respectively. Oocyte spindles can be severely damaged, as shown here by immunocytochemistry staining of the microtubules and chromosomes. The present approach can be useful to investigate underlying mechanisms of oocyte deformation exposed to well-controlled shear stresses in microfluidic channels, which enables a broad range of applications for reproductive medicine.

  6. Clinical characteristics of constrictive pericarditis diagnosed by echo-Doppler technique in Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H. S.; Song, J. K.; Song, J. M.; Kang, D. H.; Lee, C. W.; Nam, G. B.; Choi, K. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Hong, M. K.; Kim, J. J.; Park, S. W.; Park, S. J.; Song, H.; Lee, J. W.; Song, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of clinical data of 71 patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP) diagnosed by echo-Doppler technique (mean age, 49+/-17) was done. In 27 patients (38%), the etiology was unknown, and the three most frequent identifiable causes were tuberculosis (23/71, 32%), cardiac surgery (8/71, 11%), and mediastinal irradiation (6/71, 9%). Pericardiectomy was performed in 35 patients (49%) with a surgical mortality of 6% (2/35), and 11 patients (15%, 11/ 71) showed complete resolution of constrictive physiology with medical treatment. Patients with transient CP were characterized by absence of pericardial calcification, shorter symptom duration, and higher incidence of fever, weight loss, and tuberculosis. The 5-yr survival rates of patients with transient CP and those undergoing pericardiectomy were 100% and 85+/-6%, respectively, which were significantly higher than that of patients without undergoing pericardiectomy (33+/-17%, p=0.0083). Mediastinal irradiation, higher functional class, low voltage in ECG, low serum albumin, and old age were the independent variables associated with a higher mortality. Tuberculosis is still the most important etiology of CP in Korea, and not infrequently, it may cause transient CP. Early diagnosis and decision-making using follow-up echocardiography are crucial to improve the prognosis of patients with CP. PMID:11641523

  7. Local cerebral hyperthermia induces spontaneous thrombosis and arteriolar constriction in the pia mater of the mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabban, Farouk; Fahim, Mohamed A.

    1995-06-01

    The effect of local cerebral hyperthermia on responses of pial microvessels of the mouse was investigated. A set protocol was followed, involving the performance of a craniotomy on anaesthetized animals and using intravital microscope-television closed circuitry. Controlled hyperthermic exposure was applied regionally by heating the brain surface with irrigating artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Microvascular responses such as changes in diameter, thrombosis and embolism were monitored and video-taped observations were further viewed and analysed. When both brain surface and core body temperatures were kept at 37° C, no changes in pial microvessels were noted. With core body temperature kept at 37° C and at a brain surface temperature of 43.1° C, passing emboli and arteriolar constriction were observed. A few minutes later, visible thrombosis was prevalent. Further spontaneous thrombo-embolic activity continued and at the end of a 50-min hyperthermic exposure, arterioles attained a constriction of 37%. Thrombus formation was sometimes massive enough to occlude fully the microvessel. The protocol followed in this study can be adopted to other small animal species and for a variety of experimental procedures involving hyperthermia and the pial microcirculation.

  8. Kinetic modeling of the assembly, dynamic steady state, and contraction of the FtsZ ring in prokaryotic cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Surovtsev, Ivan V; Morgan, Jeffrey J; Lindahl, Paul A

    2008-07-04

    Cytokinesis in prokaryotes involves the assembly of a polymeric ring composed of FtsZ protein monomeric units. The Z ring forms at the division plane and is attached to the membrane. After assembly, it maintains a stable yet dynamic steady state. Once induced, the ring contracts and the membrane constricts. In this work, we present a computational deterministic biochemical model exhibiting this behavior. The model is based on biochemical features of FtsZ known from in vitro studies, and it quantitatively reproduces relevant in vitro data. An essential part of the model is a consideration of interfacial reactions involving the cytosol volume, where monomeric FtsZ is dispersed, and the membrane surface in the cell's mid-zone where the ring is assembled. This approach allows the same chemical model to simulate either in vitro or in vivo conditions by adjusting only two geometrical parameters. The model includes minimal reactions, components, and assumptions, yet is able to reproduce sought-after in vivo behavior, including the rapid assembly of the ring via FtsZ-polymerization, the formation of a dynamic steady state in which GTP hydrolysis leads to the exchange of monomeric subunits between cytoplasm and the ring, and finally the induced contraction of the ring. The model gives a quantitative estimate for coupling between the rate of GTP hydrolysis and of FtsZ subunit turnover between the assembled ring and the cytoplasmic pool as observed. Membrane constriction is chemically driven by the strong tendency of GTP-bound FtsZ to self-assembly. The model suggests a possible mechanism of membrane contraction without a motor protein. The portion of the free energy of GTP hydrolysis released in cyclization is indirectly used in this energetically unfavorable process. The model provides a limit to the mechanistic complexity required to mimic ring behavior, and it highlights the importance of parallel in vitro and in vivo modeling.

  9. Usefulness of the transgastric view by transesophageal echocardiography in evaluating thickened pericardium in patients with constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Chisato; Iga, Kanji; Sekiguchi, Kiyomi; Takahashi, Shuichi; Konishi, Takashi

    2002-09-01

    Detection of thickened pericardium in patients with constrictive pericarditis is essential for pericardiectomy because restrictive cardiomyopathy and severe tricuspid regurgitation show similar hemodynamic data. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether transesophageal echocardiography can evaluate thickened pericardium. We investigated 7 patients with constrictive pericarditis who underwent pericardiectomy. Thickened pericardium over the right atrium was detected in 6 patients, but the borders were not clear. Thickened pericardium over the left ventricle was not detected in any patients in the standard longitudinal and horizontal views. On the other hand, thickened pericardium over the ventricles was detected in all patients in the transgastric view as an echogenic area between the liver and ventricular wall. Tissue characteristics of the thickened pericardium could be evaluated because of the high-quality images in the transgastric view. The transgastric view by transesophageal echocardiography allows high-quality images of the pericardium, which might be useful in diagnosing constrictive pericarditis.

  10. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  11. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  12. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in diameter. It is inserted into the vagina, where it slowly releases hormones — the chemicals the body makes to control organ function — through the vaginal wall into the ...

  13. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  14. Smoke Ring Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampère's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features.

  15. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  16. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  17. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  18. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  19. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  20. Nonmedially assembled F-actin cables incorporate into the actomyosin ring in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junqi; Huang, Yinyi; Yu, Haochen; Subramanian, Dhivya; Padmanabhan, Anup; Thadani, Rahul; Tao, Yaqiong; Tang, Xie; Wedlich-Soldner, Roland

    2012-01-01

    In many eukaryotes, cytokinesis requires the assembly and constriction of an actomyosin-based contractile ring. Despite the central role of this ring in cytokinesis, the mechanism of F-actin assembly and accumulation in the ring is not fully understood. In this paper, we investigate the mechanism of F-actin assembly during cytokinesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using lifeact as a probe to monitor actin dynamics. Previous work has shown that F-actin in the actomyosin ring is assembled de novo at the division site. Surprisingly, we find that a significant fraction of F-actin in the ring was recruited from formin-Cdc12p nucleated long actin cables that were generated at multiple nonmedial locations and incorporated into the ring by a combination of myosin II and myosin V activities. Our results, together with findings in animal cells, suggest that de novo F-actin assembly at the division site and directed transport of F-actin cables assembled elsewhere can contribute to ring assembly. PMID:23185032

  1. Contractile-Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast Cytokinesis: Recent Advances and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ju; Coffman, Valerie C.; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an excellent model organism to study cytokinesis. Here, we review recent advances on contractile-ring assembly in fission yeast. First, we summarize the assembly of cytokinesis nodes, the precursors of a normal contractile ring. IQGAP Rng2 and myosin essential light chain Cdc4 are recruited by the anillin-like protein Mid1, followed by the addition of other cytokinesis node proteins. Mid1 localization on the plasma membrane is stabilized by interphase node proteins. Second, we discuss proteins and processes that contribute to the search, capture, pull, and release mechanism of contractile-ring assembly. Actin filaments nucleated by formin Cdc12, the motor activity of myosin-II, the stiffness of the actin network, and severing of actin filaments by cofilin all play essential roles in contractile-ring assembly. Finally, we discuss the Mid1-independent pathway for ring assembly, and the possible mechanisms underlying the ring maturation and constriction. Collectively, we provide an overview of the current understanding of contractile-ring assembly and uncover future directions in studying cytokinesis in fission yeast. PMID:22887981

  2. Ring chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, A; Voyce, M A; Romain, D

    1977-01-01

    A mentally and physically retarded boy with a 46,XY,ring (4) (p16q35) chromosome complement is described. Chromosome banding showed that the amount of chromosome material deleted from the ring chromosome 4 was minimal, apparently no more than the telomeres. Chromosomal aberrations appear to be restricted to the production of double-sized dicentric rings, and aneuploidy. The mosiacism resulting from the behavioural peculiarities of ring chromosomes is described as dynamic mosaicism. It is suggested that the clinical features associated with this ring chromosome are more likely to be the result of the effects of a diploid/monosomy 4/polysomy 4 mosaicism than to the deficiency of the telomeric regions of the chromosome. Images PMID:881718

  3. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  4. Three-dimensional organization of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane around the mitochondrial constriction site in mammalian cells revealed by using focused-ion beam tomography.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Keisuke; Okayama, Satoko; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    the specimens was freshly exposed using an ultramicrotome and examined by FIB/SEM (Quanta 3D FEG, FEI, USA). Ion-beam milling and image acquisition cycles were performed under the following conditions. The milling was performed with a gallium ion beam at 30 kV with a current of 100 pA, with a milling pitch of 10 nm/step. Material contrast images using backscattered electrons (BSE) were acquired at a landing energy of 2 keV with a bias voltage of 1.5-2.5 kV using a vCD detector. The remaining acquisition parameters were as follows: beam current = 11 pA, dwell time = 6-30 µs/pixel, image size = 1024 × 883 pixel (5.9 × 5.1 µm), pixel size = 5.8 nm/pixel. The resultant image stack was processed using Avizo 6.3 and Amira 5.4(FEI, USA).Reconstructed volume showed the existence of several constriction sites on mitochondria in both chemically fixed normal hepatocytes and HeLa cells. Each material contrast image of specimen surfaces showed two types of membrane associations between the ER and mitochondria. The first was an osmiophilic bridge-like structure; these bridges were approximately 50 nm in length, and they connected the ER membrane and the mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). The second was a close apposition (< 20 nm) of the ER membrane and the OMM. Membrane segmentation revealed the 3D distribution of the membrane contacts; 10 to 20% of the mitochondrial surface was occupied by ER contacts. No fundamental difference was observed between hepatocytes and HeLa cells in the distribution pattern of the contacts. Although ER-contacts and bridge-like structures were occasionally found to accumulate around the mitochondrial constriction area, we did not observe any ring-like ER tubules around the mammalian mitochondrial constriction site, as in yeast. These results suggest that the role of ER-membrane associations in the mitochondrial fission process may differ between mammals and yeast.

  5. Surgical experience on chronic constrictive pericarditis in African setting: review of 35 years’ experience in Cote d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Tanauh, Yves; Meneas, Christophe; Diby, Florent; Adoubi, Anicet; Diomande, Manga

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical experience with chronic constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is rarely documented in Africa; the aim of this study is therefore to review our African experience with CCP from 1977 to 2012 in terms of clinical and surgical outcomes and risk factors of early death after pericardiectomy. Methods This retrospective study is related to 120 patients with CCP; there were 72 men and 48 women with an average age at 28.8±10.4 years standard deviation (SD) (8–51 years). The main etiology was tuberculosis (99%). Symptoms secondary to systemic venous congestion were always present: patient were functionally classified according New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification: 63 patients presented in class II NYHA and 57 in class III or IV NYHA. The diagnosis confirmed by surgical report was: sub-acute CCP (n=12; 10%), fibrous CCP (n=36; 30%), calcified CCP (n=72; 60%). A pericardiectomy including an epicardiectomy with a systematic release of the ventricles was carried out in every case. Median sternotomy was frequently performed (n=117; 97.5%). Results Fifteen early deaths (12.5%) were observed, the cause of hospital deaths was due to a low cardiac output (n=12) and to a hepatic failure (n=3). Class III or IV (NYHA) (P=0.01), mitral regurgitation (P<0.05), persistent a diastolic syndrome after surgery (P<0.05) and low cardiac index (CI) (P<0.02) were the important risk factors. Age, size of cardiac X-ray silhouette, right and left ventricular diastolic pressures, ejection fraction (EF), atrial fibrillation and pericardial calcifications had no impact on early survival. The average follow up was 4 years (1–10 years); we lost 22 patients during follow-up. Among survivors, there was no late death; the patients were in class I or II NYHA. Post-operative catheterization evaluation (n=30) shown a significant decrease of the right and left ventricular end-diastolic pressures (P<0.05), of the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) (P<0.05) and of

  6. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  7. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  8. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  9. Tunable strength saddle-point contacts impact on quantum rings transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. J.; Diago-Cisneros, L.

    2016-09-01

    A particular subject of investigation is the role of several sadle-point contact (QPC) parameters on the scattering properties of an Aharonov-Bohm-Aharonov-Casher quantum ring (QR) under Rashba-type spin orbit interaction. We discuss the interplay of the conductance with the confinement strengths and height of the QPC, which yields new and tunable harmonic and non-harmonics patterns, while one manipulates these constriction parameters. This phenomenology may be of utility to implement a novel way to modulate spin interference effects in semiconducting QRs, providing an appealing test-platform for spintronics applications.

  10. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  11. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  12. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  13. Supernumerary small ring chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Kaffe, S; Kim, H J; Hsu, L Y; Brill, C B; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    A supernumerary small ring chromosome was found in 30% of cultured peripheral leucocytes and 50% of skin fibroblasts in a 6-year-old boy with mild mental retardation and midline cleft palate. The extra chromosome appeared to carry a densely staining region on Giemsa banding. The banding patterns of the remaining 46 chromosomes were normal. C banding indicated that the ring chromosome contained mainly centromeric constitutive heterochromatin. Chromosome analysis of both parents showed normal karyotypes by both conventional and banding techniques; thus the origin of the ring chromosome could not be determined. Images PMID:604496

  14. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  15. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  16. Electronic conductance model in constricted MoS{sub 2} with nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, Aditya; Leburton, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    We describe a self-consistent model for electronic transport in a molybdenum di-sulphide (MoS{sub 2}) layer containing a nanopore in a constricted geometry. Our approach is based on a semi-classical thermionic Poisson-Boltzmann technique using a two-valley model within the effective mass approximation to investigate perturbations caused by the nanopore on the electronic current. In particular, we show that the effect of the nanopore on the conductance is reduced as the nanopore is moved from the center to the layer edges. Our model is applied to the detection of DNA translocating through the nanopore, which reveals current features similar to those as predicted in nanopore graphene layers.

  17. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model.

  18. Experimental proof of faster-is-slower in systems of frictional particles flowing through constrictions.

    PubMed

    Pastor, José M; Garcimartín, Angel; Gago, Paula A; Peralta, Juan P; Martín-Gómez, César; Ferrer, Luis M; Maza, Diego; Parisi, Daniel R; Pugnaloni, Luis A; Zuriguel, Iker

    2015-12-01

    The "faster-is-slower" (FIS) effect was first predicted by computer simulations of the egress of pedestrians through a narrow exit [D. Helbing, I. J. Farkas, and T. Vicsek, Nature (London) 407, 487 (2000)]. FIS refers to the finding that, under certain conditions, an excess of the individuals' vigor in the attempt to exit causes a decrease in the flow rate. In general, this effect is identified by the appearance of a minimum when plotting the total evacuation time of a crowd as a function of the pedestrian desired velocity. Here, we experimentally show that the FIS effect indeed occurs in three different systems of discrete particles flowing through a constriction: (a) humans evacuating a room, (b) a herd of sheep entering a barn, and (c) grains flowing out a 2D hopper over a vibrated incline. This finding suggests that FIS is a universal phenomenon for active matter passing through a narrowing.

  19. Experimental proof of faster-is-slower in systems of frictional particles flowing through constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, José M.; Garcimartín, Angel; Gago, Paula A.; Peralta, Juan P.; Martín-Gómez, César; Ferrer, Luis M.; Maza, Diego; Parisi, Daniel R.; Pugnaloni, Luis A.; Zuriguel, Iker

    2015-12-01

    The "faster-is-slower" (FIS) effect was first predicted by computer simulations of the egress of pedestrians through a narrow exit [D. Helbing, I. J. Farkas, and T. Vicsek, Nature (London) 407, 487 (2000), 10.1038/35035023]. FIS refers to the finding that, under certain conditions, an excess of the individuals' vigor in the attempt to exit causes a decrease in the flow rate. In general, this effect is identified by the appearance of a minimum when plotting the total evacuation time of a crowd as a function of the pedestrian desired velocity. Here, we experimentally show that the FIS effect indeed occurs in three different systems of discrete particles flowing through a constriction: (a) humans evacuating a room, (b) a herd of sheep entering a barn, and (c) grains flowing out a 2D hopper over a vibrated incline. This finding suggests that FIS is a universal phenomenon for active matter passing through a narrowing.

  20. Case report: adult Class I, constricted arches, crowding and impacted cuspid.

    PubMed

    Bonk, R T

    1996-12-01

    The patient presented with constriction of both arches, moderate crowding and an unerupted and impacted maxillary cuspid. The Crozat appliance therapy efficiently developed the arches, reduced skeletal asymmetry on the sagittal plane, and distalized the upper left posteriors although this was aided by the removal of the second molar. Alignment and the development of a good functional occlusion was accomplished efficiently with the straight wire appliance. Facial balance and good lip support was maintained. No stripping was present and the periodontal health remains excellent. A significant improvement was made in the patient's smile. The teeth have been stabler during the two-year period following the initial placement of retainers. And the patient is very pleased with the treatment results.

