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Sample records for consumption diet quality

  1. Yogurt consumption is associated with better diet quality and metabolic profile in American men and women

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low-fat dairy products may be beneficial for health, but few studies have specifically focused on yogurt. We examined whether yogurt consumption was associated with better dietary patterns, diet quality, and metabolic profile. This cross-sectional study included the adults (n=6526) participating in ...

  2. The associations between yogurt consumption, diet quality, and metabolic profiles in children in the USA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong; Wang, Huifen; Hollis, James H; Jacques, Paul F

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that yogurt consumption was associated with better diet quality and a healthier metabolic profile in adults. However, such associations have not been investigated in children. The present study examined the associations in children using data from a nationally representative survey. Data from 5,124 children aged 2-18 years, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 2003 and 2006 in the USA were analyzed. The frequency of yogurt consumption over 12 months was determined using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Diet quality was assessed by the Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005) using one 24-HR dietary recall, and metabolic profiles were obtained from the NHANES laboratory data. It was found that only 33.1 % of children consumed yogurt at least once per week (frequent consumers). Adjusting for covariates, frequent consumers had better diet quality than infrequent consumers, as indicated by a higher HEI-2005 total score (P = 0.04). Frequent yogurt consumption was associated with a lower fasting insulin level (P < 0.001), a lower homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (P < 0.001), and a higher quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (P = 0.03). However, yogurt consumption was not associated with body weight, fasting glucose, serum lipid profiles, C-reactive protein, and blood pressures (all P > 0.05). These results suggest that frequent yogurt consumption may contribute to improved diet quality and a healthier insulin profile in children. Future longitudinal studies and clinical trials in children are warranted to explore the health benefits of yogurt consumption.

  3. Yogurt consumption is associated with better diet quality and metabolic profile in American men and women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huifen; Livingston, Kara A.; Fox, Caroline S.; Meigs, James B.; Jacques, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    The evidence-based Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends increasing the intake of fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products. However, yogurt, a nutrient-dense milk product, has been understudied. This cross-sectional study examined whether yogurt consumption was associated with better diet quality and metabolic profile among adults (n = 6526) participating in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998-2001) and Third Generation (2002-2005) cohorts. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake, and the Dietary Guidelines Adherence Index (DGAI) was used to measure overall diet quality. Standardized clinical examinations and laboratory tests were conducted. Generalized estimating equations examined the associations of yogurt consumption with diet quality and levels of metabolic factors. Approximately 64% of women (vs 41% of men) were yogurt consumers (ie, consumed >0 servings/week). Yogurt consumers had a higher DGAI score (ie, better diet quality) than nonconsumers. Adjusted for demographic and lifestyle factors and DGAI, yogurt consumers, compared with nonconsumers, had higher potassium intakes (difference, 0.12 g/d) and were 47%, 55%, 48%, 38%, and 34% less likely to have inadequate intakes (based on Dietary Reference Intake) of vitamins B2 and B12, calcium, magnesium, and zinc, respectively (all P ≤ .001). In addition, yogurt consumption was associated with lower levels of circulating triglycerides, glucose, and lower systolic blood pressure and insulin resistance (all P < .05). Yogurt is a good source of several micronutrients and may help to improve diet quality and maintain metabolic well-being as part of a healthy, energy-balanced dietary pattern. PMID:23351406

  4. Yogurt consumption is associated with better diet quality and metabolic profile in American men and women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huifen; Livingston, Kara A; Fox, Caroline S; Meigs, James B; Jacques, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    The evidence-based Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends increasing the intake of fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products. However, yogurt, a nutrient-dense milk product, has been understudied. This cross-sectional study examined whether yogurt consumption was associated with better diet quality and metabolic profile among adults (n = 6526) participating in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998-2001) and Third Generation (2002-2005) cohorts. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake, and the Dietary Guidelines Adherence Index (DGAI) was used to measure overall diet quality. Standardized clinical examinations and laboratory tests were conducted. Generalized estimating equations examined the associations of yogurt consumption with diet quality and levels of metabolic factors. Approximately 64% of women (vs 41% of men) were yogurt consumers (ie, consumed >0 servings/week). Yogurt consumers had a higher DGAI score (ie, better diet quality) than nonconsumers. Adjusted for demographic and lifestyle factors and DGAI, yogurt consumers, compared with nonconsumers, had higher potassium intakes (difference, 0.12 g/d) and were 47%, 55%, 48%, 38%, and 34% less likely to have inadequate intakes (based on Dietary Reference Intake) of vitamins B2 and B12, calcium, magnesium, and zinc, respectively (all P ≤ .001). In addition, yogurt consumption was associated with lower levels of circulating triglycerides, glucose, and lower systolic blood pressure and insulin resistance (all P < .05). Yogurt is a good source of several micronutrients and may help to improve diet quality and maintain metabolic well-being as part of a healthy, energy-balanced dietary pattern.

  5. Improved nutrient intake and diet quality with 100% fruit juice consumption in children: NHANES 2003-2006

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fruit juice (FJ) consumption has recently been viewed as a sweetened beverage with little regard to its nutrient contribution to the diet. NHANES, 2003–2006, data were used to examine the association of 100% FJ consumption, with nutrient intake and diet quality in children ages 2–5 y (n equals 1,665...

  6. Alcoholic Beverage Consumption, Nutrient Intakes, and Diet Quality in the US Adult Population, 1999-2006

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, Rosalind A.; Guenther, Patricia M.; Juan, Wenyen; Graubard, Barry I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about associations between alcoholic beverage consumption, nutrient intakes, and diet quality, although each has been independently associated with chronic disease outcomes. Objective This study examines cross-sectional relationships between alcoholic beverage consumption, nutrient intakes, and diet quality (Healthy Eating Index-2005 [HEI-2005] scores) in the US adult population. Methods Data were from four cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2006). Weighted multiple regression analyses, adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, and body mass index included 8,155 men and 7,715 women aged ≥20 years who reported their past-year alcoholic beverage consumption and 24-hour dietary intake. Alcoholic beverage consumption was defined by drinking status (never, former, current drinker) and, among current drinkers, by drinking level (number of drinks per day, on average: men <1 to ≥5; women <1 to ≥3). Results Among men, there was no association between drinking status and intakes of energy, most nutrients, or total HEI-2005 score. Among women, former and current (compared to never) drinkers had significantly higher intakes of energy and several nutrients, and current drinkers had significantly lower total HEI-2005 scores (current drinkers 58.9; never drinkers 63.2). Among current drinkers of both sexes, as drinking level increased, intakes of energy and several nutrients significantly increased, whereas total HEI-2005 scores significantly decreased (from 55.9 to 41.5 in men, and from 59.5 to 51.8 in women). Conclusions Among men and women, increasing alcoholic beverage consumption was associated with a decline in total diet quality as measured by the HEI-2005, apparently due to higher energy intake from alcohol as well as other differences in food choices. Educational messages should focus on nutrition and chronic disease risk associated with high consumption of alcoholic beverages and poor

  7. Dairy consumption and diet quality in a sample of Australian children.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Anna M; Flood, Victoria M; Denyer, Gareth; Webb, Karen; Marks, Guy B; Gill, Timothy P

    2012-06-01

    To examine the association between intake of dairy products and indicators of diet quality among a sample of Australian children. Three 24-hour recalls were collected from 222 children aged 8-10 years living in western Sydney. Analysis of covariance was used to examine differences in mean intakes of foods and nutrients among 3 dairy consumption groups (<1 serve, 1-2 serves, ≥2 serves per day). The percentage of children meeting healthy eating guidelines for foods and estimated average requirements (EAR) for nutrients was also assessed. Higher dairy consumption was associated with higher intakes of energy, protein, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, zinc, vitamin A, riboflavin, and niacin as well as foods from the bread and cereal group but lower intakes of mono- and polyunsaturated fats, foods from the meat and alternatives group, and energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods. Children who consumed ≥2 serves of dairy products per day (38%) were more likely to meet food and nutrient recommendations. Body mass index z-score and waist circumference were not associated with dairy consumption. Milk intake was inversely associated with the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, and children who did not meet their minimum dairy serve recommendations consumed higher quantities of sugar-sweetened beverages than milk. Adequate dairy consumption was associated with diets of higher nutritional quality but also higher intakes of energy, suggesting a potential benefit from shifting consumption from regular-fat to reduced-fat dairy products in line with current national recommendations.

  8. Consumption of ultra-processed foods predicts diet quality in Canada.

    PubMed

    Moubarac, Jean-Claude; Batal, M; Louzada, M L; Martinez Steele, E; Monteiro, C A

    2017-01-01

    This study describes food consumption patterns in Canada according to the types of food processing using the Nova classification and investigates the association between consumption of ultra-processed foods and the nutrient profile of the diet. Dietary intakes of 33,694 individuals from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey aged 2 years and above were analyzed. Food and drinks were classified using Nova into unprocessed or minimally processed foods, processed culinary ingredients, processed foods and ultra-processed foods. Average consumption (total daily energy intake) and relative consumption (% of total energy intake) provided by each of the food groups were calculated. Consumption of ultra-processed foods according to sex, age, education, residential location and relative family revenue was assessed. Mean nutrient content of ultra-processed foods and non-ultra-processed foods were compared, and the average nutrient content of the overall diet across quintiles of dietary share of ultra-processed foods was measured. In 2004, 48% of calories consumed by Canadians came from ultra-processed foods. Consumption of such foods was high amongst all socioeconomic groups, and particularly in children and adolescents. As a group, ultra-processed foods were grossly nutritionally inferior to non-ultra-processed foods. After adjusting for covariates, a significant and positive relationship was found between the dietary share of ultra-processed foods and the content in carbohydrates, free sugars, total and saturated fats and energy density, while an inverse relationship was observed with the dietary content in protein, fiber, vitamins A, C, D, B6 and B12, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin, as well as zinc, iron, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus and potassium. Lowering the dietary share of ultra-processed foods and raising consumption of hand-made meals from unprocessed or minimally processed foods would substantially improve the diet quality of Canadian.

  9. Contribution of beef consumption to nutrient intake, diet quality, and food patterns in the diets of the US population.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Theresa A; O'Neil, Carol E; Zanovec, Michael; Keast, Debra R; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between the nutrient contribution of beef, in its lowest and highest fat forms, and diet quality and food patterns in individuals 4+years of age. Beef consumers were categorized into three groups (lowest lean/highest fat [LLHF]; middle lean/middle fat content; and highest lean/lowest fat [HLLF]) based on the lean and fat content of beef consumed. Compared to non-beef consumers, HLLF consumers had higher intakes of vitamins B(6) and B(12), iron, zinc, and potassium. Non-beef consumers had higher intakes of thiamin, folate, calcium, and magnesium than HLLF beef consumers. The HLLF group had significantly higher intakes of vitamins A, C, B(6), and B(12); niacin; phosphorus; magnesium; iron; zinc; and potassium, protein and lower intakes of total energy; total fat; SFA; MUFA; total carbohydrates. There was no difference in diet quality between HLLF beef consumers and non-beef consumers. Moderate consumption of lean beef contributes to intakes of selected nutrients and diet quality was similar to non-beef consumers.

  10. Breakfast Skipping, Anxiety, Exercise, and Soda Consumption are Associated with Diet Quality in Mexican College Students.

    PubMed

    Hall, Laura; Tejada-Tayabas, Luz María; Monárrez-Espino, Joel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTEACT Despite the reported poor dietary habits and risk of weight gain in college students, they remain understudied in Mexico. Mexican college students are in a rapidly changing economic environment; a shift from a traditional, homemade cuisine to a diet more heavily influenced by an industrialized culture seems to be occurring, potentially affecting the quality of their dietary intake. A health and nutrition survey was conducted among 450 Mexican college students to study the relationship between sociodemographic factors and diet quality. Dietary data were used to build macro- and micronutrient scores, dichotomized as low and normal quality. Adjusted odds (OR [95% CI]) were computed to determine the probability of low dietary quality. Breakfast skipping (5.3 [1.2, 22.7]) and risk of anxiety (2.3 [1.3, 4.4]) were associated with a greater risk of low macronutrient quality, and caloric intake < 1,800 kcal (5.8 [3.5, 9.7]), breakfast skipping (3.7 [1.4, 10.3]), vigorous exercise ≤ 1 h/wk (2.6 [1.3, 5.2]), and soda consumption > 250 mL/d (2.0 [1.2, 3.3]) with low micronutrient quality.

  11. Clustering of lifestyle factors in Spanish university students: the relationship between smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity and diet quality.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Gómez, Carlos; Romaguera-Bosch, Dora; Tauler-Riera, Pedro; Bennasar-Veny, Miquel; Pericas-Beltran, Jordi; Martinez-Andreu, Sonia; Aguilo-Pons, Antoni

    2012-11-01

    To ascertain the prevalence of and association between main lifestyle factors (diet, physical activity, alcohol consumption and smoking) in students from the Balearic Islands University. A cross-sectional, descriptive study. A questionnaire including questions on lifestyle, dietary habits and physical activity habits was administered to the students. Four different diet quality scores were calculated (Diet Diversity Score, Mediterranean Diet Score, Dietary Guidelines Score and Global Dietary Guidelines Score). A sample of students from the Balearic Islands University. Nine hundred and eighty-seven students (45·5 % males; mean age 21·5 (sd 3·3) years). The dietary pattern of the student population was characterized by a low consumption of cereals and tubers, fruits, vegetables, olive oil, legumes and nuts, and a high consumption of processed meat, sweets, snacks, soft drinks and pastries. Linear, positive and statistically significant correlations were found between the number of meals consumed daily and all of the diet quality scores determined. Determinants of diet quality, both in the univariate and multivariate analyses, were physical activity practice, sex, age and number of meals consumed daily. Risk factors such as smoking, diet and physical inactivity had a tendency of clustering among Spanish university students. Overall diet quality was low, due to important departures from dietary recommendations and loss of the traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern. Nutritional education campaigns that include promotion of physical activity practice are needed to improve the overall health status of this population.

  12. Consumption of dry beans, peas, and lentils could improve diet quality in the US population.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Diane C; Lawrence, Frank R; Hartman, Terryl J; Curran, Julianne M

    2009-05-01

    The US Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid guidelines introduced a near doubling of the dietary recommendations for vegetables. These recommendations target specific subgroups of vegetables, including dry beans and peas. Dry beans and peas provide an array of nutrients and phytochemicals that have been shown to have beneficial health effects, yet consumption levels in the United States are quite low. Few studies have examined the influence of legume consumption on nutrient intakes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess nutrient and food group intakes of dry bean and pea consumers compared to nonconsumers. Dietary intake data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for adults aged > or =19 years was used. Results show that on any given day only 7.9% of adults are consuming dry beans and peas; Mexican Americans or other Hispanics are more likely to be consumers than nonconsumers. Consuming approximately (1/2) c dry beans or peas resulted in higher intakes of fiber, protein, folate, zinc, iron, and magnesium with lower intakes of saturated fat and total fat. These data support the specific recommendation for dry beans and peas as part of the overall vegetable recommendation. Increased consumption of dry beans and peas-economical and nutrient-rich foods-could improve the diet quality of Americans.

  13. Low Calorie Beverage Consumption Is Associated with Energy and Nutrient Intakes and Diet Quality in British Adults.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Sigrid A; Horgan, Graham W; Francis, Lucy E; Gibson, Amelia A; Stephen, Alison M

    2016-01-02

    It is unclear whether consumption of low-calorie beverages (LCB) leads to compensatory consumption of sweet foods, thus reducing benefits for weight control or diet quality. This analysis investigated associations between beverage consumption and energy intake and diet quality of adults in the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) (2008-2011; n = 1590), classified into: (a) non-consumers of soft drinks (NC); (b) LCB consumers; (c) sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumers; or (d) consumers of both beverages (BB), based on 4-day dietary records. Within-person data on beverage consumption on different days assessed the impact on energy intake. LCB consumers and NC consumed less energy and non-milk extrinsic sugars than other groups. Micronutrient intakes and food choices suggested higher dietary quality in NC/LCB consumers compared with SSB/BB consumers. Within individuals on different days, consumption of SSB, milk, juice, and alcohol were all associated with increased energy intake, while LCB and tea, coffee or water were associated with no change; or reduced energy intake when substituted for caloric beverages. Results indicate that NC and LCB consumers tend to have higher quality diets compared with SSB or BB consumers and do not compensate for sugar or energy deficits by consuming more sugary foods.

  14. Low Calorie Beverage Consumption Is Associated with Energy and Nutrient Intakes and Diet Quality in British Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Sigrid A.; Horgan, Graham W.; Francis, Lucy E.; Gibson, Amelia A.; Stephen, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether consumption of low-calorie beverages (LCB) leads to compensatory consumption of sweet foods, thus reducing benefits for weight control or diet quality. This analysis investigated associations between beverage consumption and energy intake and diet quality of adults in the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) (2008–2011; n = 1590), classified into: (a) non-consumers of soft drinks (NC); (b) LCB consumers; (c) sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumers; or (d) consumers of both beverages (BB), based on 4-day dietary records. Within-person data on beverage consumption on different days assessed the impact on energy intake. LCB consumers and NC consumed less energy and non-milk extrinsic sugars than other groups. Micronutrient intakes and food choices suggested higher dietary quality in NC/LCB consumers compared with SSB/BB consumers. Within individuals on different days, consumption of SSB, milk, juice, and alcohol were all associated with increased energy intake, while LCB and tea, coffee or water were associated with no change; or reduced energy intake when substituted for caloric beverages. Results indicate that NC and LCB consumers tend to have higher quality diets compared with SSB or BB consumers and do not compensate for sugar or energy deficits by consuming more sugary foods. PMID:26729159

  15. Fast-Food Consumption, Diet Quality, and Neighborhood Exposure to Fast Food

    PubMed Central

    Diez Roux, Ana V.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Jacobs, David R.; Franco, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined associations among fast-food consumption, diet, and neighborhood fast-food exposure by using 2000–2002 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis data. US participants (n = 5,633; aged 45–84 years) reported usual fast-food consumption (never, <1 time/week, or ≥1 times/week) and consumption near home (yes/no). Healthy diet was defined as scoring in the top quintile of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index or bottom quintile of a Western-type dietary pattern. Neighborhood fast-food exposure was measured by densities of fast-food outlets, participant report, and informant report. Separate logistic regression models were used to examine associations of fast-food consumption and diet; fast-food exposure and consumption near home; and fast-food exposure and diet adjusted for site, age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and income. Those never eating fast food had a 2–3-times higher odds of having a healthy diet versus those eating fast food ≥1 times/week, depending on the dietary measure. For every standard deviation increase in fast-food exposure, the odds of consuming fast food near home increased 11%–61% and the odds of a healthy diet decreased 3%–17%, depending on the model. Results show that fast-food consumption and neighborhood fast-food exposure are associated with poorer diet. Interventions that reduce exposure to fast food and/or promote individual behavior change may be helpful. PMID:19429879

  16. Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and its association with nutrient intakes and diet quality in German children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Libuda, Lars; Alexy, Ute; Buyken, Anette E; Sichert-Hellert, Wolfgang; Stehle, Peter; Kersting, Mathilde

    2009-05-01

    In the present study the relationship of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption with the intake of single nutrients and total diet quality in German children and adolescents was evaluated using a repeated-measures regression analysis model. We used dietary data from 7145 three-day weighed records of 1069 subjects aged 2-19 years participating in the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) Study. Intake of macronutrients as percentage of total energy intake (%En), intake of micronutrients as percentage of German reference values (intake quality score) and nutritional quality index (NQI) as an indicator of diet quality were chosen as separate dependent variables. SSB consumption was positively associated with %En from carbohydrates (boys v. girls: +4.00 v. +4.09 En%/MJ from SSB) and added sugars (boys v. girls: +7.36 v. +9.52 En%/MJ from SSB) and negatively with %En from protein (boys v. girls: - 1.25 v. - 1.31 En%/MJ from SSB) and fat (boys: - 2.82 v. - 2.73 En%/MJ from SSB). With respect to micronutrients, SSB consumption was negatively associated with folate and Ca intake, for which mean intake levels were inadequate in girls. Absolute diet quality was negatively associated with SSB consumption, whereas the effect was larger for girls (boys v. girls: - 1.41 v. - 2.63 points of NQI/MJ from SSB). Overall, results show a diluting effect of SSB consumption on micronutrient intake and diet quality. This effect might be relevant especially in girls as the association with diet quality was larger and mean NQI levels were lower in comparison with boys.

  17. Beverage Consumption in Relation to Discretionary Food Intake and Diet Quality among US Adults, 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    An, Ruopeng

    2016-01-01

    A majority of Americans consume beverages and discretionary foods-foods that are typically low in nutrient value but high in sugar, sodium, fats, and cholesterol-as part of their daily diet, which profoundly impacts their energy balance and nutritional status. This study examined consumption of different types of beverages in relation to discretionary food intake and diet quality among US adults. Nationally representative sample of 22,513 adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2012 waves were analyzed. The discretionary food category identifies energy-dense, nutrient-poor food products that do not necessarily provide essential nutrients that the human body needs, but can add variety. First-difference estimator addressed confounding bias from time-invariant unobservables (eg, eating habits, taste preferences) by using within-individual variations in diet and beverage consumption between 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls. Approximately 21.7%, 42.9%, 52.8%, 26.3%, and 22.2% of study participants consumed diet beverage, sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB), coffee, tea, and alcohol, respectively, and 90.1% consumed discretionary foods on any given day. Across beverage types, alcohol (384.8 kcal) and SSB (226.2 kcal) consumption was associated with the largest increase in daily total calorie intake; coffee (60.7 kcal) and diet-beverage (48.8 kcal) consumption was associated with the largest increase in daily calorie intake from discretionary foods, and SSB consumption was associated with the largest reduction in daily overall diet quality measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2010. The impact of beverage consumption on daily calorie intake (overall and from discretionary foods) and diet quality differed across individual sociodemographics and body-weight status. The incremental daily calorie intake from discretionary foods associated with diet-beverage consumption was highest in obese adults, and that associated with SSB was highest in

  18. Soup consumption is associated with a lower dietary energy density and a better diet quality in US adults.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong; Hollis, James H

    2014-04-28

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that soup consumption is associated with a lower risk of obesity. Moreover, intervention studies have reported that soup consumption aids in body-weight management. However, little is known about mechanisms that can explain these findings. The objective of the present study was to investigate associations between soup consumption and daily energy intake, dietary energy density (ED), nutrient intake and diet quality. Adults aged 19-64 years who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys during 2003-8 were included in the study. Soup consumers were identified from the first dietary recall using the United States Department of Agriculture food codes and combination food type from the dietary data. Compared with non-consumers (n 9307), soup consumers (n 1291) had a lower body weight (P = 0.002), a lower waist circumference (P = 0.001) and a trend towards a lower total energy intake (P = 0.087). Soup consumption was associated with a lower dietary ED (P< 0.001); this was independent of whether data on beverage or water consumption were included. Diet quality, as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2005, was significantly better in soup consumers (P = 0.008). Soup consumption was also associated with a reduced intake of total fat and an increased intake of protein, carbohydrate and dietary fibre, as well as several vitamins and minerals (P < 0.05 for all). However, it was also associated with a higher intake of Na (P < 0.001). The relationship between soup consumption and body weight could be due to a reduced dietary ED and an improved diet quality. Consumers need to pay attention to their Na intake and choose low-Na products for a healthier diet.

  19. Contribution of beef consumption to nutrient intake, diet quality, and food patterns in the diets of the US population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined the association between the nutrient contribution of beef, in its lowest and highest fat forms, and diet quality and food patterns in individuals 4+ years of age. Beef consumers were categorized into three groups (lowest lean/highest fat [LLHF]; middle lean/middle fat content; an...

  20. Plain water consumption in relation to energy intake and diet quality among US adults, 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    An, R; McCaffrey, J

    2016-10-01

    The present study examined plain water consumption in relation to energy intake and diet quality among US adults. A nationally representative sample of 18 311 adults aged ≥18 years, from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2012, was analysed. The first-difference estimator approach addressed confounding bias from time-invariant unobservables (e.g. eating habits, taste preferences) by using within-individual variations in diet and plain water consumption between two nonconsecutive 24-h dietary recalls. One percentage point increase in the proportion of daily plain water in total dietary water consumption was associated with a reduction in mean (95% confidence interval) daily total energy intake of 8.58 (7.87-9.29) kcal, energy intake from sugar-sweetened beverages of 1.43 (1.27-1.59) kcal, energy intake from discretionary foods of 0.88 (0.44-1.32) kcal, total fat intake of 0.21 (0.17-0.25) g, saturated fat intake of 0.07 (0.06-0.09) g, sugar intake of 0.74 (0.67-0.82) g, sodium intake of 9.80 (8.20-11.39) mg and cholesterol intake of 0.88 (0.64-1.13) g. The effects of plain water intake on diet were similar across race/ethnicity, education attainment, income level and body weight status, whereas they were larger among males and young/middle-aged adults than among females and older adults, respectively. Daily overall diet quality measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2010 was not found to be associated with the proportion of daily plain water in total dietary water consumption. Promoting plain water intake could be a useful public health strategy for reducing energy and targeted nutrient consumption in US adults, which warrants confirmation in future controlled interventions. © 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  1. Tree nut consumption improves nutrient intake and diet quality in US adults: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent epidemiologic studies assessing tree nut (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts) consumption and the association with nutrient intake and diet quality are lacking. This study determined the association of tree nut consumption and ...

  2. Whole-grain consumption is associated with diet quality and nutrient intake in adults: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The consumption of whole grains and its association with nutrient intake has not been assessed in a recent nationally representative population. The objective was to examine the association of consumption of whole grains, using the new whole-grain definition, with diet quality and nutrient intake in...

  3. Consumption of apples is associated with a better diet quality and reduced risk of obesity in children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most children do not meet the recommendation for fruit consumption. Apples are the second most commonly consumed fruit in the US; however, no studies have examined the association of total apple products, apples, apple sauce, and 100 % apple juice consumption on diet quality and weight/adiposity in ...

  4. Traditional food consumption is associated with better diet quality and adequacy among Inuit adults in Nunavut, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Tony; Kolahdooz, Fariba; Roache, Cindy; Sharma, Sangita

    2015-01-01

    The Inuit population is undergoing a rapid nutrition transition as a result of reduced consumption of traditional foods. This study aims to describe the differences in dietary adequacy between non-traditional and traditional eaters among Inuit populations in Nunavut, Canada. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a culturally appropriate quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Participants included 208 Inuit adults from three isolated communities in Nunavut. Traditional eaters consumed a more nutrient-dense diet and achieved better dietary adequacy than non-traditional eaters. Traditional foods accounted for 7 and 27% of energy intake among non-traditional and traditional eaters, respectively. Non-nutrient-dense foods accounted for a greater proportion of energy intake in non-traditional eaters; however, these were consumed in significant amounts by both the groups (36 and 27% of total energy). Consumption of traditional foods is associated with greater diet quality and dietary adequacy. Efforts should be made to promote traditional and non-traditional foods of high-nutritional quality.

  5. Fast-food consumption, diet quality, and neighborhood exposure to fast food: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Latetia V; Diez Roux, Ana V; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Jacobs, David R; Franco, Manuel

    2009-07-01

    The authors examined associations among fast-food consumption, diet, and neighborhood fast-food exposure by using 2000-2002 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis data. US participants (n = 5,633; aged 45-84 years) reported usual fast-food consumption (never, <1 time/week, or > or =1 times/week) and consumption near home (yes/no). Healthy diet was defined as scoring in the top quintile of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index or bottom quintile of a Western-type dietary pattern. Neighborhood fast-food exposure was measured by densities of fast-food outlets, participant report, and informant report. Separate logistic regression models were used to examine associations of fast-food consumption and diet; fast-food exposure and consumption near home; and fast-food exposure and diet adjusted for site, age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and income. Those never eating fast food had a 2-3-times higher odds of having a healthy diet versus those eating fast food > or =1 times/week, depending on the dietary measure. For every standard deviation increase in fast-food exposure, the odds of consuming fast food near home increased 11%-61% and the odds of a healthy diet decreased 3%-17%, depending on the model. Results show that fast-food consumption and neighborhood fast-food exposure are associated with poorer diet. Interventions that reduce exposure to fast food and/or promote individual behavior change may be helpful.

  6. Takeaway food consumption and its associations with diet quality and abdominal obesity: a cross-sectional study of young adults

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kylie J; McNaughton, Sarah A; Gall, Seana L; Blizzard, Leigh; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison J

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the associations of takeaway food consumption with overall diet quality and abdominal obesity. Young adults are high consumers of takeaway food so we aimed to examine these associations in a national study of young Australian adults. Methods A national sample of 1,277 men and 1,585 women aged 26–36 completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographic and lifestyle factors, a 127 item food frequency questionnaire, usual daily frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption and usual weekly frequency of takeaway food consumption. Dietary intake was compared with the dietary recommendations from the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. Waist circumference was measured for 1,065 men and 1,129 women. Moderate abdominal obesity was defined as ≥ 94 cm for men and ≥ 80 cm for women. Prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated using log binomial regression. Takeaway food consumption was dichotomised, with once a week or less as the reference group. Results Consumption of takeaway food twice a week or more was reported by more men (37.9%) than women (17.7%, P < 0.001). Compared with those eating takeaway once a week or less, men eating takeaway twice a week or more were significantly more likely to be single, younger, current smokers and spend more time watching TV and sitting, whereas women were more likely to be in the workforce and spend more time watching TV and sitting. Participants eating takeaway food at least twice a week were less likely (P < 0.05) to meet the dietary recommendation for vegetables, fruit, dairy, extra foods, breads and cereals (men only), lean meat and alternatives (women only) and overall met significantly fewer dietary recommendations (P < 0.001). After adjusting for confounding variables (age, leisure time physical activity, TV viewing and employment status), consuming takeaway food twice a week or more was associated with a 31% higher prevalence of moderate abdominal obesity in men (PR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1

  7. Association of fast food consumption with energy intake, diet quality, body mass index and the risk of obesity in a representative Mediterranean population.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Helmut; Fïto, Montserrat; Covas, Maria Isabel

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the association of fast food consumption with BMI, energy intake and diet quality in a Mediterranean population. The subjects were Spanish men (n 1491) and women (n 1563) aged 25-74 years who were examined in 1999-2000, in a population-based cross-sectional survey in northeast Spain (Girona). Dietary intake was assessed using a FFQ that included four typical fast food items. Two dietary-quality indices, the Mediterranean diet score and the healthy eating index, were created. Height and weight were measured. Within the population studied, 10.1 % reported eating fast food at least once per month. Dietary energy intake and energy density were directly associated with frequency of fast food consumption. Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for lifestyle and educational level showed an inverse association of frequency of fast food consumption with meeting the dietary reference intake (DRI) for energy (P = 0.001). The consumption of fast food more than once per week increased the risk of overall low diet quality (P < 0.001). BMI was directly associated with fast food consumption expressed in g/d (P = 0.025) and in kJ/d (P = 0.017). The risk of being obese increased with the frequency of fast food consumption (P = 0.046). Fast food consumption was associated with higher energy intakes, poor diet quality and higher BMI. The likelihood of not meeting the DRI for energy, and of being obese, increased with the frequency of fast food consumption.

  8. Improved diet quality, nutrient intake, and health associated with out-of-hand tree nut consumption in U.S. adults: NHANES 1999–2004

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    HANES (1999–2004), data were used to examine the association of out-of-hand tree nut consumption (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, filberts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts) with diet quality, nutrient intakes, and health risks in adults 19+ yrs (n equals 13,292). Using 24 hour ...

  9. Association of candy consumption with body weight measures, other health risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and diet quality in US children and adolescents: NHANES 1999-2004

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of total, chocolate, or sugar candy consumption on intakes of total energy, fat, and added sugars; diet quality; weight/adiposity parameters; and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in children 2–13 years of age (n=7,049) and adolescents 14–...

  10. Avocado consumption by adults is associated with better nutrient intake, diet quality, and some measures of adiposity: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001-2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocados contain a beneficial lipid profile, including a high level of monounsaturated fatty acids, as well as dietary fiber, essential nutrients, and phytochemicals. However, little epidemiologic data exist on the effect that consumption of avocados has on overall nutrient intake, diet quality, adi...

  11. Almond consumption is associated with better nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between almond consumption, the most widely consumed tree nut in the US, and nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, diet quality, and weight/adiposity in adults. Data from adults (N=24,808), 19+ years, participating in the NHANES 2001-2010 were u...

  12. One hundred percent orange juice consumption is associated with better diet quality, improved nutient adequacy, and no increased risk for overweight/obesity in children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of 100 percent orange juice consumption by children 2 to 18 years of age (n = 7250) participating in the 2003 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with intakes of select nutrients, MyPyramid food groups, diet quality-measur...

  13. 100% Orange juice consumption is associated with better diet quality, improved nutrient adequacy, decreased risk for obesity, and improved biomarkers of health in adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumption of 100% orange juice (OJ) has been positively associated with nutrient adequacy and diet quality, with no increased risk of overweight/obesity in children; however, no one has examined these factors in adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of 100% orange juice ...

  14. Cooked oatmeal consumption is associated with better diet quality, better nutrient intakes, and reduced risk for central adiposity and obesity in Children 2-18 years

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to assess the association between oatmeal consumption and nutrient intake, diet quality, and weight/adiposity of children aged 2-18. A nationally representative sample of children aged 2-18 (N=14,690) participating in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2...

  15. Consumption of whole grains is associated with improved diet quality and nutrient intake in children and adolescents: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine the association of consumption of whole grains (WG) with diet quality and nutrient intake in children and adolescents by a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data. The 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to study children ...

  16. Consumption of 100% fruit juice is associated with better nutrient intake and diet quality but not with weight status in children: NHANES 2007-2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined the impact of various levels of 100% fruit juice (FJ) consumption on intake of nutrients, diet quality, and weight in children using the more recent national data. We conducted a cross-sectional study examining the data from children 2-18 years of age (n=6,090). Intake of nutrien...

  17. Tree nut consumption is associated with better nutrient adequacy and diet quality in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutrient adequacy of tree nut consumers has not been examined. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2010 data were used to assess the association of tree nut consumption by adults 19+ years with nutrient adequacy and diet quality. Covariate adjusted usual intake was determined u...

  18. Tree nut consumption improves nutrient intake and diet quality in US adults: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol E; Keast, Debra R; Fulgoni, Victor L; Nicklas, Theresa A

    2010-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies assessing tree nut (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts) consumption and the association with nutrient intake and diet quality are lacking. This study determined the association of tree nut consumption and nutrient intake and diet quality using a nationally representative sample of adults. Adults 19+ years (y) (n=13,292) participating in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. Intake was determined from 24-hour diet recalls; tree nut consumers were defined as those consuming > or =(1/4) ounce/day (7.09 g). Means, standard errors, and ANOVA (adjusted for covariates) were determined using appropriate sample weights. Diet quality was measured using the Healthy Eating Index-2005. Among consumers, mean intake of tree nuts/tree nut butters was 1.19 +/- 0.04 oz/d versus 0.01 +/- 0.00 oz/d for non-consumers. In this study, 5.5 +/- 0.3 % of individuals 19-50 y (n=7,049) and 8.4 +/- 0.6 % of individuals 51+ y (n=6,243) consumed tree nuts/tree nut butters. Mean differences (p<0.01) between tree nut consumers and non-consumers of adult shortfall nutrients were: fiber (+5.0 g/d), vitamin E (+3.7 mg AT/d), calcium (+73 mg/d), magnesium (+95 mg/d), and potassium (+260 mg/d). Tree nut consumers had lower sodium intake (-157 mg/d, p<0.01). Diet quality was significantly higher in tree nut consumers (58.0+/-0.4 vs. 48.5+/-0.3, p<0.01). Tree nut consumption was associated with a higher overall diet quality score and improved nutrient intakes. Specific dietary recommendations for nut consumption should be provided for consumers.

  19. Consumption of bakery products, sweetened soft drinks and yogurt among children aged 6-7 years: association with nutrient intake and overall diet quality.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; García, Esther López; Gorgojo, Lydia; Garcés, Carmen; Royo, Miguel Angel; Martín Moreno, José María; Benavente, Mercedes; Macías, Alfonso; De Oya, Manuel

    2003-03-01

    The present study tests the hypothesis that higher consumption of bakery products, sweetened soft drinks and yogurt is associated with higher intake of energy, saturated fats, sugars and worse overall diet quality among Spanish children. This is a cross-sectional study covering 1112 children aged 6.0-7.0 years in four Spanish cities. Nutrient and food intake were obtained through a food-frequency questionnaire, and overall diet quality calculated using the healthy-eating index (HEI) developed by Kennedy et al. (1995). Standardized methods were used to measure anthropometric variables. Associations of interest were summarized as the difference in nutrient and food consumption between the value of the fifth and the first quintile of consumption (dq) of bakery products, sweetened soft drinks or yogurt, adjusted for energy intake and BMI. Bakery products, sweetened soft drinks and yogurt supplied 15.5, 1.0 and 5.6 % energy intake respectively. Higher consumption of these three foods was associated with greater energy intake (P<0.001), but not with higher BMI. Consumption of bakery products was associated with the proportion of energy derived from intake of total carbohydrates (dq 4.5 %, P<0.001) and sugars (dq 2 %, P<0.001), but did not show association with the HEI. Consumption of sweetened soft drinks was associated with a lower consumption of milk (dq -88 ml, P<0.001) and Ca (dq -175 mg/d, P<0.001), and worse HEI (dq -2, P<0.01). Consumption of yogurt, while associated with higher energy intake from saturated fats (dq 1.77 %, P<0.001) and sugars (dq 2.02 %, P<0.001), showed no association with the HEI. Differences in the intake of nutrients and foods across quintiles of consumption of bakery products, sweetened soft drinks and yogurt were usually very small. We conclude that the impact of the consumption of bakery products, sweetened soft drinks and yogurt on the quality of the diet of Spanish children is only modest, although it may contribute to aggravating

  20. Dietary intakes and diet quality according to levels of organic food consumption by French adults: cross-sectional findings from the NutriNet-Santé Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Julia; Allès, Benjamin; Péneau, Sandrine; Touvier, Mathilde; Méjean, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar; Lairon, Denis; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to assess dietary profiles of adults from the NutriNet-Santé cohort according to different levels of organic food consumption using detailed self-reported data on organic food intakes. Food intakes were obtained using an organic food frequency questionnaire (Org-FFQ). The participants were ranked into five groups (quintiles, Q) according to the proportion of organic foods in their diet. To determine diet quality, two scores were computed reflecting adherence to food-based recommendations (mPNNS-GS) and the probability of adequate nutrient intake (PANDiet). Relationships between levels of organic food consumption and dietary characteristics were assessed using multivariable-adjusted ANCOVA models. The NutriNet-Santé Study. French adults from the NutriNet-Santé Study (n 28 245). Intakes of foods of plant origin increased along with the contribution of organic foods to the diet while a reverse trend was identified for dairy products, cookies and soda (P-trend<0·0001). The diet quality scores increased from Q1 (mPNNS-GS, 7·89 (se 0·02); PANDiet: 63·04 (se 0·11)) to Q5 (mPNNS-GS, 8·78 (se 0·02); PANDiet, 69·37 (se 0·10)). Overall, high organic food consumers exhibited better diet quality, although intermediate organic food consumers showed better adherence to specific nutritional recommendations related to animal products. The study provides new insights into the understanding of organic food consumption as a part of a healthy diet and sheds some light on the dietary profiles of different categories of organic food consumers. These results underline strong dietary behaviour correlates associated with organic food consumption that should be controlled for in future aetiological studies on organic foods and health.

  1. Fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight: cross-sectional and prospective associations in a community sample of working adults.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Timothy L; French, Simone A; Mitchell, Nathan R; Wolfson, Julian

    2016-04-01

    To examine the association between fast-food consumption, diet quality and body weight in a community sample of working adults. Cross-sectional and prospective analysis of anthropometric, survey and dietary data from adults recruited to participate in a worksite nutrition intervention. Participants self-reported frequency of fast-food consumption per week. Nutrient intakes and diet quality, using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), were computed from dietary recalls collected at baseline and 6 months. Metropolitan medical complex, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Two hundred adults, aged 18-60 years. Cross-sectionally, fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher daily total energy intake (β=72·5, P=0·005), empty calories (β=0·40, P=0·006) and BMI (β=0·73, P=0·011), and lower HEI-2010 score (β=-1·23, P=0·012), total vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·004), whole grains (β=-0·39, P=0·005), fibre (β=-0·83, P=0·002), Mg (β=-6·99, P=0·019) and K (β=-57·5, P=0·016). Over 6 months, change in fast-food consumption was not significantly associated with changes in energy intake or BMI, but was significantly inversely associated with total intake of vegetables (β=-0·14, P=0·034). Frequency of fast-food consumption was significantly associated with higher energy intake and poorer diet quality cross-sectionally. Six-month change in fast-food intake was small, and not significantly associated with overall diet quality or BMI.

  2. Oatmeal consumption is associated with better diet quality and lower body mass index in adults: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Fulgoni, Victor L; Chu, YiFang; O'Shea, Marianne; Slavin, Joanne L; DiRienzo, Maureen A

    2015-12-01

    Data from the 2001-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed to assess the relationship between oatmeal consumption and nutrient intake, diet quality, and physiological measures in adults 19 years and older (n = 22,823). We hypothesized that oatmeal consumption is associated with a more favorable nutrient intake profile, better diet quality, and healthier physiological end points. Oatmeal consumers (n = 1429) were defined as those who had consumed any amount of cooked oatmeal cereal during a 24-hour recall period. Multiple regression analysis, after transforming variables to normality and using appropriate sample weights to ensure national representation, was used to assess differences between oatmeal consumers and nonconsumers in terms of demographics, and covariate-adjusted analysis of variance was used to assess differences between consumers and nonconsumers in nutrient intakes, diet quality (calculated using the Healthy Eating Index-2010), and physiological measures. Our results show that oatmeal consumers were older than nonconsumers and more likely to be female; they also were less likely to smoke and consumed less alcohol. Consumers had higher intakes of protein, dietary fiber, vitamin A, thiamin, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper, selenium, and potassium and lower intakes of total, monounsaturated, and saturated fats; cholesterol; and vitamin B12. Oatmeal consumers had higher Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores and lower body weights, waist circumferences, and body mass indices. To conclude, our results suggest that consuming oatmeal is consistent with better nutrient intakes and a higher diet quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Consumption of apples is associated with a better diet quality and reduced risk of obesity in children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2010.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol E; Nicklas, Theresa A; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2015-05-14

    Most children do not meet the recommendation for fruit consumption. Apples are the second most commonly consumed fruit in the US; however, no studies have examined the association of total apple products, apples, apple sauce, and 100 % apple juice consumption on diet quality and weight/adiposity in children. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between various apple consumption forms with diet quality and weight/adiposity in a nationally representative sample of children. Participants were children 2-18 years of age (N = 13,339) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2010. Intake was determined using a single interview administered 24-h diet recall. Apple product consumption was determined using the cycle-appropriate USDA Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies food codes. Total diet quality and component scores were determined using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI). Anthropometrics were determined using standard methods. Covariate adjusted linear and logistic regressions were used to compare apple product consumers with non-consumers; sample weights were used. Probability was set at <0.01. Approximately 26 % of the population (n = 3,482) consumed some form of apple products. Consumers of apple products, whole apples, apple sauce, and 100 % apple juice had higher HEI scores than non-consumers: 50.4 ± 0.4 v 41.9 ± 0.3, 52.5 ± 0.5 v 42.7 ± 0.3, 52.1 ± 0.8 v 47.2 ± 0.4, and 51.4 ± 0.6 v 46.5 ± 0.4, respectively. Apple products and whole apple consumers had lower BMI z-scores than non-consumers: 0.4 ± 0.04 v 0.5 ± 0.03 and 0.3 ± 0.1 v 0.5 ± 0.02, respectively. Apple products and whole apple consumers were 25 % (0.59-0.95 99(th) CI) and 30 % (0.52-0.95 99(th) CI), respectively, were less likely to be obese than non-consumers. Consumption of any form of apples contributed to the fruit recommendation of children and improved diet quality. Apples should

  4. Association of lunch meat consumption with nutrient intake, diet quality and health risk factors in U.S. children and adults: NHANES 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sanjiv; Fulgoni, Victor L; Berg, Eric P

    2015-12-30

    Consumption of lean meat is recommended as part of healthy diet by Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. Lunch meats are precooked or cured meats typically used in sandwiches and are also called as cold cuts or deli meat. The purpose of the study was to examine the association of lunch meat consumption with nutrient intake, diet quality, and physiological measures in children (age 2-18 years; n = 5,099) and adults (age 19 years and older; n = 10,216) using a large, nationally representative database. Lunch meat consumers were defined as those consuming any amount of lunch meat during a 24-h recall and association with nutrient intake, diet quality (Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 score) and physiological measures were evaluated using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007-2010. The lunch meat consumers (both children and adults) had higher intakes of calories, protein, calcium, potassium, sodium and saturated fat (for adults only) compared to non-consumers. Lunch meat intake was also associated with higher intake of meat/poultry/fish food group in both children and adult consumers than non-consumers. There was no difference in total HEI-2010 scores comparing lunch meat consumers and non-consumers in children or adults. However, HEI components scores for total fruit, whole fruit (children only), whole grains, dairy and total protein foods were significantly higher, and for greens & beans (adults only), seafood and plant protein, fatty acid ratio and sodium were significantly lower in children and adult lunch meat consumers compared to non-consumers. There were no significant differences in physiological measures or in the odds ratios of health related conditions between lunch meat consumers and non-consumers in children or adults. The results of this study may provide insight into how to better utilize lunch meats in the diets of U.S. children and adults.

  5. Association of candy consumption with body weight measures, other health risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and diet quality in US children and adolescents: NHANES 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol E; Fulgoni, Victor L; Nicklas, Theresa A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of total, chocolate, or sugar candy consumption on intakes of total energy, fat, and added sugars; diet quality; weight/adiposity parameters; and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in children 2-13 years of age (n=7,049) and adolescents 14-18 years (n=4,132) participating in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were used to determine intake. Diet quality was determined using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005). Covariate-adjusted means, standard errors, and prevalence rates were determined for each candy consumption group. Odds ratios were used to determine the likelihood of associations with weight status and diet quality. In younger children, total, chocolate, and sugar candy consumption was 11.4 g±1.61, 4.8 g±0.35, and 6.6 g±0.46, respectively. In adolescents, total, chocolate, and sugar candy consumption was 13.0 g±0.87, 7.0 g±0.56, and 5.9 g±0.56, respectively. Total candy consumers had higher intakes of total energy (2248.9 kcals±26.8 vs 1993.1 kcals±15.1, p<0.0001) and added sugars (27.7 g±0.44 vs 23.4 g±0.38, p<0.0001) than non-consumers. Mean HEI-2005 score was not different in total candy and sugar candy consumers as compared to non-consumers, but was significantly lower in chocolate candy consumers (46.7±0.8 vs 48.3±0.4, p=0.0337). Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, percentiles/z-score for weight-for-age and BMI-for-age were lower for candy consumers as compared to non-consumers. Candy consumers were 22 and 26%, respectively, less likely to be overweight and obese than non-candy consumers. Blood pressure, blood lipid levels, and cardiovascular risk factors were not different between total, chocolate, and sugar candy consumers and non-consumers (except that sugar candy consumers had lower C-reactive protein levels than non-consumers). This study suggests that candy consumption did not adversely affect

  6. Association of candy consumption with body weight measures, other health risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and diet quality in US children and adolescents: NHANES 1999–2004

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Carol E.; Fulgoni, Victor L.; Nicklas, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of total, chocolate, or sugar candy consumption on intakes of total energy, fat, and added sugars; diet quality; weight/adiposity parameters; and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in children 2–13 years of age (n=7,049) and adolescents 14–18 years (n=4,132) participating in the 1999–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Methods Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were used to determine intake. Diet quality was determined using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005). Covariate-adjusted means, standard errors, and prevalence rates were determined for each candy consumption group. Odds ratios were used to determine the likelihood of associations with weight status and diet quality. Results In younger children, total, chocolate, and sugar candy consumption was 11.4 g±1.61, 4.8 g±0.35, and 6.6 g±0.46, respectively. In adolescents, total, chocolate, and sugar candy consumption was 13.0 g±0.87, 7.0 g±0.56, and 5.9 g±0.56, respectively. Total candy consumers had higher intakes of total energy (2248.9 kcals±26.8 vs 1993.1 kcals±15.1, p<0.0001) and added sugars (27.7 g±0.44 vs 23.4 g±0.38, p<0.0001) than non-consumers. Mean HEI-2005 score was not different in total candy and sugar candy consumers as compared to non-consumers, but was significantly lower in chocolate candy consumers (46.7±0.8 vs 48.3±0.4, p=0.0337). Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, percentiles/z-score for weight-for-age and BMI-for-age were lower for candy consumers as compared to non-consumers. Candy consumers were 22 and 26%, respectively, less likely to be overweight and obese than non-candy consumers. Blood pressure, blood lipid levels, and cardiovascular risk factors were not different between total, chocolate, and sugar candy consumers and non-consumers (except that sugar candy consumers had lower C-reactive protein levels than non-consumers). Conclusion This study suggests that

  7. Tree Nut Consumption Is Associated with Better Nutrient Adequacy and Diet Quality in Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Carol E.; Nicklas, Theresa A.; Fulgoni, Victor L.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient adequacy of tree nut consumers has not been examined. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2010 data were used to assess the association of tree nut consumption by adults 19+ years (n = 14,386) with nutrient adequacy and diet quality. Covariate adjusted usual intake was determined using two 24-h dietary recalls and the National Cancer Institute method. Percentages of the consumption groups below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) or above the Adequate Intake (AI) were determined. Diet quality was determined using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI) score. Usual intake data showed consumers of tree nuts had a lower percentage (p < 0.0001) of the population below the EAR for vitamins A (22 ± 5 vs. 49 ± 1), E (38 ± 4 vs. 94 ± 0.4) and C (17 ± 4 vs. 44 ± 1); folate (2.5 ± 1.5 vs. 12 ± 0.6); calcium (26 ± 3 vs. 44 ± 1); iron (3 ± 0.6 vs. 9 ± 0.4); magnesium (8 ± 1 vs. 60 ± 1); and zinc (1.5 ± 1 vs. 13 ± 1). Tree nut consumers had a higher percentage (p < 0.0001) of the population above the AI for fiber (33 ± 3 vs. 4 ± 0.3) and potassium (12 ± 3 mg vs. 2 ± 0.2 mg). HEI-2005 total score was higher (p < 0.0001) in tree nut consumers (61 ± 0.7 vs. 52 ± 0.3) than non-consumers. Health professionals should encourage the use of tree nuts as part of a dietary approach to healthy eating. PMID:25599274

  8. The effect of whole grain consumption (WG) on diet quality and healthy eating index (HEI) scores in children aged 1 to 18 years: Results from NHANES 1999-2004

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of whole grain (WG) consumption on diet quality and nutrient intake in children: 2-5 y n=2,278), 6-12 y (n=3,868), and 13-18 y (n=4,931) using a secondary analysis of NHANES 1999-2004 data. Age groups were divided into four WG consumption groups:...

  9. One hundred percent orange juice consumption is associated with better diet quality, improved nutrient adequacy, and no increased risk for overweight/obesity in children.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol E; Nicklas, Theresa A; Rampersaud, Gail C; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of 100% orange juice (OJ) consumption by children 2 to 18 years of age (n = 7250) participating in the 2003 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with intakes of select nutrients, MyPyramid food groups, diet quality-measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005, weight status, and associated risk factors. The National Cancer Institute method was used to estimate the usual intake of 100% OJ consumption, selected nutrients, and MyPyramid food groups. Percentages of the population below the Estimated Average Requirement were determined. Covariate adjusted logistic regression was used to determine if consumers had a lower odds ratio of being overweight or obese. Usual per capita intake of 100% OJ was 1.7 oz/d. Among consumers, the usual intake of 100% OJ for children (n = 2183; 26.2% of population) was 10.2 oz/d. Consumers had higher (P < .05) energy intakes than nonconsumers (9148 ± 113 vs 8625 ± 473 kJ). However, there were no differences in weight or body mass index in consumers and nonconsumers, and there was no significant difference in the risk of being overweight or obese between consumers and nonconsumers (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-1.05). Compared with nonconsumers, consumers had a higher (P < .01) percentage (% ± SE) of the population meeting the Estimated Average Requirement for vitamin A (19.6 ± 2.0 vs 30.2 ± 1.4), vitamin C (0.0 ± 0.0 vs 29.2 ± 1.2), folate (1.3 ± 0.3 vs 5.1 ± 0.6), and magnesium (25.5 ± 2.0 vs 39.0 ± 11). The Healthy Eating Index-2005 was significantly (P < .01) higher in consumers (52.4 ± 0.4 vs 48.5 ± 0.3). Consumers also had higher intakes of total fruit, fruit juice, and whole fruit. Moderate consumption of 100% OJ should be encouraged in children as a component of a healthy diet. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diet quality and the influence of social and physical factors on food consumption and nutrient intake in materially deprived older people.

    PubMed

    Holmes, B A; Roberts, C L

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the influence of social and physical factors on diet quality in materially deprived (low income) older people in the United Kingdom. A diet quality index was obtained for 222 men and 440 women aged 65 and over living alone or with other adults of retirement age from the United Kingdom Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey (2003-2005). The association between diet quality and social and physical factors was investigated by logistic regression analysis. Analysis revealed several barriers to an adequate diet in the older low-income population. For both men and women, having the best quality diet was inversely associated with usually eating meals on one's lap as opposed to at the table (Adjusted odds ratio (ORs)=0.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.12-0.77 (men), 0.3, 0.17-0.56 (women)). For men, difficulty chewing was inversely associated with the best quality diet (OR=0.4; 0.13-0.99), whereas for women, current smoking and being 75 years or over were inversely associated with the best quality diet (OR=0.2; 0.06-0.42 and 0.5; 0.27-0.87, respectively); P value for all associations was <0.05. Results suggest that the social setting is an important determinant of diet quality in this group and future studies should collect details on where and with whom meals are taken to fully investigate the extent of this influence. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved

  11. The impact of dairy and sweetened beverage consumption on diet quality, nutrient intake, and weight of a multi-ethnic population of Head Start mothers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To assess the impact of milk and sweetened beverage (SwB) intake on diet and weight in Head Start mothers, three 24-hour dietary recalls were collected on 609 Black (43%), Hispanic (33%), or White (24%) women in AL and TX. Women were divided into four beverage consumption groups: low milk/high SwB, ...

  12. Correlation between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and sugar consumption, quality of diet, and dietary behavior in school children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yujeong

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between consumption of sugar intake by fifth grade students in primary schools and development of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). A total of 107 students participated, and eight boys and one girl (8.4% of the total) categorized as high risk for ADHD according to diagnostic criteria. There were significant differences in the occupations and drinking habits of the respondents' fathers between the normal group and risk group. In a comparison of students' nutrition intake status with daily nutrition intake standards for Koreans, students consumed twice as much protein as the recommended level, whereas their calcium intake was only 60% of the recommended DRI (dietary reference intake). Regarding intake volume of vitamin C, the normal group posted 143.9% of the recommended DRI, whereas the risk group showed only 65.5% of the recommended DRI. In terms of simple sugar intake from snacks, students in the normal group consumed 58.4 g while the risk group consumed 50.2 g. These levels constituted 12.5% of their total daily volume of sugar intake from snacks, which is higher than the 10% standard recommended by the WHO. In conclusion, children who consumed less sugar from fruit snacks or whose vitamin C intake was less than RI was at increased risks for ADHD (P < 0.05). However, no significant association was observed between total volume of simple sugar intake from snacks and ADHD development. PMID:21779528

  13. Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2008.

    PubMed

    Fulgoni, Victor L; Dreher, Mark; Davenport, Adrienne J

    2013-01-02

    Avocados contain monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) dietary fiber, essential nutrients and phytochemicals. However, no epidemiologic data exist on their effects on diet quality, weight management and other metabolic disease risk factors. The objective of this research was to investigate the relationships between avocado consumption and overall diet quality, energy and nutrient intakes, physiological indicators of health, and risk of metabolic syndrome. Avocado consumption and nutrition data were based on 24-hour dietary recalls collected by trained NHANES interviewers using the USDA Automated Multiple Pass Method (AMPM). Physiological data were collected from physical examinations conducted in NHANES Mobile Examination Centers. Diet quality was calculated using the USDA's Healthy Eating Index-2005. Subjects included 17,567 US adults ≥ 19 years of age (49% female), including 347 avocado consumers (50% female), examined in NHANES 2001-2008. Least square means, standard errors, and ANOVA were determined using appropriate sample weights, with adjustments for age, gender, ethnicity, and other covariates depending on dependent variable of interest. Avocado consumers had significantly higher intakes of vegetables (p<0.05); fruit, diet quality, total fat, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, dietary fiber, vitamins E, K, magnesium, and potassium (p<0.0001); vitamin K (p=0.0013); and lower intakes of added sugars (p<0.0001). No significant differences were seen in calorie or sodium intakes. Body weight, BMI, and waist circumference were significantly lower (p<0.01), and HDL-C was higher (p<0.01) in avocado consumers. The odds ratio for metabolic syndrome was 50% (95th CI: 0.32-0.72) lower in avocado consumers vs. non-consumers. Avocado consumption is associated with improved overall diet quality, nutrient intake, and reduced risk of metabolic syndrome. Dietitians should be aware of the beneficial associations between avocado intake, diet and health when making

  14. Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001–2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Avocados contain monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) dietary fiber, essential nutrients and phytochemicals. However, no epidemiologic data exist on their effects on diet quality, weight management and other metabolic disease risk factors. The objective of this research was to investigate the relationships between avocado consumption and overall diet quality, energy and nutrient intakes, physiological indicators of health, and risk of metabolic syndrome. Methods Avocado consumption and nutrition data were based on 24-hour dietary recalls collected by trained NHANES interviewers using the USDA Automated Multiple Pass Method (AMPM). Physiological data were collected from physical examinations conducted in NHANES Mobile Examination Centers. Diet quality was calculated using the USDA’s Healthy Eating Index-2005. Subjects included 17,567 US adults  ≥ 19 years of age (49% female), including 347 avocado consumers (50% female), examined in NHANES 2001–2008. Least square means, standard errors, and ANOVA were determined using appropriate sample weights, with adjustments for age, gender, ethnicity, and other covariates depending on dependent variable of interest. Results Avocado consumers had significantly higher intakes of vegetables (p < 0.05); fruit, diet quality, total fat, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, dietary fiber, vitamins E, K, magnesium, and potassium (p < 0.0001); vitamin K (p = 0.0013); and lower intakes of added sugars (p < 0.0001). No significant differences were seen in calorie or sodium intakes. Body weight, BMI, and waist circumference were significantly lower (p < 0.01), and HDL-C was higher (p < 0.01) in avocado consumers. The odds ratio for metabolic syndrome was 50% (95th CI: 0.32-0.72) lower in avocado consumers vs. non-consumers. Conclusions Avocado consumption is associated with improved overall diet quality, nutrient intake, and reduced risk of metabolic syndrome. Dietitians should be aware of

  15. Does social class predict diet quality?

    PubMed

    Darmon, Nicole; Drewnowski, Adam

    2008-05-01

    A large body of epidemiologic data show that diet quality follows a socioeconomic gradient. Whereas higher-quality diets are associated with greater affluence, energy-dense diets that are nutrient-poor are preferentially consumed by persons of lower socioeconomic status (SES) and of more limited economic means. As this review demonstrates, whole grains, lean meats, fish, low-fat dairy products, and fresh vegetables and fruit are more likely to be consumed by groups of higher SES. In contrast, the consumption of refined grains and added fats has been associated with lower SES. Although micronutrient intake and, hence, diet quality are affected by SES, little evidence indicates that SES affects either total energy intakes or the macronutrient composition of the diet. The observed associations between SES variables and diet-quality measures can be explained by a variety of potentially causal mechanisms. The disparity in energy costs ($/MJ) between energy-dense and nutrient-dense foods is one such mechanism; easy physical access to low-cost energy-dense foods is another. If higher SES is a causal determinant of diet quality, then the reported associations between diet quality and better health, found in so many epidemiologic studies, may have been confounded by unobserved indexes of social class. Conversely, if limited economic resources are causally linked to low-quality diets, some current strategies for health promotion, based on recommending high-cost foods to low-income people, may prove to be wholly ineffective. Exploring the possible causal relations between SES and diet quality is the purpose of this review.

  16. Diet quality and academic performance.

    PubMed

    Florence, Michelle D; Asbridge, Mark; Veugelers, Paul J

    2008-04-01

    Although the effects of nutrition on health and school performance are often cited, few research studies have examined the effect of diet quality on the academic performance of children. This study examines the association between overall diet quality and academic performance. In 2003, 5200 grade 5 students in Nova Scotia, Canada, and their parents were surveyed as part of the Children's Lifestyle and School-performance Study. Information on dietary intake, height, and weight and sociodemographic variables were linked to results of a provincial standardized literacy assessment. Diet Quality Index-International was used to summarize overall diet quality. Multilevel regression methods were used to examine the association between indicators of diet quality and academic performance while adjusting for gender and socioeconomic characteristics of parents and residential neighborhoods. Across various indicators of diet quality, an association with academic performance was observed. Students with decreased overall diet quality were significantly more likely to perform poorly on the assessment. Girls performed better than boys as did children from socioeconomically advantaged families. Children attending better schools and living in wealthy neighborhoods also performed better. These findings demonstrate an association between diet quality and academic performance and identify specific dietary factors that contribute to this association. Additionally, this research supports the broader implementation and investment in effective school nutrition programs that have the potential to improve student access to healthy food choices, diet quality, academic performance, and, over the long term, health.

  17. Quality of diet of working college students.

    PubMed

    Gorgulho, Bartira; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo; Conceição, Adriana Balian da; Steluti, Josiane; Mussi, Marina Hurga; Nagai-Manelli, Roberta; Teixeira, Liliane Reis; Luz, Andréa Aparecida da; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-01-01

    Considering the scarcity of studies with young workers and the role of diet in the prevention of chronic diseases, the objective of the study was to assess the quality of diet of working college students. The present study investigated 43 university students, aged between 18 and 25 years old who had systematically being involved in a working activity in the past 6 months, paid or unpaid, at least 6 hours daily, five days a week. Dietary intake measured by seven dietary records covering every day of the week was used to calculate the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised (B-HEIR). It was observed a low B-HEIR score (53.43,±7.81) indicating a risk of a poor quality of diet, with high intake of sodium and sugar and low consumption of fruits and whole grains. This poor quality of diet can result in an inadequate nutritional status that may increase the risk of obesity and chronic diseases.

  18. Cooked oatmeal consumption is associated with better diet quality, better nutrient intakes, and reduced risk for central adiposity and obesity in children 2–18 years: NHANES 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Carol E.; Nicklas, Theresa A.; Fulgoni, Victor L.; DiRienzo, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background None of the studies of whole grains that have looked either at diet or weight/adiposity measures have focused exclusively on oatmeal. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the association between oatmeal consumption and nutrient intake, diet quality, and weight/adiposity of children aged 2–18. Design A nationally representative sample of children aged 2–18 (N=14,690) participating in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001–2010 was used. Intake was determined from a single 24-h dietary recall. Diet quality was measured using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010). Covariate-adjusted regression analyses, using appropriate sample weights, were used to determine differences between oatmeal consumers and non-consumers for demographics, nutrient intakes, diet quality, and weight/adiposity measures (p<0.01). Logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios for weight measures and obesity (p<0.05). Results Compared to non-consumers, oatmeal consumers were more likely to be younger and less likely to be smokers. Consumers had higher intakes of dietary fiber, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper, and potassium, and significantly lower intakes of total, monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sodium. Oatmeal consumers had higher dietary quality scores attributable to higher intakes of whole grains and lower intakes of refined grains and empty calories. Children consuming oatmeal were at lower risk for having central adiposity and being obese. Conclusions Consumption of oatmeal by children was associated with better nutrient intake, diet quality, and reduced risk for central adiposity and obesity and should be encouraged as part of an overall healthful diet. PMID:26022379

  19. Meat consumption after disaggregation of meat dishes in a cohort of British adults in 1989 and 1999 in relation to diet quality.

