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Sample records for construction materials laboratory

  1. Construction material

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Antink, Allison L.

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  2. Inspection of alleged design and construction deficiencies in the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-16

    On June 8, 1994, the Office of Inspections, Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Energy (DOE), received a letter dated May 31, 1994, from a complainant concerning the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The complainant alleged that the NMSF, completed in 1987, was so poorly designed and constructed that it was never usable and that DOE proposed to gut the entire facility and sandblast the walls. According to the complainant, ``these errors are so gross as to constitute professional malpractice in a commercial design setting.`` The complainant further stated that ``DOE proposes to renovate this facility to store large amounts of plutonium (as much as 30 metric tons, by some accounts), and it is imperative that the public receive some assurance that this waste will not recur and that the facility will be made safe.`` The purpose of our inspection was to determine if the allegations regarding the design and construction of the NMSF were accurate, and if so, to determine if the Government could recover damages from the Architect/Engineer and/or the construction contractor. We also reviewed the Department`s proposed actions to renovate the NMSF.

  3. Introductory Materials Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, John E., Jr.

    Described is an introductory materials science laboratory program which emphasizes crystal structure both on the atomistic and microscopic scale and the dependence of materials properties on structure. The content of this program is classified into four major areas: (1) materials science, (2) mechanical behavior of materials, (3) materials testing…

  4. Indigenous lunar construction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Sture, Stein

    1991-11-01

    The utilization of local resources for the construction and operation of a lunar base can significantly reduce the cost of transporting materials and supplies from Earth. The feasibility of processing lunar regolith to form construction materials and structural components is investigated. A preliminary review of potential processing methods such as sintering, hot-pressing, liquification, and cast basalt techniques, was completed. The processing method proposed is a variation on the cast basalt technique. It involves liquification of the regolith at 1200-1300 C, casting the liquid into a form, and controlled cooling. While the process temperature is higher than that for sintering or hot-pressing (1000-1100 C), this method is expected to yield a true engineering material with low variability in properties, high strength, and the potential to form large structural components. A scenario for this processing method was integrated with a design for a representative lunar base structure and potential construction techniques. The lunar shelter design is for a modular, segmented, pressurized, hemispherical dome which could serve as habitation and laboratory space. Based on this design, estimates of requirements for power, processing equipment, and construction equipment were made. This proposed combination of material processing method, structural design, and support requirements will help to establish the feasibility of lunar base construction using indigenous materials. Future work will refine the steps of the processing method. Specific areas where more information is needed are: furnace characteristics in vacuum; heat transfer during liquification; viscosity, pouring and forming behavior of molten regolith; design of high temperature forms; heat transfer during cooling; recrystallization of basalt; and refinement of estimates of elastic moduli, compressive and tensile strength, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. The preliminary

  5. Indigenous lunar construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Sture, Stein

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of local resources for the construction and operation of a lunar base can significantly reduce the cost of transporting materials and supplies from Earth. The feasibility of processing lunar regolith to form construction materials and structural components is investigated. A preliminary review of potential processing methods such as sintering, hot-pressing, liquification, and cast basalt techniques, was completed. The processing method proposed is a variation on the cast basalt technique. It involves liquification of the regolith at 1200-1300 C, casting the liquid into a form, and controlled cooling. While the process temperature is higher than that for sintering or hot-pressing (1000-1100 C), this method is expected to yield a true engineering material with low variability in properties, high strength, and the potential to form large structural components. A scenario for this processing method was integrated with a design for a representative lunar base structure and potential construction techniques. The lunar shelter design is for a modular, segmented, pressurized, hemispherical dome which could serve as habitation and laboratory space. Based on this design, estimates of requirements for power, processing equipment, and construction equipment were made. This proposed combination of material processing method, structural design, and support requirements will help to establish the feasibility of lunar base construction using indigenous materials. Future work will refine the steps of the processing method. Specific areas where more information is needed are: furnace characteristics in vacuum; heat transfer during liquification; viscosity, pouring and forming behavior of molten regolith; design of high temperature forms; heat transfer during cooling; recrystallization of basalt; and refinement of estimates of elastic moduli, compressive and tensile strength, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. The preliminary

  6. Materials Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

  7. Indigenous lunar construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Wayne; Sture, Stein

    1991-01-01

    The objectives are the following: to investigate the feasibility of the use of local lunar resources for construction of a lunar base structure; to develop a material processing method and integrate the method with design and construction of a pressurized habitation structure; to estimate specifications of the support equipment necessary for material processing and construction; and to provide parameters for systems models of lunar base constructions, supply, and operations. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: comparison of various lunar structures; guidelines for material processing methods; cast lunar regolith; examples of cast basalt components; cast regolith process; processing equipment; mechanical properties of cast basalt; material properties and structural design; and future work.

  8. Laboratory Materials: Affordances or Constraints?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Rebecca C.; Ruibal-Villasenor, Maria; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory instruction is critical to the understanding of biology and is a central piece of biological sciences instruction. Although much investigation has focused on the content of biology laboratory exercises, we contend that understanding the extent to which the laboratory materials can aid or limit experimental investigation is of equal…

  9. Cold Weather Construction Materials. Part 2. Field Validation of Laboratory Tests on Regulated-Set Cement for Cold Weather Concreting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    patches, slipform tunnel liners and cast-in- place roof decking. Letters requesting information (construction problems, cracking, durability, cost, etc...this minimum mst be verified. Once known, this will also dictate the earliest times at which formwork or concrete protection could be removed. The

  10. Materials for School Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    As an assist to the superintendent and members of his staff, this booklet has been prepared for obtaining information in the field of building, planning and construction. Topics discussed are--(1) structure, (2) roofs, (3) floor construction, (4) floor finishes, (5) ceilings, (6) exterior wall construction, (7) interior walls and partitions, (8)…

  11. Chemistry and Biology Laboratories. Design--Construction--Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Werner

    Guidelines for planning, building, and equipping the biological and chemical laboratory are revealed, along with construction methods for the modernization or building of new academic or industrial type laboratories. Building equipment, services, utilities, and materials data are given with rules concerning the dimensions and services of…

  12. Construction Material And Method

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Antink, Allison L.

    2006-02-21

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic. The ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  13. Use of maxillofacial laboratory materials to construct a tissue-equivalent head phantom with removable titanium implantable devices for use in verification of the dose of intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Morris, K

    2017-02-25

    The dose of radiotherapy is often verified by measuring the dose of radiation at specific points within a phantom. The presence of high-density implant materials such as titanium, however, may cause complications both during calculation and delivery of the dose. Numerous studies have reported photon/electron backscatter and alteration of the dose by high-density implants, but we know of no evidence of a dosimetry phantom that incorporates high density implants or fixtures. The aim of the study was to design and manufacture a tissue-equivalent head phantom for use in verification of the dose in radiotherapy using a combination of traditional laboratory materials and techniques and 3-dimensional technology that can incorporate titanium maxillofacial devices. Digital designs were used together with Mimics® 18.0 (Materialise NV) and FreeForm® software. DICOM data were downloaded and manipulated into the final pieces of the phantom mould. Three-dimensional digital objects were converted into STL files and exported for additional stereolithography. Phantoms were constructed in four stages: material testing and selection, design of a 3-dimensional mould, manufacture of implants, and final fabrication of the phantom using traditional laboratory techniques. Three tissue-equivalent materials were found and used to successfully manufacture a suitable phantom with interchangeable sections that contained three versions of titanium maxillofacial implants. Maxillofacial and other materials can be used to successfully construct a head phantom with interchangeable titanium implant sections for use in verification of doses of radiotherapy.

  14. Ice as a Construction Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuppero, Anthony; Lewis, J.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation shows how water and ice can enable exceptionally simple ways to construct structures in deep space. Practicality is underscored by applying advanced tank methods being developed for Mars missions. Water or ice is now known to be present or abundant on most objects in the solar system, starting with the planet Mercury. Thermal processes alone can be used to melt ice . The cold of space can refreeze water back into ice. The anomalous low vapor pressure of water, about 7 mm Hg, permits bladder containers. Tanks or bladders made with modern polymer fiber and film can exhibit very small (<0.1 %) equivalent tankage and ullage fractions and thus hold thousands of tons of water per ton bladder. Injecting water into a bladder whose shape when inflated is the desired final shape, such as a space vehicle, provides a convenient way to construct large structures. In space, structures of 1O,OOO-T mass become feasible because the bladder mass is low enough to be launched. The bladder can weigh 1OOO times less than its contents, or 10 T. The bladder would be packed like a parachute. Shaped memory materials and/or gas inflation could reestablish the desired structure shape after unpacking. The water comes from space resources. An example examines construction of torus space vehicle with 100-m nominal dimension. People would live inside the torus. A torus, like a tire on an automobile, would spin and provide synthetic gravity at its inner surface. A torus of order 100 m across would provide a gravity with gradients low enough to mitigate against vertigo.

  15. The Extraterrestrial Materials Simulation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    In contrast to fly-by and orbital missions, in situ missions face an incredible array of challenges in near-target navigation, landing site selection, descent, landing, science operations, sample collection and handling, drilling, anchoring, subsurface descent, communications, and contamination. The wide range of materials characteristics and environments threaten mission safety and success. For example, many physical properties are poorly characterized, including strength, composition, heterogeneity, phase change, texture, thermal properties, terrain features, atmospheric interaction, and stratigraphy. Examples of the range of materials properties include, for example: (1) Comets, with a possible compressive strength ranging from a light fluff to harder than concrete: 10(exp 2) to 10 (exp 8) Pa; (2) Europa, including a possible phase change at the surface, unknown strength and terrain roughness; and (3) Titan, with a completely unknown surface and possible liquid ocean. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Construction Productivity Advancement Research (CPAR) Program. Improved Materials and Processes for Sealing and Resealing Joints in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements: Laboratory Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    However, the Superseal 1614A Plant 1 sample did meet the FS SS-S-1514A test requirements when exposed to the longer heating periods of 3.0, 4.5, and 6.0...low of 5 min of Superseal 1614A, Plant 2. Results for all materials decreased with longer heating periods . Thus, areas sealed with these materials can

  17. Sustainable Management of Construction and Demolition Materials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web page discusses how to sustainably manage construction and demolition materials, Information covers, what they are, and how builders, construction crews, demolition teams,and deign practitioners can divert C&D from landfills.

  18. Audit of construction management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Secretary of Energy`s streamlining initiatives, coupled with established policy, require the Idaho Operations Office (Idaho) to ensure that its construction projects are necessary and justified. Accordingly, the objectives of this audit were to determine if Idaho was validating project plans; identifying and evaluating construction project alternatives; and reassessing the need for planned construction in accordance with the Laboratory`s decreasing mission needs.

  19. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of available terrestrial skills to the gathering of lunar materials and the processing of raw lunar materials into industrial feed stock were investigated. The literature on lunar soils and rocks was reviewed and the chemical processes by which major oxides and chemical elements can be extracted were identified. The gathering of lunar soil by means of excavation equipment was studied in terms of terrestrial experience with strip mining operations on earth. The application of electrostatic benefication techniques was examined for use on the moon to minimize the quantity of materials requiring surface transport and to optimize the stream of raw materials to be transported off the moon for subsequent industrial use.

  20. Using Indigenous Materials for Construction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Middle East and elsewhere. The raw materials considered for development of indigenous inorganic binders include volcanic deposits, laterite clay... laterite clay activated with soda ash and lime, where laterite clay moderately calcined in the presence of soda ash partially replaces natural laterite ...optionally formulated without Portland cement, and o use locally available materials (volcanic deposites, lime, soda ash, laterite clay, gypsum, etc.) [14

  1. Mechanical properties of some materials used in airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, E B; Van Ewijk, L J G

    1928-01-01

    Since lightness is desirable in airplane construction, greater stresses must be tolerated than in other kinds of construction. It is therefore necessary to have a more accurate knowledge of the greatest stresses that may occur and of the actual properties of the materials used. The Aeronautic Research Laboratories took the limit of elasticity as the basis of the strength calculations. Many tests were made of different steels, woods, aluminum alloys, and fabrics.

  2. MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NAJAM, EDWARD W.

    THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECOND ANNUAL INDIANA-PURDUE LANGUAGE LABORATORY CONFERENCE ARE ORGANIZED, AFTER INTRODUCTORY STATEMENTS BY NAJAM AND LARSEN ON CONTEMPORARY TRENDS IN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION, UNDER THREE GENERAL HEADINGS PLUS APPENDIXES. IN THE FIRST SECTION DEVOTED TO MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES ARE ARTICLES BY HYER, GARIMALDI, EDDY, AND SMITH…

  3. Artificial intelligence in the materials processing laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials science and engineering provides a vast arena for applications of artificial intelligence. Advanced materials research is an area in which challenging requirements confront the researcher, from the drawing board through production and into service. Advanced techniques results in the development of new materials for specialized applications. Hand-in-hand with these new materials are also requirements for state-of-the-art inspection methods to determine the integrity or fitness for service of structures fabricated from these materials. Two problems of current interest to the Materials Processing Laboratory at UAH are an expert system to assist in eddy current inspection of graphite epoxy components for aerospace and an expert system to assist in the design of superalloys for high temperature applications. Each project requires a different approach to reach the defined goals. Results to date are described for the eddy current analysis, but only the original concepts and approaches considered are given for the expert system to design superalloys.

  4. High Temperature Materials Laboratory third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1990-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its third year of operation as a designated DOE User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 88 nonproprietary agreements (40 university and 48 industry) and 20 proprietary agreements (1 university, 19 industry) are now in effect. Sixty-eight nonproprietary research proposals (39 from university, 28 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and 8 proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1990 are summarized.

  5. Graphing techniques for materials laboratory using Excel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1994-01-01

    Engineering technology curricula stress hands on training and laboratory practices in most of the technical courses. Laboratory reports should include analytical as well as graphical evaluation of experimental data. Experience shows that many students neither have the mathematical background nor the expertise for graphing. This paper briefly describes the procedure and data obtained from a number of experiments such as spring rate, stress concentration, endurance limit, and column buckling for a variety of materials. Then with a brief introduction to Microsoft Excel the author explains the techniques used for linear regression and logarithmic graphing.

  6. Utilization of Marginal Construction Materials for LOC.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    specifications) in the construction of asphalt and portland cement concrete surface pavement layers. The report describes a laboratory study performed on...subjected to accelerated 5-ton military dump truck and two types of tracked vehicle traffic. Recommended properties of asphalt and portland cement concrete

  7. National voluntary laboratory accreditation program: Thermal insulation materials. Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Knab, L.I.

    1995-05-01

    NIST Handbook 150-15 presents the technical requirements of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for Thermal Insulation Materials. It is intended for information and use by staff of accredited laboratories, those laboratories seeking accreditation, other laboratory accreditation systems, users of laboratory services, and others needing information on the requirements for accreditation under the Thermal Insulation Materials program.

  8. Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study by Nora M Eldredge ARL-SR-0311 February 2015...Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study Nora M Eldredge Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  9. Laboratory Investigation on Adhesives for Naval Facilities Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    when the liquid resolidifies, the bond is formed. 4. One-component, solvent-free liquids: cyanoacrylates , such as "Super Glue " anaerobics used for...urethanes) are generally stronger than solvent-based or hot-melt adhesives, which are much stronger than most aqueous-based adhesives (casein, fish, glue ...hide glue ). , . -. Iif LibraryCard Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory I LABORATORY INVESTIGATION ON ADHESIVES FOR NAVAL FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION (Final

  10. The Mars Science Laboratory Organic Check Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, J. E.; Mogensen, C. T.; VonderHeydt, M. O.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. M.; Johnson, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Organic Check Material (OCM) has been developed for use on the Mars Science Laboratory mission to serve as a sample standard for verification of organic cleanliness and characterization of potential sample alteration as a function of the sample acquisition and portioning process on the Curiosity rover. OCM samples will be acquired using the same procedures for drilling, portioning and delivery as are used to study martian samples with The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite during MSL surface operations. Because the SAM suite is highly sensitive to organic molecules, the mission can better verify the cleanliness of Curiosity's sample acquisition hardware if a known material can be processed through SAM and compared with the results obtained from martian samples.

  11. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  12. Automation software for a materials testing laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive software system for automating much of the experimental process has recently been completed at the Lewis Research Center's high-temperature fatigue and structures laboratory. The system was designed to support experiment definition and conduct, results analysis and archiving, and report generation activities. This was accomplished through the design and construction of several software systems, as well as through the use of several commercially available software products, all operating on a local, distributed minicomputer system. Experimental capabilities currently supported in an automated fashion include both isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue and deformation testing capabilities. The future growth and expansion of this system will be directed toward providing multiaxial test control, enhanced thermomechanical test control, and higher test frequency (hundreds of hertz).

  13. Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    1997-01-01

    Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

  14. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1997-06-01

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R and D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O and M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R and D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with US geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  15. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1997-12-31

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R&D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O&M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R&D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with U.S. geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  16. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Main Propulsion Machinery § 58.05-1 Material, design and construction. (a) The material, design, construction, workmanship, and arrangement of main propulsion...

  17. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Main Propulsion Machinery § 58.05-1 Material, design and construction. (a) The material, design, construction, workmanship, and arrangement of main propulsion...

  18. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Main Propulsion Machinery § 58.05-1 Material, design and construction. (a) The material, design, construction, workmanship, and arrangement of main propulsion...

  19. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Main Propulsion Machinery § 58.05-1 Material, design and construction. (a) The material, design, construction, workmanship, and arrangement of main propulsion...

  20. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Main Propulsion Machinery § 58.05-1 Material, design and construction. (a) The material, design, construction, workmanship, and arrangement of main propulsion...

  1. Lautal as a material for airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Paul

    1929-01-01

    Lautal is a refinable aluminum alloy which, unlike duralumin, contains no magnesium. According to the statements of the Lauta Works, lautal contains: aluminum, 94%; copper, 4%; silicon, 2%. The use of lautal as a construction material is discussed in relation to specific weight, production methods, and riveting tests.

  2. The Mars Science Laboratory Organic Check Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Von der Heydt, Max O.; Mogensen, Claus T.; Canham, John; Harpold, Dan N.; Johnson, Joel; Errigo, Therese; Glavin, Daniel P.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-09-01

    Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover carries a set of five external verification standards in hermetically sealed containers that can be sampled as would be a Martian rock, by drilling and then portioning into the solid sample inlet of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite. Each organic check material (OCM) canister contains a porous ceramic solid, which has been doped with a fluorinated hydrocarbon marker that can be detected by SAM. The purpose of the OCM is to serve as a verification tool for the organic cleanliness of those parts of the sample chain that cannot be cleaned other than by dilution, i.e., repeated sampling of Martian rock. SAM possesses internal calibrants for verification of both its performance and its internal cleanliness, and the OCM is not used for that purpose. Each OCM unit is designed for one use only, and the choice to do so will be made by the project science group (PSG).

  3. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  4. Materials and techniques for model construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The problems confronting the designer of models for cryogenic wind tunnel models are discussed with particular reference to the difficulties in obtaining appropriate data on the mechanical and physical properties of candidate materials and their fabrication technologies. The relationship between strength and toughness of alloys is discussed in the context of maximizing both and avoiding the problem of dimensional and microstructural instability. All major classes of materials used in model construction are considered in some detail and in the Appendix selected numerical data is given for the most relevant materials. The stepped-specimen program to investigate stress-induced dimensional changes in alloys is discussed in detail together with interpretation of the initial results. The methods used to bond model components are considered with particular reference to the selection of filler alloys and temperature cycles to avoid microstructural degradation and loss of mechanical properties.

  5. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-03-17

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO{sub x} and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required.

  6. Construction and operation of the Howard T. Ricketts Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.; Stull, L.; Butler, J.; Chang, Y.; Allison, T.; O'Rourke, D.

    2006-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has proposed to partially fund the construction of the Howard T. Ricketts (HTR) regional biocontainment laboratory (RBL) by the University of Chicago at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. The HTR Laboratory (HTRL) would be constructed, owned, and operated by the University of Chicago on land leased to it by DOE. The preferred project site is located north of Eastwood Drive and west of Outer Circle Road and is near the biological sciences building. This environmental assessment addresses the potential environmental effects resulting from construction and operation of the proposed facility. The proposed project involves the construction of a research facility with a footprint up to approximately 44,000 ft{sup 2} (4,088 m{sup 2}). The proposed building would house research laboratories, including Biosafety Level 2 and 3 biocontainment space, animal research facilities, administrative offices, and building support areas. The NIH has identified a need for new facilities to support research on potential bioterrorism agents and emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, to protect the nation from such threats to public health. This research requires specialized laboratory facilities that are designed, managed, and operated to protect laboratory workers and the surrounding community from accidental exposure to agents. The proposed HTRL would provide needed biocontainment space to researchers and promote the advancement of knowledge in the disciplines of biodefense and emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Several alternatives were considered for the location of the proposed facility, as well as a no action alternative. The preferred alternative includes the construction of a research facility, up to 44,000 ft{sup 2} (4,088 m{sup 2}), at Argonne National Laboratory, a secure government location. Potential impacts to natural and cultural resources have been evaluated in

  7. Owner Involvement in Construction at a National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lipka, G.

    1999-03-08

    In a construction project, the contractor and the owner each have a responsibility for ensuring the health and safety of personnel on a project site. The contractor has the responsibility for ensuring that the provisions of OSHA'S safety and health regulations are followed and that the work is conducted in a safe and well thought out manner (Kohn 1996). The owner has a responsibility for disclosing to the contractor those owner-controlled hazards that are present in the work area due to ongoing and past operations (OSHA 1997). With the owner taking an active role in disclosing the potential hazards, the contractor is able to account for, plan, and mitigate potential health and safety issues during the performance phase of the project. At Sandia National Laboratories, this disclosure is made early in the project through the use of processes developed specifically for this purpose.

  8. Oak Ridge National Laboratory materials highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.R. ); Daghir, R. )

    1990-12-01

    The metallic materials discussed briefly in this report are nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, Fe{sub 3}-Al-based iron aluminides, and advanced austenitic alloys for coal utilization applications. Whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, toughened zirconia ceramics, fiber reinforced composite hot-gas filters, and titanium diboride are all discussed. The sol-gel process for the fabrication of high-yield oxide varistors is presented briefly. The use of zirconia-bonded zirconia for fiber insulation structures is presented. The patent status for all the metallic and ceramic materials and for their uses is reported. Several methods for testing the materials described include pulsed eddy-current non-destructive, Sigmajig (an improved hot-cracking test), and laser diffraction measurements for high-temperature strain measurements. MHD molten metal atomizer for powder production, thermal spraying, and microwave sintering of ceramics are all described. A process for impregnating a concrete or ceramic body with a polymeric material and a thermomechanical software development center are both discussed briefly. (BM)

  9. Containerless materials processing in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Robinson, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    Drop tube makes possible preparation of exotic materials. The 100 foot tube is oriented precisely vertical to prevent free-falling drop from hitting tube walls. Inert-gas supply, evacuation pumps, viewing ports, and flexibility in choice of melt technique allow precise control and monitoring of solidification.

  10. Preferences for nesting material as environmental enrichment for laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Van de Weerd, H A; Van Loo, P L; Van Zutphen, L F; Koolhaas, J M; Baumans, V

    1997-04-01

    Behavioural and psychological needs of laboratory animals generally cannot adequately be met in standard laboratory cages. Environmental enrichment, which provides a more structured environment can enhance the well-being of laboratory animals. They may perform more of their species-specific behaviour and may control their environment in a better way. An easily applicable form of enrichment for laboratory mice is nesting material. Six different types of nesting materials were evaluated in a preference test with male and female animals of two strains [C57BL/6J or BALB/c, n = 48]. No significant differences in preference were found between the strains or between the sexes. All mice showed a clear preference for cages with tissues or towels as compared to paper strips or no nesting material, and for cages with cotton string or wood-wool as compared to wood shavings or no nesting material. Paper-derived materials were preferred over wood-derived materials, although the results also suggest that the nature (paper or wood) of the nesting material is less important than its structure, which determines the nestability of the material. Nesting material may be a relatively simple method to contribute to the well-being of laboratory mice.

  11. 46 CFR 160.053-3 - Materials, construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Work Vests, Unicellular Plastic... workmanship of unicellular plastic foam work vests specified by this subpart shall conform to the...

  12. 46 CFR 160.053-3 - Materials, construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Work Vests, Unicellular Plastic... workmanship of unicellular plastic foam work vests specified by this subpart shall conform to the...

  13. 46 CFR 160.053-3 - Materials, construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Work Vests, Unicellular Plastic... workmanship of unicellular plastic foam work vests specified by this subpart shall conform to the...

  14. 46 CFR 160.053-3 - Materials, construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Work Vests, Unicellular Plastic... workmanship of unicellular plastic foam work vests specified by this subpart shall conform to the...

  15. Chemistry-Materials Laboratory Project Book, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Bureau of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    This Chemistry-Materials Laboratory Project Book, assembled through a survey of science instructors in vocational-technical schools in Connecticut, is intended to meet a variety of needs. It can serve as an idea book, with the instructor taking from it as needed and adding or substituting material related to class interests; as a guide book for…

  16. Indigenous Construction Materials for Theater Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    protection over thinner walls (i.e., wood frame construction). A building’s resistance to weapons attack is another safety factor. Fire resistance is...the steel and good paint maintenance (Roye 1996). K-span buildings do not provide much force protection , particularly against ballistic weapons...fire- resistant and provides force protection against ballistics and blasts. Issues related to shotcrete construction in foreign countries include

  17. Utilizing Nanofabrication to Construct Strong, Luminescent Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Gang; Lu, Hong B.; McCready, David E.; Joly, Alan G.; Bovin, Jan-Olov

    2006-05-28

    Luminescent materials have been utilized widely in applications from lighting to sensing. The new development of technologies based on luminescence properties requires the materials to have high luminescence efficiency and mechanical strength. In this article, we report the fabrication of luminescent materials possessing high mechanical strength by nanofabrication with polyvinyl alcohol used as a stabilizer or coupling agent. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission microscope observations reveal that the nanocomposite sample contains ZnS and ZnO nanoparticles as well as kozoite and sodium nitrate. The mechanical strength and hardness of these nanocomposite materials are higher than polycarbonate and some carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Strong luminescence is observed in the new nanocomposites and the luminescence intensity does not degrade following up to 30 minutes of X-ray irradiation. Our results indicate that nanofabrication may provide a good method to improve the mechanical strength of luminescent materials for some applications in which high strength luminescent materials are needed.

  18. 49 CFR 176.96 - Materials of construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials of construction. 176.96 Section 176.96 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Special Requirements for Barges § 176.96 Materials...

  19. Information systems for material flow management in construction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesároš, P.; Mandičák, T.

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the options for the management of material flows in the construction process. Management and resource planning is one of the key factors influencing the effectiveness of construction project. It is very difficult to set these flows correctly. The current period offers several options and tools to do this. Information systems and their modules can be used just for the management of materials in the construction process.

  20. Construction Trade Course. Bilingual Vocational Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Cox, Guadalupe

    This building trades course, one of a series of bilingual English-Spanish vocational education courses, is designed to introduce the basic skills that a student must know in the construction field. It is geared to teach the student basic manipulative skills, safety judgments, proper work habits, desirable attitudes, and proper behavior for initial…

  1. Development of apparatus and procedures for evaluating radon-resistant construction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, T.D.; Greenfield, M.B.; MacKenzie, J.; Meijer, R.J. de

    1992-12-31

    Laboratory facilities and apparatus have been constructed to measure radon exhalation from, and radon permeability through, various construction materials. This phase of the project has focused on development of test apparatus and evaluation of instrumentation. Results indicate significant spatial variability in the radon permeability of polyethylene, even when all test samples were selected from the same roll of material, and when no visible differentiation could be made regarding sample quality. Implications for code enforcement are described, and recommendations are offered for refinement of equipment and the measurement process, prioritization of future materials testing, and specific building code provisions, based on our results.

  2. Laboratory studies of Miocene limestone for the use of construction industry in Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva Jayawardena, Upali

    2016-04-01

    Geologically ten percent of Sri Lanka is made up of Miocene limestone which covers northern and north-western coastal belt of the Island. It is used as a raw material for various industries but only cement and lime are being used for the construction industry. Except its chemical composition there is no available literature to study about other properties. Therefore the author carried out a series of laboratory tests to find out the mechanical properties of limestone in Sri Lanka. The objective of this paper is to make a note on the various properties of Miocene limestone and describe its suitability to use as an aggregate for the construction industry in Sri Lanka. Borehole samples (NX size) of limestone were obtained from various drilling sites in Northern Province of Sri Lanka and selected samples were prepared for different laboratory tests after visual observations. The tests were carried out according to ASTM Standards at the geotechnical and materials testing laboratories. The number of samples per each test was different. The range (and average result) for each property can be mentioned here as bulk density 2213-2643 (2452) kg/m3, water absorption 2.2-4.5 (1.91)%, porosity 1-15 (6.5)%, specific gravity 2.58-2.68(2.62), ultrasonic pulse velocity P wave 4480-6338 (5668) m/s and S wave 2688-3802 (3400) m/s, uniaxial compressive strength 11-92 (35)MPa, point load strength 1.2-7.1 (3.7)MPa, aggregate impact value, AIV 25-30 (28)%, LAAV 35-38 (36)%, and Brazilian tensile strength 2.1-4.4 (3.2)MPa. Poisson's ratio 0.12-0.68 (0.22) and modulus of elasticity 42-85 (62) GPa were obtained by using P and S ultrasonic wave velocity values. According to LAAV and AIV this limestone may be suitable as the base course material for road construction but may not be suitable for surface material of highways and rail road ballasts. Ultrasonic velocity waves indicate that limestone is highly compacted and solid. According to the compressive strength of solid limestone rock a few

  3. Construction Methods and Materials. School Buildings Planning, Design, and Construction Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odell, John H.

    A school construction guide offers key personnel in school development projects information on the complex task of master planning and construction of schools in Australia. This chapter of the guide provides advice on the various types of construction that may be used, the materials available, and some elementary aspects of the services required…

  4. Mass of materials: the impact of designers on construction ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, John

    2012-01-01

    Many construction injuries are musculoskeletal related in the form of sprains and strains arising from the handling of materials, which are specified by designers. The paper presents the results of a study conducted among delegates attending two 'designing for H&S' (DfH&S) seminars using a questionnaire. The salient findings include: the level of knowledge relative to the mass and density of materials is limited; designers generally do not consider the mass and density of materials when designing structures and elements and specifying materials; to a degree designers appreciate that the mass and density of materials impact on construction ergonomics; designers rate their knowledge of the mass and density of materials as limited, and designers appreciate the potential of the consideration of the mass and density of materials to contribute to an improvement in construction ergonomics. Conclusions include: designers lack the requisite knowledge relative to the mass and density of materials; designers are thus precluded from conducting optimum design hazard identification and risk assessments, and tertiary built environment designer education does not enlighten designers relative to construction ergonomics. Recommendations include: tertiary built environment designer education should construction ergonomics; professional associations should raise the level of awareness relative to construction ergonomics, and design practices should include a category 'mass and density of materials' in their practice libraries.

  5. Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaschl, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  7. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction. [space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.; Mckenzie, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Three different chemical processing schemes were identified for separating lunar soils into the major oxides and elements. Feedstock production for space industry; an HF acid leach process; electrorefining processes for lunar free metal and metal derived from chemical processing of lunar soils; production and use of silanes and spectrally selective materials; glass, ceramics, and electrochemistry workshops; and an econometric model of bootstrapping space industry are discussed.

  8. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  9. Characterization of Coal Mine Overburden and Assessment as Mine Haul Road Construction Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Soumya Ranjan; Verma, Abhiram Kumar; Rao, Karanam Umamaheshwar

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents details of laboratory investigation carried out on coal mine overburden materials to check their suitability in base/sub-base of mine haul road pavement. In this investigation, strength characteristics of un- stabilized overburden materials are evaluated. Strength characteristics of overburden materials are obtained through laboratory tests by physical, mechanical, chemical and micro-structural analysis. The laboratory investigation shows untreated murrum, top soil and sub soil are not suitable to be used as mine haul road construction material. In this investigation, CBR method is used for layer thickness as well as cover thickness calculation. The paper also discusses the importance of various tests required for evaluation and assessment of mine haul road.

  10. Fabrication methods for construction from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Cost-driving parameters of space industrialization are discussed, specifically cost of transportation from earth to low earth orbit and productivity of labor in space. A design procedure for a space manufacturing facility (SMF) is outlined, and the design of a reference SMF is described. This SMF receives lunar materials and converts them to components of space structures such as solar power satellites. The effect of machine reliability is discussed. The SMF appears versatile and productive, and the space environment has some beneficial characteristics which may simplify manufacturing processes. Technology demonstration programs are needed, but prototypes of SMF equipment can be small devices.

  11. 46 CFR 160.053-3 - Materials, construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Foam § 160.053-3 Materials, construction and workmanship. (a) General. Except as otherwise specifically... workmanship of unicellular plastic foam work vests specified by this subpart shall conform to the...

  12. The changing role of the National Laboratories in materials research

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Fluss, M.

    1995-06-02

    The role of the National Laboratories is summarized from the era of post World War II to the present time. The U.S. federal government policy for the National Laboratories and its influence on their materials science infrastructure is reviewed with respect to: determining overall research strategies, various initiatives to interact with industry (especially in recent years), building facilities that serve the nation, and developing leading edge research in the materials sciences. Despite reductions in support for research in the U.S. in recent years, and uncertainties regarding the specific policies for R&D in the U.S., there are strong roles for materials research at the National Laboratories. These roles will be centered on the abilities of the National Laboratories to field multidisciplinary teams, the use of unique cutting edge facilities, a focus on areas of strength within each of the labs, increased teaming and partnerships, and the selection of motivated research areas. It is hoped that such teaming opportunities will include new alliances with China, in a manner similar, perhaps, to those recently achieved between the U.S. and other countries.

  13. 23 CFR 633.207 - Construction labor and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... materials native to the Appalachian region. The provisions of § 635.409 of this chapter shall not apply to... OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.207 Construction... Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Construction Contracts,” Form...

  14. 23 CFR 633.207 - Construction labor and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... materials native to the Appalachian region. The provisions of § 635.409 of this chapter shall not apply to... OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.207 Construction... Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Construction Contracts,” Form...

  15. 23 CFR 633.207 - Construction labor and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... materials native to the Appalachian region. The provisions of § 635.409 of this chapter shall not apply to... OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.207 Construction... Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Construction Contracts,” Form...

  16. 23 CFR 633.207 - Construction labor and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... materials native to the Appalachian region. The provisions of § 635.409 of this chapter shall not apply to... OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.207 Construction... Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Construction Contracts,” Form...

  17. 23 CFR 633.207 - Construction labor and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... materials native to the Appalachian region. The provisions of § 635.409 of this chapter shall not apply to... OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.207 Construction... Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Construction Contracts,” Form...

  18. Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

  19. Reinforce Design and Construction Issues with a Comprehensive Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schemmel, John J.

    In 1996, a comprehensive project was introduced in the first course of Reinforced Concrete Design, CVEG 4303 at the University of Arkansas. The primary purpose of this project was to highlight issues related to the construction of reinforced concrete elements. This semester-long project involves the design, fabrication, and testing of 8-foot long…

  20. Laboratory model of gas microchromatograph: construction and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Jerzy; Szczygielska, Malgorzata; Dziuban, Jan; Gorecka-Drzazga, Anna

    2001-08-01

    The paper describes the microsystems for total chemical analysis and the structure of a gas microchromatograph. The construction and technical data of capillary micro column of thermo conducting detector and gas microvalve are also described. The paper refers to the test of a model of gas micro chromatography, the analyses of gas samples and presents the exemplary chromatograms.

  1. Laboratory Evaluation of Nitrile Fuel Tank Materials (Phase 2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) September 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES...COVERED (From - To) October 2011–March 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Evaluation of Nitrile Fuel Tank Materials (Phase II) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ...5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) James M. Sloan, David Flanagan, Daniel DeSchepper, Paul Touchet,* and Henry Feuer† 5d

  2. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Carpenter, John

    2016-07-12

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  3. Materials of construction for advanced coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nangia, V.K.

    1982-01-01

    This book describes materials of construction, and materials problems for equipment used in advanced coal conversion systems. The need for cost effective industrial operation is always a prime concern, particularly in this age of energy consciousness. Industry is continually seeking improved materials for more efficient systems. The information presented here is intended to be of use in the design and planning of these systems. Coal conversion and utilization impose severe demands on construction materials because of high temperature, high pressure, corrosive/erosive, and other hostile environmental factors. Successful economic development of these processes can be achieved only to the extent that working materials can withstand increasingly more aggressive operating conditions. The book, which reviews present and past work on the behavior of materials in the environments of advanced coal conversion systems, is divided into three parts: atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal gasification and liquefaction, and advanced power systems.

  4. Fire-resistant materials for aircraft passenger seat construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.; Tesoro, G. C.; Moussa, A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal response characteristics of fabric and fabric-foam assemblies are described. The various aspects of the ignition behavior of contemporary aircraft passenger seat upholstery fabric materials relative to fabric materials made from thermally stable polymers are evaluated. The role of the polymeric foam backing on the thermal response of the fabric-foam assembly is also ascertained. The optimum utilization of improved fire-resistant fabric and foam materials in the construction of aircraft passenger seats is suggested.

  5. Construction of the NuMI underground laboratory facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Laughton, Christopher; Bruen, Michael P

    2003-01-01

    At Fermilab, a 4000-ft long underground complex has recently been constructed for a high-energy physics experiment. The complex is sited up to 350 ft, below grade principally in bedrock. The rock excavations were mined by TBM and drill and blast methods and supported by a combination of rock bolts, dowels and shotcrete. Water control was achieved using a combination of pre- and post-excavation grouting, drainage systems, drip shielding and air desiccation measures.

  6. Marshall Space Flight Center Materials and Processes Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.

    2012-01-01

    Marshall?s Materials and Processes Laboratory has been a core capability for NASA for over fifty years. MSFC has a proven heritage and recognized expertise in materials and manufacturing that are essential to enable and sustain space exploration. Marshall provides a "systems-wise" capability for applied research, flight hardware development, and sustaining engineering. Our history of leadership and achievements in materials, manufacturing, and flight experiments includes Apollo, Skylab, Mir, Spacelab, Shuttle (Space Shuttle Main Engine, External Tank, Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, and Solid Rocket Booster), Hubble, Chandra, and the International Space Station. MSFC?s National Center for Advanced Manufacturing, NCAM, facilitates major M&P advanced manufacturing partnership activities with academia, industry and other local, state and federal government agencies. The Materials and Processes Laborato ry has principal competencies in metals, composites, ceramics, additive manufacturing, materials and process modeling and simulation, space environmental effects, non-destructive evaluation, and fracture and failure analysis provide products ranging from materials research in space to fully integrated solutions for large complex systems challenges. Marshall?s materials research, development and manufacturing capabilities assure that NASA and National missions have access to cutting-edge, cost-effective engineering design and production options that are frugal in using design margins and are verified as safe and reliable. These are all critical factors in both future mission success and affordability.

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Amy; Thronas, Denise; Marshall, Robert

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  8. Access to Special Nuclear Material at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    R. Bean; J. Barrett; D. Gerts; B. Brush

    2010-07-01

    Access to special nuclear material (SNM) such as enriched uranium or plutonium is critical to the experimental validation of measurement techniques for nuclear nonproliferation applications. It is especially important that realistic quantities be available for measurements in the field. Security and safety requirements have made such access nearly impossible at many U.S. facilities. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been able to provide kilogram quantities of SNM for in situ measurements ranging from testing of equipment in laboratory facilities, to outdoor measurements simulating real conditions, to transfer of the SNM to the customer’s facility and back for measurements in the field. The INL will be working to make SNM more widely accessible for measurements by nuclear nonproliferation projects, including those with international researchers.

  9. Siting, Constructing, and Maintaining a Deep Underground Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Robert R.

    1983-03-01

    Experience from a recent site selection study has shown that the important considerations in siting a deep underground science facility are numerous, complicated, and most often based in economics. Even so, there are natural constraints on the maximum depth, size of openings, and construction techniques that can be attained or utilized at any particular site. In general, these are set by the local geothermal gradient, hydrologic regime, and properties of the rock mass or substance that are pertinent to geological, mining, and drilling engineering. At the same time, economics control the type of access, means of dewatering, and methods of sustaining the openings that are most feasible. If major faults can be avoided, sites offering acceptable temperature, a low water table, no outstanding aquifers or badly broken ground above the main openings, and strong, massive, largely impermeable rocks surrounding them at depth are best. Upon completion of a facility, the investment and safety of the occupants demand it rigorous maintenance.