  1. Dendritic atrophy constricts functional maps in resonance and impedance properties of hippocampal model neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dhupia, Neha; Rathour, Rahul K.; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2015-01-01

    A gradient in the density of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated (HCN) channels is necessary for the emergence of several functional maps within hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Here, we systematically analyzed the impact of dendritic atrophy on nine such functional maps, related to input resistance and local/transfer impedance properties, using conductance-based models of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We introduced progressive dendritic atrophy in a CA1 pyramidal neuron reconstruction through a pruning algorithm, measured all functional maps in each pruned reconstruction, and arrived at functional forms for the dependence of underlying measurements on dendritic length. We found that, across frequencies, atrophied neurons responded with higher efficiency to incoming inputs, and the transfer of signals across the dendritic tree was more effective in an atrophied reconstruction. Importantly, despite the presence of identical HCN-channel density gradients, spatial gradients in input resistance, local/transfer resonance frequencies and impedance profiles were significantly constricted in reconstructions with dendritic atrophy, where these physiological measurements across dendritic locations converged to similar values. These results revealed that, in atrophied dendritic structures, the presence of an ion channel density gradient alone was insufficient to sustain homologous functional maps along the same neuronal topograph. We assessed the biophysical basis for these conclusions and found that this atrophy-induced constriction of functional maps was mediated by an enhanced spatial spread of the influence of an HCN-channel cluster in atrophied trees. These results demonstrated that the influence fields of ion channel conductances need to be localized for channel gradients to express themselves as homologous functional maps, suggesting that ion channel gradients are necessary but not sufficient for the emergence of functional maps within single neurons

  2. Prefission Constriction of Golgi Tubular Carriers Driven by Local Lipid Metabolism: A Theoretical Model

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Tom; Luini, Alberto; Malhotra, Vivek; Burger, Koert N. J.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Membrane transport within mammalian cells is mediated by small vesicular as well as large pleiomorphic transport carriers (TCs). A major step in the formation of TCs is the creation and subsequent narrowing of a membrane neck connecting the emerging carrier with the initial membrane. In the case of small vesicular TCs, neck formation may be directly induced by the coat proteins that cover the emerging vesicle. However, the mechanism underlying the creation and narrowing of a membrane neck in the generation of large TCs remains unknown. We present a theoretical model for neck formation based on the elastic model of membranes. Our calculations suggest a lipid-driven mechanism with a central role for diacylglycerol (DAG). The model is applied to a well-characterized in vitro system that reconstitutes TC formation from the Golgi complex, namely the pearling and fission of Golgi tubules induced by CtBP/BARS, a protein that catalyzes the conversion of lysophosphatidic acid into phosphatidic acid. In view of the importance of a PA-DAG cycle in the formation of Golgi TCs, we assume that the newly formed phosphatidic acid undergoes rapid dephosphorylation into DAG. DAG possesses a unique molecular shape characterized by an extremely large negative spontaneous curvature, and it redistributes rapidly between the membrane monolayers and along the membrane surface. Coupling between local membrane curvature and local lipid composition results, by mutual enhancement, in constrictions of the tubule into membrane necks, and a related inhomogeneous lateral partitioning of DAG. Our theoretical model predicts the exact dimensions of the constrictions observed in the pearling Golgi tubules. Moreover, the model is able to explain membrane neck formation by physiologically relevant mole fractions of DAG. PMID:14645071

  3. Dietary niche constriction when invaders meet natives: evidence from freshwater decapods.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michelle C; Grey, Jonathan; Miller, Katie; Britton, J Robert; Donohue, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Invasive species are a key driver of global environmental change, with frequently strong negative consequences for native biodiversity and ecosystem processes. Understanding competitive interactions between invaders and functionally similar native species provides an important benchmark for predicting the consequences of invasion. However, even though having a broad dietary niche is widely considered a key factor determining invasion success, little is known about the effects of competition with functionally similar native competitors on the dietary niche breadths of invasive species. We used a combination of field experiments and field surveys to examine the impacts of competition with a functionally similar native crab species on the population densities, growth rates and diet of the globally widespread invasive red swamp crayfish in an African river ecosystem. The presence of native crabs triggered significant dietary niche constriction within the invasive crayfish population. Further, growth rates of both species were reduced significantly, and by a similar extent, in the presence of one another. In spite of this, crayfish maintained positive growth rates in the presence of crabs, whereas crabs lost mass in the presence of crayfish. Consequently, over the 3-year duration of the study, crab abundance declined at those sites invaded by the crayfish, becoming locally extinct at one. The invasive crayfish had a dramatic effect on ecosystem structure and functioning, halving benthic invertebrate densities and increasing decomposition rates fourfold compared to the crabs. This indicates that replacement of native crabs by invasive crayfish likely alters the structure and functioning of African river ecosystems significantly. This study provides a novel example of the constriction of the dietary niche of a successful invasive population in the presence of competition from a functionally similar native species. This finding highlights the importance of considering both

  4. Dendritic atrophy constricts functional maps in resonance and impedance properties of hippocampal model neurons.

    PubMed

    Dhupia, Neha; Rathour, Rahul K; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2014-01-01

    A gradient in the density of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated (HCN) channels is necessary for the emergence of several functional maps within hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Here, we systematically analyzed the impact of dendritic atrophy on nine such functional maps, related to input resistance and local/transfer impedance properties, using conductance-based models of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We introduced progressive dendritic atrophy in a CA1 pyramidal neuron reconstruction through a pruning algorithm, measured all functional maps in each pruned reconstruction, and arrived at functional forms for the dependence of underlying measurements on dendritic length. We found that, across frequencies, atrophied neurons responded with higher efficiency to incoming inputs, and the transfer of signals across the dendritic tree was more effective in an atrophied reconstruction. Importantly, despite the presence of identical HCN-channel density gradients, spatial gradients in input resistance, local/transfer resonance frequencies and impedance profiles were significantly constricted in reconstructions with dendritic atrophy, where these physiological measurements across dendritic locations converged to similar values. These results revealed that, in atrophied dendritic structures, the presence of an ion channel density gradient alone was insufficient to sustain homologous functional maps along the same neuronal topograph. We assessed the biophysical basis for these conclusions and found that this atrophy-induced constriction of functional maps was mediated by an enhanced spatial spread of the influence of an HCN-channel cluster in atrophied trees. These results demonstrated that the influence fields of ion channel conductances need to be localized for channel gradients to express themselves as homologous functional maps, suggesting that ion channel gradients are necessary but not sufficient for the emergence of functional maps within single neurons.

  5. The GABAA agonist muscimol attenuates induced airway constriction in guinea pigs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Neil R; Gallos, George; Zhang, Yi; Emala, Charles W

    2009-04-01

    GABA(A) channels are ubiquitously expressed on neuronal cells and act via an inward chloride current to hyperpolarize the cell membrane of mature neurons. Expression and function of GABA(A) channels on airway smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated in vitro. Airway smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization contributes to relaxation. We hypothesized that muscimol, a selective GABA(A) agonist, could act on endogenous GABA(A) channels expressed on airway smooth muscle to attenuate induced increases in airway pressures in anesthetized guinea pigs in vivo. In an effort to localize muscimol's effect to GABA(A) channels expressed on airway smooth muscle, we pretreated guinea pigs with a selective GABA(A) antagonist (gabazine) or eliminated lung neural control from central parasympathetic, sympathetic, and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) nerves before muscimol treatment. Pretreatment with intravenous muscimol alone attenuated intravenous histamine-, intravenous acetylcholine-, or vagal nerve-stimulated increases in peak pulmonary inflation pressure. Pretreatment with the GABA(A) antagonist gabazine blocked muscimol's effect. After the elimination of neural input to airway tone by central parasympathetic nerves, peripheral sympathetic nerves, and NANC nerves, intravenous muscimol retained its ability to block intravenous acetylcholine-induced increases in peak pulmonary inflation pressures. These findings demonstrate that the GABA(A) agonist muscimol acting specifically via GABA(A) channel activation attenuates airway constriction independently of neural contributions. These findings suggest that therapeutics directed at the airway smooth muscle GABA(A) channel may be a novel therapy for airway constriction following airway irritation and possibly more broadly in diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. Evaluating Effects of Floodplain Constriction Along a High Energy Gravel-Bed River: Snake River, WY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Christina M.

    This study examined approximately 66 km of the Snake River, WY, USA, spanning a natural reach within Grand Teton National Park and a reach immediately downstream that is confined by artificial levees. We linked the channel adjustments observed within these two reaches between 2007 and 2012 to sediment transport processes by developing a morphological sediment budget. A pair of digital elevation models (DEMs) was generated by fusing LiDAR topography with depth estimates derived from optical image data within wetted channels. Errors for both components of the DEMs (LiDAR and optical bathymetry) were propagated through the DEM of difference and sediment budget calculations. Our results indicated that even with the best available methods for acquiring high resolution topographic data over large areas, the uncertainty associated with bed elevation estimates implied that net volumetric changes were not statistically significant. In addition to the terrain analysis, we performed a tracer study to assess the mobility of different grain size classes in different morphological units. Grain sizes, hydraulic conditions, and flow resistance characteristics along cross-sections were used to calculate critical discharges for entrainment, but this bulk characterization of fluid driving forces failed to predict bed mobility. Our results indicated that over seasonal timescales specific grain classes were not preferentially entrained. Surface and subsurface grain size data were used to calculate armoring and dimensionless sediment transport ratios for both reaches; sediment supply exceeded transport capacity in the natural reach and vice versa in the confined reach. We used a conceptual model to describe channel adjustments to lateral constriction by levees. Initially we suggest levees focused flow energy and incised the bed, resulting in bed armoring. Bed armoring promoted channel widening, but levees prevented this and instead the channel migrated more rapidly within the

  7. Gas-bubble snap-off under pressure driven flow in constricted noncircular capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.R.; Radke, C.J.

    1996-04-01

    A model for snap-off of a gas thread in a constricted cornered pore is developed. The time for wetting liquid to accumulate at a pore throat into an unstable collar is examined, as for the resulting pore-spanning lens to be displaced from the pore so that snap-off is the time may repeat. A comer-flow hydrodynamic analysis for the accumulation rate of wetting liquid due to both gradients in interfacial curvature and in applied liquid-phase pressure reveals that wetting-phase pressure gradients significantly increase the frequency of liquid accumulation for snap-off as compared to liquid rearrangement driven only by differences in pore-wall curvature. For moderate and large pressure gradients, the frequency of accumulation increases linearly with pressure gradient because of the increased rate of wetting liquid flow along pore comers. Pore topology is important to the theory, for pores with relatively small throats connected to large bodies demonstrate excellent ability to snapoff gas threads even when the initial capillary pressure is high or equivalently when the liquid saturation is low. A macroscopic momentum balance across the lens resulting from snap-off reveals that lens displacement rates are not linear with the imposed pressure drop. Instead, the frequency of lens displacement scales with powers between 0.5 and 0.6 for pores with dimensionless constriction radii between 0.15 and 0.40. Statistical percolation arguments are employed to form a generation rate expression and connect pore-level foam generation events to macroscopic pressure gradients in porous media. The rate of foam generation by capillary snap-off increases linearly with the liquid-phase pressure gradient and according to a power-law relationship with respect to the imposed gas-phase pressure gradient.

  8. High-Tc micro and nano-constrictions modeling: hot spot approach for DC characteristics and HEB THz mixer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladret, Romain G.; Dégardin, Annick F.; Kreisler, Alain J.

    2014-05-01

    High-TC hot electron bolometers (HEB) are promising THz mixers due to their expected wide bandwidth, large mixing gain, and low intrinsic noise. We have simulated the characteristics of YBaCuO HEBs with a hot spot model usually dedicated to low-TC phonon cooled devices. With respect to e.g., NbN, the high-TC specificities are mainly arising from the large values of YBaCuO phonon thermal conductivity, and the film to MgO substrate phonon escape time. The consequent effects on the electron temperature profiles along the YBaCuO constriction and the current voltage DC characteristics are considered. The conversion gain G and noise temperature TN were computed for two constriction dimensions. For a 100 nm long × 100 nm wide × 10 nm thick constriction at 9 microwatt local oscillator (LO) power, the expected double sideband (DSB) TN = 1520 K (G = -13.7 dB). For a larger (but more realistic according to YBaCuO aging effects) 400 nm long × 400 nm wide × 35 nm thick constriction, minimum TN = 1210 K DSB at 35 microwatt LO power (G = -13.1 dB).

  9. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasonic Newton's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K. ); Dayal, V. )

    1992-03-09

    Interference fringes due to bondline thickness variation were observed in ultrasonic scans of the reflected echo amplitude from the bondline of adhesively joined aluminum skins. To demonstrate that full-field interference patterns are observable in point-by-point ultrasonic scans, an optical setup for Newton's rings was scanned ultrasonically in a water immersion tank. The ultrasonic scan showed distinct Newton's rings whose radii were in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  11. Bending the Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Saturn's rings appear strangely warped in this view of the rings seen through the upper Saturn atmosphere.

    The atmosphere acts like a lens in refracting (bending) the light reflected from the rings. As the rings pass behind the overexposed limb (edge) of Saturn as seen from Cassini, the ring structure appears to curve downward due to the bending of the light as it passes through the upper atmosphere.

    This image was obtained using a near-infrared filter. The filter samples a wavelength where methane gas does not absorb light, thus making the far-off rings visible through the upper atmosphere.

    By comparing this image to similar ones taken using filters where methane gas does absorb, scientists can estimate the vertical profile of haze and the abundance of methane in Saturn's high atmosphere.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 14, 2005, through a filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 938 nanometers and at a distance of approximately 197,000 kilometers (123,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 820 meters (2,680 feet) per pixel.

  12. Single cell rheometry with a microfluidic constriction: Quantitative control of friction and fluid leaks between cell and channel walls

    PubMed Central

    Preira, Pascal; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Bico, José; Théodoly, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We report how cell rheology measurements can be performed by monitoring the deformation of a cell in a microfluidic constriction, provided that friction and fluid leaks effects between the cell and the walls of the microchannels are correctly taken into account. Indeed, the mismatch between the rounded shapes of cells and the angular cross-section of standard microfluidic channels hampers efficient obstruction of the channel by an incoming cell. Moreover, friction forces between a cell and channels walls have never been characterized. Both effects impede a quantitative determination of forces experienced by cells in a constriction. Our study is based on a new microfluidic device composed of two successive constrictions, combined with optical interference microscopy measurements to characterize the contact zone between the cell and the walls of the channel. A cell squeezed in a first constriction obstructs most of the channel cross-section, which strongly limits leaks around cells. The rheological properties of the cell are subsequently probed during its entry in a second narrower constriction. The pressure force is determined from the pressure drop across the device, the cell velocity, and the width of the gutters formed between the cell and the corners of the channel. The additional friction force, which has never been analyzed for moving and constrained cells before, is found to involve both hydrodynamic lubrication and surface forces. This friction results in the existence of a threshold for moving the cells and leads to a non-linear behavior at low velocity. The friction force can nevertheless be assessed in the linear regime. Finally, an apparent viscosity of single cells can be estimated from a numerical prediction of the viscous dissipation induced by a small step in the channel. A preliminary application of our method yields an apparent loss modulus on the order of 100 Pa s for leukocytes THP-1 cells, in agreement with the literature data. PMID:24404016

  13. The Cerrillos Uplift, the La Bajada Constriction, and Hydrogeologic Framework of the Santo Domingo Basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    The geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeologic properties of the La Bajada constriction and Santo Domingo Basin, northern New Mexico, result from tectonic and volcanic processes of the late Tertiary and Quaternary Rio Grande rift. An integrated geologic and geophysical assessment in the La Bajada constriction allows development of a geologic framework that can provide input for regional ground-water flow models. These models then can provide better estimates of future water supplies in a region that largely subsists on aquifers in Rio Grande rift basins. The combination of surface geologic investigations (stratigraphic and structural studies; chapters A, B, C, and E), airborne geophysics (aeromagnetic and time-domain electromagnetic surveys; chapters D and F), ground geophysical measurements (gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; chapters D and F), and data from the few wells in the area (chapter G) provides new constraints on the hydrogeologic framework of this area. Summary results of our investigations are synthesized in chapter G. Through-going aquifers consisting of ancestral Rio Grande axial-river sand and gravel and of coarse western-piedmont gravel form the predominant ground-water pathways through the partly buried structural trough defining the La Bajada constriction between Espa?ola and Santo Domingo Basins. Thick, clay-rich Cretaceous marine shales of low hydraulic conductivity form a pervasive regional confining unit within the Cerrillos uplift on the southeast flank of the constriction. Numerous, dominantly north-northwest-striking, intrabasin faults that project part way across the La Bajada constriction create a matrix of laterally and vertically variable hydrogeologic compartments that locally partition and deflect ground-water flow parallel to faults.

  14. Enamel Pit Defects and Taurodontism in a Patient with Ring Chromosome 14 and 47,XXX.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Janice A; Lacour, Letitia; Scheuerle, Angela E

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the clinical findings and management of a case involving a patient with co-occurring ring chromosome 14 syndrome and 47,XXX presenting with enamel pit defects and taurodontism. Ring chromosome 14 syndrome is an unusual condition with uncontrolled seizure disorder as its most significant finding; 47,XXX (trisomy X; triple X) is a more common condition and has characteristic physical and behavioral findings. Neither condition has been associated with enamel pit defects.

  15. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  16. Neurological and neuropathological findings in ring chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R S; Zalneraitis, E L

    1980-01-01

    Despite the fact that mental retardation, microcephaly, seizures, and hyperactivity are common in patients with ring chromosome 4, little has been written about the underlying neuropathology. We describe a 6-year-old girl whose neuropathological findings included low brain weight, abnormal gyral development, and heterotopic neurons. The significance of these findings in regard to other retardation syndromes is discussed. Images PMID:7205435

  17. Ring correlations in random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the correlations between rings in random network glasses in two dimensions as a function of their separation. Initially, we use the topological separation (measured by the number of intervening rings), but this leads to pseudo-long-range correlations due to a lack of topological charge neutrality in the shells surrounding a central ring. This effect is associated with the noncircular nature of the shells. It is, therefore, necessary to use the geometrical distance between ring centers. Hence we find a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law out to larger distances, with the correlations between rings decaying away when two rings are more than about three rings apart.

  18. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  19. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~<500m in size) have been indirectly identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring. In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We show evidence that B ring seems to harbor two distinct populations of propellers: "big" propellers covering tens of degrees in azimuth situated in the densest part of B ring, and "small" propellers in less dense inner B ring that are similar in size and shape to known A ring propellers. The population of "big" propellers is exemplified with a single object which is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe this feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at r=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B

  20. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  1. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  2. Dynamic network morphology and tension buildup in a 3D model of cytokinetic ring assembly.

    PubMed

    Bidone, Tamara C; Tang, Haosu; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-02

    During fission yeast cytokinesis, actin filaments nucleated by cortical formin Cdc12 are captured by myosin motors bound to a band of cortical nodes and bundled by cross-linking proteins. The myosin motors exert forces on the actin filaments, resulting in a net pulling of the nodes into a contractile ring, while cross-linking interactions help align actin filaments and nodes into a single bundle. We used these mechanisms in a three-dimensional computational model of contractile ring assembly, with semiflexible actin filaments growing from formins at cortical nodes, capturing of filaments by neighboring nodes, and cross-linking among filaments through attractive interactions. The model was used to predict profiles of actin filament density at the cell cortex, morphologies of condensing node-filament networks, and regimes of cortical tension by varying the node pulling force and strength of cross-linking among actin filaments. Results show that cross-linking interactions can lead to confinement of actin filaments at the simulated cortical boundary. We show that the ring-formation region in parameter space lies close to regions leading to clumps, meshworks or double rings, and stars/cables. Since boundaries between regions are not sharp, transient structures that resemble clumps, stars, and meshworks can appear in the process of ring assembly. These results are consistent with prior experiments with mutations in actin-filament turnover regulators, myosin motor activity, and changes in the concentration of cross-linkers that alter the morphology of the condensing network. Transient star shapes appear in some simulations, and these morphologies offer an explanation for star structures observed in prior experimental images. Finally, we quantify tension along actin filaments and forces on nodes during ring assembly and show that the mechanisms describing ring assembly can also drive ring constriction once the ring is formed.

  3. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  4. Hydrogen sulfide modulates sinusoidal constriction and contributes to hepatic microcirculatory dysfunction during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Norris, Eric J; Feilen, Nicole; Nguyen, Nhat H; Culberson, Cathy R; Shin, Min C; Fish, Madeleine; Clemens, Mark G

    2013-06-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) affects vascular resistance; however, its effect on the hepatic microcirculation has not been investigated. Hepatic sinusoidal perfusion is dysregulated during sepsis, contributing to liver injury. Therefore, the present study determined the effect of H₂S on the hepatic microcirculation and the contribution of endogenous H₂S to hepatic microcirculatory dysfunction in an endotoxin model of sepsis. Portal infusion of H₂S increased portal pressure in vivo (6.8 ± 0.2 mmHg before H₂S vs. 8.6 ± 0.8 mmHg peak during H₂S infusion, P < 0.05). Using intravital microscopy, we observed decreased sinusoidal diameter (6.2 ± 0.27 μm before H₂S vs. 5.7 ± 0.3 μm after H₂S, P < 0.05) and increased sinusoidal heterogeneity during H₂S infusion (P < 0.05) and net constriction. Since hepatic H₂S levels are elevated during sepsis, we used the cystathionine γ lyase inhibitor DL-propargylglycine (PAG) to determine the contribution of H₂S to the hypersensitization of the sinusoid to the vasoconstrictor effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1). PAG treatment significantly attenuated the sinusoidal sensitization to ET-1 in endotoxin-treated animals. ET-1 infusion increased portal pressure to 175% of baseline in endotoxemic animals, which was reduced to 143% following PAG treatment (P < 0.05). PAG abrogated the increase in sinusoidal constriction after ET-1 infusion in LPS-treated rats (30.9% reduction in LPS rats vs. 11.6% in PAG/LPS rats, P < 0.05). Moreover, PAG treatment significantly attenuated the increase in NADH fluorescence following ET-1 exposure during endotoxemia (61 grayscale units LPS vs. 21 units in PAG/LPS, P < 0.05), suggesting an improvement in hepatic oxygen availability. This study is the first to demonstrate a vasoconstrictor action of H₂S on the hepatic sinusoid and provides a possible mechanism for the protective effect of PAG treatment during sepsis.

  5. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  6. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  7. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  8. Ring laser gyroscope anode

    SciTech Connect

    Ljung, B.H.

    1981-03-17

    An anode for a ring laser gyroscope which provides improved current stability in the glow discharge path is disclosed. The anode of this invention permits operation at lower currents thereby allowing a reduction of heat dissipation in the ring laser gyroscope. The anode of one embodiment of this invention is characterized by a thumbtack appearance with a spherical end where the normal sharp end of the thumbtack would be located. The stem of the anode extends from the outside of the gyroscope structure to the interior of the structure such that the spherical end is substantially adjacent to the laser beam.

  9. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  10. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  11. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  12. A zero-length bellows for the PEP-II High-Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nordby, M.; Daly, E.F.; Kurita, N.; Langton, J.