    PubMed

    Prynne, C J; Wagemakers, J J M F; Stephen, A M; Wadsworth, M E J

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify more precisely the meat intake of a cohort of adults in the UK by disaggregating composite meat dishes. Subjects were members of the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development, 1946 birth cohort. Five-day diaries were collected from 2256 men and women in 1989 and 1772 men and women in 1999. From the details provided, composite meat dishes were broken down into their constituent parts and the meat fraction was added to meat portions only. Meat intake was classified as red meat, processed meat and poultry. Meat consumption without disaggregation of meat dishes resulted in a mean overestimation of 50% in men and 33% in women. Red meat consumption fell between 1989 and 1999 from 51.7 to 41.5 g per day in men and 35.7 to 30.1 g per day in women. Poultry consumption rose from 21.6 to 32.2 g per day in men and 18.2 to 29.4 g per day in women. Re-calculating red meat intakes resulted in the percentage of subjects in 1999 consuming more than the recommendation of the World Cancer Research Fund falling from 30 to 12%. Increasing consumption of red and processed meat was associated with increased intakes of energy, fat, haem iron, zinc and vitamin B(12), and lower intake of fibre. Increased sodium intake was associated with increased consumption of processed meat. Disaggregation of meat dishes provided a more precise estimate of meat consumption. The quantity of red or processed meat in the diet was reflected in the nutrient content of the entire diet.

  20. Diet Quality and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florence, Michelle D.; Asbridge, Mark; Veugelers, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although the effects of nutrition on health and school performance are often cited, few research studies have examined the effect of diet quality on the academic performance of children. This study examines the association between overall diet quality and academic performance. Methods: In 2003, 5200 grade 5 students in Nova Scotia,…

  1. Diet Quality and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florence, Michelle D.; Asbridge, Mark; Veugelers, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although the effects of nutrition on health and school performance are often cited, few research studies have examined the effect of diet quality on the academic performance of children. This study examines the association between overall diet quality and academic performance. Methods: In 2003, 5200 grade 5 students in Nova Scotia,…

  2. Fresh pear consumption is associated with better nutrient intake, diet quality, and weight parameters in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    No studies have examined the association of consuming fresh pears on nutrient intake or adequacy, diet quality, and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF). The purpose of this study was to examine these association in adults (n=24,808) participating the NHANES 2001-2010. Covariate adjusted linear regres...

  3. Diet quality is positively associated with 100% fruit juice consumption in children and adults in the United States: NHANES 2003-2006

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One hundred percent fruit juice (100% FJ) has been viewed by some as a sweetened beverage with concerns about its effect on weight. Little regard has been given to the contribution of 100% FJ to diet quality. In this study data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were...

  4. Assessing water consumption in extreme diet scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalava, Mika; Guillaume, Joseph; Kummu, Matti

    2017-04-01

    Most of the food for humanity comes from agriculture. Producing it requires enormous resources, and the projected population growth will further increase the stress on the environment. A number of strategies have been suggested to make food production sustainable. One of them, changing the human diet, has been shown to have a considerable potential in reducing use of resources, including water. Using water footprint methodology, our results show that moving to a mostly plant-based diet or a more conservative diet change combined with halving food losses would reduce the number of people living under water scarcity by hundreds of millions. Alternatively, it would enable producing sufficient, healthy food supply for a much larger population. Questions are still remaining, though. While water footprints alone have been criticised for only concentrating on water volumes and not the impacts of consumption, with proper attention to existing resources and the ecological relevance of using them, the water footprints allow straightforward analysis of limited modifications to food systems. On the other hand, large changes to the demand of each of the crops as well as shifts in ratios between plant- and animal-based foodstuffs alter some of the underlying assumptions, which are based on the current production. We present concepts to try to tackle the dynamics involved with diet change. Specifically, we discuss and present results related to: 1) Effects of changes in the areas used for production of a crop on its marginal water footprint 2) Use of non-food grade crop production as feed 3) Use of feed from co-production systems

  5. Diet Quality of Collegiate Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Kelly; Stoess, Amanda Ireland; Forsythe, Hazel; Kurzynske, Janet; Vaught, Joy Ann; Adams, Bailey

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Collegiate athletes generally appear healthy according to weight for height and body fat standards. Despite the fact that there are well known connections between athletic performance and nutrition, little is known about the diets of collegiate athletes. The objective of this study was to determine the diet quality of 138…

  6. Diet Quality of Collegiate Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Kelly; Stoess, Amanda Ireland; Forsythe, Hazel; Kurzynske, Janet; Vaught, Joy Ann; Adams, Bailey

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Collegiate athletes generally appear healthy according to weight for height and body fat standards. Despite the fact that there are well known connections between athletic performance and nutrition, little is known about the diets of collegiate athletes. The objective of this study was to determine the diet quality of 138…

  7. Evaluation of diet quality of the elderly and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Pinto de Souza Fernandes, Dalila; Duarte, Maria Sônia Lopes; Pessoa, Milene Cristine; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz

    2017-09-01

    Observational studies suggest healthy dietary patterns are associated with risk reduction and better control of various chronic diseases. However, few Brazilian studies have focused on evaluating the quality of the elderly diet and its relationship with diseases. This study aimed to estimate the association between diet quality and socioeconomic factors, health and nutrition of the elderly. This is a cross-sectional population-based study whose target population were non-institutionalized elderly residents in the city of Viçosa, Brazil. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, health conditions, lifestyle and food consumption variables were obtained from a semi-structured questionnaire. The quality of the diet was assessed by the revised Healthy Eating Index classified into tertiles, considering the first tertile as "Poor diet quality," the second as 'Intermediate diet quality' and the third as "Better diet quality." To identify factors independently associated with diet quality model, the works used multinomial logistic regression. In the results of the multivariate analysis, the factors independently associated with "better diet quality" included female gender, higher education, history of one to five medical visits in the past year, history of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and the use of polypharmacy. Our results show that most seniors need to improve the quality of their diet and those of male gender with no or little education, and those who do not seek medical services constitute the group that needs attention concerning the measures to improve the quality of their diet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Indicators for the evaluation of diet quality.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ángel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio; Olza, Josune

    2015-02-26

    The role of diet quality and physical activity in reducing the progression of chronic disease is becoming increasingly important. Dietary Quality Indices or Indicators (DQIs) are algorithms aiming to evaluate the overall diet and categorize individuals according to the extent to which their eating behaviour is "healthy". Predefined indexes assess dietary patterns based on current nutrition knowledge and they have been developed primarily for nutritional epidemiology to assess dietary risk factors for non-communicable diseases. There are many different types of DQIs. There are three major categories of DQIs: a) nutrient-based indicators; b) food/food group based indicators; and c) combination indexes, the vast majority of DQIs, which often include a measure of diet variety within and across food groups, a measure of adequacy i.e. nutrients (compared to requirements) or food groups (quantities or servings), a measure of nutrients/foods to consume in moderation, and an overall balance of macronutrients. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI), the Diet Quality Index (DQI), the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI) and the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) are the four 'original' diet quality scores that have been referred to and validated most extensively. Several indexes have been adapted and modified from those originals. In particular, many variations on the MDS have been proposed, included different alternate MDS and Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). Primary data source of DQI's are individual dietary data collection tools, namely 24 h quantitative intake recalls, dietary records and food frequency questionnaires. Nutrients found in many scores are total fat, saturated fatty acids or the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids or the latter SFA to polyunsaturated fatty acids. Cholesterol, protein content and quality, complex carbohydrates, mono- and disaccharides, dietary fibre and sodium are also found in various scores. All DQIs, except those that

  9. Sleep patterns, diet quality and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2014-07-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that sleep has an influence on eating behaviors. Short sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and later bedtimes are all associated with increased food intake, poor diet quality, and excess body weight. Insufficient sleep seems to facilitate the ingestion of calories when exposed to the modern obesogenic environment of readily accessible food. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase snacking, the number of meals consumed per day, and the preference for energy-rich foods. Proposed mechanisms by which insufficient sleep may increase caloric consumption include: (1) more time and opportunities for eating, (2) psychological distress, (3) greater sensitivity to food reward, (4) disinhibited eating, (5) more energy needed to sustain extended wakefulness, and (6) changes in appetite hormones. Globally, excess energy intake associated with not getting adequate sleep seems to be preferentially driven by hedonic rather than homeostatic factors. Moreover, the consumption of certain types of foods which impact the availability of tryptophan as well as the synthesis of serotonin and melatonin may aid in promoting sleep. In summary, multiple connections exist between sleep patterns, eating behavior and energy balance. Sleep should not be overlooked in obesity research and should be included as part of the lifestyle package that traditionally has focused on diet and physical activity.

  10. Diet quality on meatless days: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007-2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To compare diet quality scores between adult non-meat eaters and meat eaters, and to compare the consumption of diet components across quintiles of diet quality. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) and Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010) we...

  11. 100% orange juice consumption is associated with better diet quality, improved nutrient adequacy, decreased risk for obesity, and improved biomarkers of health in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol E; Nicklas, Theresa A; Rampersaud, Gail C; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2012-12-12

    Consumption of 100% orange juice (OJ) has been positively associated with nutrient adequacy and diet quality, with no increased risk of overweight/obesity in children; however, no one has examined these factors in adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of 100% OJ consumption with nutrient adequacy, diet quality, and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a nationally representative sample of adults. Data from adults 19+ years of age (n = 8,861) participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006 were used. The National Cancer Institute method was used to estimate the usual intake (UI) of 100% OJ consumption, selected nutrients, and food groups. Percentages of the population below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) or above the Adequate Intake (AI) were determined. Diet quality was measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005). Covariate adjusted logistic regression was used to determine if consumers had a lower odds ratio of being overweight or obese or having risk factors of MetS or MetS. Usual per capita intake of 100% OJ was 50.3 ml/d. Among consumers (n = 2,310; 23.8%), UI was 210.0 ml/d. Compared to non-consumers, consumers had a higher (p < 0.05) percentage (% ± SE) of the population meeting the EAR for vitamin A (39.7 ± 2.5 vs 54.0 ± 1.2), vitamin C (0.0 ± 0.0 vs 59.0 ± 1.4), folate (5.8 ± 0.7 vs 15.1 ± 0.9), and magnesium (51.6 ± 1.6 vs 63.7 ± 1.2). Consumers were also more likely to be above the AI for potassium (4.1 ± 0.8 vs 1.8 ± 0.2). HEI-2005 was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in consumers (55.0 ± 0.4 vs 49.7 ± 0.3). Consumers also had higher intakes of total fruit, fruit juice, whole fruit, and whole grain. Consumers had a lower (p < 0.05) mean body mass index (27.6 ± 0.2 vs 28.5 ± 0.1), total cholesterol levels (197.6 ± 1.2 vs 200.8 ± 0.75 mg/dL), and low density lipoprotein

  12. 100% Orange juice consumption is associated with better diet quality, improved nutrient adequacy, decreased risk for obesity, and improved biomarkers of health in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Consumption of 100% orange juice (OJ) has been positively associated with nutrient adequacy and diet quality, with no increased risk of overweight/obesity in children; however, no one has examined these factors in adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of 100% OJ consumption with nutrient adequacy, diet quality, and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a nationally representative sample of adults. Methods Data from adults 19+ years of age (n = 8,861) participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006 were used. The National Cancer Institute method was used to estimate the usual intake (UI) of 100% OJ consumption, selected nutrients, and food groups. Percentages of the population below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) or above the Adequate Intake (AI) were determined. Diet quality was measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005). Covariate adjusted logistic regression was used to determine if consumers had a lower odds ratio of being overweight or obese or having risk factors of MetS or MetS. Results Usual per capita intake of 100% OJ was 50.3 ml/d. Among consumers (n = 2,310; 23.8%), UI was 210.0 ml/d. Compared to non-consumers, consumers had a higher (p < 0.05) percentage (% ± SE) of the population meeting the EAR for vitamin A (39.7 ± 2.5 vs 54.0 ± 1.2), vitamin C (0.0 ± 0.0 vs 59.0 ± 1.4), folate (5.8 ± 0.7 vs 15.1 ± 0.9), and magnesium (51.6 ± 1.6 vs 63.7 ± 1.2). Consumers were also more likely to be above the AI for potassium (4.1 ± 0.8 vs 1.8 ± 0.2). HEI-2005 was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in consumers (55.0 ± 0.4 vs 49.7 ± 0.3). Consumers also had higher intakes of total fruit, fruit juice, whole fruit, and whole grain. Consumers had a lower (p < 0.05) mean body mass index (27.6 ± 0.2 vs 28.5 ± 0.1), total cholesterol levels (197.6 ± 1.2 vs 200.8 ± 0.75 mg

  13. Effects of Diet on Sleep Quality.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Mikic, Anja; Pietrolungo, Cara E

    2016-09-01

    There is much emerging information surrounding the impact of sleep duration and quality on food choice and consumption in both children and adults. However, less attention has been paid to the effects of dietary patterns and specific foods on nighttime sleep. Early studies have shown that certain dietary patterns may affect not only daytime alertness but also nighttime sleep. In this review, we surveyed the literature to describe the role of food consumption on sleep. Research has focused on the effects of mixed meal patterns, such as high-carbohydrate plus low-fat or low-carbohydrate diets, over the short term on sleep. Such studies highlight a potential effect of macronutrient intakes on sleep variables, particularly alterations in slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep with changes in carbohydrate and fat intakes. Other studies instead examined the intake of specific foods, consumed at a fixed time relative to sleep, on sleep architecture and quality. Those foods, specifically milk, fatty fish, tart cherry juice, and kiwifruit, are reviewed here. Studies provide some evidence for a role of certain dietary patterns and foods in the promotion of high-quality sleep, but more studies are necessary to confirm those preliminary findings.

  14. Alcohol Consumption, Beverage Preference, and Diet in Middle-Aged Men from the STANISLAS Study

    PubMed Central

    Herbeth, Bernard; Samara, Anastasia; Stathopoulou, Maria; Siest, Gérard; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The question about differences in dietary patterns associated with beer, wine, and spirits is still unresolved. We used diet data from 423 middle-aged males of the STANISLAS Study. Using adjusted values for covariates, we observed a negative significant association between increasing alcohol intakes and the consumption of milk, yogurt, and fresh/uncured cheese, sugar and confectionery, vegetables and fruits, and a significant positive relationship with cheese, meat and organs, pork-butcher's meat, and potatoes. In addition, the first dietary pattern identified by factor analysis (characterized a more prudent diet) was inversely related to alcohol intakes. Conversely, when analyzing daily consumption of specific food groups and diet patterns according to beverage preference (wine, beer, and spirits), no significant difference was observed. In conclusion, in this sample of middle-aged French males, there was a linear trend between increasing alcohol intakes and worsening of quality of diet, while no difference was observed according to beverage preference. PMID:23056930

  15. Consumption of carotenoid-rich diet improves plasma inflammatory markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiple studies have investigated the effects of carotenoids on a limited selection of cytokines. However, inflammation is a complex system involving numerous interacting cytokines. In this study, a broad array of 30 cytokines was measured after consumption of low- and high-carotenoid diets. Nine m...

  16. Changing Diet Quality in China during 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingying; Wang, Hui; Tian, Xu

    2016-12-24

    Currently, under- and over-nutrition problems co-exist in China. However, systematic studies on the diet quality of Chinese residents have been scant. This study described the trend in diet quality of Chinese residents over a recent eight-year period and investigated the relevant influential factors. The data of Chinese adults aged 20-59 years was extracted from 2004, 2006, 2009, and 2011 China Health and Nutrition Survey. The China diet quality index (DQI) was employed to assess the diet quality of Chinese adults. The dietary consumption data of each individual was collected using a 24-h dietary recall and weighed food records implemented for three consecutive days. A mixed ordinary least squares regression model was applied to analyze the factors influencing the DQI scores of Chinese residents. Results showed that the diet quality of Chinese residents increased from 2004 to 2006, followed by a decrease in 2009 and 2011. The income, urbanicity index, and southern dummy were positively associated with DQI scores, whereas the size of household and labor intensity were negative predictors of DQI scores. The DQI scores also varied over BMI values. With an increase of the average income level in the future, the diet quality of Chinese residents is estimated to further improve. Moreover, urbanization could also contribute to reaching a more balanced diet.

  17. Changing Diet Quality in China during 2004–2011

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingying; Wang, Hui; Tian, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Currently, under- and over-nutrition problems co-exist in China. However, systematic studies on the diet quality of Chinese residents have been scant. This study described the trend in diet quality of Chinese residents over a recent eight-year period and investigated the relevant influential factors. The data of Chinese adults aged 20–59 years was extracted from 2004, 2006, 2009, and 2011 China Health and Nutrition Survey. The China diet quality index (DQI) was employed to assess the diet quality of Chinese adults. The dietary consumption data of each individual was collected using a 24-h dietary recall and weighed food records implemented for three consecutive days. A mixed ordinary least squares regression model was applied to analyze the factors influencing the DQI scores of Chinese residents. Results showed that the diet quality of Chinese residents increased from 2004 to 2006, followed by a decrease in 2009 and 2011. The income, urbanicity index, and southern dummy were positively associated with DQI scores, whereas the size of household and labor intensity were negative predictors of DQI scores. The DQI scores also varied over BMI values. With an increase of the average income level in the future, the diet quality of Chinese residents is estimated to further improve. Moreover, urbanization could also contribute to reaching a more balanced diet. PMID:28029128

  18. Water consumption related to different diets in Mediterranean cities.

    PubMed

    Vanham, D; Del Pozo, S; Pekcan, A G; Keinan-Boker, L; Trichopoulou, A; Gawlik, B M

    2016-12-15

    Providing the sustainable development goals (SDGs) water, food and energy security to cities relies strongly on resource use outside city borders. Many modern cities have recently invested in a sustainable urban water system, and score high in international city rankings regarding water management and direct urban water use. However, these rankings generally neglect external resource use for cities. Here we quantify the water resources related to food consumption in thirteen cities located in Mediterranean countries, by means of the water footprint (WF) concept. These WFs amount from 3277l per capita per day (l/cap/d) to 5789l/cap/d. These amounts are about thirty times higher than their direct urban water use. We additionally analyse the WF of three diet scenarios, based upon a Mediterranean dietary pattern. Many authors identify the Mediterranean diet as cultural heritage, being beneficial for human health and a model for a sustainable food system. The first diet scenario, a healthy Mediterranean diet including meat, leads to WF reductions of -19% to -43%. The second diet scenario (pesco-vegetarian), leads to WF reductions of -28% to -52%. The third diet scenario (vegetarian), leads to WF reductions of -30% to -53%. In other words, if urban citizens want to save water, they need to look at their diets. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Habitual diet and diet quality in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, E F; Mujagic, Z; Zhernakova, A; Hesselink, M A M; Meijboom, S; Perenboom, C W M; Masclee, A A M; Wijmenga, C; Feskens, E J M; Jonkers, D M A E

    2017-07-17

    Diet is considered to be a key factor in symptom generation in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and patients tend to exclude food products from their diet in pursue of symptom relief, which may impair diet quality. We evaluated habitual dietary intake in IBS patients with regard to nutrients and food products using an extensive food frequency questionnaire. One hundred ninety-four IBS patients were compared to 186 healthy controls using multiple logistic regression analysis. An overall diet quality score was calculated for each participant based on the criteria of the Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD) index. A lower DHD-score was found for IBS (mean [SD]: 52.9 [9.6]) vs controls (55.1 [9.2], P=.02). The diet of patients was lower in fibers (21 g vs 25 g per day, P=.002) and fructose (14 g vs 16 g, P=.033), while higher in total fat (37% vs 36% of total energy intake, P=.010) and added sugars (46 g vs 44 g, P=.029). Differences in daily intake of food products included lower consumption of apples (40 g vs 69 g, P<.001), pasta (28 vs 37 g, P=.029) and alcoholic beverages (130 g vs 193 g, P=.024) and higher consumption of processed meat (38 g vs 29 g, P<.001). Some of these findings correlated with gastrointestinal symptoms, showing differences between IBS subtypes. Differences in habitual diet were described, showing lower diet quality in IBS patients compared to controls, with increased consumption of fat and lower intake of fibers and fructose. Our data support the importance of personalized and professional nutritional guidance of IBS patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Nutritional quality of diet and academic performance in Chilean students.

    PubMed

    Correa-Burrows, Paulina; Burrows, Raquel; Blanco, Estela; Reyes, Marcela; Gahagan, Sheila

    2016-03-01

    To explore associations between the nutritional quality of diet at age 16 years and academic performance in students from Santiago, Chile. We assessed the nutritional quality of diet, using a validated food frequency questionnaire, in 395 students aged 16.8 ± 0.5 years. Depending on the amount of saturated fat, fibre, sugar and salt in the foods, diet was categorized as unhealthy, fair or healthy. Academic performance was assessed using high school grade-point average (GPA) and tests for college admission in language and mathematics. Academic results on or above the 75th percentile in our sample were considered good academic performance. We tested associations between nutritional quality of diet and good academic performance using logistic regression models. We considered sociodemographic, educational and body-mass index (BMI) factors as potential confounders. After controlling for potential confounding factors, an unhealthy diet at age 16 years was associated with reduced academic performance. Compared to participants with healthy diets, those with unhealthy diets were significantly less likely to perform well based on language tests (odds ratio, OR: 0.42; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.18-0.98) mathematics tests (OR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.15-0.82) or GPA (OR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.09-0.56). In our sample, excessive consumption of energy-dense, low-fibre, high-fat foods at age 16 years was associated with reduced academic performance.

  1. Nutritional assessment and diet quality of visually impaired Spanish children.

    PubMed

    Montero, Pilar

    2005-01-01

    The visually impaired represents a fairly numerous group in Spain although no data on their nutritional status has previously been published. This work aims to assess the nutritional state of a sample of visually impaired children and the quality of their diet. The sample comprised 229 boys and girls aged between 8 and 18 years (mean = 14, SD = 2.6), all of whom had a visual discapacity and were students of the Centros de Recursos Educativos (CREs; Educational Resources Centres) of the Organización Nacional de Ciegos de España (ONCE; Spanish National Organization for the Blind). This sample featured a high prevalence of overweight (25.8%) and obesity (11.8%) according to the international standard. The mean daily energy consumption and the quantity of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and fibre were greater in boys (2604 kcal day(-1); 290 g of carbohydrates, 126 g of fats and 90 g of proteins) than in girls (2159 kcal day(-1), 232 g of carbohydrates, 107 g of fats and 80 g of proteins). No differences in diet intake according to degree of visual impairment were found. Their diet was unbalanced in comparison with the nutritional objectives for the Spanish population, since consumption of carbohydrates was low and that of fats was very high. The results relating to the quality of the diet reveal quite large deviations from the Mediterranean model. Only 11.9% of the whole sample had a value corresponding to a good quality diet. The pattern of dietary consumption was the same as that observed in non visually impaired children in Spain in quantity and quality, nevertheless the prevalence of overweight and obesity is higher than in children without visual handicaps.

  2. Diet Soda Consumption and Risk of Incident End Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Rebholz, Casey M; Grams, Morgan E; Steffen, Lyn M; Crews, Deidra C; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Bazzano, Lydia A; Coresh, Josef; Appel, Lawrence J

    2017-01-06

    Diet soda consumption is common in the United States and is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. We prospectively analyzed diet soda consumption, assessed by food frequency questionnaire at baseline (1987-1989) and a follow-up examination (1993-1995), and incident ESRD through December 31, 2012 in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (n=15,368). Baseline mean age of participants was 54 years, 55% were female, and 27% were black. The majority of participants (43.5%) consumed <1 glass/wk of diet soda; 17.8% consumed 1-4 glasses/wk; 25.3% consumed 5-7 glasses/wk; and 13.5% consumed >7 glasses/wk. Over a median follow-up of 23 years, 357 incident ESRD cases were observed. Relative to <1 glass/wk of diet soda, consuming 1-4 glasses/wk, 5-7 glasses/wk, and >7 glasses/wk, respectively, was associated with 1.08-times (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.75 to 1.55), 1.33-times (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.75), and 1.83-times (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.52) higher risk of ESRD after adjusting for age, sex, race-center, education level, smoking status, physical activity, total caloric intake, eGFR, body mass index category, diabetes, systolic BP, and serum uric acid (P value for trend <0.001). Results were similar after additional adjustment for dietary acid load, diet quality, dietary sodium, dietary fructose, sugar-sweetened beverages, and dietary phosphorus. Risk estimates were similar by body mass index category (P value for interaction = 0.82), but the association between diet soda and ESRD was only significant for those who were overweight or obese at baseline. Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was not significantly associated with ESRD in the fully adjusted model. Diet soda consumption was associated with higher ESRD risk in this general population sample. Further research is necessary to validate these findings in other study populations and to examine potential mechanisms through which diet soda could impact kidney disease

  3. Meat consumption: trends and quality matters.

    PubMed

    Henchion, Maeve; McCarthy, Mary; Resconi, Virginia C; Troy, Declan

    2014-11-01

    This paper uses quality theory to identify opportunities for the meat sector that are consistent with trends in meat consumption. Meat consumption has increased and is likely to continue into the future. Growth is largely driven by white meats, with poultry in particular of increasing importance globally. The influence of factors such as income and price is likely decline over time so that other factors, such as quality, will become more important. Quality is complex and consumers' quality expectations may not align with experienced quality due to misconception of certain intrinsic cues. Establishing relevant and effective cues, based on extrinsic and credence attributes, could offer advantage on the marketplace. The use of extrinsic cues can help convey quality characteristics for eating quality, but also for more abstract attributes that reflect individual consumer concerns e.g. health/nutrition, and collective concerns, e.g. sustainability. However, attributes are not of equal value to all consumers. Thus consumer segmentation and production differentiation is needed.

  4. Nutritional quality of diet and academic performance in Chilean students

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Burrows, Paulina; Blanco, Estela; Reyes, Marcela; Gahagan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore associations between the nutritional quality of diet at age 16 years and academic performance in students from Santiago, Chile. Methods We assessed the nutritional quality of diet, using a validated food frequency questionnaire, in 395 students aged 16.8 ± 0.5 years. Depending on the amount of saturated fat, fibre, sugar and salt in the foods, diet was categorized as unhealthy, fair or healthy. Academic performance was assessed using high school grade-point average (GPA) and tests for college admission in language and mathematics. Academic results on or above the 75th percentile in our sample were considered good academic performance. We tested associations between nutritional quality of diet and good academic performance using logistic regression models. We considered sociodemographic, educational and body-mass index (BMI) factors as potential confounders. Findings After controlling for potential confounding factors, an unhealthy diet at age 16 years was associated with reduced academic performance. Compared to participants with healthy diets, those with unhealthy diets were significantly less likely to perform well based on language tests (odds ratio, OR: 0.42; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.18–0.98) mathematics tests (OR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.15–0.82) or GPA (OR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.09–0.56). Conclusion In our sample, excessive consumption of energy-dense, low-fibre, high-fat foods at age 16 years was associated with reduced academic performance. PMID:26966329

  5. Dietary variety and food group consumption in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet.

    PubMed

    Maslin, Kate; Dean, Tara; Arshad, Syed Hasan; Venter, Carina

    2016-08-01

    Dietary variety is defined as the number of different foods or food groups consumed over a given reference period, the consensus being that dietary variety and dietary quality are positively correlated. Recently there has been considerable interest in the association between infant dietary variety and atopic disease. This was a cross-sectional study of 8- to 27-month-old children from the Isle of Wight, UK, including two groups: a group of children consuming a cows' milk exclusion (CME) diet and a control group of children consuming an unrestricted diet. Parents completed a validated food frequency questionnaire, from which dietary variety and consumption of food groups were calculated. Growth measurements were recorded. A total of 126 participants of mean age 13.0 months were recruited. In addition to the expected differences in dairy and soya consumption, the CME group consumed sweet foods 1.6 times less frequently, non-water drinks seven times less frequently (p < 0.05) and ready-made baby foods 15 times more frequently (p < 0.01) than the control group. Overall dietary variety was significantly lower in the CME group (p < 0.01) as was variety of meat and sweet foods consumed. There was a greater concern with healthy eating in the CME group (p < 0.05). Children consuming an exclusion diet for cows' milk allergy have an overall less varied diet, including a less varied consumption of meat and sweet foods. Efforts should be made to ensure exclusion diets are as varied as possible to optimize nutritional intake. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A simulation study of the potential effects of whole grain food substitutions on diet quality in Lower Mississippi Delta adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The majority of US adult diets do not meet recommendations for consumption of whole grains, putting these individuals at increased risk for chronic diseases. Poor diet quality, inadequate consumption of whole grains, and chronic diseases are particularly prevalent in the impoverished rural South. ...

  7. Parent Diet Quality and Energy Intake Are Related to Child Diet Quality and Energy Intake.

    PubMed

    Robson, Shannon M; Couch, Sarah C; Peugh, James L; Glanz, Karen; Zhou, Chuan; Sallis, James F; Saelens, Brian E

    2016-06-01

    Parents' diets are believed to influence their children's diets. Previous studies have not adequately and simultaneously assessed the relationship between parent and child total diet quality and energy intakes. Our aim was to investigate whether parent and child diet quality and energy intakes are related. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using baseline dietary intake data from the Neighborhood Impact on Kids study collected in 2007 to 2009. Participants were parents and 6- to 12-year-old children from households in King County (Seattle area), WA, and San Diego County, CA, targeted by Neighborhood Impact on Kids were recruited. Eligible parent-child dyads (n=698) with two or three 24-hour dietary recalls were included in this secondary analysis. Child diet quality (Healthy Eating Index-2010, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension score, and energy density [for food only]) and energy intake were derived from the dietary recalls using Nutrition Data Systems for Research. Multiple linear regression models examined the relationship between parent diet quality and child diet quality, and the relationship between parent energy intake and child energy intake. In both analyses, we controlled for parent characteristics, child characteristics, household education, and neighborhood type. Parent diet quality measures were significantly related to corresponding child diet quality measures: Healthy Eating Index-2010 (standardized β=.39; P<0.001); Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension score (β=.33; P<0.001); and energy density (β=.32; P<0.001). Parent daily mean energy intake (1,763±524 kcal) was also significantly related (β=.30; P<0.001) to child daily mean energy intake (1,751±431 kcal). Parent and child intakes were closely related across various metrics of diet quality and for energy intake. Mechanisms of influence are likely to be shared food environments, shared meals, and parent modeling. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by

  8. Parent Diet Quality and Energy Intake Are Related to Child Diet Quality and Energy Intake

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Shannon M.; Couch, Sarah C.; Peugh, James L.; Glanz, Karen; Zhou, Chuan; Sallis, James F.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Parents' diets are believed to influence their children's diets. Previous studies have not adequately and simultaneously assessed the relation of parent and child total diet quality and energy intake. Objective To investigate if parent and child diet quality and energy intakes are related. Design A cross-sectional analysis using baseline dietary intake data from the Neighborhood Impact on Kids (NIK) study collected in 2007-2009. Participants/setting Parents and 6-12 year old children from households in King County (Seattle area), WA and San Diego County, CA, targeted by NIK were recruited. Eligible parent-child dyads (n=698) with two or three 24-hour dietary recalls were included in this secondary analysis. Main Outcome Measures Child diet quality (Healthy Eating Index-2010 [HEI-2010], Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] score, and energy density (for food-only) and energy intake were derived from the dietary recalls using Nutrition Data Systems for Research. Statistical Analyses Performed Multiple linear regression models examined the relationship between parent diet quality and child diet quality, and the relationship between parent energy intake and child energy intake. In both analyses, we controlled for parent characteristics, child characteristics, household education and neighborhood type. Results Parent diet quality measures were significantly related to corresponding child diet quality measures: HEI-2010 (standardized beta [β] = 0.39, p<0.001); DASH score (β = 0.33, p<0.001); energy density (β = 0.32, p<0.001). Parent daily average energy intake (1763 ± 524 kilocalories) also was significantly related (β = 0.30, p<0.001) to child daily average energy intake (1751 ± 431 kilocalories). Conclusion Parent and child intakes were closely related across various metrics of diet quality and for energy intake. Mechanisms of influence are likely to be shared food environments, shared meals, and parent modeling. PMID:27050725

  9. Micronutrient Supplement Use and Diet Quality in University Students

    PubMed Central

    Wiltgren, Adam R.; Booth, Alison O.; Kaur, Gunveen; Cicerale, Sara; Lacy, Kathleen E.; Thorpe, Maree G.; Keast, Russell S. J.; Riddell, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    Many national and international public health organisations recommend achieving nutrient adequacy through consumption of a wide variety of nutritious foods. Despite this, dietary supplement sales continue to increase. Understanding the characteristics of micronutrient supplement users and the relationship with diet quality can help develop effective public health interventions to reduce unnecessary consumption of vitamin and mineral supplements. Participants (n = 1306) were a convenience sample of students studying first year food and nutrition. Data was collected via a Food and Diet Questionnaire (FDQ) and a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Supplement users were defined as participants who indicated consuming any listed supplement as frequently as once a month or more. Diet quality was assessed using a Dietary Guideline Index (DGI) score. Prevalence of supplement use was high in this study population with 56% of participants reporting supplement use; the most popular supplements consumed were multivitamins (28%) and vitamin C (28%). A higher DGI score was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of supplement use (mean: 105 ± 18 vs. 109 ± 17, p = 0.001). Micronutrient supplement use was associated with a higher DGI score, suggesting that supplements are more likely to be used by those who are less likely to require them. PMID:25665159

  10. Micronutrient supplement use and diet quality in university students.

    PubMed

    Wiltgren, Adam R; Booth, Alison O; Kaur, Gunveen; Cicerale, Sara; Lacy, Kathleen E; Thorpe, Maree G; Keast, Russell S J; Riddell, Lynn J

    2015-02-05

    Many national and international public health organisations recommend achieving nutrient adequacy through consumption of a wide variety of nutritious foods. Despite this, dietary supplement sales continue to increase. Understanding the characteristics of micronutrient supplement users and the relationship with diet quality can help develop effective public health interventions to reduce unnecessary consumption of vitamin and mineral supplements. Participants (n=1306) were a convenience sample of students studying first year food and nutrition. Data was collected via a Food and Diet Questionnaire (FDQ) and a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Supplement users were defined as participants who indicated consuming any listed supplement as frequently as once a month or more. Diet quality was assessed using a Dietary Guideline Index (DGI) score. Prevalence of supplement use was high in this study population with 56% of participants reporting supplement use; the most popular supplements consumed were multivitamins (28%) and vitamin C (28%). A higher DGI score was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of supplement use (mean: 105±18 vs. 109±17, p=0.001). Micronutrient supplement use was associated with a higher DGI score, suggesting that supplements are more likely to be used by those who are less likely to require them.

  11. Biofilm Consumption and Variable Diet Composition of Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) during Migratory Stopover

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, Catherine B.; Bond, Alexander L.; Davidson, Peter J. A.; Butler, Robert W.; Kuwae, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Many shorebird species undertake long-distance migrations punctuated by brief stays at food-rich, estuarine stopover locations. Understanding use of these food resources helps guide conservation and responsible development decisions. We determined the extent and degree to which Western Sandpiper (Calidris mauri) utilized biofilm as a food resource across a large and variable stopover location during northward (spring) migration. We investigated the spatial heterogeneity in diet composition, to determine whether shorebirds were consistently feeding on biofilm or whether diet varied between naturally and anthropogenically delineated sites. We used stable isotope analysis to estimate that biofilm conservatively comprised 22% to 53% of Western Sandpiper droppings across all sampling sites and that prey composition differed significantly between areas within the stopover location. Widespread biofilm consumption demonstrates the importance of biofilm as a dietary component. Variable diet composition suggests that habitat heterogeneity may be an important component of high quality stopover locations in the context of “state-dependant trade-offs” of Western Sandpiper population sub-groups. Future management decisions must consider and address potential impacts on the biofilm community throughout a stopover location, as single site studies of diet composition may not be adequate to develop effective management strategies for entire stopover sites. PMID:25875528

  12. Freely accessible water does not decrease consumption of ethanol liquid diets.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, NancyEllen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2003-02-01

    In experimental studies, liquid ethanol diets are usually given as the sole source of nutrition and fluid. Two series of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of freely accessible water on the consumption of ethanol liquid diets in male Long-Evans rats. The consumption of diets and subsequent learning ability of rats were first examined in animals given twice-daily saline injections. One group received diet with no access to water for 12 weeks and was subsequently given free access to water with diets for an additional 12 weeks. A second group was given diet and water ad libitum for 24 weeks. Control animals received an isocaloric sucrose-containing diet (with or without ad libitum access to water). Subsequently, rats were tested for active avoidance learning. In the first 12 weeks, animals with ad libitum access to water drank more diet than did water-restricted animals, and previously water-restricted animals increased their diet consumption when access to water was freely available. All water-restricted animals, in both ethanol- and sucrose-treated groups, showed deficits in active avoidance learning, whereas only ethanol-treated animals in groups with ad libitum access to water showed learning deficits. In the second series of experiments, the effect of saline injections on diet consumption, both in the presence and absence of water, was examined. Although saline injections were associated with decreased diet consumption, there was no effect of free access to water. No differences in blood ethanol concentration were seen among groups. Findings obtained from both series of studies demonstrate that consumption of a Sustacal-based liquid ethanol diet does not decrease if access to water is freely available.

  13. The independent association between diet quality and body composition.

    PubMed

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Shook, Robin P; Hand, Gregory A; Hébert, James R; Blair, Steven N

    2014-05-12

    Excess body weight is associated with an imbalance between energy expenditure and dietary intake but evidence on the association between diet quality and body composition remains equivocal. Rather than relying on differences in diet quality between overweight/obese and normal weight adults, this study examined the association between the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010) and body fatness on a continuous scale, independent of physical activity (PA). Further the association between components of the HEI-2010 and risk for overweight/obesity was explored. 407 adults (27.6 ± 3.7 years) provided at least two 24-hour diet recalls over a period of 14 days, which were used to calculate the HEI-2010. Percent body fat (BF) was assessed via dual X-ray absorptiometry and PA was determined via a multi-sensor device, worn over a period of 10 days. PA was a stronger contributor to the variability in BF than the HEI-2010 and the association between HEI-2010 and BF was significant only in men. Particularly a high consumption of protein, sodium and empty calories increased the risk for overweight/obesity. Adherence to dietary guidelines positively affects body fatness in men, independent of PA. In contrast to current dietary recommendations, the risk for overweight/obesity was increased with a higher protein intake.

  14. Health significance of fat quality in the diet.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Joyce A; Villalpando, Salvador; Cassani, Roberta Soares Lara; Elmadfa, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes three presentations on the global and Latin American perspectives on the health significance of fat quality in the diet given at the 16th Congress of the Society of Latin American Nutrition in Havana, Cuba, November 11-16, 2012. Dietary fat quality contributes to the risk of the leading chronic diseases and is more important than fat quantity in reducing the risk of chronic disease mortality, especially from cardiovascular disease (CVD). In many countries, the consumption of saturated fats exceeds the recommended limit of 10% energy (%E) and intakes of polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs) are often below the recommended range of 6-11%E. Consumption of long-chain ω-3 PUFAs is especially low. In many Latin American countries, high consumption of carbohydrates, especially sugars, contributes to obesity, diabetes, hypertension and CVD, while intakes of total fat and PUFAs may be low. Thus, dietary fat recommendations must consider the dietary fat patterns of each country. Nutrition counseling can be effective in teaching individuals and families to modify their food intake patterns and control the major risk factors for chronic disease.

  15. Diet and effects of diet management on quality of life and symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ostgaard, Hege; Hausken, Trygve; Gundersen, Doris; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-06-01

    The present study investigated the diet and quality of life of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients in comparison to the background population. Furthermore, it studied the effects of guidance on diet management on changes in food intake, quality of life and symptoms. A total of 35 healthy controls, 36 IBS patients and 43 IBS patients who had received guidance on diet management 2 years earlier were included. The controls and patients were asked to complete an FFQ questionnaire, an SF-NDI questionnaire, an IBS-QoL questionnaire and a Birmingham IBS symptom score questionnaire. There were no statistical differences in the intake of calories, carbohydrates, proteins and fat between the controls and IBS patients, with or without guidance on diet management. IBS patients made a conscious choice to avoid certain food items, some of which belong to fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosacharides and polyols (FODMAPs). They had a higher consumption, however, of other food items that are rich in FODMAPs. They also avoided other food sources which are crucial for their health. Two years after receiving guidance on diet management, IBS patients had a different diet profile. They avoided all FODMAP‑rich food, consumed more food with probiotic supplements and did not avoid food sources that were crucial to their health. In addition, they had improved quality of life and reduced symptoms. Although at first sight the diet of IBS patients did not differ from that of the background population, detailed examination showed avoidance of certain food items. Guidance on the management of diet improved their choice of a healthier diet, improved quality of life and reduced IBS symptoms.

  16. Consumption of a low-carbohydrate and high-fat diet (the ketogenic diet) exaggerates biotin deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Masahiro; Matsui, Tomoyoshi; Ando, Saori; Ishii, Yoshie; Sawamura, Hiromi; Ebara, Shuhei; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2013-10-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that acts as a cofactor for several carboxylases. The ketogenic diet, a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet, is used to treat drug-resistant epilepsy and promote weight loss. In Japan, the infant version of the ketogenic diet is known as the "ketone formula." However, as the special infant formulas used in Japan, including the ketone formula, do not contain sufficient amounts of biotin, biotin deficiency can develop in infants who consume the ketone formula. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the ketogenic diet on biotin status in mice. Male mice (N = 32) were divided into the following groups: control diet group, biotin-deficient (BD) diet group, ketogenic control diet group, and ketogenic biotin-deficient (KBD) diet group. Eight mice were used in each group. At 9 wk, the typical symptoms of biotin deficiency such as hair loss and dermatitis had only developed in the KBD diet group. The total protein expression level of biotin-dependent carboxylases and the total tissue biotin content were significantly decreased in the KBD and BD diet groups. However, these changes were more severe in the KBD diet group. These findings demonstrated that the ketogenic diet increases biotin bioavailability and consumption, and hence, promotes energy production by gluconeogenesis and branched-chain amino acid metabolism, which results in exaggerated biotin deficiency in biotin-deficient mice. Therefore, biotin supplementation is important for mice that consume the ketogenic diet. It is suggested that individuals that consume the ketogenic diet have an increased biotin requirement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Consumption After a Diet Violation Disinhibition or Compensation?

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, A. Janet; Moskovich, Ashley; Haltom, Kate Byrne; Ju, Tiffany; Mann, Traci

    2009-01-01

    Previous research, restricted to the laboratory, has found that restrained eaters overeat after they violate their diet. However, there has been no evidence showing that this same process occurs outside the lab. We hypothesized that outside of this artificial setting, restrained eaters would be able to control their eating. In Study 1, 127 participants reported hourly on their diet violations and eating over 2 days. In Study 2, 89 participants tracked their intake for 8 days, and 50 of these participants consumed a milk shake (a diet violation) on Day 7, as part of an ostensibly unrelated study. As hypothesized, dieters did not overeat following violations of their diet in either study. These findings are in contrast with those of previous lab studies and dispel the widely held belief that diet violations lead to overeating in everyday life. PMID:19732383

  18. Diet-Beverage Consumption and Caloric Intake Among US Adults, Overall and by Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Sara N.; Wolfson, Julia A.; Vine, Seanna; Wang, Y. Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined national patterns in adult diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake by body-weight status. Methods. We analyzed 24-hour dietary recall with National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010 data (adults aged ≥ 20 years; n = 23 965). Results. Overall, 11% of healthy-weight, 19% of overweight, and 22% of obese adults drink diet beverages. Total caloric intake was higher among adults consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) compared with diet beverages (2351 kcal/day vs 2203 kcal/day; P = .005). However, the difference was only significant for healthy-weight adults (2302 kcal/day vs 2095 kcal/day; P < .001). Among overweight and obese adults, calories from solid-food consumption were higher among adults consuming diet beverages compared with SSBs (overweight: 1965 kcal/day vs 1874 kcal/day; P = .03; obese: 2058 kcal/day vs 1897 kcal/day; P < .001). The net increase in daily solid-food consumption associated with diet-beverage consumption was 88 kilocalories for overweight and 194 kilocalories for obese adults. Conclusions. Overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults and consume significantly more solid-food calories and a comparable total calories than overweight and obese adults who drink SSBs. Heavier US adults who drink diet beverages will need to reduce solid-food calorie consumption to lose weight. PMID:24432876

  19. Diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake among US adults, overall and by body weight.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Sara N; Wolfson, Julia A; Vine, Seanna; Wang, Y Claire

    2014-03-01

    We examined national patterns in adult diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake by body-weight status. We analyzed 24-hour dietary recall with National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 data (adults aged ≥ 20 years; n = 23 965). Overall, 11% of healthy-weight, 19% of overweight, and 22% of obese adults drink diet beverages. Total caloric intake was higher among adults consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) compared with diet beverages (2351 kcal/day vs 2203 kcal/day; P = .005). However, the difference was only significant for healthy-weight adults (2302 kcal/day vs 2095 kcal/day; P < .001). Among overweight and obese adults, calories from solid-food consumption were higher among adults consuming diet beverages compared with SSBs (overweight: 1965 kcal/day vs 1874 kcal/day; P = .03; obese: 2058 kcal/day vs 1897 kcal/day; P < .001). The net increase in daily solid-food consumption associated with diet-beverage consumption was 88 kilocalories for overweight and 194 kilocalories for obese adults. Overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults and consume significantly more solid-food calories and a comparable total calories than overweight and obese adults who drink SSBs. Heavier US adults who drink diet beverages will need to reduce solid-food calorie consumption to lose weight.

  20. Public views of the benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet.

    PubMed

    Lea, E J; Crawford, D; Worsley, A

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine consumers' perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet. Mail survey that included questions on perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet. Victoria, Australia. Four hundred and fifteen randomly selected Victorian adults. The main perceived barrier to adoption of a plant-based diet was a lack of information about plant-based diets (42% agreement). Sex, age and education differences were present in over a quarter of the barrier items. For example, non-university-educated respondents and older people were less willing to change their current eating pattern than were university educated and younger respondents. The main benefits associated with plant-based diets were health benefits, particularly decreased saturated fat intake (79% agreement), increased fibre intake (76%), and disease prevention (70%). Age, sex and education differences with regard to benefits were apparent, although sex differences were more important than age or education differences. The majority of respondents perceived there to be health benefits associated with the consumption of a plant-based diet. Compared with the proportion of respondents who agreed that there were particular benefits of eating a plant-based diet, perceived barriers were relatively low. An understanding of the perceived benefits and barriers of consuming a plant-based diet will help formulate strategies that aim to influence beliefs about plant foods, plant food consumption, and, ultimately, public health.

  1. Diet, inflammation and prediabetes-impact of quality of diet.

    PubMed

    Uusitupa, Matti; Schwab, Ursula

    2013-10-01

    Low grade inflammation has been linked to risk of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Obesity and, in particular, abdominal obesity increase the risk of diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular diseases. One of the mechanisms could be low grade inflammation and vascular endothelial dysfunction. Permanent weight reduction is the first line of treatment both for obese individuals at increased risk of diabetes and for newly onset type 2 diabetes. Weight reduction lowers the level of several inflammatory factors in the body while increasing the level of adiponectin. Besides weight reduction the quality of diet and physical activity also modifies low grade inflammation. Based on the literature survey and our own studies in humans, it is possible to have dietary patterns that reduce inflammatory stress in the body and improves vascular endothelial dysfunction. There is strong evidence to suggest that IL-1 Ra is a very sensitive marker of low grade inflammation in obesity and related phenotypes; however, its level is markedly lowered by weight reduction and by choosing foods that have been shown to reduce inflammatory stress in the body.

  2. Food Insecurity, Poor Diet Quality, and Obesity among Food Pantry Participants in Hartford, CT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robaina, Kate A.; Martin, Katie S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Examine relationships between food security, diet quality, and body mass index (BMI) among food pantry users. Methods: Convenience sample of 212 food pantry clients in Hartford, CT from June, 2010 to May, 2011. Main outcomes included food security (United States Department of Agriculture module), fruit and vegetable consumption (Block…

  3. Diet quality and body mass index are associated with healthcare resource use in older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Health care resource consumption is a growing concern. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between diet quality and body mass index with health care resource use (HRU) in a cohort of advanced age. Participants in the Geisinger Rural Aging Study (n=5,993) were mailed demographic and...

  4. Food Insecurity, Poor Diet Quality, and Obesity among Food Pantry Participants in Hartford, CT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robaina, Kate A.; Martin, Katie S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Examine relationships between food security, diet quality, and body mass index (BMI) among food pantry users. Methods: Convenience sample of 212 food pantry clients in Hartford, CT from June, 2010 to May, 2011. Main outcomes included food security (United States Department of Agriculture module), fruit and vegetable consumption (Block…

  5. Effect of diet quality and soil hardness on metabolic rate in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum.

    PubMed

    Perissinotti, Paula P; Antenucci, C Daniel; Zenuto, Roxana; Luna, Facundo

    2009-11-01

    The present work is aimed to establish, in Ctenomys talarum, the physiological and behavioral adjustments undergone by individuals when they are allowed to dig burrows in soils with different hardness and fed with diets of different quality. For each soil-diet combination, we estimated: resting metabolic rate (RMR), body temperature (T(b)), body mass, digestibility, food consumption rate, transit time, reingestion rate, feces production and time devoted to feeding, resting, locomotor activity and coprophagy. Soil type and diet quality affected RMR, but response to soil hardness was verified later. Animals fed with high quality (HQ) diet showed similar body temperature irrespective of soil condition, while animals fed with low quality (LQ) diet showed lower T(b) under soft soil (SS). Individuals fed with LQ diet showed lower RMR and both, lower digestibility and high transit time of food than those fed with HQ diet. Moreover, increments in feeding and defecation rates were observed in the former group. Number of reingested feces did not differ between animals fed with diets of different quality. However, when incidence of reingestion was considered, animals fed with HQ diet showed higher values of feces ingestion. Either feeding, resting and activity patterns were arrhythmic. However, for animals fed with LQ diet a tendency to rhythmic coprophagy was observed and it could be considered as a way to optimize feeding. This study shows that RMR is limited by digestive efficiency which is influenced by diet quality, but also thermal stress may limit the conversion of assimilated energy into work and heat.

  6. Diet qualities: healthy and unhealthy aspects of diet quality in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah E; Ramsden, Megan; Kaye, Gail

    2016-06-01

    Diet quality indexes combine the healthy and unhealthy aspects of diet within a single construct, but few studies have evaluated their association. Emerging evidence suggests that predictors differ for the more and less healthy components of children's diets. Our objectives were to determine whether preschool-aged children's frequency of eating healthy foods was inversely related to their intake of unhealthy foods and to determine whether this differed by household income, maternal education, or child race-ethnicity. We analyzed data from a representative sample of 8900 US children (mean age: 52.5 mo) who were born in 2001 and participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort. Primary caregivers reported the frequency with which children consumed fruit, vegetables, milk, juice, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), fast food, sweets, and salty snacks in the past week. Response options ranged from none to ≥4 times/d. We created healthy (fruit, vegetables, milk) and unhealthy (SSBs, fast food, sweets, salty snacks) diet scores. Healthy diet behaviors were defined as ≥2 daily servings of fruit, vegetables, and milk. The prevalence of consuming fruit, vegetables, and milk ≥2 times/d (i.e., having 3 healthy diet behaviors) was 18.5%, and a similar proportion (17.6%) of children had none of these healthy behaviors. Contrary to our hypotheses, children with more healthy diet behaviors did not have lower unhealthy diet scores. The intake of healthy foods was not inversely associated with unhealthy foods overall or within any subgroup. Overall, the Spearman rank correlation between healthy and unhealthy diet scores was positive (r = 0.09). From the lowest to the highest strata of household income, these correlations were 0.12, 0.14, 0.14, 0.05, and 0.00, respectively. No evidence was found in US preschool-aged children of an inverse association between eating healthy and unhealthy foods. The implications of combining healthy and unhealthy aspects of diet

  7. Diet quality in older age: the influence of childhood and adult socio-economic circumstances.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Janice L; Ramsay, Sheena E; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard W; Lennon, Lucy T; Wannamethee, S Goya

    2015-05-14

    Socio-economic gradients in diet quality are well established. However, the influence of material socio-economic conditions particularly in childhood, and the use of multiple disaggregated socio-economic measures on diet quality have been little studied in the elderly. In the present study, we examined childhood and adult socio-economic measures, and social relationships, as determinants of diet quality cross-sectionally in 4252 older British men (aged 60-79 years). A FFQ provided data on daily fruit and vegetable consumption and the Elderly Dietary Index (EDI), with higher scores indicating better diet quality. Adult and childhood socio-economic measures included occupation/father's occupation, education and household amenities, which combined to create composite scores. Social relationships included social contact, living arrangements and marital status. Both childhood and adult socio-economic factors were independently associated with diet quality. Compared with non-manual social class, men of childhood manual social class were less likely to consume fruit and vegetables daily (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.66, 0.97), as were men of adult manual social class (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.54, 0.79), and less likely to be in the top EDI quartile (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.61, 0.88), similar to men of adult manual social class (OR 0.66, 95 % CI 0.55, 0.79). Diet quality decreased with increasing adverse adult socio-economic scores; however, the association with adverse childhood socio-economic scores diminished with adult social class adjustment. A combined adverse childhood and adulthood socio-economic score was associated with poor diet quality. Diet quality was most favourable in married men and those not living alone, but was not associated with social contact. Diet quality in older men is influenced by childhood and adulthood socio-economic factors, marital status and living arrangements.

  8. Exploring Diet Quality between Urban and Rural Dwelling Women of Reproductive Age.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julie C; Moran, Lisa J; Teede, Helena J; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Lombard, Catherine B; Harrison, Cheryce L

    2017-06-08

    Health disparities, including weight gain and obesity exist between urban and rural dwelling women. The primary aim was to compare diet quality in urban and rural women of reproductive age, and secondary analyses of the difference in macronutrient and micronutrient intake in urban and rural women, and the predictors of diet quality. Diet quality was assessed in urban (n = 149) and rural (n = 394) women by a modified version of the Dietary Guideline Index (DGI) energy, macronutrient and micronutrient intake from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and predictors of diet quality. Diet quality did not significantly differ between urban and rural women (mean ± standard deviation (SD), 84.8 ± 15.9 vs. 83.9 ± 16.5, p = 0.264). Rural women reported a significantly higher intake of protein, fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, cholesterol and iron and a higher score in the meat and meat alternatives component of the diet quality tool in comparison to urban women. In all women, a higher diet quality was associated with higher annual household income (>$Australian dollar (AUD) 80,000 vs. <$AUD80,000 p = 0.013) and working status (working fulltime/part-time vs. unemployed p = 0.043). Total diet quality did not differ in urban and rural women; however, a higher macronutrient consumption pattern was potentially related to a higher lean meat intake in rural women. Women who are unemployed and on a lower income are an important target group for future dietary interventions aiming to improve diet quality.

  9. Benefits and barriers to the consumption of a vegetarian diet in Australia.

    PubMed

    Lea, Emma; Worsley, Anthony

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine consumers' perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a vegetarian diet. Survey (written questionnaire) that included questions on perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a vegetarian diet. South Australia. Six hundred and one randomly selected South Australians. The main perceived barriers to adopting a vegetarian diet were enjoying eating meat and an unwillingness to alter eating habits. This was the case for men, women and all age groups, although there were sex and age differences present in over half of the barrier items. For example, family food preferences were a greater problem for women than for men, while the oldest group was more likely to agree that humans are 'meant' to eat meat than the younger groups. The main benefits associated with vegetarian diets were health benefits: increased fruit and vegetable intake, decreased saturated fat intake, weight control. Animal welfare-related benefits and disease prevention were also important. Age and sex differences were apparent, although age differences were more important than sex differences. The majority of respondents perceived there to be health benefits associated with the consumption of a vegetarian diet, but also, predictably, enjoyed eating meat. Given this, it is likely that interest in plant-based diets that contain some meat is higher than that in no-meat diets. An understanding of the perceived benefits and barriers of consuming a vegetarian diet will allow the implementation of strategies to influence meat and vegetarianism beliefs, dietary behaviour and, hence, public health.

  10. Intra- and interspecific differences in diet quality and composition in a large herbivore community.

    PubMed

    Redjadj, Claire; Darmon, Gaëlle; Maillard, Daniel; Chevrier, Thierry; Bastianelli, Denis; Verheyden, Hélène; Loison, Anne; Saïd, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity in large herbivore communities is often explained by niche segregation allowed by differences in body mass and digestive morphophysiological features. Based on large number of gut samples in fall and winter, we analysed the temporal dynamics of diet composition, quality and interspecific overlap of 4 coexisting mountain herbivores. We tested whether the relative consumption of grass and browse differed among species of different rumen types (moose-type and intermediate-type), whether diet was of lower quality for the largest species, whether we could identify plant species which determined diet quality, and whether these plants, which could be "key-food-resources" were similar for all herbivores. Our analyses revealed that (1) body mass and rumen types were overall poor predictors of diet composition and quality, although the roe deer, a species with a moose-type rumen was confirmed as an "obligatory non grazer", while red deer, the largest species, had the most lignified diet; (2) diet overlap among herbivores was well predicted by rumen type (high among species of intermediate types only), when measured over broad plant groups, (3) the relationship between diet composition and quality differed among herbivore species, and the actual plant species used during winter which determined the diet quality, was herbivore species-specific. Even if diets overlapped to a great extent, the species-specific relationships between diet composition and quality suggest that herbivores may select different plant species within similar plant group types, or different plant parts and that this, along with other behavioural mechanisms of ecological niche segregation, may contribute to the coexistence of large herbivores of relatively similar body mass, as observed in mountain ecosystems.

  11. Intra- and Interspecific Differences in Diet Quality and Composition in a Large Herbivore Community

    PubMed Central

    Redjadj, Claire; Darmon, Gaëlle; Maillard, Daniel; Chevrier, Thierry; Bastianelli, Denis; Verheyden, Hélène; Loison, Anne; Saïd, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity in large herbivore communities is often explained by niche segregation allowed by differences in body mass and digestive morphophysiological features. Based on large number of gut samples in fall and winter, we analysed the temporal dynamics of diet composition, quality and interspecific overlap of 4 coexisting mountain herbivores. We tested whether the relative consumption of grass and browse differed among species of different rumen types (moose-type and intermediate-type), whether diet was of lower quality for the largest species, whether we could identify plant species which determined diet quality, and whether these plants, which could be “key-food-resources” were similar for all herbivores. Our analyses revealed that (1) body mass and rumen types were overall poor predictors of diet composition and quality, although the roe deer, a species with a moose-type rumen was confirmed as an “obligatory non grazer”, while red deer, the largest species, had the most lignified diet; (2) diet overlap among herbivores was well predicted by rumen type (high among species of intermediate types only), when measured over broad plant groups, (3) the relationship between diet composition and quality differed among herbivore species, and the actual plant species used during winter which determined the diet quality, was herbivore species-specific. Even if diets overlapped to a great extent, the species-specific relationships between diet composition and quality suggest that herbivores may select different plant species within similar plant group types, or different plant parts and that this, along with other behavioural mechanisms of ecological niche segregation, may contribute to the coexistence of large herbivores of relatively similar body mass, as observed in mountain ecosystems. PMID:24586233

  12. Good-quality diet in the early years may have a positive effect on academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Nyaradi, Anett; Li, Jianghong; Foster, Jonathan K; Hickling, Siobhan; Jacques, Angela; O'Sullivan, Therese A; Oddy, Wendy H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between early diet and academic performance during childhood. Participants were from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study (n = 2287). Frequency of consumption of food and beverages was collected at the one-, two- and three-year follow-ups, using a 24-hour food recall. Diet scores were developed from the number of eating occasions. The Western Australian Literacy and Numeracy Assessment (WALNA) data from grades five (age 10) and seven (age 12) were linked to the Raine study using The Western Australian Data Linkage System. The association between diet scores and WALNA scores was assessed using multivariate linear regression models. A higher (i.e. better quality) diet score at one year of age was associated with significantly higher scores in mathematics, reading, writing and spelling at both grades five and seven. Associations were observed between a higher diet score at two years and academic scores for mathematics, writing and spelling at grade seven. Higher dairy consumption at ages one, two and three, and higher fruit consumption at age one were associated with higher academic scores at all ages. Quality of early diet may be a predictor for later academic achievement. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cognitive Impairment Following High Fat Diet Consumption is Associated with Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pistell, Paul J.; Morrison, Christopher D.; Gupta, Sunita; Knight, Alecia G.; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Ingram, Donald K.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.

    2009-01-01

    C57Bl/6 mice were administered a high fat, Western diet (WD, 41% fat) or a very high fat lard diet (HFL, 60% fat), and evaluated for cognitive ability using the Stone T-maze and for biochemical markers of brain inflammation. WD consumption resulted in significantly increased body weight and astrocyte reactivity, but not impaired cognition, microglial reactivity, or heightened cytokine levels. HFL increased body weight, and impaired cognition, increased brain inflammation, and decreased BDNF. Collectively, these data suggest that while different diet formulations can increase body weight, the ability of high fat diets to disrupt cognition is linked to brain inflammation. PMID:20004026

  14. Post Diagnosis Diet Quality and Colorectal Cancer Survival in Women

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Teresa T.; Kashambwa, Rutendo; Sato, Kaori; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward; Ogino, Shuji; Hu, Frank B.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dietary factors are known to influence colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, however, their association with CRC survival is unclear. Therefore, we prospectively examined the association between diet quality scores, dietary patterns and colorectal cancer (CRC) survival. Methods 1201 women diagnosed with stage I–III CRC between 1986 and 2008, were followed through 2010. Diet was assessed via a food frequency questionnaire administered at least 6 months after diagnosis. We computed the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010), alternate Mediterranean Diet score (aMED) and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension score (DASH) and derived two dietary patterns, Western (unhealthy) and prudent (healthy), by principal component analysis for each woman. Results During follow-up, we documented 435 deaths, including 162 from CRC. After adjusting for potential confounders, only a higher AHEI-2010 score was significantly associated with lower overall mortality (HR comparing extreme quintiles = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52–0.98, p trend = 0.01) as well as borderline significantly with lower risk of CRC mortality by the trend test (HR Q5 vs Q1 = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.43–1.21, p trend = 0.07). When AHEI-2010 components were examined separately, inverse associations for overall mortality were primarily accounted for by moderate alcohol intake (HR comparing abstainers vs 5–15 g/d = 1.30, 95%CI = 1.05–1.61) and lower intake of sugar sweetened beverages and fruit juices combined (HR for each additional serving = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01–1.23). No other diet quality score or dietary pattern was associated with overall or CRC-specific mortality. Conclusion Higher AHEI-2010 score may be associated with lower overall mortality, moderate alcohol consumption and lower consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and juices combined appeared to account for most of the observed associations. PMID:25506700

  15. Are socioeconomic disparities in diet quality explained by diet cost?

    PubMed Central

    Monsivais, Pablo; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic disparities in nutrition are well documented. This study tested the hypothesis that socioeconomic differences in nutrient intakes can be accounted for, in part, by diet cost. Methods A representative sample of 1,295 adults in King County (WA) was surveyed in 2008–2009 and usual dietary intakes were assessed based on a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Monetary value of individual diets was estimated using local retail supermarket prices for 384 foods. Nutrients of concern as identified by the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee were fiber, vitamins A, C and E, calcium, magnesium and potassium. A nutrient density score based on all seven nutrients was another dependent measure. General linear models and linear regressions were used to examine associations among education and income, nutrient density measure and diet cost. Analyses were conducted in 2009–2010. Results Controlling for energy and other covariates, higher-cost diets were significantly higher in all seven nutrients and in overall nutrient density. Higher education and income were positively and significantly associated with the nutrient density measure, but these effects were greatly attenuated with the inclusion of the cost variable in the model. Conclusions Socioeconomic differences in nutrient intake can be substantially explained by the monetary cost of the diet. The higher cost of more nutritious diets may contribute to socioeconomic disparities in health and should be taken into account in the formulation of nutrition and public health policy. PMID:21148819

  16. [Bolsa-Família Program: diet quality of adult population in Curitiba, Paraná].