  10. Biofabrication of multi-material anatomically shaped tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Visser, Jetze; Peters, Benjamin; Burger, Thijs J; Boomstra, Jelle; Dhert, Wouter J A; Melchels, Ferry P W; Malda, Jos

    2013-09-01

    Additive manufacturing in the field of regenerative medicine aims to fabricate organized tissue-equivalents. However, the control over shape and composition of biofabricated constructs is still a challenge and needs to be improved. The current research aims to improve shape, by converging a number of biocompatible, quality construction materials into a single three-dimensional fiber deposition process. To demonstrate this, several models of complex anatomically shaped constructs were fabricated by combined deposition of poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(ε-caprolactone), gelatin methacrylamide/gellan gum and alginate hydrogel. Sacrificial components were co-deposited as temporary support for overhang geometries and were removed after fabrication by immersion in aqueous solutions. Embedding of chondrocytes in the gelatin methacrylamide/gellan component demonstrated that the fabrication and the sacrificing procedure did not affect cell viability. Further, it was shown that anatomically shaped constructs can be successfully fabricated, yielding advanced porous thermoplastic polymer scaffolds, layered porous hydrogel constructs, as well as reinforced cell-laden hydrogel structures. In conclusion, anatomically shaped tissue constructs of clinically relevant sizes can be generated when employing multiple building and sacrificial materials in a single biofabrication session. The current techniques offer improved control over both internal and external construct architecture underscoring its potential to generate customized implants for human tissue regeneration.

  11. Construction of an Instructional Design Model for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory Design: A Delphi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunag, Tara

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct an instructional systems design model for chemistry teaching laboratories at the undergraduate level to accurately depict the current practices of design experts. This required identifying the variables considered during design, prioritizing and ordering these variables, and constructing a model. Experts…

  12. Thermocouple Calibration and Accuracy in a Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Keller, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    A consolidation of information has been provided that can be used to define procedures for enhancing and maintaining accuracy in temperature measurements in materials testing laboratories. These studies were restricted to type R and K thermocouples (TCs) tested in air. Thermocouple accuracies, as influenced by calibration methods, thermocouple stability, and manufacturer's tolerances were all quantified in terms of statistical confidence intervals. By calibrating specific TCs the benefits in accuracy can be as great as 6 C or 5X better compared to relying on manufacturer's tolerances. The results emphasize strict reliance on the defined testing protocol and on the need to establish recalibration frequencies in order to maintain these levels of accuracy.

  13. Iodine Standard Materials: Preparation and Inter-Laboratory Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    D D Jenson; M L Adamic; J E Olson; M G Watrous; C Vockenhuber

    2014-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is preparing to enter the community of AMS practioners who analyze for 129Iodine. We expect to take delivery of a 0.5 MV compact accelerator mass spectrometry system, built by NEC, in the early summer of 2014. The primary mission for this instrument is iodine; it is designed to analyze iodine in the +3 charge state. As part of the acceptance testing for this instrument, both at NEC and on-site in our laboratory, some sort of standard or reference material is needed to verify performance. Appropriate standard materials are not readily available in the commercial marketplace. Small quantities can sometimes be acquired from other laboratories already engaged in iodine analyses. In the longer-term, meaningful quantities of standard materials are needed for routine use in analyses, and for quality control functions1. We have prepared some standard materials, starting with elemental Woodward iodine and NIST SRM 3231 [Iodine-129 Isotopic Standard (high level)] 10-6 solution. The goal was to make mixtures at the 5x10-10, 5x10-11, 5x10-12 ratio levels, along with some unmodified Woodward, in the chemical form of silver iodide. Approximately twenty grams of each of these mixtures were prepared. The elemental Woodward iodine was dissolved in chloroform, then reduced to iodide using sodium bisulfite in water. At this point the NIST spike material was added, in the form of sodium iodide. The mixed iodides were oxidized back to iodine in chloroform using hydrogen peroxide. This oxidation step was essential for isotopic equilibration of the 127 and 129 atoms. The iodine was reduced to iodide using sodium bisulfite as before. Excess sulfites and sulfates were precipitated with barium nitrate. After decanting, silver nitrate was used to precipitate the desired silver iodide. Once the silver iodide was produced, the material was kept in darkness as much as possible to minimize photo-oxidation. The various mixtures were synthesized independently of each

  14. Material handling for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Material Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pittman, P.; Roybal, J.; Durrer, R.; Gordon, D.

    1999-04-01

    This paper will present the design and application of material handling and automation systems currently being developed for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nuclear Material Storage Facility (NMSF) renovation project. The NMSF is a long-term storage facility for nuclear material in various forms. The material is stored within tubes in a rack called a basket. The material handling equipment range from simple lift assist devices to more sophisticated fully automated robots, and are split into three basic systems: a Vault Automation System, an NDA automation System, and a Drum handling System. The Vault Automation system provides a mechanism to handle a basket of material cans and to load/unload storage tubes within the material vault. In addition, another robot is provided to load/unload material cans within the baskets. The NDA Automation System provides a mechanism to move material within the small canister NDA laboratory and to load/unload the NDA instruments. The Drum Handling System consists of a series of off the shelf components used to assist in lifting heavy objects such as pallets of material or drums and barrels.

  15. Deformation Monitoring of Materials Under Stress in Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlatos, D.; Yiatros, S.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetry is a valid alternative solution to linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) measurements in structural testing in laboratory conditions. Although the use of LVDTs boasts a high degree of accuracy, on the other hand it is limiting as it offers measurements between two points and it thus might be unable to capture localized deformations and strains over a bigger area of a structural specimen. In this aspect photogrammetry seems to offer certain advantages. Commercial solutions provide limited testing envelopes, while on the other hand, the wide range on new materials need more versatile techniques. Based on the need to develop an in-house photogrammetric toolbox to support several structural and material experiments in the department Advanced Pore Morphology (APM) aluminium foam specimens developed at Fraunhofer IFAM in Germany and cured at CUT, were tested under monotonic compressive load. Data acquisition, analysis and results, along with lessons learnt from the process are presented in this work.

  16. Distribution of materials in construction and demolition waste in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2011-08-01

    It may not be enough simply to know the global volume of construction and demolition waste (CDW) generated in a certain region or country if one wants to estimate, for instance, the revenue accruing from separating several types of materials from the input entering a given CDW recycling plant. A more detailed determination of the distribution of the materials within the generated CDW is needed and the present paper addresses this issue, distinguishing different buildings and types of operation (new construction, retrofitting and demolition). This has been achieved by measuring the materials from buildings of different ages within the Portuguese building stock, and by using direct data from demolition/retrofitting sites and new construction average values reported in the literature. An attempt to establish a benchmark with other countries is also presented. This knowledge may also benefit industry management, especially that related to CDW recycling, helping to optimize procedures, equipment size and operation and even industrial plant spatial distribution. In an extremely competitive market, where as in Portugal low-tech and high environmental impact procedures remain the norm in the construction industry (in particular, the construction waste industry), the introduction of a successful recycling industry is only possible with highly optimized processes and based on a knowledge-based approach to problems.

  17. Advantages and challenges of dissimilar materials in automotive lightweight construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberpals, Jan-Philipp; Schmidt, Philipp A.; Böhm, Daniel; Müller, Steffen

    2015-03-01

    The core of future automotive lightweight materials is the joining technology of various material mixes. The type of joining will be essential, particularly in electrified propulsion systems, especially as an improved electrical energy transmission leads to a higher total efficiency of the vehicle. The most evident parts to start the optimization process are the traction battery, the electrical performance modules and the engines. Consequently aluminum plays a very central role for lightweight construction applications. However, the physical-technical requirements of components often require the combination with other materials. Thus the joining of mixed material connections is an essential key technology for many of the current developments, for example in the areas E-Mobility, solar energy and lightweight construction. Due to these advantages mixed material joints are already established in the automotive industry and laser beam remote welding is now a focus technology for mixed material connections. The secret of the laser welding process with mixed materials lies within the different areas of the melting phase diagram depending on the mixing ratio and the cooling down rate. According to that areas with unwanted, prim, intermetallic phases arise in the fusion zone. Therefore, laser welding of mixed material connections can currently only be used with additional filler in the automotive industry.

  18. Costs Climb on Materials for Schools: Construction Projects Delayed, Scrapped

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Joetta L.

    2004-01-01

    The rapidly rising cost of steel and other construction materials is forcing some districts that are building new schools to scramble for more money, delay work, or redesign projects. Nationwide, contractors and architects are finding it harder to give accurate estimates on projects, and some have even had to renegotiate contracts with districts.…

  19. 46 CFR 162.017-3 - Materials, construction, and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Pressure-Vacuum Relief, for Tank Vessels § 162.017-3 Materials, construction, and workmanship. (a) The... imperfections which may affect its serviceability. (b) Bodies of pressure-vacuum relief valves must be made of... unrestricted flow of cargo vapors to the atmosphere nor in an increase in the pressure or vacuum at which...

  20. 46 CFR 162.017-3 - Materials, construction, and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Pressure-Vacuum Relief, for Tank Vessels § 162.017-3 Materials, construction, and workmanship. (a) The... imperfections which may affect its serviceability. (b) Bodies of pressure-vacuum relief valves must be made of... unrestricted flow of cargo vapors to the atmosphere nor in an increase in the pressure or vacuum at which...

  1. 46 CFR 162.017-3 - Materials, construction, and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Valves, Pressure-Vacuum Relief... serviceability. (b) Bodies of pressure-vacuum relief valves must be made of bronze or such corrosion-resistant... vapors to the atmosphere nor in an increase in the pressure or vacuum at which the valve...

  2. 46 CFR 162.017-3 - Materials, construction, and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Pressure-Vacuum Relief, for Tank Vessels § 162.017-3 Materials, construction, and workmanship. (a) The... imperfections which may affect its serviceability. (b) Bodies of pressure-vacuum relief valves must be made of... unrestricted flow of cargo vapors to the atmosphere nor in an increase in the pressure or vacuum at which...

  3. A Model Framework for Course Materials Construction. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    A model framework for course materials construction is presented as an aid to Coast Guard course writers and coordinators, curriculum developers, and instructors who must modify a course or draft a new one. The model assumes that the instructor or other designated person has: (1) completed a task analysis which identifies the competencies, skills…

  4. Laboratory Studies of Cometary Materials - Continuity Between Asteroid and Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Walker, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory analysis of cometary samples have been enabled by collection of cometary dust in the stratosphere by high altitude aircraft and by the direct sampling of the comet Wild-2 coma by the NASA Stardust spacecraft. Cometary materials are composed of a complex assemblage of highly primitive, unprocessed interstellar and primordial solar system materials as well as a variety of high temperature phases that must have condensed in the inner regions of the protoplanetary disk. These findings support and contradict conclusions of comet properties based solely on astronomical observations. These sample return missions have instead shown that there is a continuity of properties between comets and asteroids, where both types of materials show evidence for primitive and processed materials. Furthermore, these findings underscore the importance and value of direct sample return. There will be great value in comparing the findings of the Stardust cometary coma sample return mission with those of future asteroid surface sample returns OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa II as well as future comet nucleus sample returns.

  5. Laboratory and field testing for utilization of an excavated soil as landfill liner material.

    PubMed

    Bozbey, Ilknur; Guler, Erol

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using a silty soil excavated in highway construction as landfill liner material. The tests were conducted both at laboratory and in situ scales, and the soil was tested in pure and lime treated forms. Different levels of compaction energy were used. For the field study, a test pad was constructed and in situ hydraulic conductivity experiments were conducted by sealed double ring infiltrometers (SDRI). Laboratory testing revealed that while lime treatment improved the shear strength, it resulted in higher hydraulic conductivity values compared to pure soil. It was observed that leachate permeation did not change the hydraulic conductivity of the pure and lime treated samples. Laboratory hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-9) m/s and met the 1.0E-08 m/s criterion in the Turkish regulations, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value allowed in most developed countries. SDRI testing, which lasted for 6 mo, indicated that lime treatment increased the hydraulic conductivity of pure soil significantly in the field scale tests. In situ hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 1E-08 and 1E-07 m/s, and exceeded the allowable value in the Turkish regulations. Undisturbed samples collected from the test pad were not representative of field hydraulic conductivities. Contrary to laboratory findings, higher compaction efforts did not result in lower hydraulic conductivities in field scales. The study verified the importance of in situ hydraulic conductivity testing in compacted liners.

  6. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  7. Development and mechanical properties of construction materials from lunar simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.

    1990-01-01

    The development of construction materials such as concrete from lunar soils without the use of water requires a different methodology than that used for conventional terrestrial concrete. Currently, this research involves two aspects: (1) liquefaction of lunar simulants with various additives in a furnace so as to produce a construction material like an intermediate ceramic; and (2) cyclic loading of simulant with different initial vacuums and densities with respect to the theoretical maximum densities (TMD). In both cases, bending, triaxial compression, extension, and hydrostatic tests will be performed to define the stress-strain strength response of the resulting materials. In the case of the intermediate ceramic, bending and available multiaxial test devices will be used, while for the compacted case, tests will be performed directly in the new device. The tests will be performed by simulating in situ confining conditions. A preliminary review of high-purity metal is also conducted.

  8. EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATION OF SALTSTONE MIXER AUGER/PADDLES MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION FOR IMPROVED WEAR RESISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Torres, R.

    2012-08-15

    Wear and corrosion testing were conducted to evaluate alternate materials of construction for the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles. These components have been degraded by wear from the slurry processed in the mixer. Material test options included PVD coatings (TiN, TiCN, and ZrN), weld overlays (Stellite 12 and Ultimet) and higher hardness steels and carbides (D2 and tungsten carbide). The corrosion testing demonstrated that the slurry is not detrimental to the current materials of construction or the new candidates. The ASTM G75 Miller wear test showed that the high hardness materials and the Stellite 12 weld overlay provide superior wear relative to the Astralloy and CF8M stainless steel, which are the current materials of construction, as well as the PVD coatings and Ultimet. The following recommendations are made for selecting new material options and improving the overall wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer components: A Stellite 12 weld overlay or higher hardness steel (with toughness equivalent to Astralloy) be used to improve the wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer paddles; other manufacturing specifications for the mixer need to be considered in this selection. The current use of the Stellite 12 weld overlay be evaluated so that coverage of the 316 auger can be optimized for improved wear resistance of the auger. The wear surfaces of the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles be evaluated so that laboratory data can be better correlated to actual service. The 2-inch Saltstone mixer prototype be used to verify material performance.

  9. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    PubMed

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing.

  10. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresneau, A.; Abou Mrad, N.; d’Hendecourt, L. LS; Duvernay, F.; Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G.

    2017-03-01

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  11. Construction material processed using lunar simulant in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Stan; Ocallaghan-Hay, Bridget; Housman, Ralph; Kindig, Michael; King, John; Montegrande, Kevin; Norris, Raymond; Vanscotter, Ryan; Willenborg, Jonathan; Staubs, Harry

    1995-01-01

    The manufacture of construction materials from locally available resources in space is an important first step in the establishment of lunar and planetary bases. The objective of the CoMPULSIVE (Construction Material Processed Using Lunar Simulant In Various Environments) experiment is to develop a procedure to produce construction materials by sintering or melting Johnson Space Center Simulant 1 (JSC-1) lunar soil simulant in both earth-based (1-g) and microgravity (approximately 0-g) environments. The characteristics of the resultant materials will be tested to determine its physical and mechanical properties. The physical characteristics include: crystalline, thermal, and electrical properties. The mechanical properties include: compressive tensile, and flexural strengths. The simulant, placed in a sealed graphite crucible, will be heated using a high temperature furnace. The crucible will then be cooled by radiative and forced convective means. The core furnace element consists of space qualified quartz-halogen incandescent lamps with focusing mirrors. Sample temperatures of up to 2200 C are attainable using this heating method.

  12. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  13. Laboratory evaluation of low cobalt wear materials for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shiels, S.A.; Wilson, W.L.; Rosengarth, K.W.; Wire, G.L.

    1994-09-01

    Laboratory wear and corrosion screening tests were conducted on several commercially available, low-cobalt and cobalt-free hardsurfacing alloys to evaluate their relative wear and corrosion performance under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary heat transport circuit conditions. Wear tests were performed under reciprocating, sliding contact. Corrosion performance was evaluated in both steady state and off-normal chemistry conditions. The wear behavior of the candidate hardsurfacing alloys was generally comparable to or better than that of Stellite 6, a material of proven wear performance under PWR operating conditions. With the exception of Tristelle 5183, the iron base alloys exhibited unacceptable corrosion behavior under wet layup conditions. The Tristelle 5183 experienced minor corrosion attack in primary coolant having elevated oxygen levels. The twelve percent cobalt alloy, Tristelle TS-2, performed well but exhibited some attack after a simulated decontamination treatment.

  14. Modern diaper performance: construction, materials, and safety review.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swatee; Kenneally, Dianna; Odio, Mauricio; Hatzopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-07-01

    A review of the literature on diapers and diaper rash reveals that many clinicians are unfamiliar with modern diaper construction and materials as well as diaper safety testing methods. Typical modern diapers do not contain ingredients of concern such as latex and disperse dyes, but use ingredients such as spandex and pigments with a favorable safety profile. Today's disposable diaper is a high performance product whose carefully designed layers and liners provide optimal urine and feces absorption and an ever more clothing-like and comfortable fit. This is possible due to a variety of specialized polymer materials that provide optimal absorption of urine and feces, thereby minimizing skin exposure.

  15. Evaluation of alternate construction materials for a lithium electrolysis cell

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Olsen, A.R.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    Electrolytic cells currently used for the production of lithium metal are constructed of A285 Grade A steel (carbon content less than 0.15%). Failures of the cell wall have frequently occurred after 2 to 5 years of service, and these failures have been attributed to corrosion resulting from the reaction of iron carbide with lithium. An examination of a recent failure confirmed this conclusion. In an effort to identify alternate construction materials with better corrosion resistance for this application, five materials with very low carbon levels and/or carbides more stable than those in A285 were selected for evaluation. Materials were evaluated after exposure in an operating electrolytic cell, after exposure to pure lithium, and after exposure to a moist air-chlorine mixture. Results show that all five of the alternative materials selected are more corrosion resistant than A285, but two were eliminated from further consideration because of other potential shortcomings. Additional long-term corrosion tests are recommended for the remaining three candidate materials. Final selection should be based on considerations of cost, availability, and fabricability in addition to compatibility. 26 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Comparison between laboratory and field leachability of MSWI bottom ash as a road material.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Maria; Querol, Xavier; Josa, Alejandro; Vazquez, Enric; López-Soler, Angel

    2008-01-15

    The leaching properties of bottom ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) used as an aggregate substitute in unbound pavement layers are evaluated. The mechanical behaviour of bottom ash is acceptable for this application, but the potential environmental consequences constitute the most important limitation on the use of bottom ash as a road material. The environmental properties of bottom ash are assessed by means of the Dutch availability test NEN 7341 and the single-batch and two-stage batch European EN 12457 laboratory leaching tests. Furthermore, an experimental unbound pavement stretch is constructed to provide information on leaching behaviour under field conditions. In this high infiltration scenario, the results from predicted (based upon laboratory leaching tests) and measured releases (under field conditions) are compared, evidencing that predictions based on compliance leaching tests may be highly realistic. The depletion period of the extractable fraction of a number of elements in these field conditions is also quantified.

  17. Environmental Projects. Volume 9: Construction of hazardous materials storage facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Activities at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) are carried out in support of seven parabolic dish antennas. These activities may give rise to environmental hazards. This report is one in a series of reports describing environmental projects at GDSCC. The construction of two hazardous materials and wastes storage facilities and an acid-wash facility is described. An overview of the Goldstone complex is also presented along with a description of the environmental aspects of the GDSCC site.

  18. Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia`s facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns.

  19. Laboratory studies of dune sand for the use of construction industry in Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva Jayawardena, Upali; Wijesuriya, Roshan; Abayaweera, Gayan; Viduranga, Tharaka

    2015-04-01

    With the increase of the annual sand demand for the construction industry the excessive excavation of river sand is becoming a serious environmental problem in Sri Lanka. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the possibility for an alternative to stop or at least to minimize river sand mining activities. Dune sand is one of the available alternative materials to be considered instead of river sand in the country. Large quantities of sand dunes occur mainly along the NW and SE coastal belt which belong to very low rainfall Dry Zone coasts. The height of dune deposits, vary from 1m to about 30 meters above sea level. The objective of this paper is to indicate some studies and facts on the dune sand deposits of Sri Lanka. Laboratory studies were carried out for visual observations and physical properties at the initial stage and then a number of tests were carried out according to ASTM standards to obtain the compressive strength of concrete cylinders and mortar cubes mixing dune sand and river sand in different percentages keeping a constant water cement ratio. Next the water cement ratio was changed for constant dune sand and river sand proportion. Microscopic analysis shows that the dune sand consist of 95 % of quartz and 5 % of garnet, feldspar, illmenite and other heavy minerals with clay, fine dust, fine shell fragments and organic matters. Grains are sub-rounded to angular and tabular shapes. The grain sizes vary from fine to medium size of sand with silt. The degree of sorting and particle size observed with dune sands are more suited with the requirement of fine aggregates in the construction industry. The test result indicates that dune sand could be effectively used in construction work without sieving and it is ideal for wall plastering due to its'-uniformity. It could also be effectively used in concrete and in mortars mixing with river sand. The best mixing ratio is 75% dune sand and 25% river sand as the fine aggregate of concrete. For mortar the mixing

  20. Interactions between organisms and parent materials of a constructed Technosol shape its hydrostructural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, Maha; Grimaldi, Michel; Lerch, Thomas Z.; Pando, Anne; Gigon, Agnès; Blouin, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    There is no information on how organisms influence hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols and how such influence will be affected by the parent-material composition factor. In a laboratory experiment, parent materials, which were excavated deep horizons of soils and green waste compost (GWC), were mixed at six levels of GWC (from 0 to 50 %). Each mixture was set up in the presence/absence of plants and/or earthworms, in a full factorial design (n = 96). After 21 weeks, hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols were characterized by soil shrinkage curves. Organisms explained the variance of hydrostructural characteristics (19 %) a little better than parent-material composition (14 %). The interaction between the effects of organisms and parent-material composition explained the variance far better (39 %) than each single factor. To summarize, compost and plants played a positive role in increasing available water in macropores and micropores; plants were extending the positive effect of compost up to 40 and 50 % GWC. Earthworms affected the void ratio for mixtures from 0 to 30 % GWC and available water in micropores, but not in macropores. Earthworms also acted synergistically with plants by increasing their root biomass, resulting in positive effects on available water in macropores. Organisms and their interaction with parent materials positively affected the hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols, with potential positive consequences on resistance to drought or compaction. Considering organisms when creating Technosols could be a promising approach to improve their fertility.

  1. The World of Construction, Laboratory Manual, Semester 2. Industrial Arts Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Research Foundation.

    This second semester laboratory manual provides activities for junior high school students which reinforce construction concepts presented in the textbook (VT 014 241) and the accompanying teacher's guide (VT 014 244). Each of the 81 activities includes a stated objective and procedures for carrying out the activity with drawings, charts, and…

  2. Outcomes of Student Participation in Apparel Construction/Sewing Laboratory Classes in Southern California Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis-Goldstein, Diane Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study was an attempt to understand the types of affective learning. The study focused on beginning students who were enrolled in apparel construction/sewing laboratory in community colleges within Los Angeles and Ventura counties during the spring of 2009 (n = 155). The primary purpose of the study was to develop scales that would…

  3. Advanced Strain-Isolation-Pad Material with Bonded Fibrous Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibold, R. W.; Saito, C. A.; Buller, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing air lay and liquid lay felt deposition techniques to fabricate strain isolation pad (SIP) materials for the Space Shuttle Orbiter was demonstrated. These materials were developed as candidate replacements for the present needled felt SIP used between the ceramic tiles and the aluminum skin on the undersurface of the Orbiter. The SIP materials that were developed consisted of high temperature aramid fibers deposited by controlled fluid (air or liquid) carriers to form low density unbonded felts. The deposited felts were then bonded at the fiber intersections with a small amount of high temperature polyimide resin. This type of bonded felt construction can potentially eliminate two of the problems associated with the present SIP, viz., transmittal of localized stresses into the tiles and load history dependent mechanical response. However, further work is needed to achieve adequate through thickness tensile strength in the bonded felts.

  4. Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

  5. Laboratory Reference Spectroscopy of Icy Satellite Candidate Surface Materials (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, J. B.; Jamieson, C. S.; Shirley, J. H.; Pitman, K. M.; Kariya, M.; Crandall, P.

    2013-12-01

    The bulk of our knowledge of icy satellite composition continues to be derived from ultraviolet, visible and infrared remote sensing observations. Interpretation of remote sensing observations relies on availability of laboratory reference spectra of candidate surface materials. These are compared directly to observations, or incorporated into models to generate synthetic spectra representing mixtures of the candidate materials. Spectral measurements for the study of icy satellites must be taken under appropriate conditions (cf. Dalton, 2010; also http://mos.seti.org/icyworldspectra.html for a database of compounds) of temperature (typically 50 to 150 K), pressure (from 10-9 to 10-3 Torr), viewing geometry, (i.e., reflectance), and optical depth (must manifest near infrared bands but avoid saturation in the mid-infrared fundamentals). The Planetary Ice Characterization Laboratory (PICL) is being developed at JPL to provide robust reference spectra for icy satellite surface materials. These include sulfate hydrates, hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, and both organic and inorganic volatile ices. Spectral measurements are performed using an Analytical Spectral Devices FR3 portable grating spectrometer from .35 to 2.5 microns, and a Thermo-Nicolet 6500 Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer from 1.25 to 20 microns. These are interfaced with the Basic Extraterrestrial Environment Simulation Testbed (BEEST), a vacuum chamber capable of pressures below 10-9 Torr with a closed loop liquid helium cryostat with custom heating element capable of temperatures from 30-800 Kelvins. To generate optical constants (real and imaginary index of refraction) for use in nonlinear mixing models (i.e., Hapke, 1981 and Shkuratov, 1999), samples are ground and sieved to six different size fractions or deposited at varying rates to provide a range of grain sizes for optical constants calculations based on subtractive Kramers-Kronig combined with Hapke forward modeling (Dalton and

  6. Evaluation and utilization of Illinois FBC residues for construction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafoori, N.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the extent to which fluidized bed combustion (FBC) by-products can be properly utilized as the viable construction materials. This investigation focuses primarily on the properties of residues derived from fluidized combustion burning of Illinois high-sulfur coal. The research plan calls for evaluation of physico-chemical and engineering characteristics of the FBC-based cement and non-cement mixes. The results of this study will be used to compare the physical and mechanical properties of the FBC-based mixtures with those of conventional mixes. The suitability of using FBC residues as a filler or binder aggregate for construction applications such as structural concrete members, precast building products, and as base or surface course for gravity dams and pavements in the form of conventional and roller compacted materials will then be evaluated. During this reporting period, the literature survey, preparation of raw materials, and chemical analyses were completed. Some of the physical properties and preconditioning studies were determined and efforts are in progress to complete these tasks.

  7. Laboratory Investigations Relevant to Cassini VIMS Reports of Coherent Constructive Interference in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert

    The Cassini spacecraft has flown between the sun and Saturn on several occasions during its orbital tour creating circumstances in which the zero phase point passed through the rings. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) recorded spectral image cubes (0.4 to 5.2 microns that showed the opposition effect (OE) at zero phase. The OE is a spike in the intensity of reflected light observed near zero phase when it is displayed as a function of phase angle. This is the first time the OE has been resolved for small areas on the rings. Laboratory investigations of angular scattering properties of particulate materials show that the OE arises from two distinct processes, shadow hiding (SHOE) and coherent backscattering (CBOE). The SHOE process causes an OE by the elimination of shadows cast by regolith grains upon one another as phase angle decreases. The CBOE process causes an OE by constructive interference between photons traveling in opposite directions along the same path within the medium. SHOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in absorbing media where multiple scattering of photons is not significant. CBOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in highly reflective media with much multiple scattering. We have made spectral dimension scans of the VIMS images that traverse the zero phase point. We selected narrow spectral bands that represent a variety of wavelengths and reflectance levels. In this way, phase curves of the ringlet were obtained for each band. We have compared these data to data we acquired in the laboratory using the JPL long arm goniometer where we measured the phase curve of particulate materials that simulate the surface of Saturn's ring particles. We argue here that the OE is due to coherent backscattering because: 1) The theoretical CBOE function fit to the data is excellent. 2) The OE width is extremely narrow 3) The angular width of the peak increases with wavelength. CBOE theory also predicts that the

  8. Review of the proposed materials of construction for the SBWR and AP600 advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1994-06-01

    Two advanced light water reactor (LWR) concepts, namely the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) and the Westinghouse Advanced Passive 600 MWe Reactor (AP600), were reviewed in detail by Argonne National Laboratory. The objectives of these reviews were to (a) evaluate proposed advanced-reactor designs and the materials of construction for the safety systems, (b) identify all aging and environmentally related degradation mechanisms for the materials of construction, and (c) evaluate from the safety viewpoint the suitability of the proposed materials for the design application. Safety-related systems selected for review for these two LWRs included (a) reactor pressure vessel, (b) control rod drive system and reactor internals, (c) coolant pressure boundary, (d) engineered safety systems, (e) steam generators (AP600 only), (f) turbines, and (g) fuel storage and handling system. In addition, the use of cobalt-based alloys in these plants was reviewed. The selected materials for both reactors were generally sound, and no major selection errors were found. It was apparent that considerable thought had been given to the materials selection process, making use of lessons learned from previous LWR experience. The review resulted in the suggestion of alternate an possibly better materials choices in a number of cases, and several potential problem areas have been cited.

  9. Characterization of porous construction materials using electromagnetic radar wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wallace Wai Lok

    This thesis reports the effort of characterizing three porous construction materials (i.e. concrete, asphalt and soils) and the establishment and formulation of novel unified constitutive models by utilizing electromagnetic (EM) radar wave. An important outcome of this research is that the studied materials were assigned successfully into their rightful positions corresponding to the different regimes governed by three EM wave properties and two engineering/geological properties of the materials. The former refers to the real part of complex dielectric permittivity (epsilon'), energy attenuation and peak-frequency drift. The latter refers to porosity and permeability determined with forward models or conventional testing techniques. In soil and asphalt, the material characterization was achieved by a novel inhouse developed method called Cyclic Moisture Variation Technique (CMVT). The technique is termed cyclic because the porous materials were subjected to change from partially saturated states to fully saturated state (i.e. permeation), and vice versa (i.e. de-watering). With CMVT, water was used as an enhancer or a tracer to differentiate the studied materials which are otherwise difficult when they are dry. Soils and asphalt with different textures were characterized by different curve families exhibited in the relationship between epsilon' and degrees of water saturation (SW). In particular, these curve families were divided into three regions: slow-climbing region in very low SW, fast-climbing region in intermediate SW and another slow-climbing region at high S W. When data obtained from the permeation and de-watering cycles was compared, dielectric hysteresis was observed, but rarely reported in the field of ground penetrating radar (GPR). Different curing histories affect both porosity and pore size distribution within mature concrete. By injecting pressurized water into concrete specimens, different concrete curing histories was back-tracked through the

  10. Contributions of NIST/NBS Researchers to the Crystallography of Construction Materials

    PubMed Central

    Stutzman, Paul

    2001-01-01

    For more than 100 years, the primary theme underlying the NBS/NIST staff contribution to the crystallography of building materials has been the development of an improved understanding of concrete materials performance. Over that time period, portland cement concrete has become one of the most important of our construction materials for roads, buildings, and other large municipal structures. At the beginning of the 20th century our understanding of portland cement composition, performance, use in concrete, and how the concrete performs in harsh environments was lacking. The efforts of NIST have served to advance construction materials science and technology through the combined efforts of experimental, field study, and theoretical computational materials science. One major achievement in the late 1920s, derived from studies on phase equilibria in cement clinker, allows calculation of potential cement clinker composition. Known as the Bogue calculation, this continues to be an essential tool in cement plant process control to this day. Additionally, contributions of NIST scientists to our knowledge of the chemistry and nature of cement hydration products have been crucial in our understanding of cement hydration and concrete durability. Today, computational materials science is a rapidly developing discipline, and NIST is developing tools incorporating predictive models aided by empirical studies. Examples include a computer-integrated knowledge system for prediction and optimization of performance and life-cycle cost of high performance concrete and the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory. Understanding the relationships between material and performance properties has not been confined only to portland cements. One of the longest running experiments at NIST, the stone test wall, has stood for over 50 years as one of the world’s largest single collections of building stone, and is invaluable for studying weathering effects associated with stone

  11. Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-30

    Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

  12. Mechanical Activation of Construction Binder Materials by Various Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical grinding down to the nano powder of construction materials. During mechanical activation a composite binder active molecules cement minerals occur in the destruction of the molecular defects in the areas of packaging and breaking metastable phase decompensation intermolecular forces. The process is accompanied by a change in the kinetics of hardening of portland cement. Mechanical processes during grinding mineral materials cause, along with the increase in their surface energy, increase the Gibbs energy of powders and, respectively, their chemical activity, which also contributes to the high adhesion strength when contacting them with binders. Thus, the set of measures for mechanical activation makes better use of the weight of components filled with cement systems and adjust their properties. At relatively low cost is possible to provide a spectacular and, importantly, easily repeatable results in a production environment.

  13. Effects of Suicide Awareness Material on Implicit Suicide Cognition: A Laboratory Experiment.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Florian; Till, Benedikt; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the increasing adoption of suicide awareness campaigns to prevent suicide, little is known about the effective construction of awareness messages used and on their impact on suicidal cognition. We hypothesized that media reporting on an individual overcoming a suicidal crisis increases the automatic association between "life" and self. University students (N = 112) were randomly allocated to one of three groups in a laboratory experiment. Participants allocated to treatment group 1 or group 2 read awareness material about a person coping with suicidal ideation by getting professional help. The only difference between the two groups was the amount of social similarity (low vs. high) between the protagonist and the participants. The control group read an article unrelated to suicide. Awareness material increased implicit cognition in terms of a strengthening of self-life associations. This effect was restricted to participants scoring low on wishful identification with the suicidal protagonist. This finding suggests that only individuals who do not wishfully identify with a protagonist going through difficult life circumstances benefit from the awareness material in terms of suicidal cognition. These findings provide a rich basis for further research and have potentially high relevance to the construction of suicide-awareness messages.

  14. Development and mechanical properties of construction materials from lunar simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.

    1992-01-01

    Development of versatile engineering materials from locally available materials in space is an important step toward the establishment of outposts on the Moon and Mars. Development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the Moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. It is also vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and tensile, flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility, and deformation characteristics are defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objectives include two areas: (1) thermal 'liquefaction' of lunar simulant (at about 1100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.), and (2) development and use of a new triaxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compacted under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or in situ stress. Details of the development of intermediate ceramic composites (ICC) and testing for their flexural and compression characteristics were described in various reports and papers. The subject of behavior of compacted simulant under vacuum was described in previous progress reports and publications; since the presently available device allows vacuum levels up to only 10(exp -4) torr, it is recommended that a vacuum pump that can allow higher levels of vacuum be utilized for further investigation.

  15. A comparative toxicity assessment of materials used in aquatic construction.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Benoit A; Ernst, William; Julien, Gary; Jackman, Paula; Doe, Ken; Schaefer, Rebecca

    2011-10-01

    Comparative toxicity testing was performed on selected materials that may be used in aquatic construction projects. The tests were conducted on the following materials: (1) untreated wood species (hemlock [Tsuga ssp], Western red cedar (Thuja plicata), red oak [Quercus rubra], Douglas fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii], red pine [Pinus resinosa], and tamarack [Larix ssp]); (2) plastic wood; (3) Ecothermo wood hemlock stakes treated with preservatives (e.g., chromated copper arsenate [CCA], creosote, alkaline copper quaternary [ACQ], zinc naphthenate, copper naphthenate, and Lifetime Wood Treatment); (4) epoxy-coated steel; (5) hot-rolled steel; (6) zinc-coated steel; and (7) concrete. Those materials were used in acute lethality tests with rainbow trout, Daphnia magna, Vibrio fischeri and threespine stickleback. The results indicated the following general ranking of the materials (from the lowest to highest LC(50) values); ACQ > creosote > zinc naphthenate > copper naphthenate > CCA (treated at 22.4 kg/m(3)) > concrete > red pine > western red cedar > red oak > zinc-coated steel > epoxy-coated steel > CCA (6.4 kg/m(3)). Furthermore, the toxicity results indicated that plastic wood, certain untreated wood species (hemlock, tamarack, Douglas fir, and red oak), hot-rolled steel, Ecothermo wood, and wood treated with Lifetime Wood Treatment were generally nontoxic to the test species.

  16. Laboratory Assessment of the Changes in Thermal Properties of Polar Diving Suit Material When Exposed to Oils at Low Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    tests was the development and construction of a mechanism which could automatically raise the suit- material sample out of, and reinsert it into, the...I Report No. c--D.-4-..82 LABORATORY ASSESSMENT OF T1E CHANGES IN - THERMAL PROPERTIES OF POLAR DIVING SUIT MATERIAL WHEN EXPOSED TO OILS AT LOW...POLAR DIVING SUIT , Performing Organiat.in Cede MATERIAL WHEN EXPOSED TO OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 1. Per,•oring Orgenization Report No. 7. Autor1 ’s

  17. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... laboratory facilities capable of performing such work are not available, or because of location or for other reasons it is clearly impractical to utilize such private commerical laboratory services. The requesting entity must further certify that such services cannot be procured reasonably and expeditiously...

  18. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... laboratory facilities capable of performing such work are not available, or because of location or for other reasons it is clearly impractical to utilize such private commerical laboratory services. The requesting entity must further certify that such services cannot be procured reasonably and expeditiously...

  19. Architectural control of construction materials with application of man-made wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, Ruslan; Abdrakhmanova, Layla

    2016-01-01

    The article considers the principles of construction materials formation based on non-organic and organic raw materials when material matrix is filled with particulate fillers from man-made wastes of various nature formed in different conditions. Qualitative and quantitative requirements for mineral, chemical and material composition of wastes to modify construction materials are detailed. The ways to use them as modifiers of construction materials are shown by the example of wastes group belonging to slags.

  20. A History of the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) 1964-1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Director of Construction Engineering Research Laboratory," 23 May 1969, Scrapbook , Technical Library, CERL. 5. Biographical Sketch, Col. Edwin S...Assell, Chief, Support Office, CERL. 30. News clipping, unknown newspaper, 29 Nov. 1973, Scrapbook , Technical Library, CERL. 31. Five Year Research...Champaign, IL, 1975), p. 12. 36. The Striker, No.1, 20 Apr. 1972, Scrapbook , Technical Library, CERL. 37. Reisacher to author, 5 Feb. 1986. 38. Ibid

  1. 48 CFR 1325.204 - Evaluating offers of foreign construction material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Buy American Act-Construction Materials 1325... construction material proposed for exception from the requirements of the Buy America Act is set forth in...