    1995-08-01

    Due to the beamline space constrictions and the modular design of the vacuum system, a conventional bellows can not be used everywhere in the PEP-II High-Energy Ring (HER) arcs. A zero-length ``Flex Flange`` was developed which actually performs better than a more standard bellows. The Flex Flange fits the space available while still preserving the modularity of the system. Furthermore, the design provides for an accurate match-up between adjoining octagonal copper chambers despite the large fabrication and assembly tolerances and high operational loads. Beam chamber continuity is ensured by an integral RF seal ring which is easy to install and fault-tolerant. Heating from synchrotron radiation and higher-order mode trapping is managed to ensure a robust connection despite the 3,000 mA beam current of the PEP-II HER. The Flex Flange concept is versatile and adaptable to many applications, yet economical both in space needed and cost.

  13. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  14. Florid Suprascapular Neuropathy after Primary Rotator Cuff Repair Attributed to Suprascapular Notch Constriction in the Setting of Double Crush Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Kiser, Casey J.; Hill, Bryce B.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient who had an open repair of a small supraspinatus tendon tear performed 6 months after an arthroscopic acromioplasty with debridement had failed to provide pain relief. Three months prior to the tendon repair, he had a two-level cervical spine discectomy and fusion (C4–5, C5–6) that improved his neck pain. Florid suprascapular neuropathy was detected 10 weeks after the open rotator cuff repair. Evidence of some nerve recovery resulted in a long period of observation. But unsatisfactory improvement warranted decompression of the suprascapular notch, which was found to be very stenotic. At surgery, there was no evidence of neuroma, cyst, or other compressing lesion or tissue. Therefore, it was ultimately hypothesized that there was an exacerbation of a preexisting, but clinically unrecognized, entrapment of the suprascapular nerve in the suprascapular notch in the setting of cervical radiculopathy (primarily C5). Retrospectively it was also concluded that had this compressive etiology been recognized, it would have favored prompt decompression rather than the long observation period. Three years was required to achieve a good result following suprascapular notch decompression. The underlying C5 radiculopathy may have created a “double crush syndrome” that contributed to the propensity for injury and the prolonged recovery. There should be heightened awareness of this problem in patients who do not have satisfactory improvement in shoulder pain from previous shoulder and neck surgery. PMID:27917243

  15. Constriction of the buccal branch of the facial nerve produces unilateral craniofacial allodynia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susannah S; Grace, Peter M; Hutchinson, Mark R; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2016-12-18

    Despite pain being a sensory experience, studies of spinal cord ventral root damage have demonstrated that motor neuron injury can induce neuropathic pain. Whether injury of cranial motor nerves can also produce nociceptive hypersensitivity has not been addressed. Herein, we demonstrate that chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the buccal branch of the facial nerve results in long-lasting, unilateral allodynia in the rat. An anterograde and retrograde tracer (3000MW tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated dextran) was not transported to the trigeminal ganglion when applied to the injury site, but was transported to the facial nucleus, indicating that this nerve branch is not composed of trigeminal sensory neurons. Finally, intracisterna magna injection of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist reversed allodynia, implicating the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by facial nerve CCI. These data extend the prior evidence that selective injury to motor axons can enhance pain to supraspinal circuits by demonstrating that injury of a facial nerve with predominantly motor axons is sufficient for neuropathic pain, and that the resultant pain has a neuroimmune component.

  16. [Water quality of closed polyculture of penaeid shrimp with tilapia and constricted tagelus].

    PubMed

    Tian, X; Li, D; Dong, S; Liu, G; Qi, Z; Lu, J

    2001-04-01

    A variety of water quality parameters were monitored in enclosures for the polyculture of penaeid shrimp with tilapia and constricted tagelus. The result showed that the environment of the polyculture systems was better than that of monoculture one. The fluctuation of DO in the water of polyculture enclosures was less violent, and their lowest values were obviously higher than those in monoculture ones. The value of COD and the number of bacteria in the water of polyculture enclosures were significantly lower than those in monoculture ones(t-test, alpha < 0.05), showing that the amount of organic matter in the water of polyculture systems was less than that in monoculture one. The biomass of plankton and the concentration of chlorophyll-a in the polyculture enclosures were also lower, showing that the suppression of the filtering animals to the plankton was obvious. The accumulation of N and P in the sediment of polyculture enclosures was 39.76% and 51.26%, lower than those of monoculture ones, respectively; and the number of bacteria in the sediment was 7.63% lower. Therefore, it is obvious that closed culture system can greatly decrease the effluent to the coastal waters caused by the pond culture industry, and decrease the pollution to the coastal waters.

  17. Noradrenergic constriction of cerebral arteries as detected by transcranial Doppler (TCD) in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Roatta, S; Canova, D; Bosone, D; Micieli, G; Passatore, M

    2003-10-01

    Interpretation of transcranial Doppler (TCD) recordings requires assumptions about flow or diameter of the insonated vessel. This study aimed at assessing if activation of the sympathetic system could affect blood velocity (bv) in basal cerebral arteries. In anaesthetized rabbits, stimulation of cervical sympathetic nerve (cervSN) was used selectively to activate the sympathetic pathway to the head while monitoring bv in all major cerebral arteries. cervSN stimulation at 10 Hz produced: 1. in internal carotid artery (ICA) and ICA-supplied arteries (ICA-s), a consistent bv increase ranging between 20 and 70%, 2. in the basilar artery, a transient decrease by 15-30%. These effects were mimicked, in both territories, by injection of phenylephrine into the ICA. Because cerebral blood flow is known to be reduced by cervSN stimulation, the increase in bv in ICA and ICA-s must be ascribed to constriction of the insonated vessels. These effects should be considered when monitoring bv during sympathetic activation tests or exercise.

  18. Flow of colloidal solids and fluids through constrictions: dynamical density functional theory versus simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Urs; Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-06-01

    Using both dynamical density functional theory and particle-resolved Brownian dynamics simulations, we explore the flow of two-dimensional colloidal solids and fluids driven through a linear channel with a constriction. The flow is generated by a constant external force acting on all colloids. The initial configuration is equilibrated in the absence of flow and then the external force is switched on instantaneously. Upon starting the flow, we observe four different scenarios: a complete blockade, a monotonic decay to a constant particle flux (typical for a fluid), a damped oscillatory behaviour in the particle flux, and a long-lived stop-and-go behaviour in the flow (typical for a solid). The dynamical density functional theory describes all four situations but predicts infinitely long undamped oscillations in the flow which are always damped in the simulations. We attribute the mechanisms of the underlying stop-and-go flow to symmetry conditions on the flowing solid. Our predictions are verifiable in real-space experiments on magnetic colloidal monolayers which are driven through structured microchannels and can be exploited to steer the flow throughput in microfluidics.

  19. Chronic nonocclusive coronary artery constriction in rats. Beta-adrenoceptor signal transduction and ventricular failure.

    PubMed Central

    Meggs, L G; Huang, H; Li, P; Capasso, J M; Anversa, P

    1991-01-01

    To determine the effects of chronic coronary artery constriction on the relationship between cardiac function and regulation of beta-adrenoceptor signal transduction, the left main coronary artery was narrowed in rats and the animals were killed 5 mo later. An average reduction in coronary luminal diameter of 44% was obtained and this change resulted in an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and a decrease in positive and negative dP/dt. Significant increases in left and right ventricular weights indicative of global cardiac hypertrophy were observed. Radioligand binding studies of beta-adrenoreceptors, agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, and ADP ribosylation of 45-kD substrate by cholera toxin were all depressed in the failing left ventricle. In contrast, in the hypertrophic non-failing right ventricle, beta-adrenoreceptor density was preserved and receptor antagonist affinity was increased. In spite of these findings at the receptor level, agonist stimulated cyclic AMP generation was reduced in the right ventricular myocardium. The quantity of the 45-kD substrate was also decreased. In conclusion, longterm nonocclusive coronary artery stenosis of moderate degree has profound detrimental effects on the contractile performance of the heart in association with marked attenuation of adrenergic support mechanisms. Images PMID:1661293

  20. Folate receptor alpha is necessary for neural plate cell apical constriction during Xenopus neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Balashova, Olga A; Visina, Olesya; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2017-03-02

    Folate supplementation prevents up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs), which result from a failure of neural tube closure during embryogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying folate action has been challenging. This study introduces Xenopus laevis as a model to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in folate action during neural tube formation. We show that knockdown of folate receptor-α (FRα) impairs neural tube formation and leads to NTDs. FRα knockdown in neural plate cells only is necessary and sufficient to induce NTDs. FRα-deficient neural plate cells fail to constrict, resulting in widening of the neural plate midline and defective neural tube closure. Pharmacological inhibition of folate action by methotrexate during neurulation induces NTDs by inhibiting folate interaction with its uptake systems. Our findings support a model for folate receptor interacting with cell adhesion molecules, thus regulating apical cell membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal dynamics necessary for neural plate folding. Further studies in this organism may unveil novel cellular and molecular events mediated by folate and lead to new means for preventing NTDs.

  1. Analysis of cellular behavior and cytoskeletal dynamics reveal a constriction mechanism driving optic cup morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás-Pérez, María; Kuchling, Franz; Letelier, Joaquín; Polvillo, Rocío; Wittbrodt, Jochen; Martínez-Morales, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks have been shown to power tissue morphogenesis. Although the basic cellular machinery generating mechanical tension appears largely conserved, tensions propagate in unique ways within each tissue. Here we use the vertebrate eye as a paradigm to investigate how tensions are generated and transmitted during the folding of a neuroepithelial layer. We record membrane pulsatile behavior and actomyosin dynamics during zebrafish optic cup morphogenesis by live imaging. We show that retinal neuroblasts undergo fast oscillations and that myosin condensation correlates with episodic contractions that progressively reduce basal feet area. Interference with lamc1 function impairs basal contractility and optic cup folding. Mapping of tensile forces by laser cutting uncover a developmental window in which local ablations trigger the displacement of the entire tissue. Our work shows that optic cup morphogenesis is driven by a constriction mechanism and indicates that supra-cellular transmission of mechanical tension depends on ECM attachment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15797.001 PMID:27797321

  2. Velocity reversals and sediment sorting in pools and riffles controlled by channel constrictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, D.M.; Wohl, E.E.; Jarrett, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Keller [Keller, E.A., 1971. Areal sorting of bed-load material; the hypothesis of velocity reversal. Geological Society of America Bulletin 82, 753-756] hypothesized that at high flow, near-bed velocities in pools exceed velocities in riffles and create pool scour. Pools, however, typically have larger cross-sectional areas of flow at bankfull discharge. This condition raises an inconsistency with Keller's velocity reversal hypothesis and the one-dimensional continuity of mass equation. To address this problem, a model of pool maintenance and sediment sorting is proposed that relies on constriction of flow by recirculating eddies and flow divergence over the exit-slopes of pools. According to the model, a narrow zone of high velocity occurs in the center of pools, creating scour. Along the downstream end of pools, an uphill climb of particles up the pool exit-slope promotes sediment deposition. The model is tested with field and flume measurements of velocity, water-surface elevation, and size of bed sediments in recirculating-eddy influenced pools. Local reversals of the water-surface gradient were measured in the field and a velocity reversal was created in the flume. The reversals that were measured indicate higher gradients of the water surface over the upstream portions of pools and higher velocities in pools at high flow. The distribution of bed sediments collected in the field also support the proposed model of pool maintenance.

  3. Effect of Right Heart Systolic Function on Outcomes in Patients with Constrictive Pericarditis Undergoing Pericardiectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xue; Xu, Rui-Yi; Liu, Jian-Zhou; Chen, Wei; Chen, Lian-Feng; Yang, Peng-Hua; Fang, Li-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine the influence of right ventricular function in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP) undergoing surgery and to compare the outcomes of patients who received surgery with those managed medically. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of CP and healthy volunteers were recruited from January 2006 to November 2011. Patients with CP chose to either receive pericardiectomy or medical management. Echocardiographic measurements were performed to evaluate heart function, and survival was recorded. Results: A total of 58 patients with CP (36 received pericardiectomy, 22 managed medically), and 43 healthy volunteers were included. CP patients who received surgery had a higher survival rate than those managed medically (P = 0.003), and higher survival was also seen in the subgroup of CP patients with severely impaired right systolic function. Albumin level, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and tricuspid regurgitation velocity were associated with survival in CP patients who received surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative right heart function does not affect surgical outcomes. Patients with severely impaired preoperative right systolic function obtain a greater survival advantage with surgery than with medical treatment. PMID:26830985

  4. Genetic analysis of a novel invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R. Graham; Puente-Rolón, Alberto R.; Reed, Robert N.; Revell, Liam J.

    2013-01-01

    The tropical island Puerto Rico is potentially vulnerable to invasion by some species of exotic snakes; however, until now no established populations had been reported. Here we report and genetically characterize the nascent invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake of the family Boidae (Boa constrictor) using mtDNA and microsatellite data. Over 150 individual B. constrictor have been removed from Mayagüez municipality since May 2011, and our results from the genetic analysis of 32 individuals suggest that this population was recently founded by individuals of one subspecies from a genetic lineage common to zoo and breeding collections, but that the potential propagule pool consists of two subspecies. We also suggest that anthropogenic long-distance dispersal within the island of Puerto Rico may be occurring from the established population, with implications for further establishment across the island. This study represents the first report of the naturalization of an invasive species of boid snake in Puerto Rico and will be important in determining mitigation strategies for this invasion as well as providing a basis for comparison to other on-going studies of invasive snakes.

  5. Changes of sleep patterns in rats with chronic constriction injury under aversive conditions.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shin; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Shinomiya, Kazuaki; Yamamoto, Wataru; Utsu, Yoshiaki; Toide, Katsuo; Kamei, Chiaki

    2007-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the changes of sleep parameters in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) under aversive conditions. The electroencephalogram (EEG) in the frontal cortex of CCI rats and electromyogram (EMG) were measured over 6 h by placing rats on sandpaper as an aversive condition, to compare with rats placed on sawdust. Six days after CCI surgery, the rats exhibited significant mechanical allodynia, and also had neuropathic pain. When rats were placed on sawdust, no significant difference was observed between the CCI group and sham-operated control group in sleep latency, total waking time, total non-REM sleep time and total REM sleep time. On the other hand, when CCI rats were placed on sandpaper, a significant increase was observed in sleep latency and total waking time compared with the sham group; however, no significant difference was observed in the total non-REM sleep time and total REM sleep time between these two groups. These results indicate that an important factor of sleep disturbance in CCI rats is not only damage to the nerves but also being under aversive conditions. In addition, it was found that CCI rats placed on sandpaper as an aversive condition can serve as a new sleep disturbance model.

  6. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators.

  7. Constriction of the levator hiatus during instruction of pelvic floor or transversus abdominis contraction: a 4D ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Bø, Kari; Braekken, Ingeborg H; Majida, Memona; Engh, Marie E

    2009-01-01

    A new theory claims that the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) can be trained via the transversus abdominis (TrA). The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of instruction of PFM and TrA contraction on constriction of the levator hiatus, using 4D perineal ultrasonography. Thirteen women with pelvic organ prolapse participated in the study. Perineal ultrasound in standing position was used to assess constriction of the levator hiatus. Analyses were conducted off-line with measurements in the axial plane of minimal hiatal dimensions. The reduction of all the hiatal dimensions was significantly greater during PFM than TrA contraction. All patients had a reduction of the levator hiatus area during PFM contraction (mean reduction 24.0%; range 6.1-49.2%). In two patients, there was an increase of the levator hiatus area during TrA contraction. Instruction of PFM contraction is more effective than TrA contraction.

  8. Severe constrictive pericarditis after parvovirus B19 and human herpes virus 6 infection in a 9-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Backhoff, David; Steinmetz, Michael; Ruschewski, Wolfgang; Stastny, Barbara; Kandolf, Reinhard; Krause, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 9-year-old girl who developed signs of congestive heart failure with significant ascites due to constrictive pericarditis. Cardiac catheterization was performed to establish the diagnosis and to rule out restrictive cardiomyopathy. Endomyocardial biopsies were positive for activated macrophages and small-vessel disease, but no viral genomes were detected. Open pericardectomy was performed and histopathologic examination of the resected thickened pericardium showed extensive fibrosis and hyaline degeneration. A combined infection with parvovirus B19 (PVB19) and human herpes virus 6 (HHV6; subtype B) was proven within the resected pericardium. We suggest that local HHV6-induced immunosuppression enhanced the PVB19 infection, thus resulting in chronic infection and leading to constrictive pericarditis.

  9. The Mechanoenzymatic Core of Dynamin-related Protein 1 Comprises the Minimal Machinery Required for Membrane Constriction*

    PubMed Central

    Francy, Christopher A.; Alvarez, Frances J. D.; Zhou, Louie; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Mears, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that continually undergo cycles of fission and fusion. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), a large GTPase of the dynamin superfamily, is the main mediator of mitochondrial fission. Like prototypical dynamin, Drp1 is composed of a mechanochemical core consisting of the GTPase, middle, and GTPase effector domain regions. In place of the pleckstrin homology domain in dynamin, however, Drp1 contains an unstructured variable domain, whose function is not yet fully resolved. Here, using time-resolved EM and rigorous statistical analyses, we establish the ability of full-length Drp1 to constrict lipid bilayers through a GTP hydrolysis-dependent mechanism. We also show the variable domain limits premature Drp1 assembly in solution and promotes membrane curvature. Furthermore, the mechanochemical core of Drp1, absent of the variable domain, is sufficient to mediate GTP hydrolysis-dependent membrane constriction. PMID:25770210

  10. Ring Flame Stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Ring Flame Stabilizer has been developed in conjunction with Lewis Research Center. This device can lower pollutant emissions (which contribute to smog and air pollution) from natural-gas appliances such as furnaces and water heaters by 90 percent while improving energy efficiency by 2 percent.

  11. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  12. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  13. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  14. Reading, Writing, and Rings!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela; Li, Erika; Hammon, Art

    2008-01-01

    "Reading, Writing, and Rings!" was created by a team of elementary teachers, literacy experts, and scientists in order to integrate science and literacy. These free units bring students inside NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. The authors--a science teacher and education outreach specialist and two evaluators of educational programs--have…

  15. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  16. The Actomyosin Ring Recruits Early Secretory Compartments to the Division Site in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Vjestica, Aleksandar; Tang, Xin-Zi

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cytokinesis is to establish a membrane barrier between daughter cells. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe utilizes an actomyosin-based division ring that is thought to provide physical force for the plasma membrane invagination. Ring constriction occurs concomitantly with the assembly of a division septum that is eventually cleaved. Membrane trafficking events such as targeting of secretory vesicles to the division site require a functional actomyosin ring suggesting that it serves as a spatial landmark. However, the extent of polarization of the secretion apparatus to the division site is presently unknown. We performed a survey of dynamics of several fluorophore-tagged proteins that served as markers for various compartments of the secretory pathway. These included markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, the COPII sites, and the early and late Golgi. The secretion machinery exhibited a marked polarization to the division site. Specifically, we observed an enrichment of the transitional endoplasmic reticulum (tER) accompanied by Golgi cisternae biogenesis. These processes required actomyosin ring assembly and the function of the EFC-domain protein Cdc15p. Cdc15p overexpression was sufficient to induce tER polarization in interphase. Thus, fission yeast polarizes its entire secretory machinery to the cell division site by utilizing molecular cues provided by the actomyosin ring. PMID:18184749

  17. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  18. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  19. The Importance of Complete Pericardiectomy and the Role of the Apical Suction Device in Chronic Constrictive Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Na, Kwon Joong; Kim, Kyung-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the preoperative attributes and clinical impacts of complete pericardiectomy in chronic constrictive pericarditis. Methods A total of 26 patients were treated from January 2001 to December 2013. The pericardium was resected as widely as possible. When excessive bleeding or hemodynamic instability occurred intraoperatively, a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB; n=3, 11.5%) or an apical suction device (n=8, 30.8%) was used. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who underwent ≥ 80% resection of the pericardium (group A, n=18) and those who underwent <80% resection of the pericardium (group B, n=8). Results The frequency of CPB use was not significantly different between groups A and B (n=2, 11.1% vs. n=1, 12.5%; p=1.000). However, the apical suction device was more frequently applied in group A than group B (n=8, 30.8% vs. n=0, 0.0%; p=0.031). The postoperative New York Heart Association functional classification improved more in group A (p=0.030). Long-term follow-up echocardiography also showed a lower frequency of unresolved constriction in group A than in group B (n=1, 5.60% vs. n=5, 62.5%; p=0.008). Conclusion Patients with chronic constrictive pericarditis demonstrated symptomatic improvement through complete pericardiectomy. Aggressive resection of the pericardium may correct constrictive physiology and an apical suction device can facilitate the approach to the posterolateral aspect of the left ventricle and atrioventricular groove area without the aid of CPB. PMID:28180099

  20. Solvothermal Metal Metathesis on a Metal-Organic Framework with Constricted Pores and the Study of Gas Separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangjun; Xue, Haitao; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Pinhui; Zhu, Dandan; Jiang, Min; Zhao, Xuebo

    2015-11-18

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with constricted pores can increase the adsorbate density of gas and facilitate effective CO2 separation from flue gas or natural gas due to their enhanced overlapping of potential fields of the pores. Herein, an MOF with constricted pores, which was formed by narrow channels and blocks of functional groups, was fabricated from the assembly of a methyl-functionalized ligand and Zn(II) centers (termed NPC-7-Zn). Structural analysis of the as-synthesized NPC-7-Zn reveals a series of zigzag pores with pore diameters of ∼0.7 nm, which could be favorable for CO2 traps. For reinforcing the framework stability, a solvothermal metal metathesis on the pristine MOF NPC-7-Zn was performed, and a new Cu(II) MOF (termed NPC-7-Cu) with an identical framework was produced. The influence of the reaction temperatures on the metal metathesis process was investigated. The results show that the constricted pores in NPC-7-Zn can induce kinetic issues that largely slow the metal metathesis process at room temperature. However, this kinetic issue can be solved by applying higher reaction temperatures. The modified MOF NPC-7-Cu exhibits significant improvements in framework stability and thus leads to a permanent porosity for this framework. The constricted pore structure enables enhanced potential fields for these pores, rendering this MOF with high adsorbate densities for CO2 and high adsorption selectivity for a CO2/N2 gas mixture. The adsorption kinetic studies reveal that CH4 has a faster diffusion rate constant than CO2, showing a surface diffusion controlled mechanism for CO2 and CH4 adsorption.