    PubMed

    Lima, Flávia Emília Leite de; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Uchimura, Kátia Yumi; Picheth, Telma

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the quality of diet of the population receiving the Bolsa Familia Program in Curitiba, state of Parana, Brazil. It was a population-based cross-sectional study, conducted from July 2006 to July 2007. 747 beneficiaries were interviewed from 19 years of age, of both genders. A 24 hour-recall was implemented in order to assess the quality of the diet and the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) was used as a parameter for the classification of the group in consumption levels. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the diet quality of the studied population. Wald test and ANOVA test were performed to compare the means of the index according to the socio-economic variables, considering a significance level of 5%. The sample comprised 91.4% of women and 8.6% of men. The average age of the population was 36.4 ± 13.3 years, with 75% having completed elementary school. The mean HEI was 51 points, which features a diet that needs improvement. The population has a monotonous diet with an adequate intake of legumes, but low for fruits, vegetables and dairy products. Comparing the categories of diet quality of individuals, all components, except sodium, showed statistically different median score (p < 0.01). Studies that evaluate the quality of the diet are essential to support the implementation of nutrition education programs targeted to the core of the problem in the populations studied.

  17. Pregnant Women Diet Quality and Its Sociodemographic Determinants in Southwestern Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Mashreky, Saidur Rahman; Ferdous, Tarana; Tegenfeldt, Kathrin; Roy, Sumitro; Rahman, A K M Fazlur; Rashid, Iftekhar; Haque, Raisul; Rahman, Zakia; Hossen, Kabir; Siddiquee, Saydur Rahman; Rahman, Mosiqure; Sanghvi, Tina G; Shaheen, Nazma

    2016-03-01

    Diet diversity of pregnant women is associated with nutrition sufficiency, micronutrient adequacy, and pregnancy outcomes. However, the sociodemographic determinants of diet diversity among pregnant women in low-income countries are not well studied. The analysis was undertaken to study the determinants of high dietary diversity and consumption of micronutrient-rich foods by pregnant women from rural Bangladesh. Pregnant women (508) were randomly selected from southwestern Bangladesh and interviewed to collect data about diet and sociodemographic characteristics. A 24-hour recall was used to collect information about diet. Diet diversity score was calculated for 9 major food groups. All analyses were conducted using STATA SE 12. The overall mean diet diversity score was low at 4.28 and was significantly high among pregnant women who have higher educational achievement, whose husbands' occupation was business, who live in households of 4 or more family members, and who were dwelling in a house with more than 1 room. Highest gap on knowledge and consumption was reported for 3 food groups including dairy foods, eggs, and dark green leafy vegetables. Consumption of dairy and eggs was lower among women from low socioeconomic status, but no significant association was found between sociodemographic characteristics and consumption of leafy vegetables. Our analysis has shown that diet quality of pregnant women was poor and intake of micronutrient-rich foods was low despite having knowledge about the importance of these foods, underscoring the need for promoting the diet quality in developing countries through behavior change communication programs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Low-energy-density diets are associated with higher diet quality and higher diet costs in French adults.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, Adam; Monsivais, Pablo; Maillot, Matthieu; Darmon, Nicole

    2007-06-01

    Low-energy-density diets are often recommended for weight control. Such diets have a higher nutrient content than do high-energy-density diets. This study tested the hypothesis that energy-dense diets have a relatively low monetary cost, whereas less energy-dense diets are more expensive. In this cross-sectional study, dietary intakes of 1,474 French adults (672 men, 802 women), aged 15 to 92 years, were assessed using 7-day diet records. Dietary energy density (kcal/g) was calculated by dividing total dietary energy by the edible weight of foods and caloric beverages consumed. Diet cost ($/7 days or $/2,000 kcal) was estimated using mean national food prices for 895 foods. The relationship between dietary energy density and diet cost was examined in a linear regression model. Within each quintile of energy intakes, the more energy-dense diets were associated with lower diet quality and with lower diet costs (r(2)=0.38 to 0.44). In a regression model, the more energy-dense diets cost less, whereas low-energy-density diets cost substantially more, adjusting for energy intakes, sex, and age. The finding that energy-dense diets cost less per 2,000 kcal may help explain why the highest rates of obesity are observed among groups of limited economic means. The finding that low-energy-density diets are associated with higher diet costs suggests that lasting improvements in diet quality may require economic as well as behavioral interventions.

  19. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  20. Type A behaviour and consumption of an atherogenic diet: no association in the PRIME study.

    PubMed

    Appleton, K M; Woodside, J V; Yarnell, J W G; Arveiler, D; Haas, B; Amouyel, P; Montaye, M; Ferrières, J; Ruidavets, J B; Ducimetière, P; Bingham, A; Evans, A

    2007-11-01

    It has previously been suggested that the association between Type A behaviour and coronary heart disease (CHD) may be mediated through diet. This analysis investigates associations between Type A behaviour and diet, with particular focus on foods high in saturated fats and cholesterol (cake, cheese, eggs and fried potatoes), foods high in unsaturated fats (fish and nuts), and fruit and vegetables. The analysis was conducted on data collected from 10,602 men from Northern Ireland and France screened for inclusion in the PRIME cohort study. Type A behaviour was measured using the Framingham Type A Behaviour Patterns Questionnaire, diet was measured using a Food Frequency Questionnaire and various demographic details were also assessed. Levels of Type A behaviour and intakes of all food groups were similar to previous studies. Using regression, Type A behaviour was significantly associated with diet, and specifically with a higher consumption of cheese and vegetables in Northern Ireland, and a higher consumption of cake, fish and vegetables in France. These associations are most plausibly explained as a result of lifestyle, although the possibility of independent associations between Type A behaviour and diet remains. The work is limited by the use of questionnaires, but the findings available suggest that Type A behaviour is unlikely to be associated with the consumption of a diet that has previously been linked to CHD. These findings suggest that any association between Type A behaviour and CHD is unlikely to be mediated through diet.

  1. Effect of diet composition on water consumption in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Shaw, M I; Beaulieu, A D; Patience, J F

    2006-11-01

    Concerns relating to use of water resources by the livestock industry, combined with the rising cost of manure management, have resulted in greater interest in identifying ways to reduce drinking water utilization by pigs while maintaining animal well-being and achieving satisfactory growth performance. The objective of this experiment was to determine if increasing the dietary CP or mineral concentrations increases water intake and excretion and, conversely, if reducing the dietary CP content reduces water intake and excretion. Forty-eight barrows (34.3 +/- 4.6 kg of BW; 12/treatment) were given free access to diets containing a low protein (16.9% CP), high protein (20.9% CP), or excess protein (25.7% CP) level, or a diet with excess levels of Ca, P, Na, and Cl. Water was available to each pig on an ad libitum basis via dish drinkers that were determined to waste less than 3% of total water flow. The excess CP diet tended to increase average daily water intake (ADWI) and urinary excretion (P < 0.10) and increased the water:feed ratio (P < 0.05); lowering dietary CP did not lower water intake or excretion. The excess mineral diet did not increase ADWI or urinary excretion but did increase water excretion via the feces. Daily nutrient intake and dietary nutrient concentration were poor predictors of ADWI; only daily intake of N and K were significantly correlated with ADWI (P < 0.05), and the r-values were low (0.39 and 0.32, respectively). There was no relationship between ADFI and ADWI. The average water:feed ratio was 2.6:1. Any study of water utilization is complicated by behavioral as well as nutritional and physiological influences, and isolating physiological need from so-called luxury intake is a significant experimental challenge. Because the impact of dietary treatment on water utilization was small, we conclude that factors other than dietary protein and mineral concentration and daily protein and mineral intake have a relatively large effect on water

  2. Factors Associated with Consumption of Diabetic Diet among Type 2 Diabetic Subjects from Ahmedabad, Western India

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mayur; Patel, Ina M.; Patel, Yash M.

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the current situation of and factors associated with consumption of diabetic diet among 399 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects from Ahmedabad, Western India. The study was performed with diagnosed (at least one year old) diabetic subjects who attended the Department of Diabetology, All India Institute of Diabetes and Research and Yash Diabetes Specialties Centre (Swasthya Hospital), Ahmedabad during July 2010–November 2010. The subjects completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included variables, such as sociodemographic factors, family history of diabetes, behavioural profile, risk profile (glycaemic status, hypertension, and obesity), and diet-related history (consumption of diabetic diet, consumption of low fat/skimmed milk, method of cooking, and sources for diet advice). Blood pressure, body mass index, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and fasting lipid profile were measured. All analyses including multivariate logistic regression were conducted using SPSS, version 11.5. In total, 399 T2DM subjects (65% male, 35% female) with mean age of 53.16±7.95 years were studied. Although 73% of T2DM subjects were consuming diabetic diet, the good glycaemic control (HbA1c level <7%) was achieved only in 35% of the subjects. The majority (75%) of the subjects had a positive family history of diabetes, and 52% were obese. In 77%, the main source of dietary advice was doctor. In 36%, the main methods of cooking were: boiling and roasting. The final multivariate model showed that visit to dietician, level of education, intake of low fat, and family history of diabetes were independent predictors for diabetic diet consumption among T2DM subjects. However, longitudinal and cohort studies are required to establish the association between consumption of diabetic diet and glycaemic control. PMID:23304911

  3. Diet quality and history of gestational diabetes mellitus among childbearing women, United States, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rui S; Simas, Tiffany A Moore; Person, Sharina D; Goldberg, Robert J; Waring, Molly E

    2015-02-26

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Diet quality plays an important role in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We compared diet quality among childbearing women with a history of GDM with the diet quality of childbearing women without a history of GDM. We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 2007 through 2010. We included women without diabetes aged 20 to 44 years whose most recent live infant was born within the previous 10 years and who completed two 24-hour dietary recalls. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 estimated overall and component diet quality. Multivariable linear regression models estimated the association between a history of GDM and current diet quality, adjusting for age, education, smoking status, and health risk for diabetes. A history of GDM was reported by 7.7% of women. Compared with women without a history of GDM, women with a history of GDM had, on average, 3.4 points lower overall diet quality (95% confidence interval [CI], -6.6 to -0.2) and 0.9 points lower score for consumption of green vegetables and beans (95% CI, -1.4 to -0.4). Other dietary component scores did not differ by history of GDM. In the United States, women with a history of GDM have lower diet quality compared with women who bore a child and do not have a history of GDM. Improving diet quality may be a strategy for preventing type 2 diabetes among childbearing women.

  4. Diet Quality and History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Among Childbearing Women, United States, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Simas, Tiffany A. Moore; Person, Sharina D.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Waring, Molly E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Diet quality plays an important role in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We compared diet quality among childbearing women with a history of GDM with the diet quality of childbearing women without a history of GDM. Methods We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 2007 through 2010. We included women without diabetes aged 20 to 44 years whose most recent live infant was born within the previous 10 years and who completed two 24-hour dietary recalls. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 estimated overall and component diet quality. Multivariable linear regression models estimated the association between a history of GDM and current diet quality, adjusting for age, education, smoking status, and health risk for diabetes. Results A history of GDM was reported by 7.7% of women. Compared with women without a history of GDM, women with a history of GDM had, on average, 3.4 points lower overall diet quality (95% confidence interval [CI], −6.6 to −0.2) and 0.9 points lower score for consumption of green vegetables and beans (95% CI, −1.4 to −0.4). Other dietary component scores did not differ by history of GDM. Conclusion In the United States, women with a history of GDM have lower diet quality compared with women who bore a child and do not have a history of GDM. Improving diet quality may be a strategy for preventing type 2 diabetes among childbearing women. PMID:25719215

  5. Vegetable variety is a key to improved diet quality in low-income women in California.

    PubMed

    Keim, Nancy L; Forester, Shavawn M; Lyly, Marika; Aaron, Grant J; Townsend, Marilyn S

    2014-03-01

    Primary prevention education interventions, including those sponsored by the US Department of Agriculture for low-income families, encourage and support increases in vegetable intake. Promoting vegetable variety as a focal point for behavior change may be a useful strategy to increase vegetable consumption. A simple vegetable variety evaluation tool might be useful to replace the time-intensive 24-hour dietary recall. The purpose of our study was to determine whether vegetable variety is associated with vegetable consumption and diet quality among US Department of Agriculture program participants. Variety of vegetable intake and measures of total vegetable intake, diet quality, and diet cost were evaluated. Low-income, female participants (N=112) aged 20 to 55 years with body mass index 17.7 to 68.5 who were the primary food purchasers/preparers for their households were recruited from four California counties representing rural, urban, and suburban areas. Energy density and Healthy Eating Index-2005 were used to assess diet quality. Vegetable variety was based on number of different vegetables consumed per week using a food frequency questionnaire, and three groups were identified as: low variety, ≤5 different vegetables per week; moderate variety, 6 to 9 vegetables per week; and high variety, ≥10 vegetables per week. Compared with the low-variety group, participants in the high-variety group ate a greater quantity of vegetables per day (P<0.001); their diets had a higher Healthy Eating Index score (P<0.001) and lower energy density (P<0.001); and costs of their daily diet and vegetable use were higher (P<0.001). Thus, greater vegetable variety was related to better overall diet quality, a larger quantity of vegetables consumed, and increased diet cost.

  6. Impacts of traditional food consumption advisories: compliance, changes in diet and loss of confidence in traditional foods.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Claire; Knopper, Loren D

    2011-06-08

    Food consumption advisories are often posted when industrial activities are expected to affect the quality and availability of traditional foods used by First Nations. We were recently involved in a project and asked to summarize details regarding the impacts of traditional food consumption advisories with respect to compliance, broader changes in diet and loss of confidence in traditional foods by people. Our review was not conducted as a formal systematic comprehensive review; rather, we focused on primary and grey literature presenting academic, health practitioner and First Nations viewpoints on the topic available from literature databases (i.e., PubMed, Web of Knowledge (SM)) as well as the internet search engine Google. Some information came from personal communications. Our overview suggests that when communicated effectively and clearly, and when community members are involved in the process, consumption advisories can result in a decrease in contaminant load in people. On the other hand, consumption advisories can lead to cultural loss and have been linked to a certain amount of social, psychological, nutritional, economic and lifestyle disruption. In some cases, communities have decided to ignore consumption advisories opting to continue with traditional lifestyles believing that the benefits of doing so outweigh the risk of following advisories. We identified that there are both positive and negative aspects to the issuance of traditional food consumption advisories. A number of variables need to be recognized during the development and implementation of advisories in order to ensure a balance between human health, maintenance of cultures and industrial activity.

  7. Diet quality is associated with mental health, social support, and neighborhood factors among Veterans.

    PubMed

    Hoerster, Katherine D; Wilson, Sarah; Nelson, Karin M; Reiber, Gayle E; Masheb, Robin M

    2016-12-01

    United States Veterans have a higher prevalence of overweight and related chronic conditions compared to the general population. Although diet is a primary and modifiable contributor to these conditions, little is known about factors influencing diet quality among Veterans. The goal of this study is to examine individual, social environment, and physical environment correlates of general diet quality among Veterans. Study participants (N=653) received care at an urban VA Medical Center in Seattle, WA and completed a mailed survey in 2012 and 2013. Diet quality was assessed with Starting the Conversation, an instrument that measures consumption of unhealthy snacks, fast food, desserts, sugar-sweetened beverages, and fats; fruits and vegetables; and healthy proteins. Variables significantly (p<0.05) associated with diet quality in bivariate analyses were included in a multivariate regression. In the multivariate model, higher level of depressive symptom severity (Diff=0.05; CI=0.01, 0.09; p=0.017); not having others eat healthy meals with the Veteran (Diff=-0.81; CI=-1.5, -0.1; p=0.022); and reduced availability of low-fat foods in neighborhood stores where the Veteran shops (Diff=-0.37; CI=-0.6, -0.2; p<0.001) were associated with poorer diet quality. Consistent with prior research in the general population, this study identified multiple domains associated with Veterans' diet quality, including psychological comorbidity, the social environment, and the physical environment. Findings from this study suggest that interventions aimed at mental health, social support, and neighborhood access to healthy foods are needed to improve Veteran diet quality.

  8. Irradiation of diets fed to captive exotic felids: microbial destruction, consumption, and fecal consistency.

    PubMed

    Crissey, S D; Slifka, K A; Jacobsen, K L; Shumway, P J; Mathews, R; Harper, J

    2001-09-01

    Two frozen, raw horse meat-based diets fed to captive exotic felids at Brookfield Zoo were irradiated to determine the extent of microbial destruction and whether radiation treatment would affect consumption and/or fecal consistency in exotic cats. Fifteen cats, two African lions (Panthera leo), two Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), one Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), two clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa), two caracals (Felis caracal), one bobcat (Felis rufus), and five fishing cats (Felis viverrinus), housed at Brookfield Zoo were fed nonirradiated and irradiated raw diets containing horse meat with cereal products and fortified with nutrients: Nebraska Brand Feline and/or Canine Diet (Animal Spectrum, North Platte, Nebraska 69103, USA). Baseline data were obtained during a 2-wk control period (nonirradiated diets), which was followed by a 4-wk period of feeding comparable irradiated diets. Feed intake and fecal consistency data were collected. An estimated radiation dose range of 0.5-3.9 kilograys reduced most microbial populations, depending on specific diet and microbe type. Irradiation had no overall effect on either feed consumption or fecal consistency in captive exotic cats, regardless of species, age, sex, or body mass. Data indicate that irradiation of frozen horse meat-based diets (packaged in 2.2-kg portions) result in microbial destruction in these products but that product storage time between irradiation and sampling may also affect microbial reduction. However, irradiation would be an appropriate method for reducing potentially pathologic bacteria in raw meat fed to exotic cats.

  9. [Spanish diet quality according to the healthy eating index].

    PubMed

    Norte Navarro, A I; Ortiz Moncada, R

    2011-01-01

    To determine the quality of the Spanish diet by means of the Healthy Feeding Index (IASE) and its relationship with geographical and socioeconomic variables. Cross-sectional descriptive study from the National Heath Questionnaire 2006 (ENS-2006). 29,478 people answering the Frequency of Consumption Questionnaire (CFC) were studied (women = 15,019; men =14,459). The IASE comprises 10 variables (grains and derivatives, vegetables, fruits, dairy products, meats, legumes, cold-processed meats, sweets, beverages, and diet-variety) constructed from the CFC and the recommendations of the Feeding Guidelines (Spanish Society of Community Nutrition 2004). The IASE categories (maximum score: 100) were: healthy feeding > 80 points; Need-for-change > 5,080; Little healthy, 50. A descriptive analysis was performed with differences of the means (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests), and the Chi-square test to study the independency of the variables such as age, gender, social class, and educational level with the IASE categories. 72% of the whole sample needs changes in their feeding patterns. The mean score for women was 73.7 ± 10.5 and for men 69.9 ± 11.3 (p < 0.001). Among the healthy category, the age group > 65 years and women obtain higher percentage (38.8% and 28.3%, respectively) in comparison to men (18.4%). Besides, the higher the social class the higher the healthy diet index will be (class-I: 24.4%, class-II: 25.0%, class-III: 25.8%) (p < 0.001). The Autonomous Communities from Valencia (5.4%), Balearic Islands (4.6%) and Andalusia (4.3%) are the ones presenting the highest index of little healthy feeding. The IASE is a rapid and cheap method to estimate the quality of the diet in the population since it uses secondary data coming from the ENS and the feeding guidelines. It is useful to planning the nutritional policies in Spain.

  10. Combined high-fat diet and sustained high sucrose consumption promotes NAFLD in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Hamdan-Pérez, Nashla; Tovar, Armando R; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Martínez-Benítez, Braulio; Torre-Villalvazo, Iván; Morán-Ramos, Sofía; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Noriega, Lilia G; Hiriart, Marcia; Medina-Santillán, Roberto; Castillo-Hernandez, María del Carmen; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum; Uribe, Misael; Torres, Nimbe

    2015-01-01

    The study of NAFLD in humans has several limitations. Using murine models helps to understand disease pathogenesis. Evaluate the impact of 4 different diets in the production of NAFLD with emphasis on a combined high-fat plus sustained high sucrose consumption. Eight week-old male Wistar rats were divided in four groups and fed for 90 days with the following diets: 1) Control chow diet (C); 2) High-fat cholesterol diet (HFC) + 5% sucrose in drinking water. 3) High-fat cornstarch diet (HFCO) + 5% sucrose in drinking water. 4) Chow diet + 20% sucrose in drinking water (HSD). Metabolic changes, leptin levels, liver histology, hepatic and plasma lipid composition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and liver gene expression of FAS, SREBP-1 and PPAR-α were evaluated. The HFC diet had the highest grade of steatosis (grade 2 of 3) and HSD showed also steatosis (grade 1). Liver weight TG and colesterol concentrations in liver were greater in the HFC diet. There were no increased levels of iron in the liver. Rats in HFC gained significantly more weight (P < 0.001). All experimental groups showed fasting hyperglycemia. HFC had the highest glucose level (158.5 ± 7 mg/dL) (P < 0.005). The HSD and the HFCO diets developed also hyperglycemia. HSD had significantly higher fasting hyperinsulinemia. Serum leptin was higher in the HFC diet (p = 0.001). In conclusion, the HFC diet with combination of high fat and high sucrose is more effective in producing NAFLD compared with a high sucrose diet only.

  11. Evaluation of a nutrient-based diet quality index in UK young children and investigation into the diet quality of consumers of formula and infant foods.

    PubMed

    Verger, Eric O; Eussen, Simone; Holmes, Bridget A

    2016-07-01

    To adapt and evaluate a nutrient-based diet quality index (PANDiet) for UK young children and to determine the nutritional adequacy of their diets according to consumption of young child formula (YCF) and commercial infant foods (CIF). Content and construct validity of the PANDiet were assessed by studying associations between the PANDiet and its components, energy intake, food intakes, and child and maternal characteristics. Four groups of children were defined according to their intake of YCF and CIF: (i) no consumption; (ii) consumption of YCF; (iii) consumption of CIF; and (iv) consumption of YCF and CIF. Child and maternal characteristics, PANDiet scores and food intakes of these four groups were compared. Secondary analysis of data from the UK Diet and Nutrition Survey of Infants and Young Children (DNSIYC, 2011). Young children (n 1152) aged 12-18 months. The PANDiet was adapted to the UK based on twenty-five nutrients. A lower PANDiet score was linked to lower intakes of YCF, CIF, vegetables and fruits. Determinants of having a lower score were being older, having siblings and having a younger mother with a lower educational level. Compared with children consuming neither YCF nor CIF, PANDiet scores were higher in children consuming CIF (+1·4), children consuming YCF (+7·2) and children consuming YCF and CIF (+7·8; all P<0·001). The PANDiet is a valid indicator of the nutrient adequacy of the diet of UK young children. Consuming CIF was not found to be associated with lower nutritional adequacy whereas consuming YCF was associated with higher nutritional adequacy.

  12. Quality of pregnant women's diet in Poland - macro-elements.

    PubMed

    Bojar, Iwona; Owoc, Alfred; Humeniuk, Ewa; Fronczak, Adam; Walecka, Irena

    2014-05-12

    The objective was to assess the quality of pregnant women's diet in Poland concerning macro-elements and to analyze reasons for low or high quality diets. Five hundred and twelve pregnant women in their 20(th) to 30(th) week of pregnancy took part in the research conducted by means of a 7-day observation of diet. Consumed products were analyzed by means of DIETETYK software developed by the Polish National Food and Nutrition Institute. Obtained macro values were averaged. The results were compared with the recommendations from the World Health Organization, European Union and Polish National Food and Nutrition Institute and analyzed statistically (χ(2) test). The pregnant women consumed an average of 1898 ±380 kcal daily. Average value of macro components supplied with the diet did not deviate from EU and NFNI nutrition recommendations: protein - 72.1 g/person daily, fats overall - 72.8 g, polyunsaturated fatty acids - 10.93 g, cholesterol - 283 mg, carbohydrates - 257 g. The study proved a significant relation between a higher quality diet of pregnant women and tertiary or secondary education (p = 0.05) as well as urban residence (p = 0.01). Pregnant women's diet in Poland is not significantly different from diet quality of pregnant women from other countries. A lower quality diet was observed among women who smoked during pregnancy and lived in rural areas.

  13. Nutrient intake, diet quality, and weight/adiposity parameters in breakfast patterns compared with no breakfast in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of different breakfast consumption patterns on nutrient intake, diet quality, and weight/adiposity status is unknown. The objective was to compare nutrient intake, diet quality, and weight/adiposity measures of consumers assigned to different breakfast patterns with breakfast skippers. Th...

  14. Educational attainment, perceived control and the quality of women's diets.

    PubMed

    Barker, Mary; Lawrence, Wendy; Crozier, Sarah; Robinson, Siân; Baird, Janis; Margetts, Barrie; Cooper, Cyrus

    2009-06-01

    Data from the Southampton Women's Survey have established that women of lower educational attainment have poorer quality diets than those of higher educational attainment. This relationship is strong and graded such that for every increase in level of educational qualification, there is an increase in the likelihood that a woman will have a better quality diet. It is not wholly explained by socio-economic status. Qualitative research carried out in Southampton suggests that women of lower educational attainment may have a poorer diet because they feel they lack control over the food choices they make for themselves and their families. We set out to investigate the relationship between educational attainment, perceived control and quality of diet in a sample of women from Southampton. Cross-sectional study using structured interviews in which women's diet, educational attainment and perceived control were assessed. 19 Children's Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. 372 women, median age 28 years. Quality of diet assessed by prudent diet score produced from principal components analysis of 20-item food frequency questionnaire, and perceived control assessed by a validated questionnaire. Women of lower educational attainment tended to have lower prudent diet scores and lower perceived control scores than women of higher educational attainment. Having a lower prudent diet score was associated with consuming fewer vegetables and vegetable dishes, less wholemeal bread and vegetarian food, and more chips and roast potatoes, meat pies, Yorkshire puddings and pancakes, crisps and snacks, white bread and added sugar. In a regression model both lower educational attainment and lower perceived control were associated with lower prudent diet scores, independent of the effects of confounding factors. However there was an interaction effect such that lower perceived control was only related to prudent diet score in the group of women of lower educational attainment. Women

  15. Health status of hostel dwellers. Part VI. Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and diet.

    PubMed

    Ramphele, M A; Heap, M

    1991-06-15

    Smoking, alcohol consumption and diet were among the criteria selected to screen health status among the residents of the urban migrant council-built hostels of Langa, Nyanga and Gguletu outside Cape Town. Smoking patterns fell within the range found elsewhere. Problems associated with alcohol consumption were exacerbated by the overcrowded hostel living conditions. Dietary patterns were not examined against the concept of an 'ideal diet'. They are understood in the context of the poverty of the hostel dwellers and in the context of limited space available in the hostel environment for cooking and storage. In comparison with a home-based migrant population, the urban migrant hostel dwellers eat more frequently, more regularly and have more variety in their diet. In the light of the findings on the lifestyle indicators of the hostel dwellers, it is concluded that improved living conditions, rather than health education that focuses on individual behaviour, will have a greater impact on improvements in their health status.

  16. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emily J.; Coates, Alison M.; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = −0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score < 5; 125.2 ± 62.6 mg; p = 0.008). The C-FFQ was found to be a quick but detailed way to collect population based caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality. PMID:27527212

  17. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emily J; Coates, Alison M; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-08-04

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = -0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score < 5; 125.2 ± 62.6 mg; p = 0.008). The C-FFQ was found to be a quick but detailed way to collect population based caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality.

  18. Nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy: Effects on food intake and diet quality.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Sarah R; Inskip, Hazel M; Godfrey, Keith M; Cooper, Cyrus; Robinson, Sian M

    2017-10-01

    Experiences of nausea and/or vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) vary greatly, but the paucity of studies with pre-pregnancy dietary data mean that little is known about the effects of NVP on diet. Using an administered food frequency questionnaire, diet was assessed before pregnancy and at 11 and 34 weeks' gestation in 2270 participants in a UK birth cohort study (Southampton Women's Survey). Experience of NVP in early pregnancy was graded as none, mild, moderate, or severe. Participants reported their level of food consumption as more, the same, or less than before pregnancy. "Prudent" diet scores (derived using principal component analysis) were used to describe participants' diet quality before, in early and late pregnancy. In early pregnancy, 89% of women were nauseous, although most commonly, the NVP experienced was mild (48%) or moderate (30%); 11% had severe NVP. A total of 39% of women reported an increase in their level of food intake in early pregnancy; 34% reported a reduction. Increasing severity of nausea was associated with changes in intake of a range of foods, most notably reduced consumption of vegetables, tea/coffee, rice/pasta, breakfast cereals, beans/pulses and citrus fruits/fruit juices and increased consumption of white bread, and soft drinks. Increasing severity of nausea was also associated with decreasing prudent diet score from before to early pregnancy, such that women with severe nausea had prudent diet scores 0.29 SDs lower than those with no nausea (P < 0.001). However, this was transient as NVP was not related to change in diet quality from before to late pregnancy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Monetary Diet Cost, Diet Quality, and Parental Socioeconomic Status in Spanish Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ribas-Barba, Lourdes; Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen; Bawaked, Rowaedh Ahmed; Fíto, Montserrat; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    Background Using a food-based analysis, healthy dietary patterns in adults are more expensive than less healthy ones; studies are needed in youth. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine relationships between monetary daily diet cost, diet quality, and parental socioeconomic status. Design and Methods Data were obtained from a representative national sample of 3534 children and young people in Spain, aged 2 to 24 years. Dietary assessment was performed with a 24-hour recall. Mediterranean diet adherence was measured by the KIDMED questionnaire. Average food cost was calculated from official Spanish government data. Monetary daily diet cost was expressed as euros per day (€/d) and euros per day standardized to a 1000kcal diet (€/1000kcal/d). Results Mean monetary daily diet cost was 3.16±1.57€/d (1.56±0.72€/1000kcal/d). Socioeconomic status was positively associated with monetary daily diet cost and diet quality measured by the KIDMED index (€/d and €/1000kcal/d, p<0.019). High Mediterranean diet adherence (KIDMED score 8–12) was 0.71 €/d (0.28€/1000kcal/d) more expensive than low compliance (KIDMED score 0–3). Analysis for nonlinear association between the KIDMED index and monetary daily diet cost per1000kcal showed no further cost increases beyond a KIDMED score of 8 (linear p<0.001; nonlinear p = 0.010). Conclusion Higher monetary daily diet cost is associated with healthy eating in Spanish youth. Higher socioeconomic status is a determinant for higher monetary daily diet cost and quality. PMID:27622518

  20. Monetary Diet Cost, Diet Quality, and Parental Socioeconomic Status in Spanish Youth.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Helmut; Gomez, Santiago F; Ribas-Barba, Lourdes; Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen; Bawaked, Rowaedh Ahmed; Fíto, Montserrat; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    Using a food-based analysis, healthy dietary patterns in adults are more expensive than less healthy ones; studies are needed in youth. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine relationships between monetary daily diet cost, diet quality, and parental socioeconomic status. Data were obtained from a representative national sample of 3534 children and young people in Spain, aged 2 to 24 years. Dietary assessment was performed with a 24-hour recall. Mediterranean diet adherence was measured by the KIDMED questionnaire. Average food cost was calculated from official Spanish government data. Monetary daily diet cost was expressed as euros per day (€/d) and euros per day standardized to a 1000kcal diet (€/1000kcal/d). Mean monetary daily diet cost was 3.16±1.57€/d (1.56±0.72€/1000kcal/d). Socioeconomic status was positively associated with monetary daily diet cost and diet quality measured by the KIDMED index (€/d and €/1000kcal/d, p<0.019). High Mediterranean diet adherence (KIDMED score 8-12) was 0.71 €/d (0.28€/1000kcal/d) more expensive than low compliance (KIDMED score 0-3). Analysis for nonlinear association between the KIDMED index and monetary daily diet cost per1000kcal showed no further cost increases beyond a KIDMED score of 8 (linear p<0.001; nonlinear p = 0.010). Higher monetary daily diet cost is associated with healthy eating in Spanish youth. Higher socioeconomic status is a determinant for higher monetary daily diet cost and quality.

  1. The effect of alcohol, tobacco and caffeine consumption and vegetarian diet on gallstone prevalence.

    PubMed

    Walcher, Thomas; Haenle, Mark Martin; Mason, Richard Andrew; Koenig, Wolfgang; Imhof, Armin; Kratzer, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the effects of alcohol, tobacco and caffeine consumption and of vegetarian diet on gallstone prevalence in an urban population sample. A total of 2417 individuals underwent ultrasound examination and completed a standardized questionnaire as part of the EMIL study. Statistical analysis of the data considered the known risk factors of age, female sex, BMI, positive family history and potential confounders, such as alcohol, caffeine and tobacco consumption and vegetarian diet using multiple logistic regression with variable selection. The prevalence of gallstones in the population sample was 8% (171 out of 2147). Findings of the study confirmed the classic risk factors of age, female sex, obesity and positive family history. After the variable selection of potential risk factors in a logistic regression that was adjusted for age, female sex, BMI and positive family history, the factors like tobacco [odds ratio (OR) 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76-1.56, P=0.64] and caffeine consumption (OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.42-1.42, P=0.40) as well as vegetarian diet (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 0.39-3.35, P=0.81) had no effect on gallstone prevalence. A protective effect against development of gallstones was shown for alcohol consumption (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.46-0.99, P=0.04). The factors like tobacco and caffeine consumption as well as vegetarian diet exerted no measurable effect on the prevalence of gallstones. A protective effect was found for alcohol consumption.

  2. Chickpeas and hummus are associated with better nutrient intake, diet quality, and levels of some cardiovascular risk factors: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Epidemiologic studies assessing chickpea/hummus consumption and the association with nutrient intake, diet quality, and health biomarkers are lacking. The association between chickpea/hummus consumption and nutrient intake, dietary quality, and health biomarkers was examined in adults using data fro...

  3. Social Determinants and Poor Diet Quality of Energy-Dense Diets of Australian Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Grech, Amanda; Rangan, Anna; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-10-01

    This research aimed to determine the diet quality and socio-demographic determinants by level of energy-density of diets of Australian young adults. Secondary analysis of the Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey-2011/2012 for adults aged 18-34 years (n = 2397) was conducted. Diet was assessed by 24-h recalls. Dietary energy-density was calculated as dietary energy/grams of food (kJ/g) and the Healthy-Eating-Index-for-Australians (HEIFA-2013) was used to assess diet quality (highest score = 100). Dietary energy-density was examined with respect to diet quality and sociodemographic determinants including gender, highest tertiary-education attainment, country-of-birth, age, income, and socio-economic-index-for-area (SEIFA). Higher dietary energy-density was associated with lower diet quality scores (β = -3.71, t (2394) = -29.29, p < 0.0001) and included fewer fruits and vegetables, and more discretionary foods. The mean dietary energy-density was 7.7 kJ/g and 7.2 kJ/g for men and women, respectively. Subpopulations most at risk of consuming high energy-dense diets included those with lower education, Australian and English-speaking countries of birth, and men with low income and women from areas of lower socio-economic status. Young adults reporting low energy-dense diets had higher quality diets. Intensive efforts are needed to reduce the high energy-density of young adults' diets, and should ensure they include populations of lower socio-economic status.

  4. Diet and heart health: moderate wine drinking strengthens the cardioprotective effects of fish consumption.

    PubMed

    de Leiris, J; Besse, S; Boucher, F

    2010-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the Mediterranean diet is beneficial to human health. Many epidemiological and research studies have reported that this diet pattern is able to limit the development and progression of coronary heart disease, one of the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries worldwide. There is now a large consensus about recommending Mediterranean diet to reduce atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease and to limit the risk of fatal complications such as sudden cardiac death and heart failure. This review underlines the role of two of the specific components of the Mediterranean diet, namely marine omega-3 fatty acids and wine, and the link between moderate wine consumption and fatty acid profiles.

  5. Diet quality and psychosocial mediators in rural African Americans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    PURPOSE: Obesity and its comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes, are largely preventable or modifiable through behavioral factors, such as dietary intake. We examined associations among diet quality, dietary intake, and psychosocial mediators of behavioral chan...

  6. Values, attitudes, and frequency of meat consumption. Predicting meat-reduced diet in Australians.

    PubMed

    Hayley, Alexa; Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Hardiman, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Reduced consumption of meat, particularly red meat, is associated with numerous health benefits. While past research has examined demographic and cognitive correlates of meat-related diet identity and meat consumption behaviour, the predictive influence of personal values on meat-consumption attitudes and behaviour, as well as gender differences therein, has not been explicitly examined, nor has past research focusing on 'meat' generally addressed 'white meat' and 'fish/seafood' as distinct categories of interest. Two hundred and two Australians (59.9% female, 39.1% male, 1% unknown), aged 18 to 91 years (M = 31.42, SD = 16.18), completed an online questionnaire including the Schwartz Values Survey, and measures of diet identity, attitude towards reduced consumption of each of red meat, white meat, and fish/seafood, as well as self-reported estimates of frequency of consumption of each meat type. Results showed that higher valuing of Universalism predicted more positive attitudes towards reducing, and less frequent consumption of, each of red meat, white meat, and fish/seafood, while higher Power predicted less positive attitudes towards reducing, and more frequent consumption of, these meats. Higher Security predicted less positive attitudes towards reducing, and more frequent consumption, of white meat and fish/seafood, while Conformity produced this latter effect for fish/seafood only. Despite men valuing Power more highly than women, women valuing Universalism more highly than men, and men eating red meat more frequently than women, gender was not a significant moderator of the value-attitude-behaviour mediations described, suggesting that gender's effects on meat consumption may not be robust once entered into a multivariate model of MRD attitudes and behaviour. Results support past findings associating Universalism, Power, and Security values with meat-eating preferences, and extend these findings by articulating how these values relate specifically

  7. Influences on the diet quality of preschool children: importance of maternal psychological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Megan; Inskip, Hazel; Ntani, Georgia; Cooper, Cyrus; Baird, Janis; Robinson, Sian; Barker, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that maternal psychological profiles relate to children’s quality of diet. Design Cross-sectional study. Mothers provided information on their health-related psychological factors and aspects of their child’s mealtime environment. Children’s diet quality was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire from which weekly intakes of foods and a diet z-score was calculated. A high score described children with a better quality diet. Cluster analysis was performed to assess grouping of mothers based on psychological factors. Mealtime characteristics, describing how often children ate whilst sitting at a table or in front of the television, their frequency of take-away food consumption, maternal covert control and food security, and children’s quality of diet were examined, according to mothers cluster membership. Subjects 324 mother-child pairs, in the Southampton Initiative for Health. Children were aged between 2-5 years. Setting Hampshire, UK. Results Two main clusters were identified. Mothers in cluster one had significantly higher scores for all psychological factors than mothers in cluster two (all P<0.001). Clusters were termed ‘more resilient’ and ‘less resilient’ respectively. Children of mothers in the less resilient cluster ate meals sitting at a table less often (p=0.03) and watched more television (p=0.01). These children had significantly poorer quality diets (β −0.61, 95% CI −0.82, −0.40, p=<0.001). This association was attenuated, but remained significant after controlling for confounding factors, that included maternal education and home/mealtime characteristics (p=0.006). Conclusion This study suggests that mothers should be offered psychological support as part of interventions to improve children’s quality of diet. PMID:25409750

  8. Development of a Diet Quality Score for Infants and Toddlers and its association with weight

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Elaine M.; Sinigaglia, Olga; Diaz, Beatriz; Campos, Maribel; Palacios, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Objective To create a Diet Quality Index Score (DQIS) for infants and toddlers and to assess its relative validity. Design Three DQIS were created (0–5, 8–11 and 12–24 months) based on a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Nine components were included, scored from 0 (inadequate) to 5 (adequate consumption) based on guidelines for timing of food’s introduction and portion sizes; the component on breastfeeding (Yes/No) was scored (0–15). Infants 6–7 months were excluded as new foods are introduced during this period. The total score (0–55 points) was categorized as Excellent (≥45), Good (35–44), Needs improvement (25–34), and Poor (<25). Relative validity was assessed against weight status among a sample of 296 children using logistic regression. Results In infants 0–5 months (n=100), mean DQIS was 42.4±9.3 and 52% had ‘Excellent’ diets. In infants 8–11 months (n=42), mean DQIS was 36.1±7.7 and most had ‘Good’ diets (47.6%). Among toddlers 12–24 months (n=117), mean DQIS was 25.7±8.0 and most had ‘Poor’ diets (50.4%). There was a trend for a higher odd of Excessive weight in those with ‘Poor’ diets compared to those with ‘Excellent’ diets, after controlling for confounders (OR 2.01; 95% CI: 0.85, 5.18). Conclusions These scores could be used to assess diet quality in infants and toddlers. There was a trend for a higher odd of Excessive weight among those with ‘Poor’ diets. To our knowledge, this is the first algorithm for the assessment of diet quality in infants and toddlers considering intake of each food group and their portion sizes. PMID:28154840

  9. Maternal diet quality before pregnancy and risk of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Singer, Amanda W; Carmichael, Suzan L; Selvin, Steve; Fu, Cecilia; Block, Gladys; Metayer, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies on maternal nutrition and childhood leukaemia risk have focused on the role of specific nutrients such as folate and have not considered broader measures of diet quality, which may better capture intake of diverse nutrients known to impact fetal development. We examined the relationship between maternal diet quality before pregnancy, as summarised by a diet quality index, and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in a case-control study in California. Dietary intake in the year before pregnancy was assessed using FFQ in 681 ALL cases, 103 AML cases and 1076 matched controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate OR and 95 % CI for diet quality continuous score and quartiles (Q1-Q4). Higher maternal diet quality score was associated with reduced risk of ALL (OR 0·66; 95 % CI 0·47, 0·93 for Q4 v. Q1) and possibly AML (OR 0·42; 95 % CI 0·15, 1·15 for Q4 v. Q1). No single index component appeared to account for the association. The association of maternal diet quality with risk of ALL was stronger in children diagnosed under the age of 5 years and in children of women who did not report using vitamin supplements before pregnancy. These findings suggest that the joint effects of many dietary components may be important in influencing childhood leukaemia risk.

  10. The food environment and diet quality of urban-dwelling older women and men: Assessing the moderating role of diet knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mercille, Geneviève; Richard, Lucie; Gauvin, Lise; Kestens, Yan; Shatenstein, Bryna; Daniel, Mark; Payette, Hélène

    2016-06-09

    The relationships between local food environments and dietary patterns are important for older adults and could be different in men and women. We examined associations between exposure to neighbourhood food sources and food consumption and the moderating role of diet knowledge separately among older women and men living in Montreal in 2003-2005 (n = 722). The proportion of fast-food outlets relative to all restaurants (%FFO) and the proportion of healthy food stores relative to all stores (%HFS) were estimated for 500 m buffers around participants' homes. Two dietary patterns, designated "Western" and "prudent", reflecting lower- and higher-quality diets respectively, were identified from food frequency questionnaire data. The unique and interactive effects of diet knowledge and food-source exposure on diet scores were tested with separate linear regression models for women and men. For men, greater %FFO exposure was related to lower prudent diet scores (β = -0.18, p = 0.02), but no effect of %HFS exposure was observed and no interactions were statistically significant. For women, an inverse relationship between %FFO and prudent diet scores was strongest among those with low diet knowledge (β = -0.22, p < 0.01). No other associations were statistically significant. Older men's diet patterns may reflect unhealthy cues associated with fast-food outlets. Among women, diet knowledge potentiated both negative and positive relationships with the food environment. In the absence of consistent main effects of the food environment on diet scores, subgroup analysis is a promising avenue for research.

  11. Obesity Mediates the Association between Mediterranean Diet Consumption and Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in US Adults.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Moon; Zhang, Jiajia; Steck, Susan E; Fung, Teresa T; Hazlett, Linda J; Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Merchant, Anwar T

    2017-04-01

    Background: The inverse association between Mediterranean diet (Med-diet) consumption and insulin resistance or inflammatory markers is well known. However, the extent to which obesity may act directly on or mediate this association is unclear.Objective: We aimed to investigate whether the associations between Med-diet consumption and markers of insulin resistance and inflammation are mediated by body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) in a representative US population.Methods: We used cross-sectional data from 4700 adults aged 20-90 y without any previous diagnosis of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or hypertension based on the NHANES III, 1988-1994. A Med-diet score (MDS) was created to assess adherence to the Med-diet. Linear regression models were fitted in conventional and causal mediation analyses comparing extreme MDS tertiles.Results: Compared with the lowest MDS tertile, the highest tertile of MDS was associated with a 0.77 lower BMI (in kg/m(2); P = 0.004) and a 2.7 cm lower WC (P < 0.001) after multivariable adjustment. WC mediated the association of MDS with insulin resistance and glucose intolerance markers (log insulin, log homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin) and inflammatory markers (white blood cell count and fibrinogen), whereas BMI mediated the association between MDS and insulin resistance and glucose intolerance markers only (all P < 0.05). The mediated effects of WC were consistently greater than those of BMI for all markers in both conventional and causal mediation analyses. Furthermore, the association between MDS and fasting glucose was fully mediated by adiposity, especially by WC in men aged <45 y and in premenopausal women.Conclusion: Our results suggest that reducing abdominal obesity may play an important role in the pathway through which Med-diet consumption reduces insulin resistance and inflammation. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Diet quality across early childhood and adiposity at 6 years: the Southampton Women's Survey

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, H; Crozier, S R; Harvey, N C; Godfrey, K M; Inskip, H M; Cooper, C; Robinson, S M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor diet quality in early childhood is inconsistently linked to obesity risk. Understanding may be limited by the use of cross-sectional data and the use of body mass index (BMI) to define adiposity in childhood. Objective: The objective of this study is to examine the effects of continued exposure to diets of varying quality across early childhood in relation to adiposity at 6 years. Methods: One thousand and eighteen children from a prospective UK birth cohort were studied. Diet was assessed using food frequency questionnaires when the children were aged 6 and 12 months, and 3 and 6 years; diet quality was determined according to scores for a principal component analysis-defined dietary pattern at each age (characterized by frequent consumption of fruits, vegetables and fish). At each age, children were allocated a value of 0/1/2 according to third of the distribution (bottom/middle/top) their diet quality score was in; values were summed to calculate an overall diet quality index (DQI) for early childhood (range 0–8). Obesity outcomes considered at 6 years were dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-assessed fat mass and BMI. Results: One hundred and seven (11%) children had a DQI=0, indicating a consistently low diet quality, 339 (33%) had a DQI=1–3, 378 (37%) had a DQI=4–6 and 194 (19%) had a DQI=7–8. There was a strong association between lower DQI and higher fat mass z-score at 6 years that was robust to adjustment for confounders (fat mass s.d. per 1-unit DQI increase: β=−0.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): −0.09, −0.01), P=0.01). In comparison with children who had the highest diet quality (DQI=7–8), this amounted to a difference in fat mass of 14% (95% CI: 2%, 28%) at 6 years for children with the poorest diets (DQI=0). In contrast, no independent associations were observed between DQI and BMI. Conclusions: Continued exposure to diets of low quality across early childhood is linked to adiposity at the age of 6 years. PMID:26121960

  13. Quality of diets consumed by older rural adults.

    PubMed

    Vitolins, Mara Z; Quandt, Sara A; Bell, Ronny A; Arcury, Thomas A; Case, L Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Older adults residing in rural communities are at risk for low dietary quality because of a variety of social, physical and environmental circumstances. Minority elders are at additional risk because of poorer health status and lower socioeconomic status. This study evaluated the food group intake of 130 older (>70 years) African American (34%), European American (36%), and Native American (30%) residents of two rural communities in central North Carolina. An interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire was used to measure dietary intake. Food items were classified into food groups similar to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide Pyramid and the National Cancer Institutes 5 A Day for Better Health program. None of the survey participants met minimum intake recommendations and most over-consumed fats, oils, sweets and snacks. African Americans and Native Americans consumed fewer servings of meats,fruits and vegetables, and fats, oils, sweets and snacks than European Americans. African American men consumed the fewest servings of fruits and vegetables of all gender/ethnic groups. Consumption of fats, oils and sweets was greatest among those 85 years and older and was more common among denture users. National strategies to educate the public about the importance of consuming a varied diet based on the recommendations presented in national nutrition education campaigns may not be reaching older adults in rural communities, particularly minority group members.

  14. Diet quality and obesity in women: the Framingham Nutrition Studies.

    PubMed

    Wolongevicz, Dolores M; Zhu, Lei; Pencina, Michael J; Kimokoti, Ruth W; Newby, P K; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Millen, Barbara E

    2010-04-01

    Obesity affects one in three American adult women and is associated with overall mortality and major morbidities. A composite diet index to evaluate total diet quality may better assess the complex relationship between diet and obesity, providing insights for nutrition interventions. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether diet quality, defined according to the previously validated Framingham nutritional risk score (FNRS), was associated with the development of overweight or obesity in women. Over 16 years, we followed 590 normal-weight women (BMI < 25 kg/m2), aged 25 to 71 years, of the Framingham Offspring and Spouse Study who presented without CVD, cancer or diabetes at baseline. The nineteen-nutrient FNRS derived from mean ranks of nutrient intakes from 3 d dietary records was used to assess nutritional risk. The outcome was development of overweight or obesity (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2) during follow-up. In a stepwise multiple logistic regression model adjusted for age, physical activity and smoking status, the FNRS was directly related to overweight or obesity (P for trend = 0.009). Women with lower diet quality (i.e. higher nutritional risk scores) were significantly more likely to become overweight or obese (OR 1.76; 95 % CI 1.16, 2.69) compared with those with higher diet quality. Diet quality, assessed using a comprehensive composite nutritional risk score, predicted development of overweight or obesity. This finding suggests that overall diet quality be considered a key component in planning and implementing programmes for obesity risk reduction and treatment recommendations.

  15. Diet quality and obesity in women: the Framingham Nutrition Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wolongevicz, Dolores M.; Zhu, Lei; Pencina, Michael J.; Kimokoti, Ruth W.; Newby, P. K.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Millen, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity affects one in three American adult women and is associated with overall mortality and major morbidities. A composite diet index to evaluate total diet quality may better assess the complex relationship between diet and obesity, providing insights for nutrition interventions. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether diet quality, defined according to the previously validated Framingham nutritional risk score (FNRS), was associated with the development of overweight or obesity in women. Over 16 years, we followed 590 normal-weight women (BMI < 25 kg/m2), aged 25 to 71 years, of the Framingham Offspring and Spouse Study who presented without CVD, cancer or diabetes at baseline. The nineteen-nutrient FNRS derived from mean ranks of nutrient intakes from 3d dietary records was used to assess nutritional risk. The outcome was development of overweight or obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) during follow-up. In a stepwise multiple logistic regression model adjusted for age, physical activity and smoking status, the FNRS was directly related to overweight or obesity (P for trend= 0·009). Women with lower diet quality (i.e. higher nutritional risk scores) were significantly more likely to become overweight or obese (OR 1·76; 95% CI 1·16, 2·69) compared with those with higher diet quality. Diet quality, assessed using a comprehensive composite nutritional risk score, predicted development of overweight or obesity. This finding suggests that overall diet quality be considered a key component in planning and implementing programmes for obesity risk reduction and treatment recommendations. PMID:19930766

  16. Smoking status is inversely associated with overall diet quality: Findings from the ORISCAV-LUX study.

    PubMed

    Alkerwi, Ala'a; Baydarlioglu, Burcu; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Stranges, Saverio; Lemmens, Paul; Shivappa, Nitin; Hébert, James R

    2017-10-01

    Relationships between food consumption/nutrient intake and tobacco smoking have been described in the literature. However, little is known about the association between smoking and overall diet quality. This study examined the associations between eight diet quality indices, namely, the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I), Recommendation Compliance Index (RCI), Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score, Energy Density Score (EDS), Dietary Diversity Score (DDS), Recommended Food Score (RFS), non-Recommended Food Score (non-RFS), and Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII), and smoking status with a focus on smoking intensity. Analyses were based on a sample of 1352 participants in the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg (ORISCAV-LUX) survey, a nationwide population-based cross-sectional study of adults aged 18-69 years. Nutritional data from food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) were used to compute selected diet quality indices. Participants were classified as never smoker, former smoker (≥12 months cessation period), occasional or light smokers (≤1 cig/d), moderate smokers (≤20 cig/d) and heavy smokers (>20 cig/d). Descriptive and linear regression analyses were performed, after adjustment for several potential covariates. Compared to the other groups, heavy smokers had significantly higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (83%), obesity (34%), and elevated glycemic biomarkers. About 50% of former smokers had hypertension. Diet quality of heavy smokers was significantly poorer than those who never smoked independent of several socioeconomic, lifestyle, and biologic confounding factors (all p < 0.001). Heavy smokers were less compliant with national or international dietary recommendations, expressed by RCI, DQI-I, and RFS. In addition, they consumed a more pro-inflammatory diet, as expressed by higher DII scores (P < 0.001) and self-reported less dietary diversity in their food choices, as expressed by DDS. This study provides new

  17. Association of diet quality with dietary inflammatory potential in youth

    PubMed Central

    Bawaked, Rowaedh Ahmed; Schröder, Helmut; Ribas-Barba, Lourdes; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria; Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen; Fíto, Montserrat; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Diet plays a crucial role in the regulation of chronic inflammation. The sparse evidence available in adult populations indicates that diet quality is linked to the dietary inflammatory potential; however, this association has not been established in youth. Design: Data were obtained from a representative national sample of 2889 children and young people in Spain, aged 6–24 years. The dietary inflammatory potential was measured by the dietary inflammatory index (DII), and diet quality by three conceptually different measures: the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index for children and adolescents (KIDMED), energy density, and total dietary antioxidants capacity. Results: The mean DII was 1.96 ± 0.76 units Scoring for the KIDMED index and the total dietary antioxidant capacity significantly decreased (p < 0.001 and p = 0.030, respectively) across quintiles of the DII, whereas the opposite was true for energy density (p < 0.001). The effect size of these associations was strongest for energy density, followed by the KIDMED index and total dietary antioxidant capacity. Conclusion: A healthy diet characterized by high adherence to the Mediterranean diet, high total dietary antioxidant capacity, or low energy density was linked to greater anti-inflammatory potential of the diet, as measured by the DII. PMID:28659737

  18. Association between quality of the diet and cardiometabolic risk factors in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Danyelle de Almeida; Fonseca, Vânia de Matos; Ramos, Eloane Gonçalves; Marinheiro, Lizanka Paola Figueiredo; Souza, Rita Adriana Gomes de; Chaves, Celia Regina Moutinho de Miranda; Peixoto, Maria Virginia Marques

    2014-12-22

    Climateric is a phase of women's life marked by the transition from the reproductive to the non-reproductive period. In addition to overall weight gain, the menopause is also associated with the increase of abdominal fat. We used The Healthy Eating Index as a summary measure to evaluate the major components and the quality of women's diet after the onset of the menopause. This study aims at examining the association between the quality of the diet and cardiometabolic risk factors in postmenopausal women. Cross-sectional study including 215 postmenopausal women attending a public outpatient clinic. The 24-hour dietary recall method was used to assess the food intake and to establish the Healthy Eating Index. Diets were then classified as appropriate diet (>80 points), diet "requiring improvement" (80-51 points), and poor diet (<51 points). Cardiometabolic risk factors included abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. The Fisher's exact test was utilized for the Statistical analysis. The analysis of the food intake showed that the average daily intake of lipids (36.7%) and sodium (2829.9 mg) were above the recommended. Only 8.8% of the women performed moderate or intense physical exercises on a regular basis. The diet was considered poor in 16.3%, "requiring improvement" in 82.8%, and appropriate for only 0.9% of the women. The study detected increased waist circumference in 92.1% of the participants. The mean concentration of triglycerides was of 183.3 mg/dl, and 130.7 mg/dl for cholesterol (Low Density Lipoprotein). Women consume a low quality diet, possibly due to the low intake of vegetables and fruits and excessive consumption of sodium. These inappropriate eating habits are associated with and, have a negative impact on the cardiometabolic risk factors such as abdominal obesity.

  19. Vitamin D3: A Role in Dopamine Circuit Regulation, Diet-Induced Obesity, and Drug Consumption.

    PubMed

    Trinko, Joseph R; Land, Benjamin B; Solecki, Wojciech B; Wickham, Robert J; Tellez, Luis A; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; de Araujo, Ivan E; Addy, Nii A; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2016-01-01

    The influence of micronutrients on dopamine systems is not well defined. Using mice, we show a potential role for reduced dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in promoting diet-induced obesity (DIO), food intake, and drug consumption while on a high fat diet. To complement these deficiency studies, treatments with exogenous fully active vitamin D3 (calcitriol, 10 µg/kg, i.p.) were performed. Nondeficient mice that were made leptin resistant with a high fat diet displayed reduced food intake and body weight after an acute treatment with exogenous calcitriol. Dopamine neurons in the midbrain and their target neurons in the striatum were found to express vitamin D3 receptor protein. Acute calcitriol treatment led to transcriptional changes of dopamine-related genes in these regions in naive mice, enhanced amphetamine-induced dopamine release in both naive mice and rats, and increased locomotor activity after acute amphetamine treatment (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Alternatively, mice that were chronically fed either the reduced D3 high fat or chow diets displayed less activity after acute amphetamine treatment compared with their respective controls. Finally, high fat deficient mice that were trained to orally consume liquid amphetamine (90 mg/L) displayed increased consumption, while nondeficient mice treated with calcitriol showed reduced consumption. Our findings suggest that reduced dietary D3 may be a contributing environmental factor enhancing DIO as well as drug intake while eating a high fat diet. Moreover, these data demonstrate that dopamine circuits are modulated by D3 signaling, and may serve as direct or indirect targets for exogenous calcitriol.

  20. Nutritional adequacy and quality control of rodent diets.

    PubMed

    Newberne, P M; Fox, J G

    1980-04-01

    One of the most often neglected variables in experimental investigations using rodents is the diet. Recent observations that diets can influence the response of a rodent to the drug, chemical or other factors under study, with biased interpretation of results, have drawn great interest. In order to be assured that the biologic response observed is a reflection of the material or condition under study, it is imperative that the diet provide essential nutrients in the proper proportions and that contaminants be kept to a minimum. Quality control is the key to these requirements; rodent diets can provide adequate nutrition, free of significant contamination. The diets which can be provided vary according to the degree of refinements; the three major types are (1) natural product, (2) semipurified and (3) chemically defined diets. Natural product diets may be open or closed formula, depending on the amount of information that the label reveals. Guaranteed analyses of proximate nutrients are provided but are of little use in assessing the nutrient value of the formulation. The National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council publications on laboratory animal nutrient requirements should be available to all investigators using experimental animals to help them evaluate the nutritional adequacy of the diets they use. Rats and mice may be considered together under some circumstances relative to crude dietary needs, but the Syrian golden hamster should be treated separately for purposes of diet. This species appears to digest foods more like a ruminant. An ideal diet for rodents is not on the horizon because of variable needs relative to different types of research and holding. Storage and shelf life of rodent diets also play important roles in providing adequate nutrition. Variations in moisture, temperature and exposure to other chemicals can affect the quality of the feed and research results. In addition, a number of chemical and biological contaminants have been

  1. Western Diet Consumption and Cognitive Impairment: Links to Hippocampal Dysfunction and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kanoski, Scott E.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    Intake of saturated fats and simple carbohydrates, two of the primary components of a modern Western diet, is linked with the development of obesity and Alzheimer's Disease. The present paper summarizes research showing that Western diet intake is associated with cognitive impairment, with a specific emphasis on learning and memory functions that are dependent on the integrity of the hippocampus. The paper then considers evidence that saturated fat and simple carbohydrate intake is correlated with neurobiological changes in the hippocampus that may be related to the ability of these dietary components to impair cognitive function. Finally, a model is described proposing that Western diet consumption contributes to the development of excessive food intake and obesity, in part, by interfering with a type of hippocampal-dependent memory inhibition that is critical in the ability of animals to refrain from responding to environmental cues associated with food, and ultimately from consuming energy intake in excess of that driven solely by caloric need. PMID:21167850

  2. High-CHO diet increases post-exercise oxygen consumption after a supramaximal exercise bout.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, G A; Bertuzzi, R; De-Oliveira, F R; Pires, F O; Lima-Silva, A E

    2016-10-24

    We investigated if carbohydrate (CHO) availability could affect the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after a single supramaximal exercise bout. Five physically active men cycled at 115% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2 peak) until exhaustion with low or high pre-exercise CHO availability. The endogenous CHO stores were manipulated by performing a glycogen-depletion exercise protocol 48 h before the trial, followed by 48 h consuming either a low- (10% CHO) or a high-CHO (80% CHO) diet regime. Compared to the low-CHO diet, the high-CHO diet increased time to exhaustion (3.0±0.6 min vs 4.4±0.6, respectively, P=0.01) and the total O2 consumption during the exercise (6.9±0.9 L and 11.3±2.1, respectively, P=0.01). This was accompanied by a higher EPOC magnitude (4.6±1.8 L vs 6.2±2.8, respectively, P=0.03) and a greater total O2 consumption throughout the session (exercise+recovery: 11.5±2.5 L vs 17.5±4.2, respectively, P=0.01). These results suggest that a single bout of supramaximal exercise performed with high CHO availability increases both exercise and post-exercise energy expenditure.

  3. High-CHO diet increases post-exercise oxygen consumption after a supramaximal exercise bout

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, G.A.; Bertuzzi, R.; De-Oliveira, F.R.; Pires, F.O.; Lima-Silva, A.E.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated if carbohydrate (CHO) availability could affect the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after a single supramaximal exercise bout. Five physically active men cycled at 115% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2 peak) until exhaustion with low or high pre-exercise CHO availability. The endogenous CHO stores were manipulated by performing a glycogen-depletion exercise protocol 48 h before the trial, followed by 48 h consuming either a low- (10% CHO) or a high-CHO (80% CHO) diet regime. Compared to the low-CHO diet, the high-CHO diet increased time to exhaustion (3.0±0.6 min vs 4.4±0.6, respectively, P=0.01) and the total O2 consumption during the exercise (6.9±0.9 L and 11.3±2.1, respectively, P=0.01). This was accompanied by a higher EPOC magnitude (4.6±1.8 L vs 6.2±2.8, respectively, P=0.03) and a greater total O2 consumption throughout the session (exercise+recovery: 11.5±2.5 L vs 17.5±4.2, respectively, P=0.01). These results suggest that a single bout of supramaximal exercise performed with high CHO availability increases both exercise and post-exercise energy expenditure. PMID:27783812

  4. Diet Soft Drink Consumption is Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome: A Two Sample Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina; Alkerwi, Ala’a; Elias, Merrrill

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analyses of soft drink intakes in samples from the United States and Europe, and assessed intakes in relation to prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components are currently lacking. We used data collected on cardiovascular health and dietary intakes in participants from two cross-sectional studies: the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS), conducted in Central New York, USA in 2001–2006 (n = 803), and the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg Study (ORISCAV-LUX), conducted in 2007–2009 (n = 1323). Odds ratios for MetS were estimated according to type and quantity of soft drink consumption, adjusting for demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors, in both studies. In both studies, individuals who consumed at least one soft drink per day had a higher prevalence of MetS, than non-consumers. This was most evident for consumers of diet soft drinks, consistent across both studies. Diet soft drink intakes were also positively associated with waist circumference and fasting plasma glucose in both studies. Despite quite different consumption patterns of diet versus regular soft drinks in the two studies, findings from both support the notion that diet soft drinks are associated with a higher prevalence of MetS. PMID:25984744

  5. Diet Soft Drink Consumption is Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome: A Two Sample Comparison.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Georgina; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Elias, Merrrill

    2015-05-13

    Comparative analyses of soft drink intakes in samples from the United States and Europe, and assessed intakes in relation to prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components are currently lacking. We used data collected on cardiovascular health and dietary intakes in participants from two cross-sectional studies: the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS), conducted in Central New York, USA in 2001-2006 (n = 803), and the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg Study (ORISCAV-LUX), conducted in 2007-2009 (n = 1323). Odds ratios for MetS were estimated according to type and quantity of soft drink consumption, adjusting for demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors, in both studies. In both studies, individuals who consumed at least one soft drink per day had a higher prevalence of MetS, than non-consumers. This was most evident for consumers of diet soft drinks, consistent across both studies. Diet soft drink intakes were also positively associated with waist circumference and fasting plasma glucose in both studies. Despite quite different consumption patterns of diet versus regular soft drinks in the two studies, findings from both support the notion that diet soft drinks are associated with a higher prevalence of MetS.