  2. Constructing a modern cytology laboratory: A toolkit for planning and design

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Janie; Wrenn, Allison; Poole, John; Jaeger, Andrew; Eltoum, Isam A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Constructing or renovating a laboratory can be both challenging and rewarding. UAB Cytology (UAB CY) recently undertook a project to relocate from a building constructed in 1928 to new space. UAB CY is part of an academic center that provides service to a large set of patients, support training of one cytotechnology program and one cytopathology fellowship training program and involve actively in research and scholarly activity. Our objectives were to provide a safe, aesthetically pleasing space and gain efficiencies through lean processes. Methods: The phases of any laboratory design project are Planning, Schematic Design (SD), Design Development (DD), Construction Documents (CD) and Construction. Lab personnel are most critical in the Planning phase. During this time stakeholders, relationships, budget, square footage and equipment were identified. Equipment lists, including what would be relocated, purchased new and projected for future growth ensure that utilities were matched to expected need. A chemical inventory was prepared and adequate storage space was planned. Regulatory and safety requirements were discussed. Tours and high level process flow diagrams helped architects and engineers understand the laboratory daily work. Future needs were addressed through a questionnaire which identified potential areas of growth and technological change. Throughout the project, decisions were driven by data from the planning phase. During the SD phase, objective information from the first phase was used by architects and planners to create a general floor plan. This was the basis of a series of meetings to brainstorm and suggest modifications. DD brings more detail to the plans with engineering, casework, equipment specifics, finishes. Design changes should be completed at this phase. The next phase, CD took the project from the lab purview into purely technical mode. Construction documents were used by the contractor for the bidding process and

  3. Assessing the environmental performance of construction materials testing using EMS: An Australian study.

    PubMed

    Dejkovski, Nick

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports the audit findings of the waste management practices at 30 construction materials testing (CMT) laboratories (constituting 4.6% of total accredited CMT laboratories at the time of the audit) that operate in four Australian jurisdictions and assesses the organisation's Environmental Management System (EMS) for indicators of progress towards sustainable development (SD). In Australia, waste indicators are 'priority indicators' of environmental performance yet the quality and availability of waste data is poor. National construction and demolition waste (CDW) data estimates are not fully disaggregated and the contribution of CMT waste (classified as CDW) to the national total CDW landfill burden is difficult to quantify. The environmental and human impacts of anthropogenic release of hazardous substances contained in CMT waste into the ecosphere can be measured by construing waste indicators from the EMS. An analytical framework for evaluating the EMS is developed to elucidate CMT waste indicators and assess these indicators against the principle of proportionality. Assessing against this principle allows for: objective evaluations of whether the environmental measures prescribed in the EMS are 'proportionate' to the 'desired' (subjective) level of protection chosen by decision-makers; and benchmarking CMT waste indicators against aspirational CDW targets set by each Australian jurisdiction included in the audit. Construed together, the EMS derived waste indicators and benchmark data provide a composite indicator of environmental performance and progress towards SD. The key audit findings indicate: CMT laboratories have a 'poor' environmental performance (and overall progress towards SD) when EMS waste data are converted into indicator scores and assessed against the principle of proportionality; CMT waste recycling targets are lower when benchmarked against jurisdictional CDW waste recovery targets; and no significant difference in the average

  4. Long term laboratory corrosion monitoring of calcine bin set materials exposed to zirconia calcine

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk, W.J.

    1994-06-01

    Corrosion testing of Type 1025 carbon steel, 405, 304, 304L, 316L, and 347 stainless steels, and 6061-T6 aluminum were conducted in synthetic zirconia calcine to model long term corrosion performance of bin set material. Testing was conducted over a period of 17 years. The existing calcine bin set {number_sign}1 is constructed of Type 405 stainless steel, 2 through 4 are constructed of Type 304 stainless steel and 5 through 7 are constructed of Type 304L stainless steel. The highest rate observed for Type 304L stainless steel was 8.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} inches per month. This would equal a wall thickness loss of about 5 mils after 500 years of storage. Currently, the established schedule for removal of corrosion test coupons from the calcine storage bins is at the end of the 10th, 100th, 250th, and 450th year of solid storage service. Very low corrosion rates and metal oxide data determined from the long term laboratory test, in conjunction with corrosion rates from the coupon assessment of the second bin set, indicate this schedule should be revised from 10 years to 50 years for the first assessment.

  5. Assessment of secondary materials for pavement construction: Technical and environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, M.C.M. |; Bridges, M.G.; Dawson, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    Current research at the University of Nottingham to enable the use of secondary materials in road construction covers technical aspects, mechanical properties of waste materials and the environmental implications of their use. Materials studied are minestone, china clay sand, slate waste, pulverized fuel ash and furnace bottom ash. The laboratory program set up for this research and the methodologies suggested for the study of the properties of these materials are presented. The test methods currently used to select pavement aggregates are presented along with current methods for the assessment of the environmental impact of secondary aggregates. The potential of the secondary aggregates is assessed within the current technical and environmental procedures previously presented. Two new methodologies are presented, one for the mechanical examination of secondary aggregates and one for the environmental assessment. The mechanical assessment encompasses conventional characterization and classification tests on both unbound and lightly treated pavement materials, and fundamental tests such as repeated load triaxial tests (RLTT) and repeated load indirect tensile tests (RLITT). Some sample results are presented, suggesting the feasibility and adequacy of this methodology for material discrimination, and evaluation of mechanical properties for design purposes. The environmental assessment indicates how the leaching concentration of contaminants from intensive testing can be used as the first step in assessing the environmental acceptability of a secondary material, and the means of determining a more realistic measure of in situ performance is discussed. The advantages and advancements of the presented methodologies over the basic and inappropriate techniques currently used to assess the suitability of secondary aggregates for use as pavement construction materials are discussed.

  6. Thermostructural Analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolic Material Tested at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie; Ehle, Curt; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RSRM nozzle liner components have been analyzed and tested to explore the occurrence of anomalous material performance known as pocketing erosion. Primary physical factors that contribute to pocketing seem to include the geometric permeability, which governs pore pressure magnitudes and hence load, and carbon fiber high temperature tensile strength, which defines a material limiting capability. The study reports on the results of a coupled thermostructural finite element analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolic (CCP) material tested at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory (the LHMEL facility). Modeled test configurations will be limited to the special case of where temperature gradients are oriented perpendicular to the composite material ply angle. Analyses were conducted using a transient, one-dimensional flow/thermal finite element code that models pore pressure and temperature distributions and in an explicitly coupled formulation, passes this information to a 2-dimensional finite element structural model for determination of the stress/deformation behavior of the orthotropic fiber/matrix CCP. Pore pressures are generated by thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin which evolve as a multi-component gas phase which is partially trapped in the porous microstructure of the composite. The nature of resultant pressures are described by using the Darcy relationships which have been modified to permit a multi-specie mass and momentum balance including water vapor condensation. Solution to the conjugate flow/thermal equations were performed using the SINDA code. Of particular importance to this problem was the implementation of a char and deformation state dependent (geometric) permeability as describing a first order interaction between the flow/thermal and structural models. Material property models are used to characterize the solid phase mechanical stiffness and failure. Structural calculations were performed using the ABAQUS code. Iterations were made

  7. 46 CFR 160.028-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Signal Pistols for Red Flare Distress Signals § 160.028-3 Materials, workmanship, construction, and...

  8. 46 CFR 160.028-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Signal Pistols for Red Flare Distress Signals § 160.028-3 Materials, workmanship, construction, and...

  9. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrík, P.; Mustafin, E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pavlovič, M.; Strašík, I.

    2015-12-01

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u 238U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  10. Analysis of chromium and sulphate origins in construction recycled materials based on leaching test results.

    PubMed

    Del Rey, I; Ayuso, J; Galvín, A P; Jiménez, J R; López, M; García-Garrido, M L

    2015-12-01

    Twenty samples of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) with different compositions collected at six recycling plants in the Andalusia region (south of Spain) were characterised according to the Landfill Directive criteria. Chromium and sulphate were identified as the most critical compounds in the leachates. To detect the sources of these two pollutant constituents in recycled aggregate, environmental assessments were performed on eight construction materials (five unused ceramic materials, two old crushed concretes and one new mortar manufactured in the laboratory). The results confirmed that leached sulphate and Cr were mainly released by the ceramic materials (bricks and tiles). To predict the toxicological consequences, the oxidation states of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) were measured in the leachates of recycled aggregates and ceramic materials classified as non-hazardous. The bricks and tiles mainly released total Cr as Cr (III). However, the recycled aggregates classified as non-hazardous according to the Landfill Directive criteria mainly released Cr (VI), which is highly leachable and extremely toxic. The obtained results highlight the need for legislation that distinguishes the oxidative state in which chromium is released into the environment. Leaching level regulations must not be based solely on total Cr, which can lead to inaccurate predictions.

  11. Interspecific variation in beeswax as a biological construction material.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Robert; Breed, Michael D; Greenberg, Alan R; Otis, Gard

    2006-10-01

    Beeswax is a multicomponent material used by bees in the genus Apis to house larvae and store honey and pollen. We characterized the mechanical properties of waxes from four honeybee species: Apis mellifera L., Apis andreniformis L., Apis dorsata L. and two subspecies of Apis cerana L. In order to isolate the material effects from the architectural properties of nest comb, we formed raw wax in to right, circular cylindrical samples, and compressed them in an electromechanical tensometer. From the resulting stress-strain curves, values for yield stress, yield strain, stress and strain at the proportional limit, stiffness, and resilience were obtained. Apis dorsata wax was stiffer and had a higher yield stress and stress at the proportional limit than all of the other waxes. The waxes of A. cerana and A. mellifera had intermediate strength and stiffness, and A. andreniformis wax was the least strong, stiff and resilient. All of the waxes had similar strain values at the proportional limit and yield point. The observed differences in wax mechanical properties correlate with the nesting ecology of these species. A. mellifera and A. cerana nest in cavities that protect the nest from environmental stresses, whereas the species with the strongest and stiffest wax, A. dorsata, constructs relatively heavy nests attached to branches of tall trees, exposing them to substantially greater mechanical forces. The wax of A. andreniformis was the least strong, stiff and resilient, and their nests have low masses relative to other species in the genus and, although not built in cavities, are constructed on lower, often shielded branches that can absorb the forces of wind and rain.

  12. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  13. Toward self-constructing materials: a systems chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2012-12-18

    To design the next generation of so-called "smart" materials, researchers will need to develop chemical systems that respond, adapt, and multitask. Because many of these features occur in living systems, we expect that such advanced artificial systems will be inspired by nature. In particular, these new materials should ultimately combine three key properties of life: metabolism, mutation, and self-replication. In this Account, we discuss our endeavors toward the design of such advanced functional materials. First, we focus on dynamic molecular libraries. These molecular and supramolecular chemical systems are based on mixtures of reversibly interacting molecules that are coupled within networks of thermodynamic equilibria. We will explain how the superimposition of combinatorial networks at different length scales of structural organization can provide valuable hierarchical dynamics for producing complex functional systems. In particular, our experimental results highlight why these libraries are of interest for the design of responsive materials and how their functional properties can be modulated by various chemical and physical stimuli. Then, we introduce examples in which these dynamic combinatorial systems can be coupled to kinetic feedback loops to produce self-replicating pathways that amplify a selected component from the equilibrated libraries. Finally, we discuss the discovery of highly functional self-replicating supramolecular assemblies that can transfer an electric signal in space and time. We show how these wires can be directly incorporated within an electronic nanocircuit by self-organization and functional feedback loops. Because the network topologies act as complex algorithms to process information, we present these systems in this order to provide context for their potential for extending the current generation of responsive materials. We propose a general description for a potential autonomous (self-constructing) material. Such a system

  14. Construction of a Shallow Underground Low-background Detector for a CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, Joel B.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Miley, Harry S.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.

    2013-05-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) is a verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), and in addition to a series of radionuclide monitoring stations, contains sixteen radionuclide laboratories capable of verification of radionuclide station measurements. This paper presents an overview of a new commercially obtained low-background detector system for radionuclide aerosol measurements recently installed in a shallow (>30 meters water equivalent) underground clean-room facility at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Specifics such as low-background shielding materials, active shielding methods, and improvements in sensitivity to IMS isotopes will be covered.

  15. Evaluation of Sulfur 'Concrete' for Use as a Construction Material on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Combining molten sulfur with any number of aggregate materials forms, when solid, a mixture having attributes similar, if not better, to conventional water-based concrete. As a result the use of sulfur "concrete" on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive environments. Consequently, discovery of troilite (FeS) on the lunar surface prompted numerous scenarios about its reduction to elemental sulfur for use, in combination with lunar regolith, as a potential construction material; not requiring water, a precious resource, for its manufacture is an obvious advantage. However, little is known about the viability of sulfur concrete in an environment typified by extreme temperatures and essentially no atmosphere. The experimental work presented here evaluates the response of pure sulfur and sulfur concrete subjected to laboratory conditions that approach those expected on the lunar surface, the results suggesting a narrow window of application.

  16. Test methods for selection of materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste vitrification. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D F; Corbett, R A; Morrison, W S

    1986-01-01

    Candidate materials of construction were evaluated for a facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant to vitrify high-level radioactive waste. Limited operating experience was available under the corrosive conditions of the complex vitrification process. The objective of the testing program was to provide a high degree of assurance that equipment will meet or exceed design lifetimes. To meet this objective in reasonable time and minimum cost, a program was designed consisting of a combination of coupon immersion and electrochemical laboratory tests and pilot-scale tests. Stainless steels and nickel-based alloys were tested. Alloys that were most resistant to general and local attack contained nickel, molybdenum (>9%), and chromium (where Cr + Mo > 30%). Alloy C-276 was selected as the reference material for process equipment. Stellite 6 was selected for abrasive service in the presence of formic acid. Alloy 690 and ALLCORR were selected for specific applications.

  17. Materials research at selected Japanese laboratories. Based on a 1992 visit: Overview, summary of highlights, notes on laboratories and topics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    I visited Japan from June 29 to August 1, 1992. The purpose of this visit was to assess the status of materials science research at selected governmental, university and industrial laboratories and to established acquaintances with Japanese researchers. The areas of research covered by these visits included ceramics, oxide superconductors, intermetallics alloys, superhard materials and diamond films, high-temperature materials and properties, mechanical properties, fracture, creep, fatigue, defects, materials for nuclear reactor applications and irradiation effects, high pressure synthesis, self-propagating high temperature synthesis, microanalysis, magnetic properties and magnetic facilities, and surface science.

  18. Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The Laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL`s substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL.

  19. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... procedures applicable to the performance of investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers laboratory... applies to Corps of Engineers Divisions and Districts operating soils, concrete, water quality and... local units of government when the total estimated cost of each investigation or test project is...

  20. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... procedures applicable to the performance of investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers laboratory... applies to Corps of Engineers Divisions and Districts operating soils, concrete, water quality and... local units of government when the total estimated cost of each investigation or test project is...

  1. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydraulic laboratories, and to the Inter-Agency Sedimentation Project. (c) References. (1) AR 37-20. (2) AR... units of government, foreign governments and private firms under the following conditions: (1) The work will be performed on a cost reimbursable basis. (2) Work may be performed for State and local units...

  2. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  3. Overview of the NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    mechanical routes to weakened products were identified in polybenzoxazole (Zylon) fibers . [This work included testing on materials which had failed...to characterize the processing, structure, mechanics and long-term reliability of high performance polymeric fibers used for ballistic protection...Apparatus, modified for fiber testing •Measurement techniques and instrumentation for characterizing next generation hybrid materials which

  4. Constructing functional mesostructured materials from colloidal nanocrystal building blocks.

    PubMed

    Milliron, Delia J; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Llordes, Anna; Helms, Brett A

    2014-01-21

    Through synthesizing colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) in the organic phase, chemists gain fine control over their composition, size, and shape. Strategies for arranging them into ordered superlattices have followed closely behind synthetic advances. Nonetheless, the same hydrophobic ligands that help their assembly also severely limit interactions between adjacent nanocrystals. As a result, examples of nanocrystal-based materials whose functionality derives from their mesoscale structure have lagged well behind advances in synthesis and assembly. In this Account, we describe how recent insights into NC surface chemistry have fueled dramatic progress in functional mesostructures. In these constructs, intimate contact between NCs as well as with heterogeneous components is key in determining macroscopic behavior. The simplest mesoscale assemblies we consider are networks of NCs constructed by in situ replacement of their bulky, insulating surface ligands with small molecules. Transistors are a test bed for understanding conductivity, setting the stage for new functionality. For instance, we demonstrated that by electrochemically charging and discharging networks of plasmonic metal oxide NCs, the transmittance of near infrared light can be strongly and reversibly modulated. When we assemble NCs with heterogeneous components, there is an even greater potential for generating complex functionality. Nanocomposites can exhibit favorable characteristics of their component materials, yet the interaction between components can also have a strong influence. Realizing such opportunities requires an intimate linking of embedded NCs to the surrounding matrix phase. We accomplish this link by coordinating inorganic anionic clusters directly to NC surfaces. By exploiting this connection, we found enhanced ionic conductivity in Ag2S-in-GeS2 nanocrystal-in-glass electrodes. In another example, we also found enhanced optical contrast when linking electrochromic niobium oxide to embedded

  5. Development of construction materials using nano-silica and aggregates recycled from construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Mukharjee, Bibhuti Bhusan; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the development of novel construction materials utilising commercial grade nano-silica and recycled aggregates retrieved from construction and demolition waste. For this, experimental work has been carried out to examine the influence of nano-silica and recycled aggregates on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, water absorption, density and volume of voids of concrete. Fully natural and recycled aggregate concrete mixes are designed by replacing cement with three levels (0.75%, 1.5% and 3%) of nano-silica. The results of the present investigation depict that improvement in early days compressive strength is achieved with the incorporation of nano-silica in addition to the restoration of reduction in compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete mixes caused owing to the replacement of natural aggregates by recycled aggregates. Moreover, the increase in water absorption and volume of voids with a reduction of bulk density was detected with the incorporation of recycled aggregates in place of natural aggregates. However, enhancement in density and reduction in water absorption and volume of voids of recycled aggregate concrete resulted from the addition of nano-silica. In addition, the results of the study reveal that nano-silica has no significant effect on elastic modulus of concrete.

  6. Audit of construction of an environmental, safety, and health analytical laboratory at the Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This document is a report from the Office of the Inspector General, US DOE. The report evaluates the need for the construction of an Environmental, Safety, and Health Laboratory at the Pantex Plant and if this project is the most cost effective manner in which to meet mission needs. It was found that: (1) mission needs were being met with existing facilities, (2) required evaluations of alternatives were not performed, (3) decisions were made based on out-dated justifications, and (4) the expenditure of $8.4M was unnecessary. As a result, it was recommended that funded be suspended until the need is clearly established.

  7. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  8. Sulphate release from construction and demolition material in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Stefan; Wessolek, Gerd

    2013-04-01

    In Berlin and many other cities soils are heavily influenced by anthropogenic activities and deposited substrates. A widespread technical substrate in technosols is construction and demolition material from residential and industrial buildings. Existing rubble landfills without sealing facilities pose threats to ground water quality. In the central city of Berlin rising sulphate concentrations of groundwaters (up to 1200 mg/L) are measured since more than two decades. Previous studies point out that the high sulphate concentrations are mainly attributed to World War II rubble. The major part of debris was deposited in form of landfills and contains approximately 0.3 wt% gypsum. The scope of our research is to determine mechanisms of sulphate release from debris material, interactions between sulphate release, soil hydraulic properties and potential sinks of sulphur. To estimate equilibrium concentration and kinetics of sulphate release of various debris components batch and column experiments are conducted. The same method is applied to determine potential adsorptive character of common debris components. To analyse the impacts of soil hydraulic properties on sulphate leaching we carry out soil column experiments with defined upper and lower boundary conditions, varying water flow velocity and induced preferential flow. Simultaneously we monitor sulphate concentration of soil leachate in a 2 m³ lysimeter. First results of the batch experiments show that gypsum from broken stucco is the main source of sulphate in the observed technosols. Other components as mortar and slag show a quite low sulphate release. Similar results are found within the column experiments. For brigs medium and strongly time dependent sulphate release is determined. Concentrations up to 1500 mg/L are measured in the soil leachate from the lysimeter.

  9. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

  10. Critical and strategic materials proceedings of the laboratory study group meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    These Proceedings serve to identify the appropriate role for the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program concerning critical and strategic materials, identify and articulate high priority DOE-BES-DMS target areas so as to maximize programmatic responsiveness to national needs concerning critical and strategic materials, and identify research, expertise, and resources (including Collaborative Research Centers) that are relevant to critical and strategic materials that is either underway or in place under the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program. Laboratory statements of collaborative research are given.

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory shipping containers for radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schaich, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The types of containers used at ORNL for the transport of radioactive materials are described. Both returnable and non-returnable types are included. Containers for solids, liquids and gases are discussed. Casks for the shipment of uranium, irradiated fuel elements, and non-irradiated fuel elements are also described. Specifications are provided. (DC)

  12. Interactions between organisms and parent materials of a constructed Technosol shape its hydrostructural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, M.; Grimaldi, M.; Lerch, T. Z.; Pando, A.; Gigon, A.; Blouin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Constructed Technosols provide an opportunity to recycle urban waste, and are an alternative to the uptake of topsoil from the countryside. Despite potential problems of erosion, compaction or water holding capacity, their physical properties and the resulting water regulation services are poorly documented. In a laboratory experiment, excavated deep horizons of soils and green waste compost (GWC) were mixed at six levels of GWC (from 0 to 50 %). Each mixture was set up in the presence/absence of plants and/or earthworms, in a full factorial design (n = 96). After 21 weeks, hydrostructural properties of constructed Technosols were characterized by soil shrinkage curves. Organisms explained the variance of hydrostructural characteristics (19 %) a little better than parent-material composition (14 %). The interaction between the effects of organisms and parent-material composition explained the variance far better (39 %) than each single factor. To summarize, compost and plants played a positive role in increasing available water in macropores and micropores; plants were extending the positive effect of compost up to 40 and 50 % GWC. Earthworms affected the void ratio for mixtures from 0 to 30 % GWC and available water in micropores, not in macropores. Earthworms also acted synergistically with plants by increasing their root biomass and the resulting positive effects on available water in macropores. Organisms and their interaction with parent materials thus positively affected the hydro-structural properties of constructed Technosols, with potential positive consequences on resistance to drought or compaction. Considering organisms when creating Technosols could be a promising approach to improve their fertility.

  13. Role of the Microcomputer-Based Laboratory Display in Supporting the Construction of New Understandings in Thermal Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, David W.; Lucas, Keith B.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers' failure to use the microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) more widely may be a result of not recognizing its capacity to transform laboratory activities. This research aimed to increase understanding of how MBL activities designed to be consistent with a constructivist theory of learning support or constrain student construction of…

  14. 43 CFR 12.830 - Buy American Act-Construction materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... awarded under a grant or cooperative agreement for construction inside the United States: Buy American Act... performance of this agreement, except for foreign construction materials, if any, listed in this...

  15. 77 FR 23117 - Rigging Equipment for Material Handling Construction Standard; Correction and Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1926 Rigging Equipment for Material Handling... sling standard for construction titled ``Rigging Equipment for Material Handling'' by removing the rated... AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Subpart H--Materials Handling, Storage, Use, and Disposal 0...

  16. 49 CFR 178.356-2 - Materials of construction and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Materials of construction and other requirements. (a) Phenolic foam insulation must be fire-resistant and... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Materials of construction and other requirements...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  17. Design, construction, and initial operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory salt-gradient solar pond

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Dreicer, J.S.; Grimmer, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    A 232 m/sup 2/ solar pond was constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of studying pond hydrodynamics on a large scale and to complement the flow visualization and one-dimensional pond simulator experiments that are ongoing at the Laboratory. Design methods and construction techniques, some of which are unique to this pond, are described in detail. The pond was excavated from a soft volcanic rock known as tuff; such rock forms a large fraction of the Los Alamos area surface geology. Because tuff has a small thermal conductivity, little insulation was required to reduce perimeter energy losses. In addition, the strength of tuff permitted the pond to be built with vertical side walls; this design eliminated local side wall convection in the gradient zone that is possible with sloping side walls. Instrumentation in the pond consists of traversing and fixed rakes of thermometers and salinity probes, an underwater pyranometer, and a weather station. The traversing rake is a wheeled trolley driven vertically on a rectangular rail. Installed on the trolley are coplanar platinum RTDs, a point conductivity probe, and an induction salinometer. The stationary rake supports 28 thermocouples and 28 sample-fluid withdrawal taps located every 10 cm. About 127 T of sodium chloride has been introduced and is nearly dissolved. A 120-cm-thick salinity gradient was established and the pond is heating. Preliminary results indicate a lower-convective-zone heating rate of 1.2/sup 0/C/day during the pond's first month of operation. Recommendations on pond design, construction, and instrumentation are presented.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory standard nuclear material container

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy A

    2009-01-01

    The shut down of United States (U.S.) nuclear-weapons production activities in the early 1990s left large quantities of nuclear materials throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex in forms not intended for long-term storage. In May 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which called for the stabilization and disposition of 'thousands of containers of plutonium-bearing liquids and solids' in the DOE complex, including LANL in the nuclear-weapons-manufacturing pipeline when manufacturing ended. This resulted in the development of the 3013 standard with container requirements for long term storage (up to 50 years). A follow on was the Criteria For Interim Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials, Charles B. Curtis, in 1996 to address storage other than the 3013 standard for shorter time frames. In January 2000, the DNFSB issued Recommendation 2000-1, which stated the need for LANL to repackage 'about one ton of plutonium metal and oxide,' declared excess to Defense Program (DP) needs. The DNFSB recommended that LANL 'stabilize and seal within welded containers with an inert atmosphere the plutonium oxides ... which are not yet in states conforming to the long-term storage envisaged by DOE-STD-3013,' and that they '... enclose existing and newly-generated legacy plutonium metal in sealed containers with an inert atmosphere,' and 'remediate and/or safely store the various residues.' Recommendation 2000-1, while adding to the number of items needing remediation, also reiterated the need to address remaining items from 1994-1 in a timely fashion. Since timetables slipped, the DNFSB recommended that the Complex 'prioritize and schedule tasks according to the consideration of risks.' In March 2005, the DNFSB issued Recommendation 2005-1. This recommendation addresses the need for a consistent set of criteria across the DOE complex for the interim storage of nuclear material packaged outside an engineered barrier. The

  19. Plasma-materials interaction results at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A.; Wampler, William R.; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Whaley, Josh A.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-08-01

    Overview of Plasma Materials Interaction (PMI) activities are: (1) Hydrogen diffusion and trapping in metals - (a) Growth of hydrogen precipitates in tungsten PFCs, (b) Temperature dependence of deuterium retention at displacement damage, (c) D retention in W at elevated temperatures; (2) Permeation - (a) Gas driven permeation results for W/Mo/SiC, (b) Plasma-driven permeation test stand for TPE; and (3) Surface studies - (a) H-sensor development, (b) Adsorption of oxygen and hydrogen on beryllium surfaces.

  20. Abstracts of AF Materials Laboratory Reports. January 1973 - December 1973

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-07-01

    substituted polymers with aryl ether , ketone and sulfone units in the backbone has been studied. The best resins seem to have come from simple...exposed to hostile environments such as heat aging plus salt spray, humid aging , humid aging and elevated temperature cycling, and fatigue...unclassified results of materials and process and radome characterization effort. Environmental exposure including thermal aging resulted in significant

  1. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.

  2. Progress in Design and Construction of the Optical Communications Laser Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Britcliffe, M.; Golshan, N.

    1999-01-01

    The deployment of advanced hyperspectral imaging and other Earth sensing instruments on board Earth observing satellites is driving the demand for high-data-rate communications. Optical communications meet the required data rates with small, low mass, and low-power communications packages. JPL, as NASA's lead center in optical communications, plans to construct a 1-m Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) at its Table Mountain Facility (TMF) complex in the San Gabriel Mountains of Southern California. The design of the building has been completed, and the construction contractor has been selected. Ground breaking is expected to start at the beginning of the 1999 TMF construction season. A request for proposal (RFP) has been issued for the procurement of the telescope system. Prior to letting the RFP we conducted a request for information with industry for the telescope system. Several vendors responded favorably and provided information on key elements of the proposed design. These inputs were considered in developing the final requirements in the RFP. Keywords: Free space optical communications, lasercom, telescopes, ground stations, adaptive optics, astrometry, Table Mountain Facility

  3. Bioremediation of endosulfan in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands: effect of bioaugmentation and biostimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Congcong; Xie, HuiJun; Mu, Yang; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Xu, Jingtao; Wang, Qian

    2014-11-01

    Bioremediation is widely used in organic pollutants disposal. However, very little has been known on its application in constructed wetlands contaminated with organochlorine pesticide, endosulfan in particular. To evaluate the effect of bioremediation on endosulfan removal and clarify the fate, bioaugmentation and biostimulation were studied in laboratory-scale vertical-flow constructed wetlands. After 20 days' experiment, endosulfan isomers removal efficiencies were increased to 89.24-97.62 % through bioremediation. In bacteria bioaugmentation (E-in) and sucrose biostimulation (E-C), peak concentrations of endosulfan in sediment were reduced by 31.02-76.77 %, and plant absorption were 347.45-576.65 μg kg(-1). By contrast, plant absorption in KH2PO4 biostimulation (E-P) was increased to 811.64 and 1,067.68 μg kg(-1). Degradation process was probably promoted in E-in and E-C, while plant absorption was enhanced in E-P. Consequently, E-in and E-C were effective for endosulfan removal in constructed wetlands, while adding KH2PO4 had potential to cause air pollution. Additionally, combined bioremediation was not recommended.

  4. High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program: 19th Annual Report, October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, Arvid

    2007-08-01

    Annual Report contains overview of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program and includes selected highlights of user activities for FY2006. Report is submitted to individuals within sponsoring DOE agency and to other interested individuals.

  5. Writing Material in Chemical Physics Research: The Laboratory Notebook as Locus of Technical and Textual Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickman, Chad

    2010-01-01

    This article, drawing on ethnographic study in a chemical physics research facility, explores how notebooks are used and produced in the conduct of laboratory science. Data include written field notes of laboratory activity; visual documentation of "in situ" writing processes; analysis of inscriptions, texts, and material artifacts produced in the…

  6. Laboratory Determination of Thermal Protection System Materials Surface Catalytic Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    using a variety of electrical discharge sources. Traditional methods of atom detection have included chemical titration,41 electron spin resonance...Probabilities Material Experiments γO, × 10-3 Quartz 11 0.098 ± 0.013 SS304 (Cr 18%, Ni 10%, Fe balance) 11 16 ± 7 Constantan (Ni 45%, Cu balance) 10 46...or b. Similar measurements with Inconel 617 at room temperature,76 and SS304 , Constantan, and Chromel at room temperature and 250 °C,68 also

  7. 46 CFR 160.057-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange... subjected to frigid or tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Floating orange smoke distress...

  8. 46 CFR 160.057-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange... subjected to frigid or tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Floating orange smoke distress...

  9. 46 CFR 160.057-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange... subjected to frigid or tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Floating orange smoke distress...

  10. 46 CFR 160.057-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange... subjected to frigid or tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Floating orange smoke distress...

  11. 46 CFR 160.022-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange... subjected to frigid or tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Floating orange smoke distress...

  12. 46 CFR 160.057-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange... subjected to frigid or tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Floating orange smoke distress...

  13. 46 CFR 160.022-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange... subjected to frigid or tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Floating orange smoke distress...

  14. 46 CFR 160.022-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange... subjected to frigid or tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Floating orange smoke distress...

  15. Laboratory Formation and Analysis of the Materials Comprising Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan Douglas

    The optical properties of interstellar dust analogs are investigated. Thin, solid, amorphous films are deposited on a substrate through excimer laser ablation. This process is analogous to the vapour deposition of atoms and ions which is thought to occur in stellar outflows and the interstellar medium (ISM). Refractive indices are calculated for typical polymeric hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) films. Thickness dependent void structure is shown to influence the resultant density of the substance. Refractive indices are also determined for amorphous magnesium silicates in both the pyroxene (MgSiO3) and olivine (Mg2SiO4) composites. A plausible dust grain model is constructed which successfully reproduces the major features of the diffuse interstellar extinction. The effects of thermal annealing and dehydrogenation of HAC are investigated. The resulting graphitized HAC is shown to exhibit a spectral signature which is commonly associated with gas phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Thermal emission from HAC is observed for the first time and is shown to be an excellent match to various anomalous unidentified infrared (UIR) emitters. The emission from HAC closely resembles those rare sources labelled Type B UIR emitters in recent works by Geballe (1996) and Tokunaga (1996). Near threshold laser ionization mass spectroscopy (LIMS) of HAC is shown to produce large ionized molecular clusters including fullerenes. The astrophysical implications of these results are discussed.

  16. Laboratory and Field Spectroscopy of Moon analogue material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    Samples derived from terrestrial analogue sites are studied to gain insight into lunar processes in their geological context (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011). For this study samples from the volcanic region of the Eifel, Germany collected during our latest field campaigns in November 2015 and February 2016 (Foing et al., 2010), are analyzed with a variety of spectrometers. The aim is to obtain a database of analyzed samples that could be used as a reference for future in situ measurements. We also use a documented set of Moon-Mars relevant minerals curated at VU Amsterdam. We are using systematically for all samples UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers, and sporadically a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and a Raman laser spectrometer on control samples. Calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers is the main focus of this research in order to obtain the clearest spectra. The calibration of the UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers requires the use of a good light source as well as suitable optical fibers to create a signal that covers the widest range in wavelengths available. To eliminate noise towards the edges of this range, multiple measurements are averaged and data is processed by dividing the signal by reference spectra. Obtained spectra can be tested for accuracy by comparing them with stationary laboratory spectrometers such as the FTIR spectrometer. The Raman, UV-VIS and NIR are also used in combination with the ExoGeoLab mock-up lander during field campaigns (Foing, Stoker, Ehrenfreund, 2011) also brought again to Eifel in February 2016, to prove the applicability of the equipment in the field. Acknowledgements: we thank Dominic Doyle for ESTEC optical lab support, Euan Monaghan (Leiden U) for FTIR measurement support, Wim van Westrenen for access to VU samples, Oscar Kamps (Utrecht U./ESTEC), Aidan Cowley (EAC) and Matthias Sperl (DLR) for support discussions

  17. 40 CFR 262.210 - Making the hazardous waste determination in the laboratory before the unwanted material is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the laboratory(ies) to an on-site central accumulation area or on-site interim status or permitted... determination in the laboratory before the unwanted material is removed from the laboratory. 262.210 Section 262... Determination and Accumulation of Unwanted Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities §...

  18. Treatment of laboratory wastewater in a tropical constructed wetland comparing surface and subsurface flow.

    PubMed

    Meutia, A A

    2001-01-01

    Wastewater treatment by constructed wetland is an appropriate technology for tropical developing countries like Indonesia because it is inexpensive, easily maintained, and has environmentally friendly and sustainable characteristics. The aim of the research is to examine the capability of constructed wetlands for treating laboratory wastewater at our Center, to investigate the suitable flow for treatment, namely vertical subsurface or horizontal surface flow, and to study the effect of the seasons. The constructed wetland is composed of three chambered unplanted sedimentation tanks followed by the first and second beds, containing gravel and sand, planted with Typha sp.; the third bed planted with floating plant Lemna sp.; and a clarifier with two chambers. The results showed that the subsurface flow in the dry season removed 95% organic carbon (COD) and total phosphorus (T-P) respectively, and 82% total nitrogen (T-N). In the transition period from the dry season to the rainy season, COD removal efficiency decreased to 73%, T-N increased to 89%, and T-P was almost the same as that in the dry season. In the rainy season COD and T-N removal efficiencies increased again to 95% respectively, while T-P remained unchanged. In the dry season, COD and T-P concentrations in the surface flow showed that the removal efficiencies were a bit lower than those in the subsurface flow. Moreover, T-N removal efficiency was only half as much as that in the subsurface flow. However, in the transition period, COD removal efficiency decreased to 29%, while T-N increased to 74% and T-P was still constant, around 93%. In the rainy season, COD and T-N removal efficiencies increased again to almost 95%. On the other hand, T-P decreased to 76%. The results show that the constructed wetland is capable of treating the laboratory wastewater. The subsurface flow is more suitable for treatment than the surface flow, and the seasonal changes have effects on the removal efficiency.

  19. Materials Databases Infrastructure Constructed by First Principles Calculations: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lianshan

    2015-10-13

    The First Principles calculations, especially the calculation based on High-Throughput Density Functional Theory, have been widely accepted as the major tools in atom scale materials design. The emerging super computers, along with the powerful First Principles calculations, have accumulated hundreds of thousands of crystal and compound records. The exponential growing of computational materials information urges the development of the materials databases, which not only provide unlimited storage for the daily increasing data, but still keep the efficiency in data storage, management, query, presentation and manipulation. This review covers the most cutting edge materials databases in materials design, and their hot applications such as in fuel cells. By comparing the advantages and drawbacks of these high-throughput First Principles materials databases, the optimized computational framework can be identified to fit the needs of fuel cell applications. The further development of high-throughput DFT materials database, which in essence accelerates the materials innovation, is discussed in the summary as well.

  20. Use of Impulse GPR for Laboratory Determination of Road Material Permittivity in Core Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysiński, Lech

    2013-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technique is commonly used for recognition of the road construction. The effective reflection coefficient corresponding to the road surface can be easily determined in data processing process. The reflection coefficient is related mostly to electric permittivity in practice and the both electrical quantities can be interpreted as material characteristics of the medium reflecting first of all its composition. These electrical properties are also interesting because their spatial contrasts inside the medium are responsible for generation distinctive reflection signals corresponding to the interlayer boundaries. These are the reasons why direct measurements of electric permittivity (or equivalent quantities) and investigations of its relation to the medium material properties are necessary in GPR practice. These measurements are usually difficult due to instability and methodological complexities and they constitute a large discipline. In the case of strongly inhomogeneous material (like stone-asphalt mixture) some additional difficulties occurs leading to some controversies between different measuring methods. The paper presents a new method of electric permittivity determination using dispersion of high-frequency electromagnetic impulse on a top of the drilling core. The measurement can be performed by the use of the same antenna which works in the field and thus its result is particularly close to the effective reflection coefficient being determined in GPR practice. The response to the medium inhomogeneity is similar in the both methods and the laboratory tests performed on core samples can be used for interpretations of the field results. The results of measurements were compared also with another method of permittivity determination and the method was applied to determination of the relation between reflection coefficient and lithological type of the stone fraction in asphalt mixture.

  1. Design and Construction of a Two-Temperature Preference Behavioral Assay for Undergraduate Neuroscience Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Richard L.; McKemy, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral assays in the undergraduate neuroscience laboratory are useful for illustrating a variety of physiological concepts. An example is homeostatic temperature regulation (thermoregulation). Many model organisms, from flies to mice, regulate internal temperatures in part by moving to suitable climates (thermotaxis). A particularly reliable method of quantifying temperature-dependent thermotactic behaviors is the two-temperature preference behavioral assay. In this preparation, an organism is free to move between two temperature-controlled surfaces, thus revealing its preferred thermal environment. Here we present the design and construction of a two-temperature preference assay chamber. The device uses Peltier-based thermoelectric modules (TECs) for heating and cooling, and is capable of precision control of temperatures from −5ºC to 60ºC. Our approach can be easily adapted for use in a variety of physiological and behavioral assays that require precise temperature control over a wide range of temperatures. PMID:23494724

  2. Problems Involved in the Choice and Use of Materials in Airplane Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Paul

    1932-01-01

    The present state of the problem of materials in airplane construction is studied on the basis of data giving the principal characteristics of different materials and showing how they affect the form of airplane parts.

  3. Construction techniques for the Taklamakan Desert Highway: research on the construction materials and the results of field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Changning; Dong, Zhibao; Li, Zhinong

    2006-03-01

    After conducting many laboratory and field experiments, several key technical issues related to the construction of China’s Taklamakan Desert Highway have been satisfactorily resolved. In particular, considerable progress has been made on the dry compaction of a sand sub-base, road design parameters, the creation of a structure that combines a sub-grade and asphalt pavement, analysis of the stability of a sand sub-base strengthened with geotextiles, and on the development of a complete set of construction techniques. The achievements of this research were successfully applied for the first time in the Taklamakan Desert, where the environmental conditions are extremely harsh. The results suggest that the construction of this highway was economical and that the simple construction methods produced a reliable highway. The resulting highway is believed to be the world’s first long-distance graded highway running through a huge desert with migrating dunes.

  4. Development of Distant Learning Laboratory and Creation of Educational Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, Michelle

    1995-01-01

    The Office of Education's fundamental goal is to disseminate information, mostly that which relates to science and technology. In this attempt, as I have observed, the office has many programs bringing both students and teachers to NASA Langley to expose them to the facilities and to teach them some about the scientific theory and about available modern technology. As a way of expanding the audience that can be reached, as the expense of bringing people in is limiting, Marchelle Canright has proposed establishing a center dedicated to researching and producing distant learning videos. Although distant learning through telecommunications is not a new concept, as many universities, colleges, and precollege level schools offer televised courses, the research in this field has been limited. Many of the standing distant learning broadcasts are simply recordings of teachers in classrooms giving lectures to their own students; they are not aimed at the television audience. In some cases the videos are produced without a Live-lecture atmosphere, but are still only classroom lectures. In either case, however, the full range of capabilities of video production are not being fully utilized. Methods for best relaying educational material have not been explored. Possibilities for including computerized images and video clips for the purpose of showing diagrams and processes, as well as examples in fitting cases, may add considerably to the educational value of these videos. Also, through Internet and satellite links, it is possible for remote students to interact with the teachers during televised sessions. These possibilities might, also, add to the effectiveness of distant learning programs. Ms. Canright's proposed center will be dedicated to researching these possibilities and eventually spreading the results to distant learning program managers. This is the project I was involved in over the summer. As implied, the center is still at the foundation stages. Ms. Canright has

  5. Laboratory alteration of gypsiferous materials below a landfill.

    PubMed

    Morillas, P; Castelló, R; Vizcayno, C

    2009-04-01

    Some urban solid waste landfill sites in Spain are located on geological substrates of gypsiferous lithology. Although this type of substrate is assumed to be of low permeability, it can develop secondary pores by dissolution and, under favourable environmental conditions, form a karstic system that may pose serious geotechnical problems in the medium and long term. The purpose of this work was to study alterations caused by selective tests in various sections of a gypsum lithological column obtained from the Colmenar de Oreja landfill site (Spain). The tests were used to assess the influence of individual environmental factors and involved the addition of milli-RO water, solutions containing a 1%, 5% or 10% concentration of landfill leachate, and 2, 5, 10 and 15mgl(-1) solutions of NaCl in successive immersion-drying cycles at -15, 20 or 60 degrees C. Differences in alterability between the six studied segments of the lithological column were found to be due to differences in lutite content, specific crystal habit and type of cement. Segments with specular gypsum were the strongest in the tests, while the segment with the highest amount of detrital materials was the most responsive to temperature and moisture changes. The treatments that produce greater alterations are those that contain only milli-RO water.