  1. Surgical Management of Massive Pericardial Effusion and Predictors for Development of Constrictive Pericarditis in a Resource Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Kesieme, Emeka B; Okokhere, Peter O; Iruolagbe, Christopher Ojemiega; Odike, Angela; Owobu, Clifford; Akhigbe, Theophilus

    2016-01-01

    Background. The diagnosis and treatment of massive pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade have evolved over the years with a tendency towards a more comprehensive diagnostic workup and less traumatic intervention. Method. We reviewed and analysed the data of 32 consecutive patients who underwent surgery on account of massive pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in a semiurban university hospital in Nigeria from February 2010 to February 2016. Results. The majority of patients (34.4%) were between 31 and 40 years. Fourteen patients (43.8%) presented with clinical and echocardiographic feature of cardiac tamponade. The majority of patients (59.4%) presented with haemorrhagic pericardial effusion and the average volume of fluid drained intraoperatively was 846 mL  ± 67 mL. Pericardium was thickened in 50% of cases. Subxiphoid pericardiostomy was performed under local anaesthesia in 28 cases. No postoperative recurrence was observed; however 5 patients developed features of constrictive pericarditis. The relationship between pericardial thickness and development of pericardial constriction was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion. Subxiphoid pericardiostomy is a very effective way of treating massive pericardial effusion. Removing tube after adequate drainage (50 mL/day) and treatment of primary pathology are key to preventing recurrence. There is also a need to follow up patients to detect pericardial constriction especially those with thickened pericardium.

  2. Surgical Management of Massive Pericardial Effusion and Predictors for Development of Constrictive Pericarditis in a Resource Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Okokhere, Peter O.; Iruolagbe, Christopher Ojemiega; Odike, Angela; Owobu, Clifford; Akhigbe, Theophilus

    2016-01-01

    Background. The diagnosis and treatment of massive pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade have evolved over the years with a tendency towards a more comprehensive diagnostic workup and less traumatic intervention. Method. We reviewed and analysed the data of 32 consecutive patients who underwent surgery on account of massive pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in a semiurban university hospital in Nigeria from February 2010 to February 2016. Results. The majority of patients (34.4%) were between 31 and 40 years. Fourteen patients (43.8%) presented with clinical and echocardiographic feature of cardiac tamponade. The majority of patients (59.4%) presented with haemorrhagic pericardial effusion and the average volume of fluid drained intraoperatively was 846 mL  ± 67 mL. Pericardium was thickened in 50% of cases. Subxiphoid pericardiostomy was performed under local anaesthesia in 28 cases. No postoperative recurrence was observed; however 5 patients developed features of constrictive pericarditis. The relationship between pericardial thickness and development of pericardial constriction was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion. Subxiphoid pericardiostomy is a very effective way of treating massive pericardial effusion. Removing tube after adequate drainage (50 mL/day) and treatment of primary pathology are key to preventing recurrence. There is also a need to follow up patients to detect pericardial constriction especially those with thickened pericardium. PMID:27517082

  3. Confinement and viscosity ratio effect on droplet break-up in a concentrated emulsion flowing through a narrow constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, Jian Wei; Gai, Ya; Tang, Sindy

    2016-11-01

    We describe the dimensionless groups that determine the break-up probability of droplets in a concentrated emulsion during its flow in a tapered microchannel consisting of a narrow constriction. Such channel geometry is commonly used in droplet microfluidics to investigate the content of droplets from a concentrated emulsion. In contrast to solid wells in multi-well plates, drops are metastable, and are prone to break-up which compromises the accuracy and the throughput of the assay. Unlike single drops, the break-up process in a concentrated emulsion is stochastic. Analysis of the behavior of a large number of drops (N >5000) shows that the probability of break-up increases with applied flow rate, the size of the drops relative to the size of the constriction, and the viscosity ratio of the emulsion. We found that the break-up probability collapses into a single curve when plotted as a function of the product of capillary number, viscosity ratio, and confinement factor defined as the un-deformed radius of the drop relative to the hydraulic radius of the constriction. The results represent a critical step towards the understanding of the physics governing instability in concentrated emulsions.

  4. Influence of a constriction in the near field of the vocal folds: physical modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Lucie; Pelorson, Xavier; Henrich, Nathalie; Ruty, Nicolas

    2008-11-01

    The involvement of the ventricular folds is often observed in human phonation and, in particular, in pathological and or some throat-singing phonation. This study aims to explore and model the possible aerodynamic interaction between the ventricular and vocal folds using suitable in vitro setups allowing steady and unsteady flow conditions. The two experimental setups consist of a rigid and a self-oscillating vocal-fold replica, coupled to a downstream rigid ventricular-fold replica in both cases. A theoretical flow modeling is proposed to quantify the aerodynamic impact of the ventricular folds on the pressure distribution and thereby on the vocal-fold vibrations. The mechanical behavior of the vocal folds is simulated by a distributed model accounting for this impact. The influence of the ventricular constriction is measured in both flow conditions and compared to the model outcome. This study objectively evaluates the additional pressure drop implied by the presence of a ventricular constriction in the larynx. It is demonstrated that such constriction can either facilitate or impede the glottal vibrations depending on the laryngeal geometrical configuration. The relevance of using static or dynamic vocal-fold replicas is discussed.

  5. Test of the movement expansion model: Anticipatory vowel lip protrusion and constriction in French and English speakers

    PubMed Central

    Noiray, Aude; Cathiard, Marie-Agnès; Ménard, Lucie; Abry, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The modeling of anticipatory coarticulation has been the subject of longstanding debates for more than 40 yr. Empirical investigations in the articulatory domain have converged toward two extreme modeling approaches: a maximal anticipation behavior (Look-ahead model) or a fixed pattern (Time-locked model). However, empirical support for any of these models has been hardly conclusive, both within and across languages. The present study tested the temporal organization of vocalic anticipatory coarticulation of the rounding feature from [i] to [u] transitions for adult speakers of American English and Canadian French. Articulatory data were synchronously recorded using an Optotrak for lip protrusion and a dedicated Lip-Shape-Tracking-System for lip constriction. Results show that (i) protrusion is an inconsistent parameter for tracking anticipatory rounding gestures across individuals, more specifically in English; (ii) labial constriction (between-lip area) is a more reliable correlate, allowing for the description of vocalic rounding in both languages; (iii) when tested on the constriction component, speakers show a lawful anticipatory behavior expanding linearly as the intervocalic consonant interval increases from 0 to 5 consonants. The Movement Expansion Model from Abry and Lallouache [(1995a) Bul. de la Comm. Parlée 3, 85–99; (1995b) Proceedings of ICPHS4, 152–155.] predicted such a regular behavior, i.e., a lawful variabilitywith a speaker-specific expansion rate, which is not language-specific. PMID:21303015

  6. Theory of vibratory mobilization and break-up of non-wetting fluids entrapped in pore constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, I.; Li, W.; Vigil, D.

    2006-12-01

    Quantitative dynamics of a non-wetting (e. g., NAPL) ganglion entrapped in a pore constriction and subjected to vibrations can be approximated by the equation of motion of an oscillator moving under the effect of the external pressure gradient, inertial oscillatory force, and restoring capillary force. The solution of the equation provides the conditions under which the droplet experiences forced oscillations without being mobilized or is liberated upon the acceleration of the wall exceeding an "unplugging" threshold. This solution provides a quantitative tool for the estimation of the parameters of vibratory fields needed to liberate entrapped non-wetting fluids. For typical pore sizes encountered in reservoirs and aquifers, wall accelerations must exceed at least several m/sec2 and even higher levels to mobilize the droplets of NAPL; however, in the populations of ganglia entrapped in natural porous environments, many may reside very near their mobilization thresholds and may be mobilized by extremely low accelerations as well. For given acceleration, lower seismic frequencies are more efficient. The ganglia may also break up into smaller pieces when passing through pore constrictions. The snap-off is governed by the geometry only; for constrictions with sinusoidal profile (spatial wavelength of L and maximum and minimum radii of rmax and rmin, the break-up occurs if L > 2π(rmin rmax)1/2. Computational fluid dynamics shows the details of the break-up process.

  7. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  8. Relaxation of endothelin-1-induced pulmonary arterial constriction by niflumic acid and NPPB: mechanism(s) independent of chloride channel block.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Evans, A M; Kozlowski, R Z

    1999-03-01

    We investigated the effects of the Cl- channel blockers niflumic acid, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) and 4, 4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) on endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced constriction of rat small pulmonary arteries (diameter 100-400 microm) in vitro, following endothelium removal. ET-1 (30 nM) induced a sustained constriction of rat pulmonary arteries in physiological salt solution. Arteries preconstricted with ET-1 were relaxed by niflumic acid (IC50: 35.8 microM) and NPPB (IC50: 21.1 microM) in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. However, at concentrations known to block Ca++-activated Cl- channels, DIDS (constriction. Similar results were obtained when pulmonary arteries were preincubated with these Cl- channel blockers. When L-type Ca++ channels were blocked by nifedipine (10 microM), the ET-1-induced (30 nM) constriction was inhibited by only 5.8%. However, niflumic acid (30 microM) and NPPB (30 microM) inhibited the ET-1-induced constriction by approximately 53% and approximately 60%, respectively, both in the continued presence of nifedipine and in Ca++-free physiological salt solution. The Ca++ ionophore A23187 (10 microM) also evoked a sustained constriction of pulmonary arteries. Surprisingly, the A23187-induced constriction was also inhibited in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner by niflumic acid (IC50: 18.0 microM) and NPPB (IC50: 8.8 microM), but not by DIDS (constriction is independent of Cl- channel blockade. One possibility is that these compounds may block the Ca++-dependent contractile processes.

  9. [Syndromes 2. Pfeiffer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Freihofer, H P

    1998-07-01

    Acrocephalosyndactylias are syndromes characterized by abnormalities of the head (craniosynostosis), the face (hypertelorism, retromaxillism), hands and feet (cutaneous or bony syndactyly). Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but spontaneous cases are described also. The group is divided into several syndromes with varying penetrance and expressivity. As an example of an acrocephalosyndactylia is the Pfeiffer syndrome presented.

  10. Hyperautofluorescent Macular Ring in a Series of Patients With Enhanced S-Cone

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rony; Greenberg, Jonathan P.; Duncker, Tobias; Nguyen, Huy V.; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe fundus autofluorescence (AF) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings in three patients with enhanced S-cone syndrome and their correlation around the hyperautofluorescent ring border. Patients had AF imaging in combination with SD-OCT line-scans through the fovea, at the posterior pole, and at a temporal locus centered on the ring border. All eyes demonstrated a macular ring of high-intensity AF. The inner segment ellipsoid band showed thinning and disorganization toward the ring border, where it was lost. PMID:25423642

  11. Electroacupuncture and lumbar transplant of GDNF-secreting fibroblasts synergistically attenuate hyperalgesia after sciatic nerve constriction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiqiang; Sun, Yong; Lu, Peihua; Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Gencheng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been shown to induce potent analgesic effects on neuropathic pain in both patients and rodents. Cell therapy to release antinociceptive agents near the pain processing centers of the spinal cord is a promising next step in the development of treatment modalities. This study investigated the effects of the combination of EA and cell therapy by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on neuropathic pain in rats. The hyperalgesic state was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve and fibroblasts genetically modified to secrete bioactive GDNF (FBs-GDNF) were used for cell therapy. Fifty-eight rats with neuropathic pain were randomly divided into five groups (CCI+PBS, n = 11; CCI+FBs-GDNF, n = 12; CCI+EA+PBS, n = 11; CCI+EA+FBs-pLNCX2, n = 12; CCI+EA+FBs-GDNF, n = 12). On the 7th day after CCI, the rats received intrathecal transplantation of FBs-GDNF or control fibroblasts (FBs-pLNCX2). In the meantime, EA was administered once every other day from the 7th day after CCI surgery for 21 days. The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) to radiant heat was measured every other day. The results showed that the ipsilateral PWL of the rats from all three EA treatment groups significantly increased starting on the 12th day compared with the PBS control group. Strikingly, the group which received EA treatment and FBs-GDNF transplantation (CCI+EA+FBs-GDNF) showed a significantly decreased thermal hyperalgesia after 2 weeks post CCI surgery compared with the groups which received EA treatment and FBs-pLNCX2 transplantation (CCI+EA+FBs-pLNCX2) or PBS (CCI+EA+PBS) as well as the FBs-GDNF transplantation group without EA treatment (CCI+FBs-GDNF). Our data suggest that EA and cell therapy can synergistically attenuate hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain rats.

  12. Abnormal DNA methylation in the lumbar spinal cord following chronic constriction injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lin, Zhi-Ping; Zheng, Hui-Zhe; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Zong-Luan; Chen, Yan; You, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is complex and not clearly understood. Glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67) is a key synthetic enzyme for the main inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and diminishes in the spinal dorsal horn in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). GAD 67 is coded by gene GAD 1. DNA methylation can regulate the expression of GAD 67 by regulating the methylation of GAD 1 promoter in the psychotic brain. DNA methylation is primarily mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and methyl-DNA binding domain proteins (MBDs). In this study, in order to discover whether DNA methylation regulates GAD 67 expression in the spinal cord in CCI rats and is involved in neuropathic pain, we examined mRNA levels of DNMTs, MBDs and GAD 67 with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and methylation of GAD 1 promoter with Pyromark CpG Assays in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. Our results showed that DNMT3a, DNMT3b and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expression increased, MBD2 expression decreased, and DNMT1, MBD1 and MBD3 expression hardly changed in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. GAD 67 expression decreased, and methylation of GAD 1 promoter increased in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. These results indicate that decreased GAD 67 may be associated with increased GAD 1 promoter methylation, which may be mediated by DNMT3a, DNMT3b, MeCP2 and MBD2 in CCI rats. These indicate that abnormal DNA methylation may be highly involved in CCI-induced neuropathic pain.

  13. Aortic Remodeling Following Transverse Aortic Constriction in Mice is Attenuated with AT1 Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Geng, Liang; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Cao, Jiu-Mei; Guo, Steven; Villamizar, Carlos; Kwartler, Callie S.; Ju, Xiaoxi; Brasier, Allan R.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although hypertension is the most common risk factor for thoracic aortic diseases, it is not understood how increased pressures on the ascending aorta lead to aortic aneurysms. We investigated the role of Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor activation in ascending aortic remodeling in response to increased biomechanical forces using a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse model. Approach and Results Two weeks after TAC, the increased biomechanical pressures led to ascending aortic dilatation, aortic wall thickening and medial hypertrophy. Significant adventitial hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in TAC ascending aortas were accompanied by increased adventitial collagen, elevated inflammatory and proliferative markers, and increased cell density due to accumulation of myofibroblasts and macrophages. Treatment with losartan significantly blocked TAC induced vascular inflammation and macrophage accumulation. However, losartan only partially prevented TAC induced adventitial hyperplasia, collagen accumulation and ascending aortic dilatation. Increased Tgfb2 expression and phosphorylated-Smad2 staining in the medial layer of TAC ascending aortas was effectively blocked with losartan. In contrast, the increased Tgfb1 expression and adventitial phospho-Smad2 staining were only partially attenuated by losartan. In addition, losartan significantly blocked Erk activation and ROS production in the TAC ascending aorta. Conclusions Inhibition of the AT1 receptor using losartan significantly attenuated the vascular remodeling associated with TAC but did not completely block the increased TGF- β1 expression, adventitial Smad2 signaling and collagen accumulation. These results help to delineate the aortic TGF-β signaling that is dependent and independent of the AT1 receptor after TAC. PMID:23868934

  14. Conditioned place preference and spontaneous dorsal horn neuron activity in chronic constriction injury model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Brian D.; Reddy, Chandan G.; Howard, Matthew A.; Kang, Sinyoung; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain commonly present with spontaneous pain, in addition to allodynia and hyperalgesia. While evoked responses in neuropathic pain models are well characterized, determining the presence of spontaneous pain is more challenging. We determined if the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model could be used to measure effects of treatment of spontaneous pain, by evaluating dorsal horn neuron (DHN) spontaneous activity and spontaneous pain-related behaviors. We measured conditioned place preference (CPP) to analgesia produced by sciatic nerve block with bupivacaine in rats with established CCI. We undertook another CPP experiment using hindpaw incision. We also examined DHN spontaneous activity in CCI rats. While CCI produced nocifensive responses to mechanical stimuli, CPP to analgesic nerve block was not evident 14 days following injury: Compared to baseline (314 ± 65 sec), CCI rats did not show a preference for the bupivacaine-paired chamber following conditioning (330 ± 102 sec). On the other hand, sciatic nerve block after hindpaw incision produced CPP on postoperative day 1, serving as a positive control. The proportion of spontaneously active DHNs (33%) was not significantly increased in CCI rats compared to the sham (21%). The median rate of spontaneous activity in the CCI group (12.6 imp/s) was not different from the sham group (9.2 imp/s). Also, there was no change in DHN spontaneous activity following sciatic nerve block with bupivacaine. Our findings suggest that CCI as a neuropathic pain model should not be used to measure effects of treatment of spontaneous pain driven by the peripheral input. PMID:26584420

  15. A Novel Imaging Analysis Method for Capturing Pharyngeal Constriction During Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Schwertner, Ryan W.; Garand, Kendrea L.; Pearson, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Videofluoroscopic imaging of swallowing known as the Modified Barium Study (MBS) is the standard of care for assessing swallowing difficulty. While the clinical purpose of this radiographic imaging is to primarily assess aspiration risk, valuable biomechanical data is embedded in these studies. Computational analysis of swallowing mechanics (CASM) is an established research methodology for assessing multiple interactions of swallowing mechanics based on coordinates mapping muscle function including hyolaryngeal movement, pharyngeal shortening, tongue base retraction, and extension of the head and neck, however coordinates characterizing pharyngeal constriction is undeveloped. The aim of this study was to establish a method for locating the superior and middle pharyngeal constrictors using hard landmarks as guides on MBS videofluoroscopic imaging, and to test the reliability of this new method. Twenty de-identified, normal, MBS videos were randomly selected from a database. Two raters annotated landmarks for the superior and middle pharyngeal constrictors frame-by-frame using a semi-automated MATLAB tracker tool at two time points. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess test-retest reliability between two raters with an ICC = 0.99 or greater for all coordinates for the retest measurement. MorphoJ integrated software was used to perform a discriminate function analysis to visualize how all 12 coordinates interact with each other in normal swallowing. The addition of the superior and middle pharyngeal constrictor coordinates to CASM allows for a robust analysis of the multiple components of swallowing mechanics interacting with a wide range of variables in both patient specific and cohort studies derived from common use imaging data.