  6. The impact of maternal high-fat diet consumption on neural development and behavior of offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, E L; Nousen, E K; Chamlou, K A; Grove, K L

    2012-01-01

    Maternal diet and metabolic state are important factors in determining the environment experienced during perinatal development. Epidemiological studies and evidence from animal models provide evidence that a mother's diet and metabolic condition are important in programming the neural circuitry that regulates behavior, resulting in a persistent impact on the offspring's behavior. Potential mechanisms by which maternal diet and metabolic profile influence the perinatal environment include placental dysfunction and increases in circulating factors such as inflammatory cytokines, nutrients (glucose and fatty acids) and hormones (insulin and leptin). Maternal obesity and high-fat diet (HFD) consumption exposure during development have been observed to increase the risk of developing serious mental health and behavioral disorders including anxiety, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder. The increased risk of developing these behavioral disorders is postulated to be due to perturbations in the development of neural pathways that regulate behavior, including the serotonergic, dopaminergic and melanocortinergic systems. It is critical to examine the influence that a mother's nutrition and metabolic profile have on the developing offspring considering the current and alarmingly high prevalence of obesity and HFD consumption in pregnant women. PMID:26069734

  7. Diet quality and sleep quality among day and night shift nurses.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Deborah; Chang, Jen Jen; Kress, Kathleen; Mattfeldt-Beman, Mildred

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether night shift workers have a poorer diet quality and sleep quality when compared with day shift nurses. There is a dearth of research investigating the association between diet quality and sleep quality of day and night shift nurses. Data on nurses (n = 103) working either a day or night shift from two Midwestern hospitals were obtained from August 2015 to February 2016. The instruments used were the Diet History Questionnaire and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index. Independent samples t-tests were used to examine differences in diet and sleep quality by work shift schedule. There were no statistically significant differences between nurses working day or night shift and sleep quality (P = 0.0684), as well as diet quality (P = 0.6499). There was a significant difference between both body mass index (P = 0.0014) and exercise (P = 0.0020) with regard to diet quality. Body mass index and sleep quality were also significantly associated (P = 0.0032). Our study found no differences between day and night shift with regard to sleep and diet quality among nurses. Deliberate health initiatives and wellness programmes specifically targeting nurses are needed to increase knowledge about maintaining a healthy lifestyle while working as a nurse, whether it is day or night shift. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Nuts Improve Diet Quality Compared to Other Energy-Dense Snacks While Maintaining Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Siew Ling; Brown, Rachel; Gray, Andrew; Chisholm, Alexandra; Delahunty, Conor

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that regular nut consumption reduces cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and does not promote weight gain despite the fact that nuts are energy-dense. However, no studies have investigated the body composition of those regularly consuming nuts compared to similar intakes of other snacks of equal energy density. This parallel study (n = 118) examined the effects of providing daily portions (~1100 kJ/d) of hazelnuts, chocolate, or potato crisps compared to a control group receiving no snacks for twelve weeks. Effects on body weight and composition, blood lipids and lipoproteins, resting metabolic rate (RMR), appetite indices, and dietary quality were compared. At week 12, there was no significant difference in any of the outcome measurements between the groups except for dietary quality, which improved significantly in the nut group. Nuts can be incorporated into the diet without adversely affecting body weight and can improve diet quality. PMID:21845219

  9. Impacts of traditional food consumption advisories: Compliance, changes in diet and loss of confidence in traditional foods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Food consumption advisories are often posted when industrial activities are expected to affect the quality and availability of traditional foods used by First Nations. We were recently involved in a project and asked to summarize details regarding the impacts of traditional food consumption advisories with respect to compliance, broader changes in diet and loss of confidence in traditional foods by people. Methods Our review was not conducted as a formal systematic comprehensive review; rather, we focused on primary and grey literature presenting academic, health practitioner and First Nations viewpoints on the topic available from literature databases (i.e., PubMed, Web of KnowledgeSM) as well as the internet search engine Google. Some information came from personal communications. Results Our overview suggests that when communicated effectively and clearly, and when community members are involved in the process, consumption advisories can result in a decrease in contaminant load in people. On the other hand, consumption advisories can lead to cultural loss and have been linked to a certain amount of social, psychological, nutritional, economic and lifestyle disruption. In some cases, communities have decided to ignore consumption advisories opting to continue with traditional lifestyles believing that the benefits of doing so outweigh the risk of following advisories. Conclusions We identified that there are both positive and negative aspects to the issuance of traditional food consumption advisories. A number of variables need to be recognized during the development and implementation of advisories in order to ensure a balance between human health, maintenance of cultures and industrial activity. PMID:21651789

  10. Consumption of ultra-processed foods and their impact on the diet of young adults

    PubMed Central

    Bielemann, Renata M; Motta, Janaína V Santos; Minten, Gicele C; Horta, Bernardo L; Gigante, Denise P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the consumption of ultra-processed foods, its associated factors, and its influence on nutrient intake in young adults. METHODS In 2004-2005, the individuals belonging to the Pelotas birth cohort of 1982 were identified for a home interview. A total of 4,297 individuals were interviewed and 4,202 individuals were included in the study (follow-up rate of 77.4%). Diet was assessed using a questionnaire on dietary intake and the percentage of daily caloric intake attributed to ultra-processed foods as well as the intake of macro- and micronutrients were estimated. The association between cohort characteristics and the consumption of ultra-processed foods was assessed using linear regression. Analysis of variance and Pearson’s Chi-square test were used to evaluate the association between the quintiles of the consumption of ultra-processed food, nutrient intake and adequacy of nutrient intake, respectively. RESULTS The consumption of ultra-processed foods corresponded to 51.2% of the total caloric intake. The consumption of ultra-processed foods was higher among women, individuals with higher education, and individuals who were never poor and eutrophic. The increased consumption of ultra-processed foods was positively correlated with the consumption of fat, cholesterol, sodium, iron, calcium, and calories (p < 0.001) and was negatively correlated with the consumption of carbohydrates, protein, and dietary fiber (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The high consumption of ultra-processed foods and its positive correlation with the intake of sodium, cholesterol, and fats underscores the need to perform interventions aimed at decreasing the intake of this food group. PMID:26018785

  11. Consumption of ultra-processed foods and their impact on the diet of young adults.

    PubMed

    Bielemann, Renata M; Motta, Janaína V Santos; Minten, Gicele C; Horta, Bernardo L; Gigante, Denise P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the consumption of ultra-processed foods, its associated factors, and its influence on nutrient intake in young adults. METHODS In 2004-2005, the individuals belonging to the Pelotas birth cohort of 1982 were identified for a home interview. A total of 4,297 individuals were interviewed and 4,202 individuals were included in the study (follow-up rate of 77.4%). Diet was assessed using a questionnaire on dietary intake and the percentage of daily caloric intake attributed to ultra-processed foods as well as the intake of macro- and micronutrients were estimated. The association between cohort characteristics and the consumption of ultra-processed foods was assessed using linear regression. Analysis of variance and Pearson's Chi-square test were used to evaluate the association between the quintiles of the consumption of ultra-processed food, nutrient intake and adequacy of nutrient intake, respectively. RESULTS The consumption of ultra-processed foods corresponded to 51.2% of the total caloric intake. The consumption of ultra-processed foods was higher among women, individuals with higher education, and individuals who were never poor and eutrophic. The increased consumption of ultra-processed foods was positively correlated with the consumption of fat, cholesterol, sodium, iron, calcium, and calories (p < 0.001) and was negatively correlated with the consumption of carbohydrates, protein, and dietary fiber (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The high consumption of ultra-processed foods and its positive correlation with the intake of sodium, cholesterol, and fats underscores the need to perform interventions aimed at decreasing the intake of this food group.

  12. Nutrition knowledge, diet quality and hypertension in a working population.

    PubMed

    Geaney, F; Fitzgerald, S; Harrington, J M; Kelly, C; Greiner, B A; Perry, I J

    2015-01-01

    To examine if employees with higher nutrition knowledge have better diet quality and lower prevalence of hypertension. Cross-sectional baseline data were obtained from the complex workplace dietary intervention trial, the Food Choice at Work Study. Participants included 828 randomly selected employees (18-64 years) recruited from four multinational manufacturing workplaces in Ireland, 2013. A validated questionnaire assessed nutrition knowledge. Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ) measured diet quality from which a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) score was constructed. Standardised digital blood pressure monitors measured hypertension. Nutrition knowledge was positively associated with diet quality after adjustment for age, gender, health status, lifestyle and socio-demographic characteristics. The odds of having a high DASH score (better diet quality) were 6 times higher in the highest nutrition knowledge group compared to the lowest group (OR = 5.8, 95% CI 3.5 to 9.6). Employees in the highest nutrition knowledge group were 60% less likely to be hypertensive compared to the lowest group (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.87). However, multivariate analyses were not consistent with a mediation effect of the DASH score on the association between nutrition knowledge and blood pressure. Higher nutrition knowledge is associated with better diet quality and lower blood pressure but the inter-relationships between these variables are complex.

  13. Mushroom intake is associated with better nutrient intake and diet quality: 2001-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The association between mushroom consumption and nutrient intake or diet quality has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between these variables in a nationally representative sample of adults. Dietary intake was determined using a 24-hour recall on adult 1...

  14. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  15. [Quality of the diet of a population of young people of Guadalajara].

    PubMed

    Fernández Morales, I; Aguilar Vilas, M V; Mateos Vega, C J; Martínez Para, M C

    2009-01-01

    The population of Guadalajara traditionally has consumed a Mediterranean diet with the typical variations of the central zone of the peninsula, but the acquisition of erroneous habits of life they can be translated, specially in the young people, in a not healthful nourishing conducts. To evaluate the quality of the diet, by means of an index of healthy nourishment (IAS) and percentage of adhesion to the Mediterranean diet (% ADM), of a teen population (n = 467) and their relation with different physiological parameters and sociodemográficos. A nutritional study has been realized on the quality of the diet in a teen population of Guadalajara of 467 young people (12-17 years) by means of questionnaires of frequency of consumption of seven days. Likewise, there has determined the ingestion of nutrients and the index of healthy nourishment (IAS) using the program of nutrition DIAL(c). The results show that the average of the population takes a diet with an acceptable IAS (62.78), though with trend towards low qualities, with high ingestions of saturated fats (38.90 +/- 6.58 g), cholesterol (384.69 +/- 74.24 mg) and sodium (3,395.43 +/-729.57 mg). Respect to % MDA there has been obtained an average value of 42.86 +/- 15.52%. These values differ depending on the age (improves with the age), the sex (better quality of the diet consumed by the girls). Likewise, all the factors sociodemográficos and the way of life considered, they influence the quality indicators used.

  16. [Could the moderate consumption of beer be included within a healthy diet?].

    PubMed

    Marcos, A; López Díaz-Ufano, M; Pascual Fuster, V

    2015-05-01

    Beer is a beverage that has been usually included in our habitual diet from immemorial time. However, beer consumption depends on food habits and lifestyle in different populations. In Mediterranean countries, fermented beverages like beer, takes up a key space in the Mediterranean diet that has been declared in 2010 as Cultural Immaterial World Heritage by UNESCO. The positioning where the Spanish Society of Primary Care Medicine and the Beer and Health Information Centre have conjointly worked on has the following beer consumption-related aims: a) to update its knowledge based on the scientific evidence; b) to evaluate the possibility to include it within a healthy diet for healthy adults; c) to inform health professionals and the general population about its possible health benefits. A panel of experts, represented by clinicians and researchers in the field of nutrition held a meeting with the purpose to review the scientific literature related to the effects of the moderate consumption of fermented beverages, particularly beer, and to reach a consensus on the results, conclusions and recommendations suggested and established by other experts at an international level. The current scientific evidence reflects that moderate consumption of beer does not affect anthropometry related variables. Although energy supply from beer is very low, its nutrients and bioactive compound contents are interesting, since its potential antioxidant effect together with the fact that anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral effects have been demonstrated, as well as its beneficial effect on cardiovascular health, leading to a greater protection than even in the abstemious population. In view of the results obtained from the literature consulted by the expert panel, we can conclude that the moderate consumption of beer can be considered within a healthy diet. Nevertheless, the general recommendation is addressed only to healthy adults, never to children, adolescents or

  17. Growth, food consumption, and energy status of juvenile pallid sturgeon fed natural or artificial diets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Hilary A.; Chipps, Steven R.; Graeb, Brian D. S.; Klumb, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Stocking of hatchery-raised fish is an important part of the pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus recovery program. In the wild, juvenile pallid sturgeon consume primarily aquatic insects, although little is known about specific dietary needs. In hatchery settings, pallid sturgeon are fed commercial diets that are formulated for salmonids. To compare food consumption, growth, and energy status of pallid sturgeon fed artificial or natural diets, we conducted a laboratory study using 24 juvenile pallid sturgeon (initial fork length 153–236 mm). Pallid sturgeon were fed a daily ration of either commercial pellets (1 mm, slow sinking; 45% protein, 19% fat) or chironomid larvae for 5 wk. Natural-fed pallid sturgeon exhibited a greater specific growth rate (2.12% d−1) than pellet-fed fish (0.06% d−1). Similarly, relative condition was greater for natural-fed sturgeon (Kn = 1.11) than that observed for pellet-fed fish (Kn = 0.87). In contrast, the hepatosomatic index was significantly higher in pellet-fed fish (2.5%), indicating a high lipid diet compared with natural-fed sturgeon (1.4%). Given the importance of natural diets to fish digestion and growth, it is suggested that a more holistic approach be applied in the development of a practical diet for pallid sturgeon that incorporates attributes of natural prey.

  18. Socioeconomic and Cultural Correlates of Diet Quality in the Canadian Arctic: Results from the 2007-2008 Inuit Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Tracey; Johnson-Down, Louise; Egeland, Grace M

    2015-09-01

    We examined the impact of socioeconomic and cultural factors on dietary quality in adult Inuit living in the Canadian Arctic. Interviews and a 24-h dietary recall were administered to 805 men and 1292 women from Inuit regions in the Canadian Arctic. We examined the effect of age, sex, education, income, employment, and cultural variables on respondents' energy, macronutrient intake, sodium/potassium ratio, and healthy eating index. Logistic regression was used to assess the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) on diet quality indicators. Age was positively associated with traditional food (TF) consumption and greater energy from protein but negatively associated with total energy and fibre intake. Associations between SES and diet quality differed considerably between men and women and there was considerable regional variability in diet quality measures. Age and cultural variables were significant predictors of diet quality in logistic regression. Increased age and use of the Inuit language in the home were the most significant predictors of TF consumption. Our findings are consistent with studies reporting a nutrition transition in circumpolar Inuit. We found considerable variability in diet quality and complex interaction between SES and cultural variables producing mixed effects that differ by age and gender.

  19. Diet promotes sleep duration and quality.

    PubMed

    Peuhkuri, Katri; Sihvola, Nora; Korpela, Riitta

    2012-05-01

    Sleep, much like eating, is an essential part of life. The mechanisms of sleep are only partially clear and are the subject of intense research. There is increasing evidence showing that sleep has an influence on dietary choices. Both cross-sectional and epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that those who sleep less are more likely to consume energy-rich foods (such as fats or refined carbohydrates), to consume fewer portions of vegetables, and to have more irregular meal patterns. In this narrative review, we pose the opposite question: can ingested food affect sleep? The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence linking diet and sleep and to determine whether what we eat and what kind of nutrients we obtain from the food consumed before bedtime matter. In addition, scientific evidence behind traditional sleep-promoting foods such as milk and some herbal products is briefly described. These are reviewed using data from clinical trials, mostly in healthy subjects. In addition, we discuss the possible mechanisms behind these observations. Lastly, we summarize our findings that emerging evidence confirms a link between diet and sleep. Overall, foods impacting the availability of tryptophan, as well as the synthesis of serotonin and melatonin, may be the most helpful in promoting sleep. Although there are clear physiological connections behind these effects, the clinical relevance needs to be studied further. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Drinking Water Intake Is Associated with Higher Diet Quality among French Adults.

    PubMed

    Gazan, Rozenn; Sondey, Juliette; Maillot, Matthieu; Guelinckx, Isabelle; Lluch, Anne

    2016-10-31

    This study aimed to examine the association between drinking water intake and diet quality, and to analyse the adherence of French men and women to the European Food Safety Authority 2010 Adequate Intake (EFSA AI). A representative sample of French adults (≥18) from the Individual and National Survey on Food Consumption (INCA2) was classified, by sex, into small, medium, and large drinking water consumers. Diet quality was assessed with several nutritional indices (mean adequacy ratio (MAR), mean excess ratio (MER), probability of adequate intakes (PANDiet), and solid energy density (SED)). Of the total sample, 72% of men and 46% of women were below the EFSA AI. This percentage of non-adherence decreased from the small to the large drinking water consumers (from 95% to 34% in men and from 81% to 9% in women). For both sexes, drinking water intake was associated with higher diet quality (greater MAR and PANDiet). This association remained significant independently of socio-economic status for women only. Low drinking water consumers did not compensate with other sources (beverages and food moisture) and a high drinking water intake was not a guarantee for reaching the EFSA AI, meaning that increasing consumption of water should be encouraged in France.

  1. Drinking Water Intake Is Associated with Higher Diet Quality among French Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gazan, Rozenn; Sondey, Juliette; Maillot, Matthieu; Guelinckx, Isabelle; Lluch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between drinking water intake and diet quality, and to analyse the adherence of French men and women to the European Food Safety Authority 2010 Adequate Intake (EFSA AI). A representative sample of French adults (≥18) from the Individual and National Survey on Food Consumption (INCA2) was classified, by sex, into small, medium, and large drinking water consumers. Diet quality was assessed with several nutritional indices (mean adequacy ratio (MAR), mean excess ratio (MER), probability of adequate intakes (PANDiet), and solid energy density (SED)). Of the total sample, 72% of men and 46% of women were below the EFSA AI. This percentage of non-adherence decreased from the small to the large drinking water consumers (from 95% to 34% in men and from 81% to 9% in women). For both sexes, drinking water intake was associated with higher diet quality (greater MAR and PANDiet). This association remained significant independently of socio-economic status for women only. Low drinking water consumers did not compensate with other sources (beverages and food moisture) and a high drinking water intake was not a guarantee for reaching the EFSA AI, meaning that increasing consumption of water should be encouraged in France. PMID:27809236

  2. Diet quality and physical activity in relation to childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    An, Ruopeng

    2017-04-01

    Healthy lifestyles such as being physically active and eating a healthy diet help reduce the childhood obesity risk. However, population-level studies on the relationship between lifestyles and childhood obesity typically focus on either physical activity or diet but seldom both. This study examined physical activity and diet quality in relation to obesity in a nationally representative sample of U.S. children and adolescents. The study sample of 2818 children 6-17 years old came from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006 waves. A healthy eating index (HEI)-2010 was constructed based on two nonconsecutive 24-h dietary recalls. Participants at or above the 60th percentile of the HEI-2010 score were classified as consuming a healthy diet. Participants engaging in at least 60 min of moderate-vigorous physical activity daily measured by accelerometer were classified as being physically active. Adjusted average marginal effect of diet quality and physical activity on obesity was calculated based on estimates from logistic regressions. Compared with those consuming a healthy diet who are physically active, the estimated probabilities for overweight and obesity were 19.03 (95% confidence interval: 11.31, 26.74) and 15.84 (10.48, 21.21) percentage points higher among children consuming an unhealthy diet and who are physically inactive, 16.53 (7.58, 25.48) and 13.48 (5.68, 21.29) percentage points higher among children consuming a healthy diet but who are physically inactive and 3.22 (-3.43, 9.88) and 3.10 (-3.08, 9.29) percentage points higher among children consuming an unhealthy diet but physically active, respectively. Healthy habit formation at an early age is essential in obesity prevention.

  3. Effects of deoxynivalenol consumption on body weight and adiposity in the diet-induced obese mouse.

    PubMed

    Amuzie, C J; Flannery, B M; Ulrich, A M; Pestka, J J

    2011-01-01

    The potential for the obese state to alter sensitivity to toxic chemicals is poorly understood. In this study, dose-response effects of the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a common food-borne mycotoxin, were determined on body weight of diet-induced obese mice. In study 1, the effects of feeding adult female B6C3F1 mice a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal from fat) containing 0, 2, 5, or 10 ppm DON for 10 wk on body weight and adiposity were compared. Mice consuming 5 or 10 ppm DON exhibited a 15 and 24% decrease in weight gain and a 50 and 83% reduction in periuterine fat, respectively. In study 2, mice were fed HFD for 8 wk to induce obesity and the effects of consuming HFD + 0, 2, 5, or 10 ppm DON for 8 wk were then determined. Mice fed 5 or 10 ppm DON exhibited a 16 and 23% weight reduction and a 0 and 40% periuterine fat reduction, respectively. In a follow-up experiment, food consumption was measured prior to and after the transition from HFD to HFD + 10 ppm DON. Exposure to DON was found to lower HFD consumption within 1 d, with significant weight loss in DON-fed mice evident after 6 d. In both studies 1 and 2, consumption of 5 or 10 ppm DON diminished circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor acid-labile subunit. Taken together, DON consumption lowered weight gain and produced weight loss in diet-induced obese mice at higher thresholds than that observed previously in normal B6C3F1 mice.

  4. Early life adversity and/or posttraumatic stress disorder severity are associated with poor diet quality, including consumption of trans fatty acids, and fewer hours of resting or sleeping in a US middle-aged population: A cross-sectional and prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gavrieli, Anna; Farr, Olivia M; Davis, Cynthia R; Crowell, Judith A; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early life adversity (ELA) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are associated with poorer psychological and physical health. Potential underlying mechanisms and mediators remain to be elucidated, and the lifestyle habits and characteristics of individuals with ELA and/or PTSD have not been fully explored. We investigated whether the presence of ELA and/or PTSD are associated with nutrition, physical activity, resting and sleeping and smoking. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 151 males and females (age: 45.6±3.5 y, BMI: 30.0±7.1kg/m2) underwent anthropometric measurements, as well as detailed questionnaires for dietary assessment, physical activity, resting and sleeping, smoking habits and psychosocial assessments. A prospective follow-up visit of 49 individuals was performed 2.5 years later and the same outcomes were assessed. ELA and PTSD were evaluated as predictors, in addition to a variable assessing the combined presence/severity of ELA–PTSD. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance after adjusting for several socioeconomic, psychosocial and anthropometric characteristics. Results Individuals with higher ELA or PTSD severity were found to have a poorer diet quality (DASH score: p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively; aHEI-2010 score: ELA p=0.009), including further consumption of trans fatty acids (ELA p=0.003); the differences were significantly attenuated null after adjusting mainly for education or income and/or race. Further, individuals with higher ELA severity reported less hours of resting and sleeping (p=0.043) compared to those with zero/lower ELA severity, and the difference remained significant in the fully adjusted model indicating independence from potential confounders. When ELA and PTSD were combined, an additive effect was observed on resting and sleeping (p=0.001); results remained significant in the fully adjusted model. They also consumed more energy from trans fatty acids (p=0.017) tended to smoke more (p=0

  5. The impact of maternal consumption of cafeteria diet on reproductive function in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Silvana; Teixeira, Deborah S; Guilherme, Christiane; da Rocha, Cláudio F K; Aranda, Bruno C C; Reis, Adolfo R; de Souza, Marcelo A; Franci, Celso R; Sanvitto, Gilberto L

    2014-04-22

    Maternal obesity is a risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome and childhood obesity, and early overnutrition seems to induce the development of pathologies in adulthood, including insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a higher BMI. In addition, it is known that obesity can negatively affect fertility and reproductive function in men. The objective of this work was to investigate the impact of maternal obesity induced by the consumption of cafeteria diet on metabolic, endocrine and reproductive outcomes in the male offspring. Body weight, abdominal fat content and concentrations of insulin, leptin, glucose and total cholesterol were analyzed in dams. The same parameters were evaluated in pups when in adulthood, in addition to the analysis of sexual behavior, followed by measurement of plasma luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, and prolactin. Maternal consumption of cafeteria diet affected reproductive hormone regulation in the offspring and such modifications were reflected on sexual performance. Also, these modifications were independent of time and of the reproductive period during which dams consumed the diet. Our results indicate, for the first time, that maternal nutrition may have a deep impact on the reproductive function of the adult male offspring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Macronutrients, Diet Quality, and Frailty in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Lewis, Cora E.; Dam, Thuy-Tien L.; Shannon, Jackilen; Redden, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Frailty, a phenotype of multisystem impairment and expanding vulnerability, is associated with higher risk of adverse health outcomes not entirely explained by advancing age. We investigated associations of macronutrients, dietary fiber, and overall diet quality with frailty status in older community-dwelling men. Methods. Participants were 5,925 men aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study at six U.S. centers. Diet was assessed at baseline with a food frequency questionnaire. We assessed frailty status (robust, intermediate, or frail) at baseline and at a second clinic visit (a mean of 4.6 years later) using a slightly modified Cardiovascular Health Study frailty index. We used multinomial logistic regression to assess associations between macronutrient intake, dietary fiber, and the Diet Quality Index Revised with frailty status at baseline and at the second clinic visit. Results. At baseline, 2,748 (46.4%) participants were robust, 2,681 (45.2%) were intermediate, and 496 (8.4%) were frail. Carbohydrate, fat, protein, and dietary fiber showed no consistent associations with frailty status. Overall diet quality exhibited fairly consistent associations with frailty status. The Diet Quality Index Revised was inversely associated with frail status relative to robust status at the baseline visit (odds ratio for Q5 vs Q1 = 0.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.30, 0.63; p for trend < .0001) and at the second clinic visit (odds ratio for Q5 vs Q1 = 0.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.03, 0.97; p for trend = .0180). Conclusions. Overall diet quality was inversely associated with prevalent and future frailty status in this cohort of older men. PMID:24304504

  7. Gut to Brain Dysbiosis: Mechanisms Linking Western Diet Consumption, the Microbiome, and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Emily E.; Hsu, Ted M.; Kanoski, Scott E.

    2017-01-01

    Consumption of a Western Diet (WD) that is high in saturated fat and added sugars negatively impacts cognitive function, particularly mnemonic processes that rely on the integrity of the hippocampus. Emerging evidence suggests that the gut microbiome influences cognitive function via the gut-brain axis, and that WD factors significantly alter the proportions of commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Here we review mechanisms through which consuming a WD negatively impacts neurocognitive function, with a particular focus on recent evidence linking the gut microbiome with dietary- and metabolic-associated hippocampal impairment. We highlight evidence linking gut bacteria to altered intestinal permeability and blood brain barrier integrity, thus making the brain more vulnerable to the influx of deleterious substances from the circulation. WD consumption also increases production of endotoxin by commensal bacteria, which may promote neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction. Recent findings also show that diet-induced alterations in gut microbiota impair peripheral insulin sensitivity, which is associated with hippocampal neuronal derrangements and associated mnemonic deficits. In some cases treatment with specific probiotics or prebiotics can prevent or reverse some of the deleterious impact of WD consumption on neuropsychological outcomes, indicating that targeting the microbiome may be a successful strategy for combating dietary- and metabolic-associated cognitive impairment. PMID:28194099

  8. Impact of breakfast consumption on nutritional adequacy of the diets of young adults in Bogalusa, Louisiana: ethnic and gender contrasts.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, T A; Myers, L; Reger, C; Beech, B; Berenson, G S

    1998-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of breakfast consumption patterns on the nutritional adequacy of diets of young adults and determine possible ethnic and gender differences. Cross-sectional survey of young adults in Bogalusa, La. Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls were collected from October 1988 through October 1991 on 504 young adults (mean age=23 years, 58% women, 70% white). Analysis of variance and logistic regression techniques were used to investigate the relationship of breakfast consumption, ethnicity, and gender on dietary adequacy. The P values are from an analysis of variance model that adjusted for gender and ethnicity. Thirty-seven percent of young adults skipped breakfast. Of those who ate breakfast, 75% ate at home, 10% ate a fast-food breakfast, and 15% reported other sources. Mean energy intake from breakfast was 485 kcal; men consumed more energy than women (P<.001), and blacks consumed more energy than whites (P<.01). The breakfast meal provided an average of 13% of energy from protein, 55% from carbohydrate, 14% from sucrose, 34% from fat, and 12% from saturated fat. Whites consumed a breakfast higher in carbohydrate and sucrose than blacks, who consumed a breakfast higher in fat and saturated fat. Variations in breakfast foods consumed explained the racial differences in the nutrient composition of the breakfast meal. Young adults who skipped breakfast had lower total daily intakes of energy (P<.0001), protein per 1,000 kcal (P<.05), and saturated fat per 1,000 kcal (P<.01) than those who consumed breakfast. For all vitamins and minerals studied, a higher percentage of young adults who skipped breakfast did not meet two thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowance than those who consumed a breakfast. Encouraging consumption of breakfast, along with selection of more healthful breakfast food choices or snacks that are culturally appropriate, may be important strategies for improving the nutritional quality of young adults' diets.

  9. Diet drink consumption and the risk of cardiovascular events: a report from the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ankur; Rubenstein, Linda; Robinson, Jennifer; Seguin, Rebecca A; Vitolins, Mara Z; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Shikany, James M; Johnson, Karen C; Snetselaar, Linda; Wallace, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Data are limited regarding the influence of diet drink consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between diet drink intake and cardiovascular events. We conducted a retrospective cohort study, utilizing data from the national, multicenter Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI OS), recruiting subjects from 1993 to 1998. Post-menopausal women with available diet drink intake data, without pre-existing CVD and who survived ≥ 60 days were included in the study. A composite of incident coronary heart disease, heart failure, myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization procedure, ischemic stroke, peripheral arterial disease and CVD death was used as the primary outcome. CVD death and all-cause mortality were secondary outcomes. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare primary and secondary outcomes across diet drink intake strata. In all, 59,614 women, mean age 62.8 years, were included for analysis. In unadjusted analysis over a follow-up of 8.7 ± 2.7 years, the primary outcome occurred in 8.5 % of the women consuming ≥ 2 diet drinks/day, compared to 6.9 %, 6.8 % and 7.2 % in the 5-7/week, 1-4/week and 0-3/month groups, respectively. After controlling for other CVD risk factors, women who consumed ≥ 2 drinks/day had a higher adjusted risk of CVD events (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.1-1.5), CVD mortality (HR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.03-2.3) and overall mortality (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.04-1.5) compared to the reference group (0-3 drinks/month). This analysis demonstrates an association between high diet drink intake and CVD outcomes and mortality in post-menopausal women in the WHI OS.

  10. Economic benefits of the Mediterranean-style diet consumption in Canada and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mohammad M.H.; Jones, Jason P.H.; Jones, Peter J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) is an established healthy-eating behavior that has consistently been shown to favorably impact cardiovascular health, thus likely improving quality of life and reducing costs associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Data on the economic benefits of MedDiet intakes are, however, scarce. Objective The objective of this study was to estimate the annual healthcare and societal cost savings that would accrue to the Canadian and American public, independently, as a result of a reduction in the incidence of CVD following adherence to a MedDiet. Design A variation in cost-of-illness analysis entailing three stages of estimations was developed to 1) identify the proportion of individuals who are likely to adopt a MedDiet in North America, 2) assess the impact of the MedDiet intake on CVD incidence reduction, and 3) impute the potential savings in costs associated with healthcare and productivity following the estimated CVD reduction. To account for the uncertainty factor, a sensitivity analysis of four scenarios, including ideal, optimistic, pessimistic, and very-pessimistic assumptions, was implemented within each of these stages. Results Significant improvements in CVD-related costs were evident with varying MedDiet adoption and CVD reduction rates. Specifically, CAD $41.9 million to 2.5 billion in Canada and US $1.0–62.8 billion in the United States were estimated to accrue as total annual savings in economic costs, given the ‘very-pessimistic’ through ‘ideal’ scenarios. Conclusions Closer adherence to dietary behaviors that are consistent with the principles of the MedDiet is expected to contribute to a reduction in the monetary burdens of CVD in Canada, the United States, and possibly other parts of the world. PMID:26111965

  11. Sugar-sweetened beverage but not diet soda consumption is positively associated with progression of insulin resistance and prediabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Previous studies have shown an inconsistent relationship between habitual beverage consumption and insulin resistance and prediabetes. Objective: The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), rather than diet soda,...

  12. Yogurt Consumption as a Signature of a Healthy Diet and Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Angelo; Panahi, Shirin

    2017-07-01

    Yogurt is considered to be a nutrient-dense food that significantly contributes to the intake of several nutrients, including calcium and protein. As described in this paper, yogurt consumers have a higher nutrient intake than do nonconsumers. Yogurt consumers are also characterized by healthier dietary habits than nonconsumers, which partly explains their reduced incidence of overweight and obesity. Recent studies also suggest that yogurt consumers exhibit healthier nonnutritional behaviors, such as reduced smoking and greater participation in physical activity, than do nonconsumers. Furthermore, when greenhouse gas emissions are used as an additional criterion to categorize foods, yogurt appears to be an eco-friendly food. Compared with that of other foods, the carbon footprint of yogurt production is low to moderate and may be included as part of a healthy and sustainable diet. Based on these factors, yogurt consumption may be the signature of a healthy diet and lifestyle. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Associations between diet quality, health status and diabetic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes and comorbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Mangou, Apostolis; Grammatikopoulou, Maria G; Mirkopoulou, Daphne; Sailer, Nikolaos; Kotzamanidis, Charalambos; Tsigga, Maria

    2012-02-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) demonstrate low dietary adherence and this is further aggravated with comorbid obesity. The aim of the present study was to assess diet quality in patients with T2DM and comorbid obesity compared to patients with T2DM alone and to examine the associations between comorbidities and diet quality. The sample consisted of 59 adult patients with diabesity (T2DM and comorbid obesity) and 94 patients with T2DM alone. All diabetes comorbidities and complications were recorded and diet quality was assessed with the Healthy Eating Index (HEI). Mean raw HEI of the diabese subjects was 81.9±7.1 and the diabetic subjects was 80.2±6.9. When HEI was adjusted to the sex, age and weight status, the diabese demonstrated a higher HEI. Among comorbidities, only renal disease decreased HEI. According to the principal component analysis of the total sample, adequate diet quality was explained by cardiovascular disease, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, peptic ulcer, sex, diabesity and diabetic foot syndrome. In the diabese, adequate HEI was explained by diabetic foot syndrome, smoking, drinking alcohol and having a family history of diabetes. Adult patients with T2DM demonstrate adequate diet quality. Different factors are associated with the adoption of a high quality diet between the diabese and the T2DM alone. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. [Improving diet quality in children through a new nutritional education programme: INFADIMED].

    PubMed

    Bibiloni, Maria Del Mar; Fernández-Blanco, Jordi; Pujol-Plana, Noemí; Martín-Galindo, Núria; Fernández-Vallejo, Maria Mercè; Roca-Domingo, Mariona; Chamorro-Medina, Juan; Tur, Josep A

    2017-04-11

    To assess the results of a nutritional education programme developed by using available local resources to improve diet quality and decrease overweight and obesity prevalence among children. A longitudinal intervention study by means of nutritional education (INFADIMED) in children (aged 3-7 years) from Vilafranca del Penedès (Barcelona, Spain), recruited from preschool centres and primary schools, with an intervention or INFADIMED group (n=319; 50.2% female) and a control group (n=880; 49.8% female). Weight, height and body mass index were measured in both groups at the beginning and at the end of the programme. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was also assessed using the KIDMED test. Consumption of fruit or juices, vegetables, yogurt and/or cheese, pasta or rice, and nuts increased, while skipping breakfast, consumption of bakery products for breakfast, and/or consumption of sweets several times per day decreased in the INFADIMED group. INFADIMED also changed, from the beginning to the end of the study, the adherence to a Mediterranean diet: high (39.2% to 70.5%), acceptable (49.2% to 28.2%), and low (11.6% to 1.3%). Approximately 2.6% of the participants in the control group and 11.3% of the participants in the INFADIMED group who were overweight and obese changed to normal weight (odds ratio: 4.08; 95% confidence interval: 2.37-7.04). INFADIMED is a nutritional education programme with benefits on both diet quality and overweight and obesity prevalence among children. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Habitual yogurt consumption and health-related quality of life: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Garcia, Esther; Leon-Muñoz, Luz; Guallar-Castillon, Pilar; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is a global indicator of perceived health status, which includes physical and mental domains. Several biological mechanisms might support an association between consumption of yogurt and better HRQL. Our aim was to assess the association between habitual yogurt consumption and HRQL in the general adult population. We conducted a prospective study with 4,445 individuals aged 18 years and older who were recruited in 2008 to 2010 and were followed up to 2012. Habitual yogurt consumption was assessed at baseline with a validated diet history. HRQL was measured with the Physical Composite Summary and the Mental Composite Summary of the Spanish version of the SF-12 Health Survey. The analysis of the association between baseline yogurt consumption and HRQL at 2012 was performed with linear regression and adjusted for the main confounders, including baseline HRQL. Mean follow-up was 3.5 years (standard deviation=0.6 years). Compared with nonconsumers of yogurt, the Physical Composite Summary scores were similar in habitual consumers of ≤6 servings/week (β=.40; P=0.20) and in consumers of ≥1 serving/day (β=.25; P=0.45). A suggestion of tendency toward a lower Mental Composite Summary score was found among daily yogurt consumers (β=-.65; P=0.09; P for trend across categories=0.07). Results were similar among individuals without morbidity, never smokers, and individuals with higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Habitual yogurt consumption did not show an association with improved HRQL. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diet, Alcohol Consumption and Cognitive Disorders in Central Africa: A Study from the EPIDEMCA Program.

    PubMed

    Pilleron, S; Desport, J-C; Jésus, P; Mbelesso, P; Ndamba-Bandzouzi, B; Dartigues, J-F; Clément, J-P; Preux, P-M; Guerchet, M

    2015-06-01

    Western research into dementia has focused on finding effective means of prevention, particularly through nutrition. To date, however, little is known about the relationship between diet and cognitive disorders in Africa, where the number of people with dementia is expected to increase most over the coming decades. The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between diet and alcohol intake and cognitive disorders among elderly people in Central Africa. Between 2011 and 2012, a cross-sectional multicentre population-based study was carried out in rural and urban areas of the Central African Republic (CAR) and the Republic of Congo (ROC). Participants aged ≥65 years were interviewed using the Community Screening Interview for Dementia (CSI-D). Elderly people who performed poorly (COGSCORE≤24.5/30) were clinically assessed by neurologists and underwent further psychometric testing. DSM-IV and Petersen criteria were required for a diagnosis of dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), respectively. A food frequency questionnaire assessed the intakes of dairy products, fruit, vegetables, starches, legumes, oleaginous foods, meat or fish, eggs and sweet foods over the previous three days. We also collected data on alcohol intake. Sociodemographic, vascular, and psychological factors were documented. Multivariate multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations. In fully adjusted models, a lower consumption of oleaginous foods was associated with MCI (OR=3.7 [1.4-9.9]) and dementia (OR=2.8 [1.0-7.7]) in a rural area of CAR. Alcohol consumption was associated with reduced probability of dementia in CAR (OR=0.3 [0.1-0.8]). In ROC, food groups and alcohol intake were not associated with MCI or dementia. In conclusion, our study provides new data about the association between diet and cognitive disorders in Africa. Further studies should investigate the relationship between diet and cognitive disorders at the level of

  17. Impact of meat consumption on nutritional quality and cardiovascular risk factors in young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, T A; Farris, R P; Myers, L; Berenson, G S

    1995-08-01

    To document the contribution of meat consumption to the overall nutritional quality of the diet and assess its impact on cardiovascular risk factors in young adults. A cross-sectional survey of young adults in Bogalusa, La. We collected 24-hour dietary recalls from 504 19- to 28-year-olds from 1988 through 1991. We examined dietary composition by meat consumption quartiles. Analysis of variance and Newman-Keuls range tests were performed. Young adults consume an average of 6.5 oz meat daily; whites most often consumed beef and blacks most often consumed pork and poultry. Persons in the < 25th percentile for meat consumption consumed a diet closest to recommended levels--with 11% of energy from protein, 55% from carbohydrate, 32% from fat, 11% from saturated fatty acids, and 264 mg dietary cholesterol. In contrast, persons in the > 75th percentile for meat consumption consumed a diet with 18% of energy from protein, 40% from carbohydrate, 41% from fat, 13% from saturated fatty acids, and 372 mg dietary cholesterol. Intakes of heme iron and phosphorus were lower and calcium intake higher in persons in the < 25th percentile compared with those in the > 75th percentile for meat consumption. The percent of persons meeting two thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowances for vitamin B-12, niacin, and zinc was greater in the > 75th percentile for meat consumption compared with the < 25th percentile for meat consumption. We noted no differences across meat consumption quartiles in blood lipids and lipoproteins, anthropometric measurements, and hemoglobin levels. Consumption of moderate amounts of lean meat, along with healthier choices in other food groups, may be necessary to meet the current dietary recommendations.

  18. Consumption of barley beta-glucan ameliorates fatty liver and insulin resistance in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joo Sun; Kim, Hyunsook; Jung, Myeong Ho; Hong, Shinhee; Song, Jihyun

    2010-07-01

    Consumption of a diet high in barley beta-glucan (BG) has been shown to prevent insulin resistance. To investigate the mechanism for the effects of barley BG, three groups of male 7-wk-old C57BL/6J mice were fed high-fat diets containing 0, 2, or 4% of barley BG for 12 wk. The 2% BG and 4% BG groups had significantly lower body weights compared with the 0% BG group. The 4% BG group demonstrated improved glucose tolerance and lower levels of insulin-resistance index and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide. Consumption of the BG diet decreased hepatic lipid content. Mice on the BG diet also demonstrated decreased fatty acid synthase and increased cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene expression levels. The BG diet promoted hepatic insulin signaling by decreasing serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 and activating Akt, and it decreased mRNA levels of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. In summary, consumption of BG reduced weight gain, decreased hepatic lipid accumulation, and improved insulin sensitivity in mice fed a high-fat diet. Insulin signaling enhanced due to the expression changes of glucose and lipid metabolism genes by BG consumption. Consumption of barley BG could be an effective strategy for preventing obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome.

  19. Food consumption patterns in a mediterranean region: does the mediterranean diet still exist?

    PubMed

    Tur, Josep A; Romaguera, Dora; Pons, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    To assess the food consumption patterns in the adult population of a Mediterranean region: the Balearic Islands (BI). A cross-sectional nutritional survey was carried out in the BI between 1999 and 2000. A random sample (n = 1,200) of the adult population (16-65 years) was interviewed. Dietary habits were assessed by means of 24-hour recall during 2 non-consecutive days, the first in the warm season and the second in the cold season, and a quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements were also obtained. Current food patterns in the BI are characterized by a prominent consumption of dairy products, vegetables, fruit, bread, soft drinks and meat. According to the dietary guidelines for the Spanish population, only appropriate consumption of olive oil and other fats, dairy products, nuts, and soft drinks have been achieved. Intakes of fruit, vegetables, fish, eggs, pulses, cereals and potatoes are below desirable levels. On the other side, intakes of sugary products, sweets and cakes are higher than desirable. Alcohol intake, in the context of the Mediterranean diet, can be considered as acceptable. The dietary patterns observed among the BI population are in harmony with the actual dietary trends in Spain and other Mediterranean countries. Mediterranean dietary habits still exist, but a progressive departure from the traditional Mediterranean diet is being observed mainly in younger generations. It would be desirable to increase the consumption of fish, vegetables, fruit, cereals and pulses and decrease the intake of food sources containing saturated fat. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Sports drink consumption and diet of children involved in organized sport

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Organized sport provides one option for children to be physically active. However, there is a paucity of information about the relationship between children’s participation in organized sport and their diet, and specifically their sports drink consumption. Therefore, the relationship between sports participation in children and the consumption of sports drinks, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and other components of diet was examined. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using baseline data from the Action Schools! BC Dissemination study cohort (n = 1421; 9.90 (0.58) y; 736 girls, 685 boys). The differences between the dietary behaviours of children participating in organized sport (sport) versus those that did not participate (non-sport) was examined. A modified Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C) was used to measure physical activity levels and participation in organized sport. A Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and 24-hour dietary recall were used to assess eating behaviour and macronutrient intake (including protein, fat, and carbohydrate as well as sugar, fibre and total calories). Fruit, vegetable and beverage quantities were hand-tallied from the dietary recall. Fruit, vegetable and beverage frequency was assessed using the FFQ. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to analyse differences between groups and a chi-square test of association was use to determine if participation in sport was significantly associated with the proportion of children consuming sports drinks and SSBs, and with gender. Results Children involved in sport had a lower body mass index (BMI) and were more physically active than children in the non-sport group (p < 0.01). Only a small number (n = 20/1421) of children consumed sports drinks and no difference in consumption of sports drink between sport and non-sport participants (p > .05) was observed. However, children involved in organized sport consumed more

  1. Sports drink consumption and diet of children involved in organized sport.

    PubMed

    Tomlin, Dona L; Clarke, Shannon K; Day, Meghan; McKay, Heather A; Naylor, Patti-Jean

    2013-08-19

    Organized sport provides one option for children to be physically active. However, there is a paucity of information about the relationship between children's participation in organized sport and their diet, and specifically their sports drink consumption. Therefore, the relationship between sports participation in children and the consumption of sports drinks, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and other components of diet was examined. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using baseline data from the Action Schools! BC Dissemination study cohort (n = 1421; 9.90 (0.58) y; 736 girls, 685 boys). The differences between the dietary behaviours of children participating in organized sport (sport) versus those that did not participate (non-sport) was examined. A modified Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C) was used to measure physical activity levels and participation in organized sport. A Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and 24-hour dietary recall were used to assess eating behaviour and macronutrient intake (including protein, fat, and carbohydrate as well as sugar, fibre and total calories). Fruit, vegetable and beverage quantities were hand-tallied from the dietary recall. Fruit, vegetable and beverage frequency was assessed using the FFQ. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to analyse differences between groups and a chi-square test of association was use to determine if participation in sport was significantly associated with the proportion of children consuming sports drinks and SSBs, and with gender. Children involved in sport had a lower body mass index (BMI) and were more physically active than children in the non-sport group (p < 0.01). Only a small number (n = 20/1421) of children consumed sports drinks and no difference in consumption of sports drink between sport and non-sport participants (p > .05) was observed. However, children involved in organized sport consumed more total calories, fat, fibre

  2. Diet quality affects bait performance in German cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Ko, Alexander E; Schal, Coby; Silverman, Jules

    2016-10-01

    Bait formulations are widely used to control German cockroach (Blattella germanica) populations. To perform optimally, these formulations must compete favorably with non-toxic alternative foods present within the insect's habitat. We hypothesized that the nutritional history of cockroaches and their acceptance or avoidance of glucose would affect their food preference and thus bait efficacy. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a controlled laboratory experiment, first providing glucose-accepting and glucose-averse cockroaches nutritionally defined diets and then offering them identical diets containing the insecticide hydramethylnon as a bait proxy to evaluate the effect of diets of differing macronutrient composition on bait performance. The interaction between diet composition and bait composition affected the survival of adult males as well as first-instar nymphs exposed to excretions produced by these males. Survival analyses indicated different responses of glucose-averse and glucose-accepting insects, but generally any combination of diet and bait that resulted in high diet intake and low bait intake reduced secondary kill. This study represents a comprehensive examination of the effect of alternative foods on bait efficacy. We suggest that disparities between the nutritional quality of baits and the foods that are naturally available could profoundly impact the management of German cockroach infestations. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Gluten-Free Diet Indications, Safety, Quality, Labels, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Kamran; Bold, Justine; Parr, Alison; Johnson, Matt W.

    2017-01-01

    A gluten-free diet (GFD) is the safest treatment modality in patient with coeliac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders. Contamination and diet compliance are important factors behind persistent symptoms in patients with gluten related-disorders, in particular CD. How much gluten can be tolerated, how safe are the current gluten-free (GF) products, what are the benefits and side effects of GFD? Recent studies published in Nutrients on gluten-free products’ quality, availability, safety, as well as challenges related to a GFD are discussed. PMID:28786929

  4. Gluten-Free Diet Indications, Safety, Quality, Labels, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Kamran; Bold, Justine; Parr, Alison; Johnson, Matt W

    2017-08-08

    A gluten-free diet (GFD) is the safest treatment modality in patient with coeliac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders. Contamination and diet compliance are important factors behind persistent symptoms in patients with gluten related-disorders, in particular CD. How much gluten can be tolerated, how safe are the current gluten-free (GF) products, what are the benefits and side effects of GFD? Recent studies published in Nutrients on gluten-free products' quality, availability, safety, as well as challenges related to a GFD are discussed.

  5. [Quality of carbohydrates in the diet and their effect on metabolic control of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Pincheira, Daniela; Morgado, Romina; Alviña, Marcela; Vega, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the parameters of metabolic control and quality of carbohydrates (CHO) of the diet in individuals with type 2 diabetes, controlled with diet and/or Metformin. In 108 men and women aged between 18 and 60 years, glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c) between 6% and 10%, without sulfonylureas or insulin theraphy; were examined through two separate surveys of 24-hour recall. The CHO intake, GI, GL of diet was analyzed. Values of HbA1c were collected from medical records. Data was tabulated in SPSS version 17 software. The Pearson correlation test was used to analyze the degree of association between variables, considering significant at p < 0.05. The mean HbA1c was 7.3 ± 1.3%, CHO consumption was 219.8 ± 27.0 g/day; GI was 74.9 ± 11.3% and GL was 164.0 ± 22.04 g. A significant positive correlation was found out between the CHO intake (r = 0.290, P < 0.05), GI (r = 0.70, p < 0.001), GL (r = 0.225, p < 0.05) of diet and HbA1c levels in the individuals. In conclusion the study showed that the quality of CHO, mainly GI, are strongly associated with metabolic control of DM 2.

  6. Diet Quality and Risk of Melanoma in an Italian Population.

    PubMed

    Malagoli, Carlotta; Malavolti, Marcella; Agnoli, Claudia; Crespi, Catherine M; Fiorentini, Chiara; Farnetani, Francesca; Longo, Caterina; Ricci, Cinzia; Albertini, Giuseppe; Lanzoni, Anna; Veneziano, Leonardo; Virgili, Annarosa; Pagliarello, Calogero; Santini, Marcello; Fanti, Pier Alessandro; Dika, Emi; Sieri, Sabina; Krogh, Vittorio; Pellacani, Giovanni; Vinceti, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Some results from laboratory and epidemiologic studies suggest that diet may influence the risk of melanoma, but convincing evidence for a role of single nutrients or food items is lacking. Diet quality, which considers the combined effect of multiple food items, may be superior for examining this relation. We sought to assess whether diet quality, evaluated with the use of 4 different dietary indexes, is associated with melanoma risk. In this population-based case-control study, we analyzed the relation between 4 diet quality indexes, the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) index, Greek Mediterranean Index (GMI), and Italian Mediterranean Index (IMI), and melanoma risk in a northern Italian community, with the use of data from 380 cases and 719 matched controls who completed a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. In the overall sample, we found an inverse association between disease risk and the HEI-2010 and DASH index, but not the Mediterranean indexes, adjusting for potential confounders (skin phototype, body mass index, energy intake, sunburn history, skin sun reaction, and education). However, in sex stratified analyses, the association appeared only in women (P-trend: 0.10 and 0.04 for the HEI-2010 and DASH index, respectively). The inverse relations were stronger in women younger than age 50 y than in older women, for whom the GMI and IMI scores also showed an inverse association with disease risk (P-trend: 0.05 and 0.02, respectively). These results suggest that diet quality may play a role in cutaneous melanoma etiology among women. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Snacking is associated with overall diet quality among adults.

    PubMed

    Zizza, Claire A; Xu, Beibei

    2012-02-01

    Snacking occasions are considered to contribute little more than energy to the diet; however, few studies have examined the role of snacking on overall diet quality. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between snacking frequency and overall diet quality. This study included 11,209 adults aged 20 years and older who participated in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Twenty-four-hour dietary recall data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 were used to assess snacking frequency and diet quality. Diet quality was assessed with the US Department of Agriculture's Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005). To adjust for confounding variables, multiple linear regression models were used to estimate the association between snacking frequency and HEI-2005 score, whereas the relationship between snacking frequency and HEI-2005 component scores were examined with Tobit regression models. Contrary to expectation, snacking was modestly associated (P<0.001) with higher total HEI-2005 scores (49.3±0.5, 49.9±0.3, 50.9±0.3, 51.9±0.4, and 51.6±0.6 for snacking zero, one, two, three, and four or more times per day, respectively). Total fruit (P<0.001), whole fruit (P<0.001), whole grains (P<0.001), milk (P<0.001), oils (P<0.001), and sodium (P<0.001) component scores were positively associated with snacking frequency. Inverse associations between snacking frequency and total vegetables (P=0.009); meat and beans (P=0.045); and the energy from solid fat, alcohol, and added sugars (P=0.007) components were observed. Although the magnitude of the association between snacking and overall diet quality was modest, snacking was associated with a more nutrient-dense diet. Focusing on the contribution snacking may have on single nutrient intakes may overlook its total nutritional impact.

  8. Growth, condition, diet, and consumption rates of northern pike in three Arizona reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flinders, J.M.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius L.) introductions are controversial in the western United States due to suspected impacts they might have on established sport fisheries and potential illegal introductions. Tbree Arizona reservoirs, Parker Canyon Lake, Upper Lake Mary and Long Lake were sampled to examine the diet, consumption dynamics, and growth of northern pike. Northern pike diets varied by season and reservoir. In Parker Canyon Lake, diets were dominated by rainbow trout in winter and spring and bluegill and green sunfish in the fall. In Long Lake the northern pike ate crayfish in spring and early summer and switched to young of the year common carp in summer and fall. Black crappie, golden shiners, and crayfish were the major prey in Upper Lake Mary during spring, but they switched to stocked rainbow trout in the fall. Northern pike growth was in the high range of growth reported throughout the United States. Estimated northern pike specific consumption rate (scr) of rainbow trout (g/g/d ?? 10-6) was greatest in Upper Lake Mary (scr = 329.1 ?? 23.7 g/g/d ?? 10-6) where stocked fingerling (280 mm TL) rainbow trout stocked in Long Lake (scr = 1.4 ?? 0.1 g/g/d ?? 10-6) and Parker Canyon Lake (scr = 287.2 ?? 15.1 g/g/d ?? 10-6) where catchable-sized rainbow trout were stocked. Managers should consider the cost-benefits of stocking fish >200 mm TL in lakes containing northern pike. ?? Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008.

  9. Gastric bypass increases ethanol and water consumption in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Subrize, Mike; Delis, Foteini; Cooney, Robert N; Culnan, Derek; Sun, Mingjie; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Hajnal, Andras

    2012-12-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is an effective treatment for morbid obesity. Increased alcohol abuse after RYGB resulted in recommendations to exclude patients with alcohol abuse histories from RYGB. The purpose of our study was to examine the effects of a RYGB on ethanol intake in diet-induced obese rats (high-fat diet). The animals underwent RYGB and were habituated along with their sham-operated obese controls and with lean rats to increasing concentrations of ethanol in a two-bottle choice paradigm. RYGB rats' daily consumption of ethanol averaged 2 g/kg at 2% habituation and 3.8 g/kg at 4% habituation, twice as much as sham-operated obese controls and 50% more than normal-diet lean controls. Obese controls drank on average 1 g/kg of ethanol (2 and 4%), significantly less (50%) than lean controls did. RYGB rats when given higher ethanol concentrations (6 and 8%) or no ethanol drank significantly more water than lean and obese controls did (66 and 100%, respectively), and their enhanced total fluid intake was associated with increased food intake, which was significantly higher than in lean (66% more calories; food + alcohol) and obese controls (44% more calories). The lower alcohol intake in the obese controls than in the lean rats suggests that obesity may interfere with alcohol's rewarding effects and RYGB may remove this protective effect. The overall enhancement of consummatory behaviors (both ethanol and water) suggests that RYGB may facilitate alcohol consumption, which in vulnerable individuals could lead to abuse and addiction.

  10. [Sanitary quality of water supply for human consumption in Campeche].

    PubMed

    Isaac-Márquez, A P; Lezama-Dávila, C M; Ku-Pech, P P; Tamay-Segovia, P

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents data of a study undertaken to know the sanitary features of water supply (deep pools) for human consumption in the city of Campeche, Mexico. Levels of intestinal bacteria (total and fecal coliforms) were monitored, as well as heterotrophic plate counts and the surroundings of each deep pool were inspected. Each water supply was monitored three times from January to July, 1993 and presented unacceptable levels of heterotrophic plate counts and coliforms which is a strong evidence of fecal contamination of animal or human origin. These findings are a clear indication of unacceptable contamination of water supply for human consumption which requires an improvement and systematic inspection in order to provide good quality water to the population of Campeche.

  11. Diet quality and adherence to a healthy diet in Japanese male workers with untreated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kanauchi, Masao; Kanauchi, Kimiko

    2015-07-10

    As Japanese societies rapidly undergo westernisation, the prevalence of hypertension is increasing. We investigated the association between dietary quality and the prevalence of untreated hypertension in Japanese male workers. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 433 male workers who completed a brief food frequency questionnaire. Adherence to the WHO-based Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI), the American Heart Association 2006 Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, and Mediterranean-style diet was assessed using four adherence indexes (HDI score, AI-84 score, DASH score and MED score). Hypertension classes were classified into three categories: non-hypertension, untreated hypertension and treated hypertension (ie, taking antihypertensive medication). The prevalence of untreated hypertension and treated hypertension was 22.4% and 8.5%, respectively. Patients with untreated hypertension had significantly lower HDI and AI-84 scores compared with non-hypertension. DASH and MED scores across the three hypertension classes were comparable. After adjusting for age, energy intake, smoking habit, alcohol drinking, physical activity and salt intake, a low adherence to HDI and a lowest quartile of AI-84 score were associated with a significantly higher prevalence of untreated hypertension, with an OR of 3.33 (95% CI 1.39 to 7.94, p=0.007) and 2.23 (1.09 to 4.53, p=0.027), respectively. A lower dietary quality was associated with increased prevalence of untreated hypertension in Japanese male workers. Our findings support a potential beneficial impact of nutritional assessment using diet qualities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Assessing dietary quality of older Chinese people using the Chinese Diet Balance Index (DBI).

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyue; Hall, John; Byles, Julie; Shi, Zumin

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have applied the Chinese Diet Balance Index (DBI) in evaluating dietary quality for Chinese people. The present cross-sectional study assessed dietary quality based on DBI for older people, and the associated factors, in four socioeconomically distinct regions in China. The China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) involves 2745 older Chinese people, aged 60 or over, from four regions (Northeast, East Coast, Central and West) in 2009. Dietary data were obtained by interviews using 24 hour-recall over three consecutive days. Four indicators: Total Score (TS), Lower Bound Score (LBS), Higher Bound Score (HBS) and Diet Quality Distance (DQD) from DBI were calculated for assessing dietary quality in different aspects. 68.9% of older people had different levels of excessive cereals intake. More than 50% of older people had moderate or severe surplus of oil (64.9%) and salt (58.6%). Intake of vegetables and fruit, milk and soybeans, water, and dietary variety were insufficient, especially for milk and soybeans. 80.8% of people had moderate or severe unbalanced diet consumption. The largest differences of DQD scores have been found for people with different education levels and urbanicity levels. People with higher education levels have lower DQD scores (p<0.001), and people living in medium and low urbanicity areas had 2.8 and 8.9 higher DQD scores than their high urbanicity counterparts (p<0.001). Also, significant differences of DQD scores have been found according to gender, marital status, work status and regions (p<0.001). DBI can reveal problems of dietary quality for older Chinese people. Rectifying unbalanced diet intake may lead to prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Dieticians and health care professionals need to increase dissemination and uptake of nutrition education, with interventions targeted at regions of lower socioeconomic status.

  13. Consumption of a Western-style diet during pregnancy impairs offspring islet vascularization in a Japanese macaque model.

    PubMed

    Pound, Lynley D; Comstock, Sarah M; Grove, Kevin L

    2014-07-01

    Children exposed to a maternal Western-style diet in utero have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms and an investigation of possible interventions are critical to reversing this phenomenon. We examined the impact of maternal Western-style diet consumption on the development of islet vascularization and innervation, both of which are critical to normal islet function, in fetal and juvenile offspring. Furthermore, we assessed whether improved dietary intake or resveratrol supplementation could ameliorate the harmful consequences of Western-style diet consumption during pregnancy. Adult female Japanese macaques were maintained on a control or Western-style diet for 4-7 yr. One cohort of dams was switched back onto a control diet, whereas another cohort received resveratrol supplementation throughout gestation. Pregnancies were terminated in the early third trimester by C-section, or offspring were born naturally and sent to necropsy at 1 yr of age. Western-style diet consumption resulted in impaired fetal islet capillary density and sympathetic islet innervation. Furthermore, this reduction in vascularization persisted in the juvenile offspring. This effect is independent of changes in the expression of key angiogenic markers. Diet reversal normalized islet vascularization to control offspring levels, whereas resveratrol supplementation caused a significant increase in capillary density above controls. These data provide a novel mechanism by which maternal Western-style diet consumption leads to increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in the offspring. Importantly, an improved maternal diet may mitigate these harmful effects. However, until the long-term consequences of increased vascularization can be determined, resveratrol use during pregnancy is not advised. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Assessment of the Sustainability of the Mediterranean Diet Combined with Organic Food Consumption: An Individual Behaviour Approach.

    PubMed

    Seconda, Louise; Baudry, Julia; Allès, Benjamin; Hamza, Oualid; Boizot-Szantai, Christine; Soler, Louis-Georges; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-12

    Mediterranean diets are promising sustainable food models and the organic food system may provide health and environmental benefits. Combining the two models could therefore be a favourable approach for food sustainability. The aim of this study was to draw up a comparative description of four diets differing in the level of organic foods consumption and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, using multidisciplinary indicators to assess the sustainability of these diets. Four groups of participants were defined and compared, combining the proportion of organic food in their diet (Org versus Conv) and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med versus NoMed). Conv-NoMed: Conventional consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Conv-Med: Conventional consumers and Mediterranean diet followers; Org-NoMed: Organic consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Org-Med: Organic consumers and Mediterranean diet followers. The adherence to nutritional recommendations was higher among the Org-Med and Conv-Med groups compared to the Conv-NoMed group (using the mPNNS-GS (modified-Programme National nutrition santé guidelines score/13.5 points): 9.29 (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.23-9.36) and 9.30 (95% CI = 9.24-9.35) versus 8.19 (95% CI = 8.17-8.22)) respectively. The mean plant/animal protein intake ratio was 1.38 (95% CI = 1.01-1.74) for the Org-Med group versus 0.44 (95% CI = 0.28-0.60) for the Conv-NoMed group. The average cost of the diet of Org-Med participants was the highest: 11.43 €/day (95% CI = 11.34-11.52). This study highlighted the importance of promoting the Mediterranean diet combined with organic food consumption for individual health and environmental aspects but challenges with regard to the cost remain.

  15. Dietary contribution of foods and beverages sold within a university campus and its effect on diet quality of young adults.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajshri; Rangan, Anna; Hebden, Lana; Yu Louie, Jimmy Chun; Tang, Lie Ming; Kay, Judy; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-02-01

    Tertiary education institutions have been linked with excessive weight in young adults. However, few data are available on the effect of foods from the university food environment on the diet quality of young adults. The aim of this study was to describe the association of a number of foods and beverages consumed at university food outlets with the diet quality of young adults. This was a cross-sectional survey in which the 103 university student participants, aged 19 to 24 y, contributed 5 d of dietary data. A purposely designed, validated smartphone application was used to collect the data. Diet quality was assessed by adherence to the 2013 dietary guidelines for food groups and nutrients, and the validated Healthy Eating Index for Australians (HEIFA-2013) was applied. Individual HEIFA-2013 scores were compared with the frequency of food purchase and consumption from university outlets to assess a dose-response effect of the food environment. Comparisons by tertiles of diet quality for body mass index, waist circumference, and takeaway food consumption (university and other) were computed using a one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test. There was a statistically significant difference between the number of university foods and beverages consumed in 5 d and the HEIFA-2013 scores: More on-campus purchases resulted in a poor-quality diet (P = 0.001). As the HEIFA-2013 tertile scores increased, there was a significant decrease in the number of university campus and other takeaway foods consumed; body mass index and waist circumference showed a decrease in trend. Efforts to improve the diet quality of young adults attending university may benefit from approaches to improve the campus food environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimism and diet quality in the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Hingle, Melanie D; Wertheim, Betsy C; Tindle, Hilary A; Tinker, Lesley; Seguin, Rebecca A; Rosal, Milagros C; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2014-07-01

    Diet quality has not been well studied in relation to positive psychological traits. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between optimism and diet quality in postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative observational study (OS) and clinical trials (CTs), and to determine whether optimism was associated with diet change after a 1-year dietary intervention. Diet quality was scored with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) and optimism assessed with the Life Orientation Test-Revised. Baseline characteristics were compared across AHEI quintiles or optimism tertiles using regression models with each variable of interest as a function of quintiles or tertiles (OS, n=87,630; CT, n=65,360). Association between optimism and baseline AHEI and change in AHEI over 1 year were tested using multivariate linear regression (CT, n=13,645). Potential interaction between optimism and trial arm and demographic/lifestyle factors on AHEI change was tested using likelihood ratio test (CT intervention, n=13,645; CT control, n=20,242). Women reporting high AHEI were non-Hispanic white, educated, physically active, past or never smokers, hormone therapy users, had lower body mass index and waist circumference, and were less likely to have chronic conditions. In the CT intervention, higher optimism was associated with higher AHEI at baseline and with greater change over 1 year (P=0.001). Effect modification by intervention status was observed (P=0.014), whereas control participants with highest optimism achieved threefold greater AHEI increase compared with those with the lowest optimism. These data support a relationship between optimism and dietary quality score in postmenopausal women at baseline and over 1 year.