  6. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 392: Spill Sites and Construction Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. Jackson

    2002-02-01

    This Closure Report documents the closure activities that were conducted to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 392--Spill Sites and Construction Materials located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CAU 392 is listed on in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996) and consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 5 and 6 of the NTS: CAS 05-17-02 Construction Materials/Lead Bricks; CAS 06-17-03 Cement Mud Pit; CAS 06-1 9-01 Cable Pile; Powder Piles (3); CAS 06-44-02 Paint Spill; CAS 06-44-03 Plaster Spill; CAS 06-44-04 Cutting Fluid Discharge Ditch. Closure activities were performed in two phases. Phase 1 activities consisted of collecting waste characterization samples of soil and material present on-site, and where appropriate, performing radiological screening of debris at the six CASs. Results were used to determine how waste generated during closure activities would be handled and disposed of, i.e., as nonhazardous sanitary or hazardous waste, etc. Phase 2 activities consisted of closing each CAS by removing debris and/or soil, disposing of the generated waste, and verifying that each CAS was clean closed by visual inspection and/or by the collecting soil verification samples for laboratory analysis. Copies of the analytical results for the site verification samples are included in Appendix A. Copies of the Sectored Housekeeping Site Closure Verification Form for each of the six CASs are included in Appendix 8. Appendix C contains a copy of the Bechtel Nevada (BN) On-site Waste Transport Manifest for the hazardous waste generated during closure of CAS 06-44-02.

  7. LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE STABILITY AND TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability and transport of radio-labeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study included flow rate, pH, i...

  8. Laboratory comparison of four iron-based filter materials for water treatment of trace element contaminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to evaluate four iron-based filter materials for trace element contaminant water treatment. The iron-based filter materials evaluated were zero valent iron (ZVI), porous iron composite (PIC), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide/hydroxide (IOH). Only fi...

  9. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This interdisciplinary laboratory in the College of Engineering support research in areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. These research programs are developed with the assistance of faculty, students, and research associates in the departments of Physics, Materials Science and Engineering, chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering.

  10. 49 CFR 40.51 - What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory? 40.51 Section 40.51 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... and Supplies Used in DOT Urine Collections § 40.51 What materials are used to send urine specimens...

  11. 49 CFR 40.51 - What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory? 40.51 Section 40.51 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... and Supplies Used in DOT Urine Collections § 40.51 What materials are used to send urine specimens...

  12. 49 CFR 40.51 - What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory? 40.51 Section 40.51 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... and Supplies Used in DOT Urine Collections § 40.51 What materials are used to send urine specimens...

  13. 49 CFR 40.51 - What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory? 40.51 Section 40.51 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... and Supplies Used in DOT Urine Collections § 40.51 What materials are used to send urine specimens...

  14. 49 CFR 40.51 - What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory? 40.51 Section 40.51 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... and Supplies Used in DOT Urine Collections § 40.51 What materials are used to send urine specimens...

  15. A simple laboratory method for determining flash fire propensity of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    A simple laboratory method for determining flash fire propensity of materials is described. The apparatus consists of a tube furnace and a combustion tube. The ignition source can be a wooded match but the hot pyrolysis tube itself may be the most suitable ignition source. Test results are presented for various materials including polyethylene, polystyrene, polycarbonate, and polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams.

  16. 46 CFR 160.031-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Appliance, Shoulder Gun Type (and Equipment) § 160.031-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements. (a) All materials used in the construction of shoulder gun type line-throwing... affecting appearance or serviceability of the gun. (d) The gun, when loaded and fired in accordance with...

  17. 46 CFR 160.031-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Appliance, Shoulder Gun Type (and Equipment) § 160.031-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements. (a) All materials used in the construction of shoulder gun type line-throwing... affecting appearance or serviceability of the gun. (d) The gun, when loaded and fired in accordance with...

  18. 46 CFR 160.031-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Appliance, Shoulder Gun Type (and Equipment) § 160.031-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements. (a) All materials used in the construction of shoulder gun type line-throwing... affecting appearance or serviceability of the gun. (d) The gun, when loaded and fired in accordance with...

  19. 46 CFR 160.031-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Appliance, Shoulder Gun Type (and Equipment) § 160.031-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements. (a) All materials used in the construction of shoulder gun type line-throwing... affecting appearance or serviceability of the gun. (d) The gun, when loaded and fired in accordance with...

  20. 46 CFR 160.031-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Appliance, Shoulder Gun Type (and Equipment) § 160.031-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements. (a) All materials used in the construction of shoulder gun type line-throwing... affecting appearance or serviceability of the gun. (d) The gun, when loaded and fired in accordance with...

  1. RECOMMENDED FOUNDATION FILL MATERIALS CONSTRUCTION STANDARD OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the technical basis for a recommended foundation fill materials standard for new construction houses in Florida. he radon-control construction standard was developed by the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). ill material standards are formulated for: (1)...

  2. 46 CFR 162.017-3 - Materials, construction, and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... serviceability. (b) Bodies of pressure-vacuum relief valves must be made of bronze or such corrosion-resistant..., and seats shall be made of bronze or such corrosion-resistant material as may be approved by the... springs shall be made of corrosion-resistant material. Springs plated with corrosion-resistant...

  3. Materials Databases Infrastructure Constructed by First Principles Calculations: A Review

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Lianshan

    2015-10-13

    The First Principles calculations, especially the calculation based on High-Throughput Density Functional Theory, have been widely accepted as the major tools in atom scale materials design. The emerging super computers, along with the powerful First Principles calculations, have accumulated hundreds of thousands of crystal and compound records. The exponential growing of computational materials information urges the development of the materials databases, which not only provide unlimited storage for the daily increasing data, but still keep the efficiency in data storage, management, query, presentation and manipulation. This review covers the most cutting edge materials databases in materials design, and their hotmore » applications such as in fuel cells. By comparing the advantages and drawbacks of these high-throughput First Principles materials databases, the optimized computational framework can be identified to fit the needs of fuel cell applications. The further development of high-throughput DFT materials database, which in essence accelerates the materials innovation, is discussed in the summary as well.« less

  4. 46 CFR 160.038-3 - Materials, workmanship, and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the metal chest and fittings shall be given a heavy coat of quick drying red lead, zinc chromate... be constructed of metal and lined with wood. (b) The lining shall be so fitted and finished as to... explosives or pyrotechnics from contact with metal surfaces. (c) The metal shall be 1/8 inch thick and...

  5. 46 CFR 160.038-3 - Materials, workmanship, and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the metal chest and fittings shall be given a heavy coat of quick drying red lead, zinc chromate... be constructed of metal and lined with wood. (b) The lining shall be so fitted and finished as to... explosives or pyrotechnics from contact with metal surfaces. (c) The metal shall be 1/8 inch thick and...

  6. 46 CFR 160.038-3 - Materials, workmanship, and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the metal chest and fittings shall be given a heavy coat of quick drying red lead, zinc chromate... be constructed of metal and lined with wood. (b) The lining shall be so fitted and finished as to... explosives or pyrotechnics from contact with metal surfaces. (c) The metal shall be 1/8 inch thick and...

  7. Method for producing fabrication material for constructing micrometer-scaled machines, fabrication material for micrometer-scaled machines

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.

    1995-12-31

    A method for producing fabrication material for use in the construction of nanometer-scaled machines is provided whereby similar protein molecules are isolated and manipulated at predetermined residue positions so as to facilitate noncovalent interaction, but without compromising the folding configuration or native structure of the original protein biomodules. A fabrication material is also provided consisting of biomodules systematically constructed and arranged at specific solution parameters.

  8. Laboratory analysis and airborne detection of materials stimulated to luminesce by the sun

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemphill, W.R.; Theisen, A.F.; Tyson, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) is an airborne electro-optical device used to image materials which have been stimulated to luminesce by the Sun. Such materials include uranium-bearing sandstone, sedimentary phosphate rock, marine oil seeps, and stressed vegetation. Prior to conducting an airborne survey, a fluorescence spectrometer may be used in the laboratory to determine the spectral region where samples of the target material exhibit maximum luminescence, and to select the optimum Fraunhofer line. ?? 1984.

  9. Progress of applied superconductivity research at Materials Research Laboratories, ITRI (Taiwan)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R. S.; Wang, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    A status report based on the applied high temperature superconductivity (HTS) research at Materials Research Laboratories (MRL), Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) is given. The aim is to develop fabrication technologies for the high-TC materials appropriate to the industrial application requirements. To date, the majorities of works have been undertaken in the areas of new materials, wires/tapes with long length, prototypes of magnets, large-area thin films, SQUID's and microwave applications.

  10. Construction data and retrieval procedures for selected wells drilled from 1985 through 1987 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehner, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-eight wells were constructed by the U. S. Geological Survey for use in describing the groundwater flow system in Melton Valley, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in eastern Tennessee. The wells were installed at 18 locations in Melton Valley and along the Clinch River during the period 1985 through 1987. During the same period, 19 wells were constructed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 7 locations in or near radioactive-waste burial grounds in Melton Valley. Construction data for all 47 wells are in the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Site Inventory data system, where information is also stored for 450 wells that were completed at the laboratory in earlier years. The data can be electronically retrieved by personnel who have access to the U.S. Geological Survey Prime computer located in Nashville, Tennessee, and retrieval procedures are given in the report. (USGS)

  11. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  12. Microcycle conidiation and medusa head conidiophores of aspergilli on indoor construction materials and air filters from hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ahearm, D G; Price, D; Simmons, R B; Mayo, A; Zhang, S T; Crow, S A

    2007-01-01

    Microcycle conidiation and microniche colonization by aspergilli was observed in-situ on various indoor construction and finishing materials. Microcycle conidiation, direct conidiogenesis from a conidium or spore with minimal intervening hyphal development, for several decades has been considered a survival mechanism during stress for a variety of moulds. Adhesive transparent tape mounts and bulk materials from various indoor materials, including air filters from hospitals and healthcare institutions, were transported to the laboratory for light microscopic and scanning electron microscopic observations. Additional materials were held in moist chambers over nonsterile soils and examined periodically for fungal development. Microcycle conidiation was observed usually in areas of sparse fungal development, mostly in association with isolations of members of the Aspergillus flavus-, A. versicolor-, A. niger groups. Branched conidiophores and medusa heads, more often associated with colonization by Eurotium spp., were observed on some preserved woods. These conidiogenesis processes might be factors in the survival and blooms of indoor aspergilli.

  13. 46 CFR 154.1702 - Materials of construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or vapor: (a) Aluminum and aluminum bearing alloys. (b) Copper and copper bearing alloys. (c) Zinc or galvanized steel. (d) Magnesium. (e) Mercury. (f) Acetylide forming materials, such as copper, silver,...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1702 - Materials of construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or vapor: (a) Aluminum and aluminum bearing alloys. (b) Copper and copper bearing alloys. (c) Zinc or galvanized steel. (d) Magnesium. (e) Mercury. (f) Acetylide forming materials, such as copper, silver,...

  15. A Model Framework for Science and Other Course Materials Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    A model is presented to provide guidance for Coast Guard writers, curriculum developers, course coordinators, and instructors who intend to update, or draft course materials. Detailed instructions are provided for developing instructor's guides and student's guides. (CS)

  16. Improved construction materials for polar regions using microcellular thermoplastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Microcellular polymer foams (MCF) are thermoplastic foams with very small cell diameters, less than 10 microns, and very large cell densities, 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 15) cells per cubic centimeter of unfoamed material. The concept of foaming polymers with microcellular voids was conceived to reduce the amount of material used for mass-produced items without compromising the mechanical properties. The reasoning behind this concept was that if voids smaller than the critical flaw size pre-existing in polymers were introduced into the matrix, they would not affect the overall strength of the product. MCF polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were examined to determine the effects of the microstructure towards the mechanical properties of the materials at room and arctic temperatures. Batch process parameters were discovered for these materials and foamed samples of three densities were produced for each material. To quantify the toughness and strength of these polymers, the tensile yield strength, tensile toughness, and impact resistance were measured at room and arctic temperatures. The feasibility of MCF polymers has been demonstrated by the consistent and repeatable MCF microstructures formed, but the improvements in the mechanical properties were not conclusive. Therefore the usefulness of the MCF polymers to replace other materials in arctic environments is questionable.

  17. Characterization of materials formed by rice husk for construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo-Rodríguez, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    This review article delves into the use of agro-industrial wastes, which in construction field provides alternatives for environmental problems with the use of them. This fact enables development and lower costs for new options in the brick, cluster, mortar and concrete industry, what represents benefits for environment, housing and generally everything related to construction, looking for sustainability. For that reason a literature review is made to support the theme focusing on the use of rice husk in its natural, ground or ash state for manufacturing elements with clay masonry, precast and optimization of concrete and mortars. The technique used is based on scientific articles and researches found in reliable databases that were analyzed and integrated into a synthesized structure, which summarized the objectives, analysis processes, the physical and mechanical properties and finally the results. The conclusions are focused on potentiality of elements production in the construction development based on the high effectiveness like thermal insulation, low density and various benefits offered by high silica content pozzolanic properties, etc.

  18. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory--health protection.

    PubMed

    Ketchen, E; Porter, W

    1981-12-01

    Maintaining reasonable control of all hazardous materials used in a large research laboratory can be a formidable task. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a Hazardous Material Coordinator for Health Protection (HMC-Hlth) and a Hazardous Material Coordinator for Environmental Protection (HMC-Env) control hazardous materials from acquisition to disposal. The HMC-Hlth, a member of the Industrial Hygiene Department, is responsible for control of the purchase and use of hazardous materials. If the material has not had a hazard evaluation, the user is required to contact the HMC-Hlth to find out if the material is hazardous before ordering it. If the material is hazardous, the user must get permission from his divisional representative to purchase it. The user is required to fill out Part 2 of a Hazardous Material Control Card (HMCC), describing the proposed use and location of the material and to return HMCC to the HMC-Hlth. This allows the Industrial Hygiene Department to evaluate the use of the materials and to take air samples as needed. Part 1 of the HMCC also contains computer printed information on the hazards.

  19. Development of Additive Construction Technologies for Application to Development of Lunar/Martian Surface Structures Using In-Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki J.; Fiske, Michael R.; Edmunson, Jennifer E.; Khoshnevis, Berokh

    2015-01-01

    For long-duration missions on other planetary bodies, the use of in situ materials will become increasingly critical. As human presence on these bodies expands, so must the breadth of the structures required to accommodate them including habitats, laboratories, berms, radiation shielding for natural radiation and surface reactors, garages, solar storm shelters, greenhouses, etc. Planetary surface structure manufacturing and assembly technologies that incorporate in situ resources provide options for autonomous, affordable, pre-positioned environments with radiation shielding features and protection from micrometeorites, exhaust plume debris, and other hazards. The ability to use in-situ materials to construct these structures will provide a benefit in the reduction of up-mass that would otherwise make long-term Moon or Mars structures cost prohibitive. The ability to fabricate structures in situ brings with it the ability to repair these structures, which allows for the self-sufficiency and sustainability necessary for long-duration habitation. Previously, under the auspices of the MSFC In-Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) project and more recently, under the jointly-managed MSFC/KSC Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project, the MSFC Surface Structures Group has been developing materials and construction technologies to support future planetary habitats with in-situ resources. One such additive construction technology is known as Contour Crafting. This paper presents the results to date of these efforts, including development of novel nozzle concepts for advanced layer deposition using this process. Conceived initially for rapid development of cementitious structures on Earth, it also lends itself exceptionally well to the automated fabrication of planetary surface structures using minimally processed regolith as aggregate, and binders developed from in situ materials as well. This process has been used successfully in the fabrication of

  20. Beyond the material grave: Life Cycle Impact Assessment of leaching from secondary materials in road and earth constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, Oliver; Bayer, Peter; Juraske, Ronnie; Verones, Francesca; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We model environmental impacts of leaching from secondary construction material. • Industrial wastes in construction contain up to 45,000 t heavy metals per year (D). • In a scenario, 150 t are leached to the environment within 100 years after construction. • All heavy metals but As, Sb and Mo are adsorbed by 20 cm subsoil in this scenario. • Environmental impacts depend on material, pollutant, construction type, and geography. - Abstract: In industrialized countries, large amounts of mineral wastes are produced. They are re-used in various ways, particularly in road and earth constructions, substituting primary resources such as gravel. However, they may also contain pollutants, such as heavy metals, which may be leached to the groundwater. The toxic impacts of these emissions are so far often neglected within Life Cycle Assessments (LCA) of products or waste treatment services and thus, potentially large environmental impacts are currently missed. This study aims at closing this gap by assessing the ecotoxic impacts of heavy metal leaching from industrial mineral wastes in road and earth constructions. The flows of metals such as Sb, As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, V and Zn originating from three typical constructions to the environment are quantified, their fate in the environment is assessed and potential ecotoxic effects evaluated. For our reference country, Germany, the industrial wastes that are applied as Granular Secondary Construction Material (GSCM) carry more than 45,000 t of diverse heavy metals per year. Depending on the material quality and construction type applied, up to 150 t of heavy metals may leach to the environment within the first 100 years after construction. Heavy metal retardation in subsoil can potentially reduce the fate to groundwater by up to 100%. One major challenge of integrating leaching from constructions into macro-scale LCA frameworks is the high variability in micro-scale technical and geographical factors

  1. Construction and laboratory test of a fibre optic sensor for rotational events recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzych, Anna; Krajewski, Zbigniew; Kowalski, Jerzy K.; Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel and technically advanced system - Fibre-Optic System for Rotational Events & Phenomena Monitoring (FOSREM). It has been designed in order to register and monitor rotational events in seismological observatories, engineering constructions, mines and even on glaciers and in their vicinity. Its wide application field is a result of unique parameters and electronic solutions which give an opportunity to measure a component of rotation in the wide range of a signal amplitude from 10-8 rad/s to 10 rad/s, as well as a frequency from 0 Hz to the upper frequency between 2.56 Hz to 328.12 Hz. Moreover, the numerical analysis and simulations indicate that it keeps the theoretical sensitivity equal to 2·10-8 rad/s/Hz1/2. FOSREM is equipped with an advanced communication module which gives the possibility for a remote detection parameter control, as well as the recorded data receiving. It enables the sensor to assemble in any chosen place. In the paper we present laboratory investigations and tests which confirm the wide application field and practical aspects of FOSREM.

  2. Construction and Organization of a BSL-3 Cryo-Electron Microscopy Laboratory at UTMB

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Michael B.; Trujillo, Juan; Leahy, Ian; Razmus, Dennis; DeHate, Robert; Lorcheim, Paul; Czarneski, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Domenica; Newton, Je T’Aime M.; Haddow, Andrew D.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    A unique cryo-electron microscopy facility has been designed and constructed at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) to study the three-dimensional organization of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents at biological safety level (BSL)-3, and their interactions with host cells. A 200 keV high-end cryo-electron microscope was installed inside a BSL-3 containment laboratory and standard operating procedures were developed and implemented to ensure its safe and efficient operation. We also developed a new microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system, which allowed us to expand the facility capabilities to study bacterial agents including spore-forming species. The new unified protocol does not require agent-specific treatment in contrast to the previously used heat decontamination. To optimize the use of the cryo-electron microscope and to improve safety conditions, it can be remotely controlled from a room outside of containment, or through a computer network world-wide. Automated data collection is provided by using JADAS (single particle imaging) and SerialEM (tomography). The facility has successfully operated for more than a year without an incident and was certified as a select agent facility by the Centers for Disease Control. PMID:23274136

  3. Construction and organization of a BSL-3 cryo-electron microscopy laboratory at UTMB.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael B; Trujillo, Juan; Leahy, Ian; Razmus, Dennis; Dehate, Robert; Lorcheim, Paul; Czarneski, Mark A; Zimmerman, Domenica; Newton, Je T'aime M; Haddow, Andrew D; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-03-01

    A unique cryo-electron microscopy facility has been designed and constructed at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) to study the three-dimensional organization of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents at biological safety level (BSL)-3, and their interactions with host cells. A 200keV high-end cryo-electron microscope was installed inside a BSL-3 containment laboratory and standard operating procedures were developed and implemented to ensure its safe and efficient operation. We also developed a new microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system, which allowed us to expand the facility capabilities to study bacterial agents including spore-forming species. The new unified protocol does not require agent-specific treatment in contrast to the previously used heat decontamination. To optimize the use of the cryo-electron microscope and to improve safety conditions, it can be remotely controlled from a room outside of containment, or through a computer network world-wide. Automated data collection is provided by using JADAS (single particle imaging) and SerialEM (tomography). The facility has successfully operated for more than a year without an incident and was certified as a select agent facility by the Centers for Disease Control.

  4. Structural Composite Construction Materials Manufactured from Municipal Solid Waste

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-20

    in Table 1. Candidate matrix materials included polystyrene (PS) or expanded polystyrene (EPS), high density polyethylene (HDPE), and polyethylene...companies make a variety of expanded polystyrene insulation panels that arc used in insulation and roofing systems.46 Thermoplastics are seeing

  5. A Model Framework for Course Materials Construction (Second Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Designed for use by Coast Guard course writers, curriculum developers, course coordinators, and instructors as a decision-support system, this publication presents a model that translates the Intraservices Procedures for Instructional Systems Development curriculum design model into materials usable by classroom teachers and students. Although…

  6. 29 CFR 779.336 - Sales of building materials for commercial property construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sales of building materials for commercial property... Service Establishments Sales Not Made for Resale § 779.336 Sales of building materials for commercial property construction. Sales of building materials to a contractor or speculative builder for...

  7. 29 CFR 779.336 - Sales of building materials for commercial property construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sales of building materials for commercial property... Service Establishments Sales Not Made for Resale § 779.336 Sales of building materials for commercial property construction. Sales of building materials to a contractor or speculative builder for...

  8. 29 CFR 779.336 - Sales of building materials for commercial property construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sales of building materials for commercial property... Service Establishments Sales Not Made for Resale § 779.336 Sales of building materials for commercial property construction. Sales of building materials to a contractor or speculative builder for...

  9. 29 CFR 779.336 - Sales of building materials for commercial property construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sales of building materials for commercial property... Service Establishments Sales Not Made for Resale § 779.336 Sales of building materials for commercial property construction. Sales of building materials to a contractor or speculative builder for...

  10. 29 CFR 779.336 - Sales of building materials for commercial property construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sales of building materials for commercial property... Service Establishments Sales Not Made for Resale § 779.336 Sales of building materials for commercial property construction. Sales of building materials to a contractor or speculative builder for...

  11. 46 CFR 160.036-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand-Held Rocket... performance requirements. (a) Materials. The materials used in handheld rocket-propelled parachute red flare... protected against corrosion. (b) Workmanship. Handheld rocket-propelled parachute red flare distress...

  12. 46 CFR 160.036-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand-Held Rocket... performance requirements. (a) Materials. The materials used in handheld rocket-propelled parachute red flare... protected against corrosion. (b) Workmanship. Handheld rocket-propelled parachute red flare distress...

  13. 46 CFR 160.036-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand-Held Rocket... performance requirements. (a) Materials. The materials used in handheld rocket-propelled parachute red flare... protected against corrosion. (b) Workmanship. Handheld rocket-propelled parachute red flare distress...

  14. 46 CFR 160.036-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand-Held Rocket... performance requirements. (a) Materials. The materials used in handheld rocket-propelled parachute red flare... protected against corrosion. (b) Workmanship. Handheld rocket-propelled parachute red flare distress...

  15. 46 CFR 50.20-30 - Alternative materials or methods of construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... scientific data and evidence as may be necessary to establish the suitability of such materials or methods of... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternative materials or methods of construction. 50.20... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Plan Submittal and Approval § 50.20-30 Alternative materials or methods...

  16. 46 CFR 50.20-30 - Alternative materials or methods of construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... scientific data and evidence as may be necessary to establish the suitability of such materials or methods of... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alternative materials or methods of construction. 50.20... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Plan Submittal and Approval § 50.20-30 Alternative materials or methods...

  17. Low cost materials of construction for biological processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-13

    The workshop was held, May 1993 in conjunction with the 15th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. The purpose of this workshop was to present information on the biomass to ethanol process in the context of materials selection and through presentation and discussion, identify promising avenues for future research. Six technical presentations were grouped into two sessions: process assessment and technology assessment. In the process assessment session, the group felt that the pretreatment area would require the most extensive materials research due the complex chemical, physical and thermal environment. Discussion centered around the possibility of metals being leached into the process stream and their effect on the fermentation mechanics. Linings were a strong option for pretreatment assuming the economics were favorable. Fermentation was considered an important area for research also, due to the unique complex of compounds and dual phases present. Erosion in feedstock handling equipment was identified as a minor concern. In the technology assessment session, methodologies in corrosion analysis were presented in addition to an overview of current coatings/linings technology. Widely practiced testing strategies, including ASTM methods, as well as novel procedures for micro-analysis of corrosion were discussed. Various coatings and linings, including polymers and ceramics, were introduced. The prevailing recommendations for testing included keeping the testing simple until the problem warranted a more detailed approach and developing standardized testing procedures to ensure the data was reproducible and applicable. The need to evaluate currently available materials such as coatings/linings, carbon/stainless steels, or fiberglass reinforced plastic was emphasized. It was agreed that economic evaluation of each material candidate must be an integral part of any research plan.

  18. Physics Laboratory Investigation of Vocational High School Field Stone and Concrete Construction Techniques in the Central Java Province (Indonesia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purwandari, Ristiana Dyah

    2015-01-01

    The investigation aims in this study were to uncover the observations of infrastructures and physics laboratory in vocational high school for Stone and Concrete Construction Techniques Expertise Field or Teknik Konstruksi Batu dan Beton (TKBB)'s in Purwokerto Central Java Province, mapping the Vocational High School or Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan…

  19. Discourse Patterns at Laboratory Practices and the Co-Construction of Knowledge by Applying SDIS-GSEQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrillo, Edgardo Ruiz; González, José Luis Cruz; Martínez, Samuel Meraz; Sánchez, Luisa Bravo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the discourse through IRE (Intervention-Response-Evaluation) in the co-construction of knowledge of Biology students during laboratory practices by applying the SDIS-GSEQ software to assess IRE discourse patterns developed during the same. The study group consisted of second semester students of the…

  20. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory--environmental protection.

    PubMed

    Eisenhower, B M; Oakes, T W; Braunstein, H M

    1984-04-01

    At a large research laboratory facility the management and control of hazardous materials, and their subsequent wastes can be an unmanageable task. Environmental regulations, mandated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, established a Federal program to provide comprehensive regulation of hazardous solid waste materials from their generation time to their disposal. In an effort to comply with these regulations, a Hazardous Materials Management and Control Program was created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program provides personnel with specific guidelines for the procurement, use, storage, transportation and disposal of hazardous materials/wastes, and ensures that they are managed in a manner which adequately protects all personnel, the general public, and the environment.

  1. Beyond the material grave: Life Cycle Impact Assessment of leaching from secondary materials in road and earth constructions.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Oliver; Bayer, Peter; Juraske, Ronnie; Verones, Francesca; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2014-10-01

    In industrialized countries, large amounts of mineral wastes are produced. They are re-used in various ways, particularly in road and earth constructions, substituting primary resources such as gravel. However, they may also contain pollutants, such as heavy metals, which may be leached to the groundwater. The toxic impacts of these emissions are so far often neglected within Life Cycle Assessments (LCA) of products or waste treatment services and thus, potentially large environmental impacts are currently missed. This study aims at closing this gap by assessing the ecotoxic impacts of heavy metal leaching from industrial mineral wastes in road and earth constructions. The flows of metals such as Sb, As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, V and Zn originating from three typical constructions to the environment are quantified, their fate in the environment is assessed and potential ecotoxic effects evaluated. For our reference country, Germany, the industrial wastes that are applied as Granular Secondary Construction Material (GSCM) carry more than 45,000 t of diverse heavy metals per year. Depending on the material quality and construction type applied, up to 150 t of heavy metals may leach to the environment within the first 100 years after construction. Heavy metal retardation in subsoil can potentially reduce the fate to groundwater by up to 100%. One major challenge of integrating leaching from constructions into macro-scale LCA frameworks is the high variability in micro-scale technical and geographical factors, such as material qualities, construction types and soil types. In our work, we consider a broad range of parameter values in the modeling of leaching and fate. This allows distinguishing between the impacts of various road constructions, as well as sites with different soil properties. The findings of this study promote the quantitative consideration of environmental impacts of long-term leaching in Life Cycle Assessment, complementing site-specific risk

  2. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  3. US/Russian laboratory-to-laboratory program in materials protection, control and accounting at the RRC Kurchatov Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.; Roumiansev, A.; Shmelev, V.

    1996-06-01

    Six US DOE Laboratories are carrying out a program of cooperation with the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute (RRC KI) to improve the capabilities and facilities in nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A). In 1995, the primary emphasis of this program was the implementation of improved physical protection at a demonstration building at RRC KI, and the upgrading of the computerized MC&A system, diagnostic instrumentation, and physical inventory procedures at a critical assembly within this building. Work continues in 1996 at the demonstration building but now also has begun at the two Kurchatov buildings which constitute the Central Storage Facility (CSF). At this facility, there will be upgrades in the physical inventory taking procedures, a test and evaluation of gamma-ray isotopic measurements, evaluations of nuclear material portal monitors and neutron-based measurement equipment as well as development of an improved computerized materials accounting system, implementation of bar code printing and reading equipment, development of tamper indicating device program, and substantial improvements in physical protection. Also, vulnerability assessments begun in 1995 are being extended to additional high priority facilities at Kurchatov.

  4. Recent work on use of lunar materials for SPS construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, G. K.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of mounting a small operation on the Moon to productively use lunar materials in support of programs such as the solar power satellite is addressed. A cost effective scenario of a small chemical process plant on the surface of the Moon and a small machine shop located in orbit is presented. The mass of the space installation is compared to the projected outputs in 90 days. It is indicated that the system would have the capability of replicating about 90% of its own components and would provide the metals, glasses, and silicon needed for the contruction of 90% to 96% of the mass of one solar power satellite per year.

  5. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development.

    PubMed

    Aalseth, C E; Bonicalzi, R M; Cantaloub, M G; Day, A R; Erikson, L E; Fast, J; Forrester, J B; Fuller, E S; Glasgow, B D; Greenwood, L R; Hoppe, E W; Hossbach, T W; Hyronimus, B J; Keillor, M E; Mace, E K; McIntyre, J I; Merriman, J H; Myers, A W; Overman, C T; Overman, N R; Panisko, M E; Seifert, A; Warren, G A; Runkle, R C

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  6. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology, 10-3. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the second of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  7. Cardiopulmonary Laboratory Specialist, 10-6. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These instructor and student materials for a postsecondary level course for cardiopulmonary laboratory specialist training comprise one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the course is to train students to…

  8. Testing Plastic Deformations of Materials in the Introductory Undergraduate Mechanics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romo-Kroger, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for…

  9. EFFECT OF FREEZE-THAW ON THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF BARRIER MATERIALS: LABORATORY AND FIELD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted on barrier materials to determine if their hydraulic conductivity changes as a result of freezing and thawing. esults of the tests were compared to data collected from a field study. ests were conducted on two compacted clays, one sand-bentonite mi...

  10. Brownfields Recover Your Resources - Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Construction and Demolition Materials at Land Revitalization Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides background information on how the sustainable reuse of brownfield properties includes efforts to reduce the environmental impact by reusing and recycling materials generated during building construction, demolition, or renovation.

  11. COMPATIBILITY OF NAPLS AND OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH MATERIALS UED IN WELL CONSTRUCTION, SAMPLING, AND REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structural integrity of well construction, sampling, and remediation materials may be compromised at many hazardous sites by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and their dissolved constituents. A literature review of compatibility theory and qualitative field experiences are provid...

  12. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  13. Method of improving superconducting qualities of fabricated constructs by shock preprocessing of precursor materials

    DOEpatents

    Nellis, William J.; Maple, M. Brian

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of improving the physical properties of superconducting materials which comprises: a. applying a high strain rate deformation to said materi The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California, for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  14. Sediment laboratory quality-assurance project: studies of methods and materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, J.D.; Newland, C.A.; Gray, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    In August 1996 the U.S. Geological Survey initiated the Sediment Laboratory Quality-Assurance project. The Sediment Laboratory Quality Assurance project is part of the National Sediment Laboratory Quality-Assurance program. This paper addresses the fmdings of the sand/fme separation analysis completed for the single-blind reference sediment-sample project and differences in reported results between two different analytical procedures. From the results it is evident that an incomplete separation of fme- and sand-size material commonly occurs resulting in the classification of some of the fme-size material as sand-size material. Electron microscopy analysis supported the hypothesis that the negative bias for fme-size material and the positive bias for sand-size material is largely due to aggregation of some of the fine-size material into sand-size particles and adherence of fine-size material to the sand-size grains. Electron microscopy analysis showed that preserved river water, which was low in dissolved solids, specific conductance, and neutral pH, showed less aggregation and adhesion than preserved river water that was higher in dissolved solids and specific conductance with a basic pH. Bacteria were also found growing in the matrix, which may enhance fme-size material aggregation through their adhesive properties. Differences between sediment-analysis methods were also investigated as pan of this study. Suspended-sediment concentration results obtained from one participating laboratory that used a total-suspended solids (TSS) method had greater variability and larger negative biases than results obtained when this laboratory used a suspended-sediment concentration method. When TSS methods were used to analyze the reference samples, the median suspended sediment concentration percent difference was -18.04 percent. When the laboratory used a suspended-sediment concentration method, the median suspended-sediment concentration percent difference was -2

  15. Construction Materials Used in the Historical Roman Era Bath in Myra

    PubMed Central

    Oguz, Cem; Turker, Fikret

    2014-01-01

    The physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of mortars and bricks used in the historical building that was erected at Myra within the boundaries of Antalya Province during the Roman time were investigated. The sample picked points were marked on the air photographs and plans of the buildings and samples were photographed. Then petrographic evaluation was made by stereo microscope on the polished surfaces of construction materials (mortar, brick) taken from such historical buildings in laboratory condition. Also, microstructural analyses (SEM/EDX, XRD), physical analyses (unit volume, water absorption by mass, water absorption by volume, specific mass, compacity, and porosity), chemical analyses (acid loss and sieve analysis, salt analyses, pH, protein, fat, pozzolanic activity, and conductivity analyses), and mechanical experiments (compressive strength, point loading test, and tensile strength at bending) were applied and the obtained results were evaluated. It was observed that good adherence was provided between the binder and the aggregate in mortars. It was also detected that bricks have preserved their originality against environmental, atmospheric, and physicochemical effects and their mechanical properties showed that they were produced by appropriate techniques. PMID:25089290

  16. Construction materials used in the historical Roman era bath in Myra.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Cem; Turker, Fikret; Kockal, Niyazi Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of mortars and bricks used in the historical building that was erected at Myra within the boundaries of Antalya Province during the Roman time were investigated. The sample picked points were marked on the air photographs and plans of the buildings and samples were photographed. Then petrographic evaluation was made by stereo microscope on the polished surfaces of construction materials (mortar, brick) taken from such historical buildings in laboratory condition. Also, microstructural analyses (SEM/EDX, XRD), physical analyses (unit volume, water absorption by mass, water absorption by volume, specific mass, compacity, and porosity), chemical analyses (acid loss and sieve analysis, salt analyses, pH, protein, fat, pozzolanic activity, and conductivity analyses), and mechanical experiments (compressive strength, point loading test, and tensile strength at bending) were applied and the obtained results were evaluated. It was observed that good adherence was provided between the binder and the aggregate in mortars. It was also detected that bricks have preserved their originality against environmental, atmospheric, and physicochemical effects and their mechanical properties showed that they were produced by appropriate techniques.

  17. Field and laboratory testing of seal materials proposed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, M.K.; Howard, C.L.

    1996-02-05

    The Small Scale Seal Performance Tests (SSSPT) were a series of in situ tests designed to evaluate the feasibility of various materials for sealing purposes. Testing was initiated in 1985 and concluded in 1995. Materials selected for the SSSPT included salt-saturated concrete, a 50%/50% mixture of crushed salt and bentonite, bentonite, and crushed salt. This paper presents a summary of the SSSPT field program, results of the in situ testing, and a discussion of post-testing laboratory studies of salt-saturated concrete. Results of the SSSPT support the use of salt-saturated concrete, compacted bentonite clay, and compacted crushed salt as sealing materials for the WIPP.

  18. Laboratory requirements for in-situ and remote sensing of suspended material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. Y.; Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1978-01-01

    Recommendations for laboratory and in-situ measurements required for remote sensing of suspended material are presented. This study investigates the properties of the suspended materials, factors influencing the upwelling radiance, and the various types of remote sensing techniques. Calibration and correlation procedures are given to obtain the accuracy necessary to quantify the suspended materials by remote sensing. In addition, the report presents a survey of the national need for sediment data, the agencies that deal with and require the data of suspended sediment, and a summary of some recent findings of sediment measurements.

  19. Effects of implant angulation, material selection, and impression technique on impression accuracy: a preliminary laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Sveikata, Kestutis; Savickas, Raimondas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary laboratory study was to evaluate the effects of 5- and 25-degree implant angulations in simulated clinical casts on an impression's accuracy when using different impression materials and tray selections. A convenience sample of each implant angulation group was selected for both open and closed trays in combination with one polyether and two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials. The influence of material and technique appeared to be significant for both 5- and 25-degree angulations (P < .05), and increased angulation tended to decrease impression accuracy. The open-tray technique was more accurate with highly nonaxially oriented implants for the small sample size investigated.

  20. Laboratory requirements for in-situ and remote sensing of suspended material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. Y.; Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    Recommendations for laboratory and in-situ measurements required for remote sensing of suspended material are presented. This study investigates the properties of the suspended materials, factors influencing the upwelling radiance, and the various types of remote sensing techniques. Calibration and correlation procedures are given to obtain the accuracy necessary to quantify the suspended materials by remote sensing. In addition, the report presents a survey of the national need for sediment data, the agencies that deal with and require the data of suspended sediment, and a summary of some recent findings of sediment measurements.

  1. Applications of Composite Materials in Helicopter Construction (Les Applications des Materiaux Composite dans la Construction des Helicopteres),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-21

    developments. Besides the weight savings obtained by the use of composite materials, it is appropriate to stress the reliability, the resistance to corrosion...molding Assembly by gluing and "ultrasonic" welding or resistance welding Price Ratio 1 4 2 Advantages No risk of corrosion Weight slightly Weight...all-composite cabin floor in place of the metal sandwich construction of DAUPHIN N. Bending strength Shear resistance Better ball impact strength

  2. Construction materials as a waste management solution for cellulose sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Modolo, R.; Rodrigues, M.; Coelho, I.

    2011-02-15

    Sustainable waste management system for effluents treatment sludge has been a pressing issue for pulp and paper sector. Recycling is always recommended in terms of environmental sustainability. Following an approach of waste valorisation, this work aims to demonstrate the technical viability of producing fiber-cement roof sheets incorporating cellulose primary sludge generated on paper and pulp mills. From the results obtained with preliminary studies it was possible to verify the possibility of producing fiber-cement sheets by replacing 25% of the conventional used virgin long fiber by primary effluent treatment cellulose sludge. This amount of incorporation was tested on an industrial scale. Environmental parameters related to water and waste, as well as tests for checking the quality of the final product was performed. These control parameters involved total solids in suspension, dissolved salts, chlorides, sulphates, COD, metals content. In the product, parameters like moisture, density and strength were controlled. The results showed that it is possible to replace the virgin long fibers pulp by primary sludge without impacts in final product characteristics and on the environment. This work ensures the elimination of significant waste amounts, which are nowadays sent to landfill, as well as reduces costs associated with the standard raw materials use in the fiber-cement industrial sector.