  16. A Novel Imaging Analysis Method for Capturing Pharyngeal Constriction During Swallowing.

    PubMed

    Schwertner, Ryan W; Garand, Kendrea L; Pearson, William G

    2016-01-01

    Videofluoroscopic imaging of swallowing known as the Modified Barium Study (MBS) is the standard of care for assessing swallowing difficulty. While the clinical purpose of this radiographic imaging is to primarily assess aspiration risk, valuable biomechanical data is embedded in these studies. Computational analysis of swallowing mechanics (CASM) is an established research methodology for assessing multiple interactions of swallowing mechanics based on coordinates mapping muscle function including hyolaryngeal movement, pharyngeal shortening, tongue base retraction, and extension of the head and neck, however coordinates characterizing pharyngeal constriction is undeveloped. The aim of this study was to establish a method for locating the superior and middle pharyngeal constrictors using hard landmarks as guides on MBS videofluoroscopic imaging, and to test the reliability of this new method. Twenty de-identified, normal, MBS videos were randomly selected from a database. Two raters annotated landmarks for the superior and middle pharyngeal constrictors frame-by-frame using a semi-automated MATLAB tracker tool at two time points. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess test-retest reliability between two raters with an ICC = 0.99 or greater for all coordinates for the retest measurement. MorphoJ integrated software was used to perform a discriminate function analysis to visualize how all 12 coordinates interact with each other in normal swallowing. The addition of the superior and middle pharyngeal constrictor coordinates to CASM allows for a robust analysis of the multiple components of swallowing mechanics interacting with a wide range of variables in both patient specific and cohort studies derived from common use imaging data.

  17. Differential Impact of Constrictive Physiology after Pericardiocentesis in Malignancy Patients with Pericardial Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chung, Hyemoon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2015-01-01

    Background Echocardiographic signs of constrictive physiology (CP) after pericardiocentesis are frequently observed in malignancy patients. The purpose of the current study was to explore whether features of CP after pericardiocentesis have prognostic impact in malignancy patients with pericardial effusion (PE). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 467 consecutive patients who underwent pericardiocentesis at our institution from January 2006 to May 2014. Among them, 205 patients with advanced malignancy who underwent comprehensive echocardiography after the procedure comprised the study population. Co-primary end points were all-cause mortality (ACM) and repeated drainage (RD) for PE. Patients were divided into four subgroups according to cytologic result for malignant cells and CP (positive cytology with negative CP, both positive, both negative, and negative cytology with positive CP). Results CP after pericardiocentesis was present in 106 patients (50%) at median 4 days after the procedure. During median follow-up of 208 days, ACM and RD occurred in 162 patients (79%) and 29 patients (14%), respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed that independent predictors for ACM were male gender and positive cytology (all, p < 0.05). For RD, predictors were positive cytology, the absence of cardiac tamponade, and negative CP after pericardiocentesis (all, p < 0.05). When the patients were divided into four subgroups, patients with negative cytology and positive CP demonstrated the most favorable survival (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.39, p = 0.005) and the lowest RD rates (HR: 0.07, p = 0.012). Conclusion CP after pericardiocentesis is common, but does not always imply poor survival or the need for RD in patients with advanced malignancies. On the contrary, the presence of CP in patients with negative cytology conferred the most favorable survival and the lowest rate of RD. Comprehensive echocardiographic evaluation for CP after pericardiocentesis would be helpful for

  18. Reduced cardiac fructose 2,6 bisphosphate increases hypertrophy and decreases glycolysis following aortic constriction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxun; Xu, Jianxiang; Wang, Qianwen; Brainard, Robert E; Watson, Lewis J; Jones, Steven P; Epstein, Paul N

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to test whether reduced levels of cardiac fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F-2,6-P(2)) exacerbates cardiac damage in response to pressure overload. F-2,6-P(2) is a positive regulator of the glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase. Normal and Mb transgenic mice were subject to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham surgery. Mb transgenic mice have reduced F-2,6-P(2) levels, due to cardiac expression of a transgene for a mutant, kinase deficient form of the enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PFK-2) which controls the level of F-2,6-P(2). Thirteen weeks following TAC surgery, glycolysis was elevated in FVB, but not in Mb, hearts. Mb hearts were markedly more sensitive to TAC induced damage. Echocardiography revealed lower fractional shortening in Mb-TAC mice as well as larger left ventricular end diastolic and end systolic diameters. Cardiac hypertrophy and pulmonary congestion were more severe in Mb-TAC mice as indicated by the ratios of heart and lung weight to tibia length. Expression of α-MHC RNA was reduced more in Mb-TAC hearts than in FVB-TAC hearts. TAC produced a much greater increase in fibrosis of Mb hearts and this was accompanied by 5-fold more collagen 1 RNA expression in Mb-TAC versus FVB-TAC hearts. Mb-TAC hearts had the lowest phosphocreatine to ATP ratio and the most oxidative stress as indicated by higher cardiac content of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. These results indicate that the heart's capacity to increase F-2,6-P(2) during pressure overload elevates glycolysis which is beneficial for reducing pressure overload induced cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction and fibrosis.

  19. Flow structures and red blood cell dynamics in arteriole of dilated or constricted cross section.

    PubMed

    Gambaruto, Alberto M

    2016-07-26

    Vessel with 'circular' or 'star-shaped' cross sections are studied, representing respectively dilated or constricted cases where endothelial cells smoothly line or bulge into the lumen. Computational haemodynamics simulations are carried out on idealised periodic arteriole-sized vessels, with red blood cell 'tube' hematocrit value=24%. A further simulation of a single red blood cell serves for comparison purposes. The bulk motion of the red blood cells reproduces well-known effects, including the presence of a cell-free layer and the apparent shear-thinning non-Newtonian rheology. The velocity flow field is analysed in a Lagrangian reference frame, relative to any given red blood cell, hence removing the bulk coaxial motion and highlighting instead the complex secondary flow patterns. An aggregate formation becomes apparent, continuously rearranging and dynamic, brought about by the inter-cellular fluid mechanics interactions and the deformability properties of the cells. The secondary flow field induces a vacillating radial migration of the red blood cells. At different radial locations, the red blood cells express different residence times, orientation and shape. The shear stresses exerted by the flow on the vessel wall are influenced by the motion of red blood cells, despite the presence of the cell-free layer. Spatial (and temporal) variations of wall shear stress patters are observed, especially for the 'circular' vessel. The 'star-shaped' vessel bears considerable stress at the protruding endothelial cell crests, where the stress vectors are coaxially aligned. The bulging endothelial cells hence regularise the transmission of stresses on the vessel wall.

  20. Differences in the effects of turns and constrictions on the resistive response in current-biased superconducting wire after single photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotova, A. N.; Y Vodolazov, D.

    2013-07-01

    We study how turns and constrictions affect the resistive response of superconducting wire after instantaneous, localized heating, by modeling the absorption of a single photon by the wire. We find that the presence of constrictions favors the detection of photons with a range of energies whereas the presence of turns increases the ability to detect only relatively ‘low’ energy photons. The main reason is that in the case of a constriction the current density is increased over the whole length and width of the constriction while in the case of a turn the current density is enhanced only near the inner corner of the turn. This results in inhomogeneous Joule heating near the turn and worsens the conditions for the appearance of the normal domain at relatively small currents, where the ‘high’ energy photons could already create a normal domain in the straight part of the wire. We also find that the amplitude of the voltage pulse depends on the location at which the photon is absorbed, being smallest when the photon is absorbed near the turn and largest when the photon is absorbed near the constriction. This effect is due to the difference in the resistance of constrictions and turns in the normal state from the resistance of the rest of the wire.

  1. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  2. Ring closure in actin polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  3. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  4. Uranus: the rings are black.

    PubMed

    Sinton, W M

    1977-11-04

    An upper limit of 0.05 is established for the geometric albedo of the newly discovered rings of Uranus. In view of this very low albedo, the particles of the rings cannot be ice-covered as are those of rings A and B of Saturn.

  5. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  6. Saturn Ring Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Answering fundamental questions about ring particle characteristics, and individual and group behavior, appears to require close-proximity (a few km) observations. Saturn's magnificent example of a ring system offers a full range of particle sizes, densities, and behaviors for study, so it is a natural choice for such detailed investigation. Missions implementing these observations require post-approach Delta(V) of approximately 10 km/s or more, so past mission concepts called upon Nuclear Electric Propulsion. The concept described here reduces the propulsive Delta(V) requirement to as little as 3.5 km/s, difficult but not impossible for high-performance chemical propulsion systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Strained Ring Energetic Binders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-27

    polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ). PHBV was not found to have the mechanical instability problems of PBV, but was still thermally unstable (Tonset - 660C, Tmax - 1090C...DISCUSSION 4 Polybenzvalene (PBV) 4 Polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ) 6 Chain-Transfer Studies 11 CONCLUSIONS 15 EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES 16 .F 4E 19 APPENDICES A...strained ring polymers similar to PBV are known. The investigation of one of these polymers, polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ), is also described in this report

  8. Which Ringed Planet...!?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Don't worry - you are not the only one who thought this was a nice amateur photo of planet Saturn, Lord of the Rings in our Solar System! But then the relative brightness and positions of the moons may appear somewhat unfamiliar... and the ring system does look unusually bright when compared to the planetary disk...?? Well, it is not Saturn, but Uranus , the next giant planet further out, located at a distance of about 3,000 million km, or 20 times the distance between the Sun and the Earth. The photo shows Uranus surrounded by its rings and some of the moons, as they appear on a near-infrared image that was obtained in the K s -band (at wavelength 2.2 µm) with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument on the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile) . The exposure was made on November 19, 2002 (03:00 hrs UT) during a planetary research programme. The observing conditions were excellent (seeing 0.5 arcsec) and the exposure lasted 5 min. The angular diameter of Uranus is about 3.5 arcsec. The observers at ISAAC were Emmanuel Lellouch and Thérése Encrenaz of the Observatoire de Paris (France) and Jean-Gabriel Cuby and Andreas Jaunsen (both ESO-Chile). The rings The rings of Uranus were discovered in 1977, from observations during a stellar occultation event by astronomer teams at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) and the Perth Observatory (Australia). Just before and after the planet moved in front of the (occulted) star, the surrounding rings caused the starlight to dim for short intervals of time. Photos obtained from the Voyager-2 spacecraft in 1986 showed a multitude of very tenuous rings. These rings are almost undetectable from the Earth in visible light. However, on the present VLT near-infrared picture, the contrast between the rings and the planet is strongly enhanced. At the particular wavelength at which this observation was made, the infalling sunlight is almost completely absorbed by gaseous methane present in the planetary atmosphere

  9. Precooler Ring Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Moenich, J.

    1980-10-02

    The precooler vacuum system, as proposed by FNAL, is based on a suitable modification of the existing Electron Cooling Ring System. Because of the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets, distributed ion pumping, as exists in the Electron Cooling Ring, is not applicable. Instead, the proposed pumping will be done with commercial appendage ion pumps mounted approximately every two meters around the circumference of the ring. The loss of effective pumping speed and non-uniformity of system pressure with appendage pumps may not be major considerations but the large number required does effect experimental and analytical equipment placement considerations. There is a distributed pumping technique available which: (1) is not affected by the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets; (2) will provide a minimum of four times the hydrogen pumping speed of the proposed appendage ion pumps; (3) will require no power during pumping after the strip is activated; (4) will provide the heat source for bakeout; (5) is easily replaceable; and (6) can be purchased, installed, and operated at a generous economic advantage over the presently proposed ion pumped system. The pumping technique referred to is non-evaporable gettering with ST101 Zr/Al pumping strip. A technical description of this pumping strip is given on Data Sheet 1 and 2 attached to this report.

  10. Saturn's ``Gossamer'' Ring: The F Ring's Inner Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    Recent Galileo and Earth-based images have revealed for the first time that Jupiter's ``gossamer'' ring is actually composed of two rings, one bounded at the outer edge by Amalthea and the other bounded by Thebe. Dynamical models suggest that these rings are composed of dust grains ejected off the surfaces of the two moons, which then evolve inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. A very faint sheet of material filling the region between Saturn's A and F Rings reported by Burns et al. (BAAS 15, 1013--1014, 1983) may be a dynamically analogous system, in which dust escapes from the F Ring and evolves inward to the A Ring. Unlike Jupiter's gossamer rings, however, the inner sheet of Saturn's F Ring has been well observed from a large range of phase angles and visual wavelengths by Voyager. Voyager images reveal that this faint ring shows a tenfold increase in brightness between phase angles of 125(deg) and 165(deg) , indicating that it is composed of fine dust microns in size. Preliminary estimates of the normal optical depth fall in the range 1--2*E(-4) , depending on the dust size distribution assumed. Initial spectrophotometry reveals that the ring is neutral in color. The ring is uniform in brightness over the entire region between the two rings, with no evidence for internal structure associated with Prometheus and Atlas, suggesting that neither of these embedded moons acts as either a source or a sink. We will refine the aforementioned measurements and develop photometric models to better constrain the properties of the dust in this ring. This will enable us to relate the dust population to that in the F Ring proper, and to better explore the dynamical processes at work.

  11. Moebius Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ...

  12. [The concomitance of pericarditis constrictiva in patient with Silver-Russell syndrome, primary hyperparathyroidism and oncologic history: causal coincidence or pathogenetic sequence?].

    PubMed

    Banach, Monika; Zapolski, Tomasz; Drozd, Jakub; Wysokiński, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The most common cause of calcific pericarditis is idiopathic. We report a case of a 24 year-old woman with Silver-Russell syndrome, history of Wilms' tumour in childhood, constrictive pericarditis and primary hyperparathyroidism. We analyse pathologic mechanisms of disseminated calcification and possible genetic factors that may contribute to aetiology and clinical presentation of calcific pericarditis.

  13. Helmet latching and attaching ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, E. W.; Viikinsalo, S. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A neck ring releasably secured to a pressurized garment carries an open-ended ring normally in the engagement position fitted into an annular groove and adapted to fit into a complementary annular groove formed in a helmet. Camming means formed on the inner surface at the end of the helmet engages the open-ended ring to retract the same and allow for one motion donning even when the garment is pressurized. A projection on the end of the split ring is engageable to physically retract the split ring.

  14. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Ring Sideroblasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

  15. Mass of Saturn's A ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The mass of Saturn's A ring is reestimated using the behavior of spiral density waves embedded in the ring. The Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) observed the star delta-Scorpii as it was occulted by Saturn's rings during the Voyager 2 flyby of Saturn in 1981 producing a radial profile of the rings. We examined forty spiral density waves in the Voyager PPS data of the A ring including 10 weaker waves that have not been previously analyzed by means of an autoregressive power spectral technique called Burg. The strengths of this new method for ring studies are that weaker, less extended waves are easily detected and characterized. This method is also the first one which does not require precise knowledge of the resonance location and phase of the wave in order to calculate the surface mass density. Uncertainties of up to 3 km are present in the currently available radial scales for Saturn's rings.

  16. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  17. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  18. Leprechaunism with mosaicism 46, XX/47, XX extra ring chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Ventruto, V; Sebastio, L; Sebastio, G; DeMasi, R V; Vota, U; Farina, L; Festa, B

    1977-01-01

    A case of leprechaunism with a chromosomal abnormality is reported. The patient was a female infant, born to healthy, consanguineous young parents. Her course was one of extreme marasmus, with death at 3 months of age. She presented the classical features of the syndrome and chromosome mosaicism 46, XX/47, XX, +r(?). It was not possible to identify the origin of the extra ring chromosome. It is difficult to establish the role of such a cytogenetic finding in the aetiology of the syndrome. Images PMID:592357

  19. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  20. Role of miR-145 in chronic constriction injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaolin; Tang, Yuanzhang; Zhang, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of miRNA-145 (miR-145) in rat models of chronic constriction injury (CCI). Rats were randomly divided into control, sham, CCI, agomiRNA (agomiR)-normal control (NC) and agomiR-145 groups (n=25 in each group); in addition, 30 rats with CCI were divided into small hairpin (sh)RNA-NC and shRNA-ras responsive element binding protein 1 (RREB1) groups. Paw withdrawal thermal latency (PWTL) and paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) were detected. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect miR-145 expression levels, and western blotting was performed to measure RREB1 and phosphorylated-protein kinase B (p-AKT) expression levels. In addition, a dual luciferase reporter assay was conducted to identify the target gene of miR-145. PWMT and PWTL were decreased in CCI rats and this decrease was alleviated by miR-145 injection. At 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after CCI, miR-145 expression level in the spinal cord tissue of rats in the CCI group was significantly decreased compared with 1 day before CCI (P<0.05). Compared with the CCI group, miR-145 expression level in the agomiR-145 group was significantly higher (P<0.05). In addition, expression levels of RREB1 and p-AKT were significantly increased in the CCI group and significantly decreased in the agomiR-145 group (P<0.05). Furthermore, knockdown of RREB1 expression by shRNA-RREB1 significantly increased values of PWMT and PWTL, decreased expression levels of RREB1 and p-AKT, and increased miR-145 expression levels (P<0.05). Further investigation demonstrated that miR-145 can bind with RREB1 mRNA. In conclusion, miR-145 may be involved in the development of CCI through regulating the expression of RREB1. PMID:28105140

  1. Ring currents in azulene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, A. T.; Todorov, T. N.; Elena, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    We propose a self consistent polarisable ion tight binding theory for the study of push-pull processes in aromatic molecules. We find that the method quantitatively reproduces ab initio calculations of dipole moments and polarisability. We apply the scheme in a simulation which solves the time dependent Schrödinger equation to follow the relaxation of azulene from the second excited to the ground states. We observe rather spectacular oscillating ring currents which we explain in terms of interference between the HOMO and LUMO states.

  2. Wave structure in planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Linda Joyce

    1992-01-01

    Planetary rings contain a wealth of wavelike structure that is driven by gravitational resonance interactions with nearby satellites. Wave behavior is a powerful tool for estimating physical ring parameters that are key to our understanding of ring origin and evolution. A new technique, utilizing the Burg autoregressive power spectral algorithm, was developed for probing the physical characteristics of rings and for detecting waves that are not otherwise visible. Data from the Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune and the Voyager radio science (RSS) occultation by Saturn's rings were used. Local surface mass density estimates are obtained from the dispersion of 40 spiral density waves in Saturn's A ring, including 10 weaker waves not previously analyzed. Surface mass densities vary from 20 to 60 gm sq cm. Increasing optical depth is not correlated with increasing surface mass density, especially after the Keeler gap, suggesting that ring particle size and composition are not uniform throughout the A ring. Saturn's A ring mass is reestimated using the surface mass densities and is 5.2 +/- 1.3 x 1021 gm. The wakes of Saturn's satellite Pan are not short timescale phenomena because the effects of Pan's gravitational perturbations persist for more than one Pan encounter. Four additional Pan wakes were discovered at longitudes greater than 360 deg. Collective effects such as collisions modify the wake dispersion more extensively at greater longitudes. Pan is the dominant mass in the Encke gap. A spiral density wave was detected inside the Uranian delta ring. Upper and lower bounds were estimated for the surface mass density of the delta ring 5 less than or equal to sigma less than or equal to 10 gm/sq cm, the viscosity 10 less than or equal to nu less than or equal to 40 sq cm/sec, and the local ring height 7 less than or equal to h less than or equal to 20 m. These values are comparable to the corresponding

  3. A case report of bilateral Brodie bite in early mixed dentition using bonded constriction quad-helix appliance.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Kunihiko; Takaku, Sakiko; Murase, Chiaki; Nishii, Yasushi; Sueishi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Brodie bite is a comparatively rare type of malocclusion found in primary and mixed dentition. It not only adversely affects chewing and muscle functions, but also impairs normal growth and development of the mandible. This report describes the therapeutic results of a patient with bilateral Brodie bite in early mixed dentition after using a bonded constriction quad-helix appliance. The patient, a boy aged 9 years and 2 months, first visited our hospital after occlusal abnormality in the molar region was detected at a local dental clinic. Case analysis resulted in a diagnosis of bilateral Brodie bite with slight mandibular retrognathism. Treatment objectives were to reduce the arch width of the maxillary dentition and expand the mandibular arch in order to establish and stabilize molar occlusion and to achieve a Class I molar relation and appropriate overbite and overjet. Treatment comprised covering the occlusal surface of the maxillary molars with resin and attaching a bonded constriction quad-helix appliance joined with a 0.040-inch quad-helix wire. A bi-helix appliance was also fixed to the mandibular dentition. Brodie bite visibly improved after 5 months. Cervical headgear was then fitted and the patient observed until eruption of the permanent dentition was complete. Class I molar relation was achieved after 2 years and 6 months, although spacing remained in the maxillary and mandibular dentitions. Treatment of bilateral Brodie bite in mixed dentition by means of a bonded constriction quad-helix appliance attached to the maxillary dentition enabled effective bite opening and reduction in the width of maxillary arch independent of the patient's cooperation, providing good therapeutic outcome in a short time period.