  17. Is gestational weight gain associated with diet quality during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Shin, Dayeon; Bianchi, Leonard; Chung, Hwan; Weatherspoon, Lorraine; Song, Won O

    2014-08-01

    The gestational weight gain (GWG) guidelines of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) aim to optimize birth outcomes and reduce pregnancy complications. The GWG guidelines are set based on the prepregnancy weight status and optimal weight gain at different trimesters of pregnancy. Dietary references intakes (DRIs) of the IOM are set for each trimester of pregnancy for energy intake and other essential nutrients by age groups (≤ 18, 19-30, 31-51 years). The DRIs, however, do not take into account the differing energy and nutrient requirements of women with different prepregnancy weights. In this cross-sectional study, we tested the hypothesis that diet quality during pregnancy is associated with adequate GWG at different stages of pregnancy. Diet quality during pregnancy was assessed from a 24-h recall measured by the healthy eating index of 2005 (HEI-2005). Both GWG and diet quality data were from 490 pregnant women aged 16-43 years included in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006, a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the US, during which pregnant women were oversampled. Logistic regression models adjusted for age, trimester of gestation, race/ethnicity, education level, marital status, family poverty income ratio, daily supplement use, physical activity, and prepregnancy BMI were used to investigate if HEI-2005 is a determinant of GWG status at different trimesters of pregnancy. We found that HEI-2005 scores were not determinants of adequate GWG, although inadequate intake of total vegetables (OR 3.8, CI 1.1-13.2, p = 0.03) and oils were associated with excessive GWG (OR 2.8, CI 1.2-6.4, p = 0.02) when covariates were controlled. Although adequate GWG was not associated with diet quality as measured by HEI-2005 during pregnancy in this study, comprehensive prenatal counseling is still important to reduce adverse birth outcomes.

  18. The association between adherence to the New Nordic Diet and diet quality

    PubMed Central

    Bjørnarå, Helga Birgit; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Stea, Tonje Holte; Torstveit, Monica Klungland; Hillesund, Elisabet Rudjord; Andersen, Lene Frost; Berntsen, Sveinung; Bere, Elling

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported a positive association between scoring on healthy Nordic diet scales and the intake of healthy foods and nutrients, and also with higher intake of meat, sweets, cakes, and energy in general. These studies have used the same food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) responses for constructing the diet score as for calculating intakes of foods and nutrients. Thus, it is not clear whether the coexistence of healthy and less healthy dietary aspects among adherers to Nordic diets would occur even though separate methods were applied for exploring these relations. Objective To assess the association between adherence to the New Nordic Diet (NND), derived from an FFQ, and diet quality, determined from two 24-h dietary recall interviews. Design In total, 65 parents of toddlers in Southern Norway answered the NND FFQ and two 24-h dietary recall interviews. NND adherence was determined from the FFQ and categorized into low, medium, and high adherence. The two 24-h recalls provided data for the intake of specific foods and nutrients, selected on the basis of the Norwegian food-based guidelines as an indicator of a healthy diet. The Kruskal–Wallis test was used for assessing differences in food and nutrient intake across NND groups. Results High NND adherence derived from FFQ was associated with a high intake of fruits (p=0.004) and fiber (p=0.02), and a low intake of meat (p=0.004) and margarines (p=0.05), derived from recalls. A larger proportion of high NND adherers (68%) complied with the national dietary recommendation targeting meat intake compared with low NND adherers (29%) (p=0.04). Conclusion The present study showed that higher NND adherence measured with FFQ was associated with a higher intake of selected healthy foods and nutrients, measured with recalls. However, a higher intake of meat, sweets, and energy, as earlier reported, was not observed. PMID:27257844

  19. Chronic insufficient sleep and diet quality: Contributors to childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Hu, Frank B; Redline, Susan; Rosner, Bernard; Gillman, Matthew W; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Taveras, Elsie M

    2016-01-01

    To examine associations of chronic insufficient sleep with diet and whether diet explains the sleep-adiposity relationship. In Project Viva, 1,046 parents reported children's sleep duration at 6 m and annually until midchildhood (7 y). The main exposure was a sleep curtailment score (6 m-7 y) ranging from 0 (maximal curtailment) to 13 (adequate sleep). In mid-childhood, parents reported children's diet; researchers measured height/weight. Multivariable linear regression assessed associations of sleep with diet (Youth Healthy Eating Index [YHEI]); sleep with BMI z-score adjusting for YHEI; and, secondarily, joint associations of sleep and YHEI with BMI. Mean (SD) sleep and YHEI scores were 10.21 (2.71) and 58.76 (10.37). Longer sleep duration was associated with higher YHEI in mid-childhood (0.59 points/unit sleep score; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.86). Although higher YHEI was associated with lower BMI z-score (-0.07 units/10-point increase; 95% CI: -0.13, -0.01), adjustment for YHEI did not attenuate sleep-BMI associations. Children with sleep and YHEI scores below the median (<11 and <60) had BMI z-scores 0.34 units higher (95% CI: 0.16, 0.51) than children with sleep and YHEI scores above the median. While parent-reported diet did not explain inverse associations of sleep with adiposity, both sufficient sleep and high-quality diets are important to obesity prevention. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  20. Food insecurity is inversely associated with diet quality of lower-income adults.

    PubMed

    Leung, Cindy W; Epel, Elissa S; Ritchie, Lorrene D; Crawford, Patricia B; Laraia, Barbara A

    2014-12-01

    Food insecurity acts as a chronic stressor independent of poverty. Food-insecure adults may consume more highly palatable foods as a coping mechanism, leading to poorer diet quality and increased risks of chronic disease over time. Using data from the 1999-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, this study aimed to examine the cross-sectional differences in dietary intake and diet quality by household food security among 8,129 lower-income adults (≤300% of the federal poverty level). Food insecurity was assessed using the 18-item US Household Food Security Survey Module. Dietary intake was assessed from 24-hour recalls and diet quality was measured using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 and the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010. Relative mean differences in dietary outcomes by household food security were estimated using linear regression models, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Lower-income food-insecure adults reported higher consumption of some highly palatable foods, including high-fat dairy products (P trend<0.0001) and salty snacks (P trend=0.01) compared with lower-income food-secure adults. Food insecurity was also associated with more sugar-sweetened beverages (P trend=0.003); more red/processed meat (P trend=0.005); more nuts, seeds, and legumes (P trend=0.0006); fewer vegetables (P trend<0.0001); and fewer sweets and bakery desserts (P trend=0.0002). No differences were observed for intakes of total energy and macronutrients. Food insecurity was significantly associated with lower Healthy Eating Index-2005 (P trend<0.0001) and Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores (P trend<0.0001). Despite no macronutrient differences, food insecurity was associated with characteristics of poor diet quality known to increase chronic disease risk.

  1. What are the roles of calorie restriction and diet quality in promoting healthy longevity?

    PubMed

    Rizza, Wanda; Veronese, Nicola; Fontana, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data indicate that diet plays a central role in the pathogenesis of many age-associated chronic diseases, and in the biology of aging itself. Data from several animal studies suggest that the degree and time of calorie restriction (CR) onset, the timing of food intake as well as diet composition, play major roles in promoting health and longevity, breaking the old dogma that only calorie intake is important in extending healthy lifespan. Data from human studies indicate that long-term CR with adequate intake of nutrients results in several metabolic adaptations that reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Moreover, CR opposes the expected age-associated alterations in myocardial stiffness, autonomic function, and gene expression in the human skeletal muscle. However, it is possible that some of the beneficial effects on metabolic health are not entirely due to CR, but to the high quality diets consumed by the CR practitioners, as suggested by data collected in individuals consuming strict vegan diets. More studies are needed to understand the interactions among single nutrient modifications (e.g. protein/aminoacid, fatty acids, vitamins, phytochemicals, and minerals), the degree of CR and the frequency of food consumption in modulating anti-aging metabolic and molecular pathways, and in the prevention of age-associated diseases.

  2. Diet quality and eating behavioural patterns in preschool children in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yip, Pui-Sze; Chan, Vivian Wai-Yen; Lee, Queenie Kwan-Yee; Lee, Hang-Mei

    2017-03-01

    To assess the diet quality and eating behaviour of preschool children, investigate parents' feeding practices, and obtain information on the kindergarten nutrition environment of Hong Kong children aged 30-60 months. Dietary information was obtained using multiple 24-hour recalls. Questionnaires were developed to obtain information on children' seating behaviour, parents' feeding practices and preschool nutrition environment. A total of 302 children and 23 local kindergartens from three regions of Hong Kong were surveyed. The results showed consumption of vegetable and fruit were adequate; however, consumption of grain and meat were excessive, while milk and dairy intakes were inadequate. On average, the children consumed 1,280 kcal per day, or 92% of the Chinese Nutrition Society's energy recommendation. For macronutrients, the mean percentages of energy from carbohydrate, protein and fat were 55%, 17% and 28%, respectively, which are within the United States Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges. The mean intakes of carbohydrate and protein were 175 g and 53.4 g, respectively. For micronutrients, the mean intakes of vitamin D, calcium, iron and zinc were significantly lower than the reference nutrient intake or adequate intake (p<0.05), but those of sodium and niacin were significantly higher than the tolerable upper intake levels (p<0.05). This study showed that diet quality among children in Hong Kong needs to be improved, as some nutrients are consumed in excess whereas others are consumed in inadequate amounts. Other results on children's eating behaviour, parent's feeding practices and school nutrition environment are also reported.

  3. Feeding periodicity, diet composition, and food consumption of subyearling rainbow trout in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Chalupnicki, Marc; Abbett, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Although winter is a critically important period for stream salmonids, aspects of the ecology of several species are poorly understood. Consequently, we examined the diel feeding ecology of subyearling rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during winter in a central New York stream. Rainbow trout diet was significantly different during each 4-h interval and also differed from the drift and benthos. Feeding was significantly greater during darkness (i.e. 20:00 h – 04:00 h) than during daylight hours (i.e. 08:00 h – 16:00 h), peaking at 20:00 h. Daily food consumption (1.9 mg) and daily ration (3.4 %) during winter were substantially lower than previously reported for subyearling rainbow trout in the same stream during summer. These findings provide important new insights into the winter feeding ecology of juvenile rainbow trout in streams.

  4. Parental feeding practices in relation to low diet quality and obesity among LSES children.

    PubMed

    Entin, Anna; Kaufman-Shriqui, Vered; Naggan, Lechaim; Vardi, Hillel; Shahar, Danit R

    2014-01-01

    To examine the relationships between parental feeding practices, diet quality, overweight, and obesity among low-socioeconomic status (LSES) preschoolers. A cohort of preschool children (aged 5-6) and their mothers was recruited from November 2009 to December 2009. To overcome seasonal and personal variation in dietary intake, 3 replications of the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and a parental Feeding Practices Questionnaire (CFPQ) were obtained in person at baseline, 3 months from baseline, and 6 months from baseline. Anthropometric measurements were attained at preschool class on the same dates. Scores of the 12 factors of the CFPQ were calculated and related to dietary intake. Correlation coefficients between the mean energy and fat intake and CFPQ factors' scores were calculated. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc analyses was used to compare nutrient intake and anthropometric measures across CFPQ tertiles. Preschoolers (n = 63), aged 64.4 ± 5.0 months (47% boys), were recruited. Unhealthy feeding practices including food as a reward for good behavior and food restriction for promoting health were associated with increased consumption of junk food, sweets, and snacks. Among healthy feeding practices, encouraging balance and food variety and healthy eating modeled by parents were associated with increased vegetable consumption and smaller waist circumference. Weight was negatively associated with factors that reflect parental pressure and food restriction for weight control. Our data showed that certain feeding practices relate to a higher diet quality and lower weight and waist circumference. These practices may be encouraged in order to improve diet quality and prevent overweight and obesity.

  5. The Diet Quality of Competitive Adolescent Male Rugby Union Players with Energy Balance Estimated Using Different Physical Activity Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Tracy; Harries, Simon K.; Williams, Rebecca L.; Lum, Cheryl; Callister, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of the current study were to comprehensively assess the dietary intakes and diet quality of a sample of Australian competitive adolescent rugby union players and compare these intakes with National and Sports Dietitians Association (SDA) Recommendations for adolescent athletes. A secondary aim investigated applying different physical activity level (PAL) coefficients to determine total energy expenditure (TEE) in order to more effectively evaluate the adequacy of energy intakes. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Anthropometrics and dietary intakes were assessed in 25 competitive adolescent male rugby union players (14 to 18 years old). Diet was assessed using the validated Australian Eating Survey (AES) food frequency questionnaire and diet quality was assessed through the Australian Recommended Food Score. Results: The median dietary intakes of participants met national recommendations for percent energy (% E) from carbohydrate, protein and total fat, but not carbohydrate intake when evaluated as g/day as proposed in SDA guidelines. Median intakes of fibre and micronutrients including calcium and iron also met national recommendations. Overall diet quality was classified as ‘good’ with a median diet quality score of 34 (out of a possible 73); however, there was a lack of variety within key food groups including carbohydrates and proteins. Non-core food consumption exceeded recommended levels at 38% of the daily total energy intake, with substantial contributions from takeaway foods and sweetened beverages. A PAL coefficient of 1.2–1.4 was found to best balance the energy intakes of these players in their pre-season. Conclusions: Adolescent rugby players met the percent energy recommendations for macronutrients and attained an overall ‘good’ diet quality score. However, it was identified that when compared to specific recommendations for athletes, carbohydrate intakes were below recommendations and these players in their pre

  6. The Diet Quality of Competitive Adolescent Male Rugby Union Players with Energy Balance Estimated Using Different Physical Activity Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Tracy; Harries, Simon K; Williams, Rebecca L; Lum, Cheryl; Callister, Robin

    2016-09-07

    The aims of the current study were to comprehensively assess the dietary intakes and diet quality of a sample of Australian competitive adolescent rugby union players and compare these intakes with National and Sports Dietitians Association (SDA) Recommendations for adolescent athletes. A secondary aim investigated applying different physical activity level (PAL) coefficients to determine total energy expenditure (TEE) in order to more effectively evaluate the adequacy of energy intakes. Cross-sectional. Anthropometrics and dietary intakes were assessed in 25 competitive adolescent male rugby union players (14 to 18 years old). Diet was assessed using the validated Australian Eating Survey (AES) food frequency questionnaire and diet quality was assessed through the Australian Recommended Food Score. The median dietary intakes of participants met national recommendations for percent energy (% E) from carbohydrate, protein and total fat, but not carbohydrate intake when evaluated as g/day as proposed in SDA guidelines. Median intakes of fibre and micronutrients including calcium and iron also met national recommendations. Overall diet quality was classified as 'good' with a median diet quality score of 34 (out of a possible 73); however, there was a lack of variety within key food groups including carbohydrates and proteins. Non-core food consumption exceeded recommended levels at 38% of the daily total energy intake, with substantial contributions from takeaway foods and sweetened beverages. A PAL coefficient of 1.2-1.4 was found to best balance the energy intakes of these players in their pre-season. Adolescent rugby players met the percent energy recommendations for macronutrients and attained an overall 'good' diet quality score. However, it was identified that when compared to specific recommendations for athletes, carbohydrate intakes were below recommendations and these players in their pre-season reported high consumption of non-core foods, particularly sugar

  7. Diet Quality of Young Adults Enrolling in TXT2BFiT, a Mobile Phone-Based Healthy Lifestyle Intervention.

    PubMed

    Nour, Monica Marina; McGeechan, Kevin; Wong, Annette Ty; Partridge, Stephanie R; Balestracci, Kate; Roy, Rajshri; Hebden, Lana; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2015-05-27

    Young adulthood is associated with poor dietary habits and vulnerability to weight gain. Population studies have revealed that inadequate fruit and vegetable intake, excessive sugar-sweetened beverages, and frequent takeaway food consumption are dietary habits requiring intervention. The aim was to examine the dietary patterns and diet quality of overweight young adults on enrollment into a mobile phone-based healthy lifestyle (mHealth) intervention, TXT2BFiT. Baseline diets were analyzed using the online Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies version 2. The Healthy Eating Index for Australians (HEIFA) based on the 2013 Dietary Guidelines, was used to rate individual diets according to intake of core foods and deleterious nutrients including sugar, sodium, saturated fat, and alcohol. Findings were compared with the 2011 Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NNPAS). Gender differences were assessed with t tests and chi-square tests. ANOVA models were used to determine linear trends of core and noncore food intake and nutrients across quartiles of HEIFA scores. Associations between HEIFA score, sugar-sweetened beverages, and takeaway food consumption were assessed using linear regression analysis. Diets of 230 participants (females: n=141; males: n=89; body mass index: mean 27.2, SD 2.5 kg/m(2)) were analyzed. The mean diet quality score was 45.4 (SD 8.8, range 21.7-77.0) out of 100 points, with no significant difference between genders. Compared with the NNPAS data for adults aged 19-30 years, this cohort had a lower intake of some core foods and higher intake of alcohol and saturated fat. Better quality diets were associated with higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and wholegrains (P<.001). Takeaway food (P=.01) and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (P<.001) were negatively associated with diet quality. Overweight young adults had poorer diets compared with the reference Australian population within the same age group. This

  8. Maternal Milk Consumption Predicts the Tradeoff between Milk and Soft Drinks in Young Girls’ Diets1

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jennifer Orlet; Mitchell, Diane C.; Smiciklas-Wright, Helen; Birch, Leann Lipps

    2008-01-01

    Milk intake constitutes an important source of dietary calcium for young girls but declines throughout childhood. Recent work shows that the intake of soft drinks may contribute to this decline. Influences on the apparent tradeoff between soft drinks and milk in young girls’ diets are not well described. The objective of this research was to test a model depicting maternal beverage choices as predictors of their daughters’ milk and soft drink intake. A structural equation model describing maternal influences on daughters’ milk, soft drink and calcium intakes was tested using data from 180 non-Hispanic, white families with 5-y-old daughters. Mothers’ calcium, milk and soft drink intakes were evaluated as predictors of their daughters’ intakes. Mothers’ and daughters’ soft drink intakes were also examined as predictors of their own milk and calcium intakes. The model provided a good fit to the data, revealing mother-daughter similarities in beverage intake. Mothers who drank milk more frequently had daughters who drank milk more frequently and drank fewer soft drinks. For both mothers and daughters, soft drink consumption was negatively related to both milk and calcium intake. This research provides evidence that mothers’ beverage choices influence the tradeoff between milk and soft drinks in their daughters’ diets. In particular, mothers’ milk and soft drink intakes may affect their daughters’ calcium adequacy in early childhood by influencing the frequency with which their daughters consume those beverages. PMID:11160541

  9. Watermelon consumption improves inflammation and antioxidant capacity in rats fed an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mee Young; Hartig, Nicole; Kaufman, Katy; Hooshmand, Shirin; Figueroa, Arturo; Kern, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Watermelon, rich in antioxidants and other bioactive components, may be a viable method to improve CVD risk factors through reduced oxidative stress. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of watermelon powder consumption on lipid profiles, antioxidant capacity, and inflammation in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated rats fed an atherogenic diet. We hypothesized that watermelon would increase antioxidant capacity and reduce blood lipids and inflammation through modulation of related gene expression. Forty male-weanling (21 days old) Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (10 per group, total N = 40) in a 2 diets (control or 0.33% watermelon) × 2 treatments (with or without DSS) factorial design using an atherogenic diet. Watermelon-fed groups exhibited significantly lower serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P< .05). C-reactive protein levels were significantly lower in watermelon-fed rats than the control (P= .001). In addition, oxidative stress as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances was significantly lower in watermelon groups (P= .001). Total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities were greater in watermelon groups (P< .05). Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase were significantly lower in DSS-treated rats when watermelon was consumed (P< .05). Fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2, and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression was significantly downregulated in the watermelon group without DSS (P< .05). These findings indicate that watermelon improves risk factors for CVD in rats through better lipid profiles, lower inflammation, and greater antioxidant capacity by altering gene expression for lipid

  10. Quality of life and diet intervention in individuals at risk for recurrence of colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Pakiz, Bilge; Flatt, Shirley; Mills, Kathleen C.; Jordan, Lindsay J.; Carethers, John M.; Rock, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The effect of participation in a diet intervention study on self-reported quality of life (QOL) with subjects at risk of recurrence of colorectal adenomas was explored in 77 men and women, aged 18-80 years, with a history of adenomatous polyps. Participants were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups and followed for one year. Dietary goals for the intervention group included reduced intake of fat and increased intakes of fiber, calcium, and vegetables and fruit. Diet counseling was provided by telephone. Anthropometric measurements were obtained and dietary intakes were assessed at baseline, six and 12 months. The Quality of Life Factors questionnaire (QF), designed to explore the absolute effects of the diet intervention on participants’ perceived QOL, was administered at baseline and study end. Based on repeated 24-hour dietary recalls, the intervention group reported significantly higher consumption of vegetables, fruit, low-fat dairy products, fiber, and calcium at 12 months. There were no significant differences in total QF scores for the two groups at study end, and no significant changes within groups between baseline and study end. Findings suggest that even though the intervention participants made significant modifications in their eating behavior, these changes did not impact their perceived QOL negatively. PMID:15386785

  11. DIET QUALITY OF MOROCCAN ADOLESCENTS LIVING IN MOROCCO AND IN SPAIN.

    PubMed

    Montero, M Del Pilar; Mora-Urda, Ana Isabel; Anzid, Karim; Cherkaoui, Mohamed; Marrodan, M Dolores

    2017-03-01

    Intra-population socioeconomic changes and migration are powerful factors in changing eating habits. Changes in eating habits could affect the nutritional status, growth, development and health of adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the diet of adolescents of Moroccan origin living in Spain with that of adolescents living in Morocco. The sample comprised 428 Moroccan adolescents aged from 12 to 19 recruited in high schools: 327 living in Ouarzazate (Morocco) and 101 living in Madrid (Spain). The variables studied were energy intake (kcal/day), diet quality indicators (adherence to the Mediterranean Adequacy Index (MAI); cholesterol intake (mg/day); fibre intake (g/day) and energy profile)); and indicators of keeping traditional customs (halal meat consumption, bread made at home). Teenagers from Morocco living in Madrid consumed more calories, proteins, saturated fats and simple sugars (p<0.001) than those living in Morocco. Their diet was of lower quality than that of their peers in Morocco. This difference was more marked in boys than in girls. Changes in eating habits associated with migration from the south to the north Mediterranean basin can benefit young migrants in an immediate way (through greater availability of energy and nutrients), but later in life it could have negative consequences for their health, increasing the risk of overweight, obesity and cardiovascular and metabolic problems.

  12. Contribution of food prices and diet cost to socioeconomic disparities in diet quality and health: a systematic review and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Context: It is well established in the literature that healthier diets cost more than unhealthy diets. Objective: The aim of this review was to examine the contribution of food prices and diet cost to socioeconomic inequalities in diet quality. Data Sources: A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases was performed. Study Selection: Publications linking food prices, dietary quality, and socioeconomic status were selected. Data Extraction: Where possible, review conclusions were illustrated using a French national database of commonly consumed foods and their mean retail prices. Data Synthesis: Foods of lower nutritional value and lower-quality diets generally cost less per calorie and tended to be selected by groups of lower socioeconomic status. A number of nutrient-dense foods were available at low cost but were not always palatable or culturally acceptable to the low-income consumer. Acceptable healthier diets were uniformly associated with higher costs. Food budgets in poverty were insufficient to ensure optimum diets. Conclusions: Socioeconomic disparities in diet quality may be explained by the higher cost of healthy diets. Identifying food patterns that are nutrient rich, affordable, and appealing should be a priority to fight social inequalities in nutrition and health. PMID:26307238

  13. Contribution of food prices and diet cost to socioeconomic disparities in diet quality and health: a systematic review and analysis.

    PubMed

    Darmon, Nicole; Drewnowski, Adam

    2015-10-01

    It is well established in the literature that healthier diets cost more than unhealthy diets. The aim of this review was to examine the contribution of food prices and diet cost to socioeconomic inequalities in diet quality. A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases was performed. Publications linking food prices, dietary quality, and socioeconomic status were selected. Where possible, review conclusions were illustrated using a French national database of commonly consumed foods and their mean retail prices. Foods of lower nutritional value and lower-quality diets generally cost less per calorie and tended to be selected by groups of lower socioeconomic status. A number of nutrient-dense foods were available at low cost but were not always palatable or culturally acceptable to the low-income consumer. Acceptable healthier diets were uniformly associated with higher costs. Food budgets in poverty were insufficient to ensure optimum diets. Socioeconomic disparities in diet quality may be explained by the higher cost of healthy diets. Identifying food patterns that are nutrient rich, affordable, and appealing should be a priority to fight social inequalities in nutrition and health. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute.

  14. Development and evaluation of a stand-alone index for the assessment of small children's diet quality.

    PubMed

    Röytiö, Henna; Jaakkola, Johanna; Hoppu, Ulla; Poussa, Tuija; Laitinen, Kirsi

    2015-08-01

    To construct and evaluate an independent Children's Index of Diet Quality (CIDQ). A food consumption questionnaire, which contained twenty-five multiple-item questions on eating and food intake, was formulated and evaluated against 7 d food records. Key questions that best reflected a healthy diet, defined in criteria set by the nutrient recommendations, were searched and validated by correlation and analyses of receiver-operating characteristic curves. Settings A cohort of a young population of South-West Finland. Participants (n 400) were 2-6-year-old children. Fifteen questions were identified to best depict the children's diet quality in reference to the recommendations. These questions were scored, summarized and further constructed into a three-class index (good, moderate and poor dietary quality) where higher scores depicted better diet quality. The CIDQ cut-off score of 14 points for good dietary quality had a sensitivity of 0.59 and a specificity of 0.82 and the cut-off score of 10 points, for at least moderate dietary quality, had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.69. Higher index scores were related to higher dietary intakes of several vitamins, lower dietary intakes of SFA and cholesterol, and further with lower serum cholesterol and higher serum vitamin C concentrations. The three-class food index was found to represent diet quality as defined in recommendations and evaluated against nutrient intakes from food diaries and biochemical markers. This self-standing index could provide an effective and low-burden method to obtain information about diet quality and guide future recommendations.

  15. Estimated daily intake of phenolics and antioxidants from green tea consumption in the Korean diet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bong Han; Nam, Tae Gyu; Park, Na Young; Chun, Ock K; Koo, Sung I; Kim, Dae-Ok

    2016-01-01

    To estimate daily intake of total phenolics and flavonoids from green tea and the contribution of green tea to the antioxidant intake from the Korean diet, 24 commercial brands of green tea were selected and analyzed. Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2008 and 2011 indicate that the green tea consumption in these 2 years was 2.8 g/tea drinker/day and 2.9 g/tea drinker/day, respectively. Based on data derived from direct measurements of green tea phenolics and the dataset of the 2008 KNHANES, we estimated the daily per tea drinker phenolics intake to be 172 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE), the total flavonoids to be 43 mg catechin equivalents (CE) and the total antioxidants to be 267 mg vitamin C equivalents (VCE; 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay) and 401 mg VCE (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) assay). In 2011, we estimated the daily per tea drinker total phenolics intake to be 246 mg GAE, the total flavonoids to be 60 mg CE and the antioxidants to be 448 mg VCE (DPPH assay) and 630 mg VCE (ABTS assay). The daily intake of total phenolics, total flavonoids and antioxidants from green tea consumption increased from 2008 to 2011.

  16. Impact of Early Consumption of High-Fat Diet on the Mesolimbic Dopaminergic System

    PubMed Central

    Tantot, F.; Glangetas, C.; Janthakhin, Y.; Boitard, C.; De Smedt-Peyrusse, V.; Pape, J. R.; Vancassel, S.; Trifilieff, P.; Georges, F.; Coutureau, E.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggest that consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) can impact the maturation of brain circuits, such as during adolescence, which could account for behavioral alterations associated with obesity. In the present study, we used behavioral sensitization to amphetamine to investigate the effect of periadolescent HFD exposure (pHFD) in rats on the functionality of the dopamine (DA) system, a central actor in food reward processing. pHFD does not affect responding to an acute injection, however, a single exposure to amphetamine is sufficient to induce locomotor sensitization in pHFD rats. This is paralleled by rapid neurobiological adaptations within the DA system. In pHFD-exposed animals, a single amphetamine exposure induces an increase in bursting activity of DA cells in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) as well as higher DA release and greater expression of (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Post-synaptically, pHFD animals display an increase in NAc D2 receptors and c-Fos expression after amphetamine injection. These findings highlight the vulnerability of DA system to the consumption of HFD during adolescence that may support deficits in reward-related processes observed in obesity. PMID:28580417

  17. The Nutrient Balance Concept: A New Quality Metric for Composite Meals and Diets.

    PubMed

    Fern, Edward B; Watzke, Heribert; Barclay, Denis V; Roulin, Anne; Drewnowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of foods that provide suitable levels of nutrients and energy are required for optimum health. Currently, however, it is difficult to define numerically what are 'suitable levels'. To develop new metrics based on energy considerations-the Nutrient Balance Concept (NBC)-for assessing overall nutrition quality when combining foods and meals. The NBC was developed using the USDA Food Composition Database (Release 27) and illustrated with their MyPlate 7-day sample menus for a 2000 calorie food pattern. The NBC concept is centered on three specific metrics for a given food, meal or diet-a Qualifying Index (QI), a Disqualifying Index (DI) and a Nutrient Balance (NB). The QI and DI were determined, respectively, from the content of 27 essential nutrients and 6 nutrients associated with negative health outcomes. The third metric, the Nutrient Balance (NB), was derived from the Qualifying Index (QI) and provided key information on the relative content of qualifying nutrients in the food. Because the Qualifying and Disqualifying Indices (QI and DI) were standardized to energy content, both become constants for a given food/meal/diet and a particular consumer age group, making it possible to develop algorithms for predicting nutrition quality when combining different foods. Combining different foods into composite meals and daily diets led to improved nutrition quality as seen by QI values closer to unity (indicating nutrient density was better equilibrated with energy density), DI values below 1.0 (denoting an acceptable level of consumption of disqualifying nutrients) and increased NB values (signifying complementarity of foods and better provision of qualifying nutrients). The Nutrient Balance Concept (NBC) represents a new approach to nutrient profiling and the first step in the progression from the nutrient evaluation of individual foods to that of multiple foods in the context of meals and total diets.

  18. Higher diet quality is inversely associated with mortality in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Deborah A; Ban, Yulun; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2015-03-01

    Diet quality has been inversely associated with overall mortality in white populations, but the evidence in African-American populations is limited. The goal of the present study was to assess diet quality in relation to all-cause mortality in the Black Women's Health Study, a follow-up study of African-American women begun in 1995. Data used in this study were obtained via biennial questionnaires from 1995 to 2011. Based on food-frequency questionnaire data collected in 1995 and 2001, we calculated an index-based diet quality score [Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)] and derived dietary patterns (prudent and Western) with the use of factor analysis. We followed 37,001 women who were aged 30-69 y and free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes at baseline for mortality through 2011. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Based on a total of 1678 deaths during 16 y of follow-up, higher DASH scores were associated with reduced all-cause mortality (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.89 for highest vs. lowest quintiles). The DASH components most strongly associated with lower mortality were high intake of whole grains and low intake of red and processed meat. A Western dietary pattern, characterized by high intake of red and processed meat, was associated with increased all-cause mortality rates (HR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.17, 1.60 for highest vs. lowest quintiles of score); a prudent dietary pattern was not associated with risk. A DASH-style diet high in intake of whole grains and low in consumption of red meat is associated with reduced mortality rates in healthy African-American women. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Breakfast Dietary Patterns among Mexican Children Are Related to Total-Day Diet Quality.

    PubMed

    Afeiche, Myriam C; Taillie, Lindsey Smith; Hopkins, Sinead; Eldridge, Alison L; Popkin, Barry M

    2017-03-01

    Background: Mexico has experienced shifts in food availability and consumption patterns over the past few decades from traditional diets to those containing more high-energy density foods, resulting in the development of unhealthful dietary patterns among children and adults. However, to our knowledge it is not known whether breakfast consumption patterns contribute to the overall daily diet of Mexican children.Objective: We examined total-day diet among breakfast consumers compared with breakfast skippers, identified and investigated breakfast dietary patterns in relation to energy and nutrient intakes at breakfast and across the day, and examined these patterns in relation to sociodemographic characteristics.Methods: With the use of nationally representative dietary data (one 24-h recall) from the 2012 Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey, 3760 children aged 4-13 y were categorized into mutually exclusive breakfast patterns with the use of cluster analysis. The association between breakfast patterns and breakfast skippers with dietary intake at breakfast and for the total day was investigated with the use of multivariate linear regression.Results: Most children (83%) consumed breakfast. Six breakfast dietary patterns were identified (milk and sweetened breads, tortillas and beans, sweetened beverages, sandwiches and quesadillas, eggs, and cereal and milk) and reflected both traditional and more Westernized dietary patterns. Sugar-sweetened beverages were consumed across all patterns. Compared with all breakfast dietary patterns, breakfast skippers had the lowest intake of several nutrients of public health concern. Nutrients to limit that were high at breakfast tended to be high for the total day and vice versa for nutrients to encourage.Conclusions: There was not a single pattern that complied perfectly with the Mexican School Breakfast Guidelines, but changes such as increasing dietary fiber by encouraging more whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and

  20. Consumption of milk-protein combined with green tea modulates diet-induced thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hursel, Rick; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2011-08-01

    Green tea and protein separately are able to increase diet-induced thermogenesis. Although their effects on long-term weight-maintenance were present separately, they were not additive. Therefore, the effect of milk-protein (MP) in combination with green tea on diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) was examined in 18 subjects (aged 18-60 years; BMI: 23.0 ± 2.1 kg/m(2)). They participated in an experiment with a randomized, 6 arms, crossover design, where energy expenditure and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured. Green tea (GT)vs. placebo (PL) capsules were either given in combination with water or with breakfasts containing milk protein in two different dosages: 15 g (15 MP) (energy% P/C/F: 15/47/38; 1.7 MJ/500 mL), and 3.5 g (3.5 MP) (energy% P/C/F: 41/59/0; 146.4 kJ/100 mL). After measuring resting energy expenditure (REE) for 30 min, diet-induced energy expenditure was measured for another 3.5 h after the intervention. There was an overall significant difference observed between conditions (p < 0.001). Post-hoc, areas under the curve (AUCs) for diet-induced energy expenditure were significantly different (P ≤ 0.001) for GT + water (41.11 [91.72] kJ·3.5 h) vs. PL + water (10.86 [28.13] kJ·3.5 h), GT + 3.5 MP (10.14 [54.59] kJ·3.5 h) and PL + 3.5 MP (12.03 [34.09] kJ·3.5 h), but not between GT + 3.5 MP, PL + 3.5 MP and PL + water, indicating that MP inhibited DIT following GT. DIT after GT + 15 MP (167.69 [141.56] kJ·3.5 h) and PL + 15 MP (168.99 [186.56] kJ·3.5 h) was significantly increased vs. PL + water (P < 0.001), but these were not different from each other indicating that 15 g MP stimulated DIT, but inhibited the GT effect on DIT. No significant differences in RQ were seen between conditions for baseline and post-treatment. In conclusion, consumption of milk-protein inhibits the effect of green tea on DIT.

  1. Consumption of Milk-Protein Combined with Green Tea Modulates Diet-Induced Thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hursel, Rick; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

    2011-01-01

    Green tea and protein separately are able to increase diet-induced thermogenesis. Although their effects on long-term weight-maintenance were present separately, they were not additive. Therefore, the effect of milk-protein (MP) in combination with green tea on diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) was examined in 18 subjects (aged 18–60 years; BMI: 23.0 ± 2.1 kg/m2). They participated in an experiment with a randomized, 6 arms, crossover design, where energy expenditure and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured. Green tea (GT)vs. placebo (PL) capsules were either given in combination with water or with breakfasts containing milk protein in two different dosages: 15 g (15 MP) (energy% P/C/F: 15/47/38; 1.7 MJ/500 mL), and 3.5 g (3.5 MP) (energy% P/C/F: 41/59/0; 146.4 kJ/100 mL). After measuring resting energy expenditure (REE) for 30 min, diet-induced energy expenditure was measured for another 3.5 h after the intervention. There was an overall significant difference observed between conditions (p < 0.001). Post-hoc, areas under the curve (AUCs) for diet-induced energy expenditure were significantly different (P ≤ 0.001) for GT + water (41.11 [91.72] kJ・3.5 h) vs. PL + water (10.86 [28.13] kJ・3.5 h), GT + 3.5 MP (10.14 [54.59] kJ・3.5 h) and PL + 3.5 MP (12.03 [34.09] kJ・3.5 h), but not between GT + 3.5 MP, PL + 3.5 MP and PL + water, indicating that MP inhibited DIT following GT. DIT after GT + 15 MP (167.69 [141.56] kJ・3.5 h) and PL + 15 MP (168.99 [186.56] kJ・3.5 h) was significantly increased vs. PL + water (P < 0.001), but these were not different from each other indicating that 15 g MP stimulated DIT, but inhibited the GT effect on DIT. No significant differences in RQ were seen between conditions for baseline and post-treatment. In conclusion, consumption of milk-protein inhibits the effect of green tea on DIT. PMID:22254119

  2. Early consumption of blueberry diet protects against sex steroid deficiency-induced bone loss in adult female rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied the effects of blueberry consumption in early development on bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats later in life. Weanling female rats were fed AIN-93G semi-purified diets supplemented with 10% whole blueberry powder from PND 21 to PND34 (short-term group), or PND21 to PND81 (chro...

  3. Socio-economic characteristics, living conditions and diet quality are associated with food insecurity in France.

    PubMed

    Bocquier, Aurélie; Vieux, Florent; Lioret, Sandrine; Dubuisson, Carine; Caillavet, France; Darmon, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    To assess the prevalence of household food insecurity (FI) in France and to describe its associations with socio-economic factors, health behaviours, diet quality and cost (estimated using mean food prices). Cross-sectional nationally representative survey. FI was assessed using an adapted version of the US Department of Agriculture's Food Insufficiency Indicator; dietary intake was assessed using a 7 d open-ended food record; and individual demographic, socio-economic and behavioural variables were assessed using self-administered questionnaires and interviews. Individuals experiencing FI were compared with food-secure individuals, the latter being divided into four categories according to quartiles of their income per consumption unit (FS1 to FS4). Differences among categories were analysed using χ² tests, ANOVA and tests for trend. Individual and National Dietary Survey (INCA2), 2006-2007. Adults aged 18-79 years (n 2624). Individuals experiencing FI represented 12·2% of the population. They were on average younger, more frequently women and single parents with children compared with those in the other four categories. Their mean income per consumption unit was higher than that in the FS1 category, but they reported poorer material and housing conditions. The prevalence of smoking and the mean daily time spent watching television were also higher in the FI category. No significant difference among categories was found for energy intake, but mean intakes of fruits, vegetables and fish were lower, and diet quality was slightly but significantly poorer in the FI category. Daily diet cost was also lower in the FI category. France is not spared by FI. FI should be routinely monitored at the national level and research should be promoted to identify effective strategies to reduce nutrition inequalities in France.

  4. Is cooking at home associated with better diet quality or weight-loss intention?

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Julia A; Bleich, Sara N

    2015-06-01

    To examine national patterns in cooking frequency and diet quality among adults in the USA, overall and by weight-loss intention. Analysis of cross-sectional 24 h dietary recall and interview data. Diet quality measures included total kilojoules per day, grams of fat, sugar and carbohydrates per day, fast-food meals per week, and frozen/pizza and ready-to-eat meals consumed in the past 30 d. Multivariable regression analysis was used to test associations between frequency of cooking dinner per week (low (0-1), medium (2-5) and high (6-7)), dietary outcomes and weight-loss intention. The 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Adults aged 20 years and over (n 9569). In 2007-2010, 8 % of adults lived in households in which someone cooked dinner 0-1 times/week and consumed, on an average day, 9627 total kilojoules, 86 g fat and 135 g sugar. Overall, compared with low cookers (0-1 times/week), a high frequency of cooking dinner (6-7 times/week) was associated with lower consumption of daily kilojoules (9054 v. 9627 kJ, P=0·002), fat (81 v. 86 g, P=0·016) and sugar (119 v. 135 g, P<0·001). Individuals trying to lose weight consumed fewer kilojoules than those not trying to lose weight, regardless of household cooking frequency (2111 v. 2281 kJ/d, P<0·006). Cooking dinner frequently at home is associated with consumption of a healthier diet whether or not one is trying to lose weight. Strategies are needed to encourage more cooking among the general population and help infrequent cookers better navigate the food environment outside the home.

  5. Diet Quality and Cancer Outcomes in Adults: A Systematic Review of Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Jennifer; Brown, Leanne; Williams, Rebecca L.; Byles, Julie; Collins, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary patterns influence cancer risk. However, systematic reviews have not evaluated relationships between a priori defined diet quality scores and adult cancer risk and mortality. The aims of this systematic review are to (1) describe diet quality scores used in cohort or cross-sectional research examining cancer outcomes; and (2) describe associations between diet quality scores and cancer risk and mortality. The protocol was registered in Prospero, and a systematic search using six electronic databases was conducted through to December 2014. Records were assessed for inclusion by two independent reviewers, and quality was evaluated using a validated tool. Sixty-four studies met inclusion criteria from which 55 different diet quality scores were identified. Of the 35 studies investigating diet quality and cancer risk, 60% (n = 21) found a positive relationship. Results suggest no relationship between diet quality scores and overall cancer risk. Inverse associations were found for diet quality scores and risk of postmenopausal breast, colorectal, head, and neck cancer. No consistent relationships between diet quality scores and cancer mortality were found. Diet quality appears to be related to site-specific adult cancer risk. The relationship with cancer mortality is less conclusive, suggesting additional factors impact overall cancer survival. Development of a cancer-specific diet quality score for application in prospective epidemiology and in public health is warranted. PMID:27399671

  6. Reduced tobacco consumption, improved diet and life expectancy for 1988-1998: analysis of New Zealand and OECD data.

    PubMed

    Laugesen, Murray; Grace, Randolph C

    2017-06-02

    We compared changes in tobacco consumption and diet in relation to changes in life expectancy in 1988-1998 in 22 OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries. Between 1985 and 1995 using regression analysis we estimated differences in tobacco consumption per adult and the differences in the sum of atherogenic and thrombogenic indices against life expectancy. Each index was derived from the various fats per gram of food from standard texts, and from the annual measurements of fat in the food balance sheets of each country. In 1985-1995, New Zealand showed the largest decrease in tobacco consumption per adult (41%) and the greatest decrease (except for Switzerland) in the sum of atherogenic and thrombogenic indices (17%) as a measure of diet. New Zealand ranked first for life expectancy increases from 1988-1998 for men (3.2 years), women (2.8 years) and both sexes combined. Regression analyses revealed that increases in life expectancy across the OECD for males, but not females, were strongly associated with decreases in tobacco consumption, with a weaker effect of diet improvement. These results suggest that reduced tobacco consumption in 1985-1995 likely contributed to New Zealand's gains in life expectancy from 1988-1998.

  7. Associations between added sugar (solid vs. liquid) intakes, diet quality, and adiposity indicators in Canadian children.

    PubMed

    Wang, JiaWei; Shang, Lei; Light, Kelly; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Paradis, Gilles; Gray-Donald, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the influence of different forms of added sugar intake on diet quality or their association with obesity among youth. Dietary intake was assessed by three 24-h recalls in 613 Canadian children (aged 8-10 years). Added sugars (mean of 3-day intakes) were categorized according to source (solid or liquid). Dietary intake and the Canadian Healthy Eating Index (« HEI-C ») were compared across tertiles of solid and liquid added sugars separately as were adiposity indicators (body mass index (BMI), fat mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), and waist circumference). Cross-sectional associations were examined in linear regression models adjusting for age, sex, energy intake, and physical activity (7-day accelerometer). Added sugar contributed 12% of total energy intake (204 kcal) on average, of which 78% was from solid sources. Higher consumption of added sugars from either solid or liquid source was associated with higher total energy, lower intake of micronutrients, vegetables and fruit, and lower HEI-C score. Additionally liquid sources were associated with lower intake of dairy products. A 10-g higher consumption of added sugars from liquid sources was associated with 0.4 serving/day lower of vegetables and fruit, 0.4-kg/m(2) higher BMI, a 0.5-kg higher fat mass, and a 0.9-cm higher waist circumference whereas the associations of added sugars from solid sources and adiposity indicators tended to be negative. In conclusion, higher consumption of added sugar from either solid or liquid sources was associated with lower overall diet quality. Adiposity indicators were only positively associated with added sugars from liquid sources.

  8. The share of ultra-processed foods determines the overall nutritional quality of diets in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Louzada, Maria Laura da Costa; Ricardo, Camila Zancheta; Steele, Euridice Martinez; Levy, Renata Bertazzi; Cannon, Geoffrey; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2017-07-17

    To estimate the dietary share of ultra-processed foods and to determine its association with the overall nutritional quality of diets in Brazil. Cross-sectional. Brazil. A representative sample of 32 898 Brazilians aged ≥10 years was studied. Food intake data were collected. We calculated the average dietary content of individual nutrients and compared them across quintiles of energy share of ultra-processed foods. Then we identified nutrient-based dietary patterns, and evaluated the association between quintiles of dietary share of ultra-processed foods and the patterns' scores. The mean per capita daily dietary energy intake was 7933 kJ (1896 kcal), with 58·1 % from unprocessed or minimally processed foods, 10·9 % from processed culinary ingredients, 10·6 % from processed foods and 20·4 % from ultra-processed foods. Consumption of ultra-processed foods was directly associated with high consumption of free sugars and total, saturated and trans fats, and with low consumption of protein, dietary fibre, and most of the assessed vitamins and minerals. Four nutrient-based dietary patterns were identified. 'Healthy pattern 1' carried more protein and micronutrients, and less free sugars. 'Healthy pattern 2' carried more vitamins. 'Healthy pattern 3' carried more dietary fibre and minerals and less free sugars. 'Unhealthy pattern' carried more total, saturated and trans fats, and less dietary fibre. The dietary share of ultra-processed foods was inversely associated with 'healthy pattern 1' (-0·16; 95 % CI -0·17, -0·15) and 'healthy pattern 3' (-0·18; 95 % CI -0·19, -0·17), and directly associated with 'unhealthy pattern' (0·17; 95 % CI 0·15, 0·18). Dietary share of ultra-processed foods determines the overall nutritional quality of diets in Brazil.

  9. Increasing consumption of breakfast cereal improves thiamine status in overweight/obese women following a hypocaloric diet.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rosa M; López-Sobaler, Ana M; Andrés, Pedro; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elena; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Bermejo, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the thiamine status in a group of young, overweight/obese women and to analyse the changes in this status produced by two weight-control programmes based on approximating the diet to the theoretical ideal, increasing the relative consumption of vegetables (V) or cereals (C) (especially breakfast cereals). The study subjects were 57 Spanish women with a body mass index (BMI) of 24-35 kg/m(2), all of whom were randomly assigned to one of two slightly hypocaloric diets. Dietetic, anthropometric and biochemical data were collected at the beginning of the study and at 2 and 6 weeks. C and V subjects showed a reduction in their energy intake, body weight and BMI, both at 2 and 6 weeks. Thiamine intake and blood thiamine levels only increased with diet C (both at 2 and 6 weeks). 21.8% cf the women, 21.8% had blood thiamine levels <150 nmol/L at the beginning of the study, but at 6 weeks of intervention only 3.7% of the women in diet C, as compared with 30.8% of the women in diet V, showed blood thiamine levels <150 nmol/L. Although both diet C and diet V induced weight loss and a reduction in BMI, diet C would appear to be more useful in the maintenance of an adequate thiamine status.

  10. Alcohol consumption and Mediterranean Diet adherence among health science students in Spain: the DiSA-UMH Study.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Alexander; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva Maria; Garcia de la Hera, Manuela; Gimenez-Monzo, Daniel; Gonzalez-Palacios, Sandra; Valera-Gran, Desirée; Torres-Collado, Laura; Vioque, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    To describe the association between consumption of different alcoholic beverages and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of the baseline data of the DiSA-UMH study, an ongoing cohort study with Spanish health science students (n=1098) aged 17-35 years. Dietary information was collected by a validated 84-item food frequency questionnaire. Participants were grouped into non-drinkers, exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers and drinkers of all types of alcoholic beverages. Mediterranean diet adherence was determined by using a modification of the relative Mediterranean Diet Score (rMED; score range: 0-16) according to consumption of 8 dietary components. We performed multiple linear and multinomial regression analyses. The mean alcohol consumption was 4.3g/day (SD: 6.1). A total of 19.5%, 18.9% and 61.6% of the participants were non-drinkers, exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers and drinkers of all types of alcoholic beverages, respectively. Participants who consumed beer and/or wine exclusively had higher rMED scores than non-drinkers (β: 0.76, 95%CI: 0.25-1.27). Drinkers of all types of alcoholic beverages had similar rMED scores to non-drinkers. Non-drinkers consumed less fish and more meat, whereas drinkers of all types of alcoholic beverages consumed fewer fruits, vegetables and more meat than exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers. The overall alcohol consumption among the students in our study was low-to-moderate. Exclusive beer and/or wine drinkers differed regarding the Mediterranean diet pattern from non-drinkers and drinkers of all types of alcohol. These results show the need to properly adjust for diet in studies of the effects of alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Diet quality and body mass index are associated with health care resource use in rural older adults.

    PubMed

    Ford, Dara W; Hartman, Terryl J; Still, Christopher; Wood, Craig; Mitchell, Diane C; Bailey, Regan; Smiciklas-Wright, Helen; Coffman, Donna L; Jensen, Gordon L

    2014-12-01

    Health care resource consumption is a growing concern. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between diet quality and body mass index with health care resource use (HRU) in a cohort of advanced age. Participants in the Geisinger Rural Aging Study (n=5,993) were mailed demographic and dietary questionnaires in 2009. Of those eligible, 2,995 (50%; 1,267 male, 1,728 female; mean age 81.4±4.4 years) provided completed surveys. Multivariate negative binomial models were used to estimate relative risk and 95% CI of HRU outcomes with diet quality as assessed by the Dietary Screening Tool score and body mass index determined from self-reported height and weight. Poor diet quality was associated with a 20% increased risk for emergency room (ER) visits. Fruit and vegetable consumption was grouped into quintiles of intake, with the highest quintile serving as the reference group in analyses. The three lowest fruit and vegetable quintiles were associated with increased risk for ER visits (23% to 31%); the lowest quintile increased risk for inpatient visits (27%). Obesity increased risk of outpatient visits; however, individuals with class I obesity were less likely than normal-weight individuals to have ER visits (relative risk=0.84; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.99). Diets of greater quality, particularly with greater fruit and vegetable intake, are associated with favorable effects on HRU outcomes among older adults. Overweight and obesity are associated with increased outpatient HRU and, among obese individuals, with decreased ER visits. These findings suggest that BMI and diet quality beyond age 74 years continue to affect HRU measures. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of dietary consumption of cranberry powder on metabolic parameters in growing rats fed high fructose diets.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Ramesh C; Rogers, Theodore J; Wilkes, Samuel E; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L

    2010-10-01

    The effect of dietary consumption of a cranberry powder (CP) containing increased amounts of procyanidins and other phytochemicals on metabolic parameters associated with metabolic syndrome was investigated in growing rats fed a high fructose diet. Dietary treatments were control (starch based), high fructose (HF), and HF containing either 3.3, 6.6, or 33 g CP/kg diet. Fasting plasma glucose and triglycerides tended to be higher with HF feeding and were reduced by feeding CP. The area under curve following an oral glucose tolerance test was 35-50% higher in animals fed HF diet vs. control and was decreased to control levels by the low or medium but not high CP diet. Feeding CP tended to lower fasting plasma insulin. Homeostatic models of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA-BCF) were lowest in animals fed low or medium CP diets (p < 0.05). Rats fed the control starch diet had slightly higher food intake, final body weight, and abdominal fat compared to animals fed other diets. Kidney weight was higher in HF group and feeding CP decreased kidney weight to normal levels. In the fed state, plasma triglyceride was increased with HF diet, whereas insulin was lower in animals fed HF diet. Overall, inclusion of CP in the diet was effective in modulating some aspects of metabolic parameters associated with metabolic syndrome and the medium level of CP in the diet produced a better response than the lower and higher CP levels. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010

  13. Alpaca semen quality in relation to different diets.

    PubMed

    Juyena, N S; Vencato, J; Pasini, G; Vazzana, I; Stelletta, C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biochemical composition of seminal plasma, along with semen quality, of alpacas maintained on different diets (hay; hay+pasture grazing; pasture grazing+sheep concentrate; pasture grazing+horse concentrate; Periods 1-4, respectively). Alpacas (n=5) were fed the four different diets for a period of 6 weeks each. During the period of feeding of each diet, semen was collected using an artificial vagina to determine its volume, viscosity, sperm concentration and sperm motility. Moreover, testicular volume and body condition score were evaluated. Seminal plasma was analysed biochemically to measure total protein, triglyceride, cholesterol, γ-glutamyl transferase, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase levels. Protein profiles were investigated using one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. There was high variability in semen parameters between different males maintained on the same diet. Semen volume increased significantly (P<0.05) when alpacas were fed diets containing commercial sheep and horse concentrates. In contrast, sperm concentration and motility decreased significantly (P<0.05) from Period 1 to Period 4. Dietary changes had no effect on viscosity. Significant reductions were seen in triglyceride and cholesterol content, as well as γ-glutamyl transferase, ALT and alkaline phosphatase concentrations, from Period 1 to Period 4. Regardless of experimental period, a wide variation was seen in seminal plasma enzyme concentrations between alpacas, whereas diet had no effect on glucose and total protein concentrations in the seminal plasma. Eight protein bands, with molecular weights ranging from 200 to 14kDa, were considered in electrophoresis gel after image analysis. Proteins fractions of the 14-kDa (total protein express in mddL(-1) with a molecular weight of 14-kDa, TP8) and 21-kDa (total protein express in mddL(-1) with a molecular weight of 21-kDa, TP7) bands

  14. The effect of weaner diet protein content and diet quality on the long-term performance of pigs to slaughter.

    PubMed

    Wellock, I J; Houdijk, J G M; Miller, A C; Gill, B P; Kyriazakis, I

    2009-04-01

    Short and long-term effects of manipulating dietary CP content and diet quality in weaner diets on health and performance of pigs were investigated in a 2 x 2 factorial combination of CP inclusion (high-CP, 230 g of CP/kg vs. low-CP, 170 g of CP/kg) and diet quality (high-quality, cooked cereals, and animal protein vs. low-quality, raw cereals, and plant protein). Diets were fed ad libitum for 14 d postweaning to pigs weaned at 29.4+/-3.1 d of age and 9.9+/-1.0 kg of BW. From d 14 to slaughter at 104+/-3 kg, all pigs were fed the same series of standard commercial diets. There were 15 replicates per treatment in the weaner phase (<30 kg) and 5 replicates per treatment in the grower-finisher phase (>30 kg). High-quality diets promoted gut health as indicated by improved fecal lactobacilli to coliform ratio (P=0.002) and decreased fecal enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli counts on d 11 postweaning (P=0.028), reducing the risk of postweaning diarrhea and improving pig health from weaning to the end of the weaner phase. Reducing CP content had no effect on gut health. High-CP (P=0.053) and high-quality (P=0.025) diets independently increased ADG during the first 14 d postweaning compared with low-CP and low-quality diets, respectively. There were no interactions between dietary CP content and quality on any of the response criteria investigated. Despite differences in the immediate postweaning period, there was no effect of manipulating diet quality or CP content for 2 wk postweaning on lifetime performance with pigs reaching slaughter weight in 128+/-7 d. These results indicate that high-quality diets may protect pig gut health during the immediate postweaning period. However, it may be possible to use less expensive, decreased quality weaner diets without any adverse effects on long-term performance when weaning older, heavier pigs and where health status, environmental control, and stock management are all maintained to a high standard.

  15. Diet quality of preschool children aged 2 to 5 years living in the urban area of Pelotas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Katharine Konrad; Schneider, Bruna Celestino; França, Giovanny Vinicius Araújo; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; dos Santos, Iná; Assunção, Maria Cecília Formoso

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the dietary quality of preschool children in the urban area of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Methods: Dietary quality was measured according to the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), adapted to Brazil. Food consumption was obtained using the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). The index score was obtained by a score, ranging from 0 to 100, distributed in 13 food groups that characterize different components of a healthy diet. The better the quality of the diet, the closer the score is to 100. Results: Dietary quality was evaluated in 556 preschoolers. The mean HEI score value was 74.4 points, indicating that diets need improvement. The mean scores were significantly higher among girls and in children from families with income between one and less than three minimum wages. Conclusions: The children showed vegetable consumption below the recommended level, while foods of the food group of oils and fats, as well as the group of sugars, candies, chocolates and snacks, were consumed in excess. It is important to reinforce guidelines to promote healthier eating habits, which may persist later in life. PMID:26122208

  16. Soy product consumption and association with health characteristics and dietary quality indices in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sadeghian, Mehdi; Hajishafiee, Maryam; Izadi, Vajihe; Vahidianfar, Fereshteh; Azadbakht, Leila

    2015-02-01

    To determine the average intake of soy products and its association with socio-demographic, general and health characteristics, and dietary quality indices among the population of Isfahan, Iran. In this descriptive cross-sectional study conducted on 491 subjects in 2013-2014, grocery stores, nuts stores, chain stores, and supermarkets from different areas of Isfahan Municipality were visited. Shop owners were asked to report the amounts of soy products sales (soy nut, processed soy protein, soy milk and soy yogurt). Furthermore, a food frequency questionnaire was completed from 496 customers by an experienced nutritionist. Mean sales and intake of soy products and dietary intakes including dietary quality indices and mean adequacy ratio (MAR) as well as anthropometric and socio-demographic variables were assessed. Soy protein and soy yogurt are the highest [673 ± 81 (g/month)] and lowest [420 ± 148 (g/month)] purchased soy products, respectively. While soy nut [63 ± 10 (g/month)] was consumed to the lowest amount, soy protein [236 ± 39 (g/month)] was the most consumed soy product. Subjects with higher consumption of soy products were older and had higher intake of protein, vitamin C, zinc and iron, and lower intake of whole grains, legumes, and vegetables as well as greater values of MAR and dietary diversity score as well as nutrient adequacy ratio for vitamin C. Soy protein is the most purchased and consumed soy product among people living in Isfahan. More intakes of whole grains and vegetables among those with higher consumption of soy foods could define greater quantities of zinc, iron and vitamin C in the diet. Soy consumption had a reverse correlation with body mass index.

  17. Snacking patterns, diet quality, and cardiovascular risk factors in adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship of snacking patterns on nutrient intake and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in adults is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of snacking patterns with nutrient intake, diet quality, and a selection of CVRF in adults participating in the 2001-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Methods 24-hour dietary recalls were used to determine intake and cluster analysis was used to identify the snacking patterns. Height and weight were obtained and the health indices that were evaluated included diastolic and systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerides, blood glucose, and insulin. Results The sample was participants (n = 18,988) 19+ years (50% males; 11% African-Americans; 72% white, 12% Hispanic-Americans, and 5% other). Cluster analyses generated 12 distinct snacking patterns, explaining 61% of the variance in snacking. Comparisons of snacking patterns were made to the no snack pattern. It was found that miscellaneous snacks constituted the most common snacking pattern (17%) followed by cakes/cookies/pastries (12%) and sweets (9%). Most snacking patterns were associated with higher energy intakes. Snacking patterns cakes/cookies/pastries, vegetables/legumes, crackers/salty snacks, other grains and whole fruit were associated with lower intakes of saturated fatty acids. Added sugars intakes were higher in the cakes/cookies/pastries, sweets, milk desserts, and soft drinks patterns. Five snack patterns (cakes/cookies/pastries, sweets, vegetable/legumes, milk desserts, soft drinks) were associated with lower sodium intakes. Several snack patterns were associated with higher intakes of potassium, calcium, fiber, vitamin A, and magnesium. Five snacking patterns (miscellaneous snacks; vegetables/legumes; crackers/salty snacks; other grains; and whole fruit) were associated with better diet quality scores. Alcohol was associated with

  18. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and consumption of functional foods among the Balearic Islands' adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Asli Emine; Bibiloni, Maria Del Mar; Murcia, María Antonia; Pons, Antoni; Tur, Josep A

    2015-03-01

    To assess differences in adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) between consumers and non-consumers of functional foods among the Balearic Islands' adolescent population. Cross-sectional nutritional survey carried out (2007-2008) in the Balearic Islands, a Mediterranean region. Dietary assessment was based on a semi-quantitative FFQ and two non-consecutive 24 h recalls. Anthropometric measurements and questions related to socio-economic status, physical activity and adherence to the MD were assessed. Data obtained from a representative sample of all inhabitants living in the Balearic Islands aged 12-17 years. A random sample (n 1961) of the adolescent population was interviewed. The mean adherence to the MD among consumers of functional foods was 56.42 (sd 6.05) % and 55.76 (sd 5.41) % among non-consumers. Consumption of fruit juice, fibre-rich bread/cookies, cereal bars, fish and soya milk was higher among adolescents with high MD adherence, and consumption of modified milk, probiotics, breakfast cereals and infusions was higher among adolescents with low MD adherence. Daily intakes of functional dietary components from plant foods (dietary fibre, vitamins C and E, carotene, folic acid) were higher among adolescents with high MD adherence. The Balearic Islands' adolescent population had moderate adherence to the MD; higher adherence was observed among consumers of functional foods. Average daily intakes of functional foods and functional dietary components were higher among adolescents with high adherence to the MD. Gender, age and low parental education were risk factors for low adherence to the MD, mainly among non-consumers of functional foods.