  3. Ductwork: Materials of construction for flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    O`Donnell, R.J.; Khederian, J.C.; Martin, J.E.; Watson, W.K.

    1995-09-01

    This paper identifies the ductwork materials required for the various service conditions in the wet limestone flue gas desulfurization system (FGDS) at Indianapolis Power and Light Company`s (IPL) Petersburg Units 1 and 2. This project was initiated by IPL in response to the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 and is intended to treat the flue gas from two base-loaded units with a combined capacity of approximately 700 MW gross electrical output. The flue gas conditions include hot unscrubbed gas (bypass), hot unscrubbed gas mixed with cool ambient air (normal), a mixing zone of gas only/air only associated with an open bypass system (no damper), and cool, wet scrubbed gas (outlet ducts). In addition, there are upset conditions associated with the loss of an air preheater. This system is somewhat unique, in that each unit has its own separate open or undampered bypass system, including separate stack liners. While a separate bypass system eliminates the extremely severe corrosion problems associated with mixing unscrubbed gas and scrubbed gas in a common bypass flue, it does create potential problems mixing cool ambient air with hot flue gas.

  4. Construction materials as a waste management solution for cellulose sludge.

    PubMed

    Modolo, R; Ferreira, V M; Machado, L M; Rodrigues, M; Coelho, I

    2011-02-01

    Sustainable waste management system for effluents treatment sludge has been a pressing issue for pulp and paper sector. Recycling is always recommended in terms of environmental sustainability. Following an approach of waste valorisation, this work aims to demonstrate the technical viability of producing fiber-cement roof sheets incorporating cellulose primary sludge generated on paper and pulp mills. From the results obtained with preliminary studies it was possible to verify the possibility of producing fiber-cement sheets by replacing 25% of the conventional used virgin long fiber by primary effluent treatment cellulose sludge. This amount of incorporation was tested on an industrial scale. Environmental parameters related to water and waste, as well as tests for checking the quality of the final product was performed. These control parameters involved total solids in suspension, dissolved salts, chlorides, sulphates, COD, metals content. In the product, parameters like moisture, density and strength were controlled. The results showed that it is possible to replace the virgin long fibers pulp by primary sludge without impacts in final product characteristics and on the environment. This work ensures the elimination of significant waste amounts, which are nowadays sent to landfill, as well as reduces costs associated with the standard raw materials use in the fiber-cement industrial sector.

  5. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher

    2013-04-19

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  6. Management of nuclear materials in an R D environment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.G.; Roth, S.B.; Jones, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary R D organization and, as such, its nuclear materials inventory is diverse. Accordingly, major inventories of isotopes such as Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-242, U-235, Th, tritium, and deuterium, and lesser amounts of isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and exotic isotopes such as berkelium must be managed in accordance with Department of Energy Orders and Laboratory policies. Los Alamos also acts as a national resource for many one-of-a-kind materials which are supplied to universities, industry, and other government agencies within the US and throughout the world. Management of these materials requires effective interaction and communication with many nuclear materials custodians residing in over forty technical groups as well as effective interaction with numerous outside organizations. This paper discusses the role, philosophy, and organizational structure of Nuclear Materials Management at Los Alamos and also briefly presents results of two special nuclear materials management projects: 1- Revision of Item Description Codes for use in the Los Alamos nuclear material data base and 2- The recommendation of new economic discard limits for Pu-239. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Management of nuclear materials in a R and D environment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.G.; Roth, S.B.; Jones, S.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary R and D organization and, as such, its nuclear materials inventory is diverse. Accordingly, major inventories of isotopes such as Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-242, U-235, Th, tritium, and deuterium, and lesser amounts of isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and exotic isotopes such as berkelium must be managed in accordance with Department of Energy Orders and Laboratory policies. Los Alamos also acts as a national resource for many one-of-a-kind materials which are supplied to universities, industry, and other government agencies within the U.S. and throughout the world. Management of these materials requires effective interaction and communication with many nuclear materials custodians residing in over forty technical groups as well as effective interaction with numerous outside organizations. This paper discusses the role, philosophy, and organizational structure of Nuclear Materials Management at Los Alamos and also briefly presents results of two special nuclear materials management projects: Revision of Item Description Codes for use in the Los Alamos nuclear material data base and The recommendation of new economic discard limits for Pu-239.

  8. Evaluation of bedding and nesting materials for laboratory mice by preference tests.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohei; Shimosaki, Shunsuke; Tongu, Miki; Kobayashi, Yuta; Nabika, Toru; Nomura, Masato; Yamada, Takaya

    2007-10-01

    Bedding and nesting materials can improve the health and environmental welfare of laboratory mice. This study was carried out to examine which items are actually preferred by mice. Two series of studies were performed on four types of floor-covering materials (Wood-shavings (Clean-chip), Cloth (Agrebe), Recycled-paper (Paper-clean), Paper (Care-feeaz), and on four types of nesting materials (Recycled-paper (Shepherd-shack), Cloth (Agrebe), Wood (Wood-cylinder), and Polycarbonate (Mouse-igloo). Preference of bedding materials was judged by the time length of staying in a cage. The results indicate that mice stayed in the cloth material (Agrebe) longer than in other bedding materials (light 51.1 +/- 5.3%, dark 51.5 +/- 2.6%). In the second experiment, the duration of stay in Agrebe was significantly longer than that in the other nesting materials in the light phase (70.9 +/- 2.4%). In the dark phase, staying time both in Agrebe and Shepherd-shack were significantly longer. These data suggest that cloth bedding and nesting is recommended for the environmental enrichment of laboratory mice.

  9. Lewis' enhanced laboratory for research into the fatigue and constitutive behavior of high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1985-01-01

    Lewis Research Center's high temperature fatigue laboratory has undergone significant changes resulting in the addition of several new experimental capabilities. New materials testing systems have been installed enabling research to be conducted in multiaxial fatigue and deformation at high temperature, as well as cumulative creep-fatigue damage wherein the relative failure-life levels are widely separated. A key component of the new high-temperature fatigue and structures laboratory is a local, distributed computer system whose hardware and software architecture emphasizes a high degree of configurability, which in turn, enables the researcher to tailor a solution to the problem at hand.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  11. Construction of a test embankment using a sand-tire shred mixture as fill material.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungmin; Prezzi, Monica; Siddiki, Nayyar Zia; Kim, Bumjoo

    2006-01-01

    Use of tire shreds in construction projects, such as highway embankments, is becoming an accepted way of beneficially recycling scrap tires. However, in the last decade there was a decline in the use of pure tire shreds as fill materials in embankment construction, as they are susceptible to fire hazards due to the development of exothermic reactions. Tire shred-sand mixtures, on the other hand, were found to be effective in inhibiting exothermic reactions. When compared with pure tire shreds, tire shred-sand mixtures are less compressible and have higher shear strength. However, the literature contains limited information on the use of tire shred-soil mixtures as a fill material. The objectives of this paper are to discuss and evaluate the feasibility of using tire shred-sand mixtures as a fill material in embankment construction. A test embankment constructed using a 50/50 mixture, by volume, of tire shreds and sand was instrumented and monitored to: (a) determine total and differential settlements; (b) evaluate the environmental impact of the embankment construction on the groundwater quality due to leaching of fill material; and (c) study the temperature variation inside the embankment. The findings in this research indicate that mixtures of tire shreds and sand are viable materials for embankment construction.

  12. Estimating construction and demolition debris generation using a materials flow analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Cochran, K M; Townsend, T G

    2010-11-01

    The magnitude and composition of a region's construction and demolition (C&D) debris should be understood when developing rules, policies and strategies for managing this segment of the solid waste stream. In the US, several national estimates have been conducted using a weight-per-construction-area approximation; national estimates using alternative procedures such as those used for other segments of the solid waste stream have not been reported for C&D debris. This paper presents an evaluation of a materials flow analysis (MFA) approach for estimating C&D debris generation and composition for a large region (the US). The consumption of construction materials in the US and typical waste factors used for construction materials purchasing were used to estimate the mass of solid waste generated as a result of construction activities. Debris from demolition activities was predicted from various historical construction materials consumption data and estimates of average service lives of the materials. The MFA approach estimated that approximately 610-78 × 10(6)Mg of C&D debris was generated in 2002. This predicted mass exceeds previous estimates using other C&D debris predictive methodologies and reflects the large waste stream that exists.

  13. WET-WEATHER POLLUTION PREVENTION THROUGH MATERIALS SUBSTITUTION AS PART OF INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature review of urban stormwater runoff and building/construction materials has shown that many materials such as galvanized metal, concrete, asphalt, and wood products, have the potential to release pollutants into urban stormwater runoff and snowmelt. However, much of th...

  14. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Construction Electrician, 3-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course contains materials for both classroom (and shop) instruction and independent study in the skills needed by construction electricians. It was adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational education. Students completing the course will be able to perform apprentice duties pertaining to the installation of overhead…

  15. 46 CFR 160.062-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Lifesaving Equipment, Hydraulic and Manual § 160.062-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance... this subpart. In addition, all metals and materials used in a hydraulic release must be compatible with... coating on the parts of a hydraulic release are not acceptable. The criteria for accepting any...

  16. 46 CFR 160.062-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Lifesaving Equipment, Hydraulic and Manual § 160.062-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance... this subpart. In addition, all metals and materials used in a hydraulic release must be compatible with... coating on the parts of a hydraulic release are not acceptable. The criteria for accepting any...

  17. 46 CFR 160.062-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Lifesaving Equipment, Hydraulic and Manual § 160.062-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance... this subpart. In addition, all metals and materials used in a hydraulic release must be compatible with... coating on the parts of a hydraulic release are not acceptable. The criteria for accepting any...

  18. 48 CFR 52.225-11 - Buy American Act-Construction Materials under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... country into a new and different construction material distinct from the materials from which it was..., Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia... another country, has been substantially transformed in a FTA country into a new and different...

  19. 48 CFR 52.225-11 - Buy American Act-Construction Materials under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... country into a new and different construction material distinct from the materials from which it was..., Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau... country, has been substantially transformed in a FTA country into a new and different...

  20. 48 CFR 52.225-11 - Buy American Act-Construction Materials under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... country into a new and different construction material distinct from the materials from which it was..., Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia... another country, has been substantially transformed in a FTA country into a new and different...

  1. 48 CFR 52.225-11 - Buy American Act-Construction Materials under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... country into a new and different construction material distinct from the materials from which it was..., Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali,...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF COMMON METHODOLOGY TO CALCULATE CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Taro; Takimoto, Masamichi; Sone, Shinri; Kishida, Hiroyuki; Hanaki, Keisuke; Fujita, Tsuyoshi

    Concerning CO2 emissions related to infrastructure development, common calculation methodology has not been certified. Common calculation methodology is necessary to know effective approach toward total CO2 emissions reduction. In this study, we develop a calculation method of CO2 emissions related to infrastructure development and propose it as common methodology. As the first step, we focus our attention on major construction materials, because the manufacturing of construction materials occupies a large part of the total CO2 emissions. The calculation method should satisfy the following requirements: (1) covering all CO2 emissions, (2) based on material quantities, (3) having clear evidence, (4) categorizing materials from perspective of those concerned with infrastructure development, (5) able to reflect site oriented data, and (6) updated annually. The developed method combines the pile-up and the input-output technique to satisfy the requirements above. The major part of CO2 emissions is calculated with material based quantities by applying the pile-up to input of primary material and energy consumption. Complementary use of the input-output, we developed, covers all the domestic activities, includes product developments, fixed capital formations, and the others. An estimation, using official and industry-based statistics for some major construction materials such as cement and aggregate, confirms that the pile-up calculates approximately 90% of CO2 emissions due to the manufacturing activities. The method also enables us to update ordinary CO2 emissions of the construction materials annually.

  3. Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Views about Using Computer-Based Instructional Materials in Constructing Mathematical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukova-Guzel, Esra; Canturk-Gunhan, Berna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine prospective mathematics teachers' views about using computer-based instructional materials in constructing mathematical concepts and to reveal how the sample computer-based instructional materials for different mathematical concepts altered their views. This is a qualitative study involving twelve…

  4. 46 CFR 160.037-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke... manufacturer and approved by the Commandant. The color of the tube shall be orange. The combustible materials... tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Hand orange smoke distress signals shall be of first...

  5. 46 CFR 160.037-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke... manufacturer and approved by the Commandant. The color of the tube shall be orange. The combustible materials... tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Hand orange smoke distress signals shall be of first...

  6. 46 CFR 160.037-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke... manufacturer and approved by the Commandant. The color of the tube shall be orange. The combustible materials... tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Hand orange smoke distress signals shall be of first...

  7. 46 CFR 160.037-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke... manufacturer and approved by the Commandant. The color of the tube shall be orange. The combustible materials... tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Hand orange smoke distress signals shall be of first...

  8. 46 CFR 160.037-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke... manufacturer and approved by the Commandant. The color of the tube shall be orange. The combustible materials... tropical climates, or both. (b) Workmanship. Hand orange smoke distress signals shall be of first...

  9. Laboratory-scale testing of non-consumable anode materials: Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect

    Marschman, S.C.

    1989-03-01

    Development of inert anode materials for use in the electrolytic production of aluminum is one of the major goals of the Inert Electrodes Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs, at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objectives of the Materials Development and Testing Task include the selection, fabrication, and evaluation of candidate non-consumable anode materials. Research performed in FY 1987 focused primarily on the development and evaluation of cermets that are based on the two-phase oxide system NiO/endash/NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and contain a third, electrically conductive metal phase composed primarily of copper and nickel. The efforts of this task were focused on three areas: materials fabrication, small-scale materials testing, and laboratory-scale testing. This report summarizes the development and testing results of the laboratory-scale testing effort during FY 1987. The laboratory-scale electrolysis testing effort was instrumental in partially determining electrolysis cell operating parameters. Although not optimized, NiO/endash/NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4//endash/Cu-based cermets were successfully operated for 20 h in cryolite-based electrolytes ranging in bath ratios from 1.1 to 1.35, in electrolytes that contained 1.5 wt % LiF, and at conditions slightly less than Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ saturation. The operating conditions that lead to anode degradation have been partly identified, and rudimentary control methods have been developed to ensure proper operation of small electrolysis cells using nonconsumable anodes. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  11. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory April 29-May 2, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2012-04-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses Capability Reviews to assess the quality and institutional integration of science, technology and engineering (STE) and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of LANL STE. The capabilities are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory and therefore will include experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines from multiple line organizations. Capability Reviews are designed to provide a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. The principal product of the Capability Review is the report that includes the review committee's assessments, recommendations, and recommendations for STE.

  12. Description of the Structural Materials Information Center being established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, B.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a Structural aging Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify potential structural safety issues related to continued service of nuclear power plants and to establish criteria for evaluating and resolving these issues. One of the tasks in this program focuses on the establishment of a Structural Materials Information Center where data and information on the time variation of concrete and concrete-related material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors will be collected and assembled into a database. This database will be used to assist in the prediction of potential long-term deterioration of critical structural components in nuclear power plants and to establish limits on hostile environmental exposure for these structures and materials. Materials property data and information will be collected at the Structural Materials Information Center from open literature, published references, and identifiable sources. Initially, the database will include portland cement concrete, metallic reinforcement, prestressing tendon and structural steel materials. Then, as data and information for other material systems are obtained, the database will be expanded and updated. The database will be developed and presented in two complementary formats. The Structural Materials Handbook will be published in four volumes as an expandable, hard copy handbook. The Materials Electronic Database will be developed to reflect the same information as contained in the handbook, but will be formatted for use on an IBM or IBM-compatible personal computer.

  13. Using experimental design modules for process characterization in manufacturing/materials processes laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ankenman, Bruce; Ermer, Donald; Clum, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Modules dealing with statistical experimental design (SED), process modeling and improvement, and response surface methods have been developed and tested in two laboratory courses. One course was a manufacturing processes course in Mechanical Engineering and the other course was a materials processing course in Materials Science and Engineering. Each module is used as an 'experiment' in the course with the intent that subsequent course experiments will use SED methods for analysis and interpretation of data. Evaluation of the modules' effectiveness has been done by both survey questionnaires and inclusion of the module methodology in course examination questions. Results of the evaluation have been very positive. Those evaluation results and details of the modules' content and implementation are presented. The modules represent an important component for updating laboratory instruction and to provide training in quality for improved engineering practice.

  14. Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ratzel, A.C. III

    1998-09-01

    This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  15. SRB Materials and Processes Assessment from Laboratory and Ocean Environmental Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Materials and Processes Laboratory evaluation of Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB) and Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) candidate material, both in-house and with ocean exposure tests at Panama City and Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida is presented. Early sample tests showed excellent seawater corrosion resistance for inconel 718 and titanium 6A1-4V alloys. Considerable corrosion and biofouling occurred with bare 2219-T87 aluminum. Subsequent tests conclusively demonstrated that epoxy coatings prevented corrosion of 2219-T87 aluminum as long as the coatings stays intact. The results and assessment of the series of ocean environmental tests that were conducted are also presented.

  16. Space Station microgravity and materials processing facility A national laboratory dedicated to U.S. interests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.; Pevey, E. R.; Mookherji, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Microgravity and Materials Processing Facility (MMPF) of the Space Station is examined. The MMPF is designed to accommodate individual experiments and associated hardware and is to be housed in the Manufacturing and Technology Laboratory Module. The objectives of the microgravity and materials processing study and the user, experiment/equipment, MMPF system requirements, and programmatics and planning development tasks of the study are described. Consideration is given to the acceleration environment, on-orbit sample preparation and analysis, mission-time-line analyses, and payload complement trades. Diagrams of the MMPF are presented.

  17. 40 CFR 262.206 - Labeling and management standards for containers of unwanted material in the laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.206 Labeling and management standards for containers of unwanted material in the laboratory. An eligible academic entity must manage... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling and management standards...

  18. Analysis of Material Handling Safety in Construction Sites and Countermeasures for Effective Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C N Anil; Sakthivel, M; Elangovan, R K; Arularasu, M

    2015-01-01

    One of many hazardous workplaces includes the construction sites as they involve several dangerous tasks. Many studies have revealed that material handling equipment is a major cause of accidents at these sites. Though safety measures are being followed and monitored continuously, accident rates are still high as either workers are unaware of hazards or the safety regulations are not being strictly followed. This paper analyses the safety management systems at construction sites through means of questionnaire surveys with employees, specifically referring to safety of material handling equipment. Based on results of the questionnaire surveys, two construction sites were selected for a safety education program targeting worker safety related to material handling equipment. Knowledge levels of the workers were gathered before and after the program and results obtained were subjected to a t-test analysis to mark significance level of the conducted safety education program.

  19. Development of construction materials like concrete from lunar soils without water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Saadatmanesh, H.; Frantziskonis, G.

    1989-01-01

    The development of construction materials such as concrete from lunar soils without the use of water requires a different methodology than that used for conventional terrestrial concrete. A unique approach is attempted that utilizes factors such as initial vacuum and then cyclic loading to enhance the mechanical properties of dry materials similar to those available on the moon. The application of such factors is expected to allow reorientation, and coming together, of particles of the materials toward the maximum theoretical density. If such a density can provide deformation and strength properties for even a limited type of construction, the approach can have significant application potential, although other factors such as heat and chemicals may be needed for specific construction objectives.

  20. Analysis of Material Handling Safety in Construction Sites and Countermeasures for Effective Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Anil Kumar, C. N.; Sakthivel, M.; Elangovan, R. K.; Arularasu, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of many hazardous workplaces includes the construction sites as they involve several dangerous tasks. Many studies have revealed that material handling equipment is a major cause of accidents at these sites. Though safety measures are being followed and monitored continuously, accident rates are still high as either workers are unaware of hazards or the safety regulations are not being strictly followed. This paper analyses the safety management systems at construction sites through means of questionnaire surveys with employees, specifically referring to safety of material handling equipment. Based on results of the questionnaire surveys, two construction sites were selected for a safety education program targeting worker safety related to material handling equipment. Knowledge levels of the workers were gathered before and after the program and results obtained were subjected to a t-test analysis to mark significance level of the conducted safety education program. PMID:26446572

  1. Fusion Materials Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Wiffen, F. W.; Katoh, Yutai; Melton, Stephanie G.

    2015-12-01

    The realization of fusion energy is a formidable challenge with significant achievements resulting from close integration of the plasma physics and applied technology disciplines. Presently, the most significant technological challenge for the near-term experiments such as ITER, and next generation fusion power systems, is the inability of current materials and components to withstand the harsh fusion nuclear environment. The overarching goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) fusion materials program is to provide the applied materials science support and understanding to underpin the ongoing Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science fusion energy program while developing materials for fusion power systems. In doing so the program continues to be integrated both with the larger United States (US) and international fusion materials communities, and with the international fusion design and technology communities.This document provides a summary of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 activities supporting the Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Materials Research for Magnetic Fusion Energy (AT-60-20-10-0) carried out by ORNL. The organization of this report is mainly by material type, with sections on specific technical activities. Four projects selected in the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicitation of late 2011 and funded in FY2012-FY2014 are identified by “FOA” in the titles. This report includes the final funded work of these projects, although ORNL plans to continue some of this work within the base program.

  2. 'The artist's piece is already in the stone': constructing creativity in paleontology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Caitlin Donahue

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory technicians are typically portrayed as manual workers following routine procedures to produce scientific data. However, technicians in vertebrate paleontology laboratories often describe their work in terms of creativity and artistry. Fossil specimens undergo extensive preparation--including rock removal, damage repair, and reconstruction of missing parts--to become accessible to researchers. Technicians called 'fossil preparators' choose, apply, and sometimes invent these preparation methods. They have no formal training, no standard protocols, and few publications to consult on techniques. Despite the resulting diversity of people and practices, preparators and their work are usually absent from research publications, making them 'invisible technicians' in Steven Shapin's sense. But preparators reject the view of their work as predictable or simple; in particular, many preparators value art training, the aesthetics of prepared fossils, and the process of creative problem-solving in their work. Based on interviews and participant observation and drawing from literature in science studies, sociology of work, and anthropology of craft, I ask why these technicians compare themselves with artists and how this portrayal affects scientific practice and social order in laboratories. I argue that associating artistry and creativity with their work distances preparators from ideas of unskilled technical work and technicians' low status, thus improving their social role in the laboratory community and preserving their power over laboratory practices.

  3. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoniette J

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen STE capabilities. Table 1

  4. Stochastic identification of composite material properties from limited experimental databases, part I: Experimental database construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrez, Loujaine; Moens, David; Vandepitte, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Composite materials exhibit variability and uncertainties in their material properties with relation to their compositions and manufacturing processes. Conventional deterministic identification of composite material properties involves numerical-experimental characterisation techniques. These techniques do not account for the associated spatial variability and uncertainties in the identified properties. The objective of this work is to characterise spatially-stochastic macroscopic material properties of heterogeneous composite fabrics from limited-size macro-scale experimental measurements. The work is organised in a sequence of two papers. The first paper, present manuscript, is concerned with the construction of an experimental database of macroscopic material properties of heterogeneous composite fabrics from limited-size macro-scale experimental measurements. The mobility frequency response functions from a number of cantilever-beam specimens of the composite material are measured at selected points along each beam. These direct measurements are introduced to a set of deterministic inverse problems in order to reconstruct a database of heterogeneous Young's modulus spatial fields. The constructed database will be used, in the second paper of the sequence, to construct a stochastic model of the material properties that account for both aleatory uncertainties, related to sample inter-variability, as well as epistemic uncertainties due to insufficiency of the available data.

  5. Materials capability review Los Alamos National Laboratory, May 3-6, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    conducting science, technology and engineering. The specific charge for the Materials Capability Review is to assess the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled, 'First Principles Predictive Capabilities for Transuranic Materials: Mott Insulators to Correlated Metals' using the criteria performance, quality, and relevance for the current status of the project. The committee is requested to provide advice on future direction of the project.

  6. Laboratory illustrations of the transformations and deposition of inorganic material in biomass boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    Boilers fired with certain woody biomass fuels have proven to be a viable, reliable means of generating electrical power. The behavior of the inorganic material in die fuels is one of the greatest challenges to burning the large variety of fuels available to biomass combustors. Unmanageable ash deposits and interactions between ash and bed material cause loss in holler availability and significant increase in maintenance costs. The problems related to the behavior of inorganic material now exceed all other combustion-related challenges in biomass-fired boilers. This paper reviews the mechanisms of ash deposit formation, the relationship between fuel properties and ash deposit properties, and a series of laboratory tests in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor designed to illustrate how fuel type, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions impact ash deposit properties.

  7. Laboratory illustrations of the transformations and deposition of inorganic material in biomass boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    Boilers fired with certain woody biomass fuels have proven to be a viable, reliable means of generating electrical power. The behavior of the inorganic material in the fuels is one of the greatest challenges to burning the large variety of fuels available to biomass combustors. Unmanageable ash deposits and interactions between ash and bed material cause loss in boiler availability and significant increase in maintenance costs. The problems related to the behavior of inorganic material now exceed all other combustion-related challenges in biomass-fired boilers. This paper reviews the mechanisms of ash deposit formation, the relationship between fuel properties and ash deposit properties, and a series of laboratory tests in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor designed to illustrate how fuel type, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions impact ash deposit properties.

  8. Laboratory test methods for evaluating the fire response of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    The test methods which were developed or evaluated were intended to serve as means of comparing materials on the basis of specific responses under specific sets of test conditions, using apparatus, facilities, and personnel that would be within the capabilities of perhaps the majority of laboratories. Priority was given to test methods which showed promise of addressing the pre-ignition state of a potential fire. These test methods were intended to indicate which materials may present more hazard than others under specific test conditions. These test methods are discussed and arranged according to the stage of a fire to which they are most relevant. Some observations of material performance which resulted from this work are also discussed.

  9. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory - environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhower, B.M.; Oakes, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    In the Federal Register of May 19, 1980, the US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated final hazardous waste regulations according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. The major substantive portions of these regulations went into effect on November 19, 1980, and established a federal program to provide comprehensive regulation of hazardous waste from its generation to its disposal. In an effort to comply with these regulations, a Hazardous Materials Management and Control Program was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program is administered by two Hazardous Materials Coordinators, who together with various support groups, ensure that all hazardous materials and wastes are handled in such a manner that all personnel, the general public, and the environment are adequately protected.

  10. Laboratory illustrations of the transformations and deposition of inorganic material in biomass boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.

    1995-08-01

    Boilers fired with certain woody biomass fuels have proven to be a viable, reliable means of generating electrical power. The behavior of the inorganic material in the fuels is one of the greatest challenges to burning the large variety of fuels available to biomass combustors. Unmanageable ash deposits and interactions between ash and bed material cause loss in boiler availability and significant increase in maintenance costs. The problems related to the behavior of inorganic material now exceed all other combustion-related challenges in biomass-fired boilers. This paper reviews the mechanisms of ash deposit formation, the relationship between fuel properties and ash deposit properties, and a series of laboratory tests in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor designed to illustrate how fuel type, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions impact ash deposit properties.

  11. A precise laboratory goniometer system to collect spectral BRDF data of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Guangping; Jiao, Ziti; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Hu; Dong, Yadong

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a precise laboratory goniometer system to quickly collect bidirectional reflectance distribution factor(BRDF)of typical materials such soil, canopy and artificial materials in the laboratory. The system consists of the goniometer, SVC HR1024 spectroradiometer, and xenon long-arc lamp as light source. the innovation of cantilever slab can reduce the shadow of the goniometer in the principle plane. The geometric precision of the footprint centre is better than +/-4cm in most azimuth directions, and the angle-controlling accuracy is better than 0.5°. The light source keeps good stability, with 0.8% irradiance decrease in 3 hours. But the large areal heterogeneity of the light source increase the data processing difficulty to capture the accurate BRDF. First measurements are taken from soil in a resolution of 15° and 30° in zenith and azimuth direction respectively, with the +/-50° biggest view angle. More observations are taken in the hot-spot direction. The system takes about 40 minutes to complete all measurements. A spectralon panel is measured at the beginning and end of the whole period. A simple interactive interface on the computer can automatically control all operations of the goniometer and data-processing. The laboratory experiment of soil layer and grass lawn shows that the goniometer can capture the the multi-angle variation of BRDF.

  12. Fracture toughness determination of dental materials by laboratory testing and finite element models.

    PubMed

    Pidaparti, R M; Beatty, M W

    1995-03-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of finite element analysis in predicting the stress intensity factor (KIC) for three types of dental materials: a glass ionomer, a dental amalgam, and a composite resin. Laboratory tests were conducted on small single-edge notch specimens loaded in three-point bending to determine values for fracture toughness (KQ). Using the dimensions measured for each laboratory specimen, a J integral approach was employed to calculate KIC using finite element analysis. Both two-dimensional plane strain and three-dimensional models were used in determining KIC for each specimen, and these values were compared to the KQ values obtained from laboratory tests. The results indicated that no significant differences existed between laboratory results and those obtained from both two- and three-dimensional finite element models (P > .85). For the three-dimensional model, values for KIC were found to vary across the specimen thickness, with the values at the center of the specimen closely paralleling those obtained from the two-dimensional plane strain model. It was concluded that the two-dimensional plane strain J integral technique was as effective as the three-dimensional technique in calculating values for KIC.

  13. Constructing Material Interfaces from Data Sets with Volume-Fraction Information

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnell, K.; Duchaineau, M.A.; Schikore, D.R.; Hamann, B.; Joy, K.I.

    2000-03-29

    We present a new algorithm for material boundary interface reconstruction from data sets containing volume fractions. We transform the reconstruction problem to a problem that analyzes the dual data set, where each vertex in the dual mesh has an associated barycentric coordinate tuple that represents the fraction of each material present. After constructing the dual tetrahedral mesh from the original mesh, we construct material boundaries by mapping a tetrahedron into barycentric space and calculating the intersections with Voronoi cells in barycentric space. These intersections are mapped back to the original physical space and triangulated to form the boundary surface approximation. This algorithm can be applied to any grid structure and can treat any number of materials per element/vertex.

  14. Homogeneity study of a corn flour laboratory reference material candidate for inorganic analysis.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Ana Maria Pinto; Dos Santos, Liz Oliveira; Brandao, Geovani Cardoso; Leao, Danilo Junqueira; Bernedo, Alfredo Victor Bellido; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a homogeneity study of a corn flour reference material candidate for inorganic analysis is presented. Seven kilograms of corn flour were used to prepare the material, which was distributed among 100 bottles. The elements Ca, K, Mg, P, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn and Mo were quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) after acid digestion procedure. The method accuracy was confirmed by analyzing the rice flour certified reference material, NIST 1568a. All results were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and principal component analysis (PCA). In the study, a sample mass of 400mg was established as the minimum mass required for analysis, according to the PCA. The between-bottle test was performed by analyzing 9 bottles of the material. Subsamples of a single bottle were analyzed for the within-bottle test. No significant differences were observed for the results obtained through the application of both statistical methods. This fact demonstrates that the material is homogeneous for use as a laboratory reference material.

  15. High Temperature Materials Laboratory fourth annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1991-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its fourth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 118 nonproprietary agreements (62 university and 56 industry) and 28 proprietary agreements (2 university, 26 industry) are now in effect. Five other government facilities have also participated in the user program. Sixty-free nonproprietary research proposals (38 from university, 26 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and four proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1991 are summarized.

  16. High Temperature Materials Laboratory fifth annual report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1992-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its fifth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy (DOE) User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Growth of the User Program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions executing user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 145 nonproprietary agreements (77 university and 68 industry) and 30 proprietary agreements (2 university, 28 industry) are now in effect. Five other government facilities have also participated in the User Program. Thirty-six states are represented by these interactions. Eighty-one nonproprietary research proposals (44 from university, 36 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and six proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1992 are summarized.

  17. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  18. High Temperature Materials Laboratory sixth annual report, October 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1993-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its sixth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the User Program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions executing user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 172 nonproprietary agreements (88 university and 84 industry) and 35 proprietary agreements, (2 university, 33 industry) are now in effect. Six other government facilities have also participated in the User Program. Thirty-eight states are represented by these interactions. Ninety-four nonproprietary research proposals (44 from universities, 47 from industry, and 3 from other government facilities) and three proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Nonproprietary research projects active in FY 1993 are summarized.

  19. Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zaeh, R.A.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

  20. Laboratory and field measurements of vapors generated by organic materials in drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Candler, J.; Churan, M.; Conn, L.

    1996-11-01

    In an era of increasing awareness of worker health issues one of the key concerns in exploration activities is the exposure of wellsite personnel to vapors generated by organic materials in drilling fluids. Areas on the drilling location with the highest exposure potentials are the shale shakers and mud pits. These areas are often enclosed in rooms and ventilated to prevent unhealthy levels of vapors from accumulating. In continuing efforts to minimize health risks, new products are evaluated to minimize the volatility of organic materials used in drilling fluids. This study presents a laboratory technique for measuring vapors generated from organic materials in drilling fluids. Using this technique, data will be presented comparing the volume of vapors generated from diesel oils, mineral oils, synthetic fluids and a water-miscible glycol. Field data collected from the shaker and mud pit areas of drilling operations will be used to validate the laboratory study to field conditions. The potential health effects of the collected vapors will be reviewed.

  1. 49 CFR 178.358-2 - Materials of construction and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equivalent. (d) Fire-retardant (intumescent) paint must be applied to any wood blocking which is located at... Materials of construction and other requirements. (a) Phenolic foam insulation must be fire resistant and... provide pressure relief during the insulation foaming and in the event of a fire. These holes, which...

  2. 49 CFR 178.358-2 - Materials of construction and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... equivalent. (d) Fire-retardant (intumescent) paint must be applied to any wood blocking which is located at... Materials of construction and other requirements. (a) Phenolic foam insulation must be fire resistant and... provide pressure relief during the insulation foaming and in the event of a fire. These holes, which...

  3. 49 CFR 178.358-2 - Materials of construction and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... equivalent. (d) Fire-retardant (intumescent) paint must be applied to any wood blocking which is located at... Materials of construction and other requirements. (a) Phenolic foam insulation must be fire resistant and... provide pressure relief during the insulation foaming and in the event of a fire. These holes, which...

  4. GROUND WATER ISSUE: NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS COMPATIBILITY WITH MATERIALS USED IN WELL CONSTRUCTION, SAMPLING, AND REMEDIATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This issue paper provides a comprehensive literature review regarding the compatibility of NAPLs with a wide variety of materials used at hazardous waste sites. A condensed reference table of compatibility data for 207 chemicals and 28 commonly used well construction and sampling...

  5. 48 CFR 252.225-7045 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material Under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Balance of Payments... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7045 Balance of Payments... clause: Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material Under Trade Agreements (MAY 2012)...

  6. 48 CFR 252.225-7045 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material Under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Balance of Payments... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7045 Balance of Payments... clause: Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material Under Trade Agreements (NOV 2009)...

  7. 48 CFR 252.225-7044 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Balance of Payments... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7044 Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material. As prescribed in 225.7503(a)(1), use the following clause: Balance of Payments...

  8. 48 CFR 252.225-7044 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Balance of Payments... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7044 Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material. As prescribed in 225.7503(a), use the following clause: Balance of Payments...

  9. 48 CFR 252.225-7045 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material Under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Balance of Payments... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7045 Balance of Payments... clause: Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material Under Trade Agreements (JUN 2011)...

  10. 48 CFR 252.225-7044 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Balance of Payments... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7044 Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material. As prescribed in 225.7503(a)(1), use the following clause: Balance of Payments...

  11. 48 CFR 252.225-7044 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Balance of Payments... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7044 Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material. As prescribed in 225.7503(a)(1), use the following clause: Balance of Payments...

  12. 48 CFR 252.225-7045 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material Under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Balance of Payments... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7045 Balance of Payments... clause: Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material Under Trade Agreements (OCT 2013)...

  13. 48 CFR 252.225-7045 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material Under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Balance of Payments... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7045 Balance of Payments... clause: Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material Under Trade Agreements (AUG 2013)...

  14. 48 CFR 252.225-7044 - Balance of Payments Program-Construction Material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Balance of Payments... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7044 Balance of Payments Program—Construction Material. As prescribed in 225.7503(a)(1), use the following clause: Balance of Payments...

  15. Construction Mechanic Part II, 8-6. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, is the second of a two-course series that teaches students to maintain and repair automotive and construction equipment using either gasoline or diesel engines. It covers basic chassis and power train troubleshooting, diagnosis, and adjustment…

  16. 75 FR 62181 - Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge Rehabilitation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... Rehabilitation AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Section 1114 of the... materials used in new Federal-aid bridge construction and bridge rehabilitation projects. As part of the... rehabilitation projects. Data on Federal-aid and non-Federal-aid highway bridges are included in the report...

  17. 29 CFR 779.335 - Sales of building materials for residential or farm building construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sales of building materials for residential or farm building construction. 779.335 Section 779.335 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT...

  18. 46 CFR 160.040-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Appliance, Impulse-Projected Rocket Type (and Equipment) § 160.040-3 Materials, construction, workmanship...-projected rocket type line-throwing appliances and equipment shall be of good quality suitable for the... operation aboard vessels at sea. (c) Workmanship. Impulse-projected rocket type line-throwing...

  19. 46 CFR 160.040-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Appliance, Impulse-Projected Rocket Type (and Equipment) § 160.040-3 Materials, construction, workmanship...-projected rocket type line-throwing appliances and equipment shall be of good quality suitable for the... operation aboard vessels at sea. (c) Workmanship. Impulse-projected rocket type line-throwing...

  20. 46 CFR 160.040-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Appliance, Impulse-Projected Rocket Type (and Equipment) § 160.040-3 Materials, construction, workmanship...-projected rocket type line-throwing appliances and equipment shall be of good quality suitable for the... operation aboard vessels at sea. (c) Workmanship. Impulse-projected rocket type line-throwing...

  1. 46 CFR 160.040-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Appliance, Impulse-Projected Rocket Type (and Equipment) § 160.040-3 Materials, construction, workmanship...-projected rocket type line-throwing appliances and equipment shall be of good quality suitable for the... operation aboard vessels at sea. (c) Workmanship. Impulse-projected rocket type line-throwing...

  2. 46 CFR 160.040-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Appliance, Impulse-Projected Rocket Type (and Equipment) § 160.040-3 Materials, construction, workmanship...-projected rocket type line-throwing appliances and equipment shall be of good quality suitable for the... operation aboard vessels at sea. (c) Workmanship. Impulse-projected rocket type line-throwing...

  3. Construction and testing of simple airfoils to demonstrate structural design, materials choice, and composite concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunnell, L. Roy; Piippo, Steven W.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this educational exercise is to have students build and evaluate simple wing structures, and in doing so, learn about materials choices and lightweight construction methods. A list of equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  4. 29 CFR 779.335 - Sales of building materials for residential or farm building construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sales of building materials for residential or farm building construction. 779.335 Section 779.335 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND... for Certain Retail or Service Establishments Sales Not Made for Resale § 779.335 Sales of...

  5. Construction Surveying, 3-27. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This short course on construction surveying was developed from military curriculum materials for use in technical and vocational education programs. Students completing the course should be able to perform engineering surveys related to area and route surveying (knowledge of basic survey techniques is a prerequisite). The course is divided into…

  6. Construction Mechanic Part I, 8-5. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, is the first of a two-course series that teaches students to maintain and repair automotive and construction equipment using either gasoline or diesel engines. It covers basic combustion engine principles and electrical system principles as well…

  7. EFFECTIVE REMOVAL OF TCE IN A LABORATORY MODEL OF A PRB CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water contaminated with TCE is commonly treated with a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) constructed with zero-valence iron. The cost of iron as the reactive matrix has driven a search for less costly alternatives, and composted plant mulch has been used as an alternative ...