  4. The Charging of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graps, Amara L.; Horanyi, M.; Havnes, O.; Gruen, E.

    2008-09-01

    Planetary rings have an undeniable aesthetic appeal, resulting in media icons of ringed planets as descriptive of the planetary sciences field as a whole. Such far-reaching symbolism might not be misplaced, however, because planetary rings represent a fundamental class of planetary structure that invites interdisciplinary investigations from specialists in dust, gravitational, plasma, collisional, and radiative transfer physics, due to: its sub-micron to meters-sized particles, its immersion in the planet's magnetic field, its embedded moonlets and its close proximity to the ringed planet's ionosphere and innermost moons. As such, planetary rings are a metaphoric bridge through a wide range of planetary physical processes. Processes to charge ring particles have different relative dynamical effects, dependent upon the rings' particle sizes, and the ring's plasma, magnetic and gravitational environments. This presentation will review what is known about the charging parameters and processes of planetary rings, in particular the sum of the individual currents from the time-varying charge dQ/dt, of the planetary ring particle. The individual currents depend on the environmental plasma conditions: number density, flow speed, temperature, and mass for the currents: electron and ion capture from the plasma, ion currents to a moving grain, photoelectron emission, secondary electron emission, thermionic effects, with stochastic charging influencing all of the above. Since rings are an ensemble of particles, ("cloud" Ring), we will define an ensemble, and consider the above currents, including those for the smallest ring particles, the dust particles, to arrive at a table giving charge potential and other relevant parameters.

  5. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  6. Storage ring injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some basic issues involved in injecting the beam into storage rings with the principal parameters of those studied at the workshop have been considered. The main conclusion is that straightforward adjustments of the storage ring parameters makes injection easy. The largest number of injected turns is fourteen, and the phase space dilution allowance seems adequate to ensure very small beam loss during injection. The adjustments also result in lower bending magnet fields, and high field superconducting magnets (e.g., 5 Tesla) are not necessary. The design changes do not necessarily affect the Keil-Schnell criterion for stability of the longitudinal microwave instability, although that criterion appears to be irrelevant. Because the beams are expected to be unstable, but with slow growth rates, the vacuum chamber impedances required to give equal risetimes for the various designs are compared for systems posing various degrees of difficulty for injection. Finally, the impact of the parameters on cost is noted, and a system is considered that cuts the length of the linac in half by using doubly charged ions.

  7. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  8. Ring current and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  9. Reversible Rings with Involutions and Some Minimalities

    PubMed Central

    Fakieh, W. M.; Nauman, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    In continuation of the recent developments on extended reversibilities on rings, we initiate here a study on reversible rings with involutions, or, in short, ∗-reversible rings. These rings are symmetric, reversible, reflexive, and semicommutative. In this note we will study some properties and examples of ∗-reversible rings. It is proved here that the polynomial rings of ∗-reversible rings may not be ∗-reversible. A criterion for rings which cannot adhere to any involution is developed and it is observed that a minimal noninvolutary ring is of order 4 and that a minimal noncommutative ∗-reversible ring is of order 16. PMID:24489510

  10. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  11. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  12. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  13. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  14. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  15. Laser midline glossectomy and lingual tonsillectomy as treatments for sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Arata; Kawakatsu, Kenji; Suzuki, Kenji; Nishimura, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    Preservation treatments for sleep respiratory disorders, such as the use of a dental device and the technique of nasal continuous positive air pressure, cause discomfort to the patient and are not radical treatments. Therefore, we performed operative therapy instead. Laser midline glossectomy was performed to treat constriction at the root of the tongue in 16 patients diagnosed with sleep apnea syndrome. We also tried lingual tonsil excision using the Harmonic Scalpel in three patients with stenosis at the base of the tongue.

  16. Molecular Mechanism of Membrane Constriction and Tubulation Mediated by the F-BAR Protein Pacsin/Syndapin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Navarro, M; Peng, G; Molinelli, E; Lin, G; Judson, B; Rajashankar, K; Sondermann, H

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins of the Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) and Fer-CIP4 homology-BAR (F-BAR) family participate in cellular membrane trafficking and have been shown to generate membrane tubules. The degree of membrane bending appears to be encoded in the structure and immanent curvature of the particular protein domains, with BAR and F-BAR domains inducing high- and low-curvature tubules, respectively. In addition, oligomerization and the formation of ordered arrays influences tubule stabilization. Here, the F-BAR domain-containing protein Pacsin was found to possess a unique activity, creating small tubules and tubule constrictions, in addition to the wide tubules characteristic for this subfamily. Based on crystal structures of the F-BAR domain of Pacsin and mutagenesis studies, vesiculation could be linked to the presence of unique structural features distinguishing it from other F-BAR proteins. Tubulation was suppressed in the context of the full-length protein, suggesting that Pacsin is autoinhibited in solution. The regulated deformation of membranes and promotion of tubule constrictions by Pacsin suggests a more versatile function of these proteins in vesiculation and endocytosis beyond their role as scaffold proteins.

  17. Effect of tachycardia and constriction of left circumflex artery on coronary flow and pressure in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Di Lavore, P; Gattullo, D; Guiot, C; Losano, G; Mary, D A; Vacca, G; Vono, P

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of graded changes in heart rate between 100 and 160 beats/min and constriction of the left circumflex coronary artery which reduced coronary blood flow was examined in seven anaesthetized and artificially ventilated dogs in the absence of significant changes in aortic blood pressure. Mean diastolic coronary blood flow, and the difference between the mean diastolic pressures in the coronary artery and the left ventricle were related to the increase in heart rate. 2. In all seven dogs diastolic coronary blood flow showed linear increases with heart rate increments with and without coronary narrowing which averaged 70 and 82% respectively. 3. A significant shift to the right in the relation between heart rate and mean diastolic coronary blood flow occurred with each grade of coronary constriction. Coronary blood flow became lower at any given heart rate. 4. The shift to the right in the relation between heart rate and coronary blood flow was associated with decreases in the difference between the mean diastolic pressures in the coronary artery and the left ventricle which accompanied the increase in heart rate. 5. The results suggest that increases in heart rate can enhance diastolic coronary blood flow despite coronary narrowing which reduced flow, possibly through dilatation in myocardial blood vessels. PMID:3254420

  18. Current Inhalers Deliver Very Small Doses to the Lower Tracheobronchial Airways: Assessment of Healthy and Constricted Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Walenga, Ross L.; Longest, P. Worth

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the regional delivery of conventional aerosol medications, a new whole-lung computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach was applied for metered dose inhaler (MDI) and dry powder inhaler (DPI) aerosols delivered to healthy and constricted airways. The CFD approach included complete airways through the third respiratory bifurcation (B3) and applied the new stochastic individual pathway (SIP) modeling technique beyond B3 through the remainder of the conducting airways together with a new model of deposition in the alveolar region. Bronchiolar (B8-B15) deposition fraction (DF) values were low (~1%) for both MDI and DPI aerosols with the healthy geometry, while delivery to the constricted model was even lower, with DF values of 0.89% and 0.81% for the MDI and DPI, respectively. Calculating dose per unit-surface-area for the commercial MDI and DPI products resulted in approximately 10−3 μg/cm2 in the lower tracheobronchial (TB) region of B8-B15 and 10−4 μg/cm2 in the alveolar region. Across the lung, dose per unit-surface-area varied by 2 orders of magnitude, which increased to 4 orders of magnitude when the mouth-throat region was included. The MDI and DPI both provided very low drug dose per unit-surface-area to the small TB and alveolar airways. PMID:26852850

  19. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    PubMed

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  20. A rare chronic constrictive pericarditis with localized adherent visceral pericardium and normal parietal pericardium: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qingqiang; Yun, Lin; Xu, Rui; Li, Guohua; Yao, Yucai; Li, Jiamin

    2016-09-01

    Classic constrictive pericarditis (CP) is characterized by fibrous scarring and adhesion of both the visceral pericardium and the parietal pericardium, which leads to restricted cardiac filling. However, diagnosing CP with normal thickness pericardium and without calcification is still a challenge. The predominant cause in the developed world is idiopathic or viral pericarditis followed by post-cardiac surgery and post-radiation. Tuberculosis still remains a common cause of CP in developing countries. In this report, we describe a rare case of idiopathic localized constrictive visceral pericardium with normal thickness of the parietal pericardium in a middle-aged man. The patient presented with unexplained right heart failure and echocardiography showed moderate bi-atrial enlargement which should be identified with the restrictive cardiomyopathy. After 10 months of conservative treatment, the progression of right heart failure was remaining. A pericardiectomy was performed and the patient recovered. This case serves as a reminder to consider CP in patients with unexplained right heart failure, so that timely investigation and treatment can be initiated.

  1. Current Inhalers Deliver Very Small Doses to the Lower Tracheobronchial Airways: Assessment of Healthy and Constricted Lungs.

    PubMed

    Walenga, Ross L; Longest, P Worth

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the regional delivery of conventional aerosol medications, a new whole-lung computational fluid dynamics modeling approach was applied for metered dose inhaler (MDI) and dry powder inhaler (DPI) aerosols delivered to healthy and constricted airways. The computational fluid dynamics approach included complete airways through the third respiratory bifurcation (B3) and applied the new stochastic individual pathway modeling technique beyond B3 through the remainder of the conducting airways together with a new model of deposition in the alveolar region. Bronchiolar (B8-B15) deposition fraction values were low (∼1%) for both MDI and DPI aerosols with the healthy geometry, whereas delivery to the constricted model was even lower, with deposition fraction values of 0.89% and 0.81% for the MDI and DPI, respectively. Calculating dose per unit surface area for the commercial MDI and DPI products resulted in approximately 10(-3) μg/cm(2) in the lower tracheobronchial region of B8-B15 and 10(-4) μg/cm(2) in the alveolar region. Across the lung, dose per unit surface area varied by 2 orders of magnitude, which increased to 4 orders of magnitude when the mouth-throat region was included. The MDI and DPI both provided very low drug dose per unit surface area to the small tracheobronchial and alveolar airways.

  2. Black ring deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gimon, Eric; Gimon, Eric G.; Levi, Thomas S.

    2007-06-22

    We present a sample microstate for a black ring in four and five dimensional language. The microstate consists of a black string microstate with an additional D6-brane. We show that with an appropriate choice of parameters the piece involving the black string microstate falls down a long AdS throat, whose M-theory lift is AdS_3 x S2. We wrap a spinning dipole M2-brane on the S2 in the probe approximation. In IIA, this corresponds to a dielectric D2-brane carrying only D0-charge. We conjecture this is the firstapproximation to a cloud of D0-branes blowing up due to their non-abelian degrees of freedom and the Myers effect.

  3. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  4. Dressler's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome may also be called postpericardiotomy syndrome, post-myocardial infarction syndrome and post-cardiac injury syndrome. With recent ... Dressler's syndrome. References LeWinter MM. Pericardial complications of myocardial infarction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 27, ...

  5. The Saturn Ring Observer: In situ studies of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Spilker, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey recently undertaken by the NRC's Space Studies Board for the National Academy of Sciences, studies were commissioned for a number of potential missions to outer planet targets. One of these studies examined the technological feasibility of a mission to carry out in situ studies of Saturn's rings, from a spacecraft placed in a circular orbit above the ring plane: the Saturn Ring Observer. The technical findings and background are discussed in a companion poster by T. R. Spilker et al. Here we outline the science goals of such a mission. Most of the fundamental interactions in planetary rings occur on spatial scales that are unresolved by flyby or orbiter spacecraft. Typical particle sizes in the rings of Saturn are in the 1 cm - 10 m range, and average interparticle spacings are a few meters. Indirect evidence indicates that the vertical thickness of the rings is as little as 5 - 10 m, which implies a velocity dispersion of only a few mm/sec. Theories of ring structure and evolution depend on the unknown characteristics of interparticle collisions and on the size distribution of the ring particles. The SRO could provide direct measurements of both the coefficient of restitution -- by monitoring individual collisions -- and the particles’ velocity dispersion. High-resolution observations of individual ring particles should also permit estimates of their spin states. Numerical simulations of Saturn’s rings incorporating both collisions and self-gravity predict that the ring particles are not uniformly distributed, but are instead clustered into elongated structures referred to as “self-gravity wakes”, which are continually created and destroyed on an orbital timescale. Theory indicates that the average separation between wakes in the A ring is of order 30-100 m. Direct imaging of self-gravity wakes, including their formation and subsequent dissolution, would provide critical validation of these models. Other

  6. [Malyugin ring--an alternative in the treatment of a miotic pupil].

    PubMed

    Muşat, Ovidiu; Mahdi, Labib; Gheorghe, Andreea; Burcea, Marian; Cernat, Corina; Cristescu, Răzvan; Toma, Oana; Radu, Asandi

    2014-01-01

    Small pupil and Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (lFIS) has always been a challenge in cataract surgery. Iris dilation and mechanical stabilization can be achieved by using intraoperative iris retractors, preferably before capsulorhexis. Malyugin ring is a mechanical iris expansion device, which presents many advantages (gently relaxes the iris tissue, implants easier and less traumatic). The disadvantages of using Malyugin ring consists primarily in the high cost and in an increased duration of surgical procedure.

  7. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  8. Contraceptive vaginal rings: a review.

    PubMed

    Brache, Vivian; Faundes, Anibal

    2010-11-01

    Development efforts on contraceptive vaginal rings were initiated over 40 years ago based on two principles: the capacity of the vaginal epithelium to absorb steroids and the capacity of elastomers to release these hormones at a nearly constant rate. Numerous models of contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) have been studied, but only two have reached the market: NuvaRing, a combined ring that releases etonogestrel (ENG) and ethinylestradiol (EE), and Progering, a progesterone-releasing ring for use in lactating women. The main advantages of CVRs are their effectiveness (similar to or slightly better than the pill), ease of use without the need of remembering a daily routine, user's ability to control initiation and discontinuation, nearly constant release rate allowing for lower doses, greater bioavailability and good cycle control with the combined ring. The main disadvantages are related to the mode of delivery; CVRs may cause vaginal discharge and complaints, ring expulsion is not uncommon, the ring may be felt during coitus and vaginal insertion may be unpleasant for some women. The studies reviewed in this article provide evidence that CVRs are safe, effective and highly acceptable to women. There is no doubt that CVRs offer a new, effective contraceptive option to women, expanding their available choices of hormonal contraception.

  9. Ring Infiltrate in Staphylococcal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Wallang, Batriti S.; Sharma, Savitri; Sahu, Srikant K.; Mittal, Ruchi

    2013-01-01

    Smear and culture tests of corneal scrapings from a patient with a ring infiltrate confirmed significant growth of a Staphylococcus species resistant to fluoroquinolones. Because of nonresponse to medical management, the patient underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. Staphylococcal infection of the cornea may appear as a ring-like infiltrate that is recalcitrant to medical management. PMID:23100354

  10. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  11. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  12. How Jupiter's Ring Was Discovered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, James; Kerr, Richard

    1985-01-01

    "Rings" (by astronomer James Elliot and science writer Richard Kerr) is a nontechnical book about the discovery and exploration of ring systems from the time of Galileo to the era of the Voyager spacecraft. One of this book's chapters is presented. (JN)

  13. Rings Full of Waves (zoom)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows a close-up view of a density wave in Saturn's A ring. It was taken by the narrow angle camera on the Cassini spacecraft after successful entry into Saturn's orbit. The view shows the dark, or unlit, side of the rings.

  14. Simulating the Smallest Ring World of Chariklo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    A ring system consisting of two dense narrow rings has been discovered around Centaur Chariklo. The existence of these rings around a small object poses various questions about their origin, stability, and lifetime. In order to understand the nature of Chariklo’s rings, we perform global N-body simulations of the self-gravitating collisional particle rings for the first time. We find that Chariklo should be denser than the ring material in order to avoid the rapid diffusion of the rings. If Chariklo is denser than the ring material, fine spiral structures called self-gravity wakes occur in the inner ring. These wakes accelerate the viscous spreading of the ring significantly and typically occur on timescales of about 100 {years} for m-sized ring particles, which is considerably shorter than the timescales suggested in previous studies. The existence of these narrow rings implies smaller ring particles or the existence of shepherding satellites.

  15. Familial ainhum: a case report of multiple toe involvement in a father and son, staging of ainhum with insight into different types of constricting bands.

    PubMed

    Priya, Bt; Suganthy, Rajakumari R; Manimegalai, M; Krishnaveni, A

    2015-01-01

    Ainhum, also known as dactylolysis spontanea, is a painful constriction of the base of the fifth toe, frequently followed by spontaneous amputation a few years later. The disease is often symmetrical on both the feet, but, occasionally, other toes are also affected and rarely the distal phalanx of the fifth finger. Pseudoainhum is a similar condition that occurs as a secondary event resulting from certain hereditary and nonhereditary diseases that lead to annular constriction of digits. We hereby present a case of familial ainhum in father and son with multiple toes affected, autoamputation, and more involvement of fourth toe than the fifth toe, which is a very rare finding.

  16. Dipole spring ferroelectrics in superlattice SrTiO3/BaTiO3 thin films exhibiting constricted hysteresis loops

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pingping; Ma, Xingqiao; Li, Yulan; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Chen , L.Q.

    2012-03-01

    Ferroelectric superlattice heterostructures have recently been explored for potential applications in electronic devices. In this letter we employed the phase-field approach to simulate the domain structure and switching of a (BaTiO3)8/(SrTiO3)3 superlattice film constrained by a GdScO3 substrate. A constricted ferroelectric hysteresis loop was observed with a high saturation polarization but a small coercive field. The shape of the hysteresis loop is understood by analyzing the ferroelectric polarization distributions during switching. It is demonstrated that the constricted loop show a similar mechanism to the exchange coupling effect in magnetic multilayers.

  17. Alternate rapid maxillary expansion-constriction and tooth-borne symphyseal distraction osteogenesis : A case report demonstrating treatment of a patient with severe crowding.

    PubMed

    Gökalp, Hatice

    2016-05-01

    Surgically assisted rapid mandibular expansion is a contemporary treatment alternative to enable genuine skeletal mandibular widening. Mandibular widening via a tooth-borne distractor is a practical and noninvasive clinical approach. Recently, to expand and protract the maxilla, the alternate rapid maxillary expansion-and-constriction procedure was suggested. In this case report, we describe a female patient (12 years 7 months old) having severe maxillary and mandibular crowding who underwent repeated alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction in combination with tooth-borne symphyseal distraction osteogenesis.

  18. A clinico-pathological conference on constrictive pericarditis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis: a case report with expert commentary and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Adam D; Khan, Muhammad E A; Hoey, Edward T; Rassl, Doris; Nashef, Samer A M

    2011-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is the commonest cardiac complication of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two percent of patients with RA develop significant clinical symptoms of pericarditis, which may not correlate with joint disease duration or severity. Symptoms are often vague and non-specific, which frequently delays the diagnosis and subsequent management. Surgical excision of the pericardium is the only definitive treatment option. We present the case of a 60 year-old lady with RA who presented with symptoms due to pericardial constriction and underwent radical pericardectomy.

  19. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, polycystic ovary syndrome can cause menstrual disturbances, weight gain beginning in adolescence, excess hair growth, and impaired insulin action and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome-a combination of ...

  20. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.