  19. Revised WIC Food Package and Children’s Diet Quality

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Cindy W.; Crawford, Patricia B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In October 2009, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) food package was revised to include more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lower-fat milk. We examined the impact of the WIC food package revisions on the diet quality of children in households using WIC. METHODS: A total of 1197 children aged 2 to 4 years from low-income households were studied from before and after the policy implementation (using the 2003–2008 and 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). The Healthy Eating Index–2010 (HEI-2010) was calculated using two 24-hour diet recalls. Linear regression was used to examine the difference in HEI-2010 score attributable to the food package change, adjusting for baseline and secular trends among WIC participants and nonparticipants, as well as child and household characteristics. Component scores of the HEI-2010 index were analyzed with generalized linear models. RESULTS: Average HEI-2010 scores for participants and nonparticipants were 52.4 and 50.0 at baseline, and 58.3 and 52.4 after the policy change, respectively. The WIC food package revisions were associated with an adjusted average of 3.7 additional HEI-2010 points (95% confidence interval, 0.6–6.9) for WIC participants compared with nonparticipants. In particular, the revisions were associated with a 3.4-fold relative increase (95% confidence interval, 1.3–9.4) in the Greens and Beans component score for WIC participants compared with nonparticipants. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this national sample indicate that the WIC food package revisions were associated with higher diet quality for children participating in WIC. PMID:27244804

  20. Revised WIC Food Package and Children's Diet Quality.

    PubMed

    Tester, June M; Leung, Cindy W; Crawford, Patricia B

    2016-05-01

    In October 2009, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) food package was revised to include more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lower-fat milk. We examined the impact of the WIC food package revisions on the diet quality of children in households using WIC. A total of 1197 children aged 2 to 4 years from low-income households were studied from before and after the policy implementation (using the 2003-2008 and 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). The Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) was calculated using two 24-hour diet recalls. Linear regression was used to examine the difference in HEI-2010 score attributable to the food package change, adjusting for baseline and secular trends among WIC participants and nonparticipants, as well as child and household characteristics. Component scores of the HEI-2010 index were analyzed with generalized linear models. Average HEI-2010 scores for participants and nonparticipants were 52.4 and 50.0 at baseline, and 58.3 and 52.4 after the policy change, respectively. The WIC food package revisions were associated with an adjusted average of 3.7 additional HEI-2010 points (95% confidence interval, 0.6-6.9) for WIC participants compared with nonparticipants. In particular, the revisions were associated with a 3.4-fold relative increase (95% confidence interval, 1.3-9.4) in the Greens and Beans component score for WIC participants compared with nonparticipants. Results from this national sample indicate that the WIC food package revisions were associated with higher diet quality for children participating in WIC. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Diet cost, diet quality and socio-economic position: how are they related and what contributes to differences in diet costs?

    PubMed

    Rydén, Petra J; Hagfors, Linda

    2011-09-01

    To examine diet costs in relation to dietary quality and socio-economic position, and to investigate underlying reasons for differences in diet costs. Dietary intake was assessed by a 4 d food diary and evaluated using the 2005 Healthy Eating Index (HEI). National consumer food prices collected by Statistics Sweden and from two online stores/supermarkets were used to estimate diet costs. Sweden. A nationally representative sample of 2160 children aged 4, 8 or 11 years. Higher scores on the HEI resulted in higher diet costs and, conversely, higher diet costs were linked to increased total HEI scores. Children who consumed the most healthy and/or expensive diets ate a more energy-dilute and varied diet compared with those who ate the least healthy and/or least expensive diets. They also consumed more fish, ready meals and fruit. Regression analysis also linked increased food costs to these food groups. There was a positive, but weak, relationship between HEI score and diet cost, parental education and parental occupation respectively. Healthy eating is associated with higher diet cost in Swedish children, in part because of price differences between healthy and less-healthy foods. The cheapest and most unhealthy diets were found among those children whose parents were the least educated and had manual, low-skill occupations. Our results pose several challenges for public health policy makers, as well as for nutrition professionals, when forming dietary strategies and providing advice for macro- and microlevels in society.

  2. Effect of quantity, quality, and length of alfalfa hay on selective consumption by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, C; Armentano, L E

    2003-02-01

    Twenty-four lactating Holstein cows were used in a replicated 6 x 6 Latin square design. Experimental periods were 6 or 7 d. Cows were housed in tie-stalls, and diets were fed ad libitum twice daily at 1100 and 1600 h. Diets contained 60% concentrate and either 40% alfalfa hay or 20% alfalfa hay and 20% alfalfa silage (dry matter basis). The effect of quantity, quality, and length of hay on sorting behavior was determined. Treatments consisted of 20% lower or higher quality long alfalfa hay, 20% lower or higher quality chopped alfalfa hay, and 40% lower or higher quality chopped alfalfa hay. Variation of sorting among cows was also determined. Particle size distribution of samples of as-fed total mixed rations and orts were determined using the Wisconsin particle size separator. Screens have square holes with diagonals of 26.9, 18, 8.98, 5.61, and 1.65 mm (screens Y1 to Y5, respectively). Sorting was calculated as the actual intake of each fraction expressed as a percentage ofthe predicted intake. Increasing the proportion of dry hay increased sorting. Quality of alfalfa hays that were offered did not affect sorting activity. Feeding long alfalfa hay increased selective consumption of fine particles. However, feeding long alfalfa hay also increased intake of longer particles because a higher percentage of long particles was offered. Across treatments, animals consistently sorted against longer particles in favor of finer particles. In particular, intake of Y1 as a percentage of the predicted intake was the most variable. Average Y1 intake, across the six treatments for each cow, was between 60 and 70% of predicted intake for four cows, 71 to 80% for 11 cows, 81 to 90% for five cows, 91 to 100% for two cows, and 101 to 110% for two cows. On one diet a cow failed to consume any of the Y1 portion of the total mixed ration. This variation among animals in sorting of very long feed particles may have practical significance.

  3. Assessment of the Sustainability of the Mediterranean Diet Combined with Organic Food Consumption: An Individual Behaviour Approach

    PubMed Central

    Seconda, Louise; Baudry, Julia; Allès, Benjamin; Hamza, Oualid; Boizot-Szantai, Christine; Soler, Louis-Georges; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    Mediterranean diets are promising sustainable food models and the organic food system may provide health and environmental benefits. Combining the two models could therefore be a favourable approach for food sustainability. The aim of this study was to draw up a comparative description of four diets differing in the level of organic foods consumption and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, using multidisciplinary indicators to assess the sustainability of these diets. Four groups of participants were defined and compared, combining the proportion of organic food in their diet (Org versus Conv) and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med versus NoMed). Conv–NoMed: Conventional consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Conv–Med: Conventional consumers and Mediterranean diet followers; Org–NoMed: Organic consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Org–Med: Organic consumers and Mediterranean diet followers. The adherence to nutritional recommendations was higher among the Org–Med and Conv–Med groups compared to the Conv–NoMed group (using the mPNNS-GS (modified-Programme National nutrition santé guidelines score/13.5 points): 9.29 (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.23–9.36) and 9.30 (95% CI = 9.24–9.35) versus 8.19 (95% CI = 8.17–8.22)) respectively. The mean plant/animal protein intake ratio was 1.38 (95% CI = 1.01–1.74) for the Org–Med group versus 0.44 (95% CI = 0.28–0.60) for the Conv–NoMed group. The average cost of the diet of Org–Med participants was the highest: 11.43 €/day (95% CI = 11.34–11.52). This study highlighted the importance of promoting the Mediterranean diet combined with organic food consumption for individual health and environmental aspects but challenges with regard to the cost remain. PMID:28085096

  4. Mangoes are associated with better nutrient intake, diet quality, and levels of some cardiovascular risk factors: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies assessing mango consumption and the association with nutrient intake, diet quality, and health biomarkers are lacking. This study assessed these associations using a nationally representative sample of children 2-18 years old (n=11,974; 50% female) and adults 19+ years (n=17,568; 48.8% femal...

  5. Diet quality is lower and energy intake higher on weekends compared to weekdays in midlife women: A one-year cohort study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Differences in energy and macronutrient intakes by weekday and weekend have been reported, but there are little data on differences in food group consumption and indices of diet quality. Objective: To describe dietary intake by day and on weekends compared to weekdays. Design: One-year c...

  6. Choosing a beverage: comparison of preferences and beliefs related to the reported consumption of regular vs. diet sodas.

    PubMed

    Tuorila, H; Pangborn, R M; Schutz, H G

    1990-02-01

    In a survey conducted among American females (N = 100, mean age = 20.8 years), consumption of regular and diet sodas and related beliefs and concerns were measured. Based on reported frequencies of consumption, 30 could be classified as users of regular and 44 as users of diet sodas, while 20 subjects did not use either. Both user groups reported liking for their "own" sodas and dislike for the "other" sodas, and non-users did not like either. Beliefs best differentiating among the three groups were: (1) superiority of taste of their "own" sodas, (2) perceived efficiency to quench thirst, and (3) perceived compatibility with other menu items. Users of diet sodas and the non-users were more concerned about weight-related issues than users of regular sodas, who had less concerned attitudes. The users of regular sodas also reported a significantly higher frequency of consumption of several foods high in sugar, fat and/or sodium. Thus, the selection of one's principal soda is not only a choice between two beverages but may be an indication of a particular consumption style and reflect a whole set of attitudes towards one's own body.

  7. Consumption of soft drinks and health-related quality of life in the adult population.

    PubMed

    Lana, A; Lopez-Garcia, E; Rodríguez-Artalejo, F

    2015-11-01

    Despite the accumulated evidence on the health risks associated with sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), the industry has funded mass communication strategies promoting the idea that soft drinks, including SSB, may represent a source of well-being. This study assessed the association between consumption of soft drinks and health-related quality of life (HRQL), as a proxy of well-being, in the adult population of Spain. The cohort was established in 2008-2010 with 8417 individuals representative of the Spanish population aged 18-60 years. Habitual soft drink consumption was assessed with a validated diet history at baseline. HRQL was measured using the SF-12 questionnaire at baseline and in a subsample of 2132 study participants in 2012. The analyses were performed using linear regression and adjusted for the main confounders. In cross-sectional analyses at baseline, those who drank ⩾1 serving/day of SSB had a lower (worse) score on the physical composite summary (PCS) of the SF-12 (adjusted linear regression coefficient: -1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.60 to -0.54) than those who drank <1 serving/week. Results were similar among individuals younger than 35 years (-1.06; 95% CI: -1.79 to -0.32), those who were not dieting (-1.21; 95% CI: -1.80 to -0.62), those who did not lose >5 kg in the previous 4 years (-0.79; 95% CI: -1.87 to 0.29), and in those without morbidity (-1.18; 95% CI: -1.91 to -0.46). Neither SSBs nor artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) showed an association with the mental composite summary (MCS) of the SF-12. In the prospective analyses, no association was observed between baseline consumption of SSBs or ASBs and the changes in the PCS and MCS score from 2008/2010 to 2012. No evidence was found that soft drink consumption has a beneficial effect on either the physical or mental dimensions of HRQL.

  8. The Nutrient Balance Concept: A New Quality Metric for Composite Meals and Diets

    PubMed Central

    Fern, Edward B; Watzke, Heribert; Barclay, Denis V.; Roulin, Anne; Drewnowski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background Combinations of foods that provide suitable levels of nutrients and energy are required for optimum health. Currently, however, it is difficult to define numerically what are ‘suitable levels’. Objective To develop new metrics based on energy considerations—the Nutrient Balance Concept (NBC)—for assessing overall nutrition quality when combining foods and meals. Method The NBC was developed using the USDA Food Composition Database (Release 27) and illustrated with their MyPlate 7-day sample menus for a 2000 calorie food pattern. The NBC concept is centered on three specific metrics for a given food, meal or diet—a Qualifying Index (QI), a Disqualifying Index (DI) and a Nutrient Balance (NB). The QI and DI were determined, respectively, from the content of 27 essential nutrients and 6 nutrients associated with negative health outcomes. The third metric, the Nutrient Balance (NB), was derived from the Qualifying Index (QI) and provided key information on the relative content of qualifying nutrients in the food. Because the Qualifying and Disqualifying Indices (QI and DI) were standardized to energy content, both become constants for a given food/meal/diet and a particular consumer age group, making it possible to develop algorithms for predicting nutrition quality when combining different foods. Results Combining different foods into composite meals and daily diets led to improved nutrition quality as seen by QI values closer to unity (indicating nutrient density was better equilibrated with energy density), DI values below 1.0 (denoting an acceptable level of consumption of disqualifying nutrients) and increased NB values (signifying complementarity of foods and better provision of qualifying nutrients). Conclusion The Nutrient Balance Concept (NBC) represents a new approach to nutrient profiling and the first step in the progression from the nutrient evaluation of individual foods to that of multiple foods in the context of meals and total

  9. Fast-food consumers in Singapore: demographic profile, diet quality and weight status.

    PubMed

    Whitton, Clare; Ma, Yi; Bastian, Amber Carla; Fen Chan, Mei; Chew, Ling

    2014-08-01

    To determine the demographic profile of fast-food consumers among adult Singapore residents and ascertain whether fast-food consumption frequency is associated with diet quality and weight status. A nationally representative cross-sectional survey including an FFQ and anthropometric measures. Participants were grouped based on their fast-food consumption frequency as non-consumer, occasional consumer or regular consumer, with regular defined as at least once per week. Individuals living in the community in Singapore. Singapore residents (n 1627) aged 18-69 years of Chinese, Malay and Indian ethnicity. Proportions of regular fast-food consumers were higher in younger age groups, higher income groups and middle education level groups. Mean daily energy intake was positively associated with fast-food consumption frequency (non-consumers 9636 kJ (2303 kcal); occasional consumers 11 159 kJ (2667 kcal); regular consumers 13 100 kJ (3131 kcal); P for trend < 0·001). Fast-food consumers were more likely to exceed the RDA for energy, fat and saturated fat, and less likely to meet wholegrain and fruit recommendations. Both regular consumers (OR = 1·24; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·51) and occasional consumers (OR = 1·52; 95 % CI 1·32, 1·77) were more likely to have a waist:hip ratio indicating abdominal obesity. Occasional consumers were more likely to have a BMI ≥ 23·0 kg/m2 (OR = 1·19; 95 % CI 1·04, 1·37), whereas regular consumers were less likely (OR = 0·76; 95 % CI 0·64, 0·91) to have an 'at-risk' BMI. Fast-food consumption is most prevalent in young adults, high income and middle education level groups. Frequent fast-food consumption in Singapore is associated with unfavourable dietary and nutrient profiles and abdominal obesity.

  10. Fish consumption among young overweight European adults and compliance to varying seafood content in four weight loss intervention diets.

    PubMed

    Thorsdottir, I; Birgisdottir, Be; Kiely, M; Martinez, Ja; Bandarra, Nm

    2009-05-01

    Fish is considered an important part of a healthy diet and is frequently recommended as a main course at least twice a week. To study the frequency of fish consumption among young overweight European adults and their compliance to varying seafood consumption in weight loss intervention diets. After meeting the inclusion criteria, the subject's seafood intake was evaluated. Subjects were randomly assigned into four groups and were advised energy-restricted diets for 8 weeks, including no seafood (control), cod, salmon or fish oil. A validated FFQ was used to evaluate the consumption of seafood at baseline, midpoint and endpoint, and long-chain n-3 fatty acids in blood erythrocytes were measured. Iceland, Ireland and Spain. The sample (n 324); 20-40-year-olds with BMI = 27.5-32.5 kg/m2; 85 % participated. At baseline, 34 % of the participants reported eating fish at least twice a week as the main course. During the intervention, six participants reported that they did not finish their fish portions, 15 % of the participants consumed small amount of fish additional to the study protocol in weeks 1-4 and 23 % in weeks 5-8 (P = 0.010). Changes in erythrocyte long-chain n-3 fatty acids confirmed good compliance, with increases in the salmon (P < 0.001) and fish oil (P < 0.001) groups, smaller increase in the cod group (P = 0.037) and decrease in the control group (P = 0.030). Frequency of fish consumption among 66 % of young European overweight adults is lower than frequently recommended. Compliance to varying seafood consumption was good. Therefore, including more fish in the diet of this group should be encouraged.

  11. A cohort study on diet and the risk of Parkinson's disease: the role of food groups and diet quality.

    PubMed

    Sääksjärvi, K; Knekt, P; Lundqvist, A; Männistö, S; Heliövaara, M; Rissanen, H; Järvinen, R

    2013-01-28

    Previous studies on individual foods and nutrients and Parkinson's disease (PD) risk have been inconsistent. Furthermore, only one study has examined the association between the quality of diet and PD. We investigated the prediction of food groups and diet quality on PD in the Finnish Mobile Clinic Survey (1966-72). The population comprised 4524 individuals, aged 40-79 years and free from PD at baseline. Data collection included health examinations, a questionnaire and a 1-year dietary history interview. A modified Alternate Healthy Eating Index was formed to assess diet quality. Statistical analyses were based on Cox's model. During a 41-year follow-up, eighty-five incident cases of PD occurred. No statistically significant associations were found between PD incidence and most of the food groups examined. A few exceptions were fruits and berries in men and milk in women, which showed positive associations. An inverse association between the intake of meat products and PD was found in women. The diet quality index did not predict PD, the adjusted relative risk between the highest and lowest quartiles being 1.83 (95 % CI 0.65, 5.18) in men and 0.97 (95 % CI 0.38, 2.48) in women. The present study suggests that since most of the single food groups or the quality of diet did not predict PD occurrence, the role of diet is apparently rather modest.

  12. Impact of dairy and sweetened beverage consumption on diet and weight of a multiethnic population of head start mothers.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Carol E; Nicklas, Theresa A; Liu, Yan; Franklin, Frank A

    2009-05-01

    Mothers with children in Head Start play a critical role in providing healthful diets and modeling good dietary behaviors to their children, but there is little information available on their diet, especially on beverage consumption. The objective of this study was to assess the association of milk and sweetened beverage consumption with nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, and weight of a multiethnic population of Head Start mothers. Using a cross-sectional, secondary analysis, African-American (43%), Hispanic (33%), and white (24%) women (n=609) were divided into four beverage consumption groups: high milk/low sweetened beverage, high milk/high sweetened beverage, low milk/low sweetened beverage, and low milk/high sweetened beverage. Nutrient intake was determined by averaging 24-hour dietary recalls from 3 nonconsecutive days. Dietary adequacy was determined with the Mean Adequacy Ratio. Mean body mass index for the four beverage consumption groups was compared; there were no differences among the groups (overall mean+/-standard error=30.8+/-0.3). Women in the high milk/low sweetened beverage group had higher mean intakes of vitamins A, D, and B-6; riboflavin; thiamin; folate; phosphorus; calcium; iron; magnesium; and potassium (P<0.0125 for all) when compared with the other beverage consumption groups. Mean Adequacy Ratio was highest in the high milk/low sweetened beverage (71.8+/-0.8) and lowest in the low milk/high sweetened beverage (58.4+/-0.8) consumption groups (P<0.0125). Women in the high milk/low sweetened beverage group consumed more nutrient-dense foods. Overall consumption of milk was low. Consumption of high milk/low sweetened beverage was associated with improved nutrient intake, including the shortfall nutrients, ie, calcium, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin A.

  13. Impact of Dairy and Sweetened Beverage Consumption on Diet and Weight of a Multiethnic Population of Head Start Mothers

    PubMed Central

    O’NEIL, CAROL E.; NICKLAS, THERESA A.; LIU, YAN; FRANKLIN, FRANK A.

    2009-01-01

    Mothers with children in Head Start play a critical role in providing healthful diets and modeling good dietary behaviors to their children, but there is little information available on their diet, especially on beverage consumption. The objective of this study was to assess the association of milk and sweetened beverage consumption with nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, and weight of a multiethnic population of Head Start mothers. Using a cross-sectional, secondary analysis, African-American (43%), Hispanic (33%), and white (24%) women (n=609) were divided into four beverage consumption groups: high milk/low sweetened beverage, high milk/high sweetened beverage, low milk/low sweetened beverage, and low milk/high sweetened beverage. Nutrient intake was determined by averaging 24-hour dietary recalls from 3 nonconsecutive days. Dietary adequacy was determined with the Mean Adequacy Ratio. Mean body mass index for the four beverage consumption groups was compared; there were no differences among the groups (overall mean±standard error=30.8±0.3). Women in the high milk/low sweetened beverage group had higher mean intakes of vitamins A, D, and B-6; riboflavin; thiamin; folate; phosphorus; calcium; iron; magnesium; and potassium (P<0.0125 for all) when compared with the other beverage consumption groups. Mean Adequacy Ratio was highest in the high milk/low sweetened beverage (71.8±0.8) and lowest in the low milk/high sweetened beverage (58.4±0.8) consumption groups (P<0.0125). Women in the high milk/low sweetened beverage group consumed more nutrient-dense foods. Overall consumption of milk was low. Consumption of high milk/low sweetened beverage was associated with improved nutrient intake, including the shortfall nutrients, ie, calcium, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin A. PMID:19394474

  14. [Diet quality of preschool children aged 2 to 5 years living in the urban area of Pelotas, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Leal, Katharine Konrad; Schneider, Bruna Celestino; França, Giovanny Vinicius Araújo; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; dos Santos, Iná; Assunção, Maria Cecília Formoso

    2015-01-01

    To assess the dietary quality of preschool children in the urban area of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Dietary quality was measured according to the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), adapted to Brazil. Food consumption was obtained using the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). The index score was obtained by a score, ranging from 0 to 100, distributed in 13 food groups that characterize different components of a healthy diet. The better the quality of the diet, the closer the score is to 100. Dietary was evaluated in 556 preschoolers. The mean HEI score value was 74.4 points, indicating that diets need improvement. The mean scores were significantly higher among girls and in children from families with income between one and less than three minimum wages. The children showed vegetable consumption below the recommended level, while the food group of oils and fats, as well as the group of sugars, candies, chocolates and snacks were consumed in excess. It is important to reinforce guidelines to promote healthier eating habits, which may persist later in life. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Health and nutrition economics: diet costs are associated with diet quality.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Yu-Hung; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2009-01-01

    The WHO asserts that the global food price crisis threatens public health and jeopardizes the health of the most disadvantaged groups such as women, children, the elderly and low-income families. Economic factors play a crucial role and could affect personal nutrition status and health. Economic decision factors such as food price and income do influence people's food choices. Moreover, food costs are a barrier for low income-families to healthier food choices. Several studies indicate that diet costs are associated with dietary quality and also food safety. Food prices have surged over the past couple of years (2007-9) and raised serious concerns about food security around the world. Rising food prices are having severe impacts on population health and nutritional status. Therefore, people who change their diet pattern for economic reasons may develop a range of nutritionally-related disorders and diseases, from so-called over-nutrition to or with under-nutrition even within the one household. This is likely to increase with growing food insecurity. Presently, economics is not integrated with mainstream nutrition science or practice, other than in "home economics", but it can enable greater understanding of how socioeconomic status may interplay with human nutritional status and health and how these situations might be resolved. Collaborative, cross-disciplinary nutritional economics research should play a greater role in the prevention and management of food crises.

  16. Chronic coffee consumption in the diet-induced obese rat: impact on gut microbiota and serum metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Theresa E; Palmnäs, Marie S A; Yang, Jaeun; Bomhof, Marc R; Ardell, Kendra L; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Shearer, Jane

    2014-04-01

    Epidemiological data confirms a strong negative association between regular coffee consumption and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Coffee is initially absorbed in the stomach and small intestine but is further fermented in the colon by gut microbiota. The bioavailability, production and biological activity of coffee polyphenols is modulated, in part, by gut microbiota. The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic coffee consumption could mitigate negative gut microbiota and metabolomic profile changes induced by a high-fat diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to chow (12% kcal fat) or high-fat (60% kcal fat) diet. Each group was further divided into water or caffeinated coffee for 10 weeks. Coffee consumption in high-fat-fed rats was associated with decreased body weight, adiposity, liver triglycerides and energy intake. Despite a more favorable body composition, rats displayed profound systemic insulin resistance, likely due to caffeine. Coffee consumption attenuated the increase in Firmicutes (F)-to-Bacteroidetes (B) ratio and Clostridium Cluster XI normally associated with high-fat feeding but also resulted in augmented levels of Enterobacteria. In the serum metabolome, coffee had a distinct impact, increasing levels of aromatic and circulating short-chain fatty acids while lowering levels of branched-chain amino acids. In summary, coffee consumption is able to alter gut microbiota in high-fat-fed rats although the role of these changes in reducing diabetes risk is unclear given the increased insulin resistance observed with coffee in this study.

  17. The Mediterranean Diet Score Is More Strongly Associated with Favorable Cardiometabolic Risk Factors over 2 Years than Other Diet Quality Indexes in Puerto Rican Adults.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Josiemer; Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Bigornia, Sherman J; Noel, Sabrina E; Tucker, Katherine L

    2017-03-08

    Background: Multiple diet quality scores have been used to evaluate adherence to specific dietary recommendations or to consumption of healthful foods and nutrients. It remains unknown which score can more strongly predict longitudinal changes in cardiometabolic risk factors.Objective: We aimed to determine associations of 5 diet quality scores [AHA diet score (AHA-DS), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2005, Mediterranean diet score (MeDS), and Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)] with 2-y changes in cardiometabolic risk factors in adults 45-75 y old.Methods: Data from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study were analyzed (n = 1194). Diet quality scores were calculated from a baseline-validated food-frequency questionnaire. Multivariable-adjusted, repeated-subjects, mixed-effects models, adjusted for baseline measures, estimated associations between each z score and 14 individual cardiometabolic factors measured at 2 y.Results: MeDS was significantly associated with lower 2-y waist circumference (β coefficient ± SE: -0.52 ± 0.26, P = 0.048); body mass index (BMI; -0.23 ± 0.08, P = 0.005); log-insulin (-0.06 ± 0.02, P = 0.005); log-homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; -0.05 ± 0.02, P = 0.030), and log-C-reactive protein (-0.13 ± 0.03, P = 0.0002). Similar but weaker associations were observed for the AHEI with BMI, insulin, and HOMA-IR. The AHA-DS was inversely associated with BMI (-0.17 ± 0.08, P = 0.033). Neither the HEI-2005 nor DASH was significantly associated with any variable. Traditional Puerto Rican foods consumed by individuals with high MeDSs included vegetables and meats in homemade soups, orange juice, oatmeal, beans and legumes, fish, whole milk, corn oil, and beer.Conclusions: The MeDS comprises food components and scores associated with a favorable cardiometabolic profile over 2 y in Puerto Rican adults. An overall healthy diet may be particularly beneficial for maintaining a

  18. Consumption of diets high in prebiotic fiber or protein during growth influences the response to a high fat and sucrose diet in adulthood in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Early dietary exposure can influence susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes later in life. We examined the lasting effects of a high protein or high prebiotic fiber weaning diet when followed by a high energy diet in adulthood. Methods At birth, litters of Wistar rats were culled to 10 pups. At 21 d pups were weaned onto control (C), high prebiotic fiber (HF) or high protein (HP) diet. Rats consumed the experimental diets until 14 wk when they were switched to a high fat/sucrose (HFHS) diet for 6 wk. Body composition and energy intake were measured and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed. Blood was analyzed for satiety hormones and tissues collected for real-time PCR. Results Weight gain was attenuated in male rats fed HF from 12 wk until study completion. In females there were early reductions in body weight that moderated until the final two wk of HFHS diet wherein HF females weighed less than HP. Final body weight was significantly higher following the high fat challenge in male and female rats that consumed HP diet from weaning compared to HF. Lean mass was higher and fat mass lower with HF compared to HP and compared to C in males. Energy intake was highest in HP rats, particularly at the start of HFHS feeding. Plasma glucose was higher in HP rats compared to HF during an OGTT. Plasma amylin was higher in HF females compared to C and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was higher in HF rats during the OGTT. Leptin was higher in HP rats during the OGTT. HF upregulated GLUT 5 mRNA expression in the intestine and downregulated hepatic hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Male rats fed HP had higher hepatic triglyceride content than C or HF. Conclusion These data suggest that while a long-term diet high in protein predisposes to an obese phenotype when rats are given a high energy diet in adulthood, consumption of a high fiber diet during growth may provide some protection. PMID:20920272

  19. Equol status and blood lipid profile in hyperlipidemia after consumption of diets containing soy foods.

    PubMed

    Wong, Julia M W; Kendall, Cyril W C; Marchie, Augustine; Liu, Zhen; Vidgen, Ed; Holmes, Candice; Jackson, Chung-Ja; Josse, Robert G; Pencharz, Paul B; Rao, A Venketeshwer; Vuksan, Vladimir; Singer, William; Jenkins, David J A

    2012-03-01

    Recent analyses have challenged the effectiveness of soy foods as part of a cardiovascular risk reduction diet. The objective of the study was to show whether equol status determines the effectiveness of soy foods to lower LDL cholesterol and to raise HDL cholesterol. Eighty-five hypercholesterolemic men and postmenopausal women (42 men, 43 women) participated in 1 of 3 studies that represented a range of soy interventions and that followed the same general protocol at a Canadian university hospital research center. Soy foods were provided for 1 mo at doses of 30-52 g/d for the 3 studies as follows: 1) soy foods with either high-normal (73 mg/d) or low (10 mg/d) isoflavones, 2) soy foods with or without a prebiotic to enhance colonic fermentation (10 g polyfructans/d), or 3) soy foods with a low-carbohydrate diet (26% carbohydrate). Studies 1 and 2 were randomized controlled crossover trials, and study 3 was a parallel study. The separation of the group into equol producers (n = 30) and nonproducers (n = 55) showed similar reductions from baseline in LDL cholesterol (-9.3 ± 2.5% and -11.1 ± 1.6%, respectively; P = 0.834), with preservation of HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I only in equol producers compared with reductions in nonproducers (HDL cholesterol: +0.9 ± 2.7% compared with -4.3 ± 1.1%, P = 0.006; apolipoprotein A-I: -1.0 ± 1.1% compared with -4.7 ± 1.0%; P = 0.011). The amount of urinary equol excreted did not relate to the changes in blood lipids. Soy foods reduced serum LDL cholesterol equally in both equol producers and nonproducers. However, in equol producers, ~35% of our study population, soy consumption had the added cardiovascular benefit of maintaining higher HDL-cholesterol concentrations than those seen in equol nonproducers. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00877825 (study 1), NCT00516594 (study 2), and NCT00256516 (study 3).

  20. Diet-Quality Scores and Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Population Study Using Proton-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ruth; Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun; Chu, Winnie Chiu-Wing; Wong, Grace Lai-Hung; Li, Liz Sin; Leung, Jason; Chim, Angel Mei-Ling; Yeung, David Ka-Wai; Sea, Mandy Man-Mei; Woo, Jean; Chan, Francis Ka-Leung; Chan, Henry Lik-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Dietary pattern analysis is an alternative approach to examine the association between diet and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study examined the association of two diet-quality scores, namely Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) and Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) with NAFLD prevalence. Apparently healthy Chinese adults (332 male, 465 female) aged 18 years or above were recruited through a population screening between 2008 and 2010 in a cross-sectional population-based study in Hong Kong. DQI-I and MDS, as well as major food group and nutrient intakes were calculated based on dietary data from a food frequency questionnaire. NAFLD was defined as intrahepatic triglyceride content at ≥5% by proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the association between each diet-quality score or dietary component and prevalent NAFLD with adjustment for potential lifestyle, metabolic and genetic factors. A total of 220 subjects (27.6%) were diagnosed with NAFLD. DQI-I but not MDS was associated with the prevalence of NAFLD. A 10-unit decrease in DQI-I was associated with 24% increase in the likelihood of having NAFLD in the age and sex adjusted model (95% CI: 1.06-1.45, p = 0.009), and the association remained significant when the model was further adjusted for other lifestyle factors, metabolic and genetic factors [OR: 1.26 (95% CI: 1.03-1.54), p = 0.027]. Multivariate regression analyses showed an inverse association of the intake of vegetables and legumes, fruits and dried fruits, as well as vitamin C with the NAFLD prevalence (p<0.05). In conclusion, a better diet quality as characterized by a higher DQI-I and a higher consumption of vegetables, legumes and fruits was associated with a reduced likelihood of having NAFLD in Hong Kong Chinese.

  1. Diet-Quality Scores and Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Population Study Using Proton-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ruth; Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun; Chu, Winnie Chiu-Wing; Wong, Grace Lai-Hung; Li, Liz Sin; Leung, Jason; Chim, Angel Mei-Ling; Yeung, David Ka-Wai; Sea, Mandy Man-Mei; Woo, Jean; Chan, Francis Ka-Leung; Chan, Henry Lik-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Dietary pattern analysis is an alternative approach to examine the association between diet and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study examined the association of two diet-quality scores, namely Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) and Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) with NAFLD prevalence. Apparently healthy Chinese adults (332 male, 465 female) aged 18 years or above were recruited through a population screening between 2008 and 2010 in a cross-sectional population-based study in Hong Kong. DQI-I and MDS, as well as major food group and nutrient intakes were calculated based on dietary data from a food frequency questionnaire. NAFLD was defined as intrahepatic triglyceride content at ≥5% by proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the association between each diet-quality score or dietary component and prevalent NAFLD with adjustment for potential lifestyle, metabolic and genetic factors. A total of 220 subjects (27.6%) were diagnosed with NAFLD. DQI-I but not MDS was associated with the prevalence of NAFLD. A 10-unit decrease in DQI-I was associated with 24% increase in the likelihood of having NAFLD in the age and sex adjusted model (95% CI: 1.06–1.45, p = 0.009), and the association remained significant when the model was further adjusted for other lifestyle factors, metabolic and genetic factors [OR: 1.26 (95% CI: 1.03–1.54), p = 0.027]. Multivariate regression analyses showed an inverse association of the intake of vegetables and legumes, fruits and dried fruits, as well as vitamin C with the NAFLD prevalence (p<0.05). In conclusion, a better diet quality as characterized by a higher DQI-I and a higher consumption of vegetables, legumes and fruits was associated with a reduced likelihood of having NAFLD in Hong Kong Chinese. PMID:26418083

  2. Association of breakfast energy density with diet quality and body mass index in American adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ashima K; Andon, Mark B; Angelopoulos, Theodore J; Rippe, James M

    2008-11-01

    Recent reports suggest that dietary energy density (ED) is associated with diet quality, energy intake, and body weight. Breakfast consumption was also associated with diet quality and body weight; however, little is known about the association of breakfast consumption with dietary ED. We examined differences in the ED (in energy content/g of food) of diets between breakfast consumers and nonconsumers, and in breakfast reporters we examined the association of ED of breakfast foods with ED of nonbreakfast foods, diet quality, and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). We combined dietary data from the 3 continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (1999-2004) to determine the ED (in kcal/g) of foods and nutritive beverages and the ED of foods only (n = 12 316; >or=20 y). Linear and logistic regression methods were used to examine the independent associations of breakfast reporting or breakfast ED with 24-h ED, nonbreakfast ED, diet quality, and BMI. The ED of 24-h dietary intake was lower among breakfast reporters than among nonreporters. Women breakfast reporters (but not men) had lower BMI than did nonreporters (27.9 +/- 0.2 compared with 29.4 +/- 0.4; P = 0.001). With increasing breakfast ED, nonbreakfast ED and fat intake increased, but micronutrient intake and the likelihood of mention of all 5 food groups declined. BMI increased with increasing breakfast ED in men but with increasing nonbreakfast ED in women (P consumption and suggest that the ED of breakfast was associated with diet quality, overall diet ED, and body weight.

  3. Maternal and postnatal high-fat diet consumption programs energy balance and hypothalamic melanocortin signaling in nonhuman primate offspring.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Elinor L; Rivera, Heidi M; True, Cadence A; Franco, Juliana G; Baquero, Karalee; Dean, Tyler A; Valleau, Jeanette C; Takahashi, Diana L; Frazee, Tim; Hanna, Genevieve; Kirigiti, Melissa A; Bauman, Leigh A; Grove, Kevin L; Kievit, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Maternal high-fat-diet (HFD) consumption during pregnancy decreased fetal body weight and impacted development of hypothalamic melanocortin neural circuitry in nonhuman primate offspring. We investigated whether these impairments during gestation persisted in juvenile offspring and examined the interaction between maternal and early postnatal HFD consumption. Adult dams consumed either a control diet (CTR; 15% calories from fat) or a high-saturated-fat diet (HFD; 37% calories from fat) during pregnancy. Offspring were weaned onto a CTR or HFD at ~8 mo of age. Offspring from HFD-fed dams displayed early catch-up growth and elevated body weight at 6 and 13 mo of age. Maternal and postnatal HFD exposure reduced the amount of agouti-related peptide fibers in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Postnatal HFD consumption also decreased the amount of agouti-related peptide fibers in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Postnatal HFD was associated with decreased food intake and increased activity. These results support and extend our previous findings of maternal diet effects on fetal development and reveal, for the first time in a nonhuman primate model, that maternal HFD-induced disturbances in offspring body weight regulation extended past gestation into the juvenile period. Maternal HFD consumption increases the risk for offspring developing obesity, with the developmental timing of HFD exposure differentially impacting the melanocortin system and energy balance regulation. The present findings provide translational insight into human clinical populations, suggesting that profound health consequences may await individuals later in life following intrauterine and postnatal HFD exposure. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Vitamin D3: A Role in Dopamine Circuit Regulation, Diet-Induced Obesity, and Drug Consumption123

    PubMed Central

    Land, Benjamin B.; Wickham, Robert J.; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; de Araujo, Ivan E.; Addy, Nii A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The influence of micronutrients on dopamine systems is not well defined. Using mice, we show a potential role for reduced dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in promoting diet-induced obesity (DIO), food intake, and drug consumption while on a high fat diet. To complement these deficiency studies, treatments with exogenous fully active vitamin D3 (calcitriol, 10 µg/kg, i.p.) were performed. Nondeficient mice that were made leptin resistant with a high fat diet displayed reduced food intake and body weight after an acute treatment with exogenous calcitriol. Dopamine neurons in the midbrain and their target neurons in the striatum were found to express vitamin D3 receptor protein. Acute calcitriol treatment led to transcriptional changes of dopamine-related genes in these regions in naive mice, enhanced amphetamine-induced dopamine release in both naive mice and rats, and increased locomotor activity after acute amphetamine treatment (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Alternatively, mice that were chronically fed either the reduced D3 high fat or chow diets displayed less activity after acute amphetamine treatment compared with their respective controls. Finally, high fat deficient mice that were trained to orally consume liquid amphetamine (90 mg/L) displayed increased consumption, while nondeficient mice treated with calcitriol showed reduced consumption. Our findings suggest that reduced dietary D3 may be a contributing environmental factor enhancing DIO as well as drug intake while eating a high fat diet. Moreover, these data demonstrate that dopamine circuits are modulated by D3 signaling, and may serve as direct or indirect targets for exogenous calcitriol. PMID:27257625

  5. Isolation stress exposure and consumption of palatable diet during the prepubertal period leads to cellular changes in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Krolow, R; Noschang, C; Arcego, D M; Pettenuzzo, L F; Weis, S N; Marcolin, M L; Huffell, A P; Mota, C S; Dalmaz, C

    2013-02-01

    Social isolation is one of the most potent stressors in the prepubertal period and may influence disease susceptibility or resilience in adulthood. The glucocorticoid response and, consequently, the adaptive response to stress involve important changes in mitochondrial functions and apoptotic signaling. Previous studies have shown that consumption of a palatable diet reduces some stress effects. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether isolation stress in early life can lead to cellular alterations in the hippocampus. For this, we evaluated oxidative stress parameters, DNA breakage index, mitochondrial mass and potential, respiratory chain enzyme activities, apoptosis, and necrosis in the hippocampus of juvenile male rats submitted or not to isolation stress during the pre-puberty period. We also verified whether consumption of a palatable diet during this period can modify stress effects. Results show that stress led to an oxidative imbalance, DNA breaks, increased the mitochondrial potential and early apoptosis, and decreased the number of live and necrotic cells. In addition, the palatable diet increased glutathione peroxidase activity, high mitochondrial potential and complex I-III activity in the hippocampus of juvenile rats. The administration of a palatable diet during the isolation period prevented the stress effects that caused the reduction in live cells and increased apoptosis. In conclusion, the stress experienced during the pre-pubertal period induced a hippocampal oxidative imbalance, DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased apoptosis, while consumption of a palatable diet attenuated some of these effects of exposure, such as the reduction in live cells and increased apoptosis, besides favoring an increase in antioxidant enzymes activities.

  6. Home food environment in relation to children's diet quality and weight status.

    PubMed

    Couch, Sarah C; Glanz, Karen; Zhou, Chuan; Sallis, James F; Saelens, Brian E

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this cohort study was to explore relationships among the home food environment (HFE), child/parent characteristics, diet quality, and measured weight status among 699 child-parent pairs from King County, WA, and San Diego County, CA. HFE variables included parenting style/feeding practices, food rules, frequency of eating out, home food availability, and parents' perceptions of food costs. Child dietary intake was measured by 3-day recall and diet quality indicators included fruits and vegetables, sweet/savory snacks, high-calorie beverages, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score. Individual linear regression models were run in which child BMI z score and child diet quality indicators were dependent variables and HFE variables and child/parent characteristics were independent variables of interest. Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with parental encouragement/modeling (β=.68, P<0.001) and unhealthful food availability (-0.27, P<0.05); DASH score with food availability (healthful: 1.3, P<0.01; unhealthful: -2.25, P<0.001), food rules (0.45, P<0.01), and permissive feeding style (-1.04, P<0.05); high-calorie beverages with permissive feeding style (0.14, P<0.01) and unhealthful food availability (0.21, P<0.001); and sweet/savory snacks with healthful food availability (0.26, P<0.05; unexpectedly positive). Children's BMI z score was positively associated with parent's use of food restriction (0.21, P<0.001), permissive feeding style (0.16, P<0.05), and concern for healthy food costs (0.10, P<0.01), but negatively with verbal encouragement/modeling (-0.17, P<0.05), and pressure to eat (-0.34, P<0.001). Various HFE factors associated with parenting around eating and food availability are related to child diet quality and weight status. These factors should be considered when designing interventions for improving child health.

  7. The quality and monetary value of diets consumed by adults in the United States123

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Colin D; Drewnowski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Background: Food prices are an established determinant of food choice and may affect diet quality. Research on diet cost and diet quality in representative populations has been hindered by lack of data. Objective: We sought to explore the distribution of diet cost and diet quality among strata of the US population and to examine the association between the 2 variables. Design: In this cross-sectional study, monetary costs of diets consumed by participants in the 2001–2002 NHANES were estimated with the use of a national food price database. Healthy Eating Index (HEI)–2005 values were estimated with the use of the population ratio method for the calculation of average scores. Mean daily diet costs, energy-adjusted diet costs, and HEI-2005 scores were estimated for subpopulations of interest. Associations between energy-adjusted diet cost, HEI-2005 scores, and HEI-2005 component scores were evaluated. Results: Higher energy-adjusted diet costs were significantly associated with being older and non-Hispanic white, having a higher income and education, and living in a food-secure household. Higher diet costs were also associated with higher HEI-2005 scores for both men and women. Women in the highest quintile of diet costs had a mean HEI-2005 score of 69.6 compared with 52.5 for women in the lowest-cost quintile. Higher diet cost was strongly associated with consuming more servings of fruit and vegetables and fewer calories from solid fat, alcoholic beverages, and added sugars. Conclusion: Given the observed association between diet cost and diet quality, helping consumers select affordable yet nutritious diets ought to be a priority for researchers and health professionals. PMID:21918223

  8. Diet of stoats ( Mustela erminea) in an Alpine habitat:The importance of fruit consumption in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinoli, Adriano; Preatoni, Damiano G.; Chiarenzi, Barbara; Wauters, Luc A.; Tosi, Guido

    2001-02-01

    The diet of stoat, Mustela erminea, in the Italian Alps was studied from May to October 1996 and 1997 through faecal analysis. Scats were collected along twenty transects and near dens within a 10-km 2 study area. In the same area, seasonal variation in the available biomass of different prey types was estimated using capture-mark-recapture (small rodents), pitfall trap grids (insects), and fruit counts. About 60 % of scats ( n = 734) contained small rodents, indicating that they were the main prey for stoat. However, the frequency of occurrence of fruits in the diet increased significantly in August, after rodent biomass had dropped by more than 50 % in July, but increased again to previous August levels. Fruit consumption decreased in September and October, although available biomass of fruits remained constant. Thus stoat included a large amount of alternative food in their diet when fruits were mature and their availability, and probably their profitability, increased. We were, however, unable to measure absolute consumption of prey. We conclude that primary prey, rodents, is always harvested, suggesting that the costs of harvesting rodents, abundant throughout spring-autumn, are never high. The consumption of alternative prey is independent of its availability, and increases only when relative benefits of harvesting alternative prey (fruits) increases, which is consistent with optimal foraging theory.

  9. The Effect of Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Consumption on Overall Diet: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Sharon L; McKinley, Michelle C; Young, Ian S; Cardwell, Chris R; Woodside, Jayne V

    2016-01-01

    Increasing fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption is associated with reduced risk of major diseases. However, it is unclear if health benefits are related to increased micronutrient intake or to improvements in overall diet profile. This review aimed to assess if increasing FV consumption had an impact on diet profile. In the systematic review, 12 studies revealed increases in micronutrient intakes, whilst the meta-analysis confirmed macronutrient findings from the systematic review showing no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in energy (kcals) in seven studies (mean difference = 1 kcals [95% CI = -115, 117]; p = 0.98), significant decreases in total fat (% energy) in five studies (Mean difference = -4% [95% CI = -5, -3]; p = < 0.00001) and significant increases in fiber in six studies (Mean difference = 5.36 g [95% CI = 4, 7]; p = < 0.00001) and total carbohydrate (% energy) in four studies (Mean = 4% [95% CI= 2, 5]; p = < 0.00001). In conclusion, results indicate that increased FV consumption increases micronutrient, carbohydrate and fiber intakes and possibly reduces fat intake, with no overall effect on energy intake. Therefore health benefits may act through an improvement in overall diet profile alongside increased micronutrient intakes.

  10. Development of a diet quality index with special reference to micronutrient adequacy for adolescent girls consuming a lacto-vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Tupe, Rama

    2010-06-01

    Recent dietary guidelines emphasize micronutrient sufficiency by giving importance to consumption of whole grains and a variety of fruits and vegetables. The objective of this study was to identify a measure of micronutrient quality of diets in adolescent girls consuming a lacto-vegetarian diet. Data were collected on the nutritional status of 630 schoolgirls (ages 10 to 16 years) from Pune city, India, in a cross-sectional survey during 2006-2007. Dietary intakes were assessed by 24-hour recall on 3 nonconsecutive days. Nutrient intakes were calculated from the Indian nutritive value databases. Micronutrient adequacy was expressed as a ratio of observed intake to reference intake. An Adolescent Micronutrient Quality Index (AMQI) was formulated using the Indian and the recent US dietary guidelines. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for plasma levels of vitamin C, beta carotene, and zinc. The average energy intake of the majority of the girls was below the Indian recommended dietary intakes, whereas micronutrient intakes were 50% to 70% lower than recommended dietary intakes. The mean AMQI score was 41.5+/-9.4. The age of subjects as well as mother's education and occupation were significantly associated with the AMQI. The AMQI was correlated with nutrient intakes and the ratio of observed intake to reference intake (P<0.01) after controlling for energy intake and sociodemographic factors. Higher AMQI scores were associated with higher concentrations of plasma vitamin C (r=0.26), beta carotene (r=0.34), and zinc (r=0.12). The AMQI is a useful measure of the dietary adequacy and micronutrient quality of the diets of adolescent girls consuming lacto-vegetarian diets. 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Discrepancy in socioeconomic status does not fully explain the variation in diet quality between consumers of different coffee types.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tommy Hon Ting; Sui, Zhixian; Rangan, Anna; Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu

    2017-06-21

    Habitual consumers of different coffee types may vary in socioeconomic status (SES), which is an important determinant of diet quality. Nonetheless, research on diet quality among coffee consumers was scarce. We aimed to compare the diet quality of coffee consumers with different preferences towards coffee type and additive usage. In this cross-sectional analysis, intake data of food, coffee, and additive usage from the adult respondents of the 2011-2012 Australian Health Survey were used. Participants were grouped according to the type of coffee (espresso and ground coffee, E&G; coffee made from coffee mixes and instant coffee, M&I; non-consumers, NC) and additives (milk, sugar, and intense sweetener) consumed. Adjusted food group intake was compared between consumption groups using general linear model. E&G drinkers had better SES than M&I and NC. After adjusting for covariates, the mean dairy intake of E&G drinkers was 22.2% higher than M&I drinkers (p < 0.001) and 33.1% higher than NC (p < 0.001). Mean discretionary food intake of E&G drinkers was 12.1% lower than M&I (p = 0.003) and 12.3% lower than NC (p = 0.001). In terms of additive usage, non-users of coffee additive had the lowest dairy food intake and the highest discretionary food intake. Coffee consumers' different preferences towards coffee type and additive usages reflected significant variations in their diet quality, even after adjustment of SES. Therefore, future epidemiological studies should consider separating coffee drinkers according to their habitual consumption of different types of coffee.

  12. Food consumption of adults in Germany: results of the German National Nutrition Survey II based on diet history interviews.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Thorsten; Krems, Carolin; Moon, Kilson; Brombach, Christine; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2015-05-28

    The second German National Nutrition Survey (NVS II) aimed to evaluate food consumption and other aspects of nutritional behaviour of a representative sample of the German population, using a modular design with three different dietary assessment methods. To assess usual food consumption, 15,371 German speaking subjects 14-80 years of age completed a diet history interview between November 2005 and November 2006. With reference to the guidelines of the German Nutrition Society (DGE), NVS II observed that the German population did not eat enough foods of plant origin, especially vegetables and consumed too much of meat and meat products. While generally similar food consumption is observed in other European countries, consumption of bread, fruit juices/nectars and beer is higher in Germany. On average, men consumed two times more meat and soft drinks as well as six times more beer than women did, whereas the consumption of vegetables, fruit as well as herbal/fruit tea was higher in women. Older participants showed a lower consumption of meat, fruit juice/nectars, soft drinks and spirits as well as a higher consumption of fish, vegetables, fruit, and herbal/fruit tea than adolescents and younger adults did. There are also differences in food consumption with regard to socio-economic status (SES). Persons with higher SES consumed more vegetables, fruit, fish, water, coffee/tea and wine, while persons with lower SES consumed more meat and meat products, soft drinks and beer. In general, the food consumption of women, the elderly and the higher SES group tends to be closer to the official dietary guidelines in Germany.

  13. Bioenergetics assessment of fish and crayfish consumption by river otter (Lontra canadensis): integrating prey availability, diet, and field metabolic rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dekar, Matthew P.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; Beringer, J.

    2010-01-01

    River otters (Lontra canadensis) are important predators in aquatic ecosystems, but few studies quantify their prey consumption. We trapped crayfish monthly as an index of availability and collected otter scat for diet analysis in the Ozark Mountains of northwestern Arkansas, USA. We measured otter daily energy expenditure (DEE) with the doubly labeled water method to develop a bioenergetics model for estimating monthly prey consumption. Meek's crayfish (Orconectes meeki) catch-per-unit-effort was positively related to stream temperature, indicating that crayfish were more available during warmer months. The percentage frequency of occurrence for crayfish in scat samples peaked at 85.0% in summer and was lowest (42.3%) in winter. In contrast, the percentage occurrence of fish was 13.3% in summer and 57.7% in winter. Estimates of DEE averaged 4738 kJ·day-1 for an otter with a body mass of 7842 g. Total biomass consumption ranged from 35 079 to 52 653 g·month-1 (wet mass), corresponding to a high proportion of fish and crayfish in the diet, respectively. Otter consumption represents a large fraction of prey production, indicating potentially strong effects of otters on trophic dynamics in stream ecosystems.

  14. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage but Not Diet Soda Consumption Is Positively Associated with Progression of Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiantao; Jacques, Paul F; Meigs, James B; Fox, Caroline S; Rogers, Gail T; Smith, Caren E; Hruby, Adela; Saltzman, Edward; McKeown, Nicola M

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown an inconsistent relation between habitual beverage consumption and insulin resistance and prediabetes. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), rather than diet soda, is associated with long-term progression of insulin resistance and the development of prediabetes. We analyzed the prospective association between cumulative mean consumption of SSBs or diet soda and incident prediabetes (n = 1685) identified across a median of 14 y of follow-up in participants [mean ± SD age: 51.9 ± 9.2 y; 59.6% women; mean ± SD body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)): 26.3 ± 4.4] of the Framingham Offspring cohort. The prospective association between beverage consumption and change in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; n = 2076) over ∼7 y was also analyzed. The cumulative mean consumption of SSBs and diet soda was estimated by using food-frequency questionnaires. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models and linear regression models were implemented to estimate the HRs of incident prediabetes and change in HOMA-IR, respectively. After adjustment for multiple potential confounders, including baseline BMI, we observed that SSB intake was positively associated with incident prediabetes (P-trend < 0.001); the highest SSB consumers (>3 servings/wk; median: 6 servings/wk) had a 46% higher risk of developing prediabetes than did the SSB nonconsumers (HR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.16, 1.83). Higher SSB intake was also associated with a greater increase in HOMA-IR (P-trend = 0.006). No prospective associations were observed between diet soda intake and risk of prediabetes (P-trend = 0.24) or changes in HOMA-IR (P-trend = 0.25). These associations were similar after additional adjustment for change in BMI. Regular SSB intake, but not diet soda intake, is associated with a greater increase in insulin resistance and a higher risk of developing prediabetes in a group of

  15. A vegetable to meat consumption ratio as a relevant factor determining cancer preventive diet. The Mediterranean versus other European countries.

    PubMed

    Kapiszewska, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The observed growth of cancer incidence in certain regions has been usually linked to frequent consumption of 'unhealthy' food. Such food often contains genotoxic substances as heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) and/or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbones (PAHs), occurring during food preparation, which induce DNA damage in cells. These substances are mainly formed during frying or grilling of meat and they can be removed from the body in a two-stage metabolic process of detoxification (phase 1 and phase 2). If they are not excreted, they form DNA adducts. The effectiveness of detoxification depends on the activity of enzymes encoded by polymorphic genes. A diet containing plenty of fruits and vegetables, due to the presence of biologically active polyphenols, can modulate activity of detoxifying enzymes. Such a diet can decrease the extent of DNA adducts, breaks and oxidative damage, supporting the body's enzymatic system in sufficient removal of DNA damage. The antioxidant vitamins' content in such a diet also enhances the DNA protection by increasing the scavenging of radical oxidative species that occurs during metabolic reactions. The lack of balance between the amount of 'unhealthy' and 'healthy' food leads to the accumulation of unrepaired damage, initiating DNA instability and inducing cancer development. Such damage is often used as a biomarker of cancer risk in epidemiological studies. Moreover, in in vitro studies, the amount of the DNA damage is used as indicator of the protective ability of vitamins, plant extracts and/or individual flavonoids. The incidences of certain dietaryrelated cancers in European Mediterranean countries is lower than in Central and Northern European countries; there is simultaneously variation in the habitual diet in these regions. This suggests that some features of routine nutrition in the Mediterranean countries may be responsible for this preventing effect. However, inconsistency in the epidemiological data, associating the

  16. Chronic stress is associated with indicators of diet quality in habitual breakfast skippers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background. Previous studies suggest that eating breakfast is associated with better diet quality, but reasons underlying this relationship are not clear. Objective. Our objective was to assess diet quality of women with established breakfast habits and determine if stress or cognitive function cont...

  17. Diet Quality Is Low among Female Food Pantry Clients in Eastern Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Patricia; Zizza, Claire; Jacoby, Jocelynn; Tayie, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examine diet quality, food security, and obesity among female food pantry clients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A food pantry in Lee County, Alabama. Participants: Fifty-five female food pantry clients between 19 and 50 years of age. Main Outcome Measure(s): Diet quality using United States (US) Department of Agriculture…

  18. Diet Quality Is Low among Female Food Pantry Clients in Eastern Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Patricia; Zizza, Claire; Jacoby, Jocelynn; Tayie, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examine diet quality, food security, and obesity among female food pantry clients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A food pantry in Lee County, Alabama. Participants: Fifty-five female food pantry clients between 19 and 50 years of age. Main Outcome Measure(s): Diet quality using United States (US) Department of Agriculture…

  19. Childhood Obesity and Association with Lower Diet Quality in US Children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While overweight children consume adequate calories, little is known regarding the quality of their diets. We sought to compare the diet quality of children in the US by their weight status and identify other correlates of dietary inadequacy. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis on a nationally r...

  20. Diet quality is inversely related to cardiovascular risk factors in adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of the study was to determine if there was an association between diet quality and cardiovascular risk factors in adults. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001–2008 data were used to compare diet quality, as determined by using 2005 Healthy Eating Index-2005 scores, and card...

  1. Nutritional quality of a high carbohydrate diet as consumed by children: The Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, T A; Myers, L; Farris, R P; Srinivasan, S R; Berenson, G S

    1996-05-01

    To study the nutritional adequacy of a high carbohydrate diet as consumed by children in a 24-h period, a sample of 568 10-y-old children was stratified into four levels of carbohydrate intake: < 45% of total energy (kJ), 45%-50% energy, 50%-55% energy, and >55% energy. Composition of the diet for those consuming >55% energy from carbohydrates was adequate in total energy, with 29% energy from fat, 11 % energy from saturated fatty acid, an average of 88 mg dietary cholesterol/4200 kJ and less than 10% energy from sucrose. Increased carbohydrate intake was attributed to an increased consumption of total sugars, starch and fiber. The percentage of children meeting two thirds or more of the Recommended Dietary Allowances for niacin and zinc was lower in the high carbohydrate intake group than in any of the low carbohydrate intake groups. Children with a high carbohydrate intake consumed more fruits, breads, grains, milk, desserts, candy and non-dairy beverages than those with a lower carbohydrate intake who consumed more meats. To meet current dietary recommendations for increased carbohydrate intake when meal patterns are designed, it is necessary to incorporate adequate amounts of foods from all of the food groups to maximize nutritional quality.

  2. Controversy and statistical issues in the use of nutrient densities in assessing diet quality.

    PubMed

    Forshee, Richard A; Storey, Maureen L

    2004-10-01

    The use of nutrient densities, such as percentage of daily energy from added sugars (%E(AS)), creates serious statistical analysis and interpretation problems. This article examines the statistical analyses used in the September 2002 National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine (IOM) draft report on Dietary Reference Intakes for macronutrients. The most critical issues involve the use of a ratio, %E(AS), as the key analytic variable and the use of a model that does not properly control for total energy in the diet. Upon analyzing the same data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, an alternative statistical approach using multiple regression to partition total energy into "energy from added sugars" and "energy from other sources" produced very different results than the IOM analysis. Whereas the IOM reported decreasing intakes of calcium, vitamin A, iron, and zinc with increasing %E(AS), we found that the association of energy from added sugars with micronutrient intake was inconsistent and small. Energy from other sources had a much stronger and consistent association with micronutrient intake. We conclude that consumption of added sugars has little or no association with diet quality.

  3. Diet quality of young people in southern Spain evaluated by a Mediterranean adaptation of the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I).

    PubMed

    Mariscal-Arcas, M; Romaguera, D; Rivas, A; Feriche, B; Pons, A; Tur, J A; Olea-Serrano, F

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the recently developed Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) was useful to evaluate the diet quality of a young Mediterranean population. A cross-sectional nutritional survey was carried out in southern Spain (Granada-Andalucia) from 2002 to 2005. Dietary information (24 h recall and FFQ) and socio-demographic and lifestyle data were collected from a representative sample of the population (n 288, 44.1 % females and 55.9 % males) aged 6-18 years (mean 12.88 (sd 2.78) years). DQI-I was designed according to the method of Kim et al. modified by Tur et al. for Mediterranean populations. It focused on four main characteristics of a high-quality diet (variety, adequacy, moderation and overall balance). This young population from southern Spain obtained 56.31 % of the total DQI-I score, indicating a poor-quality diet. A higher score was associated with a longer breakfast and greater physical activity. The DQI-I may require further modification for application in Mediterranean populations, differentiating between olive oil and saturated fats, among other changes. Further research is needed to develop a new diet quality index adapted to the Mediterranean diet.

  4. [The overall nutritional quality of the diet is reflected in the growth of Nigerian children].

    PubMed

    Tarini, A; Bakari, S; Delisle, H

    1999-01-01

    Childhood malnutrition is widespread in the Sahel region of Africa. In Niger, the 1992 Population and Health Survey found that 32% of children under the age of five years had stunted growth and 16% had muscle wasting. Vitamin A deficiency and anemia are major health problems and it is thought that the rate of zinc deficiency is also high. However, very little is known about the dietary intakes of children. The aim of this study was to assess food consumption, energy and nutrient intake in weaned, preschool age children and to assess their risks of deficiency. Three surveys were conducted in periods of food shortage. Two of the surveys were carried out one year apart, in the rainy season (August to September). The third was conducted at the end of the subsequent dry season (July). Sixty children from rural areas (30 girls and 30 boys) aged 2 to 4 years of age at the start of the study (mean age 36.8 + 7.0 months) from the Ouallam district (western Niger) were studied in surveys 1 and 2, and thirty of these children were then studied in the third survey. Food intake was assessed using a modified weighed intake technique. All foods and beverages consumed by the child at each meal were recorded over three days. The raw ingredients of homemade family meals were weighed and the final cooked weight was also recorded. If the child ate from a shared bowl, the number of mouthfuls was counted and three mouthful samples were weighed. Total serving size was then calculated based on the number of mouthfuls and the mean mouthful weight. Snacks and meals eaten away from home were assessed by questioning the mother. Energy, protein, vitamin A, iron and zinc intakes were compared using the most relevant food composition data and the adequacy of the diet was determined from international recommendations for intake. Energy, iron and zinc requirements were adjusted for diets with a low level of digestibility. Protein requirements were adjusted according to the protein mix quality score

  5. Effects of five southern California macroalgal diets on consumption, growth, and gonad weight, in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Matthew C; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Reed, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Consumer growth and reproductive capacity are direct functions of diet. Strongylocentrotid sea urchins, the dominant herbivores in California kelp forests, strongly prefer giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), but are highly catholic in their ability to consume other species. The biomass of Macrocystis fluctuates greatly in space and time, and the extent to which urchins can use alternate species of algae or a mixed diet of multiple algal species to maintain fitness when giant kelp is unavailable is unknown. We experimentally examined the effects of single and mixed species diets on consumption, growth and gonad weight in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Urchins were fed single species diets consisting of one of four common species of macroalgae (the kelps Macrocystis pyrifera and Pterygophora californica, and the red algae Chondracanthus corymbiferus and Rhodymenia californica (hereafter referred to by genus)) or a mixed diet containing all four species ad libitum over a 13-week period in a controlled laboratory setting. Urchins fed Chondracanthus, Macrocystis and a mixed diet showed the highest growth (in terms of test diameter, wet weight and jaw length) and gonad weight, while urchins fed Pterygophora and Rhodymenia showed the lowest. Urchins consumed their preferred food, Macrocystis, at the highest rate when offered a mixture, but consumed Chondracanthus or Macrocystis at similar rates when the two algae were offered alone. The differences in urchin feeding behavior and growth observed between these diet types suggest the relative availability of the algae tested here could affect urchin populations and their interactions with the algal assemblage. The fact that the performance of urchins fed Chondracanthus was similar or higher than those fed the preferred Macrocystis suggests that the availability of the former could could sustain growth and reproduction of purple sea urchins during times of low Macrocystis abundance as is common following

  6. Effects of five southern California macroalgal diets on consumption, growth, and gonad weight, in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Jarrett E.K.; Reed, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Consumer growth and reproductive capacity are direct functions of diet. Strongylocentrotid sea urchins, the dominant herbivores in California kelp forests, strongly prefer giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), but are highly catholic in their ability to consume other species. The biomass of Macrocystis fluctuates greatly in space and time, and the extent to which urchins can use alternate species of algae or a mixed diet of multiple algal species to maintain fitness when giant kelp is unavailable is unknown. We experimentally examined the effects of single and mixed species diets on consumption, growth and gonad weight in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Urchins were fed single species diets consisting of one of four common species of macroalgae (the kelps Macrocystis pyrifera and Pterygophora californica, and the red algae Chondracanthus corymbiferus and Rhodymenia californica (hereafter referred to by genus)) or a mixed diet containing all four species ad libitum over a 13-week period in a controlled laboratory setting. Urchins fed Chondracanthus, Macrocystis and a mixed diet showed the highest growth (in terms of test diameter, wet weight and jaw length) and gonad weight, while urchins fed Pterygophora and Rhodymenia showed the lowest. Urchins consumed their preferred food, Macrocystis, at the highest rate when offered a mixture, but consumed Chondracanthus or Macrocystis at similar rates when the two algae were offered alone. The differences in urchin feeding behavior and growth observed between these diet types suggest the relative availability of the algae tested here could affect urchin populations and their interactions with the algal assemblage. The fact that the performance of urchins fed Chondracanthus was similar or higher than those fed the preferred Macrocystis suggests that the availability of the former could could sustain growth and reproduction of purple sea urchins during times of low Macrocystis abundance as is common following

  7. Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario: A review of nine years of double-crested cormorant diet and fish consumption information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Ross, Robert M.; McCullough, Russ D.