  8. An Assessment of the Application of Psychomotor Learning Theory Constructs in Preclinical Laboratory Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feil, Philip

    1992-01-01

    A survey investigated the application of constructs related to acquisition of psychomotor skills in the preclinical dental curriculum in 220 departments of operative dentistry, fixed and removable prosthodontics, pediatric dentistry, and periodontics. Results indicate insufficient opportunities for students to define desired outcomes and…

  9. The potential for constructed wetlands to treat alkaline bauxite residue leachate: laboratory investigations.

    PubMed

    R, Buckley; T, Curtin; R, Courtney

    2016-07-01

    High alkalinity (pH > 12) of bauxite residue leachates presents challenges for the long-term storage and managements of the residue. Whilst the use of constructed wetlands is gaining in interest for its use in the treatment of alkaline waters, thus far, there is limited evidence of its suitability for treating NaOH dominated bauxite residue leachate. A series of batch trials were conducted to investigate the potential for constructed wetland conferred mechanisms (dilution water quality, contact with CO2, and substrate type) for treating NaOH solutions to levels permissible for discharge (p < 9). Results demonstrate that significant reductions in solution pH can be achieved depending on the diluting water quality. Levels achieved may not always be suitable for direct discharge (i.e. pH ≤ 9), but further reductions occur with carbonation and soil contact. The extent of pH decrease and the timeframe required are influenced by soil quality, with greater efficiency observed in soils with higher organic matter content. Decrease in solution pH to discharge permit values are possible through a combination of the mechanisms occurring in a constructed wetland. Formation of a calcite precipitate was observed in some treatments and further characterisation by XRD and XPS suggested surface coating with Na2CO3. It is therefore suggested that, under suitable conditions, constructed wetland technology can reduce leachate pH to <9 through mechanisms supporting the precipitation of sodium carbonate from solution. Further trials should investigate the activity under biological conditions representative of an operating constructed wetland.

  10. The use of laboratory methods in contact dermatitis induced by composite materials.

    PubMed

    Ayala, F; Lembo, G; Balato, N; Patruno, C; Scognamiglio, G; Strazzullo, G; de Stefano, S

    1990-05-01

    Thin-layer chromatography, column chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used to investigate the chemical constituents and haptens responsible in 2 different circumstances where allergic contact dermatitis from composite materials was suspected. In an aircraft factory where epoxy resins were used, tetraglycidyl-4,4'-dimethyl dianiline and phenylglycidyl ether were identified as the haptens responsible for an outbreak of contact dermatitis. The role of abietic acid as the main sensitizer in colophony was confirmed in a case of contact dermatitis occurring in a sportsman with an acute eczematous reaction due to a leg bandage. Identification of the chemical sensitizers was possible only by using the aforementioned laboratory methods.

  11. Laboratory experiments for defining scaling relations between rock material properties and rock resistance to erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklar, L. S.; Beyeler, J. D.; Collins, G. C.; Farrow, J. W.; Hsu, L.; Litwin, K. L.; Polito, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Rock resistance to erosion is a key variable that limits rates of morphologic change and mass flux in landscapes. However, we have limited knowledge of how measurable material properties influence rock resistance to specific erosion processes. Rock 'erodibility' is commonly a free parameter in surface process models, where users assign or solve for numerical values that lack meaning outside of the model. Moreover, erodibility parameters often lump material resistance to erosion together with aspects of the forces driving erosion that are not explicitly represented in the model. Laboratory experiments in which rock types are varied, while erosive forces are held constant, can be used to develop scaling relationships between rock properties and erosion resistance for individual detachment mechanisms. With knowledge of why erosion rates vary between rock types for constant erosive forces, laboratory and field experiments that vary erosive intensity can be used to quantify the absolute susceptibility to erosion in physically explicit terms. Here we synthesize data collected over the past decade from a suite of laboratory investigations of rock resistance to wear by sediment particle impacts, and wear of sediment particles themselves, in experiments replicating fluvial and granular flow conditions. Materials tested included: field-sampled bedrock and sediment covering the widest feasible range of apparent durability and lithologic type; synthetic sandstones made from mixtures of sand and Portland cement; and water ice, both pure and containing solid impurities, tested over a wide range of temperatures. Material properties measured included: dry-bulk and saturated density, porosity, tensile strength, fracture toughness, elastic moduli, mineralogy, cement type, and the grain size of mineral crystals and cemented clasts. Erosion rates were measured by mass or volume loss divided by run time, in bedrock abrasion mills, barrel tumblers, and a large rotating drum. We find

  12. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Energy Analysis of Passive House with Variable Construction Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baďurová, Silvia; Ponechal, Radoslav; Ďurica, Pavol

    2013-11-01

    The term "passive house" refers to rigorous and voluntary standards for energy efficiency in a building, reducing its ecological footprint. There are many ways how to build a passive house successfully. These designs as well as construction techniques vary from ordinary timber constructions using packs of straw or constructions of clay. This paper aims to quantify environmental quality of external walls in a passive house, which are made of a timber frame, lightweight concrete blocks and sand-lime bricks in order to determine whether this constructional form provides improved environmental performance. Furthermore, this paper assesses potential benefit of energy savings at heating of houses in which their external walls are made of these three material alternatives. A two storey residential passive house, with floorage of 170.6 m2, was evaluated. Some measurements of air and surface temperatures were done as a calibration etalon for a method of simulation.

  13. A Construction System for CALL Materials from TV News with Captions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Mori, Kazumasa; Nakagawa, Seiichi

    Many language learning materials have been published. In language learning, although repetition training is obviously necessary, it is difficult to maintain the learner's interest/motivation using existing learning materials, because those materials are limited in their scope and contents. In addition, we doubt whether the speech sounds used in most materials are natural in various situations. Nowadays, some TV news programs (CNN, ABC, PBS, NHK, etc.) have closed/open captions corresponding to the announcer's speech. We have developed a system that makes Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) materials for both English learning by Japanese and Japanese learning by foreign students from such captioned newscasts. This system computes the synchronization between captions and speech by using HMMs and a forced alignment algorithm. Materials made by the system have following functions: full/partial text caption display, repetition listening, consulting an electronic dictionary, display of the user's/announcer's sound waveform and pitch contour, and automatic construction of a dictation test. Materials have following advantages: materials present polite and natural speech, various and timely topics. Furthermore, the materials have the following possibility: automatic creation of listening/understanding tests, and storage/retrieval of the many materials. In this paper, firstly, we present the organization of the system. Then, we describe results of questionnaires on trial use of the materials. As the result, we got enough accuracy on the synchronization between captions and speech. Speaking totally, we encouraged to research this system.

  14. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60 Food... § 212.60 What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and..., in-process materials, and finished PET drug products must have and follow written procedures for...

  15. Center for Coal-Derived Low Energy Materials for Sustainable Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, Robert; Robl, Tom; Rathbone, Robert

    2012-06-30

    The overarching goal of this project was to create a sustained center to support the continued development of new products and industries that manufacture construction materials from coal combustion by-products or CCB’s (e.g., cements, grouts, wallboard, masonry block, fillers, roofing materials, etc). Specific objectives includes the development of a research kiln and associated system and the formulation and production of high performance low-energy, low-CO2 emitting calcium sulfoaluminate (CAS) cement that utilize coal combustion byproducts as raw materials.

  16. Well Construction Details, Groundwater Elevations, and Figures for the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater Area at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Copland, John R.

    2017-01-01

    This Sandia National Laboratories / New Mexico (SNL/NM) submittal contains groundwater information that the United States Geological Survey (USGS) has requested. The USGS will use the information to assist Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in its ongoing groundwater studies. The information in this submittal contains well-construction details and groundwater-elevation data for monitoring wells that SNL/NM has installed. Relevant well-construction data from other government agencies are also summarized. This submittal contains four data tables and three figures. Information in the tables has been used by SNL/NM to prepare groundwater compliance reports that have previously incorporated the three figures. The figures depict the potentiometric surface for the Perched Groundwater System, the potentiometric surface for the Regional Aquifer, and a Conceptual Site Model for the vicinity of Tijeras Arroyo in the northern portion of KAFB.

  17. Sulphur transformation and deposition in the rhizosphere of Juncus effusus in a laboratory-scale constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Wiessner, A; Kuschk, P; Jechorek, M; Seidel, H; Kästner, M

    2008-09-01

    Sulphur cycling and its correlation to removal processes under dynamic redox conditions in the rhizosphere of helophytes in treatment wetlands are poorly understood. Therefore, long-term experiments were performed in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands treating artificial domestic wastewater in order to investigate the dynamics of sulphur compounds, the responses of plants and nitrifying microorganisms under carbon surplus conditions, and the generation of methane. For carbon surplus conditions (carbon:sulphate of 2.8:1) sulphate reduction happened but was repressed, in contrast to unplanted filters mentioned in literature. Doubling the carbon load caused stable and efficient sulphate reduction, rising of pH, increasing enrichment of S(2-) and S(0) in pore water, and finally plant death and inhibition of nitrification by sulphide toxicity. The data show a clear correlation of the occurrence of reduced S-species with decreasing C and N removal performance and plant viability in the experimental constructed wetlands.

  18. ELWIRA "Plants, wood, steel, concrete - a lifecycle as construction materials": University meets school - science meets high school education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss-Sieberth, Alexandra; Strauss, Alfred; Kalny, Gerda; Rauch, Hans Peter; Loiskandl, Willibald

    2016-04-01

    The research project "Plants, wood, steel, concrete - a lifecycle as construction materials" (ELWIRA) is in the framework of the Sparkling Science programme performed by the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences together with the Billroth Gymnasium in Vienna. The targets of a Sparkling Science project are twofold (a) research and scientific activities should already be transferred in the education methods of schools in order to fascinate high school students for scientific methods and to spark young people's interest in research, and (b) exciting research questions not solved and innovative findings should be addressed. The high school students work together with the scientists on their existing research questions improve the school's profile and the high school student knowledge in the investigated Sparkling Science topic and can lead to a more diverse viewing by the involvement of the high school students. In the project ELWIRA scientists collaborate with the school to quantify and evaluate the properties of classical building materials like concrete and natural materials like plants and woodlogs in terms of their life cycle through the use of different laboratory and field methods. The collaboration with the high school students is structured in workshops, laboratory work and fieldworks. For an efficient coordination/communication, learning and research progress new advanced electronic media like "Moodle classes/courses" have been used and utilized by the high school students with great interest. The Moodle classes are of high importance in the knowledge transfer in the dialogue with the high school students. The research project is structured into four main areas associated with the efficiencies of building materials: (a) the aesthetic feeling of people in terms of the appearance of materials and associated structures will be evaluated by means of jointly developed and collected questionnaires. The analysis, interpretation and evaluation are carried

  19. Construct a Test and Integration Laboratory Eglin Air Force Base Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    storage tanks , or Environmental Restoration Program remediation sites or areas of concem exist at the site....species, and contains no surface water, wetlands, or flood plains. No lead-based paints (LBP), asbestos containing materials (ACM), underground

  20. Office of Inspector General report on audit of renovation and new construction projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-05

    The Oakland Operations Office (Oakland) is responsible for acquiring facilities needed to satisfy mission needs and to do so at the least cost to the Department of Energy (Department). The objective of the audit was to determine if proposed renovation and new construction projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) met mission needs while minimizing cost to the Government. In pursuing three projects, estimated to cost over $78 million, Livermore had not demonstrated that it had selected the best alternatives for meeting the Department`s needs while minimizing cost. Livermore was able to pursue these projects because Oakland did not ensure that the laboratory had performed cost and benefit analyses of all alternatives. Further, Oakland did not establish benchmarks to assess the reasonableness of the total costs of designing, constructing, and managing these projects. As a result, it was likely that the Department was spending more than necessary on renovation and new construction projects at Livermore. Although the projects met mission needs, it was recommended that the Manager, Oakland: (1) require Livermore to perform analyses of expected costs and benefits for alternatives; (2) evaluate the adequacy of Livermore`s cost and benefit analyses of alternatives; (3) establish benchmarks based on industry and other government agency cost data to assess the reasonableness of Livermore`s total design, construction, and project management costs; and (4) select the alternative that meets established needs at the least cost to the Government. Oakland agreed with the recommendations and will implement them starting with the Fiscal Year 1999 project submission and validation.

  1. The importance of building construction materials relative to other factors affecting structure survival during wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Brennan, Teresa J.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2017-01-01

    Structure loss to wildfire is a serious problem in wildland-urban interface areas across the world. Laboratory experiments suggest that fire-resistant building construction and design could be important for reducing structure destruction, but these need to be evaluated under real wildfire conditions, especially relative to other factors. Using empirical data from destroyed and surviving structures from large wildfires in southern California, we evaluated the relative importance of building construction and structure age compared to other local and landscape-scale variables associated with structure survival. The local-scale analysis showed that window preparation was especially important but, in general, creating defensible space adjacent to the home was as important as building construction. At the landscape scale, structure density and structure age were the two most important factors affecting structure survival, but there was a significant interaction between them. That is, young structure age was most important in higher-density areas where structure survival overall was more likely. On the other hand, newer-construction structures were less likely to survive wildfires at lower density. Here, appropriate defensible space near the structure and accessibility to major roads were important factors. In conclusion, community safety is a multivariate problem that will require a comprehensive solution involving land use planning, fire-safe construction, and property maintenance.

  2. The aging of wire chambers filled with dimethyl ether: wire and construction materials and freon impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jibaly, Mohammed; Majewski, Stan; Chrusch, Peter; Wojcik, Randolph; Sauli, Fabio; Gaudaen, Jan

    1989-11-01

    This is a complete summary of our study of the aging of different types of wire chambers, with a variety of construction materials and wires, filled with dimethyl ether (DME) of varying degrees of purity. The resistive Nicotin and Stablohm wires were corroded by DME, producing fast aging. The moderately resistive stainless steel wires were able to withstand extended irradiation (up to 1 C/cm) in high-purity DME without any apparent damage; and gold-plated tungsten and molybdenum wires exhibited a comparable behavior. Many construction materials were tested and recommendations are thus reached as to what kinds of materials are safe in building DME-operated wire chambers. Among many different Freon and hydrocarbon impurities detected in DME by means of gas chromatography (GC), Freon-11 was found to be mostly responsible for the aging, even with noncorrosive stainless steel or gold-plated wires. The availability and feasibility of obtaining Freon-free DME is reported as well.

  3. Snapping shrimp prefer natural as opposed to artificial materials as their habitat in laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Lai Kean; Ghazali, Shahriman M.

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzed the habitat selection behavior of the snapping shrimp, Alpheus spp., comparing natural shelters (Rocks with oysters attached on the surface Sh; rocks with smooth surface, Ro and coral rubble, Co with plastic bottle. Controlled laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the habitat preference, effect of photoperiod and shrimp orientation at shelter. The current study indicated that snapping shrimp preferred natural materials but rejected plastic bottle as their shelter. Among the natural shelters, coral rubble was the most preferred habitat followed by shell and rock. Photoperiod showed minimum effect on the shrimp where they spend most of the time inside and underneath the shelters. In conclusion the current study showed that snapping shrimp preferred coral rubble as opposed to other natural material and plastic bottle. The result also suggested that plastic debris in the marine environment is not an alternative habitat for snapping shrimp.

  4. Construction of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action of granting a site use permit to construct and operate a conference center on an approximately 70-acre tract of land on the Savannah River Site (SRS). While the proposed action requires an administrative decision by DOE, this EA reviews the linked action of physically constructing and operating a conference center. The SRS is a DOE-owned nuclear production facility encompassing approximately 200,000 acres in southwestern South Carolina. The proposed conference center would have an area of approximately 4,000 square feet, and would infrequently accommodate as many as 150 people, with the average being about 20 people per day. In addition to the No-Action alternative, under which the Research Foundation would not require the 70-acre tract of SRS land for a conference center, this EA considers site preservation. Under Site Preservation only minimal activities necessary to the SRS mission would occur, thereby establishing the lower limits of environmental consequences. A review conducted under the SRS permitting process identified no other forms of possible site development. Similarly, SRS areas identified in the Nuclear Complex Reconfiguration Site Proposal (DOE, 199la) do not include the conference center site area in proposed weapons complex reconfiguration activities. As a consequence, this EA does not consider other forms of possible site development as alternatives. The potential environmental consequences associated with the action of constructing and operating a conference center include impacts to cultural resources and impacts from construction activities, primarily related to land clearing (5 to 10 acres) and providing access to the site.

  5. Application of Nanotechnology-Based Thermal Insulation Materials in Building Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozsaky, David

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology-based materials have previously been used by space research, pharmaceuticals and electronics, but in the last decade several nanotechnology-based thermal insulation materials have appeared in building industry. Nowadays they only feature in a narrow range of practice, but they offer many potential applications. These options are unknown to most architects, who may simply be afraid of these materials owing to the incomplete and often contradictory special literature. Therefore, they are distrustful and prefer to apply the usual and conventional technologies. This article is intended to provide basic information about nanotechnology-based thermal insulation materials for designers. It describes their most important material properties, functional principles, applications, and potential usage options in building construction.

  6. Expanded polystyrene as the bearing building material of low energy construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesaros, P.; Spisakova, M.; Kyjakova, L.; Mandicak, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability of buildings is a really important issue for the construction industry. Sustainable buildings are characterized by the lower construction costs for energy consumption and operations, they are environmentally friendly, able to save natural resources and they are comfortable and healthy for their users. The European Union supports this trend through its Strategy 2020, respectively with document Energy Roadmap 2020. The strategy 2020 sets greenhouse gas emissions 20% lower than 1990, 20% of energy from renewable and 20% increase in energy efficiency. It manifests itself in introduction of modern technologies of house building. One potential for the energy saving is construction of low-energy buildings using modern materials. This paper focuses on the analysis of the low-energy buildings made by expanded polystyrene as the bearing building material. The paper analyzes their design and describes the benefits of this modern but unusual type of construction technology for houses. The examples from abroad clearly indicate that this technology has potential in modern architecture. The success and exploration of this technology potential in the conditions of Slovak construction sector is closely related to interest of investors and users of further sustainable houses which are design according the Strategy 2020 conditions.

  7. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, L.

    1997-03-01

    This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

  8. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  9. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  10. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  11. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  12. Study of improving the thermal response of a construction material containing a phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaouatni, A.; Martaj, N.; Bennacer, R.; Elomari, M.; El Ganaoui, M.

    2016-09-01

    The use of phase change materials (PCMs) for improving the thermal comfort in buildings has become an attractive application. This solution contributes to increasing the thermal inertia of the building envelope and reducing power consumption. A building element filled with a PCM and equipped with ventilation tubes is proposed, both for increasing inertia and contributing to refreshing building envelope. A numerical simulation is conducted by the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics, which aims to test the thermal behaviour of the developed solution. An experimental study is carried out on a concrete block containing a PCM with ventilation tubes. The objective is to see the effect of PCM coupled with ventilation on increasing the inertia of the block. The results show the ability of this new solution to ensure an important thermal inertia of a building.

  13. Technology Transfer Opportunities for the Construction Engineering Community: Materials and Diagnostics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-27

    34 .. CC .0 clj 0 C.C. -" C 4)4) 0 C.27 ROOF BLISTER VALVE Charles Korhonen U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Annually, the Army...7122 (within Illinois). REFERENCES 1. A. Kumar, E. C. Segan, and J. Bukowski , "Ceramic Coated Anodes for Cathodic Protection," Materials Performance...Chief of Engineers. References: (Available from the author) 1. "Roof Moisture Surveys: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow," by Wayne Tobiasson and Charles

  14. Attenuation of hydrogen sulfide at construction and demolition debris landfills using alternative cover materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Reinhart, Debra

    2010-04-01

    The attenuation of H(2)S emissions by various landfill cover materials was evaluated using both laboratory and field experiments. The results demonstrated that cover materials consisting of selected waste products (compost and yard trash) and soils amended with quicklime and calcium carbonate effectively attenuated H(2)S emissions and detectable H(2)S emissions were only encountered in a testing plot using a sandy soil cover (average emission rate was 4.67x10(-6)mgm(-2)s(-1)). H(2)S concentration profiles in the cover materials indicated that H(2)S was removed as it migrated through the cover materials. At the same depth in the testing area, the H(2)S concentration in the sandy soil field plot was always higher than that of other testing plots because the sand (a) demonstrated less ability to remove H(2)S and (b) exhibited a higher H(2)S concentration at the base of the cover. Laboratory experiments confirmed these observations, with a combination of physical adsorption, chemical reactions, and biological oxidation, accounting for the enhanced removal. In addition to removal, the results suggest that some of the cover materials reduced H(2)S generation by creating less favorable conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., high pH and temperature).

  15. EFFECTIVE REMOVAL OF TCE IN A LABORATORY MODEL OF A PRB CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  16. Dynamics of nitrobenzene degradation and interactions with nitrogen transformations in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lv, Tao; Wu, Shubiao; Hong, Hao; Chen, Li; Dong, Renjie

    2013-04-01

    Three laboratory-scale CWs (i.e., tidal flow CW as well as planted and unplanted horizontal subsurface flow CWs) were set up to treat artificial nitrobenzene (NB) industry effluents in this study. An inflow NB load equal to or less than 70 mg/L achieved approximately 95% NB removal regardless of wetland type. When NB influent load increased to 160 mg/L, NB removal efficiency decreased to 57%, 46%, and 33% in planted and unplanted horizontal CWs as well as tidal flow CWs, respectively. Higher NB degradation efficiency in planted horizontal CW highlighted the positive effect of wetland plants. Moreover, strong inhibition of nitrogen removal was initiated in CWs with an increase of NB loads to 160 mg/L, which was probably caused by NB toxicity. The investigation indicated not only the potential application of treatment wetlands as a secondary ecological treatment system for NB-containing wastewater, but also the interactions with nitrogen transformations in CWs.

  17. Corrosion resistance and behavior of construction materials exposed to dilute sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures under static conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    Laboratory investigation has been undertaken to determine the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of various construction materials in a simulated hydrolysis environment (5 wt % sulfuric acid) at temperatures ranging from 90 to 220C. Tests were performed in an autoclave-type electrochemical cell. The corrosion behavior of the test materials was determined using computer-controlled DC potentiodynamic polarization. Corrosion rates of the test materials were determined using AC impedance techniques. Among the stainless steels tested, only alloy N08026 (Carpenter 20Mo-6) performed satisfactory up to a temperature of 100C. The alloy passivated spontaneously in the environment and corroded at a rate of less than 2 mpy. None of the stainless steels tested could be used at 120{degrees}C or above. A number of nickel-based alloys tested had good corrosion resistance up to 100C, but their corrosion rate exceeded 2 mpy at higher temperatures. Zirconium alloys were satisfactory up to 180C. Only tantalum and a tantalum-niobium alloy were satisfactory up to 220C.

  18. Clogging pattern in vertical-flow constructed wetlands: insight from a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Hua, G F; Zhu, W; Zhao, L F; Huang, J Y

    2010-08-15

    Substrate clogging caused by the accumulation of the particulate solids is the worst operational problem for vertical-flow constructed wetlands (VFCW). In this paper, the effects of particulate solids distribution and their accumulation in the substrate with different gravel sizes were investigated. The results demonstrated that the clogging layer can be considered as two parts: one is the blanket-like deposition layer, and the other is the upper substrate clogging layer. Furthermore, the clogging process shall be partitioned as three stages of puncture phase for the pollutants; the formation of the blanket-like deposition layer; and the formation and compaction phase to the whole clogging layer. With reference to the clogging mechanism, it is believed that the particulate solids (< 100 microm) were absorbed firstly by electrostatic forces and van der Waals' forces. This is followed by the "bridging" made by the accumulated solids which act as a "sieve", thus further restricting larger particulate solids to flow through.

  19. Helmet of a laminate construction of polycarbonate and polysulfone polymeric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J. (Inventor); Dawn, Frederic S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An article of laminate construction is disclosed which is comprised of an underlayer of polycarbonate polymer material to which is applied a chemically resistant outer layer of polysulfone. The layers which are joined by compression-heat molding, are molded to form the shape of a body protective shell such as a space helmet comprising a shell of polycarbonate, polysulfone laminate construction attached at its open end to a sealing ring adapted for connection to a space suit. The front portion of the shell provides a transparent visor for the helmet. An outer visor of polycarbonate polysulfone laminate construction is pivotally mounted to the sealing ring for covering the transparent visor portion of the shell during extravehicular activities. The polycarbonate under layer of the outer visor is coated on its inner surface with a vacuum deposit of gold to provide additional thermal radiation resistance.

  20. The design, construction and testing of a scour monitoring system using magnetostrictive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Steven Richard

    A system for the continuous monitoring of scour has been designed, constructed and implemented. The system detects the level of scour by attaching flow to a buried post at known depths, and detecting when individual sensors become unearthed. Two bio-inspired flow sensors were designed and constructed for use on the post. The first, resembling a seal whisker, utilized the magnetostrictive materials Alfenol and Galfenol and was optimized for >0.15m/s flow. The second, resembling seaweed, used a conventional permanent magnet and was optimized for <0.15m/s flow. A small, low powered data acquisition system was designed and constructed to monitor and record the data from the sensors. A total of four scour posts were installed at two different sites; two vertically to monitor conventional scour and two horizontally to monitor lateral riverbed migration. Data from the posts was analyzed and presented and lessons learned were documented.

  1. PREFACE: International Scientific Conference of Young Scientists: Advanced Materials in Construction and Engineering (TSUAB2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanitsa, Natalia O.

    2015-01-01

    In October 15-17, 2014 International Scientific Conference of Young Scientists: Advanced Materials in Construction and Engineering (TSUAB2014) took place at Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building (Tomsk, Russia). The Conference became a discussion platform for researchers in the fields of studying structure and properties of advanced building materials and included open lectures of leading scientists and oral presentations of master, postgraduate and doctoral students. A special session was devoted to reports of school children who further plan on starting a research career. The Conference included an industrial exhibition where companies displayed the products and services they supply. The companies also gave presentations of their products within the Conference sessions.

  2. Construction, implementation, and evaluation of an undergraduate biology laboratory teaching model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrant, Todd M.

    This dissertation documents a time series study in which an undergraduate non-majors biology laboratory was revised, leading to the development of a new teaching model. The course model was developed at a large Midwestern university enrolling about 827 students in 32 sections per semester and using graduate teaching assistants as primary instructors. The majority of the students consisted of freshman and sophomores, with the remainder being juniors and seniors. This dissertation explains the rationale leading to the development and implementation of this educational model using graduate teaching assistants as the primary course instructors and embedded course assessment as evidence of its success. The major components of this model include six major items including: learning community, course design, GTA professional development, course delivery, assessment, and the filter. The major aspects of this model include clear links between instruction, GTA professional development, embedded assessment (student and GTA), course revision, student perceptions, and performance. The model includes the following components: Formal and informal discourse in the learning community, teaching assistant professional development, the use of multiple assessment tools, a filter to guide course evaluation, and redirection and delivery of course content based on embedded formal course assessment. Teaching assistants receive both initial and ongoing professional development throughout the semester in effective instructional pedagogy from an instructor of record. Results for three years of operation show a significant increase in student biology content knowledge and the use of scientific process/critical thinking skills with mean improvement in student performance of 25.5% and 18.9% respectively. Mean attendance for ISB 208L is 95% for the six semesters of this study showing students regularly attend the laboratory classes and remain in the course with a completion rate of 93

  3. Aggregates from natural and recycled sources; economic assessments for construction applications; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, David R.; Goonan, Thomas G.

    1998-01-01

    Increased amounts of recycled materials are being used to supplement natural aggregates (derived from crushed stone, sand and gravel) in road construction. An understanding of the economics and factors affecting the level of aggregates recycling is useful in estimating the potential for recycling and in assessing the total supply picture of aggregates. This investigation includes a descriptive analysis of the supply sources, technology, costs, incentives, deterrents, and market relationships associated with the production of aggregates.

  4. Systematic Study of Trace Radioactive Impurities in Candidate Construction Materials for EXO-200

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, D.S.; Grinberg, P.; Weber, P.; Baussan, E.; Djurcic, Z.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Akimov, D.; Bellerive, A.; Bowcock, M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Craddock, W.; Danilov, M.; DeVoe, R.; Dixit, M.; Dolgolenko, A.; /Alabama U. /NRC-INMS /Neuchatel U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Maryland U. /UC, Irvine

    2007-10-24

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  5. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, Kym S; Burdz, Tamara V; Turenne, Christine Y; Sharma, Meenu K; Kabani, Amin M; Wolfe, Joyce N

    2005-01-01

    Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3) laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation) may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226) was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7%) of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18), resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation) or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a CL3 laboratory. This

  6. Study of capability of microorganisms to develop on construction materials used in space objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakova, N.; Svistunova, Y.; Novikova, N.

    One of the most topical issues nowadays in the whole set of space research is the study of microbiological risks (medical, technical, technological). Experiments held onboard MIR station and International Space Station (ISS) clearly demonstrated capacity of microorganisms to contaminate the environment, equipment and belonging of habitual compartments of space objects. In this connection microorganisms-biodestructors play an important role. In their vital functioning they are capable of causing biological damage of different polymers, biocorrosion of metals which can lead to serious difficulties in performing long-term flights, namely the planned mission to Mars. Our purpose was to study capability of growth and reproduction of microorganisms on construction materials of various chemical composition as the first stage of biodestruction process. In our research we used "flight" strains of bacteria (Bacillus subtilus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Pseudomonas pumilus etc.) recovered from the ISS environment in several missions. For control we used "earth" bacteria species with typical properties. To model the environment of the ISS we took construction materials which are widely used in the interior and equipment of the ISS. The results we've obtained show that some microorganisms are capable of living and reproducing themselves on construction materials and their capability is more pronounced than that of the "earth" species. The best capability for growth and reproduction was characteristic of Bacillus subtilus.

  7. 48 CFR 52.225-12 - Notice of Buy American Act Requirement-Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Notice of Buy American Act Requirement—Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements (FEB 2009) (a... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice of Buy American Act Requirement-Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements. 52.225-12 Section 52.225-12 Federal...

  8. Synthesis of Nano-Crystalline Materials in Open-Air Laboratory: A Case Study of Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Biswarup; Bhattacherjee, Ashis; Roy, Madhusudan

    2015-02-01

    The work deals with synthesis of nano-crystalline materials in open-air laboratory and in-depth investigation of the tobacco sample of one branded cigarette and its ash using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and associated techniques. It exhibits the presence of nanocrystals and nanorods of various oxides in cigarette ash. The structure, shape, size and composition of these nanocrystals and nanorods are explored. The energy dispersive X-ray spectra from different regions of the tobacco sample and its ash using high-angle annular dark field scanning/transmission electron microscopy mode are utilized to obtain elemental composition and their relative abundances. For a detailed distribution of different elements in the nanorods, elemental mapping using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy is also presented. The results highlight the conversion of amorphous constituents of tobacco to nanomaterials on combustion at low temperatures, thus mixing up in the atmosphere.

  9. Enabling completion of the material disposition area G closure at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenhorn, James Allen; Bishop, Milton L

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) and the Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) have developed and are implementing an integrated strategy to accelerate the disposition of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) legacy transuranic waste inventory currently stored in Technical Area 54, Material Disposition Area (MDA) G. As that strategy has been implemented the easier waste streams have been certified and shipped leaving the harder more challenging wastes to be dispositioned. Lessons learned from around the complex and a partnership with the National Transuranic Program located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, are enabling this acceleration. The Waste Disposition Program is responsible for the removal of both the above ground and below grade, retrievably stored transuranic waste in time to support the negotiated consent order with the State of New Mexico which requires closure of MDA G by the year 2015. The solutions and strategy employed at LANL are applicable to any organization that is currently managing legacy transuranic waste.

  10. Safety evaluation for packaging 222-S laboratory cargo tank for onetime type B material shipment

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, P.M.

    1994-08-19

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to evaluate and document the safety of the onetime shipment of bulk radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory cargo tank (222-S cargo tank). The 222-S cargo tank is a US Department of Transportation (DOT) MC-312 specification (DOT 1989) cargo tank, vehicle registration number HO-64-04275, approved for low specific activity (LSA) shipments in accordance with the DOT Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). In accordance with the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1A, Chapter III (RL 1988), an equivalent degree of safety shall be provided for onsite shipments as would be afforded by the DOT shipping regulations for a radioactive material package. This document demonstrates that this packaging system meets the onsite transportation safety criteria for a onetime shipment of Type B contents.

  11. High Temperature Materials Laboratory eight and ninth annual reports, October 1994 through September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, A.E.; Russell, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its ninth year of operation as a designated US Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document profiles the historical growth of the HTML User and Fellowship Programs since their inception in 1987. Growth of the HTML programs has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements, and by the number of days of instrument use (user days) since the HTML began operation. A total of 276 nonproprietary agreements (135 industry, 135 university, and 6 other federal agency) and 56 proprietary agreements are now in effect. This represents an increase of 70 nonproprietary user agreements since the last reporting period (for FY 1994). A state-by-state summary of these nonproprietary user agreements is given in Appendix A, and an alphabetical listing is provided in Appendix B. Forty-four states are represented by these users. During FY 1995 and 1996, the HTML User Program evaluated 145 nonproprietary proposals (62 from industry, 82 from universities, and 1 from other government facilities) and several proprietary proposals. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about 95% of those proposals, frequently after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the committee. This annual report discusses activities in the individual user centers, as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users, proposals, and publications as well as summaries of the nonproprietary research projects active during 1995 and 1996.

  12. High Temperature Materials Laboratory seventh annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Teague, P.A.

    1994-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its seventh year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the User Program has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements since the HTML began operation in 1987. A total of 193 nonproprietary agreements (91 industry and 102 university) and 41 proprietary agreements (39 industry and two university) are now in effect. This represents an increase of 21 nonproprietary user agreements during FY 1994. Forty-one states are represented by these users. During FY 1994, the HTML User Program evaluated 106 nonproprietary proposals (46 from industry, 52 from universities, and 8 from other government facilities) and 8 proprietary proposals. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about ninety-five percent of those evaluated proposals, sometimes after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the Committee. This annual report discusses FY 1994 activities in the individual user centers, as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users and their proposals and FY 1994 publications, and summarizes nonproprietary research projects active in FY 1994.

  13. High Temperature Materials Laboratory, Eleventh Annual Report: October 1997 through September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, A.E.; Russell, B.J.

    2000-03-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its eleventh year of operation as a designated US Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document profiles the historical growth of the HTML User and Fellowship Programs since their inception in 1987. Growth of the HTML programs has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements and by the number of days of instrument use (user days) since the HTML began operation.A total of 522 agreements (351 industry,156 university,and 15 other federal agency) are now in effect (452 nonproprietary and 70 proprietary). This represents an increase of 75 user agreements since the last reporting period (for FY 1997). A state-by-state summary of the nonproprietary user agreements is given in Appendix A. Forty-six states are represented. During FY 1998, the HTML User Program evaluated 80 nonproprietary proposals (32 from industry, 45 from universities, and 3 from other government facilities) and several proprietary proposals. Appendix B provides a detailed breakdown of the nonproprietary proposals received during FY 1998. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about 95% of those proposals, sometimes after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the committee. This annual report discusses activities in the individual user centers as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users, proposals, and publications as well as summaries of the nonproprietary research projects active during 1998.

  14. JSC Materials Laboratory Reproduction and Failure Analysis of Cracked Orbiter Reaction Control System Niobium Thruster Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Willard L.; Jacobs, Jeremy B.

    2006-01-01

    In April 2004 a Space Shuttle Orbiter Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster was found to be cracked while undergoing a nozzle (niobium/C103 alloy) retrofit. As a failure resulting from an in-flight RCS thruster burn-through (initiated from a crack) could be catastrophic, an official Space Shuttle Program flight constraint was issued until flight safety could be adequately demonstrated. This paper describes the laboratory test program which was undertaken to reproduce the cracking in order to fully understand and bound the driving environments. The associated rationale developed to justify continued safe flight of the Orbiter RCS system is also described. The laboratory testing successfully reproduced the niobium cracking, and established specific bounding conditions necessary to cause cracking in the C103 thruster injectors. Each of the following conditions is necessary in combination together: 1) a mechanically disturbed / cold-worked free surface, 2) an externally applied sustained tensile stress near yield strength, 3) presence of fluorine-containing fluids on exposed tensile / cold-worked free surfaces, and 4) sustained exposure to temperatures greater than 400 F. As a result of this work, it was concluded that fluorine-containing materials (e.g. HF acid, Krytox , Brayco etc.) should be carefully controlled or altogether eliminated during processing of niobium and its alloys.

  15. Clogging development and hydraulic performance of the horizontal subsurface flow stormwater constructed wetlands: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ping; Yu, Bohai; Zhou, Yongchao; Zhang, Yiping; Li, Jin

    2017-02-21

    The horizontal subsurface constructed wetland (HSSF CW) is a highly effective technique for stormwater treatment. However, progressive clogging in HSSF CW is a widespread operational problem. The aim of this study was to understand the clogging development of HSSF CWs during stormwater treatment and to assess the influence of microorganisms and vegetation on the clogging. Moreover, the hydraulic performance of HSSF CWs in the process of clogging was evaluated in a tracer experiment. The results show that the HSSF CW can be divided into two sections, section I (circa 0-35 cm) and section II (circa 35-110 cm). The clogging is induced primarily by solid entrapment in section I and development of biofilm and vegetation roots in section II, respectively. The influence of vegetation and microorganisms on the clogging appears to differ in sections I and II. The tracer experiment shows that the hydraulic efficiency (λ) and the mean hydraulic retention time (t mean) increase with the clogging development; although, the short-circuiting region (S) extends slightly. In addition, the presence of vegetation can influence the hydraulic performance of the CWs, and their impact depends on the characteristics of the roots.

  16. Applying solubilization treatment to reverse clogging in laboratory-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Guofen, Hua; Wei, Zhu; Lianfang, Zhao; Yunhui, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Substrate clogging is characterized as a frequently occurring operational problem for subsurface-flow constructed wetlands. The application of solubilization treatment to reduce clogging was tested in lab-scaled setups to provide a promising solution. The performance of solubilization treatment on reducing clogging and the related effects on plants and biofilms in the wetland system were investigated in this paper. The results showed that the infiltration rate and available porosity of wetland substrate increased as a function of increased dosage of NaOH, HCl, NaClO, and detergent, respectively. Among the four solvents, it appeared that NaClO had the most obvious effects on reducing clogging and the infiltration rate and effective porosity recovered to 69% of the original condition. The two possible reasons for solubilization were the flocculents' structure of the clogs was broken up or parts of the organic clogs were dissolved. The function of adding NaOH and NaClO was to dissolve the protein and polysaccharides of the organic clogs; the function of adding HCl was to release the anaerobic gas wrapped in the organic clogs. Furthermore, experiments results also showed that the solubilized solvents did not demonstrate a long-term negative effect on plants and biofilms.

  17. Effects of Various Dental Materials on Alkaline Phosphatase Extracted from Pulp: An Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lorin R.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that demonstrates the effects of various dental materials on a representative enzyme from the pulp is outlined. The experiment encourages students to consider the effects that various restorative materials and techniques might have on enzymes in the living pulp. (Author/MLW)

  18. Medical Laboratory Technician--Chemical Chemistry & Urinalysis, 10-2. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This publication, the last of three course materials in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from the Military Curriculum Materials for Use in Technical and Vocational Education series, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It can be used by advanced students or beginning students participating in a…

  19. Laboratory Investigations of the Complex Refractory Organic Material Produced from Irradiation of Pluto Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sanford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Much of Pluto's surface consists of N2 ice with smaller amounts of CH4 and CO ices. Despite the low temperature (approximately 45K), chemistry can be driven in the surface ices by radiation processing such as cosmic ray bombardment. When cosmic rays strike the surface, much of their energy is dispersed in the form of secondary electrons, which in turn drive much of the resulting chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments designed to simulate the conditions on these icy bodies may provide insight into this chemistry. Significant progress has been made in the laboratory toward understanding the smaller, simple compounds produced in the solid phase by radiation processing of (N2, CH4, CO) ices (Bohn et al. 1994; Moore & Hudson 2003; Hodyss et al. 2011; Kim and Kaiser 2012). Recently Materese et al. (2014) used a variety of techniques to better characterize the refractory materials produced from the UV photo-irradiation of N2:CH4:CO ices. However, because Pluto's atmosphere is optically thick to Lyman-alpha UV radiation it is important to re-examine the results using an alternate radiation source. Our latest work has consisted of the analysis of refractory materials produced from the electron bombardment of low temperature N2(-), CH4(-), and CO(-)containing ices (100:1:1). The ice mixture was chosen to be analogous to the known surface ices on Pluto and the radiation source was chosen to mimic the secondary electrons produced by cosmic rays bombardment. The residues were studied using multiple chemical techniques including, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The organic residues produced in these experiments can be seen as an analog for the refractory component of the surface of Pluto, and are compared with the residues previously obtained from UV photo-irradiation. UV and near- IR spectroscopy of the surfaces of Pluto and Charon during the encounter with

  20. Materials-of-Construction Radiation Sensitivity for a Fission Surface Power Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Geng, Steven M.; Niedra, Janis M.; Sayir, Ali; Shin, Eugene E.; Sutter, James K.; Thieme, Lanny G.