  1. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a

  2. Hemostatic analysis of a 13 year old with antiphospholipid syndrome and restrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Steenwyk, Brad L; Burch, Thomas M; King, Colin K; McGiffin, David C

    2007-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune thrombophilic disorder that is uncommon in adults and remarkably rare in children. Thrombotic etiological factors are variable in antiphospholipid syndrome, including antibody-antigen complex-mediated platelet activation, inhibition of anticoagulants, or attenuation of fibrinolysis. We present the case of a child with antiphospholipid syndrome presenting with syncope, constrictive pericarditis and hepatic enlargement that was found to have platelet-mediated hypercoagulability and marked clot lysis via thrombelastography in the preoperative period. Restoration of circulation following pericardectomy and inotropic support was associated with attenuation of hypercoagulability and fibrinolysis. It is concluded that the etiological factors responsible for antiphospholipid syndrome-mediated hemostatic abnormalities and the probable effects of hepatic hypoperfusion on clot lysis in this patient were detected with thrombelastography, and similar thrombelastographic analyses are recommended to compliment standard coagulation assessments of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

  3. Researches on the Piston Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehihara, Keikiti

    1944-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, steam engines, air compressors, and so forth, the piston ring plays an important role. Especially, the recent development of Diesel engines which require a high compression pressure for their working, makes, nowadays, the packing action of the piston ring far more important than ever. Though a number of papers have been published in regard to researches on the problem of the piston ring, none has yet dealt with an exact measurement of pressure exerted on the cylinder wall at any given point of the ring. The only paper that can be traced on this subject so far is Mr. Nakagawa's report on the determination of the relative distribution of pressure on the cylinder wall, but the measuring method adopted therein appears to need further consideration. No exact idea has yet been obtained as to how the obturation of gas between the piston and cylinder, the frictional resistance of the piston, and the wear of the cylinder wall are affected by the intensity and the distribution of the radial pressure of the piston ring. Consequently, the author has endeavored, by employing an apparatus of his own invention, to get an exact determination of the pressure distribution of the piston ring. By means of a newly devised ring tester, to which piezoelectricity of quartz was applied, the distribution of the radial pressure of many sample rings on the market was accurately determined. Since many famous piston rings show very irregular pressure distribution, the author investigated and achieved a manufacturing process of the piston ring which will exert uniform pressure on the cylinder wall. Temperature effects on the configuration and on the mean spring power have also been studied. Further, the tests were performed to ascertain how the gas tightness of the piston ring may be affected by the number or spring power. The researches as to the frictional resistance between the piston ring and the cylinder wall were carried out, too. The procedure of study, and

  4. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Mark A.

    1985-01-01

    A laser pulse is injected into an unstable ring resonator-amplifier structure. Inside this resonator the laser pulse is amplified, spatially filtered and magnified. The laser pulse is recirculated in the resonator, being amplified, filtered and magnified on each pass. The magnification is chosen so that the beam passes through the amplifier in concentric non-overlapping regions similar to a single pass MOPA. After a number of passes around the ring resonator the laser pulse is spatially large enough to exit the ring resonator system by passing around an output mirror.

  5. Ocular findings in cytogenetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W A; Alfi, O S; Donnell, G N

    1979-06-01

    Several cytogenetic syndromes are reviewed, and the salient ocular and facial abnormalities that might lead to a diagnosis are pointed out. Examples are given of mongoloid slant to the palpebral fissures, not only in Down's syndrome, but also in monosomy 9p, where, in addition, the triangular skull is almost diagnostic. Antimongoloid slant is found in trisomy 9p, where the eyes also have enophthalmos of monosomy 9p. Hypertelorism is another common finding in these syndromes; in monosomy 5p it is almost always present, although it occurs in other conditions as well, including trisomy 12p. The ring 22 syndrome has a distinguishing finding called "doe's eyes" because of the shape of the palpebral fissures. Trisomy 13 has numerous ocular findings as well as skull and facial involvements.

  6. Multiscale modeling of mechanosensing channels on vesicles and cell membranes in 3D constricted flows and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan-Nan; Liu, Allen; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the gating of mechanosensing channels (Mscls) on vesicles and cell membranes under different flow conditions using a multiscale approach. At the cell level (microns), the membrane tension is calculated using a 3D two-component whole-cell membrane model based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), including the cortex cytoskeleton and its interactions with the lipid bilayer. At the Mscl level (nanometers), we predict the relation between channel gating and the membrane tension obtained from a cell-level model using a semi-analytical model based on the bilayer hydrophobic mismatch energy. We systematically study the gating of Mscls of vesicles and cell membranes in constricted channel flows and shear flows, and explore the dependence of the gating on flow rate, cell shape and size. The results provide guidance for future experiments in inducing Mscl opening for various purposes such as drug delivery.

  7. Fabrication and Characterization of Ultrathin PBCO/YBCO/PBCO Constrictions for Hot Electron Bolometer THz Mixing Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroz, Christophe; Degardin, Annick F.; Villegier, Jean-Claude; Kreisler, Alain J.

    2007-06-01

    Superconducting Hot Electron Bolometer (HEB) mixers are a competitive alternative to conventional mixer technologies in the terahertz range because of their ultrawide bandwidth, high conversion gain, and low intrinsic noise level, even at 77 K. A technological process to realize HEBs based on high-Tc YBa2Cu3O7-delta (YBCO) materials is described. Ultra-thin 12 to 40 nm layers were sputtered on MgO (100) substrates, sub-micrometer constrictions (0.5 mum times 0.5 mum) were etched on these and log-periodic gold antennas were then integrated. Good superconducting properties were measured after the whole process. Electrical transport characteristics of the device are discussed, aging effects are considered and regular bolometric THz response results are given.

  8. Effects of Exposure to Intermittent versus Continuous Red Light on Human Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin Suppression, and Pupillary Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Ho Mien, Ivan; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Lau, Pauline; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Tan, Sara Shuhui; Gooley, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n = 24, 21–28 yr) lived individually in a laboratory for 6 consecutive days. Circadian rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, body temperature, and heart rate were assessed before and after exposure to 6 h of continuous red light (631 nm, 13 log photons cm−2 s−1), intermittent red light (1 min on/off), or bright white light (2,500 lux) near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion (n = 8 in each group). Melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction were also assessed during light exposure. We found that circadian resetting responses were similar for exposure to continuous versus intermittent red light (P = 0.69), with an average phase delay shift of almost an hour. Surprisingly, 2 subjects who were exposed to red light exhibited circadian responses similar in magnitude to those who were exposed to bright white light. Red light also elicited prolonged pupillary constriction, but did not suppress melatonin levels. These findings suggest that, for red light stimuli outside the range of sensitivity for melanopsin, cone photoreceptors can mediate circadian phase resetting of physiologic rhythms in some individuals. Our results also show that sensitivity thresholds differ across non-visual light responses, suggesting that cones may contribute differentially to circadian resetting, melatonin suppression, and the pupillary light reflex during exposure to continuous light. PMID:24797245

  9. Accuracy and pitfalls of early diastolic motion of the mitral annulus for diagnosing constrictive pericarditis by tissue Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Partho P; Mohan, Jagdish C; Mehta, Vimal; Arora, Ramesh; Pandian, Natesa G; Khandheria, Bijoy K

    2004-04-01

    Mitral annular velocities are reportedly useful in diagnosing constrictive pericarditis (CP); however, their exact efficacy in larger clinical settings remains unevaluated. This study reexamined the role of longitudinal tissue Doppler imaging in diagnosing CP in clinical practice. Tissue velocity imaging (GE Vingmed System Five) was performed in 122 subjects (87 referred with clinically suspected CP and 35 age- and sex-matched controls). Of the 87 subjects with suspected CP, 45 (51.7%) had CP confirmed at surgery, 11 (12.6%) had restrictive heart disease, 20 (23.0%) had right heart failure due to cor pulmonale, and the other 11 (12.6%) had old pericardial effusions and no hemodynamic evidence of constriction on follow-up echocardiography. Of the 45 patients with CP, mitral early diastolic (Ea) annular velocities from septal and lateral regions were normal (>/=8 cm/s) in 40 (88.9%) and decreased (<8 cm/s) in 1 or both regions in 5 (3 with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, 2 with extensive mitral annular calcification). Of 11 patients with restrictive cardiomyopathy, 8 (72.7%) had reduced Ea (<8 cm/s) and 3 showed normal Ea velocity in 1 or both corners of the mitral annulus. All except 2 patients with right-sided heart failure from cor pulmonale and those with previous pericardial effusion had normal Ea velocities. A normal Ea velocity improved recognition of CP, particularly in the presence of nondiagnostic 2-dimensional or transmitral flow-Doppler imaging. The overall sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing CP using tissue Doppler incrementally with M-mode, 2-dimensional, and transmitral flow Doppler were 88.8% and 94.8%, respectively. Mitral annular velocities help with diagnosis and differentiation of CP in most cases, except in the presence of extensive annular calcification, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, or segmental nonuniformity in myocardial velocities.

  10. Feasibility of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in Alleviation of Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constrictive Injury Nerve Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Yi; Liu, Shih-An; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Su, Hong-Lin; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neurobehavior of neuropathic pain by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is very similar to that in humans, and it is accompanied by a profound local inflammation response. In this study, we assess the potentiality of human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) for alleviating the neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction nerve injury model. Methods and Methods This neuropathic pain animal model was conducted by four 3–0 chromic gut ligatures loosely ligated around the left sciatic nerve in Sprague—Dawley rats. The intravenous administration of hAFMSCs with 5x105 cells was conducted for three consecutive days. Results The expression IL-1β, TNF-α and synaptophysin in dorsal root ganglion cell culture was remarkably attenuated when co-cultured with hAFMSCs. The significant decrease of PGP 9.5 in the skin after CCI was restored by administration of hAFMSCs. Remarkably increased expression of CD 68 and TNF-α and decreased S-100 and neurofilament expression in injured nerve were rescued by hAFMSCs administration. Increases in synaptophysin and TNF-α over the dorsal root ganglion were attenuated by hAFMSCs. Significant expression of TNF-α and OX-42 over the dorsal spinal cord was substantially attenuated by hAFMSCs. The increased amplitude of sensory evoked potential as well as expression of synaptophysin and TNF-α expression was alleviated by hAFMSCs. Human AFMSCs significantly improved the threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as various parameters of CatWalk XT gait analysis. Conclusion Human AFMSCs administration could alleviate the neuropathic pain demonstrated in histomorphological alteration and neurobehavior possibly through the modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27441756

  11. Nectin-2 and N-cadherin interact through extracellular domains and induce apical accumulation of F-actin in apical constriction of Xenopus neural tube morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hitoshi; Nandadasa, Sumeda; Yamamoto, Takamasa S; Terasaka-Iioka, Chie; Wylie, Christopher; Ueno, Naoto

    2010-04-01

    Neural tube formation is one of the most dynamic morphogenetic processes of vertebrate development. However, the molecules regulating its initiation are mostly unknown. Here, we demonstrated that nectin-2, an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule, is involved in the neurulation of Xenopus embryos in cooperation with N-cadherin. First, we found that, at the beginning of neurulation, nectin-2 was strongly expressed in the superficial cells of neuroepithelium. The knockdown of nectin-2 impaired neural fold formation by attenuating F-actin accumulation and apical constriction, a cell-shape change that is required for neural tube folding. Conversely, the overexpression of nectin-2 in non-neural ectoderm induced ectopic apical constrictions with accumulated F-actin. However, experiments with domain-deleted nectin-2 revealed that the intracellular afadin-binding motif, which links nectin-2 and F-actin, was not required for the generation of the ectopic apical constriction. Furthermore, we found that nectin-2 physically interacts with N-cadherin through extracellular domains, and they cooperatively enhanced apical constriction by driving the accumulation of F-actin at the apical cell surface. Interestingly, the accumulation of N-cadherin at the apical surface of neuroepithelium was dependent on the presence of nectin-2, but that of nectin-2 was not affected by depletion of N-cadherin. We propose a novel mechanism of neural tube morphogenesis regulated by the two types of cell adhesion molecules.

  12. Black rings at large D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    We study the effective theory of slowly rotating black holes at the infinite limit of the spacetime dimension D. This large D effective theory is obtained by integrating the Einstein equation with respect to the radial direction. The effective theory gives equations for non-linear dynamical deformations of a slowly rotating black hole by effective equations. The effective equations contain the slowly rotating Myers-Perry black hole, slowly boosted black string, non-uniform black string and black ring as stationary solutions. We obtain the analytic solution of the black ring by solving effective equations. Furthermore, by perturbation analysis of effective equations, we find a quasinormal mode condition of the black ring in analytic way. As a result we confirm that thin black ring is unstable against non-axisymmetric perturbations. We also include 1 /D corrections to the effective equations and discuss the effects by 1 /D corrections.

  13. Dissipative ring solitons with vorticity.

    PubMed

    Soto-Crespo, J M; Akhmediev, N; Mejia-Cortés, C; Devine, N

    2009-03-16

    We study dissipative ring solitons with vorticity in the frame of the (2+1)-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. In dissipative media, radially symmetric ring structures with any vorticity m can be stable in a finite range of parameters. Beyond the region of stability, the solitons lose the radial symmetry but may remain stable, keeping the same value of the topological charge. We have found bifurcations into solitons with n-fold bending symmetry, with n independent on m. Solitons without circular symmetry can also display (m + 1)-fold modulation behaviour. A sequence of bifurcations can transform the ring soliton into a pulsating or chaotic state which keeps the same value of the topological charge as the original ring.

  14. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  15. Analysis of Ring Wake Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. C.; Stewart, G. R.

    1999-09-01

    indent=20pt Collisional N-body simulations at the edge of a perturbed planetary ring are used to model the edges of the Encke gap in Saturn's rings. A small satellite, Pan, orbits inside the Encke gap and excites forced eccentricities and density wakes on both edges of the gap. The simulations use a local cell method to model a narrow ring using particles of the appropriate size for the A-ring at the proper optical depth. In the simulations we see evidence for shear reversal at the wake peaks. Our results imply that the most significant factor in the damping of the wakes is the reduction of the forced eccentricity and not randomization of the phase angles of the particles. The reduction of the forced eccentricity occurs in an orderly fashion with steep drops at each successive wake maximum following the highest density wake peak. indent=20pt At the inner edge (that nearer the perturber) we see phase shifts visible as bending of the line wake maxima. Because the simulations are actually of narrow rings, we also see a number of interesting phenomena at the outer edge. A strong boundary layer forms at that edge, which becomes partially detached from the rest of the ring. The wake patterns persist much further downstream in this boundary layer than they do in the rest of the ring. We also observe that in the less dense region between the main section of the ring and the boundary layer the magnitude of the forced eccentricities reverse their behavior in the main part and increase at each wake maxima. indent=20pt At the talk we will compare our results to the various analytic theories of Borderies, Goldreich, and Tremaine.

  16. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  18. A New Membrane Protein Sbg1 Links the Contractile Ring Apparatus and Septum Synthesis Machinery in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Kriti; Palani, Saravanan; Cortés, Juan C. G.; Sato, Mamiko; Sevugan, Mayalagu; Ramos, Mariona; Vijaykumar, Shruthi; Osumi, Masako; Naqvi, Naweed I.; Ribas, Juan Carlos; Balasubramanian, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in many organisms requires a plasma membrane anchored actomyosin ring, whose contraction facilitates cell division. In yeast and fungi, actomyosin ring constriction is also coordinated with division septum assembly. How the actomyosin ring interacts with the plasma membrane and the plasma membrane-localized septum synthesizing machinery remains poorly understood. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an attractive model organism to study cytokinesis, the β-1,3-glucan synthase Cps1p / Bgs1p, an integral membrane protein, localizes to the plasma membrane overlying the actomyosin ring and is required for primary septum synthesis. Through a high-dosage suppressor screen we identified an essential gene, sbg1+ (suppressor of beta glucan synthase 1), which suppressed the colony formation defect of Bgs1-defective cps1-191 mutant at higher temperatures. Sbg1p, an integral membrane protein, localizes to the cell ends and to the division site. Sbg1p and Bgs1p physically interact and are dependent on each other to localize to the division site. Loss of Sbg1p results in an unstable actomyosin ring that unravels and slides, leading to an inability to deposit a single contiguous division septum and an important reduction of the β-1,3-glucan proportion in the cell wall, coincident with that observed in the cps1-191 mutant. Sbg1p shows genetic and / or physical interaction with Rga7p, Imp2p, Cdc15p, and Pxl1p, proteins known to be required for actomyosin ring integrity and efficient septum synthesis. This study establishes Sbg1p as a key member of a group of proteins that link the plasma membrane, the actomyosin ring, and the division septum assembly machinery in fission yeast. PMID:27749909

  19. Classifying Saturn's F Ring Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Sremcevic, M.; Esposito, L. W.; Colwell, J. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) has recorded more than 113 stellar occultations by Saturn's F ring providing measurements with ring plane resolutions of a few dozen meters and better. Inner and outer F ring strands have been seen throughout the Cassini mission where they revealed themselves as non-continuous, azimuthally and temporally highly variable structures. In the light of a more accurate orbit description of the F ring core we find evidence for a ring that becomes dynamically more active as the system approaches anti-apse alignment with Prometheus. This is consistent with the observed increased strand activity. A recent strand that morphologically resembles the core is the strongest seen to date and points to the intricate relation between core and strands indicating the strands' violent creation. Using more than 150 identifications of various strands, we trace their kinematics and infer dynamical timescales and photometric properties. Implications for the dynamical evolution of the F ring will be discussed. This research was supported by the Cassini Project.

  20. Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Krueger, H.

    2007-10-01

    Thebe's gossamer ring, the outermost and faintest of Jupiter's rings, has an outward extension that we have previously argued is due to a shadow resonance (Hamilton 2003, DPS meeting #35, #11.09). A shadow resonance arises from the abrupt shutoff of photoelectric charging when a dust particle enters Jupiter's shadow which, in turn, affects the strength of the electromagnetic perturbation from the planet's intense magnetic field. The result is a coupled oscillation between a particle's orbital eccentricity and its semimajor axis. Ring material spreads outward from Thebe while maintaining its vertical thickness just as observed by Galileo imaging. In addition to cameras, the Galileo spacecraft was also equipped with dust and plasma detectors. The spacecraft made two passes through the ring and its dust detector found that 1) dust fluxes drop immediately interior to Thebe's orbit, 2) some grains have inclinations in excess of 20 degrees and 3) submicron particles are present in the Amalthea ring in much greater numbers than in the Thebe ring. These findings can all be explained in the context of our shadow resonance model: the inner boundary is a direct consequence of the conservation of the Electromagnetic Jacobi Constant, the high inclinations are forced by a vertical resonance, and the excess submicron particles are a consequence of the weakening of electromagnetic forces in the vicinity of synchronous orbit. In this talk, we will present the data sets as well as detailed numerical simulations that back up these claims.