    2002-01-01

    The diet of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) on Little Galloo Island (LGI) in the eastern basin of Lake Ontario has been quantified since 1992. Over the past nine years considerable information has been generated on cormorant feeding ecology through the examination of approximately 12,000 pellets collected on LGI, where three distinct cormorant feeding periods, pre-chick, chick, and post-chick, are delineated by differences in diet composition and daily fish consumption. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were the major prey during pre-chick and post-chick feeding periods. Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), which move inshore to spawn in mid-June, dominated (>60%) cormorant diets during the chick feeding period. Mean daily fish consumption (14.6) during the pre-chick feeding period was significantly greater than during the chick feeding (9.3) or post-chick feeding (8.0) periods. The proportion of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in the diet increased over the season (0.8% to 7.2%), while the size of bass consumed declined (214 mm to 143 mm). Forage fish (mainly alewife, three-spine sticklebacks [Gasterosteus aculeatus] and minnows) comprised 58% of the diet of LGI cormorants, followed by panfish (37%) (yellow perch, pumpkinseed [Lepomis gibbosus], rock bass [Ambloplites rupestris]) and gamefish (5%) (mostly smallmouth bass). On the average LGI cormorants consumed about 32.8 million fish annually, weighing about 1.4 million kilograms. Cormorants from LGI consumed more biomass of smallmouth bass and yellow perch annually than is taken by sport (bass and yellow perch) and commercial (perch) fishermen.

  8. Effects of high-fat diet on salivary α-amylase, serum parameters and food consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lénia; Mouta, Raquel; Costa, Ana Rodrigues; Pereira, Alfredo; Capela e Silva, Fernando; Amado, Francisco; Antunes, Célia M; Lamy, Elsa

    2015-06-01

    Salivary α-amylase, a major protein in saliva, has been described as a marker of sympathetic nervous system activity, hence for metabolic energy balance. In this context, its expression in overweight and obesity is of interest. Rats fed with a diet enriched with sunflower oil differentially gained weight yielding two subgroups according to their susceptibility (OP) or resistance (OR) to obesity. Elevated plasmatic levels of leptin in the OP subgroup and altered plasmatic lipid profiles (lower triglycerides and higher total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio compared to controls) in the OR subgroup were observed. Animals from the OP subgroup presented higher α-amylase expression and activity even prior to the dietary treatment, suggesting that this salivary protein may constitute a putative indicator of susceptibility for fat tissue accumulation. After 18 weeks of high-fat diet consumption, salivary α-amylase levels did not significantly change in the OP subgroup, but increased 3-fold in the OR subgroup. The increase in α-amylase levels for the latter might represent an adaptation to lower starch intake. These results suggest that salivary α-amylase secretion might be useful to predict susceptibility for weight gain induced by high-fat diet consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determinants of diet quality in pregnancy: sociodemographic, pregnancy-specific, and food environment influences.

    PubMed

    Nash, Danielle M; Gilliland, Jason A; Evers, Susan E; Wilk, Piotr; Campbell, M Karen

    2013-01-01

    To advance the knowledge of determinants of diet quality in pregnancy by focusing on both personal characteristics and the food environment. Cross-sectional study in which participants from the Prenatal Health Project were linked to a geographic dataset by home address. Access to fast food, convenience stores, and grocery stores was measured using a geographic information system (ArcGIS9.3). Pregnant women (n = 2,282) were recruited between 2002 and 2005 in London, Ontario, Canada. Dietary quality was measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire and the Canadian Diet Quality Index for Pregnancy. Univariate and multivariate linear regressions were calculated with the predictor variables on the Canadian Diet Quality Index for Pregnancy. Pregnant women who were born in Canada, common-law, nulliparous, less physically active, smokers, more anxious, or lacking family support had lower diet quality on average. Presence of fast-food restaurants, convenience stores, and grocery stores within 500 m of participants' homes was not associated with diet quality after controlling for personal variables. The food environment does not seem to have a large influence on diet quality in pregnancy. Further research is needed to determine other potential reasons for low diet quality among pregnant women. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Critical analysis of the diet quality of the Brazilian population according to the Healthy Eating Index: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Patrícia Regina Silva; Rocha, Naruna Pereira; Milagres, Luana Cupertino; de Novaes, Juliana Farias

    2015-12-01

    In light of the importance of studying instruments that assess the food quality of the population, this study sought to conduct a systematic review of the quality of the diet of the Brazilian population using the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) and duly analyzing its methodology and results. The major electronic databases were used for the selection of studies. After the searches with the key words, 32 articles were included in this review. The growing interest of the scientific community in addressing this issue was observed, with recent studies using this instrument in Brazil. Methodological issues of articles were evaluated and discussed taking into consideration the revised versions and adaptations of the HEI. Some common results were highlighted among the studies such as low consumption of fruit, vegetables and/or dairy products, and the wider consumption of meat and eggs, cholesterol, total fat and saturated fat. Among the articles that address the HEI and socioeconomic aspects it was seen that quality of diet improves both in accordance with the increasing level of education of parents and with the family income in the population studied. The HEI can be used to monitor changes in dietary patterns and also as a nutrition education and health promotion tool.

  11. Establishing a food list for a Total Diet Study: how does food consumption of specific subpopulations need to be considered?

    PubMed

    Akhandaf, Y; De Henauw, S; Dofkova, M; Ruprich, J; Papadopoulos, A; Sirot, V; Kennedy, M C; Pinchen, H; Blume, K; Lindtner, O; Brantsaeter, A L; Meltzer, H M; Sioen, I

    2015-01-01

    A Total Diet Study (TDS) consists of selecting, collecting and analysing commonly consumed foods to obtain concentration data of different chemical compounds in foods as eaten. A TDS food list summarises the most consumed foods and represents the dietary habits of the general population of the country under study. The work reported here investigated whether TDS food lists that were initially designed for the whole population of the country under study also sufficiently cover the dietary pattern of specific subpopulations that are extra vulnerable for certain contaminants. The work was performed using data of three European countries: the Czech Republic, France and the UK. Each national food consumption database was combined with the corresponding national TDS food list (containing 336, 212 and 119 food items for the Czech Republic, France and the UK, respectively). The data were aggregated on the highest level of hierarchy of FoodEx-1, a pan-European food classification system, including 20 main FoodEx-1 groups. For the group 'milk and dairy products', the coverage of the consumption by the food list was investigated for more refined subgroups. For each food group or subgroup and country, the average percentage of coverage of the diet by the national TDS food list was calculated for different subpopulations, including children versus adults, women versus men, vegetarians versus non-vegetarians, and women of child-bearing age versus older women. The average diet of the different subpopulations was sufficiently covered by the food list of the Czech Republic and France. For the UK the average coverage was low due to a different food-coding approach and because food lists were not derived directly from national food consumption data. At the level of the 20 main food groups, differences between the subpopulations with respect to the average coverage of consumption by the TDS food list were minimal. The differences were more pronounced when looking in detail at the

  12. The association between diet quality, dietary patterns and depression in adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that diet modifies key biological factors associated with the development of depression; however, associations between diet quality and depression are not fully understood. We performed a systematic review to evaluate existing evidence regarding the association between diet quality and depression. Method A computer-aided literature search was conducted using Medline, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, January 1965 to October 2011, and a best-evidence analysis performed. Results Twenty-five studies from nine countries met eligibility criteria. Our best-evidence analyses found limited evidence to support an association between traditional diets (Mediterranean or Norwegian diets) and depression. We also observed a conflicting level of evidence for associations between (i) a traditional Japanese diet and depression, (ii) a “healthy” diet and depression, (iii) a Western diet and depression, and (iv) individuals with depression and the likelihood of eating a less healthy diet. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first review to synthesize and critically analyze evidence regarding diet quality, dietary patterns and depression. Further studies are urgently required to elucidate whether a true causal association exists. PMID:23802679

  13. Microbiological quality and safe handling of enteral diets in a hospital in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Raquel Oliveira Medrado; Correia, Eliznara Fernades; Pereira, Keyla Carvalho; Costa, Paulo de Souza; da Silva, Daniele Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of enteral diets represents a high risk of compromising the patient's medical condition. To assess the microbiological quality and aseptic conditions in the preparation and administration of handmade and industrialized enteral diets offered in a hospital in the Valley of Jequitinhonha, MG, Brazil, we performed a microbiological analysis of 50 samples of diets and 27 samples of surfaces, utensils, and water used in the preparation of the diets. In addition, we assessed the good handling practices of enteral diets according to the requirements specified by the Brazilian legislation. Both kinds of enteral diets showed contamination by coliforms and Pseudomonas spp. No sample was positive for Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. On the other hand, Listeria spp. was detected in only one sample of handmade diets. Contamination was significantly higher in the handmade preparations (p < 0.05). Nonconformities were detected with respect to good handling practices, which may compromise the diet safety. The results indicate that the sanitary quality of the enteral diets is unsatisfactory, especially handmade diets. Contamination by Pseudomonas spp. is significant because it is often involved in infection episodes. With regard to aseptic practices, it was observed the need of implementing new procedures for handling enteral diets. PMID:26273278

  14. Food patterns and dietary quality associated with organic food consumption during pregnancy; data from a large cohort of pregnant women in Norway.

    PubMed

    Torjusen, Hanne; Lieblein, Geir; Næs, Tormod; Haugen, Margaretha; Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Brantsæter, Anne Lise

    2012-08-06

    Little is known about the consumption of organic food during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to describe dietary characteristics associated with frequent consumption of organic food among pregnant women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). The present study includes 63 808 women who during the years 2002-2007 answered two questionnaires, a general health questionnaire at gestational weeks 15 and a food frequency questionnaire at weeks 17-22. The exploration of food patterns by Principal component analyses (PCA) was followed by ANOVA analyses investigating how these food patterns as well as intake of selected food groups were associated with consumption of organic food. The first principal component (PC1) identified by PCA, accounting for 12% of the variation, was interpreted as a 'health and sustainability component', with high positive loadings for vegetables, fruit and berries, cooking oil, whole grain bread and cereal products and negative loadings for meat, including processed meat, white bread, and cakes and sweets. Frequent consumption of organic food, which was reported among 9.1% of participants (n = 5786), was associated with increased scores on the 'health and sustainability component' (p < 0.001). The increase in score represented approximately 1/10 of the total variation and was independent of sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics. Participants with frequent consumption of organic food had a diet with higher density of fiber and most nutrients such as folate, beta-carotene and vitamin C, and lower density of sodium compared to participants with no or low organic consumption. The present study showed that pregnant Norwegian women reporting frequent consumption of organically produced food had dietary pattern and quality more in line with public advice for healthy and sustainable diets. A methodological implication is that the overall diet needs to be included in future studies of potential health

  15. Food patterns and dietary quality associated with organic food consumption during pregnancy; data from a large cohort of pregnant women in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the consumption of organic food during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to describe dietary characteristics associated with frequent consumption of organic food among pregnant women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Methods The present study includes 63 808 women who during the years 2002–2007 answered two questionnaires, a general health questionnaire at gestational weeks 15 and a food frequency questionnaire at weeks 17-22. The exploration of food patterns by Principal component analyses (PCA) was followed by ANOVA analyses investigating how these food patterns as well as intake of selected food groups were associated with consumption of organic food. Results The first principal component (PC1) identified by PCA, accounting for 12% of the variation, was interpreted as a ‘health and sustainability component’, with high positive loadings for vegetables, fruit and berries, cooking oil, whole grain bread and cereal products and negative loadings for meat, including processed meat, white bread, and cakes and sweets. Frequent consumption of organic food, which was reported among 9.1% of participants (n = 5786), was associated with increased scores on the ‘health and sustainability component’ (p < 0.001). The increase in score represented approximately 1/10 of the total variation and was independent of sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics. Participants with frequent consumption of organic food had a diet with higher density of fiber and most nutrients such as folate, beta-carotene and vitamin C, and lower density of sodium compared to participants with no or low organic consumption. Conclusion The present study showed that pregnant Norwegian women reporting frequent consumption of organically produced food had dietary pattern and quality more in line with public advice for healthy and sustainable diets. A methodological implication is that the overall diet needs to be

  16. Association of increased monetary cost of dietary intake, diet quality and weight management in Spanish adults.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Helmut; Serra-Majem, Luis; Subirana, Isaac; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria; Fitó, Montserrat; Elosua, Roberto

    2016-03-14

    Higher monetary diet cost is associated with healthier food choices and better weight management. How changes in diet cost affect changes in diet quality and weight remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of changes in individual monetary diet cost on changes in diet quality, measured by the modified Mediterranean diet score recommendations (MDS-rec) and by energy density (ED), as well as changes in weight and BMI. We conducted a prospective, population-based study of 2181 male and female Spaniards aged between 25 and 74 years, who were followed up to the 2009-2010 academic year. We measured weight and height and recorded dietary data using a validated FFQ. Average food cost was calculated from official Spanish government data. We fitted multivariate linear and logistic regression models. The average daily diet cost increased from 3·68(SD0.0·89)€/8·36 MJ to 4·97(SD1·16)€/8·36 MJ during the study period. This increase was significantly associated with improvement in diet quality (Δ ED and Δ MDS-rec; P<0·0001). Each 1€ increase in monetary diet cost per 8·36 MJ was associated with a decrease of 0·3 kg in body weight (P=0·02) and 0·1 kg/m(2) in BMI (P=0·04). These associations were attenuated after adjusting for changes in diet quality indicators. An improvement in diet quality and better weight management were both associated with an increase in diet cost; this could be considered in food policy decisions.

  17. Sugared water consumption by adult offspring of mothers fed a protein-restricted diet during pregnancy results in increased offspring adiposity: the second hit effect.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Rodríguez, M; Martínez-Gómez, M; Cuevas, E; Nicolás, L; Castelán, F; Nathanielsz, P W; Zambrano, E; Rodríguez-Antolín, J

    2014-02-01

    Poor maternal nutrition predisposes offspring to metabolic disease. This predisposition is modified by various postnatal factors. We hypothesised that coupled to the initial effects of developmental programming due to a maternal low-protein diet, a second hit resulting from increased offspring postnatal sugar consumption would lead to additional changes in metabolism and adipose tissue function. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of sugared water consumption (5% sucrose in the drinking-water) on adult offspring adiposity as a 'second hit' following exposure to maternal protein restriction during pregnancy. We studied four offspring groups: (1) offspring of mothers fed the control diet (C); (2) offspring of mothers fed the restricted protein diet (R); (3) offspring of control mothers that drank sugared water (C-S); (4) offspring of restricted mothers that drank sugared water (R-S). Maternal diet in pregnancy was considered the first factor and sugared water consumption as the second factor - the second hit. Body weight and total energy consumption, before and after sugared water consumption, were similar in all the groups. Sugared water consumption increased TAG, insulin and cholesterol concentrations in both the sexes of the C-S and R-S offspring. Sugared water consumption increased leptin concentrations in the R-S females and males but not in the R offspring. There was also an interaction between sugared water and maternal diet in males. Sugared water consumption increased adipocyte size and adiposity index in both females and males, but the interaction with maternal diet was observed only in females. Adiposity index and plasma leptin concentrations were positively correlated in both the sexes. The present study shows that a second hit during adulthood can amplify the effects of higher adiposity arising due to poor maternal pregnancy diet in an offspring sex dependent fashion.

  18. Moderate alcohol consumption aggravates high fat-diet induced steatohepatitis in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) develops in the absence of chronic and excessive alcohol consumption. However, it remains unknown whether moderate alcohol consumption aggravates liver inflammation in pre-existing NASH condition. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were first fed ad libitum...

  19. Positive Attitude toward Healthy Eating Predicts Higher Diet Quality at All Cost Levels of Supermarkets☆

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Anju; Monsivais, Pablo; Cook, Andrea J.; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Shopping at low-cost supermarkets has been associated with higher obesity rates. This study examined whether attitudes toward healthy eating are independently associated with diet quality among shoppers at low-cost, medium-cost, and high-cost supermarkets. Data on socioeconomic status (SES), attitudes toward healthy eating, and supermarket choice were collected using a telephone survey of a representative sample of adult residents of King County, WA. Dietary intake data were based on a food frequency questionnaire. Thirteen supermarket chains were stratified into three categories: low, medium, and high cost, based on a market basket of 100 commonly eaten foods. Diet-quality measures were energy density, mean adequacy ratio, and total servings of fruits and vegetables. The analytical sample consisted of 963 adults. Multivariable regressions with robust standard error examined relations between diet quality, supermarket type, attitudes, and SES. Shopping at higher-cost supermarkets was associated with higher-quality diets. These associations persisted after adjusting for SES, but were eliminated after taking attitudinal measures into account. Supermarket shoppers with positive attitudes toward healthy eating had equally higher-quality diets, even if they shopped at low-, medium-, or high-cost supermarkets, independent of SES and other covariates. These findings imply that shopping at low-cost supermarkets does not prevent consumers from having high-quality diets, as long as they attach importance to good nutrition. Promoting nutrition-education strategies among supermarkets, particularly those catering to low-income groups, can help to improve diet quality. PMID:23916974

  20. Positive attitude toward healthy eating predicts higher diet quality at all cost levels of supermarkets.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Anju; Monsivais, Pablo; Cook, Andrea J; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Shopping at low-cost supermarkets has been associated with higher obesity rates. This study examined whether attitudes toward healthy eating are independently associated with diet quality among shoppers at low-cost, medium-cost, and high-cost supermarkets. Data on socioeconomic status (SES), attitudes toward healthy eating, and supermarket choice were collected using a telephone survey of a representative sample of adult residents of King County, WA. Dietary intake data were based on a food frequency questionnaire. Thirteen supermarket chains were stratified into three categories: low, medium, and high cost, based on a market basket of 100 commonly eaten foods. Diet-quality measures were energy density, mean adequacy ratio, and total servings of fruits and vegetables. The analytical sample consisted of 963 adults. Multivariable regressions with robust standard error examined relations between diet quality, supermarket type, attitudes, and SES. Shopping at higher-cost supermarkets was associated with higher-quality diets. These associations persisted after adjusting for SES, but were eliminated after taking attitudinal measures into account. Supermarket shoppers with positive attitudes toward healthy eating had equally higher-quality diets, even if they shopped at low-, medium-, or high-cost supermarkets, independent of SES and other covariates. These findings imply that shopping at low-cost supermarkets does not prevent consumers from having high-quality diets, as long as they attach importance to good nutrition. Promoting nutrition-education strategies among supermarkets, particularly those catering to low-income groups, can help to improve diet quality.

  1. Menu modeling with MyPyramid food patterns: incremental dietary changes lead to dramatic improvements in diet quality of menus.

    PubMed

    Hornick, Betsy A; Krester, Alison J; Nicklas, Theresa A

    2008-12-01

    The MyPyramid food guidance system provides recommended food intake patterns for members of each sex at various age and activity levels. These food intake patterns are based on recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. Actual consumption patterns of American adults compared to MyPyramid recommendations indicate that substantial changes are needed to meet the goals of MyPyramid. One method for encouraging dietary change, known as the small steps approach, involves small, gradual changes to meet a desired endpoint. Menu modeling was used to evaluate the effects of gradual dietary changes on diet quality. Seven days of baseline menus were developed to model the intake of adult women aged 31 to 50 years. Incremental changes were made to each baseline menu to create a series of three transitional menus and a final target menu. Target menus met MyPyramid energy and nutrient intake goals. Diet quality was measured for each baseline, transitional, and target menu using the Healthy Eating Index-2005. The average Healthy Eating Index-2005 score for baseline menus compared to target menus increased by more than 50 points with incremental increases observed for each transitional menu. This analysis demonstrates that small, practical changes in food choices that bring consumers closer to meeting MyPyramid recommendations result in gradual and dramatic improvements in diet quality. Food and nutrition professionals can use menu modeling to provide concrete examples and specific guidance for making progressive changes in food selections to meet current dietary recommendations.

  2. Long-term consumption of fish oil-enriched diet impairs serotonin hypophagia in rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Regina L H; Andrade, Iracema S; Telles, Mônica M; Albuquerque, Kelse T; Nascimento, Cláudia M O; Oyama, Lila M; Casarini, Dulce E; Ribeiro, Eliane B

    2010-10-01

    Hypothalamic serotonin inhibits food intake and stimulates energy expenditure. High-fat feeding is obesogenic, but the role of polyunsaturated fats is not well understood. This study examined the influence of different high-PUFA diets on serotonin-induced hypophagia, hypothalamic serotonin turnover, and hypothalamic protein levels of serotonin transporter (ST), and SR-1B and SR-2C receptors. Male Wistar rats received for 9 weeks from weaning a diet high in either soy oil or fish oil or low fat (control diet). Throughout 9 weeks, daily intake of fat diets decreased such that energy intake was similar to that of the control diet. However, the fish group developed heavier retroperitoneal and epididymal fat depots. After 12 h of either 200 or 300 μg intracerebroventricular serotonin, food intake was significantly inhibited in control group (21-25%) and soy group (37-39%) but not in the fish group. Serotonin turnover was significantly lower in the fish group than in both the control group (-13%) and the soy group (-18%). SR-2C levels of fish group were lower than those of control group (50%, P = 0.02) and soy group (37%, P = 0.09). ST levels tended to decrease in the fish group in comparison to the control group (16%, P = 0.339) and the soy group (21%, P = 0.161). Thus, unlike the soy-oil diet, the fish-oil diet decreased hypothalamic serotonin turnover and SR-2C levels and abolished serotonin-induced hypophagia. Fish-diet rats were potentially hypophagic, suggesting that, at least up to this point in its course, the serotonergic impairment was either compensated by other factors or not of a sufficient extent to affect feeding. That fat pad weight increased in the absence of hyperphagia indicates that energy expenditure was affected by the serotonergic hypofunction.

  3. Diet quality of Americans differs by age, sex, race/ethnicity, income, and education level.

    PubMed

    Hiza, Hazel A B; Casavale, Kellie O; Guenther, Patricia M; Davis, Carole A

    2013-02-01

    An index that assesses the multidimensional components of the diet across the lifecycle is useful in describing diet quality. The purpose of this study was to use the Healthy Eating Index-2005, a measure of diet quality in terms of conformance to the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, to describe the diet quality of Americans by varying sociodemographic characteristics in order to provide insight as to where diets need to improve. The Healthy Eating Index-2005 scores were estimated using 1 day of dietary intake data provided by participants in the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Mean daily intakes of foods and nutrients, expressed per 1,000 kilocalories, were estimated using the population ratio method and compared with standards that reflect the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Participants included 3,286 children (2 to 17 years), 3,690 young and middle-aged adults (18 to 64 years), and 1,296 older adults (65+ years). Results are reported as percentages of maximum scores and tested for significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) by age, sex, race/ethnicity, income, and education levels. Children and older adults had better-quality diets than younger and middle-aged adults; women had better-quality diets than men; Hispanics had better-quality diets than blacks and whites; and diet quality of adults, but not children, generally improved with income level, except for sodium. The diets of Americans, regardless of socioeconomic status, are far from optimal. Problematic dietary patterns were found among all sociodemographic groups. Major improvements in the nutritional health of the American public can be made by improving eating patterns. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Effects of maternal diet and host quality on oviposition patterns and offspring performance in a seed beetle (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Segovia, Ricardo; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2008-07-01

    In seed beetles, oviposition decisions may influence the offspring phenotype because eggs constitute the initial resources available for larval development. We tested the effects of host quality variations (small vs. large seeds of the host plant Calystegia sepium, Convolvulaceae) on oviposition patterns and offspring performance of the seed beetle Megacerus eulophus. We also manipulated the maternal diet: high diet quality vs. low diet quality to evaluate possible interactive effects of the maternal nutritional environment and host quality on oviposition patterns. We further assessed the consequences of egg size variation in offspring size. Female M. eulophus fed with high-quality diet (H-diet) laid more eggs and lived longer than females fed with low-quality diet (P-diet). Fecundity decreased under a low-quality host for both maternal diets. The occurrence of maternal environmental effects on egg size plasticity was detected. Under conditions of low-quality host, mothers fed with the high-quality diet produced bigger eggs in comparison with a high-quality host, whereas females fed with the low-quality diet produced smaller ones. Regardless of these differences observed in egg size depending on the maternal diet, progeny emerging from small seeds (low-quality host) showed a similar performance at emergence. Offspring traits were only significantly affected by host quality. Beetles emerging from large seeds had greater body weight and length than those reared on small seeds. Variations in oviposition patterns in response to host quality are discussed.

  5. Effects of maternal diet and host quality on oviposition patterns and offspring performance in a seed beetle (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Segovia, Ricardo; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2008-07-01

    In seed beetles, oviposition decisions may influence the offspring phenotype because eggs constitute the initial resources available for larval development. We tested the effects of host quality variations (small vs. large seeds of the host plant Calystegia sepium, Convolvulaceae) on oviposition patterns and offspring performance of the seed beetle Megacerus eulophus. We also manipulated the maternal diet: high diet quality vs. low diet quality to evaluate possible interactive effects of the maternal nutritional environment and host quality on oviposition patterns. We further assessed the consequences of egg size variation in offspring size. Female M. eulophus fed with high-quality diet (H-diet) laid more eggs and lived longer than females fed with low-quality diet (P-diet). Fecundity decreased under a low-quality host for both maternal diets. The occurrence of maternal environmental effects on egg size plasticity was detected. Under conditions of low-quality host, mothers fed with the high-quality diet produced bigger eggs in comparison with a high-quality host, whereas females fed with the low-quality diet produced smaller ones. Regardless of these differences observed in egg size depending on the maternal diet, progeny emerging from small seeds (low-quality host) showed a similar performance at emergence. Offspring traits were only significantly affected by host quality. Beetles emerging from large seeds had greater body weight and length than those reared on small seeds. Variations in oviposition patterns in response to host quality are discussed.

  6. Effects of an experimental phytase on performance, egg quality, tibia ash content and phosphorus bioavailability in laying hens fed on maize- or barley-based diets.

    PubMed

    Francesch, M; Broz, J; Brufau, J

    2005-06-01

    A 24-week performance trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of an experimental phytase on performance, egg quality, tibia ash content and phosphorus excretion in laying hens fed on either a maize- or a barley-based diet. At the end of the trial, an ileal absorption assay was conducted in order to determine the influence of phytase supplementation on the apparent absorption of calcium and total phosphorus (P). Each experimental diet was formulated either as a positive control containing 3.2 g/kg non-phytate phosphorus (NPP), with the addition of dicalcium phosphate (DCP), or as a low P one, without DCP addition. Both low P diets (containing 1.3 or 1.1 g/kg NPP) were supplemented with microbial phytase at 0, 150, 300 and 450 U/kg. The birds were housed in cages, allocating two hens per cage as the experimental unit. Each of 10 dietary treatments was assigned to 16 replicates. Low dietary NPP (below 1.3 g/kg) was not able to support optimum performance of hens during the laying cycle (from 22 to 46 weeks of age), either in maize or barley diets. Rate of lay, daily egg mass output, feed consumption, tibia ash percentage and weight gain were reduced in hens fed low NPP diets. The adverse effects of a low P diet were more severe in hens on a maize diet than in those on a barley diet. Low dietary NPP reduced egg production, weight gain, feed consumption and tibia ash content and microbial phytase supplementation improved these parameters. Hens given low NPP diets supplemented with phytase performed as well as the hens on positive control diets containing 3.2 g/kg of NPP. A 49% reduction of excreta P content was achieved by feeding hens on low NPP diets supplemented with phytase, without compromising performance. Phytase addition to low NPP diets increased total phosphorus absorption at the ileal level, from 0.25 to 0.51 in the maize diet and from 0.34 to 0.58 in the barley diet. Phosphorus absorption increased linearly with increasing levels of dietary phytase

  7. The meat quality and growth performance in broiler chickens fed diet with cinnamon powder.

    PubMed

    Sang-Oh, Park; Chae-Min, Ryu; Byung-Sung, Park; Jong, Hwangbo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the feeding effect of diets containing 3, 5 and 7% of cinnamon powder on meat quality and growth performance in broiler chickens. The chicken meat quality and growth performance in broiler chickens fed diets containing cinnamon powder increased significantly (P < 0.05) when compared to the control group. However, the TBARS of the meat of chickens fed diets containing cinnamon powder decreased significantly (P < 0.05) when compared to the control group. These findings suggest that the cinnamon powder can improve the shelf life and quality of chicken meat with maximize the productivity of broiler chickens.

  8. Association of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.

    PubMed

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Mattei, Josiemer; Fung, Teresa T; Li, Yanping; Pan, An; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B

    2017-07-13

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between changes in diet quality over time and the risk of death. We used Cox proportional-hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for total and cause-specific mortality among 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1998 through 2010. Changes in diet quality over the preceding 12 years (1986-1998) were assessed with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 score, the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score. The pooled hazard ratios for all-cause mortality among participants who had the greatest improvement in diet quality (13 to 33% improvement), as compared with those who had a relatively stable diet quality (0 to 3% improvement), in the 12-year period were the following: 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 0.97) according to changes in the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 0.84 (95 CI%, 0.78 to 0.91) according to changes in the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.95) according to changes in the DASH score. A 20-percentile increase in diet scores (indicating an improved quality of diet) was significantly associated with a reduction in total mortality of 8 to 17% with the use of the three diet indexes and a 7 to 15% reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index and Alternate Mediterranean Diet. Among participants who maintained a high-quality diet over a 12-year period, the risk of death from any cause was significantly lower - by 14% (95% CI, 8 to 19) when assessed with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 11% (95% CI, 5 to 18) when assessed with the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 9% (95% CI, 2 to 15) when assessed with the DASH score - than the risk among participants with consistently low diet scores over time. Improved diet quality over 12 years was

  9. Alcoholic beverage preference and diet in a representative Dutch population: the Dutch national food consumption survey 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Sluik, D; van Lee, L; Geelen, A; Feskens, E J

    2014-03-01

    The habitual consumption of a specific type of alcoholic beverage may be related to the overall dietary pattern. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate associations between alcoholic beverage preference and dietary intake in The Netherlands. A total of 2100 men and women from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey 2007-2010 were studied. A general questionnaire assessed alcoholic beverage preference and two non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls assessed overall diet. Mean nutrient and food group intakes, and adherence to the 2006 Dutch dietary guidelines across categories of alcoholic beverage preference were compared and adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), education, smoking, physical activity, energy intake and frequency and absolute alcohol consumption. Largest differences in dietary habits were detected between persons who preferred wine and those who preferred beer. Persons with a beer preference had a higher absolute intake of meat, soft drinks, margarine and snacks. In contrast, persons with a wine preference had a higher absolute consumption of healthy foods. However, after multiple adjustments, wine consumers still consumed less energy and more vegetables and fruit juices compared with beer consumers. Adherence to the Dutch dietary guidelines did not differ between preference categories after multiple adjustments. In this cross-sectional analysis in a representative sample of the Dutch population, a beer preference was associated with less healthy dietary behaviour, especially compared with wine preference. However, these differences were largely explained by other socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. These results suggest that alcoholic beverage preference may not be independently related to diet.

  10. Self-selection of a high calcium diet by vitamin D-deficient lactating rats increases food consumption and milk production.

    PubMed

    Brommage, R; DeLuca, H F

    1984-08-01

    Lactating and nonlactating rats, both deficient and replete in cholecalciferol, were allowed a free selection among three diets containing 0.47% Ca, 0.3% P (normal Ca, normal P diet); 2.0% Ca, 0.3% P (high Ca diet); and 0.47% Ca, 1.0% P (high P diet). An additional group of vitamin D-deficient lactating rats was fed only the normal Ca, normal P diet. Vitamin D-deficient rats showed a strong selection preference for the high Ca diet but avoided the high P diet, whereas cholecalciferol-replete rats consumed the normal Ca, normal P diet predominantly. Compared to the nonselecting rats, the selection of the high Ca diet by the lactating rats deficient in vitamin D resulted in an increase in plasma calcium levels, hypophosphatemia, a doubling of food consumption, a reduction in maternal body weight loss and a stimulation of milk production as indicated by pup growth. These results demonstrate that vitamin D-deficient rats select a high Ca diet and that the decrease in milk production found in vitamin D deficiency results from a decrease in food consumption and that this anorexia is at least partially dependent on the hypocalcemia normally occurring in vitamin D deficiency.

  11. Depression severity, diet quality, and physical activity in women with obesity and depression.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, Bradley M; Whited, Matthew C; Schneider, Kristin L; Ma, Yunsheng; Oleski, Jessica L; Merriam, Philip A; Waring, Molly E; Olendzki, Barbara C; Mann, Devin M; Ockene, Ira S; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2012-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is prevalent in clinical weight-loss settings and predicts poor weight-loss outcomes. It is unknown whether the severity of depressive symptoms among those with MDD is associated with diet quality or physical activity levels. This knowledge is important for improving weight-loss treatment for these patients. It was hypothesized that more severe depression is associated with poorer diet quality and lower physical activity levels among individuals with obesity and MDD. Participants were 161 women with current MDD and obesity enrolled in the baseline phase of a weight-loss trial between 2007 and 2010. Depression severity was measured with the Beck Depression Inventory II. The Alternate Healthy Eating Index was applied to data from three 24-hour diet recalls to capture overall diet quality. Daily metabolic equivalents expended per day were calculated from three 24-hour physical activity recalls. Greater depression severity was associated with poorer overall diet quality (estimate=-0.26, standard error 0.11; P=0.02), but not with physical activity (estimate=0.07, standard error 0.05; P=0.18), in linear regression models controlling for income, education, depression-related appetite change, binge eating disorder, and other potential confounds. Associations with diet quality were primarily driven by greater intake of sugar (r=0.20; P<0.01), saturated fat (r=0.21; P<0.01), and sodium (r=0.22; P<0.01). More severe depression was associated with poorer overall diet quality, but not physical activity, among treatment-seeking women with MDD and obesity. Future studies should identify mechanisms linking depression to diet quality and determine whether diet quality improves with depression treatment.

  12. Diet Quality Varies by Race/Ethnicity of Head Start Mothers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the key role that women from limited income families play as family food providers and their high risk for diet-related chronic diseases, there is a paucity of data about their diet quality and how it might vary by race/ethnicity. Our objective was to compare nutrient and food intakes of mu...

  13. Maternal Low Quality Protein Diet Alters Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations of Weaning Rats.

    PubMed

    Kabasakal Cetin, Arzu; Dasgin, Halil; Gülec, Atila; Onbasilar, İlyas; Akyol, Asli

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have indicated the influence of a maternal low protein diet on the fetus. However, the effect of a maternal low quality protein diet on fetal growth and development is largely unknown. Wistar rats (11 weeks old) were mated and maintained on either a chow diet with 20% casein (n = 6) as the control group (C), or a low quality protein diet with 20% wheat gluten (n = 7) as the experimental group (WG) through gestation and lactation. Maternal body weights were similar in both groups throughout the study. Birth weights were not influenced by maternal diet and offspring body weights during lactation were similar between the groups. Offspring's plasma amino acid profiles showed that plasma methionine, glutamine and lysine were significantly lower and aspartic acid, ornithine and glycine-proline were significantly higher in the WG. Plant based protein comprises an important part of protein intake in developing countries. It is well-known that these diets can be inadequate in terms of essential amino acids. The current study shows differential effects of a maternal low quality protein diet on the offspring's plasma amino acids. Future studies will examine further aspects of the influence of maternal low quality protein diets on fetal growth and development.

  14. Maternal Low Quality Protein Diet Alters Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations of Weaning Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kabasakal Cetin, Arzu; Dasgin, Halil; Gülec, Atila; Onbasilar, İlyas; Akyol, Asli

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated the influence of a maternal low protein diet on the fetus. However, the effect of a maternal low quality protein diet on fetal growth and development is largely unknown. Wistar rats (11 weeks old) were mated and maintained on either a chow diet with 20% casein (n = 6) as the control group (C), or a low quality protein diet with 20% wheat gluten (n = 7) as the experimental group (WG) through gestation and lactation. Maternal body weights were similar in both groups throughout the study. Birth weights were not influenced by maternal diet and offspring body weights during lactation were similar between the groups. Offspring’s plasma amino acid profiles showed that plasma methionine, glutamine and lysine were significantly lower and aspartic acid, ornithine and glycine-proline were significantly higher in the WG. Plant based protein comprises an important part of protein intake in developing countries. It is well-known that these diets can be inadequate in terms of essential amino acids. The current study shows differential effects of a maternal low quality protein diet on the offspring’s plasma amino acids. Future studies will examine further aspects of the influence of maternal low quality protein diets on fetal growth and development. PMID:26633475

  15. Effects of Chronic Consumption of Sugar-Enriched Diets on Brain Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity in Adult Yucatan Minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Melissa; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Meurice, Paul; Val-Laillet, David

    2016-01-01

    Excessive sugar intake might increase the risk to develop eating disorders via an altered reward circuitry, but it remains unknown whether different sugar sources induce different neural effects and whether these effects are dependent from body weight. Therefore, we compared the effects of three high-fat and isocaloric diets varying only in their carbohydrate sources on brain activity of reward-related regions, and assessed whether brain activity is dependent on insulin sensitivity. Twenty-four minipigs underwent 18FDG PET brain imaging following 7-month intake of high-fat diets of which 20% in dry matter weight (36.3% of metabolisable energy) was provided by starch, glucose or fructose (n = 8 per diet). Animals were then subjected to a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp to determine peripheral insulin sensitivity. After a 7-month diet treatment, all groups had substantial increases in body weight (from 36.02±0.85 to 63.33±0.81 kg; P<0.0001), regardless of the diet. All groups presented similar insulin sensitivity index (ISI = 1.39±0.10 mL·min-1·μUI·kg). Compared to starch, chronic exposure to fructose and glucose induced bilateral brain activations, i.e. increased basal cerebral glucose metabolism, in several reward-related brain regions including the anterior and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, the caudate and putamen. The lack of differences in insulin sensitivity index and body weight suggests that the observed differences in basal brain glucose metabolism are not related to differences in peripheral insulin sensitivity and weight gain. The differences in basal brain metabolism in reward-related brain areas suggest the onset of cerebral functional alterations induced by chronic consumption of dietary sugars. Further studies should explore the underlying mechanisms, such as the availability of intestinal and brain sugar transporter, or the appearance of addictive-like behavioral correlates of these

  16. Are socio-economic disparities in diet quality explained by diet cost?

    PubMed

    Monsivais, Pablo; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2012-06-01

    Socio-economic disparities in nutrition are well documented. This study tested the hypothesis that socio-economic differences in nutrient intakes can be accounted for, in part, by diet cost. A representative sample of 1295 adults in King County (WA) was surveyed in 2008-2009, and usual dietary intakes were assessed based on a food-frequency questionnaire. The monetary value of individual diets was estimated using local retail supermarket prices for 384 foods. Nutrients of concern as identified by the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee were fibre, vitamins A, C and E, calcium, magnesium and potassium. A nutrient density score based on all seven nutrients was another dependent measure. General linear models and linear regressions were used to examine associations among education and income, nutrient density measure and diet cost. Analyses were conducted in 2009-2010. Controlling for energy and other covariates, higher-cost diets were significantly higher in all seven nutrients and in overall nutrient density. Higher education and income were positively and significantly associated with the nutrient density measure, but these effects were greatly attenuated with the inclusion of the cost variable in the model. Socio-economic differences in nutrient intake can be substantially explained by the monetary cost of the diet. The higher cost of more nutritious diets may contribute to socio-economic disparities in health and should be taken into account in the formulation of nutrition and public health policy.

  17. American Diet Quality: Where It Is, Where It Is Heading, and What It Could Be.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Magdalena M; Reedy, Jill; Krebs-Smith, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    Diet quality is critically important to the prevention of many types of chronic disease. The federal government provides recommendations for optimal diet quality through the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and sets benchmarks for progress toward these recommendations through the Healthy People objectives. This analysis estimated recent trends in American diet quality and compared those trends to the quality of diets that would meet the Healthy People 2020 objectives and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans in order to measure progress toward our national nutrition goals. This analysis used 24-hour recall data from the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, between the years of 1999-2000 and 2011-2012, to determine mean intakes of various dietary components for the US population over time. Mean intakes were estimated using the population ratio method, and diet quality was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010). The mean HEI-2010 total score for the US population has increased from 49 in 1999-2000 to 59 in 2011-2012; continuing on that trajectory, it would reach a score of 65 by 2019-2020. A diet that meets the Healthy People 2020 objectives would receive a score of 74 and, by definition, a diet that meets the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans would receive a score of 100. Trends in HEI-2010 component scores vary; all HEI-2010 component scores except sodium have increased over time. Diet quality is improving over time, but not quickly enough to meet all of the Healthy People 2020 objectives. Whole fruit and empty calories are the only HEI-2010 components on track to meet their respective Healthy People 2020 targets. Furthermore, the country falls short of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans by a large margin in nearly every component of diet quality assessed by the HEI-2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. American Diet Quality: Where it is, Where it is Heading, and What it Could Be

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Magdalena M.; Reedy, Jill; Krebs-Smith, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diet quality is critically important to the prevention of many types of chronic disease. The Federal government provides recommendations for optimal diet quality through the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and sets benchmarks for progress towards these recommendations through the Healthy People objectives. Objective This analysis estimated recent trends in American diet quality and compared those trends to the quality of diets that would meet the Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) objectives and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) in order to measure progress towards our national nutrition goals. Design This analysis used 24-hour recall data from the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, between the years of 1999–2000 and 2011–2012, to determine mean intakes of various dietary components for the United States population over time. Mean intakes were estimated using the population ratio method, and diet quality was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010). Results The mean HEI-2010 total score for the U.S. population has increased from 49 in 1999–2000 to 59 in 2011–2012; continuing on that trajectory, it would reach a score of 65 by 2019–2020. A diet that meets the HP2020 objectives would receive a score of 74, and, by definition, a diet that meets the 2010 DGAs would receive a score of 100. Trends in HEI-2010 component scores vary; all HEI-2010 component scores except sodium have increased over time. Conclusions Diet quality is improving over time, but not quickly enough to meet all of the HP2020 objectives. Whole fruit and empty calories are the only HEI-2010 components on track to meet their respective HP2020 targets. Furthermore, the country falls short of the 2010 DGAs by a large margin in nearly every component of diet quality assessed by the HEI-2010. PMID:26612769

  19. Prolonged consumption of potato-based diets by infants and small children.

    PubMed

    Lopez de Romaña, G; Graham, G C; Madrid, S; MacLean, W C

    1981-08-01

    A previous short-term study demonstrated that infants and children could consume diets in which 75% of energy and all protein was provided by the white potato. Nitrogen balance was inferior to casein control at this level or protein intake. Potato intake was limited by the bulk of the diets and the poor digestibility of carbohydrates. In the present study 10 children were offered diets containing 50%, 75% and 84.2% of total energy as potato (Solanum Tuberosum ssp. andigena) during a period of 3 months. Casein was added to the 50 and 75% diets to complete 8% of energy as protein (N X 6.25). Acceptability, tolerance, digestibility and growth of the children were analyzed. The 84.2% potato studies were aborted shortly after the beginning because of the excessively large volume. Acceptability and tolerance to the 50% potato diets were excellent but with the 75% potato diets were noted to decrease during the last days of the studies. Six of the eight children who completed the studies showed satisfactory weight gain and catch-up growth while maintaining normal serum albumin concentrations. In one other, weight gain was adequate but did not achieve catch-up growth, and in the youngest child weight gain and linear growth were inadequate. Metabolic balances did not show improvement or deterioration of digestibility throughout the study. Infants can consume up to 50-75% of energy and as much as 80% of their nitrogen requirements as potato if the remaining energy and nitrogen is provided by a non-bulky, easily digestible food.

  20. Specific psychological variables predict quality of diet in women of lower, but not higher, educational attainment

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Wendy; Schlotz, Wolff; Crozier, Sarah; Skinner, Timothy C; Haslam, Cheryl; Robinson, Sian; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Barker, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work found that perceived control over life was a significant predictor of the quality of diet of women of lower educational attainment. In this paper, we explore the influence on quality of diet of a range of psychological and social factors identified during focus group discussions, and specify the way this differs in women of lower and higher educational attainment. We assessed educational attainment, quality of diet, and psycho-social factors in 378 women attending Sure Start Children’s Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. Multiple-group path analysis showed that in women of lower educational attainment, the effect of general self-efficacy on quality of diet was mediated through perceptions of control and through food involvement, but that there were also direct effects of social support for healthy eating and having positive outcome expectancies. There was no effect of self-efficacy, perceived control or outcome expectancies on the quality of diet of women of higher educational attainment, though having more social support and food involvement were associated with improved quality of diet in these women. Our analysis confirms our hypothesis that control-related factors are more important in determining dietary quality in women of lower educational attainment than in women of higher educational attainment. PMID:21078352

  1. Developmental Biology and Effects of Adult Diet on Consumption, Longevity, and Fecundity of Colaspis crinicornis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Kentaro; Meinke, Lance J.

    2015-01-01

    The chrysomelid beetle Colaspis crinicornis Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) occurs primarily in the Great Plains region of the United States. Little is known about the biology and ecology of this species, but over the last decade, it has become increasingly common in the corn, Zea mays L., and soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, agroecosystem of southeastern Nebraska. As part of a larger comprehensive project to understand the natural history and pest potential of this species, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the developmental biology, morphological characters of immature stages, and the effect of adult diet on consumption, longevity, and fecundity. Females readily deposited egg clusters in the soil, and percentage egg hatch was high under laboratory conditions. Larvae and pupae were confirmed to be soil-dwelling stages. C. crinicornis has relatively short egg, pupal, and adult stages with the majority of its life cycle spent in the larval stage. Results of choice and no-choice adult feeding experiments indicate that diets of corn or soybean leaves did not significantly affect consumption, longevity, or fecundity of adult C. crinicornis, suggesting that corn and soybean leaves are similarly suitable food sources for adults. The ability to effectively utilize tissues from very different plant families as adult food sources suggests that C. crinicornis is polyphagous in the field. PMID:26106090

  2. Developmental Biology and Effects of Adult Diet on Consumption, Longevity, and Fecundity of Colaspis crinicornis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Miwa, Kentaro; Meinke, Lance J

    2015-01-01

    The chrysomelid beetle Colaspis crinicornis Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) occurs primarily in the Great Plains region of the United States. Little is known about the biology and ecology of this species, but over the last decade, it has become increasingly common in the corn, Zea mays L., and soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, agroecosystem of southeastern Nebraska. As part of a larger comprehensive project to understand the natural history and pest potential of this species, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the developmental biology, morphological characters of immature stages, and the effect of adult diet on consumption, longevity, and fecundity. Females readily deposited egg clusters in the soil, and percentage egg hatch was high under laboratory conditions. Larvae and pupae were confirmed to be soil-dwelling stages. C. crinicornis has relatively short egg, pupal, and adult stages with the majority of its life cycle spent in the larval stage. Results of choice and no-choice adult feeding experiments indicate that diets of corn or soybean leaves did not significantly affect consumption, longevity, or fecundity of adult C. crinicornis, suggesting that corn and soybean leaves are similarly suitable food sources for adults. The ability to effectively utilize tissues from very different plant families as adult food sources suggests that C. crinicornis is polyphagous in the field. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  3. Does social distinction contribute to socioeconomic inequalities in diet: the case of 'superfoods' consumption.

    PubMed

    Oude Groeniger, Joost; van Lenthe, Frank J; Beenackers, Mariëlle A; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M

    2017-03-27

    The key mechanisms underlying socioeconomic inequalities in dietary intake are still poorly understood, hampering the development of interventions. An important, but sparsely mentioned mechanism is that of 'social distinction', whereby those in a higher socioeconomic position adopt dietary patterns by which they can distinguish themselves from lower socioeconomic groups. We investigated the importance of distinction as a mechanism, by testing the socioeconomic gradient in the consumption of so-called 'superfoods' and the contribution of a well-established indicator of distinction, cultural participation. Data from participants (25-75 years) of the 2014 survey of the Dutch population-based GLOBE study were used (N = 2812). Multivariable regression models were used to analyse the association between education, income and cultural participation (e.g. visits to museums, opera, theatre, concerts) and the consumption of superfoods (spelt, quinoa and goji berries, chia seeds or wheatgrass). The consumption of superfoods is far more prevalent among higher socioeconomic groups. Adjusting for cultural participation strongly attenuated the educational and income gradient in superfoods consumption, whereas cultural participation remained strongly associated with superfoods consumption. Those in the highest quintile of cultural participation reported the highest consumption of spelt products (OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 2.10;4.18), quinoa (OR = 3.50, 95% CI = 2.12;5.79) and goji berries, chia seeds or wheatgrass (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.73;4.17). The associations between socioeconomic position and the consumption of 'superfoods' seem to be partially driven by a process of social distinction. These findings suggest that distinction may be an important, but currently neglected mechanism in generating socioeconomic inequalities in dietary intake. It deserves a more prominent role in interventions to reduce these inequalities.

  4. Alcohol consumption patterns, diet and body weight in 10 European countries.

    PubMed

    Sieri, S; Krogh, V; Saieva, C; Grobbee, D E; Bergmann, M; Rohrmann, S; Tjønneland, A; Ferrari, P; Chloptsios, Y; Dilis, V; Jenab, M; Linseisen, J; Wallström, P; Johansson, I; Chirlaque, M D; Sanchez, M J; Niravong, M; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Welch, A A; Allen, N E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; van der Schouw, Y T; Sacerdote, C; Panico, S; Parr, C L; Braaten, T; Olsen, A; Jensen, M K; Bingham, S; Riboli, E; Slimani, N

    2009-11-01

    Europe has the highest level of alcohol consumption in the world. As drinking patterns are important determinants of the beneficial and harmful effects of alcohol consumption, we investigated alcohol consumption in relation to nutrient intake, place of consumption, education and body weight in a sample of adults from 10 European countries. A 24-h dietary recall interview was conducted on 13 025 men and 23 009 women, aged 35-74 years, from 27 centres participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Means and standard errors of alcohol consumption, adjusted for age, were calculated, stratified by gender and centre. In many centres, higher level drinkers (males consuming >24 g of ethanol/day, equivalent to >2 standard drinks and females consuming >12 g of ethanol/day equivalent to >1 standard drink) obtained more energy from fat and protein and less from sugar than did abstainers. The proportion of energy from starch tended to be higher for male and lower for female higher level drinkers than for abstainers. Female higher level drinkers had a lower body mass index than did abstainers, whereas male higher level drinkers generally weighed more. Male higher level drinkers were less educated than abstainers in Mediterranean countries, but were more educated elsewhere. Female higher level drinkers were usually more educated than were abstainers. Outside the home, consumption (both genders) tended to be at friends' homes, particularly among men in Northern and Central Europe, and in bars in Spain. This study reveals clear geographical differences in drinking habits across Europe, and shows that the characteristics of different alcohol consumption categories also vary.

  5. Dietary consumption of advanced glycation end products and pancreatic cancer in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Li; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Zimmerman, Thea Palmer; Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Liang; Kahle, Lisa; Risch, Adam; Subar, Amy F; Cross, Amanda J; Hollenbeck, Albert; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary; Sinha, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds present in uncooked foods as well as in foods cooked at high temperatures. AGEs have been associated with insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation in patients with diabetes. Dietary AGEs are an important contributor to the AGE pool in the body. N(ϵ)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) AGE is one of the major biologically and chemically well-characterized AGE markers. The consumption of red meat, which is CML-AGE rich, has been positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. With the use of a published food CML-AGE database, we estimated the consumption of CML AGE in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and evaluated the association between CML-AGE consumption and pancreatic cancer and the mediating effect of CML AGE on the association between red meat consumption and pancreatic cancer. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for pancreatic cancer. During an average of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2193 pancreatic cancer cases (1407 men and 786 women) from 528,251 subjects. With the comparison of subjects in the fifth and the first quintiles of CML-AGE consumption, we observed increased pancreatic cancer risk in men (HR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.93, P-trend = 0.003) but not women (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.72, P-trend = 0.42). Men in the highest quintile of red meat consumption had higher risk of pancreatic cancer (HR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.70), which attenuated after adjustment for CML-AGE consumption (HR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.53). Dietary CML-AGE consumption was associated with modestly increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men and may partially explain the positive association between red meat and pancreatic cancer. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Fried food consumption, genetic risk, and body mass index: gene-diet interaction analysis in three US cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qibin; Chu, Audrey Y; Kang, Jae H; Huang, Jinyan; Rose, Lynda M; Jensen, Majken K; Liang, Liming; Curhan, Gary C; Pasquale, Louis R; Wiggs, Janey L; De Vivo, Immaculata; Chan, Andrew T; Choi, Hyon K; Tamimi, Rulla M; Ridker, Paul M; Hunter, David J; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Chasman, Daniel I; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2014-03-19

    To examine the interactions between genetic predisposition and consumption of fried food in relation to body mass index (BMI) and obesity. Prospective cohort study. Health professionals in the United States. 9623 women from the Nurses' Health Study, 6379 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, and a replication cohort of 21,421 women from the Women's Genome Health Study. Repeated measurement of BMI over follow-up. There was an interaction between fried food consumption and a genetic risk score based on 32 BMI-associated variants on BMI in both the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (P ≤ 0.001 for interaction). Among participants in the highest third of the genetic risk score, the differences in BMI between individuals who consumed fried foods four or more times a week and those who consumed fried foods less than once a week amounted to 1.0 (SE 0.2) in women and 0.7 (SE 0.2) in men, whereas the corresponding differences were 0.5 (SE 0.2) and 0.4 (SE 0.2) in the lowest third of the genetic risk score. The gene-diet interaction was replicated in the Women's Genome Health Study (P<0.001 for interaction). Viewed differently, the genetic association with adiposity was strengthened with higher consumption of fried foods. In the combined three cohorts, the differences in BMI per 10 risk alleles were 1.1 (SE 0.2), 1.6 (SE 0.3), and 2.2 (SE 0.6) for fried food consumption less than once, one to three times, and four or more times a week (P<0.001 for interaction); and the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for obesity per 10 risk alleles were 1.61 (1.40 to 1.87), 2.12 (1.73 to 2.59), and 2.72 (2.12 to 3.48) across the three categories of consumption (P=0.002 for interaction). In addition, the variants in or near genes highly expressed or known to act in the central nervous system showed significant interactions with fried food consumption, with the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) variant showing the strongest result (P<0

  7. Coffee consumption and the risk of overall and fatal prostate cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health study

    PubMed Central

    Bosire, Claire; Stampfer, Meir J.; Subar, Amy F.; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Park, Yikyung; Sinha, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Evidence on the association between coffee consumption and prostate cancer risk is inconsistent; furthermore, few studies have examined the relationship between coffee consumption and fatal prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether coffee intake is associated with the risk of overall and fatal prostate cancer. Methods We conducted a prospective analysis among 288,391 men in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP Diet and Health Study who were between 50–71 years old at baseline in 1995–96. Coffee consumption was assessed at baseline. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the age- and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Over 11 years of follow-up, 23,335 cases of prostate cancer were ascertained, including 2,927 advanced and 917 fatal cases. Coffee consumption was not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk. The multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CI), comparing those who drank six or more cups per day to non-drinker were; 0.94 (0.86–1.02), p-trend=0.08 for overall prostate cancer, 1.13 (0.91–1.40), p-trend=0.62 for advanced prostate cancer and 0.79 (0.53–1.17), p-trend=0.20 for fatal prostate cancer. The findings remained nonsignificant when we stratified by prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing history or restricted to non-smokers. Conclusions We found no statistically significant association between coffee consumption and the risk of overall, advanced or fatal prostate cancer in this cohort, though a modest reduction in risk could not be excluded. PMID:23681472

  8. Conservatism predicts lapses from vegetarian/vegan diets to meat consumption (through lower social justice concerns and social support).

    PubMed

    Hodson, Gordon; Earle, Megan

    2017-08-30

    Lapses from vegetarian and vegan (i.e., veg*n) food choices to meat consumption are very common, suggesting that sustaining veg*nism is challenging. But little is known about why people return to eating animals after initially deciding to avoid meat consumption. Several potential explanatory factors include personal inconvenience, meat cravings, awkwardness in social settings, or health/nutrition concerns. Here we test the degree to which political ideology predicts lapsing to meat consumption. Past research demonstrates that political ideology predicts present levels of meat consumption, whereby those higher in right-wing ideologies eat more animals, even after controlling for their hedonistic liking of meat (e.g., Dhont & Hodson, 2014). To what extent might political ideology predict whether one has lapsed from veg*n foods back to meat consumption? In a largely representative US community sample (N = 1313) of current and former veg*ns, those higher (vs. lower) in conservatism exhibited significantly greater odds of being a former than current veg*n, even after controlling for age, education, and gender. This ideology-lapsing relation was mediated (i.e., explained) by those higher (vs. lower) in conservatism: (a) adopting a veg*n diet for reasons less centered in justice concerns (animal rights, environment, feeding the poor); and (b) feeling socially unsupported in their endeavor. In contrast, factors such as differential meat craving or lifestyle inconvenience played little mediational role. These findings demonstrate that ideology and justice concerns are particularly relevant to understanding resilience in maintaining veg*n food choices. Implications for understanding why people eat meat, and how to develop intervention strategies, are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Long Term Consumption of Flaxseed Enriched Diet Decreased Ovarian Cancer Incidence and Prostaglandin E2 in Hens

    PubMed Central

    Eilati, Erfan; Bahr, Janice M.; Hales, Dale Buchanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Prevention may be the best approach to reduce ovarian cancer. Flaxseed is the richest vegetable source of omega-3 fatty acids which may be effective in the prevention of ovarian cancer. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most proinflammatory ecoisanoid and one of the downstream products of two isoforms of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Our objective was to determine if long-term consumption of a flaxseed enriched diet decreased ovarian cancer severity and incidence in the laying hen and to investigate its potential correlation with the expression of COX enzymes and PGE2 concentration. Methods White Leghorn hens were fed 10% flaxseed-enriched or standard diet for 4 years. The severity and incidence of ovarian cancer were determined by gross pathology and histology. COX-1 and COX-2 protein and mRNA expression and PGE2 concentrations in ovaries were measured by Western blot, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Results The results demonstrated that there was a reduction in ovarian cancer severity and incidence in hens fed flaxseed diet. In correlation with decreased ovarian cancer severity and incidence, concentration of PGE2 and expression of COX-2 were diminished in ovaries of hens fed flaxseed. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the lower levels of COX-2 and PGE2 are the main contributing factors in the chemo-suppressive role of long-term flaxseed consumption in ovarian cancer in laying hens. These findings may provide the basis for clinical trials of dietary intervention targeting prostaglandin biosynthesis for the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23707669

  10. Western High-Fat Diet Consumption during Adolescence Increases Susceptibility to Traumatic Stress while Selectively Disrupting Hippocampal and Ventricular Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan-Masih, Priya; Vega-Torres, Julio David; Haddad, Elizabeth; Rainsbury, Sabrina; Baghchechi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Psychological trauma and obesity co-occur frequently and have been identified as major risk factors for psychiatric disorders. Surprisingly, preclinical studies examining how obesity disrupts the ability of the brain to cope with psychological trauma are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine whether an obesogenic Western-like high-fat diet (WD) predisposes rats to post-traumatic stress responsivity. Adolescent Lewis rats (postnatal day 28) were fed ad libitum for 8 weeks with either the experimental WD diet (41.4% kcal from fat) or the control diet (16.5% kcal from fat). We modeled psychological trauma by exposing young adult rats to a cat odor threat. The elevated plus maze and the open field test revealed increased psychological trauma-induced anxiety-like behaviors in the rats that consumed the WD when compared with control animals 1 week after undergoing traumatic stress (p < 0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging showed significant hippocampal atrophy (20% reduction) and lateral ventricular enlargement (50% increase) in the animals fed the WD when compared with controls. These volumetric abnormalities were associated with behavioral indices of anxiety, increased leptin and FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) levels, and reduced hippocampal blood vessel density. We found asymmetric structural vulnerabilities to the WD, particularly the ventral and left hippocampus and lateral ventricle. This study highlights how WD consumption during adolescence impacts key substrates implicated in post-traumatic stress disorder. Understanding how consumption of a WD affects the developmental trajectories of the stress neurocircuitry is critical, as stress susceptibility imposes a marked vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27844058

  11. Diet quality is independently associated with weight status in children aged 9-10 years.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Amy; Welch, Ailsa; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Griffin, Simon J; Cassidy, Aedín

    2011-03-01

    Although energy imbalance is key to the development of childhood obesity, the association between different dietary components, reflected in diet quality scores, and children's weight status has not been extensively studied. The current study determined if diet quality, characterized according to 3 predefined scores, was associated with weight status in a population-based sample of 9- to 10-y-old British children, independently of factors previously associated with weight status. In a cross-sectional study of 1700 children (56% girls), data from 4-d food diaries were used to calculate 3 diet quality scores modified to be reflective of children's diets: the Diet Quality Index (DQI), Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI), and Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS). Physical activity was measured with 7-d accelerometery, and height, weight, waist, and bio-impedance were objectively measured and used to calculate weight status variables. After multiple adjustments, including physical activity and overall energy density, higher DQI and HDI scores were significantly associated with improved weight status. Comparing extreme quintiles of the scores revealed the DQI and HDI were associated with lower waist circumference (-3.0%, P = 0.005 and -2.5%, P = 0.033, respectively), and lower body fat (-5.1%, P = 0.023 and -4.9%, P = 0.026, respectively). The DQI was also associated with lower weight (-5.9%; P = 0.002) and BMI (-4.2%; P = 0.004). No significant associations were observed with the MDS. These findings suggest that diet quality is independently associated with children's weight status. Future work should consider if diet quality scores could be key components of interventions designed to reduce obesity in children.

  12. Honey bee-collected pollen in agro-ecosystems reveals diet diversity, diet quality, and pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Colwell, Megan J; Williams, Geoffrey R; Evans, Rodger C; Shutler, Dave

    2017-09-01

    European honey bees Apis mellifera are important commercial pollinators that have suffered greater than normal overwintering losses since 2007 in North America and Europe. Contributing factors likely include a combination of parasites, pesticides, and poor nutrition. We examined diet diversity, diet nutritional quality, and pesticides in honey bee-collected pollen from commercial colonies in the Canadian Maritime Provinces in spring and summer 2011. We sampled pollen collected by honey bees at colonies in four site types: apple orchards, blueberry fields, cranberry bogs, and fallow fields. Proportion of honey bee-collected pollen from crop versus noncrop flowers was high in apple, very low in blueberry, and low in cranberry sites. Pollen nutritional value tended to be relatively good from apple and cranberry sites and poor from blueberry and fallow sites. Floral surveys ranked, from highest to lowest in diversity, fallow, cranberry, apple, and blueberry sites. Pesticide diversity in honey bee-collected pollen was high from apple and blueberry sites and low from cranberry and fallow sites. Four different neonicotinoid pesticides were detected, but neither these nor any other pesticides were at or above LD50 levels. Pollen hazard quotients were highest in apple and blueberry sites and lowest in fallow sites. Pollen hazard quotients were also negatively correlated with the number of flower taxa detected in surveys. Results reveal differences among site types in diet diversity, diet quality, and pesticide exposure that are informative for improving honey bee and land agro-ecosystem management.

  13. Development of a Short Questionnaire to Assess Diet Quality among Older Community-Dwelling Adults.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S M; Jameson, K A; Bloom, I; Ntani, G; Crozier, S R; Syddall, H; Dennison, E M; Cooper, C R; Sayer, A A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a short questionnaire to assess diet quality in older adults. Cross-sectional study. Hertfordshire, UK. 3217 community-dwelling older adults (59-73 years). Diet was assessed using an administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ); two measures of diet quality were defined by calculating participants' 'prudent diet' scores, firstly from a principal component analysis of the data from the full FFQ (129 items) and, secondly, from a short version of the FFQ (including 24 indicator foods). Scores calculated from the full and short FFQ were compared with nutrient intake and blood concentrations of vitamin C and lipids. Prudent diet scores calculated from the full FFQ and short FFQ were highly correlated (0.912 in men, 0.904 in women). The pattern of associations between nutrient intake (full FFQ) and diet scores calculated using the short and full FFQs were very similar, both for men and women. Prudent diet scores calculated from the full and short FFQs also showed comparable patterns of association with blood measurements: in men and women, both scores were positively associated with plasma vitamin C concentration and serum HDL; in women, an inverse association with serum triglycerides was also observed. A short food-based questionnaire provides useful information about the diet quality of older adults. This simple tool does not require nutrient analysis, and has the potential to be of value to non-specialist researchers.