    2007-01-01

    A fission reactor combined with a free-piston Stirling convertor is one of many credible approaches for producing electrical power in space applications. This study assumes dual-opposed free-piston Stirling engines/linear alternators that will operate nominally at 825 K hot-end and 425 K cold-end temperatures. The baseline design options, temperature profiles, and materials of construction discussed here are based on historical designs as well as modern convertors operating at lower power levels. This notional design indicates convertors primarily made of metallic components that experience minimal change in mechanical properties for fast neutron fluences less than 10(sup 20) neutrons per square centimeter. However, these radiation effects can impact the magnetic and electrical properties of metals at much lower fluences than are crucial for mechanical property integrity. Moreover, a variety of polymeric materials are also used in common free-piston Stirling designs for bonding, seals, lubrication, insulation and others. Polymers can be affected adversely by radiation doses as low as 10(sup 5) - 10(sup 10) rad. Additionally, the absorbing dose rate, radiation hardness, and the resulting effect (either hardening or softening) varies depending on the nature of the particular polymer. The classes of polymers currently used in convertor fabrication are discussed along possible substitution options. Thus, the materials of construction of prototypic Stirling convertor engines have been considered and the component materials susceptible to damage at the lowest neutron fluences have been identified.

  1. Experimental study of bentonite-soil mixtures as anti-seepage materials of constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Zifu; Zhao, Xin; Li, Haihan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, mixtures of different kinds of bentonite and soil were used and tested in order to find a cheap alternative to current anti-seepage materials for constructed wetlands. The anti-seepage layer of constructed wetlands was simulated in the experimental study and the permeability coefficient of the mixed materials was determined in order to evaluate the anti-seepage effect of mixtures. The main results are as follows: (i) The minimum mass ratio of bentonite to soil is 10%; (ii) Within a certain range, the more compact and higher the wet density is, then the better anti-seepage effect is (under the condition of certain moisture content). The permeability coefficient of the mixed materials exponentially increased with the increase of wet density; (iii) At the wet density of 1.83 g/cm(3), corresponding with the optimum compactness, the mixture of natural sodium bentonite produced in Wyoming, USA and soil from Cangzhou, Hebei province showed the best anti-seepage performance; (iv) The impermeability of the mixture with smaller particle sizes of bentonite was far better than that with the bigger particle sizes; (v) The hydration effect of bentonite changed the structure of the mixture materials into a special structure that is similar to that of pure bentonite. The particles of the mixture became expanded under SEM investigation and the mixture became more compact, which could have the same or similar effect as pure bentonite for anti-seepage.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy Amos

    2010-01-01

    Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program

  3. Quenched Carbonaceous Composite: a laboratory analog for carbonaceous material in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, A T; Wada, S

    1997-01-01

    We review the properties of Quenched Carbonaceous Composite (QCC), a residue produced from a hydrocarbon plasma, and the properties of its derivatives. A. Sakata and his colleagues have shown that QCC has a 220 nm absorption band, visible fluorescence matching the extended red emission seen in reflection nebulae, and infrared absorption bands that correspond to the infrared emission features in reflection nebulae, HII regions, and planetary nebulae. These properties make QCC a strong candidate material as a laboratory analog to the carbonaceous material in the interstellar medium. QCC is distinguished from the PAH hypothesis in that (1) it is a condensate composed of aromatic and aliphatic molecules, as well as radicals; (2) it exhibits a 220 nm absorption that is very similar in wavelength to the 217 nm absorption in the interstellar medium; (3) it exhibits visible fluorescence consistent with that seen in reflection nebulae; and (4) the bands at 7.7 and 8.6 microns are caused by ketone bands in oxidized QCC. The aromatic component in QCC is thought to be typically 1-4 rings, with the majority being about 1-2 rings.

  4. Geophysical investigation at US Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Massachusetts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, J.L.; Simms, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    Results of a comprehensive, integrated geophysical investigation at 5 sites at the U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL) located in Watertown, MA, are presented. In 1960, the Army's first materials research reactor was completed at MTL, which was used actively in molecular and atomic structure research activities until 1970, when it was deactivated. In addition to the research reactor were facilities that stored and handled depleted uranium (DU). In 1989, the Commission on Base Realignment and Closure recommended that MTL be closed. The MTL closure program is being supervised by the U.S. Army Environmental Center. As part of the MTL closure program, any previously contaminated sites must be identified. Based on historical information, 5 sites were selected at MTL to be examined in further detail using geophysical methods. The geophysical investigation was designed to detect and delineate anomalous conditions indicative of buried waste, waste containers, fuel storage tanks, and unmapped drain or sewer lines having the potential of carrying wastes off the site. Electromagnetics, Geophysics, Magnetics, Geophysical surveys, Ground penetrating, Radar.

  5. A study of different fault slip modes governed by the gouge material composition in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharyan, G. G.; Novikov, V. A.; Ostapchuk, A. A.; Pavlov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Described are results of laboratory experiments which revealed regularities of gradual transition from stick-slip mode to aseismic creep. The behaviour of model gouge-filled fault was investigated with experimental setup of the spring-bock model. It was experimentally proven that small variations of a percentage of materials with velocity strengthening and velocity weakening properties in the fault principal slip zone may result in significant variation of the portion of seismic energy radiated during a fault slip event. The tests simulated different modes of interblock sliding whose characteristic values of scaled kinetic energy varied by several orders of magnitude, while differences in contact strength and shear stress drop remained relatively small. The obtained results led to the conclusion that the earthquake radiation efficiency and the fault slip mode are governed by the ratio of two parameters-maximum fault slip-weakening rate and shear stiffness of the enclosing massif. The ratio can be essentially changed by small variations of the material composition of the fault principal slip zone.

  6. A study of different fault slip modes governed by the gouge material composition in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharyan, G. G.; Novikov, V. A.; Ostapchuk, A. A.; Pavlov, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    Described are results of laboratory experiments which revealed regularities of gradual transition from stick-slip mode to aseismic creep. The behavior of model gouge-filled fault was investigated with experimental setup of the spring-bock model. It was experimentally proven that small variations of a percentage of materials with velocity strengthening and velocity weakening properties in the fault principal slip zone may result in significant variation of the portion of seismic energy radiated during a fault slip event. The tests simulated different modes of inter-block sliding whose characteristic values of scaled kinetic energy varied by several orders of magnitude, while differences in contact strength and shear stress drop remained relatively small. The obtained results led to the conclusion that the earthquake radiation efficiency and the fault slip mode are governed by the ratio of two parameters - maximum fault slip-weakening rate and shear stiffness of the enclosing massif. The ratio can be essentially changed by small variations of the material composition of the fault principal slip zone.

  7. Heuristic economic assessment of the Afghanistan construction materials sector: cement and dimension stone production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the U.S. Government has invested more than $106 billion for physical, societal, and governmental reconstruction assistance to Afghanistan (Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, 2012a). This funding, along with private investment, has stimulated a growing demand for particular industrial minerals and construction materials. In support of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey released a preliminary mineral assessment in 2007 on selected Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2007). More recently, the 2007 mineral assessment was updated with the inclusion of a more extensive array of Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2011). As a follow-up on the 2011 assessment, this report provides an analysis of the current use and prospects of the following Afghan industrial minerals required to manufacture construction materials: clays of various types, bauxite, gypsum, cement-grade limestone, aggregate (sand and gravel), and dimension stone (sandstone, quartzite, granite, slate, limestone, travertine, marble). The intention of this paper is to assess the: Use of Afghan industrial minerals to manufacture construction materials, Prospects for growth in domestic construction materials production sectors, Factors controlling the competitiveness of domestic production relative to foreign imports of construction materials, and Feasibility of using natural gas as the prime source of thermal energy and for generating electrical energy for cement production. The discussion here is based on classical principles of supply and demand. Imbedded in these principles is an understanding that the attributes of supply and demand are highly variable. For construction materials, demand for a given product may depend on seasons of the year, location of construction sites, product delivery time, political factors, governmental regulations, cultural issues, price, and how essential a given product might be to the buyer. Moreover, failure on the

  8. The quality of Muntilan sand (Central Java) as construction material, a longitudinal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endroyo, Bambang

    2016-04-01

    Muntilan sand is a volcanic sand generated by the volcanic activities of Mount Merapi which excavated from Muntilan district. Mount Merapi located at Central Java, Indonesia, is still active until now and erupts almost every 5-10 years. It's eruptions produced the form of lava which later get cold, perched around the peak, and forming lava domes. Furthermore, a part of lava dome avalanches will be slide down through the rivers on the the foot of the mountain. One of several districts which have rivers that containing volcanic materials is Muntilan. Muntilan sand has been used widely as a construction material. The prospects of thiruses were very good and may not be substituted by the other local sand. As a construction material, Muntilan sand must fulfill technical standard (durability number, fineness modulus, unit weight, silt content, organic content, and chemical content). But as a nature material, Muntilan sands also are influenced by circumstance of the environment. The research was conducted to describe the quality of Muntilan sand in a long term (the past until future). The method used was descriptive in longitudinal study and also a meta analysis. The result may useful for contractors and consultants (local, national and international/foreign) which will get a several projects in Central Java. The research conclusions are: (1) Until several years which will come, Muntilan sand was suitable for the construction works,(2) The durability, fineness modulus, unit weight, silt content, and organic content was in a constant rate, and have tend to increase for future, and (3) The chemical content was not in constant rate but varies in long term.

  9. Evaluation and utilization of Illinois FBC residues for construction materials. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafoori, N.; Sami, S.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the extent to which fluidized bed combustion (FBC) by-products can be properly utilized as viable construction materials. This investigation focuses primarily on the properties of residues derived from fluidized combustion burning of Illinois high-sulfur coal. The research plan calls for evaluation of physics-chemical and engineering characteristics of the FBC-based cement and non-cement mixes. The results of this study will be used to compare the physical and mechanical properties of the FBC-based mixtures with those of conventional mixes. The suitability of using FBC residues as filler or binder aggregates for Portland cement-based mixtures and non-Portland cement mixes in the form of conventional and roller compacted materials will be evaluated. During this reporting period, fabrication of the laboratory specimens used for evaluation of the sulfate durability of FBC cement-based mixtures (task I) were completed. Work on engineering characteristics of roller compacted non-cement FBC mixes (task II), is on-going.

  10. Evaluation of materials proposed for the construction of the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) on beamlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D.; Robb, C.; Deyoreo, J.; Atherton, J.

    1992-11-01

    The proposed upgrade of the NOVA laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employs a multipass architecture that requires an optical switch to emit the laser light at the appropriate fluence. This Pockels cell-based optical switch does not use traditional ring or thin-film electrodes because of the large aperture and high fluence of the laser system. Rather, it uses a plasma electrode Pockels cell with a KD*P crystal as the electro-optical medium. A discharge plasma is formed on each side of the electro-optic crystal and high voltage is applied across the crystal through the plasma electrode to initiate optical switching. In October 1991 we began evaluating materials suggested for the large aperture plasma electrode optical switch. Previous experiments suggested that switching performance could be significantly affected by the deterioration of cell materials. The final prototype switch tested used polyethylene for the switch body, Mykroy for the mid-plane and a silicone vulcanite to encapsulate the KD*P crystal. The encapsulant easily compensated for the effect of assembling the optical switch and no strain-induced birefringence in the crystal after encapsulation was measured. Oxygen was eventually added to the plasma to react with the sputtered carbon from the cathode and produce a gaseous effluent. As an added benefit, the production of ozone absorbed most of the ultraviolet radiation affecting the encapsulant. All the materials tested decomposed and produced volatiles, although no change in the damage threshold of exposed optical surfaces tested to date was seen. An evaluation of the recommended materials for major cell components using published manufacturers data, experimental results from our Material Evaluation Apparatus, and outgassing performance and sputtering data produced at the Laboratory's Vacuum Process Lab is presented.

  11. Phosphorus sorption capacities and physicochemical properties of nine substrate materials for constructed wetland

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, L.H.; Zhu, X.Z.; Ma, M.; Ouyang, Y.; Dong, M.; Zhu, W.L.; Luo, S.M.

    2008-08-15

    Constructed wetland (CW) is a promising technique for removal of pollutants from wastewater and agricultural runoff. The performance of a CW to remove pollutants, however, hinges on the use of suitable substrate materials. This study examined the physicochemical properties and phosphorus (P) sorption capacities of nine different CW substrate materials using both batch experiments and the Freundlich as well as the Langmuir isotherm. The nine substrate materials used in this study were turf, topsoil, gravel, midsized sand (MSS), blast furnace slag (BFS), coal burn slag (CBS), blast furnace artificial slag (BFAS), coal burn artificial slag (CBAS), and midsized artificial sand (MSAS). Experimental data showed that sorption of P increased with initial solution P concentrations for all nine substrate materials. The maximum P sorption capacity of the substrate materials estimated by Langmuir isotherm was in the following order: turf (4243 mg/kg substrate) > BFAS (2116 mg/kg substrate) > BFS (1598 mg/kg substrate) > CBS (1449 mg/kg substrate) > top soil (1396 mg/kg substrate) > CBAS (1194 mg/kg substrate) > MSAS (519 mg/kg substrate) > gravel (494 mg/kg substrate) > MSS (403 mg/kg substrate). The specific gravity of eight substrate materials (except gravel) had very significant negative correlations with the P sorption, whereas the particle diameter of D-60 and uniformity coefficient (K-60) had positive correlations with the P sorption. The cation exchange capacity, organic matter, available ferrous, and exchangeable aluminum of the eight substrate materials also had very significant positive correlations with the P sorption, while the pH of the substrate materials showed a very significant negative correlation with the P sorption. Our study further suggests that turf and CBAS are the two relatively ideal substrate materials suitable for removal of P from a CW system.

  12. Phosphorus sorption capacities and physicochemical properties of nine substrate materials for constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lihua; Zhu, Xizhen; Ma, Mei; Ouyang, Ying; Dong, Mei; Zhu, Wenling; Luo, Shiming

    2008-08-01

    Constructed wetland (CW) is a promising technique for removal of pollutants from wastewater and agricultural runoff. The performance of a CW to remove pollutants, however, hinges on the use of suitable substrate materials. This study examined the physicochemical properties and phosphorus (P) sorption capacities of nine different CW substrate materials using both batch experiments and the Freundlich as well as the Langmuir isotherm. The nine substrate materials used in this study were turf, topsoil, gravel, midsized sand (MSS), blast furnace slag (BFS), coal burn slag (CBS), blast furnace artificial slag (BFAS), coal burn artificial slag (CBAS), and midsized artificial sand (MSAS). Experimental data showed that sorption of P increased with initial solution P concentrations for all nine substrate materials. The maximum P sorption capacity of the substrate materials estimated by Langmuir isotherm was in the following order: turf (4243 mg/kg substrate) > BFAS (2116 mg/kg substrate) > BFS (1598 mg/kg substrate) > CBS (1449 mg/kg substrate) > top soil (1396 mg/kg substrate) > CBAS (1194 mg/kg substrate) > MSAS (519 mg/kg substrate) > gravel (494 mg/kg substrate) > MSS (403 mg/kg substrate). The specific gravity of eight substrate materials (except gravel) had very significant negative correlations with the P sorption, whereas the particle diameter of D(60) and uniformity coefficient (K(60)) had positive correlations with the P sorption. The cation exchange capacity, organic matter, available ferrous, and exchangeable aluminum of the eight substrate materials also had very significant positive correlations with the P sorption, while the pH of the substrate materials showed a very significant negative correlation with the P sorption. Our study further suggests that turf and CBAS are the two relatively ideal substrate materials suitable for removal of P from a CW system.

  13. Construction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Harbor Deepening Project, Jacksonville, FL Palm Valley Bridge Project, Jacksonville, FL Rotary Club of San Juan, San Juan, PR Tren Urbano Subway...David. What is nanotechnology? What are its implications for construction?, Foresight/CRISP Workshop on Nanotechnology, Royal Society of Arts

  14. Construction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    San Juan, PR Tren Urbano Subway Project, San Juan, PR U.S. Army South, San Juan, PR U.S. Coast Guard Housing Project, San Juan, PR U.S. Coast Guard...construction?, Foresight/CRISP Workshop on Nanotechnology, Royal Society of Arts . Cheltenham, England: 2001, p.5. 56 Concrete Proposals, Economist, July 24

  15. The Role of the Microcomputer-Based Laboratory Display in Supporting the Construction of New Understandings in Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, David W.; Lucas, Keith B.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

    2003-04-01

    Teachers' failure to utilise MBL activities more widely may be due to not recognising their capacity to transform the nature of laboratory activities to be more consistent with contemporary constructivist theories of learning. This research aimed to increase understanding of how MBL activities specifically designed to be consistent with a constructivist theory of learning support or constrain student construction of understanding. The first author conducted the research with his Year 11 physics class of 29 students. Dyads completed nine tasks relating to kinematics using a Predict-Observe-Explain format. Data sources included video and audio recordings of students and teacher during four 70-minute sessions, students' display graphs and written notes, semi-structured student interviews, and the teacher's journal. The study identifies the actors and describes the patterns of interactions in the MBL. Analysis of students' discourse and actions identified many instances where students' initial understanding of kinematics were mediated in multiple ways. Students invented numerous techniques for manipulating data in the service of their emerging understanding. The findings are presented as eight assertions. Recommendations are made for developing pedagogical strategies incorporating MBL activities which will likely catalyse student construction of understanding.

  16. Angular Scattering Reflectance and Polarization Measurements of Candidate Regolith Materials Measured in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Boryta, Mark D.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Vandervoort, Kurt; Vides, Christina L.

    2016-10-01

    The reflectance and polarization of light reflected from a solar system object indicates the chemical and textural state of the regolith. Remote sensing data are compared to laboratory angular scattering measurements and surface properties are determined.We use a Goniometric Photopolarimeter (GPP) to make angular reflectance and polarization measurements of particulate materials that simulate planetary regoliths. The GPP employs the Helmholtz Reciprocity Principle ( 2, 1) - the incident light is linearly polarized - the intensity of the reflected component is measured. The light encounters fewer optical surfaces improving signal to noise. The lab data are physically equivalent to the astronomical data.Our reflectance and polarization phase curves of highly reflective, fine grained, media simulate the regolith of Jupiter's satellite Europa. Our lab data exhibit polarization phase curves that are very similar to reports by experienced astronomers (4). Our previous reflectance phase curve data of the same materials agree with the same astronomical observers (5). We find these materials exhibit an increase in circular polarization ratio with decreasing phase angle (3). This suggests coherent backscattering (CB) of photons in the regolith (3). Shkuratov et al.(3) report that the polarization properties of these particulate media are also consistent with the CB enhancement process (5). Our results replicate the astronomical data indicating Europa's regolith is fine-grained, high porous with void space exceeding 90%.1. Hapke, B. W. (2012). ISBN 978-0-521-88349-82. Minnaert, M. (1941).Asrophys. J., 93, 403-410.3. Nelson, R. M. et al. (1998). Icarus, 131, 223-230.4. Rosenbush, V. et al. (2015). ISBN 978-1-107-04390-9, pp 340-359.5. Shkuratov, Yu. et al. (2002) Icarus 159, 396-416.

  17. Numerical and Experimental Analysis on Inorganic Phase Change Material Usage in Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuvel, S.; Saravanasankar, S.; Sudhakarapandian, R.; Muthukannan, M.

    2014-12-01

    This work demonstrates the significance of Phase Change Material (PCM) in the construction of working sheds and product storage magazines in fireworks industries to maintain less temperature variation by passive cooling. The inorganic PCM, namely Calcium Chloride Hexahydrate (CCH) is selected in this study. First, the performance of two models with inbuilt CCH was analysed, using computational fluid dynamics. A significant change in the variation of inner wall temperature was observed, particularly during the working hours. This is mainly due to passive cooling, where the heat transfer from the surroundings to the room is partially used for the phase change from solid to liquid. The experiment was carried out by constructing two models, one with PCM packed in hollow brick walls and roof, and the other one as a conventional construction. The experimental results show that the temperature of the room got significantly reduced up to 7 °C. The experimental analysis results had good agreement with the numerical analysis results, and this reveals the advantage of the PCM in the fireworks industry construction.

  18. Establishment of Biosafety Level-3 (BSL-3) laboratory: Important criteria to consider while designing, constructing, commissioning & operating the facility in Indian setting

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Devendra T.; Yadav, Pragya D.; Majumdar, Triparna Dutta; Chauhan, Devendra S.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Since the enactment of Environmental Protection Act in 1989 and Department of Biotechnology (DBT) guidelines to deal with genetically modified organisms, India has embarked on establishing various levels of biosafety laboratories to deal with highly infectious and pathogenic organisms. Occurrence of outbreaks due to rapidly spreading respiratory and haemorrhagic fever causing viruses has caused an urgency to create a safe laboratory environment. This has thus become a mandate, not only to protect laboratory workers, but also to protect the environment and community. In India, technology and science are progressing rapidly. Several BSL-3 [=high containment] laboratories are in the planning or execution phase, to tackle biosafety issues involved in handling highly infectious disease agents required for basic research and diagnosis. In most of the developing countries, the awareness about biocontainment has increased but planning, designing, constructing and operating BSL-3 laboratories need regular updates about the design and construction of facilities and clear definition of risk groups and their handling which should be in harmony with the latest international practices. This article describes the major steps involved in the process of construction of a BSL-3 laboratory in Indian settings, from freezing the concept of proposal to operationalization phase. The key to success of this kind of project is strong institutional commitment to biosafety norms, adequate fund availability, careful planning and designing, hiring good construction agency, monitoring by experienced consultancy agency and involvement of scientific and engineering personnel with biocontainment experience in the process. PMID:25297350

  19. Use of macrophyte plants, sand & gravel materials in constructed wetlands for greywater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qomariyah, S.; Ramelan, AH; Sobriyah; Setyono, P.

    2017-02-01

    Greywater discharged without any treatments into drainage channels or natural water bodies will lead to environmental degradation and health risk. Local macrophyte plants combined with natural materials of sand and gravel have been used in a system of constructed wetland for the treatment of the greywater. This paper presents the results of some studies of the system carried out in Indonesia, Thailand, and Costa Rica. The studies demonstrate the success of the constructed wetland systems in removing some pollutants of BOD, COD, TSS, pathogen, and detergent. The studies resulted in the treated water in a level of treatment that fulfils the requirement of the local standards for wastewater reuse as irrigation water, fishery, or other outdoor needs.

  20. Composting and bioremediation process evaluation of wood waste materials generated from the construction and demolition industry.

    PubMed

    McMahon, V; Garg, A; Aldred, D; Hobbs, G; Smith, R; Tothill, I E

    2008-04-01

    The suitability of using bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition (C&D) waste from landfill has been validated in this study. Different timber products from C&D waste have been composted using various composting approaches. The present work demonstrates the quality of compost produced as a result of composting of mixed board product wood waste, which is frequently obtained from the construction and demolition industry. Three compost mixes were prepared by mixing shredded chip board, medium density fibre, hardboard and melamine. Poultry manure, Eco-Bio mixture and green waste were used as nutrient supplements. The results revealed that compost produced from mixtures of poultry manure and green waste used as nutrient supplements improved the performance in plant growth trials (phytotoxicity tests). Results obtained from the experimental study clearly indicate that the composts produced comply with the criterion suggested in BSI PAS 100 (A specification for compost materials) for use in different applications. Composting can also be demonstrated to be a very practical approach to material management including transport reduction to and from the site. The economic suitability of the process will be improved with the increase in landfill tax. In the current regulatory scenario, it is recommended that these materials should be composted at a centralised facility.

  1. Predicting Material Performance in the Space Environment from Laboratory Test Data, Static Design Environments, and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Josep I.; Edwards, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Qualifying materials for use in the space environment is typically accomplished with laboratory exposures to simulated UV/EUV, atomic oxygen, and charged particle radiation environments with in-situ or subsequent measurements of material properties of interest to the particular application. Choice of environment exposure levels are derived from static design environments intended to represent either mean or extreme conditions that are anticipated to be encountered during a mission. The real space environment however is quite variable. Predictions of the on orbit performance of a material qualified to laboratory environments can be done using information on 'space weather' variations in the real environment. This presentation will first review the variability of space environments of concern for material degradation and then demonstrate techniques for using test data to predict material performance in a variety of space environments from low Earth orbit to interplanetary space using historical measurements and space weather models.

  2. Use of non-standardised micro-destructive techniques in the characterization of traditional construction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannou, Ioannis; Theodoridou, Magdalini; Modestou, Sevasti; Fournari, Revecca; Dagrain, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The characterization of material properties and the diagnosis of their state of weathering and conservation are three of the most important steps in the field of cultural heritage preservation. Several standardised experimental methods exist, especially for determining the material properties and their durability. However, they are limited in their application by the required size of test specimens and the controlled laboratory conditions needed to undertake the tests; this is especially true when the materials under study constitute immovable parts of heritage structures. The current use of other advanced methods of analysis, such as imaging techniques, in the aforementioned field of research offers invaluable results. However, these techniques may not always be accessible to the wider research community due to their complex nature and relatively high cost of application. This study presents innovative applications of two recently developed cutting techniques; the portable Drilling Resistance Measuring System (DRMS) and the scratch tool. Both methods are defined as micro-destructive, since they only destroy a very small portion of sample material. The general concept of both methods lies within the forces needed to cut a material by linear (scratch tool) or rotational (DRMS) cutting action; these forces are related to the mechanical properties of the material and the technological parameters applied on the tool. Therefore, for a given testing configuration, the only parameter influencing the forces applied is the strength of the material. These two techniques have been used alongside a series of standardised laboratory tests aiming at the correlation of various stone properties (density, porosity, dynamic elastic modulus and uniaxial compressive strength). The results prove the potential of both techniques in assessing the uniaxial compressive strength of stones. The scratch tool has also been used effectively to estimate the compressive strength of mud bricks. It

  3. Constructing wetlands: measuring and modeling feedbacks of oxidation processes between plants and clay-rich material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Rémon; Dekker, Stefan C.; Griffioen, Jasper; Wassen, Martin J.

    2016-04-01

    Interest is growing in using soft sediment as a building material in eco-engineering projects. Wetland construction in the Dutch lake Markermeer is an example: here the option of dredging some of the clay-rich lake-bed sediment and using it to construct 10.000 ha of wetland will soon go under construction. Natural processes will be utilized during and after construction to accelerate ecosystem development. Knowing that plants can eco-engineer their environment via positive or negative biogeochemical plant-soil feedbacks, we conducted a six-month greenhouse experiment to identify the key biogeochemical processes in the mud when Phragmites australis is used as an eco-engineering species. We applied inverse biogeochemical modeling to link observed changes in pore water composition to biogeochemical processes. Two months after transplantation we observed reduced plant growth and shriveling as well as yellowing of foliage. The N:P ratios of plant tissue were low and were affected not by hampered uptake of N but by enhanced uptake of P. Plant analyses revealed high Fe concentrations in the leaves and roots. Sulfate concentrations rose drastically in our experiment due to pyrite oxidation; as reduction of sulfate will decouple Fe-P in reducing conditions, we argue that plant-induced iron toxicity hampered plant growth, forming a negative feedback loop, while simultaneously there was a positive feedback loop, as iron toxicity promotes P mobilization as a result of reduced conditions through root death, thereby stimulating plant growth and regeneration. Given these two feedback mechanisms, we propose that when building wetlands from these mud deposits Fe-tolerant species are used rather than species that thrive in N-limited conditions. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of studying the biogeochemical properties of the building material and the feedback mechanisms between plant and soil prior to finalizing the design of the eco-engineering project.

  4. Laboratory measurements of materials in extreme conditions; The use of high energy radiation sources for high pressure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1998-06-01

    High energy lasers can be used to study material conditions that are appropriate fort inertial confinement fusion: that is, materials at high densities, temperatures, and pressures. Pulsed power devices can offer similar opportunities. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be a high energy multi-beam laser designed to achieve the thermonuclear ignition of a mm-scale DT-filled target in the laboratory. At the same time, NE will provide the physics community with a unique tool for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers and pulsed power tools can contribute to investigations of high energy density matter in the areas of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  5. Identifying and Dealing with Hazardous Materials and Procedures in the General Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David A.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of freshman chemistry laboratory manuals identified 15 questionable laboratory procedures, including the use of potentially hazardous chemicals. Alternatives are suggested for each hazard discussed (such as using a substitute solvent for benzene). (SK)

  6. Ion irradiation studies of construction materials for high-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafin, E.; Seidl, T.; Plotnikov, A.; Strašík, I.; Pavlović, M.; Miglierini, M.; Stanćek, S.; Fertman, A.; Lanćok, A.

    The paper reviews the activities and reports the current results of GSI-INTAS projects that are dealing with investigations of construction materials for high-power accelerators and their components. Three types of materials have been investigated, namely metals (stainless steel and copper), metallic glasses (Nanoperm, Finemet and Vitrovac) and organic materials (polyimide insulators and glass fiber reinforced plastics/GFRP). The materials were irradiated by different ion beams with various fluencies and energies. The influence of radiation on selected physical properties of these materials has been investigated with the aid of gamma-ray spectroscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), conversion electrons Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), optical spectroscopy (IR and UV/VIS) and other analytical methods. Some experiments were accompanied with computer simulations by FLUKA, SHIELD and SRIM codes. Validity of the codes was verified by comparison of the simulation results with experiments. After the validation, the codes were used to complete the data that could not be obtained experimentally.

  7. The Use Potential of Traditional Building Materials for the Realization of Structures by Modern Methods of Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spišáková, Marcela; Mačková, Daniela

    2015-11-01

    The sustainable building has taken off in recent years with many investors looking for new and different methods of construction. The traditional building materials can be made out of natural materials, while others can help to lower energy costs of the occupant once built. Regardless of what the goal of the investor is, traditional building materials and their use is on the rise. The submitted paper provides an overview of natural building materials and possible modern building systems using these construction materials. Based on the questionnaire survey is defined the use potential of traditional building materials for the realization of the construction by methods of modern constructions and then are determined the drivers and barriers of traditional materials through using modern methods of construction. Considering the analysis of the achieved results, we can identify the gaps in the construction market in Slovakia and also to assess the perception of potential investors in the field of traditional building materials use, which is the purpose of submitted paper.

  8. Materials and construction techniques for cryogenic wind tunnel facilities for instruction/research use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, S. F.; Roper, A. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the cryogenic wind tunnel program conducted at NASA Langley Research Center are presented to provide a starting point for the design of an instructional/research wind tunnel facility. The advantages of the cryogenic concept are discussed, and operating envelopes for a representative facility are presented to indicate the range and mode of operation. Special attention is given to the design, construction and materials problems peculiar to cryogenic wind tunnels. The control system for operation of a cryogenic tunnel is considered, and a portion of a linearized mathematical model is developed for determining the tunnel dynamic characteristics.

  9. Thermal comfort of aeroplane seats: influence of different seat materials and the use of laboratory test methods.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Volkmar T

    2003-07-01

    This study determined the influence of different cover and cushion materials on the thermal comfort of aeroplane seats. Different materials as well as ready made seats were investigated by the physiological laboratory test methods Skin Model and seat comfort tester. Additionally, seat trials with human test subjects were performed in a climatic chamber. Results show that a fabric cover produces a considerably higher sweat transport than leather. A three-dimensional knitted spacer fabric turns out to be the better cushion alternative in comparison to a moulded foam pad. Results from the physiological laboratory test methods nicely correspond to the seat trials with human test subjects.

  10. Microbial community structure of different electrode materials in constructed wetland incorporating microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junfeng; Song, Xinshan; Wang, Yuhui; Abayneh, Befkadu; Ding, Yi; Yan, Denghua; Bai, Junhong

    2016-12-01

    The microbial fuel cell coupled with constructed wetland (CW-MFC) microcosms were operated under fed-batch mode for evaluating the effect of electrode materials on bioelectricity generation and microbial community composition. Experimental results indicated that the bioenergy output in CW-MFC increased with the substrate concentration; maximum average voltage (177mV) was observed in CW-MFC with carbon fiber felt (CFF). In addition, the four different materials resulted in the formation of significantly different microbial community distribution around the anode electrode. The relative abundance of Proteobacteria in CFF and foamed nickel (FN) was significantly higher than that in stainless steel mesh (SSM) and graphite rod (GR) samples. Notably, the findings indicate that CW-MFC utilizing FN anode electrode could apparently improve relative abundance of Dechloromonas, which has been regarded as a denitrifying and phosphate accumulating microorganism.

  11. High Temperature Materials Laboratory Thirteenth Annual Report: October 1999 Through September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, AE

    2001-11-07

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program continued to work with industrial, academic, and governmental users this year, accepting 86 new projects and developing 50 new user agreements. The table on the following page presents the breakdown of these statistics. The figure on page 2 depicts the continued growth in user agreements and user projects. You may note that our total number of proposals is nearing 1000, and we expect to achieve this number in our first proposal review meeting of FY 2001. The large number of new agreements bodes well for the future. A list of proposals to the HTML follows this section; at the end of the report, we present a list of agreements between HTML and universities and industries, broken down by state. Program highlights this year included several outstanding user projects (some of which are discussed in later sections), the annual meeting of the HTML Programs Senior Advisory Committee, the completion of a formal Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP), and finalization of a purchase agreement with JEOL for a new-generation electron microscope.

  12. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  13. Thermal Properties of Two Materials Commonly Used in Low Temperature Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Angel

    2013-02-01

    We carried out measurements of thermal conductance and thermal contact resistance of two materials commonly used in low temperature laboratories such as an Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI) Filter and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy. Both samples were attached on a heat sink made of oxygen-free high thermal conductivity (OFHC) copper and characterized at temperatures between 0.3 K and 4.5 K, using a 3He refrigerator mounted on a pumped 4He cryostat. For the EMI filter we applied a varied input power from 0.25 up to 50 μW to the heater which is soldered to its central pin, whereas for a thin layer of Stycast sandwiched between a copper strap and the heat sink we applied an input power from 10 up to 810 μW. The temperature dependences obtained in each case were K=3 {\\cdot} 10^{-5}T^{2.3} [W/K], and RK=8.4 {\\cdot} 10^{-3}T^{1.7} [W/cm^{2 K}] respectively.

  14. Binding and solubility of oleic acid to laboratory materials: A possible artifact

    SciTech Connect

    Mailman, D.; Rose, C. )

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that significant amounts of fatty acids were dissolved in or bound to the surfaces of common laboratory materials was examined. The uptake or adsorption of radioisotopically labeled oleic acid and cholic acid by plastic tubing of Tygon{trademark}, Teflon{trademark}, and polyethylene, and Pyrex{trademark}, and borosilicate glass, and steel was measured. {sup 3}H-oleic acid and {sup 14}C-cholic acid were used in the presence of different concentration of unlabeled oleic acid, cholic acid, and/or bovine serum albumin. Concentrations, composition, pH, and perfusion rates were varied. Relatively large amounts of oleic acid were lost by dissolving in plastic and adsorption to glass or metal. The degree of losses decreased in the presence of compounds in the perfusion solution which could bind or dissolve oleic acid. In contrast, cholic acid was not lost to plastic, glass or metal. The magnitude of and influence of perfusion rate, composition, pH, and sequence of perfusion solutions on oleic acid losses were sufficiently large that the results of certain studies, such as those of unstirred water layers or albumin-stimulated fatty acid uptake by hepatocytes may need to be reexamined.

  15. Schiff's Bases and Crown Ethers as Supramolecular Sensing Materials in the Construction of Potentiometric Membrane Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Norouzi, Parviz; Riahi, Siavash

    2008-01-01

    Ionophore incorporated PVC membrane sensors are well-established analytical tools routinely used for the selective and direct measurement of a wide variety of different ions in complex biological and environmental samples. Potentiometric sensors have some outstanding advantages including simple design and operation, wide linear dynamic range, relatively fast response and rational selectivity. The vital component of such plasticized PVC members is the ionophore involved, defining the selectivity of the electrodes' complex formation. Molecular recognition causes the formation of many different supramolecules. Different types of supramolecules, like calixarenes, cyclodextrins and podands, have been used as a sensing material in the construction of ion selective sensors. Schiff's bases and crown ethers, which feature prominently in supramolecular chemistry, can be used as sensing materials in the construction of potentiometric ion selective electrodes. Up to now, more than 200 potentiometric membrane sensors for cations and anions based on Schiff's bases and crown ethers have been reported. In this review cation binding and anion complexes will be described. Liquid membrane sensors based on Schiff's bases and crown ethers will then be discussed. PMID:27879786

  16. Schiff's Bases and Crown Ethers as Supramolecular Sensing Materials in the Construction of Potentiometric Membrane Sensors.

    PubMed

    Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Norouzi, Parviz; Riahi, Siavash

    2008-03-11

    Ionophore incorporated PVC membrane sensors are well-established analyticaltools routinely used for the selective and direct measurement of a wide variety of differentions in complex biological and environmental samples. Potentiometric sensors have someoutstanding advantages including simple design and operation, wide linear dynamic range,relatively fast response and rational selectivity. The vital component of such plasticizedPVC members is the ionophore involved, defining the selectivity of the electrodes' complexformation. Molecular recognition causes the formation of many different supramolecules.Different types of supramolecules, like calixarenes, cyclodextrins and podands, have beenused as a sensing material in the construction of ion selective sensors. Schiff's bases andcrown ethers, which feature prominently in supramolecular chemistry, can be used assensing materials in the construction of potentiometric ion selective electrodes. Up to now,more than 200 potentiometric membrane sensors for cations and anions based on Schiff's bases and crown ethers have been reported. In this review cation binding and anioncomplexes will be described. Liquid membrane sensors based on Schiff's bases and crownethers will then be discussed.

  17. Dynamics of sulphur compounds in horizontal sub-surface flow laboratory-scale constructed wetlands treating artificial sewage.

    PubMed

    Wiessner, A; Rahman, K Z; Kuschk, P; Kästner, M; Jechorek, M

    2010-12-01

    The knowledge regarding the dynamics of sulphur compounds inside constructed wetlands is still insufficient. Experiments in planted (Juncus effusus) and unplanted horizontal sub-surface-flow laboratory-scale constructed wetlands fed with artificial wastewater were carried out to evaluate the sulphate reduction, the composition and dynamics of generated sulphur compounds, as well as the influence of carbon load and plants on processes of sulphur transformation. In planted and unplanted wetlands, the addition of organic carbon (TOC of about 120 mg L(-1)) immediately affected the transformation of up to 90% of the incoming sulphate (150 mg L(-1)), directing it mainly towards elemental sulphur (30%) and sulphide (8%). During this experimental period, nearly 52% of the transformed sulphate-sulphur was calculated to be immobilized inside the planted wetland and 66% inside the unplanted one. In subsequent experiments, the deficiency of organic carbon inside the planted wetlands favoured the decrease of elemental sulphur in the pore water coupled to retransformation of depot-sulphur to dissolved sulphate. Nearly 90% of the deposited and reduced sulphur was found to be reoxidized. In principle, the results indicate a substantial improvement of this reoxidation of sulphur by oxygen released by the helophytes. Surplus of organic carbon promotes the ongoing sulphate reduction and the stability of deposed and dissolved reduced sulphur compounds. In contrast, inside the unplanted control wetland, a relative stability of the formed sulphur depots and the generated amount of dissolved sulphur compounds including elemental sulphur could be observed independently of the different loading conditions.