  1. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  2. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) , Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) and the DESPA and DASGAL laboratories of the Observatoire de Paris in France, in collaboration with ESO. The CONICA infra-red camera was built, under an ESO contract, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) (Heidelberg) and the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) (Garching) in Germany, in collaboration with ESO. Saturn - Lord of the rings ESO PR Photo 04a/02 ESO PR Photo 04a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 54k] [Normal - JPEG: 1034 x 800 pix - 200k] Caption : PR Photo 04a/02 shows the giant planet Saturn, as observed with the VLT NAOS-CONICA Adaptive Optics instrument on December 8, 2001; the distance was 1209 million km. It is a composite of exposures in two near-infrared wavebands (H and K) and displays well the intricate, banded structure of the planetary atmosphere and the rings. Note also the dark spot at the south pole at the bottom of the image. One of the moons, Tethys, is visible as a small point of light below the planet. It was used to guide the telescope and to perform the adaptive optics "refocussing" for this observation. More details in the text. Technical information about this photo is available below. This NAOS/CONICA image of Saturn ( PR Photo 04a/02 ), the second-largest planet in the solar system, was obtained at a time when Saturn was close to summer solstice in the southern hemisphere. At this moment, the tilt of the rings was about as large as it can be, allowing the best possible view of the planet's South Pole. That area was on Saturn's night side in 1982 and could therefore not be photographed during the Voyager encounter. The dark spot close to the South Pole is a remarkable structure that measures approximately 300 km across. It was only recently observed in visible light from the ground with a telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in the Pyrenees (France) - this is the first infrared image to

  3. Characterization of 5-HT receptors mediating constriction of porcine carotid arteriovenous anastomoses; involvement of 5-HT1B/1D and novel receptors

    PubMed Central

    De Vries, Peter; Villalón, Carlos M; Heiligers, Jan P C; Saxena, Pramod R

    1998-01-01

    It was previously shown that porcine cranial arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs) constrict to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), ergotamine, dihydroergotamine, as well as sumatriptan and that sumatriptan acts exclusively via 5-HT1B/1D receptors. The present study was devoted to establish the contribution of 5-HT1B/1D receptors in the constriction of AVAs elicited by 5-HT (in presence of 0.5 mg kg−1 ketanserin), ergotamine and dihydroergotamine in anaesthetized pigs.Intracarotid infusion of 5-HT (2 μg kg−1 min−1) and intravenous doses of ergotamine (2.5–20 μg kg−1) and dihydroergotamine (3–100 μg kg−1) reduced AVA and increased nutrient blood flows and vascular conductances. The vasodilator response to 5-HT, observed mainly in the skin and ear, was much more prominent than that of the ergot alkaloids.Treatment with the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (0.5 mg kg−1, i.v.) significantly attenuated both ergot-induced AVA constriction and arteriolar dilatation, whereas GR127935 only slightly affected the carotid vascular effects of 5-HT.The results suggest that 5-HT constricts carotid AVAs primarily via receptors, which seem to differ from those (5-HT1B/1D) stimulated by sumatriptan. The ergot alkaloids produce AVA constriction for a substantial part via 5-HT1B/1D receptors, but also stimulate unidentified receptors. Both these non-5-HT1B/1D receptors may be targets for the development of novel antimigraine drugs.The moderate vasodilator response to the ergot derivatives seems to be mediated, at least in part, by 5-HT1B/1D receptors, whereas the arteriolar dilatation caused by 5-HT may be mediated by other, possibly 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:9605562

  4. The Putative Exchange Factor Gef3p Interacts with Rho3p GTPase and the Septin Ring during Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Sofía; Manjón, Elvira; Sánchez, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    The small GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family and its regulatory proteins play a central role in cytokinetic actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we show that the fission yeast guanine nucleotide exchange factor Gef3p interacts with Rho3p at the division site. Gef3p contains a putative DH homology domain and a BAR/IMD-like domain. The protein localized to the division site late in mitosis, where it formed a ring that did not constrict with actomyosin ring (cytokinetic actomyosin ring) invagination; instead, it split into a double ring that resembled the septin ring. Gef3p co-localized with septins and Mid2p and required septins and Mid2p for its localization. Gef3p interacts physically with the GTP-bound form of Rho3p. Although Gef3p is not essential for cell separation, the simultaneous disruption of gef3+ and Rho3p-interacting proteins, such as Sec8p, an exocyst component, Apm1p, a subunit of the clathrin adaptor complex or For3p, an actin-polymerizing protein, yielded cells with strong defects in septation and polarity respectively. Our results suggest that interactions between septins and Rho-GEFs provide a new targeting mechanism for GTPases in cytokinesis, in this case probably contributing to Rho3p function in vesicle tethering and vesicle trafficking in the later steps of cell separation. PMID:24947517

  5. Clinical features associated with adverse events in patients with post-pericardiotomy syndrome following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Alraies, M Chadi; Al Jaroudi, Wael; Shabrang, Cyrus; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Klein, Allan L; Tamarappoo, Balaji K

    2014-11-01

    Postpericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) may be associated with tamponade and pericardial constriction that may require procedural intervention. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features associated with adverse events requiring procedural intervention in patients with PPS. A total of 239 patients who developed PPS after cardiac surgery were monitored for 12 months. PPS was diagnosed if 2 of the 5 following findings were present: fever without infection, pleuritic pain, friction rub, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion (<60 days after surgery). The primary end point was the development of pericardial effusion or pericardial constriction requiring procedural intervention. Among 239 patients with PPS, 75 (31%) required procedural intervention. In a univariate analysis, the odds of a procedural intervention were decreased with older age (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96 to 0.99) and with colchicine used in combination with anti-inflammatory agents (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.79). However, the odds were increased in patients with preoperative heart failure (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1 to 3.39) and early postoperative constrictive physiology (OR 5.77, 95% CI 2.62 to 12.7). After multivariate adjustment, treatment with colchicine along with anti-inflammatory agents was associated with lower odds of requiring intervention (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99). Independent positive predictors of procedural intervention included age (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99), time to PPS (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99), and early postoperative constrictive physiology (OR 6.23, 95% CI 2.04 to 19.07). In conclusion, younger age, early-onset PPS, and postoperative constrictive physiology were associated with the need for procedural intervention in patients with PPS, whereas colchicine was associated with reduced odds of adverse events and procedural intervention.

  6. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by {alpha}-helical region substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2010-04-16

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the {alpha}-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  7. Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, G.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. The ring resides in the Roche zone, where tidal disruption competes with self-gravity, which allows us to observe the lifecycle of moonlets. Just as nearby moons create structure at the B ring edge (Esposito et al. 2012) and the Keeler gap (Murray 2007), the F ring "shepherding" moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In fact, Beurle et al (2010) show that Prometheus makes it possible for "distended, yet gravitationally coherent clumps" to form in the F ring, and Barbara and Esposito (2002) predicted a population of ~1 km bodies in the ring. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Seventeen of those 27 features are associated with clumps of ring material. Two features are opaque in occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects, which we refer to as Moonlets. The 15 other features partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. Upon visual inspection of the occultation profile, these features resemble Icicles, thus we will refer to them as such here. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, while Moonlets are possible solid objects. Optical depth is an indicator of clumping because more-densely aggregated material blocks more light; therefore, it is natural to imagine moonlets as later evolutionary stage of icicle, when looser clumps of material compact to form a feature that appears

  8. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  9. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  10. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.

  11. Double acting stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  12. Plasma deposited rider rings for hot displacer

    DOEpatents

    Kroebig, Helmut L.

    1976-01-01

    A hot cylinder for a cryogenic refrigerator having two plasma spray deposited rider rings of a corrosion and abrasion resistant material provided in the rider ring grooves, wherein the rider rings are machined to the desired diameter and width after deposition. The rider rings have gas flow flats machined on their outer surface.

  13. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion.

  14. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-08-24

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion. 3 figs.

  15. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  16. Influence of systemically given placebo, trapidil and isosorbide dinitrate on norepinephrine-evoked hand vein constriction in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sziegoleit, Werner; Dannenberg, Katrin; Konschak, Ariana; Lautenschläger, Christine; Presek, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Since trapidil (CAS 15421-84-8) is able to dilate human hand veins after local intravenous administration, four studies were carried out in healthy male volunteers using the dorsal hand vein compliance technique to test the influence of common systemic single doses of trapidil (200 mg orally, 100 mg intravenously) and isosorbide dinitrate (CAS 87-33-2, 20 mg orally) on norepinephrine (CAS 51-41-2)-evoked hand vein constriction in comparison with oral placebo. Oral placebo and oral trapidil were studied in a randomized double-blind cross-over design in 10 subjects aged 20 to 30 years, and oral isosorbide dinitrate and intravenous trapidil, in a randomized open cross-over design in 8 subjects aged 22 to 29 years. In the three similar studies with oral medications dose-response curves for venoconstriction by locally infused norepinephrine were established before and 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after oral medication and ED50 values of norepinephrine were calculated. The control dose-response curves and ED50 values of norepinephrine did not differ significantly. After oral placebo administration the dose-response curves of norepinephrine did not change significantly, but the ED50 of norepinephrine increased 3 h after placebo (from 12.1 to 31.7 ng/ min), indicating a lessening in norepinephrine effect at this time. After oral trapidil application the dose-response curves of norepinephrine shifted to the left compared with the pre-treatment curve (significantly 2 h after trapidil) and the corresponding curves after placebo with a significant decrease in the ED50 of norepinephrine 3 h after trapidil compared with placebo (from 31.7 to 12.6 ng/ min). After oral isosorbide dinitrate administration the dose-response curves of norepinephrine did not differ significantly from the pre-treatment curve, but they shifted to the left compared with the corresponding curves after placebo (significantly 3 h after isosorbide dinitrate). The ED50 of norephinephrine decreased significantly 2 h after

  17. Archiving of Planetary Ring Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Stellar occultation data provide our only Earth-based means of probing planetary rings at kilometer spatial resolution. The occultation data archive at MIT contains original data and analysis products of stellar occultations by the ring systems of the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune observed by members of the group (and other groups) from 1977 to the present. During this time period, several media have been used to record and store the original and processed data: (1) chart records; (2) printed output, (3) audio reel tape; (4) audio cassette tape; (5) 7-track, 1/2-inch computer tape; (6) 9-track, 1/2-inch computer tape at 800, 1600, and 6250 bpi; (7) NOVA disk platters (2.5 and 5.0 Mbyte); (8) write once optical disks; (9) punched cards; and (10) read-write optical disks. With the rapid change of computer technology over this time period, some of these media have become not only obsolete, but nearly extinct. In particular, it has become nearly impossible to find any facilities that can still read 800 bpi tapes, which contain the only copies of several important data sets for the ring system of Uranus. In particular, we have an extensive ring data collection that includes data sets for the following Uranian ring occultations: U0, U11, U12, U13, U14, U25, U17, and U36.

  18. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jacob; Stewart, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of rings have traditionally been done using N-body methods, granting insight into the interactions of individual ring particles on varying scales. However, due to the scale of a typical ring system and the sheer number of particles involved, a global N-body simulation is too computationally expensive, unless particle collisions are replaced by stochastic forces (Bromley & Kenyon, 2013). Rings are extraordinarily flat systems and therefore are well-suited to existing geophysical shallow-water hydrodynamics models with well-established non-linear advection methods. By adopting a general relationship between pressure and surface density such as a polytropic equation of state, we can modify the shallow-water formula to treat a thin, compressible, self-gravitating, shearing fluid. Previous hydrodynamic simulations of planetary rings have been restricted to axisymmetric flows and therefore have not treated the response to nonaxisymmetric perturbations by moons (Schmidt & Tscharnuter 1999, Latter & Ogilvie 2010). We seek to expand on existing hydrodynamic methods and, by comparing our work with complementary N-body simulations and Cassini observations, confirm the veracity of our results at small scales before eventually moving to a global domain size. We will use non-Newtonian, dynamically variable viscosity to model the viscous transport caused by unresolved self-gravity wakes. Self-gravity will be added to model the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as density waves and edge waves. Support from NASA Outer Planets and Planetary Geology and Geophysics programs is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Storage ring working group report

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, S.

    1997-01-01

    Over the last two decades great progress has been made in the development of storage rings with small transverse emittance. It is now a good time to consider the possibility of achieving very short bunches m storage rings. From the perspective of synchrotron radiation source development, there are at least two motivations for obtaining short electron bunches: (1) the generation of sub- picosecond x-ray pulses and (2) the coherent emission of sub- picosecond pulses of far infrared radiation. A useful short-term goal is the experimental study of bunches with 1 ps rms length both at high ({approx_gt} 1 GeV) and low ({approx_lt} 150 MeV) electron energies. Experiments on 1 ps bunches are now feasible and can yield new insight into the high frequency impedance of storage rings and the associated phenomena which can result in bunch lengthening. Achievement of 1 ps bunches can also be expected to allow the first observation of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring, in the millimeter wavelength regime. A longer-term objective is the realization of 100 fs bunches. Achievement of this goal not only will advance understanding of storage rings but will open up new opportunities in synchrotron radiation based research at both x-ray and far infrared wavelengths. It is now an appropriate time to carry forward theoretical investigations clarifying the fundamental limitations on bunch length, and to devise schemes to minimize it.

  20. Ring wormholes via duality rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2016-09-01

    We apply duality rotations and complex transformations to the Schwarzschild metric to obtain wormhole geometries with two asymptotically flat regions connected by a throat. In the simplest case these are the well-known wormholes supported by phantom scalar field. Further duality rotations remove the scalar field to yield less well known vacuum metrics of the oblate Zipoy-Voorhees-Weyl class, which describe ring wormholes. The ring encircles the wormhole throat and can have any radius, whereas its tension is always negative and should be less than -c4 / 4 G. If the tension reaches the maximal value, the geometry becomes exactly flat, but the topology remains non-trivial and corresponds to two copies of Minkowski space glued together along the disk encircled by the ring. The geodesics are straight lines, and those which traverse the ring get to the other universe. The ring therefore literally produces a hole in space. Such wormholes could perhaps be created by negative energies concentrated in toroidal volumes, for example by vacuum fluctuations.

  1. Ring Beholds a Delicate Flower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope finds a delicate flower in the Ring Nebula, as shown in this image. The outer shell of this planetary nebula looks surprisingly similar to the delicate petals of a camellia blossom. A planetary nebula is a shell of material ejected from a dying star. Located about 2,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra, the Ring Nebula is also known as Messier Object 57 and NGC 6720. It is one of the best examples of a planetary nebula and a favorite target of amateur astronomers.

    The 'ring' is a thick cylinder of glowing gas and dust around the doomed star. As the star begins to run out of fuel, its core becomes smaller and hotter, boiling off its outer layers. The telescope's infrared array camera detected this material expelled from the withering star. Previous images of the Ring Nebula taken by visible-light telescopes usually showed just the inner glowing loop of gas around the star. The outer regions are especially prominent in this new image because Spitzer sees the infrared light from hydrogen molecules. The molecules emit infrared light because they have absorbed ultraviolet radiation from the star or have been heated by the wind from the star.

    Download the QuickTime movie for the animated version of this Ring Nebula image.

  2. The rubber band syndrome: the forgotten rubber band in the wrist.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Kant, Kumar Shashi; Verma, Indreshwar

    2013-01-01

    A linear constricting scar around the wrist in the presence of a discharging sinus raises clinical suspicion of a forgotten band around the wrist. A 3-year-old girl presented with an encircling scar, swelling and discharging sinus over the right wrist since last three months. There were no trophic ulcers and gross sensations were intact. Wrist radiographs showed the "constriction" sign in the radial epiphysis. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of encircling band inside wrist abutting the bone. A coloured rubber band was surgically extracted lying deep to restored and continuous tendons and neurovascular structures. Wound healing was uneventful. Examination at 14 months revealed residual ulnar nerve palsy. If aware, the clinical diagnosis is fairly accurate in rubber band syndrome. MRI aids in establishing diagnosis preoperatively. The reparative potential of a child's tissues is amazing. Although the lesion heals well after extraction of encircling band, the clinician should be wary of residual neurological changes.

  3. Hepatorenal syndrome. Definition, pathophysiology, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Briglia, Andrew E; Anania, Frank A

    2002-04-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome is a well characterized entity in which vasodilation of splanchnic vessels and intense constriction of the renal cortical vasculature occur in concert. The condition is often fatal unless orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is performed. Many extracorporeal blood purification techniques exist which can be offered to patients awaiting OLT. Continuous hemofiltration, with or without other modalities such as therapeutic plasma exchange and hemoperfusion, may be helpful in improving the level of consciousness of these patients. Unfortunately, mortality and hepatic regeneration do not appear to be affected by such interventions. The development of a hybrid bioartifical liver support system and pharmacologic manipulation of the hemodynamic perturbations that occur in HRS provide particularly appealing prospects as a means of providing a bridge to liver transplantation in the future.

  4. Ring Vaccination and Smallpox Control

    PubMed Central

    van den Hof, Susan; Wallinga, Jacco; van Wijngaarden, Jan

    2004-01-01

    We present a stochastic model for the spread of smallpox after a small number of index cases are introduced into a susceptible population. The model describes a branching process for the spread of the infection and the effects of intervention measures. We discuss scenarios in which ring vaccination of direct contacts of infected persons is sufficient to contain an epidemic. Ring vaccination can be successful if infectious cases are rapidly diagnosed. However, because of the inherent stochastic nature of epidemic outbreaks, both the size and duration of contained outbreaks are highly variable. Intervention requirements depend on the basic reproduction number R0, for which different estimates exist. When faced with the decision of whether to rely on ring vaccination, the public health community should be aware that an epidemic might take time to subside even for an eventually successful intervention strategy. PMID:15200816

  5. Traversable wormholes: The Roman ring

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1997-04-01

    In this Brief Report I introduce yet another class of geometries for which semiclassical chronology protection theorems are of dubious physical reliability. I consider a {ital {open_quotes}Roman ring{close_quotes}} of traversable wormholes, wherein a number of wormholes are arranged in a ring in such a manner that no subset of wormholes is near chronology violation, though the combined system can be arbitrarily close to chronology violation. I show that (with enough wormholes in the ring) the gravitational vacuum polarization (the expectation value of the quantum stress-energy tensor) can be made arbitrarily small. In particular, the back reaction can be kept arbitrarily small all the way to the {open_quotes}reliability horizon,{close_quotes} so that semiclassical quantum gravity becomes unreliable before the gravitational back reaction becomes large. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. CMB lensing and giant rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  7. STUDIES ON EXPERIMENTAL HYPERTENSION : IX. THE EFFECT ON BLOOD PRESSURE OF CONSTRICTION OF THE ABDOMINAL AORTA ABOVE AND BELOW THE SITE OF ORIGIN OF BOTH MAIN RENAL ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, H; Kahn, J R; Hanzal, R F

    1939-04-30

    Constriction of the aorta just above the origin of both main renal arteries invariably resulted in elevation of the carotid systolic and carotid mean pressure. The hypertension was not immediate, but developed in about the same time as after constriction of the main renal arteries (3). Constriction of the aorta just below the origin of both main renal arteries had no significant effect on the carotid systolic or carotid mean pressure. Since these results were first reported (1), Rytand (88, 89) has shown by an indirect method, namely, the demonstration of the development of cardiac hypertrophy, that hypertension in the upper part of the body can be produced in the rat by constriction of the aorta just above the origin of both main renal arteries. The immediate effect of constriction of the aorta either below or above the main renal arteries is a fall of blood pressure (femoral mean pressure) below the site of the clamp, the extent of the fall being directly dependent upon the degree of constriction of the aorta. Of particular interest is the eventual elevation of the femoral mean pressure above the normal in some animals with the aorta constricted or even occluded above the origin of the main renal arteries. This was most pronounced and persistent in those animals in which, in addition, the aorta below the origin of the renal arteries, and, in some animals, the main renal arteries, also were constricted. The most important factors which determined this elevation of blood pressure in the lower part of the body were probably increased flow of blood into the vascular bed below the clamp and peripheral vasoconstriction of renal and humoral origin, as in the case of the hypertension produced by constriction of the main renal arteries alone (2-86). Although elevation of the carotid systolic or carotid mean pressure occurred invariably within 24 to 48 hours after the constriction of the aorta above the site of origin of both main renal arteries, yet there was a tendency

  8. Anterior Pituitary Aplasia in an Infant with Ring Chromosome 18p Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Durrin, Sarah; Lindgren, Valerie; Shad, Zohra; Boucher-Berry, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We present the first reported case of an infant with 18p deletion syndrome with anterior pituitary aplasia secondary to a ring chromosome. Endocrine workup soon after birth was reassuring; however, repeat testing months later confirmed central hypopituitarism. While MRI reading initially indicated no midline defects, subsequent review of the images confirmed anterior pituitary aplasia with ectopic posterior pituitary. This case demonstrates how deletion of genetic material, even if resulting in a chromosomal ring, still results in a severe syndromic phenotype. Furthermore, it demonstrates the necessity of close follow-up in the first year of life for children with 18p deletion syndrome and emphasizes the need to verify radiology impressions if there is any doubt as to the radiologic findings. PMID:27843654

  9. Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Krueger, H.

    2008-05-01

    Thebe's gossamer ring, the outermost and faintest of Jupiter's rings, extends outward by at least half a jovian radius from its source satellite while maintaining a constant vertical thickness. This structure is created by an electromagnetic perturbation known as a shadow resonance (Hamilton 2003, DPS meeting #35, #11.09). A shadow resonance arises from the abrupt shutoff of photoelectric charging when a dust particle enters Jupiter's shadow which, in turn, affects the strength of the electromagnetic perturbation from the planet's intense magnetic field. The result is a coupled oscillation between a particle's orbital eccentricity and its semimajor axis. Ring material spreads outward from Thebe while maintaining its vertical thickness just as observed by Galileo imaging. In addition to cameras, the Galileo spacecraft was also equipped with dust and plasma detectors. The spacecraft made two passes through the ring and its dust detector found that 1) dust fluxes drop immediately interior to Thebe's orbit, 2) some grains have inclinations in excess of 20 degrees and 3) submicron particles are present in the Amalthea ring in much greater numbers than in the Thebe ring. These findings can all be explained in the context of our shadow resonance model: the inner boundary is a direct consequence of the conservation of the Electromagnetic Jacobi Constant, the high inclinations are forced by a vertical version of the shadow resonance, and the excess submicron particles are a consequence of the weakening of electromagnetic forces in the vicinity of synchronous orbit. In this talk, we will present the data sets as well as detailed numerical simulations that back up these claims.

  10. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  11. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease. Symptoms KIDNEYS With all types of Alport syndrome the kidneys are affected. The tiny blood vessels in the glomeruli of the kidneys are ...

  12. Reye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome has occurred in children who were given aspirin when they had chickenpox or the flu. Reye syndrome has become very rare. This is because aspirin is no longer recommended for routine use in ...

  13. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  14. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... will order several other tests like blood tests, EEG, and brain scans. How Is Tourette Syndrome Treated? ... connected to Tourette syndrome, like ADHD and anxiety. Stress or being upset can make the tics worse, ...

  15. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  16. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy ... can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do not cause early symptoms and are ...

  17. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Like for Kids With Marfan Syndrome? en español Síndrome de Marfan Evan couldn't wait for school ... for Marfan syndrome runs in families, getting passed down to children from parents who have the disease. ...

  18. Edwards' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  19. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift Matching Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome ... approved by the Proteus Syndrome Foundation Assessment and management of the orthopedic and other complications of Proteus ...

  20. Apert Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.