  18. Using sorbent waste materials to enhance treatment of micro-point source effluents by constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Verity; Surridge, Ben; Quinton, John; Matthews, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Sorbent materials are widely used in environmental settings as a means of enhancing pollution remediation. A key area of environmental concern is that of water pollution, including the need to treat micro-point sources of wastewater pollution, such as from caravan sites or visitor centres. Constructed wetlands (CWs) represent one means for effective treatment of wastewater from small wastewater producers, in part because they are believed to be economically viable and environmentally sustainable. Constructed wetlands have the potential to remove a range of pollutants found in wastewater, including nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and carbon (C), whilst also reducing the total suspended solids (TSS) concentration in effluents. However, there remain particular challenges for P and N removal from wastewater in CWs, as well as the sometimes limited BOD removal within these treatment systems, particularly for micro-point sources of wastewater. It has been hypothesised that the amendment of CWs with sorbent materials can enhance their potential to treat wastewater, particularly through enhancing the removal of N and P. This paper focuses on data from batch and mesocosm studies that were conducted to identify and assess sorbent materials suitable for use within CWs. The aim in using sorbent material was to enhance the combined removal of phosphate (PO4-P) and ammonium (NH4-N). The key selection criteria for the sorbent materials were that they possess effective PO4-P, NH4-N or combined pollutant removal, come from low cost and sustainable sources, have potential for reuse, for example as a fertiliser or soil conditioner, and show limited potential for re-release of adsorbed nutrients. The sorbent materials selected for testing were alum sludge from water treatment works, ochre derived from minewater treatment, biochar derived from various feedstocks, plasterboard and zeolite. The performance of the individual sorbents was assessed through

  19. Determining the hydraulic properties of saturated, low-permeability geological materials in the laboratory: Advances in theory and practice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, M.; Takahashi, M.; Morin, R.H.; Endo, H.; Esaki, T.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The accurate hydraulic characterization of low-permeability subsurface environments has important practical significance. In order to examine this issue from the perspective of laboratory-based approaches, we review some recent advancements in the theoretical analyses of three different laboratory techniques specifically applied to low-permeability geologic materials: constant-head, constant flow-rate and transient-pulse permeability tests. Some potential strategies for effectively decreasing the time required to confidently estimate the permeability of these materials are presented. In addition, a new and versatile laboratory system is introduced that can implement any of these three test methods while simultaneously subjecting a specimen to high confining pressures and pore pressures, thereby simulating in situ conditions at great depths. The capabilities and advantages of this innovative system are demonstrated using experimental data derived from Shirahama sandstone and Inada granite, two rock types widely encountered in Japan.

  20. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS (Eff. 12-12-2011... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  1. PATRAM '92: 10th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials [Papers presented by Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    This document provides the papers presented by Sandia Laboratories at PATRAM '92, the tenth International symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held September 13--18, 1992 in Yokohama City, Japan. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (FL)

  2. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking & Immunohematology, 10-4. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the third of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  3. Response of removal rates to various organic carbon and ammonium loads in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands treating artificial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shubiao; Kuschk, Peter; Wiessner, Arndt; Kästner, Matthias; Pang, Changle; Dong, Renjie

    2013-01-01

    High levels (92 and 91%) of organic carbon were successfully removed from artificial wastewater by a laboratory-scale constructed wetland under inflow loads of 670 mg/m2 x d (100 mg/d) and 1600 mg/m2d (240 mg/d), respectively. Acidification to pH 3.0 was observed at the low organic carbon load, which further inhibited the denitrification process. An increase in carbon load, however, was associated with a significant elevation of pH to 6.0. In general, sulfate and nitrate reduction were relatively high, with mean levels of 87 and 90%, respectively. However, inhibition of nitrification was initiated with an increase in carbon loads. This effect was probably a result of competition for oxygen by heterotrophic bacteria and an inhibitory effect of sulfide (S2) toxicity (concentration approximately 3 mg/L). In addition, numbers of healthy stalks of Juncus effusus (common rush) decreased from 14 000 to 10 000/m2 with an increase of sulfide concentration, indicating the negative effect of sulfide toxicity on the wetland plants.

  4. Changes in soil hydraulic properties caused by construction of a simulated waste trench at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shakofsky, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of filled waste disposal trenches on transport-governing soil properties, comparisons were made between profiles of undisturbed soil and disturbed soil in a simulated waste trench. The changes in soil properties induced by the construction of a simulated waste trench were measured near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the semi-arid southeast region of Idaho. The soil samples were collected, using a hydraulically- driven sampler to minimize sample disruption, from both a simulated waste trench and an undisturbed area nearby. Results show that the undisturbed profile has distinct layers whose properties differ significantly, whereas the soil profile in the simulated waste trench is. by comparison, homogeneous. Porosity was increased in the disturbed cores, and, correspondingly, saturated hydraulic conductivities were on average three times higher. With higher soil-moisture contents (greater than 0.32), unsaturated hydraulic conductivities for the undisturbed cores were typically greater than those for the disturbed cores. With lower moisture contents, most of the disturbed cores had greater hydraulic conductivities. The observed differences in hydraulic conductivities are interpreted and discussed as changes in the soil pore geometry.

  5. Bioaccumulation and trophodynamics of the antidepressants sertraline and fluoxetine in laboratory-constructed, three-level aquatic food chains.

    PubMed

    Boström, Marja L; Ugge, Gustaf; Jönsson, Jan Åke; Berglund, Olof

    2016-10-03

    Although reports of pharmaceutical bioconcentration in aquatic organisms are increasing, less is known about trophic transfer in aquatic food webs. In the present study, we tested the bioaccumulation and trophodynamics of sertraline and fluoxetine, two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) frequently detected in aquatic environments, by exposing constructed aquatic food chains under controlled laboratory conditions. Both of these ionizable, weak base pharmaceuticals, showed lower bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) with increasing trophic level, i.e. no biomagnification, in two three-level food chains (Acer platanoides, fed to Asellus aquaticus, in turn fed to Notonecta glauca or Pungitius pungitius). Mean sertraline BAFs (L/kg) in A. platanoides, A. aquaticus, N. glauca, and P. pungitus were: 2200, 360, 26, and 49, respectively, and mean fluoxetine BAFs: 1300, 110, 11, and 41, respectively. The weak influence of diet was further demonstrated by measured BAFs being equal to, or lower than measured bioconcentration factors (BCFs). Organism lipid content was not positively correlated with BAFs, suggesting other processes driving interspecific differences in SSRI bioaccumulation. The empirically derived parameter values were introduced into a proposed bioaccumulation model and a poor correlation was found between modelled and empirical BAFs (r(2) =-0.63). In conclusion, the apparent lack of biomagnification of these ionizable pharmaceuticals suggest that environmental concern should not necessarily focus on higher trophic levels only, but on species showing high bioconcentration factors at any trophic level. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effects of the Construction of Learning Materials on Concept Learning from Text in Students: Sequence and Hierarchical Structure of Learning Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsuki, Toru; Fushimi, Yohji

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the effects of learning material construction on concept learning while aiming for students to acquire the basic concepts of electricity and magnetism. Reports that concept learning of electricity and magnetism is influenced by the hierarchical structure of learning materials, not by sequence. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  7. Attenuation of landfill leachate by clay liner materials in laboratory columns: 2. Behaviour of inorganic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Thornton, S F; Lerner, D N; Tellam, J H

    2001-02-01

    The chemical attenuation of inorganic contaminants in methanogenic landfill leachate, spiked with heavy metals (Cd, Cd, Ni and Zn), by two UK clay liner materials was compared in laboratory columns over 15 months. Ammonium was attenuated by ion-exchange but this attenuation was finite and when exhausted, NH4 passed through the liners at concentrations found in the leachate. The breakthrough behaviour of NH4 could be described by a simple distribution coefficient. Heavy metals were attenuated by sorption and precipitation of metal sulphide and carbonate compounds near the top of the liner. Adequate SO4 and CaCO3 in the liner is necessary to ensure the long term retention of heavy metals, and pH buffering agents added to stabilise reactive metal fractions should be admixed with the liner. Some metals may not be chemically attenuated by clay liners due to the formation of stable complexes with organic and/or colloidal fractions in leachate. Flushing of the liners with oxygenated water after leachate caused mobilisation of attenuated contaminants. Sorbed NH4 was released by the liners but groundwater loadings were manageable. Re-oxidation of metal sulphides under these conditions resulted in the release of heavy metals from the liners when the pH buffering capacity was poor. Contaminant attenuation by the clay liners was similar and the attenuation of NH4 and heavy metals could be predicted from the geochemical properties of the liner using simple tests. A conceptual model of clay liner performance is presented. Chemical attenuation of inorganic pollutants can be included in containment liner design to produce a dual reactive-passive barrier for landfills.

  8. Construction material properties of slag from the high temperature arc gasification of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Justin G; Olivera, Fernando D; Wasman, Scott J; Townsend, Timothy G; McVay, Michael C; Ferraro, Christopher C; Blaisi, Nawaf I

    2016-06-01

    Slag from the high temperature arc gasification (HTAG) of municipal solid waste (MSW) was tested to evaluate its material properties with respect to use as a construction aggregate. These data were compared to previously compiled values for waste to energy bottom ash, the most commonly produced and beneficially used thermal treatment residue. The slag was tested using gradations representative of a base course and a course aggregate. Los Angeles (LA) abrasion testing demonstrated that the HTAG slag had a high resistance to fracture with a measured LA loss of 24%. Soundness testing indicated a low potential for reactivity and good weathering resistance with a mean soundness loss of 3.14%. The modified Proctor compaction testing found the slag to possess a maximum dry density (24.04kN/m(3)) greater than conventionally used aggregates and WTE BA. The LBR tests demonstrated a substantial bearing capacity (>200). Mineralogical analysis of the HTAG suggested the potential for self cementing character which supports the elevated LBR results. Preliminary material characterization of the HTAG slag establishes potential for beneficial use; larger and longer term studies focusing on the material's possibility for swelling and performance at the field scale level are needed.

  9. Are There Feasible Alternatives to Laboratory Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses several alternatives to the use of laboratory animals in investigating biomedical problems. Alternatives include tissue culture, use of plant and bacterial material, redesigning experiments, and construction of mathematical and computer models. (CS)

  10. Quality of materials supplied to dental laboratories for the fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Christopher D; Allen, P Finbarr

    2003-12-01

    The adequacy of prescription for fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures is often regarded as being less than ideal. This study examines the nature and quality of written instructions and master impression sent to dental laboratories in Ireland for fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial denture frameworks. Questionnaires were issued to dental laboratories seeking specific information relating to the materials (impression materials and trays) and written instructions supplied, as well as the technicians' opinion regarding the suitability of these materials. One hundred completed questionnaires were returned. One-third of master impressions were made using a plastic stock tray and alginate; technicians felt that one-fifth of master impressions were unsuitable; almost three-fifths of written instructions were inadequate. The quality of clinical information examined was found to be less than adequate.

  11. Virtual earthquake engineering laboratory with physics-based degrading materials on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, In Ho

    For the last few decades, we have obtained tremendous insight into underlying microscopic mechanisms of degrading quasi-brittle materials from persistent and near-saintly efforts in laboratories, and at the same time we have seen unprecedented evolution in computational technology such as massively parallel computers. Thus, time is ripe to embark on a novel approach to settle unanswered questions, especially for the earthquake engineering community, by harmoniously combining the microphysics mechanisms with advanced parallel computing technology. To begin with, it should be stressed that we placed a great deal of emphasis on preserving clear meaning and physical counterparts of all the microscopic material models proposed herein, since it is directly tied to the belief that by doing so, the more physical mechanisms we incorporate, the better prediction we can obtain. We departed from reviewing representative microscopic analysis methodologies, selecting out "fixed-type" multidirectional smeared crack model as the base framework for nonlinear quasi-brittle materials, since it is widely believed to best retain the physical nature of actual cracks. Microscopic stress functions are proposed by integrating well-received existing models to update normal stresses on the crack surfaces (three orthogonal surfaces are allowed to initiate herein) under cyclic loading. Unlike the normal stress update, special attention had to be paid to the shear stress update on the crack surfaces, due primarily to the well-known pathological nature of the fixed-type smeared crack model---spurious large stress transfer over the open crack under nonproportional loading. In hopes of exploiting physical mechanism to resolve this deleterious nature of the fixed crack model, a tribology-inspired three-dimensional (3d) interlocking mechanism has been proposed. Following the main trend of tribology (i.e., the science and engineering of interacting surfaces), we introduced the base fabric of solid

  12. Selective classification and quantification model of C&D waste from material resources consumed in residential building construction.

    PubMed

    Mercader-Moyano, Pilar; Ramírez-de-Arellano-Agudo, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    The unfortunate economic situation involving Spain and the European Union is, among other factors, the result of intensive construction activity over recent years. The excessive consumption of natural resources, together with the impact caused by the uncontrolled dumping of untreated C&D waste in illegal landfills have caused environmental pollution and a deterioration of the landscape. The objective of this research was to generate a selective classification and quantification model of C&D waste based on the material resources consumed in the construction of residential buildings, either new or renovated, namely the Conventional Constructive Model (CCM). A practical example carried out on ten residential buildings in Seville, Spain, enabled the identification and quantification of the C&D waste generated in their construction and the origin of the waste, in terms of the building material from which it originated and its impact for every m(2) constructed. This model enables other researchers to establish comparisons between the various improvements proposed for the minimization of the environmental impact produced by building a CCM, new corrective measures to be proposed in future policies that regulate the production and management of C&D waste generated in construction from the design stage to the completion of the construction process, and the establishment of sustainable management for C&D waste and for the selection of materials for the construction on projected or renovated buildings.

  13. Aircraft wing weight build-up methodology with modification for materials and construction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, P.; Labell, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    An aircraft wing weight estimating method based on a component buildup technique is described. A simplified analytically derived beam model, modified by a regression analysis, is used to estimate the wing box weight, utilizing a data base of 50 actual airplane wing weights. Factors representing materials and methods of construction were derived and incorporated into the basic wing box equations. Weight penalties to the wing box for fuel, engines, landing gear, stores and fold or pivot are also included. Methods for estimating the weight of additional items (secondary structure, control surfaces) have the option of using details available at the design stage (i.e., wing box area, flap area) or default values based on actual aircraft from the data base.

  14. An Approach to Evaluate Precision and Inter-Laboratory Variability of Flammability Test Methods for Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Beeson, Harold D.

    2005-01-01

    Materials selection for spacecraft is based on conventional flammability or ignition sensitivity acceptance tests. Current procedures for determining the inter-laboratory repeatability and reproducibility of aerospace materials flammability tests are not considering the dependence of data variability on test conditions and consequently attempts to characterize the precision of these methods were not successful. The inter-laboratory data variability is determined with tests conducted under arbitrary conditions, which consequently may not provide sufficient information to enable adequate determination of a method's precision. For evaluating the precision of NASA's flammability test methods, the protocol recommended includes selecting critical parameters and determining the 50% failure point by considering the specific failure criteria of each method using the critical parameter as a variable. Upon performing inter-laboratory round robin testing using this approach, the laboratories' performance could be evaluated by comparing the repeatability of the 50% failure point and/or the repeatability of critical conditions where the probabilities of passing and failing are unity, i.e., the transition zone repeatability. When a sufficient amount of data has been acquired with this method, an adequate estimation of precision of aerospace materials flammability test methods will be possible.

  15. Material selection for a constructed wetroof receiving pre-treated high strength domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zapater-Pereyra, M; van Dien, F; van Bruggen, J J A; Lens, P N L

    2013-01-01

    A constructed wetroof (CWR) is defined in this study as the combination of a green roof and a constructed wetland: a shallow wastewater treatment system placed on the roof of a building. The foremost challenge of such CWRs, and the main aim of this investigation, is the selection of an appropriate matrix capable of assuring the required hydraulic retention time, the long-term stability and the roof load-bearing capacity. Six substrata were subjected to water dynamics and destructive tests in two testing-tables. Among all the materials tested, the substratum configuration composed of sand, light expanded clay aggregates, biodegradable polylactic acid beads together with stabilization plates and a turf mat is capable of retaining the water for approximately 3.8 days and of providing stability (stabilization plates) and an immediate protection (turf mat) to the system. Based on those results, a full-scale CWR was built, which did not show any physical deterioration after 1 year of operation. Preliminary wastewater treatment results on the full-scale CWR suggest that it can highly remove main wastewater pollutants (e.g. chemical oxygen demand, PO4(3-)-P and NH4(+)-N). The results of these tests and practical design considerations of the CWR are discussed in this paper.

  16. Possibility of using waste tire composites reinforced with rice straw as construction materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han-Seung; Kim, Dae-Jun; Lee, Young-Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Jeon, Jin-Yong; Kang, Chun-Won

    2004-10-01

    Agricultural lignocellulosic fiber (rice straw)-waste tire particle composite boards were manufactured for use as insulation boards in construction, using the same method as that used in the wood-based panel industry. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.8 and a rice straw content (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70 by wt.% of rice straw/waste tire particle). A commercial polyurethane adhesive for rubber was used as the composite binder. The water proof, water absorption and thickness swelling properties of the composite boards were better than those of wood particleboard. Furthermore, the flexibility and flexural properties of the composite boards were superior to those of other wood-based panel products. The composite boards also demonstrated good acoustical insulation, electrical insulation, anti-caustic and anti-rot properties. These boards can be used to prevent impact damage, are easily modifiable and are inexpensive. They are able to be used as a substitute for insulation boards and other flexural materials in construction.

  17. Physical properties and hydrological response of green roof substrates based on recycled construction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanwalleghem, Tom; Hayas, Antonio; Jiménez-Quiñones, Daniel; Peña, Adolfo; Giráldez, Juan Vicente

    2015-04-01

    Green roofs in urban areas improve the building's energy efficiency and provide a wide array of additional environmental benefits. Characterizing and predicting the physical properties and hydrological response of green roofs is necessary to understand the roof's heat balance, which is controlled to a large extent by the substrate's water content, to predict the runoff response and functioning as a part of sustainable urban drainage systems and to plan irrigation of the plants in drier climates. This study examines 10 different extensive green roof substrates, based on recycled construction materials. Green roof simulation decks were installed in boxes of 0,6 m x 0,4 m to a depth of 70 mm, 10 with and 10 without plants. Total water holding capacity of the substrates varied between 10,4 - 23,9 %, with an additional 19 % retained by the drainage layer and geotextiles used in the simulation deck. An important compaction of 30 % on average was observed after 1,5 months. Final bulk densities are between 1457 - 1993 kg m-3. In an evaporation experiment, it was shown that the water evaporated from the green roofs is controlled mainly by the relative moisture content. Substrate properties exerted only a secondary control, with the lowest evaporation rates from the substrates with highest coarse crushed aggregate content and with the highest clay content. The evaporation model proposed here was shown to work well to simulate the evolution of the water balance and therefore the specific unit weight over longer time periods in all substrates, with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency of 0.989. Finally, plants were found to grow satisfactorily in all substrates. Therefore, when regular irrigation is provided, it was concluded that green roofs based on recycled construction materials are a viable option. Future research will have to explore the long-term plant dynamics under water-limited conditions.

  18. Design and construction of a French drain for groundwater diversion in solid waste storage area six at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Stansfield, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    Engineering modifiations or engineered barriers have been suggested as a possible means of improving the performance of low-level waste disposal sites located in the humid eastern United States. Design and construction of a passive French drain, located in Solid Waste Storage Area No. 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The drain was designed to hydrologically isolate a 0.44-ha area that contains a group of 49 low-level waste trenches by separating it from upgradient groundwater recharge areas. The 252-m drain (maximum depth = 9 m) that surrounds the group of trenches on the north and east sides was excavated, lined with filter fabric, backfilled with crushed stone, and covered with a 0.6 m layer of excavated material at an estimated cost of $153,000. Of the 17 days it took to complete the work, about 5 days were spent excavating sidewall slide material that fell into the drain during excavation. Photography of the drain wall revealed the contorted structure of the weathered shale, which was responsible for many of the slides. Monitoring wells placed at intervals on the drain centerline indicate that groundwater is draining from the surrounding Maryville Formation (Conasauga Group); flows at catch basin No. 2 ranged from a base flow of 4 to 7 L/min to a maximum of 35 L/min, recorded on October 13. In response to groundwater flow in the drain, water levels in several monitoring wells adjacent to the drain have dropped by as much as 2.24 m to an elevation only slightly higher than the bottom of the French drain. In addition to the general lowering of the water table in the vicinity of the drain, water levels in three trenches began to subside, indicating that the drain is beginning to have an effect on the water in the trenches as well. Further monitoring of both drain discharge and water levels in monitoring wells across the site is continuing.

  19. Laboratory measurements of dielectric properties of compact and granular materials, in relation with Rosetta mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Y.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Encrenaz, P.; Gheudin, M.; Ciarletti, V.; Gulkis, S.; Jambon, A.; Ruffié, G.; Prigent, C.

    2012-04-01

    The European Rosetta spacecraft (s/c), launched in 2004, will be the first s/c to orbit a comet and place a lander module on its surface. In 2014, the s/c will rendezvous with the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and place the lander on its surface thereby allowing in situ and remote sensing of the comet nucleus. Two radio experiments, one passive (MIRO [1]) and one active (CONSERT [2]), are aboard the Rosetta s/c. MIRO, composed of two radiometers, with center band frequencies at 190 GHz and at 563 GHz to determine the brightness temperatures of the target surfaces and sub-surfaces, has already observed asteroids (2867) Steins [3] and (21) Lutetia [4]. CONSERT will investigate the deep interior of the nucleus using 90 MHz radio-waves transmitted from the orbiter through the nucleus and returned to the orbiter from the lander. To support interpretations of MIRO and CONSERT observations, a program of dielectric properties measurements is under development on a large range of frequencies encompassing those of the above-mentioned experiments. Several instruments for dielectric constant determination are available at IMS laboratory (Bordeaux, France): impedance analyzer, coaxial sensor, resonant cavities (measuring respectively at 100 MHz, 0.5-6 GHz, 1.2-13.4 GHz). Millimeter benches are available at both IMS and LERMA laboratories (measuring respectively at 30-110 GHz and 70-230 GHz). Taking into account the possible presence of regolith layers on the surface of asteroids or nuclei and the very low density of cometary nuclei [5], the dependence of the dielectric constant on the structure and porosity of given granular materials needs also to be investigated (while the thermal and hygrometric conditions are carefully monitored). We have already reported measurements obtained on various meteorites, possibly representative of some asteroid surfaces [6, 7]. We will also report systematic measurements obtained on a large sample of pyroclastic deposits from Etna, providing

  20. Design, construction, and characterization of a novel robotic welding fume generator and inhalation exposure system for laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Afshari, Aliakbar A; Stone, Sam; Chen, Bean; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fletcher, W Gary; Goldsmith, W Travis; Vandestouwe, Kurt H; McKinney, Walter; Castranova, Vincent; Frazer, David G

    2006-04-01

    Respiratory effects observed in welders have included lung function changes, metal fume fever, bronchitis, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Many questions remain unanswered regarding the causality and possible underlying mechanisms associated with the potential toxic effects of welding fume inhalation. The objective of the present study was to construct a completely automated, computer-controlled welding fume generation and inhalation exposure system to simulate real workplace exposures. The system comprised a programmable six-axis robotic welding arm, a water-cooled arc welding torch, and a wire feeder that supplied the wire to the torch at a programmed rate. For the initial studies, gas metal arc welding was performed using a stainless steel electrode. A flexible trunk was attached to the robotic arm of the welder and was used to collect and transport fume from the vicinity of the arc to the animal exposure chamber. Undiluted fume concentrations consistently ranged from 90-150 mg/m(3) in the animal chamber during welding. Temperature and humidity remained constant in the chamber during the welding operation. The welding particles were composed of (from highest to lowest concentration) iron, chromium, manganese, and nickel as measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Size distribution analysis indicated the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the generated particles to be approximately 0.24 microm with a geometric standard deviation (sigma(g)) of 1.39. As determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the generated aerosols were mostly arranged as chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. Characterization of the laboratory-generated welding aerosol has indicated that particle morphology, size, and chemical composition are comparable to stainless steel welding fume generated in other studies. With the development of this novel system, it will be possible to establish an animal model using

  1. Influence of the redox condition dynamics on the removal efficiency of a laboratory-scale constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Wiessner, A; Kappelmeyer, U; Kuschk, P; Kästner, M

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory reactor planted with Juncus effusus treating an artificial wastewater was used to investigate the short-term and long-term variations and interactions in the redox conditions as well as the removal efficiency of C and the N turnover. The permanent circulation of the process water enabled the micro-gradient processes to be evaluated for an operating period of 20 months. Steady-state conditions were achieved throughout the operating period with high mean removal efficiencies of 92.7% total organic carbon, 82.0% ammonia and 97.6% nitrate. Daily variations in the redox state of the rhizosphere of a few hundred mV were observed, ranging from about -200 to oxidized conditions of about +200 mV and driven by daylight. Variations in pH associated with changes in light and redox were linked to the dynamics of the fates of organic and inorganic carbon species. The ammonia removal processes were found to be firmly established, including for moderately reduced redox conditions with high efficiencies for E(h)>-50 mV. The enrichment of ammonia (up to 13 mg l(-1)) closely linked to the light, particularly during summertime, indicates the existence of hitherto unconsidered additional N turnover pathways in the rhizoplane involving N(2) produced by microbes or released by plants. C turnover was strongly related to the seasonal variation in illumination with minimum efficiencies during the dark season. In addition, it was characterized by oscillation with periods of approximately 1 month. The relationships found are dominant for biofilms on the rhizoplane and decisive for the removal efficiency of especially simple constructed and natural wetlands. The results highlight the importance of helophytes and their physiological specifics for removal processes.

  2. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Shock compression of condensed materials (laboratory studies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunin, Ryurik F.

    2001-04-01

    Laboratory shock compression data obtained in Russia since 1948 are reviewed, including those for elements and alloys, organic compounds, minerals, rocks, and liquids as well as the hydrides, carbides, and nitrides of metals.

  3. A Green Starting Material for Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Wilson, T. Michelle; Burtch, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    Electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) experiment is designed for the second-semester and undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. In the EAS experiment, the principles of green chemistry are discussed and illustrated in conjunction with the presentation of electrophilic aromatic substitution.

  4. Experimental study and steady-state simulation of biogeochemical processes in laboratory columns with aquifer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirbahman, Aria; Schönenberger, René; Furrer, Gerhard; Zobrist, Jürg

    2003-07-01

    Packed bed laboratory column experiments were performed to simulate the biogeochemical processes resulting from microbially catalyzed oxidation of organic matter. These included aerobic respiration, denitrification, and Mn(IV), Fe(III) and SO 4 reduction processes. The effects of these reactions on the aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry of the aquifer material were closely examined. The data were used to model the development of alkalinity and pH along the column. To study the independent development of Fe(III)- and SO 4-reducing environments, two columns were used. One of the columns (column 1) contained small enough concentrations of SO 4 in the influent to render the reduction of this species unimportant to the geochemical processes in the column. The rate of microbially catalyzed reduction of Mn(IV) changed with time as evidenced by the variations in the initial rate of Mn(II) production at the head of the column. The concentration of Mn in both columns was controlled by the solubility of rhodochrosite (MnCO 3(S)). In the column where significant SO 4 reduction took place (column 2), the concentration of dissolved Fe(II) was controlled by the solubility of FeS. In column 1, where SO 4 reduction was not important, maximum dissolved Fe(II) concentrations were controlled by the solubility of siderite (FeCO 3(S)). Comparison of solid-phase and aqueous-phase data suggests that nearly 20% of the produced Fe(II) precipitates as siderite in column 1. The solid-phase analysis also indicates that during the course of experiment, approximately 20% of the total Fe(III) hydroxides and more than 70% of the amorphous Fe(III) hydroxides were reduced by dissimilatory iron reduction. The most important sink for dissolved S(-II) produced by the enzymatic reduction of SO 4 was its direct reaction with solid-phase Fe(III) hydroxides leading initially to the formation of FeS. Compared to this pathway, precipitation as FeS did not constitute an important sink for S(-II) in column

  5. Termination of Safeguards for Accountable Nuclear Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holzemer; Alan Carvo

    2012-04-01

    Termination of safeguards ends requirements of Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) and thereby removes the safeguards basis for applying physical protection requirements for theft and diversion of nuclear material, providing termination requirements are met as described. Department of Energy (DOE) M 470.4 6 (Nuclear Material Control and Accountability [8/26/05]) stipulates: 1. Section A, Chapter I (1)( q) (1): Safeguards can be terminated on nuclear materials provided the following conditions are met: (a) 'If the material is special nuclear material (SNM) or protected as SNM, it must be attractiveness level E and have a measured value.' (b) 'The material has been determined by DOE line management to be of no programmatic value to DOE.' (c) 'The material is transferred to the control of a waste management organization where the material is accounted for and protected in accordance with waste management regulations. The material must not be collocated with other accountable nuclear materials.' Requirements for safeguards termination depend on the safeguards attractiveness levels of the material. For attractiveness level E, approval has been granted from the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) Safeguards and Security (S&S). In some cases, it may be necessary to dispose of nuclear materials of attractiveness level D or higher. Termination of safeguards for such materials must be approved by the Departmental Element (this is the DOE Headquarters Office of Nuclear Energy) after consultation with the Office of Security.

  6. Rice straw-wood particle composite for sound absorbing wooden construction materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han-Seung; Kim, Dae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2003-01-01

    In this study, rice straw-wood particle composite boards were manufactured as insulation boards using the method used in the wood-based panel industry. The raw material, rice straw, was chosen because of its availability. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8, and a rice straw content (10/90, 20/80, and 30/70 weight of rice straw/wood particle) of 10, 20, and 30 wt.%. A commercial urea-formaldehyde adhesive was used as the composite binder, to achieve 140-290 psi of bending modulus of rupture (MOR) with 0.4 specific gravity, 700-900 psi of bending MOR with 0.6 specific gravity, and 1400-2900 psi of bending MOR with a 0.8 specific gravity. All of the composite boards were superior to insulation board in strength. Width and length of the rice straw particle did not affect the bending MOR. The composite boards made from a random cutting of rice straw and wood particles were the best and recommended for manufacturing processes. Sound absorption coefficients of the 0.4 and 0.6 specific gravity boards were higher than the other wood-based materials. The recommended properties of the rice straw-wood particle composite boards are described, to absorb noises, preserve the temperature of indoor living spaces, and to be able to partially or completely substitute for wood particleboard and insulation board in wooden constructions.

  7. Recycling waste brick from construction and demolition of buildings as pozzolanic materials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kae-Long; Wu, Hsiu-Hsien; Shie, Je-Lueng; Hwang, Chao-Lung; An Cheng

    2010-07-01

    This investigation elucidates the pozzolic characteristics of pastes that contain waste brick from building construction and demolition wastes. The TCLP leaching concentrations of waste brick for the target cations or heavy metals were all lower than the current regulatory thresholds of the Taiwan EPA. Waste brick had a pozzolanic strength activity index of 107% after 28 days. It can be regarded as a strong pozzolanic material. The compressive strengths of waste brick blended cement (WBBC) that contain 10% waste brick increased from 71.2 MPa at 28 days to 75.1 MPa at 60 days, an increase of approximately 5% over that period. At 28 days, the pozzolanic reaction began, reducing the amount of Ca(OH)(2) and increasing the densification. The intensity of the peak at 3640 cm(- 1) associated with Ca(OH)(2) is approximately the same for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) pastes. The hydration products of all the samples yield characteristics peaks at 978 cm(-1) associated with C-S-H, and at ~3011 cm(-1) and 1640 cm(-1) associated with water. The samples yield peaks at 1112 cm(-1), revealing the formation of ettringite. In WBBC pastes, the ratio Q(2)/Q(1) increases with curing time. These results demonstrate that increasing the curing time increases the number of linear polysilicate anions in C-S-H. Experimental results reveal that waste brick has potential as a pozzolanic material in the partial replacement of cement.

  8. Submission of Notice of Termination of Coverage Under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System General Permit No. CAS000002 for WDID No. 201C349114, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Ignition Facility Construction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brunckhorst, K

    2009-04-21

    This is the completed Notice of Termination of Coverage under the General Permit for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activity. Construction activities at the National Ignition Facility Construction Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are now complete. The Notice of Termination includes photographs of the completed construction project and a vicinity map.

  9. Development of dielectric barrier discharge-type ozone generator constructed with piezoelectric transformers: effect of dielectric electrode materials on ozone generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teranishi, Kenji; Shimomura, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Susumu; Itoh, Haruo

    2009-11-01

    The dependence of ozone generation on the types of dielectric electrode material has been investigated using an ozone generator constructed with the piezoelectric transformer developed in our laboratory. The ozone generator is based on the excitation of the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), which has the advantage of a compact configuration for generating ozone. Four kinds of dielectric materials are prepared for dielectric barrier electrodes. Electrical properties of the DBD and the ozone generation characteristics are investigated for the different dielectric materials. Differences in the discharge mode among the barrier electrode materials are recognized and discussed on the basis of the results of the Lissajous figures and voltage-current waveforms. During the continuous running of the generator, a temporal decrease in ozone concentration is observed owing to the temperature increase inside the reactor. Although the ozone generation characteristics are influenced by many properties of dielectrics, two important factors for achieving high-efficiency ozone generation are identified in this study. One is the use of a high-thermal conductivity material for the dielectric electrode, which functions well as a heat sink for transferring the generated heat to the outside through the material. The other factor is the control of the discharge mode. Our results show that the discharge mode that is considered as Townsend-like DBD is suitable for high-efficiency ozone generation.

  10. Life cycle based risk assessment of recycled materials in roadway construction.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, A C; Gardner, K H; Fopiano, J; Benson, C H; Edil, T B

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses a life-cycle assessment (LCA) framework to characterize comparative environmental impacts from the use of virgin aggregate and recycled materials in roadway construction. To evaluate site-specific human toxicity potential (HTP) in a more robust manner, metals release data from a demonstration site were combined with an unsaturated contaminant transport model to predict long-term impacts to groundwater. The LCA determined that there were reduced energy and water consumption, air emissions, Pb, Hg and hazardous waste generation and non-cancer HTP when bottom ash was used in lieu of virgin crushed rock. Conversely, using bottom ash instead of virgin crushed rock increased the cancer HTP risk due to potential leachate generation by the bottom ash. At this scale of analysis, the trade-offs are clearly between the cancer HTP (higher for bottom ash) and all of the other impacts listed above (lower for bottom ash). The site-specific analysis predicted that the contaminants (Cd, Cr, Se and Ag for this study) transported from the bottom ash to the groundwater resulted in very low unsaturated zone contaminant concentrations over a 200 year period due to retardation in the vadose zone. The level of contaminants predicted to reach the groundwater after 200 years was significantly less than groundwater maximum contaminant levels (MCL) set by the US Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Results of the site-specific contaminant release estimates vary depending on numerous site and material specific factors. However, the combination of the LCA and the site specific analysis can provide an appropriate context for decision making. Trade-offs are inherent in making decisions about recycled versus virgin material use, and regulatory frameworks should recognize and explicitly acknowledge these trade-offs in decision processes.

  11. Visualizing the Invisible: The Construction of Three Low-Cost Schlieren Imaging Systems for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopal, Venkatesh; Klosowiak, Julian L.; Jaeger, Robert; Selimkhanov, Timur; Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction and operation of three low-cost schlieren imaging systems that can be fabricated using surplus optics and 80/20, an aluminium extrusion based construction system. Each system has a different optical configuration. The low cost and ease of construction makes these systems highly suitable for high-school and…

  12. Permittivity Investigations of the Road Construction Raw Materials for Purposes of GPR Data Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysiński, Lech

    2014-05-01

    Permittivity is the major material property governing the formation of GPR response signal in diagnostic measurements. Every quantitative interpretation refers explicitly or implicitly to discussion of permittivity values. Thus, the recognition of permittivity for materials typical of the given technological area is necessary to make use of diagnostic measurements. Collection of several tens of stone cores representing different outcrops was investigated in order to obtain cross-sectional view of permittivity for stone materials being in use in Polish road construction industry as components of stone-asphalt mixtures. The main task was to estimate the typical permittivity values for stone materials treated as representation of several major petrological types. The capacimetry (at 50 MHz) was used as major and very efficient method of permittivity assessment and formation of the samples was subordinated to demands of this method. This method allows for determination of permittivity variability on the lateral surface of the cylindrical sample, giving the insight into the major features of the permittivity spatial distribution characteristic for the given rock. For the most homogeneous samples (in terms of permittivity distribution) the permittivity was measured also on the core top at frequency 2 GHz using impulse GPR reflectometry. No clear proofs for considerable permittivity frequency dependence were found (in the frame of the two methods precision) for these rocks. This conclusion can be related generally to major rock-forming minerals at least in dry igneous rocks. Only solid rocks obtained from regular massive outcrops were included to this first cross-sectional sampling, while artificial synthetic materials and natural gravels of postglacial origin were omitted since additional problems occur in these cases. This first experience allowed to recognize practical problems related to the sampling procedure. The collected data allow for provisional identification

  13. Toxicity of materials in fire situations: Laboratory data obtained at the University of San Francisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Casey, C. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Approximately 300 materials were evaluated using a specific set of test conditions. Materials tested included wood, fibers, fabrics and synthetic polymers. Data obtained using 10 different sets of test conditions are presented.

  14. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to evaluate several low-temperature characteristics of Challenge 5100, a new protective clothing material developed by Chemical Fabrics Corporation. The low temperature characteristics of three other protective clothing materials were also evaluated...

  15. Fusion Materials Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Wiffen, Frederick W; Katoh, Yutai; Melton, Stephanie G.

    2016-12-01

    This document summarizes FY2016 activities supporting the Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Materials Research for MFE carried out by ORNL. The organization of the report is mainly by material type, with sections on specific technical activities.

  16. Reception and study of lunar surface material in inert gas medium. [considering laboratory vacuum receiving chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkov, Y. A.; Rudnitskiy, Y. M.; Glotov, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    The reception and study of lunar material returned by the Luna 16 space station is described. The layout of a vacuum receiving chamber for working with material in a helium atmosphere is examined along with the main operations involved in extracting the material from the ampule and drill.

  17. Estimating the water content of geologic materials using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy: Applications to laboratory and spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, Ralph Edward

    Visible-near infrared reflectance spectroscopy has been used to relate the absorption strength of the 3 micrometer hydration feature to absolute water content (weight percent) of hydrated geologic materials. Complicating factors of albedo, particle size, and composition were examined individually. Laboratory results combining spectral measurements of materials under ambient, low relative humidity, and heated conditions with measurements of water content provide a method to link changes in band strength to changes in water content for materials under varying hydration states. Primary results indicate that reflectance spectra should be converted to single scattering albedo in order to accurately estimate water content for a wide variety of clay minerals, sulfates, zeolites, and hydrated volcanic materials. These methods are applicable to both laboratory and remotely sensed reflectance spectra. Application of our hydration model to high-resolution Mars Express OMEGA spectra of the martian surface reveal that bright and dark regions have similar water contents in the equatorial latitudes (2--4 wt. %), hydration increases with latitude poleward of ˜60°N (up to 8--15 wt. %), and local outcrops of sulfate and phyllosilicate material exhibit water contents of 5--8 wt. %. Furthermore, high latitude surfaces exhibit seasonal changes in water content on the order of 2--3 wt. %, likely the result of water vapor exchange between the regolith and atmosphere. The methods and model presented here provide a robust, non-destructive technique for estimating the water content of particulate samples spanning a wide albedo range (0.07--0.9), particle size (<250 mum), and composition (well-ordered to poorly crystalline). Applying these models to laboratory samples and spacecraft data will provide insight into the hydration state of terrestrial and planetary materials and the location, amount, and role of water in the solar system under current and past conditions.

  18. An Evaluation of the Instruction Carried out with Printed Laboratory Materials Designed in Accordance with 5E Model: Reflection of Light and Image on a Plane Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayvaci, Hakan Sevki; Yildiz, Mehmet; Bakirci, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a print laboratory material based on 5E model of constructivist learning approach to teach reflection of light and Image on a Plane Mirror. The effect of the instruction which conducted with the designed print laboratory material on academic achievements of prospective science and technology teachers and their attitudes towards…

  19. Influence of environmental parameters and of their interactions on the release of metal(loid)s from a construction material in hydraulic engineering.

    PubMed

    Schmukat, A; Duester, L; Goryunova, E; Ecker, D; Heininger, P; Ternes, T A

    2016-03-05

    Besides the leaching behaviour of a construction material under standardised test-specific conditions with laboratory water, for some construction materials it is advisable to test their environmental behaviour also under close to end use conditions. The envisaged end use combined with the product characteristics (e.g. mineral phases) is decisive for the choice of environmental factors that may change the release of substance that potentially cause adverse environmental effects (e.g. fertilisation or ecotoxicity). At the moment an experimental link is missing between mono-factorial standardised test systems and non standardised complex incubation experiments such as mesocosms which are closer to environmental conditions. Multi-factorial batch experiments may have the potential to close the gap. To verify this, batch experiments with copper slag were performed which is used as armour stones in hydraulic engineering. Design of experiments (DoE) was applied to evaluate the impact of pH, ionic strength, temperature and sediment content on the release of As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn. The study shows that release and sediment-eluent partitioning of metal(loid)s are impacted by interactions between the studied factors. Under the prevalent test conditions sediment acts as a sink enhancing most strongly the release of elements from the material.

  20. Development and Assessment of Green, Research-Based Instructional Materials for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    This research entails integrating two novel approaches for enriching student learning in chemistry into the context of the general chemistry laboratory. The first is a pedagogical approach based on research in cognitive science and the second is the green chemistry philosophy. Research has shown that inquiry-based approaches are effective in…