  14. Diet quality is low among female food pantry clients in Eastern Alabama.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Patricia; Zizza, Claire; Jacoby, Jocelynn; Tayie, Francis A

    2009-01-01

    Examine diet quality, food security, and obesity among female food pantry clients. Cross-sectional study. A food pantry in Lee County, Alabama. Fifty-five female food pantry clients between 19 and 50 years of age. Diet quality using United States (US) Department of Agriculture Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2005), adult obesity (Body Mass Index [BMI] > or = 30 kg/m(2)), household food security (US Department of Agriculture Module). Analysis of variance and multivariate models. Diet quality of the women was generally poor, with a mean HEI of a 43 on a 100 point scale. Having low education level (less than a high school degree) and being a smoker were related to lower overall diet quality. Sixty-seven percent of the clients were obese while 65% percent were food insecure. Food pantry clients are characterized by high levels of food insecurity, obesity and poor diet quality. Smoking was associated with food insecurity and low diet quality. Increased outreach efforts to improve nutrition education and to help food pantry clients stop smoking could be beneficial.

  15. The relationship between diet quality and adult obesity: evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Kala; Campbell, M Karen; Choi, Yun-Hee; Sarma, Sisira

    2014-01-01

    To assess the relationship between diet quality and body mass index (BMI) in Canadian adults. We used confidential, individual-level data on 6325 adult men and 7211 nonpregnant adult women from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey to construct 2 diet quality indices (the Diet Quality Index [DQI] and and the Healthy Eating Index [HEI]) and BMI. After adjusting for known observable confounders, a latent class modeling analysis was conducted to account for unobservable confounders. We found that there were 2 latent classes (low-BMI and high-BMI components), and that DQI and HEI indices were negatively associated with BMI in the high-BMI component. In the high-BMI component, a one-unit increase in DQI score is associated with a 0.053 kg/m(2) decrease in BMI, whereas a one-unit increase in HEI score is associated with a 0.095 kg/m(2) decrease in BMI. Subgroup analyses revealed that the association between diet quality and obesity was stronger in women. Diet quality is associated with lower BMI in high-BMI individuals in Canada. Diet quality exhibits a distinct association in each latent class; this association is stronger in women. Latent class analysis offers a superior methodological framework in understanding the modifiable risk factors for obesity.

  16. Quality of diet and food choices of Finnish young men: a sociodemographic and health behaviour approach.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Clarissa M L; Jallinoja, Piia; Lahti-Koski, Marjaana; Absetz, Pilvikki; Paturi, Merja; Pihlajamäki, Harri; Sahi, Timo; Uutela, Antti

    2010-06-01

    Eating habits of Finns have improved dramatically in 40 years. The proportion of fat in the diet has decreased and vegetable and fruit consumption increased. Knowledge of Finnish young men's dietary habits is limited. The aim was to assess food choices and quality of diet among young men and to analyse how background and health behaviour factors explain it. In 2007, data on eating habits, sociodemographic background factors and health behaviours of 17-21-year-old men (n 2905) entering military service were collected by self-administrated questionnaire. Two indexes - core food index (CFI) and extra food index (EFI) - were formed to describe daily and redundant snacking-type eating, respectively. Associations of background factors and health behaviours on the indexes were analysed by general linear modelling. In all, 13 % consumed fruits and berries daily and 8 % consumed vegetables, whereas 24 % consumed pizza and 19 % consumed hamburgers more than once a week. CFI increased with educational level (P < 0.001) and was explained by background and health behaviour (smoking, physical activity and eating breakfast). EFI was inversely associated with BMI (P < 0.001) and explained by health behaviour: (smoking, physical activity, drinking beer and eating breakfast). These results indicate that in early adulthood, eating habits cluster with other health behaviours among men. In this age group, education is associated with core food but not with extra food eating habits. Furthermore, seasonal variation is seen in both types of eating. When promoting healthy eating, a distinction between core foods and extra foods by using feasible indexes will be helpful in targeting the efforts.

  17. Retinal-Image Quality and Night-Vision Performance after Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Castro, José J.; Pozo, Antonio M.; Anera, Rosario G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the influence of alcohol consumption on the retinal-image quality and visual performance under surrounding low-illumination conditions. Methods. A volunteer sample of 67 subjects was analyzed. Optical quality of the eye was evaluated by means of the Strehl ratio, the Objective Scattering Index (OSI), and the tear-film quality. We used the visual disturbance index (VDI) to evaluate visual performance under low-illumination conditions and we measured the pupil size under these conditions. The tear-film volume was also measured. All measurements were made before and after alcohol consumption and patients were classified into two groups depending on their breath alcohol content (BrAC): low-alcohol (BrAC < 0.25 mg/L) and high-alcohol content (BrAC ≥ 0.25 mg/L). Results. The VDI was significantly higher after alcohol consumption: the higher the BrAC, the higher the deterioration of the visual discrimination capacity. The pupil size increased significantly for the high-BrAC group. Parameters evaluating optical quality deteriorated after alcohol consumption. Conclusion. The visual performance under low-illumination conditions and the retinal-image quality were deteriorated after alcohol consumption, especially for the high-alcohol group. Furthermore, some physiological changes were observed under effects for high-alcohol contents, such as an increase in the pupil size and disturbances in the tear film, which deteriorated optical quality. PMID:24949202

  18. Impact of 100% Fruit Juice Consumption on Diet and Weight Status of Children: An Evidence-based Review.

    PubMed

    Crowe-White, Kristi; O'Neil, Carol E; Parrott, J Scott; Benson-Davies, Sue; Droke, Elizabeth; Gutschall, Melissa; Stote, Kim S; Wolfram, Taylor; Ziegler, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of 100% fruit juice remains controversial for its potential adverse impact on weight and displacement of essential foods in the diets of children. A systematic review of the literature published from 1995-2013 was conducted using the PubMed database to evaluate associations between intake of 100% fruit juice and weight/adiposity and nutrient intake/adequacy among children of 1 to 18 years of age. Weight status outcome measures included body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score, ponderal index, obesity, weight gain, adiposity measures, and body composition. Nutrient outcome measures included intake and adequacy of shortfall nutrients. Data extraction and analysis was conducted according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence Analysis Process. Twenty-two studies on weight status provided evidence that did not support an association between 100% fruit juice consumption and weight/adiposity in children after controlling for energy intake. Limited evidence from eight studies suggests that children consuming 100% fruit juice have higher intake and adequacy of dietary fiber, vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium. Differences in methodology and study designs preclude causal determination of 100% fruit juice as sole influencer of weight status or nutrient intake/adequacy of shortfall nutrients. In context of a healthy dietary pattern, evidence suggests that consumption of 100% fruit juice may provide beneficial nutrients without contributing to pediatric obesity.

  19. Effect of water addition on selective consumption (sorting) of dry diets by dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, C; Giannico, F; Armentano, L E

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether adding water to a dry diet would reduce sorting and improve cow performance. Eighteen multiparous lactating Holstein cows were used in a cross-over design with 21-d periods. Treatments had the same dietary composition and differed only by adding water (WET) or not (DRY). Diets consisted of 10% alfalfa silage, 30% hay (approximately 80% grass and 20% alfalfa), and 60% concentrate [dry matter (DM) basis]. Dietary DM was 80.8% for DRY and 64.4% for WET. Both diets contained 16.9% crude protein and 24.3% neutral detergent fiber. Particle size was determined using the Wisconsin Particle Size Separator on the as-fed diets. The separator has five square-hole screens (Y(1) to Y(5)) with diagonal openings of 26.9 mm for Y(1), 18 mm for Y(2), 8.98 mm for Y(3), 5.61 mm for Y(4), and 1.65 mm for Y(5), and one pan. Sorting was calculated on a 60 degrees C DM basis (60DM). Predicted intake of Y(i) was calculated as the product of 60DM intake (60DMI) and the 60DM fraction of Y(i) in the total mixed ration for that screen. For DRY and WET, actual 60DMI by screen expressed as a percentage of predicted intake was 61.4% vs. 75.2% for Y(1), 83.8% vs. 98.6% for Y(2), 85.6% vs. 90.8% for Y(3), 95.2% vs. 96.0% for Y(4), 100.1% vs. 101.9% for Y(5), and 105.9% vs. 102.9% for pan, respectively. Adding water did not affect total DM intake (28.3 kg/d) or milk production (41.3 kg/d). Neutral detergent fiber intake was 6.42 kg/d for WET and 6.15 kg/d for DRY. Milk fat percentage tended to be higher (3.41% vs. 3.31%) when cows consumed WET vs. DRY. No differences in ruminal pH, NH(3), and volatile fatty acids were observed. Cows sorted against long particles in favor of shorter particles on both diets. Adding water to dry diets reduced sorting and tended to increase neutral detergent fiber intake and milk fat percentage.

  20. Four-Week Consumption of Malaysian Honey Reduces Excess Weight Gain and Improves Obesity-Related Parameters in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanyan Enchang, Francis; Nor Hussein, Fuzina

    2017-01-01

    Many studies revealed the potential of honey consumption in controlling obesity. However, no study has been conducted using Malaysian honey. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of two local Malaysian honey types: Gelam and Acacia honey in reducing excess weight gain and other parameters related to obesity. The quality of both honey types was determined through physicochemical analysis and contents of phenolic and flavonoid. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced to become obese using high fat diet (HFD) prior to introduction with/without honey or orlistat for four weeks. Significant reductions in excess weight gain and adiposity index were observed in rats fed with Gelam honey compared to HFD rats. Moreover, levels of plasma glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol, plasma leptin and resistin, liver enzymes, renal function test, and relative organ weight in Gelam and Acacia honey treated groups were reduced significantly when compared to rats fed with HFD only. Similar results were also displayed in rats treated with orlistat, but with hepatotoxicity effects. In conclusion, consumption of honey can be used to control obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and appears to be more effective than orlistat. PMID:28246535

  1. Four-Week Consumption of Malaysian Honey Reduces Excess Weight Gain and Improves Obesity-Related Parameters in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Samat, Suhana; Kanyan Enchang, Francis; Nor Hussein, Fuzina; Wan Ismail, Wan Iryani

    2017-01-01

    Many studies revealed the potential of honey consumption in controlling obesity. However, no study has been conducted using Malaysian honey. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of two local Malaysian honey types: Gelam and Acacia honey in reducing excess weight gain and other parameters related to obesity. The quality of both honey types was determined through physicochemical analysis and contents of phenolic and flavonoid. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced to become obese using high fat diet (HFD) prior to introduction with/without honey or orlistat for four weeks. Significant reductions in excess weight gain and adiposity index were observed in rats fed with Gelam honey compared to HFD rats. Moreover, levels of plasma glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol, plasma leptin and resistin, liver enzymes, renal function test, and relative organ weight in Gelam and Acacia honey treated groups were reduced significantly when compared to rats fed with HFD only. Similar results were also displayed in rats treated with orlistat, but with hepatotoxicity effects. In conclusion, consumption of honey can be used to control obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and appears to be more effective than orlistat.

  2. Western-diet consumption induces alteration of barrier function mechanisms in the ileum that correlates with metabolic endotoxemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Guerville, Mathilde; Leroy, Anaïs; Sinquin, Annaëlle; Laugerette, Fabienne; Michalski, Marie-Caroline; Boudry, Gaëlle

    2017-08-01

    Obesity and its related disorders have been associated with the presence in the blood of gut bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS). However, the factors underlying this low-grade elevation in plasma LPS, so-called metabolic endotoxemia, are not fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the effects of Western diet (WD) feeding on intestinal and hepatic LPS handling mechanisms in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Rats were fed either a standard chow diet (C) or a Western Diet (WD, 45% fat) for 6 wk. They were either fed ad libitum or pair-fed to match the caloric intake of C rats for the first week, then fed ad libitum for the remaining 5 wk. Six-week WD feeding led to a mild obese phenotype with increased adiposity and elevated serum LPS-binding protein (LBP) levels relative to C rats, irrespective of initial energy intake. Serum LPS was not different between dietary groups but exhibited strong variability. Disrupted ileal mucus secretion and decreased ileal Reg3-γ and -β gene expression along with high ileal permeability to LPS were observed in WD compared with C-fed rats. Ileal and cecal intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity as well as Verrucomicrobia and Bifidobacterium cecal levels were increased in WD-fed rats compared with C-fed rats. WD consumption did not impact mRNA levels of LPS-handling hepatic enzymes. Correlation analysis revealed that ileal passage of LPS, IAP activity, Proteobacteria levels and hepatic aoah gene expression correlated with serum LPS and LBP, suggesting that ileal mucosal defense impairment induced by WD feeding contribute to metabolic endotoxemia. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Effect of concentrates restriction on feed consumption, diet digestibility, and nitrogen utilization in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Das, A; Smith, M L; Saini, M; Katole, Shrikant; Kullu, S S; Gupta, B K; Sharma, A K; Swarup, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of concentrates restriction on feed consumption, diet digestibility, and utilization of nitrogen in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), two feeding trials were conducted on three juveniles, four sub-adults, and three adults. During trial I, the conventional zoo diets of juveniles, sub-adults, and adult contained 22, 17, and 16% of concentrates on dry matter (DM) basis, respectively. During trial II, the amount of concentrate was reduced by 50%. A digestion trial of five days collection period was conducted during each period. The animals ate more roughages when concentrates were restricted. Intake of DM (g/kg BW(0.75) /day) was highest in sub-adults, followed by juveniles and adults. Apparent digestibility of crude protein (CP), neutral detergent soluble (NDS), and supply of digestible energy (DE) was highest in juveniles, followed by sub-adults and adults. Based upon the estimated metabolic fecal nitrogen (MFN) and calculated endogenous urinary nitrogen (EUN) and dermal losses, minimum dietary CP required to meet maintenance requirement was estimated to be 6.12, 6.05, and 5.97% in juveniles, sub-adults, and adults, respectively. Restriction of concentrates resulted in decreased (P < 0.05) digestibility of DM and GE, but the diet still supplied adequate amounts of DE and CP to fulfill estimated requirements of energy and protein during the period of experimentation. Thus, the concentrates portion of the diets of captive Asian elephants should be fed in a restricted way so as to reduce the intake of excessive calories and the potential risk of obesity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Associations between the neighbourhood food environment, neighbourhood socioeconomic status, and diet quality: An observational study.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Maria; Csizmadi, Ilona; Friedenreich, Christine M; Uribe, Francisco Alaniz; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; McLaren, Lindsay; Potestio, Melissa; Sandalack, Beverly; McCormack, Gavin R

    2016-09-15

    The neighbourhood environment may play an important role in diet quality. Most previous research has examined the associations between neighbourhood food environment and diet quality, and neighbourhood socioeconomic status and diet quality separately. This study investigated the independent and joint effects of neighbourhood food environment and neighbourhood socioeconomic status in relation to diet quality in Canadian adults. We undertook a cross-sectional study with n = 446 adults in Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Individual-level data on diet and socio-demographic and health-related characteristics were captured from two self-report internet-based questionnaires, the Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II (C-DHQ II) and the Past Year Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ). Neighbourhood environment data were derived from dissemination area level Canadian Census data, and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) databases. Neighbourhood was defined as a 400 m network-based 'walkshed' around each participant's household. Using GIS we objectively-assessed the density, diversity, and presence of specific food destination types within the participant's walkshed. A seven variable socioeconomic deprivation index was derived from Canadian Census variables and estimated for each walkshed. The Canadian adapted Healthy Eating Index (C-HEI), used to assess diet quality was estimated from food intakes reported on C-DHQ II. Multivariable linear regression was used to test for associations between walkshed food environment variables, walkshed socioeconomic status, and diet quality (C-HEI), adjusting for individual level socio-demographic and health-related covariates. Interaction effects between walkshed socioeconomic status and walkshed food environment variables on diet quality (C-HEI) were also tested. After adjustment for covariates, food destination density was positively associated with the C-HEI (β 0.06, 95 % CI 0.01-0.12, p = 0.04) though the magnitude of the

  5. Effect of fructose consumption on insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic subjects: a systematic review and meta-analysis of diet-intervention trials.

    PubMed

    Ter Horst, Kasper W; Schene, Merle R; Holman, Rebecca; Romijn, Johannes A; Serlie, Mireille J

    2016-12-01

    High fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to several features of metabolic syndrome including insulin resistance, but to our knowledge, no previous meta-analyses have investigated the effect of fructose on insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic subjects. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled diet-intervention studies in nondiabetic subjects to determine the effect of fructose on insulin sensitivity. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials on the basis of predetermined eligibility criteria. Two investigators independently performed the study selection, quality assessment, and data extraction. Results were pooled with the use of the generic inverse-variance method with random effects weighting and were expressed as mean differences (MDs) or standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% CIs. Twenty-nine articles that described 46 comparisons in 1005 normal-weight and overweight or obese participants met the eligibility criteria. An energy-matched (isocaloric) exchange of dietary carbohydrates by fructose promoted hepatic insulin resistance (SMD: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.91; P = 0.04) but had no effect on fasting plasma insulin concentrations (MD: -0.79 pmol/L; 95% CI: -6.41, 4.84 pmol/L; P = 0.78), the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (MD: 0.13; 95% CI: -0.07, 0.34; P = 0.21), or glucose disposal rates under euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp conditions (SMD: 0.00; 95% CI: 20.41, 0.41; P = 1.00). Hypercaloric fructose (∼25% excess of energy compared with that of the weight-maintenance control diet) raised fasting plasma insulin concentrations (MD: 3.38 pmol/L; 95% CI: 0.03, 6.73 pmol/L; P < 0.05) and induced hepatic insulin resistance (SMD: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.28, 1.26; P < 0.01) without affecting the HOMA-IR (MD: 0.18; 95% CI: -0.02, 0.39; P = 0.08) or glucose disposal rates (SMD: 0.10; 95% CI: -0.21, 0.40; P = 0.54). Results may have been limited by the low quality, small

  6. Coffee consumption attenuates insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in rats fed on high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Morakinyo, A O; Adekunbi, D A; Dada, K A; Adegoke, O A

    2013-12-20

    Several epidemiological evidences indicate that consumption of coffee is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) however; there is dearth of experimental data to support these observations. Given that associations do not necessarily infer causality, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of coffee consumption on glucose regulation, T2DM and the probable mechanisms of action, using an animal model. The effect of coffee (2-fold dilution) by oral gavage on normal and high sucrose-solution (HSS) fed (30 % w/v) rats was evaluated. The results showed that consumption of coffee significantly increase glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity (p<0.05) along with significant improvement in SOD and GSH activities. In addition, lipid indices such as TG and LDL as well as the lipid peroxidation marker (MDA) were markedly reduced (p<0.05) in rats fed with coffee compared with that of the HSS fed rats. These findings suggest that coffee consumption improves insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance in HSS-fed rat possibly via inhibition of oxidative stress.

  7. Body mass index, poor diet quality and health related quality of life are associated with mortality in rural older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In an aging population, potentially modifiable factors impacting mortality such as diet quality, body mass index (BMI), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are of interest. Surviving members of the Geisinger Rural Aging Study (GRAS) (n = 5,993; aged =74 years) were contacted in the fall of 20...

  8. Impact of diet on faecal output and caecotroph consumption in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Meredith, A L; Prebble, J L

    2017-03-01

    To assess the impact of four rabbit diets (hay only, extruded diet with hay, muesli with hay and muesli only) on faecal pellet size, faecal output and caecotrophy. Thirty-two Dutch rabbits were studied over 17 months. Faecal pellet size and weight were measured in weeks 3, 9, 21 and 43 and faecal output in weeks 10, 22 and 45. Number of uneaten caecotrophs was recorded weekly. Faecal pellets were consistently smaller and lighter in rabbits fed muesli only, and the size of pellets produced by those fed muesli with hay decreased over the course of the study. Faecal output was greatest in rabbits with the highest hay intake. Uneaten caecotrophs were found in greatest frequency in rabbits fed muesli. Muesli diets have a negative effect on faecal output and caecotroph ingestion and may therefore predispose to digestive disorders. Higher hay intake is associated with greater faecal output and fewer uneaten caecotrophs and may assist in preventing the gastrointestinal stasis. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  9. Evaluation of diet quality and its associated factors among adolescents in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Rezali, Fara Wahida; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah; Mohd Yusof, Barakatun Nisak; Sanker, Kaartina; Woon, Fui Chee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study aims to determine contribution of meal frequency, self-efficacy for healthy eating, and availability of healthy foods towards diet quality of adolescents in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. SUBJECTS/METHODS This study was conducted among 373 adolescents aged from 13 to 16 years old. Diet quality of the respondents was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index for Malaysians. Meal frequency, self-efficacy for healthy eating, and availability of healthy foods were assessed through the Eating Behaviours Questionnaire (EBQ), self-efficacy for healthy eating scale, and availability of healthy foods scale, respectively. RESULTS The majority of the respondents (80.7%) were at risk of poor diet quality. Males (mean = 34.2 ± 8.2%) had poorer diet quality than females (mean = 39.9 ± 9.0%) (t = -5.941, P < 0.05). Malay respondents (mean = 36.9 ± 8.7%) had poorer diet quality than Indian respondents (mean = 41.3 ± 10.0%) (F = 2.762, P < 0.05). Age (r = 0.123, P < 0.05), self-efficacy for healthy eating (r = 0.129, P < 0.05), and availability of healthy foods (r = 0.159, P < 0.05) were positively correlated with the diet quality of the respondents. However, meal frequency was not correlated with the diet quality of the respondents. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that being a male, being a Malay, low self-efficacy for healthy eating, and low availability of healthy foods contributed significantly towards poor diet quality among respondents. CONCLUSIONS In short, sex, ethnicity, self-efficacy for healthy eating, and availability of healthy foods were associated with diet quality among adolescents. Health practitioners should take into consideration of differences in sex and ethnicity during implementation of nutrition-related intervention programs. Self-efficacy for healthy eating and availability of healthy foods should be included as important components in improving diet quality of adolescents. PMID:26425281

  10. The global burden of disease attributable to low consumption of fruit and vegetables: implications for the global strategy on diet.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Karen; Pomerleau, Joceline; Causer, Louise; Altmann, Dan R.; McKee, Martin

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We estimated the global burden of disease attributable to low consumption of fruit and vegetables, an increasingly recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cancer, and compared its impact with that of other major risk factors for disease. METHODS: The burden of disease attributable to suboptimal intake of fruit and vegetables was estimated using information on fruit and vegetable consumption in the population, and on its association with six health outcomes (ischaemic heart disease, stroke, stomach, oesophageal, colorectal and lung cancer). Data from both sources were stratified by sex, age and by 14 geographical regions. FINDINGS: The total worldwide mortality currently attributable to inadequate consumption of fruit and vegetables is estimated to be up to 2.635 million deaths per year. Increasing individual fruit and vegetable consumption to up to 600 g per day (the baseline of choice) could reduce the total worldwide burden of disease by 1.8%, and reduce the burden of ischaemic heart disease and ischaemic stroke by 31% and 19% respectively. For stomach, oesophageal, lung and colorectal cancer, the potential reductions were 19%, 20%, 12% and 2%, respectively. CONCLUSION: This study shows the potentially large impact that increasing fruit and vegetable intake could have in reducing many noncommunicable diseases. It highlights the need for much greater emphasis on dietary risk factors in public health policy in order to tackle the rise in noncommunicable diseases worldwide, and suggests that the proposed intersectoral WHO/FAO fruit and vegetable promotion initiative is a crucial component in any global diet strategy. PMID:15744402

  11. Consumption of a resistant protein, sericin, elevates fecal immunoglobulin A, mucins, and cecal organic acids in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yukako; Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Tsujimoto, Kazuhisa; Sasaki, Masahiro; Kato, Norihisa

    2011-11-01

    We previously reported that consumption of a resistant protein, sericin, reduces colon tumorigenesis, constipation, and serum TG in rodents. The present study was conducted to elucidate the effects of dietary sericin on the intestinal luminal environment in rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Rats were fed 300 or 50 g/kg of beef tallow with or without 40 g/kg sericin, a protein purified from cocoons of Bombix mori, for 3 wk. Intestinal luminal variables, including IgA (index of intestinal immune function), mucins (index of barrier function), organic acids, microflora, and secondary bile acids, were measured. Dietary sericin markedly elevated fecal IgA in the HF diet group (3-fold, P < 0.05) but not in the low-fat (LF) diet group. Fecal mucin levels were elevated by sericin intake in the HF diet group (P < 0.05). Cecal organic acids, including acetate, propionate, n-butyrate, and succinate, were significantly lower in the HF diet group compared with the LF diet group. Dietary sericin significantly elevated cecal acetate and n-butyrate in the HF diet group but not in the LF diet group. Compared with the LF diet, the HF diet significantly increased serum TG in the untreated group but not in those fed sericin. The HF diet increased lower density lipoprotein (VLDL + IDL + LDL) cholesterol and it was reduced by sericin intake (P < 0.05). There was an inverse correlation between serum TG and cecal acetate (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = -0.63; P < 0.001). The profile of microflora in cecal digesta and fecal secondary bile acids (a risk factor for colon cancer) did not differ between the HF diet and HF diet with sericin groups. These results suggest a novel and favorable effect of sericin on colon health by modulating intestinal immune and barrier functions and fermentation in rats fed a HF diet.

  12. Dairy consumption and ovarian cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mommers, M; Schouten, L J; Goldbohm, R A; van den Brandt, P A

    2006-01-01

    Ovary cancer risk in relation to consumption of dairy products was investigated using a self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk factors for cancer, which was completed in 1986 by 62 573 postmenopausal women participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Follow-up for cancer was implemented by annual record linkage with the Netherlands Cancer Registry and a nationwide pathology registry. After 11.3 years of follow-up, data of 252 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 2216 subcohort members were available for analysis. No association was seen between consumption of milk, yoghurt, cheese or fermented dairy products and ovarian cancer risk. The multivariable adjusted relative risk of epithelial ovarian cancer for women in the highest compared to the lowest quintile of intake of lactose or dairy fat was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.60–1.45; Ptrend=0.32) and 1.53 (95% CI=1.00–2.36; Ptrend=0.11), respectively. Lactose or dairy fat intakes were not associated with serous ovarian cancer risk. Our results do not support an association between consumption of dairy products or lactose intake and ovarian cancer. PMID:16306872

  13. Cultural perspectives and current consumption changes of cooked rice in Korean diet

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Cooked rice is a staple food for Koreans which provides more than 60% of daily required energy. In 1960's, Koreans ate 600 g-800 g of cooked rice per meal and the energy obtained from cooked rice was almost more than 80% of the daily intake of energy. However, as the economy of Korea improved, the major industry has been shifted from agriculture to various manufacturing industries and the export of those products has been increased thus increasing the national income but decreasing the farming population and thus rice consumption have been decreased. It has been said that the decreased rice consumption is caused solely by decreased farming population but it can also be said that the decreased farming population is caused by decreased rice consumption. As the national income increases, the type of foods people consume have become diversified. Various processed foods such as convenience food or ready-to-eat food have been widespread, which are mostly made of wheat flour rather than rice. PMID:20535379

  14. From yellow perch to round goby: A review of double-crested cormorant diet and fish consumption at three St. Lawrence River colonies, 1999–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Farquhar, James F; Klindt, Rodger M; Mazzocchi, Irene; Mathers, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    The number of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the upper St. Lawrence River has increased markedly since the early 1990s. In 1999, a binational study was initiated to examine the annual diet composition and fish consumption of cormorants at colonies in the upper river. Since 1999, 14,032 cormorant pellets, collected from May through September each year, have been examined from St. Lawrence River colonies to estimate fish consumption and determine temporal and spatial variation in diet. Seasonal variation in diet composition within a colony was low. Prior to 2006 yellow perch was the primary fish consumed by cormorants in the upper St. Lawrence River. Round goby were first observed in cormorant diets in 2003 and by 2006 were the main fish consumed at two of the three colonies. The time interval it took from the first appearance of round goby in the diet at a colony to when goby were the dominant prey species varied by island, ranging from two to five years. Daily fish consumption at each cormorant colony increased significantly from the pre-round goby to post-round goby period. The mean annual biomass of yellow perch consumed decreased significantly during the post-round goby period at the three colonies. Reduced consumption of yellow perch by cormorants may alleviate suspected localized impacts on perch near some of the larger river colonies.

  15. Association between intake of total vs added sugar on diet quality: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Tapsell, Linda C

    2015-12-01

    Given its potential effect on nutrient and energy density, the sugar content of the diet is a subject of controversy. The aim of this review was to examine the cross-sectional or prospective evidence for associations between the intake of total sugar or added sugar (high vs low intakes) and diet quality or nutrient intakes in the general population. The following databases were searched for English-language articles published between 1972 and 2012: CINAHL Plus, EBM Reviews, ERIC, MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and ScienceDirect. The search identified studies that examined the association between intake of total sugar and/or added sugar and diet quality (n = 22) or nutrient intakes (n = 30). The following data were extracted: sample size and population, dietary assessment method, source of added sugar data, source of funding, comparator, association between total sugar or added sugar and diet quality, and the direction and magnitude of the association. Of 22 studies, all except 1 found a higher intake of added sugar to be associated with poorer diet quality, and the exceptional study did not adjust for total energy intake. Twenty-one of 30 studies found a negative association between added sugar and micronutrient intakes. The same association was not found for total sugar intake. Any negative association between dietary sugar and diet quality is better exposed by referring to added sugar rather than total sugar. There was substantial variation in features of study quality, including sample size, so the magnitude of the observed effect was generally small and may not be of clinical significance. Furthermore, the positive influence that core foods such as fruit and milk exert on total sugar values may bias the association between total sugar and diet quality. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The home environment: A mediator of nutrition knowledge and diet quality in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tabbakh, Tamara; Freeland-Graves, Jean H

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research was to assess adherence to the Healthy Eating Index-2010 of mothers and their adolescents (11-14 years old) and to examine the role of the home environment as a mediator of maternal nutrition knowledge and adolescent diet quality. It is hypothesized that mothers with greater knowledge impact the diet quality of their adolescents by creation of healthier home environments. A sample of 206 mother-adolescent dyads separately completed the Multidimensional Home Environment Scale, a Food Frequency Questionnaire, and a Nutrition Knowledge Scale. Body mass index-for-age percentiles were derived from weight and height measurements obtained by researcher; diet quality was estimated via the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010. Percent of maximum score on nutrition knowledge for both mothers and adolescents were poor, with lowest scores on recommendations of healthy eating and physical activity (48% and 19%, respectively). A model of maternal nutrition knowledge (independent variable) and adolescent diet quality (dependent variable) indicated that greater knowledge was associated with higher scores on total fruit (p = 0.02), whole grains (p = 0.05), seafood and plant proteins (p = 0.01), and overall diet quality (p < 0.01), as well as lower scores on empty calories (p = 0.01). Inclusion of the home environment as a mediator yielded significant estimates of the indirect effect (β = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.3-1.0). Within the home environment, psychological (β = 0.46), social (β = 0.23), and environmental (β = 0.65) variables were all significant mediators of nutrition knowledge on diet quality. These results emphasize the importance of maternal nutrition knowledge and the mediating effect of the home environment on the diet quality of adolescents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Associations among physical activity, diet quality, and weight status in US adults.

    PubMed

    Pate, Russell R; Taverno Ross, Sharon E; Liese, Angela D; Dowda, Marsha

    2015-04-01

    Nearly 70% of adult Americans are overweight or obese, but the associations between physical activity, diet quality, and weight status have not been examined in a representative sample of US adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations among moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), diet quality, and weight status within and across age groups in US adults. Participants included 2587 men and 2412 women age 20 to ≥70 yr from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004 and 2005-2006. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry. Diet quality was assessed with overall Healthy Eating Index-2005 scores. Measures of weight status, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference were assessed using standard National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey protocols. Across age groups, MVPA was lower in the older age groups for both men and women, whereas diet quality was higher (P < 0.001). BMI and waist circumference were also higher in the older age groups (P < 0.05). Within age groups, MVPA was inversely associated with BMI and waist circumference for men and women in nearly every age group (P < 0.05). Diet quality was inversely associated with the weight status variables only in men age 30-39, 40-49 (BMI only), and 50-59 yr and women age 50-59 yr (P < 0.05). We observed clear age-related trends for measures of weight status, physical activity, and diet quality in US men and women. MVPA was very consistently related to weight status in both genders. The relation between diet quality and weight status was less consistent. These findings provide support for public health efforts to prevent obesity by promoting increased physical activity in adult Americans.

  18. Snacking Behaviors, Diet Quality, and BMI in a Community Sample of Working Adults

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Timothy L.; French, Simone A.; Harnack, Lisa J.; Mitchell, Nathan R.; Wolfson, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Background Snacking behaviors have been linked with higher energy intake and excess weight. However results have been inconsistent. Moreover, few data are available on the extent to which snacking affects diet quality. Objective This study describes snacking behaviors, including total snacking energy, frequency, time of day, and percentage of snacking energy intake by food groups, and their associations with diet quality and BMI. Design Snacking behaviors and dietary intake were examined cross-sectionally among 233 adults participating in a community-based worksite nutrition intervention from September 2010–February 2013. Three telephone-administered 24-hour dietary recalls were collected (two weekday; one weekend day). Diet quality was characterized by the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 and BMI was computed using measured height and weight. Setting The setting was a large metropolitan medical complex in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Main outcome measures Outcome measures included diet quality and BMI. Statistical analyses General linear regression models were used to examine associations between each of the snacking behaviors as independent variables, and diet quality and BMI as dependent variables. Results Percent of snacking energy from fruit & juice (β=0.13, P=0.001) and nuts (β=0.16, P=0.008) were significantly positively associated with diet quality. Percent of snacking energy from desserts and sweets (β=−0.16, P<0.001) and sugar-sweetened beverages (β=−0.22, P=0.024) were significantly inversely associated. Percent of snacking energy from vegetables (β=−0.18, P=0.044) was significantly associated with lower BMI. Percent snacking energy from desserts and sweets was significantly associated with a higher BMI (β=0.04, P=0.017). Conclusions Snack food choices, but not total energy from snacks, frequency or time of day, were significantly associated with diet quality and BMI. PMID:25769747

  19. Snacking behaviors, diet quality, and body mass index in a community sample of working adults.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Timothy L; French, Simone A; Harnack, Lisa J; Mitchell, Nathan R; Wolfson, Julian

    2015-07-01

    Snacking behaviors have been linked with higher energy intake and excess weight. However, results have been inconsistent. In addition, few data are available on the extent to which snacking affects diet quality. This study describes snacking behaviors, including total snacking energy, frequency, time of day, and percentage of snacking energy intake by food groups, and their associations with diet quality and body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). Snacking behaviors and dietary intake were examined cross-sectionally among 233 adults participating in a community-based worksite nutrition intervention from September 2010 through February 2013. Three telephone-administered 24-hour dietary recalls were collected (2 weekdays; 1 weekend day). Diet quality was characterized by the Healthy Eating Index 2010 and BMI was computed using measured height and weight. The setting was a large metropolitan medical complex in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Outcome measures included diet quality and BMI. General linear regression models were used to examine associations between each of the snacking behaviors as independent variables, and diet quality and BMI as dependent variables. Percent of snacking energy from fruit and juice (β=.13; P=0.001) and nuts (β=.16; P=0.008) were significantly positively associated with diet quality. Percent of snacking energy from desserts and sweets (β=-.16; P<0.001) and sugar-sweetened beverages (β=-.22; P=0.024) were significantly inversely associated. Percent of snacking energy from vegetables (β=-.18; P=0.044) was significantly associated with lower BMI. Percent snacking energy from desserts and sweets was significantly associated with a higher BMI (β=.04; P=0.017). Snack food choices, but not total energy from snacks, frequency, or time of day, were significantly associated with diet quality and BMI. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Consumption of a diet rich in Brassica vegetables is associated with a reduced abundance of sulphate-reducing bacteria: A randomised crossover study.

    PubMed

    Kellingray, Lee; Tapp, Henri S; Saha, Shikha; Doleman, Joanne F; Narbad, Arjan; Mithen, Richard F

    2017-09-01

    We examined whether a Brassica-rich diet was associated with an increase in the relative abundance of intestinal lactobacilli and sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), or alteration to the composition of the gut microbiota, in healthy adults. A randomised crossover study was performed with ten healthy adults who were fed a high- and a low-Brassica diet for 2-wk periods, with a 2-wk washout phase separating the diets. The high-Brassica diet consisted of six 84 g portions of broccoli, six 84 g portions of cauliflower and six 300 g portions of a broccoli and sweet potato soup. The low-Brassica diet consisted of one 84 g portion of broccoli and one 84 g portion of cauliflower. Faecal microbiota composition was measured in samples collected following 2-wk Brassica-free periods (consumption of all Brassica prohibited), and after each diet, whereby the only Brassica consumed was that supplied by the study team. No significant changes to the relative abundance of lactobacilli were observed (p = 0.8019). The increased consumption of Brassica was associated with a reduction in the relative abundance of SRB (p = 0.0215), and members of the Rikenellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, Mogibacteriaceae, Clostridium and unclassified Clostridiales (p < 0.01). The increased consumption of Brassica vegetables was linked to a reduced relative abundance of SRB, and therefore may be potentially beneficial to gastrointestinal health. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Consumption of a diet rich in Brassica vegetables is associated with a reduced abundance of sulphate‐reducing bacteria: A randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Kellingray, Lee; Tapp, Henri S.; Saha, Shikha; Doleman, Joanne F.; Narbad, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    Scope We examined whether a Brassica‐rich diet was associated with an increase in the relative abundance of intestinal lactobacilli and sulphate‐reducing bacteria (SRB), or alteration to the composition of the gut microbiota, in healthy adults. Methods and results A randomised crossover study was performed with ten healthy adults who were fed a high‐ and a low‐Brassica diet for 2‐wk periods, with a 2‐wk washout phase separating the diets. The high‐Brassica diet consisted of six 84 g portions of broccoli, six 84 g portions of cauliflower and six 300 g portions of a broccoli and sweet potato soup. The low‐Brassica diet consisted of one 84 g portion of broccoli and one 84 g portion of cauliflower. Faecal microbiota composition was measured in samples collected following 2‐wk Brassica‐free periods (consumption of all Brassica prohibited), and after each diet, whereby the only Brassica consumed was that supplied by the study team. No significant changes to the relative abundance of lactobacilli were observed (p = 0.8019). The increased consumption of Brassica was associated with a reduction in the relative abundance of SRB (p = 0.0215), and members of the Rikenellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, Mogibacteriaceae, Clostridium and unclassified Clostridiales (p < 0.01). Conclusion The increased consumption of Brassica vegetables was linked to a reduced relative abundance of SRB, and therefore may be potentially beneficial to gastrointestinal health. PMID:28296348

  2. [Body satisfaction and diet quality in female university students from the Basque Country].

    PubMed

    Amaral Alves, Daniela; Hernández Regidor, Nerea; Basabe Baraño, Nekane; Rocandio Pablo, Ana Maria; Arroyo Izaga, Marta

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the body weight satisfaction and the diet quality in a group of female university students and to assess the differences between degrees in different fields of knowledge. Participants were 47 women volunteers classified as normal weight, 29 from the degree in Human Nutrition and Dietetics and 18 from the degree in Social Work. Dietary intake was evaluated by a validated food frequency questionnaire. This information was used to estimate the Diet Quality Index. Recalled weight and desired weight were used to measure weight satisfaction. Furthermore, lifestyle variables were registered. Data were analyzed using SPSS vs 17.0. The proportion of students who were satisfied with their body weight was 27.7%, 57.4% were dissatisfied and 14.9% very dissatisfied. Differences between degree courses were not found in weight satisfaction classification. The mean Diet Quality Index was 38.5±6.7, and 83% of participants had a diet classified as "needs to improve". Human Nutrition and Dietetics students had higher Diet Quality Index scores (41.5±5.1) than Social Work students (33.7±6.5) (p<0.001). In conclusion, a large proportion of participants were dissatisfied with their body weight and they wished to weigh less than current weight values. It seems that the knowledge of Nutrition university student participants affects their food practice, but this is not enough to achieve a healthy diet and to reduce their body dissatisfaction.

  3. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    PubMed

    Palmnäs, Marie S A; Cowan, Theresa E; Bomhof, Marc R; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05). Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  4. Low-Dose Aspartame Consumption Differentially Affects Gut Microbiota-Host Metabolic Interactions in the Diet-Induced Obese Rat

    PubMed Central

    Palmnäs, Marie S. A.; Cowan, Theresa E.; Bomhof, Marc R.; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A.; Vogel, Hans J.; Hittel, Dustin S.; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5–7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10–12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05). Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation. PMID:25313461

  5. Adipose tissue redistribution caused by an early consumption of a high sucrose diet in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Castellanos Jankiewicz, Ashley Kate; Rodríguez Peredo, Sofía Montserrat; Cardoso Saldaña, Guillermo; Díaz Díaz, Eulises; Tejero Barrera, María Elizabeth; del Bosque Plata, Laura; Carbó Zabala, Roxana

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide. The quantity and site of accumulation of adipose tissue is of great importance for the physiopathology of this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a high carbohydrate diet on adipose tissue distribution. Male Wistar rats, control (CONT) and high sucrose diet (HSD; 30% sucrose in their drinking water), were monitored during 24 weeks and total energy and macronutrient intake were estimated by measuring daily average consumption. A bioelectrical impedance procedure was performed at 22 weeks of treatment to assess body compartments and systolic arterial blood pressure was measured. Serum was obtained and retroperitoneal adipose tissue was collected and weighed. HSD ingested less pellets and beverage, consuming less lipids and proteins than CONT, but the same amount of carbohydrates. Retroperitoneal adipose tissue was more abundant in HSD. Both groups were normoglycemic; triglycerides, adiponectin and leptin levels were higher, while total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol were lower in HSD; insulin, HOMA index and systolic blood pressure had a tendency of being higher in HSD. This model presents dyslipidemia and a strong tendency for insulin resistance and hypertension. Even though there was no difference in body compartments between groups, retroperitoneal adipose tissue was significantly increased in HSD. This suggests that a rearrangement of adipose tissue distribution towards the abdominal cavity takes place as a result of chronic high sucrose consumption, which contributes to a higher risk of suffering from metabolic and chronic degenerative diseases. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Short-term changes in consumption and oviposition rates of Neoseiulus californicus strains (Acari: Phytoseiidae) after a diet shift.

    PubMed

    Castagnoli, M; Simoni, S; Nachman, G

    2001-01-01

    Short-term effects on consumption and oviposition rates of four strains of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) after a diet shift were evaluated. The new feeding conditions experienced by the predators were six fixed densities of eggs or protonymphs of Tetranychus urticae Koch placed on excised strawberry leaflet discs and maintained under laboratory conditions (25 +/- 1 degrees C, 75-85% RH, 16L: 8D). The observations were made on the first and the fifth day of the experiment. The phytoseiids came from three long-term mass-reared strains fed on T. urticae, Dermatophagoidesfarinae Hughes, or Quercus spp. pollen, respectively. The fourth strain was collected directly in a strawberry field. Time since diet transfer can be added to the factors (i.e. feeding history and prey density) already known to affect the functional and numerical responses of N. californicus, both when it feeds on prey eggs and protonymphs. If consumption rates were averaged over all strains and densities, 9.04 and 11.41 eggs, and 6.97 and 6.48 protonymphs were consumed on the first and the fifth day, respectively. If the same was done for oviposition rates, predators feeding on eggs produced 1.46 and 2.36 eggs/female/day, whereas predators feeding on protonymphs produced 1.35 and 2.29 eggs/female/day. Time had the greatest impact on the functional response of the strain that had previously fed on tetranychids, while an effect of time on the numerical response was detectable in all strains.

  7. The Gluten-Free Diet: Safety and Nutritional Quality

    PubMed Central

    Saturni, Letizia; Ferretti, Gianna; Bacchetti, Tiziana

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of Celiac Disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, atrophy of intestinal villi and several clinical manifestations has increased in recent years. Subjects affected by CD cannot tolerate gluten protein, a mixture of storage proteins contained in several cereals (wheat, rye, barley and derivatives). Gluten free-diet remains the cornerstone treatment for celiac patients. Therefore the absence of gluten in natural and processed foods represents a key aspect of food safety of the gluten-free diet. A promising area is the use of minor or pseudo-cereals such as amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum and teff. The paper is focused on the new definition of gluten-free products in food label, the nutritional properties of the gluten-free cereals and their use to prevent nutritional deficiencies of celiac subjects. PMID:22253989

  8. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Diet Quality in a Working Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Sandra B.; Higgins, Melinda; Dai, Jun; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Frediani, Jennifer K.; Reilly, Carolyn; Brigham, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    The associations between specific intra- and inter-personal psychosocial factors and dietary patterns were explored in a healthy, working adult population. Participants (N= 640) were enrolled in a prospective predictive health study and characterized by a mean age of 48(SD = 11) years, 67% women, and 30% minority. Baseline psychosocial measures of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, social support, and family functioning were examined for their relationships with three diet quality indices - AHEI, DASH, and the Mediterranean. Dietary intake was of moderate quality in this high income, well-educated, psychosocially healthy population. Social support was positively associated with better diet quality for all three indices (p< .01). Further research should focus on socio-environmental factors associated with diet quality. PMID:23408456

  9. The influence of diet, consumption and lipid use on recruitment of white bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckmayer, W.J.; Margraf, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of white bass (Morone chrysops) in Lake Erie has declined in recent years, sparking interest in mechanisms influencing its recruitment. We evaluate two mechanisms affecting recruitment: diet and the potential for competition, and storage of lipid energy reserves and the relationship to overwinter survival. The fish in our study were characteristic of white bass in the northern portion of their range, feeding predominantly on zooplankton. Only the largest age-0 white bass ate fish as a significant portion of their diet. Over the summer sampling period, we found decreasing ration sizes, expressed as a percentage of maximum ration, as the summer progressed with a concomitant decrease in the relative amount of lipid storage. In laboratory experiments, age-0 white bass held at 5??C and given food ad libitum did feed, but at rates that were insufficient to maintain body weight. Loss in weight was accompanied with a loss in lipids at a rate of 2.8 mg of lipids per gram of body weight per day. Based on our data, we concluded that age-0 white bass in Lake Erie were food-limited. Food limitation resulted in reduced growth rates, presumably related to competition with other planktivorous fishes. Reduced growth results in increased mortality and, ultimately, low recruitment through increased risk of predation by larger piscivorous fishes, reduced ability for white bass to switch to more energetically profitable piscivory and the increased likelihood of higher overwinter mortality because of reduced lipid stores.

  10. Gluten-free diet and quality of life in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Samasca, Gabriel; Sur, Genel; Lupan, Iulia; Deleanu, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Many recent studies overshadow the effects of gluten-free diet. Gluten-free diet positive effects were observed in celiac disease patients: increase in body mass index, higher energy intakes, reducing adiposity gain, moderates the risk of the associated complications. However, adhering to a gluten-free diet is difficult for many people. A new solution is needed for quality of life of celiac disease patients, not for celiac disease treatment. Health education on gluten-free diet at home and in society seems to be the solution. The aim of our study is to evaluate the recent research on gluten-free diet as a nutritional therapy for patients with celiac disease. To achieve this purpose we have analyzed the published studies from 2008 to the present on nutrition in celiac disease.

  11. Associations between motives for dish choice during home-meal preparation and diet quality in French adults: findings from the NutriNet-Santé study.

    PubMed

    Ducrot, Pauline; Méjean, Caroline; Fassier, Philippine; Allès, Benjamin; Hercberg, Serge; Péneau, Sandrine

    2017-03-01

    A number of motives such as constraints or pleasure have been suggested to influence dish choices during home-meal preparation. However, no study has evaluated how the importance conferred to these motives potentially influence diet quality. The present study aims at investigating the difference in diet quality according to the importance attached by individuals to various dish choice motives. The importance of twenty-seven criteria related to dish choices on weekdays was evaluated among 48 010 French adults from the NutriNet-Santé study. ANCOVA and logistic regression models, adjusted for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, were used to evaluate the association between the importance attached to dish choice motives (yes v. no) and energy and food group intakes, as well as adherence to French nutritional guidelines (modified Programme National Nutrition Santé-Guideline Score (mPNNS-GS)). A higher adherence to nutritional guidelines was observed in individuals attaching importance to a healthy diet (mPNNS-GS score 7·87 (sd 0·09) v. 7·39 (sd 0·09)) and specific diets (mPNNS-GS score 7·73 (sd 0·09) v. 7·53 (sd 0·09)), compared with those who attached little/no importance (all P<0·0001). These individuals also exhibited higher intakes of fruits and vegetables, but a lower consumption of meat, milk and cheese, sugary products and convenience foods compared with their respective counterparts (all P<0·0001). For other motives, that is, constraints, pleasure and organisation, only small differences were observed. The main difference in diet quality was related to the importance placed on a healthy diet. Although a causal link should be demonstrated, our findings suggested that strategies aiming at enabling people to take into account diet quality during home-meal preparation might be effective levers to promote healthy eating.

  12. Evaluation of the Relative Validity of the Short Diet Questionnaire for Assessing Usual Consumption Frequencies of Selected Nutrients and Foods

    PubMed Central

    Shatenstein, Bryna; Payette, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    A 36-item Short Diet Questionnaire (SDQ) was developed to assess usual consumption frequencies of foods providing fats, fibre, calcium, vitamin D, in addition to fruits and vegetables. It was pretested among 30 community-dwelling participants from the Québec Longitudinal Study on Nutrition and Successful Aging, “NuAge” (n = 1793, 52.4% women), recruited in three age groups (70 ± 2 years; 75 ± 2 years; 80 ± 2 years). Following revision, the SDQ was administered to 527 NuAge participants (55% female), distributed among the three age groups, both sexes and languages (French, English) prior to the second of three non-consecutive 24 h diet recalls (24HR) and validated relative to the mean of three 24HR. Full data were available for 396 participants. Most SDQ nutrients and fruit and vegetable servings were lower than 24HR estimates (p < 0.05) except calcium, vitamin D, and saturated and trans fats. Spearman correlations between the SDQ and 24HR were modest and significant (p < 0.01), ranging from 0.19 (cholesterol) to 0.45 (fruits and vegetables). Cross-classification into quartiles showed 33% of items were jointly classified into identical quartiles of the distribution, 73% into identical and contiguous quartiles, and only 7% were frankly misclassified. The SDQ is a reasonably accurate, rapid approach for ranking usual frequencies of selected nutrients and foods. Further testing is needed in a broader age range. PMID:26247965

  13. Evaluation of the Relative Validity of the Short Diet Questionnaire for Assessing Usual Consumption Frequencies of Selected Nutrients and Foods.

    PubMed

    Shatenstein, Bryna; Payette, Hélène

    2015-08-04

    A 36-item Short Diet Questionnaire (SDQ) was developed to assess usual consumption frequencies of foods providing fats, fibre, calcium, vitamin D, in addition to fruits and vegetables. It was pretested among 30 community-dwelling participants from the Québec Longitudinal Study on Nutrition and Successful Aging, "NuAge" (n = 1793, 52.4% women), recruited in three age groups (70 ± 2 years; 75 ± 2 years; 80 ± 2 years). Following revision, the SDQ was administered to 527 NuAge participants (55% female), distributed among the three age groups, both sexes and languages (French, English) prior to the second of three non-consecutive 24 h diet recalls (24HR) and validated relative to the mean of three 24HR. Full data were available for 396 participants. Most SDQ nutrients and fruit and vegetable servings were lower than 24HR estimates (p < 0.05) except calcium, vitamin D, and saturated and trans fats. Spearman correlations between the SDQ and 24HR were modest and significant (p < 0.01), ranging from 0.19 (cholesterol) to 0.45 (fruits and vegetables). Cross-classification into quartiles showed 33% of items were jointly classified into identical quartiles of the distribution, 73% into identical and contiguous quartiles, and only 7% were frankly misclassified. The SDQ is a reasonably accurate, rapid approach for ranking usual frequencies of selected nutrients and foods. Further testing is needed in a broader age range.

  14. Effects of feed consumption rate of beef cattle offered a diet supplemented with nitrate ad libitum or restrictively on potential toxicity of nitrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Araujo, R C; Koenig, K M; Beauchemin, K A

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of feed consumption rate on potential toxicity, rumen fermentation, and eating behavior when beef heifers were fed a diet supplemented with nitrate (NI). Twelve ruminally cannulated heifers (827 ± 65.5 kg BW) were used in a randomized complete block design. The experiment consisted of 10-d adaptation, 8-d urea-feeding, and 3-d nitrate-feeding periods. All heifers were fed a diet supplemented with urea (UR) during the adaptation and urea-feeding periods, whereas the NI diet (1.09% NO in dietary DM) was fed during the nitrate-feeding period. After adaptation, heifers were randomly assigned to ad libitum or restrictive feeding (about 80% of ad libitum intake) for the urea- and nitrate-feeding periods. Ad libitum DMI decreased (14.1 vs. 15.1 kg/d; < 0.01) when heifers were fed the NI diet compared with the UR diet. The amount of feed consumed increased ( < 0.01) at 0 to 3 h and decreased ( ≤ 0.03) at 3 to 24 h for restrictive vs. ad libitum feeding of both the UR and NI diets. Compared to the UR diet, the NI diet decreased ( < 0.01) feed consumption at 0 to 3 h and increased ( < 0.02) feed consumption at 3 to 24 h (except feed consumption at 9 to 12 h; = 0.90), indicating nitrate feeding changed the consumption pattern (a more even distribution of feed intake over the day). The increased feed consumption from 0 to 3 h after feeding the NI diet restrictively vs. ad libitum numerically decreased ( = 0.11) rumen pH and numerically or significantly increased ( = 0.01 to 0.28) rumen ammonia, NO, and NO; blood methemoglobin; and plasma NO and NO at 3 h. Regression analysis indicated that increased feed consumption (0 to 3 h) exponentially elevated ( < 0.01; = 0.75) blood methemoglobin, and plasma NO + NO among other rumen and blood variables had the greatest correlation (sigmoid response; < 0.01, = 0.47) with feed consumption (0 to 3 h). Particle size distribution of orts was partially altered ( = 0.02 to 0

  15. Neighborhood Availability of Convenience Stores and Diet Quality: Findings From 20 Years of Follow-Up in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study

    PubMed Central

    Rummo, Pasquale E.; Meyer, Katie A.; Boone-Heinonen, Janne; Jacobs, David R.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Lewis, Cora E.; Steffen, Lyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the association between neighborhood convenience stores and diet outcomes for 20 years of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study. Methods. We used dietary data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study years 1985–1986, 1992–1993, and 2005–2006 (n = 3299; Birmingham, AL; Chicago, IL; Minneapolis, MN; and Oakland, CA) and geographically and temporally matched neighborhood-level food resource and US Census data. We used random effects repeated measures regression to estimate associations between availability of neighborhood convenience stores with diet outcomes and whether these associations differed by individual-level income. Results. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, greater availability of neighborhood convenience stores was associated with lower diet quality (mean score = 66.3; SD = 13.0) for participants with lower individual-level income (b = −2.40; 95% CI = −3.30, −1.51); associations at higher individual-level income were weaker. We observed similar associations with whole grain consumption across time but no statistically significant associations with consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, artificially sweetened beverages, snacks, processed meats, fruits, or vegetables. Conclusions. The presence of neighborhood convenience stores may be associated with lower quality diets. Low-income individuals may be most sensitive to convenience store availability. PMID:25790410

  16. Contextual factors are associated with diet quality in youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nansel, Tonja R.; Lipsky, Leah M.; Liu, Aiyi; Laffel, Lori M.B.; Mehta, Sanjeev N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined differences in diet quality by meal type, location, and time of week in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D). A sample of youth with T1D (n=252; 48% female) age 8 to 18 years (13.2±2.8) with diabetes duration ≥1 year (6.3±3.4) completed 3-day diet records. Multilevel linear regression models tested for differences in diet quality indicators by meal type, location and time of week (weekdays versus weekends). Participants showed greater energy intake and poorer diet quality on weekends relative to weekdays, with lower intake of fruit and vegetables, and higher intake of total and saturated fat. Differences in diet quality were seen across meal types, with higher nutrient density at breakfast and dinner than at lunch and snacks. Participants reported the highest whole grain and lowest fat intake at breakfast, but higher added sugar than at lunch or dinner. Dinner was characterized by the highest fruit intake, lowest added sugar, and lowest glycemic load, but also the highest sodium intake. The poorest nutrient density and highest added sugar occurred during snacks. Diet quality was poorer for meals consumed away from home than those consumed at home for breakfast, dinner, and snacks. Findings regarding lunch meal location were mixed, with higher nutrient density, lower glycemic load, and less added sugar at home lunches, and lower total fat, saturated fat, and sodium at lunches away from home. Findings indicate impacts of meal type, location and time of week on diet quality, suggesting targets for nutrition education and behavioral interventions. PMID:24651028

  17. Evaluation of the quality and health literacy demand of online renal diet information.

    PubMed

    Lambert, K; Mullan, J; Mansfield, K; Koukomous, A; Mesiti, L

    2017-10-01

    Dietary modification is critical in the self-management of chronic kidney disease. The present study describes the accuracy, quality and health literacy demand of renal diet information for adults with kidney disease obtained from the Internet and YouTube (www.youtube.com). A comprehensive content analysis was undertaken in April and July 2015 of 254 eligible websites and 161 YouTube videos. The accuracy of the renal diet information was evaluated by comparing the key messages with relevant evidence-based guidelines for the dietary management of people with kidney disease. The DISCERN tool (www.discern.org.uk) was used to evaluate the quality of the material. Health literacy demand was evaluated using the Patient Education Material Assessment Tool (www.ahrq.gov/professionals/prevention-chronic-care/improve/self-mgmt/pemat/index.html) and seven validated readability calculators. The most frequent renal diet topic found online was generic dietary information for people with chronic kidney disease. The proportion of renal diet information obtained from websites that was accurate was 73%. However, this information was mostly of poor quality with extensive shortcomings, difficult to action and written with a high health literacy demand. By contrast, renal diet information available from YouTube was highly understandable and actionable, although only 18% of the videos were accurate, and a large proportion were of poor quality with extensive shortcomings. The most frequent authors of accurate, good quality, understandable, material were government bodies, dietitians, academic institutions and medical organisations. Renal diet information found online that is written by government bodies, dietitians, academic institutions and medical organisations is recommended. Further work is required to improve the quality and, most importantly, the actionability of renal diet information found online. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  18. Contextual factors are associated with diet quality in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nansel, Tonja R; Lipsky, Leah M; Liu, Aiyi; Laffel, Lori M B; Mehta, Sanjeev N

    2014-08-01

    This study examined differences in diet quality by meal type, location, and time of week in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A sample of youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n=252; 48% female) age 8 to 18 years (mean±standard deviation=13.2±2.8 years) with diabetes duration ≥1 year (mean±standard deviation=6.3±3.4 years) completed 3-day diet records. Multilevel linear regression models tested for differences in diet quality indicators by meal type, location, and time of week (weekdays vs weekends). Participants showed greater energy intake and poorer diet quality on weekends relative to weekdays, with lower intake of fruit and vegetables, and higher intake of total and saturated fat. Differences in diet quality were seen across meal types, with higher nutrient density at breakfast and dinner than at lunch and snacks. Participants reported the highest whole-grain and lowest fat intake at breakfast, but higher added sugar than at lunch or dinner. Dinner was characterized by the highest fruit intake, lowest added sugar, and lowest glycemic load, but also the highest sodium intake. The poorest nutrient density and highest added sugar occurred during snacks. Diet quality was poorer for meals consumed away from home than those consumed at home for breakfast, dinner, and snacks. Findings regarding lunch meal location were mixed, with higher nutrient density, lower glycemic load, and less added sugar at home lunches, and lower total fat, saturated fat, and sodium at lunches away from home. Findings indicate impacts of meal type, location, and time of week on diet quality, suggesting targets for nutrition education and behavioral interventions. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A high quality diet is associated with reduced systemic inflammation in middle-aged individuals.

    PubMed

    Dias, Joana Alves; Wirfält, Elisabet; Drake, Isabel; Gullberg, Bo; Hedblad, Bo; Persson, Margaretha; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Schiopu, Alexandru; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Björkbacka, Harry

    2015-01-01

    To examine if overall diet quality is associated with cellular and soluble biomarkers of systemic inflammation in middle-aged individuals. A group of 667 individuals, aged 63-68 years, selected from the cardiovascular arm of the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort, participated in this study. Baseline examinations consisted of an extensive socio-demographic questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, blood sampling and detailed dietary data. Mononuclear leukocytes frozen at baseline were thawed and analysed with flow cytometry to quantify monocyte subsets based on CD14 and CD16 expression. Plasma cytokines were measured using multiplexed immune assays. A diet quality index consisting of six components (saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish and shellfish, dietary fibre, fruit and vegetables, and sucrose) was constructed to measure adherence to the Swedish Nutrition Recommendations/Dietary Guidelines. General linear models were used to investigate associations between index scores and several biomarkers of inflammation. A higher percentage of women reported adherence to the nutritional recommendations and had better overall diet quality than men. Participants with higher diet quality were more likely to have a healthier lifestyle. The levels of high-sensitive CRP, S100A8/A9, TNF-α, white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes and CD14(+)CD16(++) were lower in participants with higher index scores. The associations remained significant after adjustment for potential confounders. In this cross-sectional study, we found that a high diet quality is associated with lower systemic inflammation. As the incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer is directly correlated with the levels of inflammation, our findings might indicate a protective role of high-quality diet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Edible dry bean consumption (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) modulates cardiovascular risk factors and diet-induced obesity in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zongjian; Jiang, Weiqin; Thompson, Henry J

    2012-08-01

    Pulses are grain legumes that have sustained the civilisations of the world throughout their development; yet this staple food crop has fallen into disuse, particularly in Westernised societies, and decreased consumption parallels increased prevalence of CVD. The objective of the present study was to identify mechanisms that account for the cardioprotective activity of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), one of the four primary pulse crops, which is widely produced and consumed globally. Laboratory assays that can be used for in vivo screening of dry beans and other pulses to identify those with the greatest potential to benefit human health are also reported. Sprague-Dawley rats and a diet-induced obesity model in C57Bl/6 mice were used to assess the effect of cooked dry bean incorporated into a purified diet formulation on plasma lipids and hepatic proteins involved in the regulation of lipid biosynthesis. In both animal species, short-term feeding of a bean-containing diet reduced plasma total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol without affecting HDL-cholesterol or total TAG. Mechanisms associated with cholesterol catabolism and excretion are the likely targets of the bean effect. Unexpectedly, bean-fed obese mice experienced weight loss as well as an improved plasma lipid profile within a 12 d time frame. These findings support the use of short-term (7-14 d) assays to investigate mechanisms that account for the cardioprotective and weight regulatory effects of dry bean and to screen dry bean germplasm resources for types of bean with high protective activity. These same assays can be used to identify the bioactive components of bean that account for the observed effects.

  1. Increased Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Type 2 Diabetes Is Independent of Diet Quality

    PubMed Central

    Jarvandi, Soghra; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Schootman, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor diet increases the risk of both colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. We investigated the role of diet in the association between diabetes and colorectal cancer. Methods We analyzed data from 484,020 individuals, aged 50–71 years who participated in the prospective National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study and were cancer free at baseline (1995–1996). History of diabetes was self-reported. Diet quality was measured with the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005), using a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire. Cox regression models were constructed to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of first primary incident colorectal cancer, overall and by anatomical location. Results During an average follow-up of 9.2 years, we identified 7,598 new cases of colorectal cancer. After controlling for non-dietary confounders, diabetes was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (HR 1.27, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.36). Further adjustment for diet quality did not attenuate this association. Diabetes was associated with a HR of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.40) in individuals with good diet (quartile 4 of HEI-2005) and 1.58 (95% CI: 1.34, 1.86) in those with poor diet (quartile 1 of HEI-2005), compared to those with no diabetes and good diet. Moreover, diabetes was associated with a stronger risk of proximal than distal colon cancer (HR: 1.33 vs. HR: 1.20), while poor diet was associated with a weaker risk of proximal colon cancer (HR: 1.18 vs. HR: 1.46). Conclusion Diabetes and poor diet, independently and additively are associated with the increased risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:24069323

  2. Semen Quality and Sperm Function Loss by Hypercholesterolemic Diet Was Recovered by Addition of Olive Oil to Diet in Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Aida A.; Funes, Abi K.; Cid-Barria, Macarena; Cabrillana, María E.; Monclus, María A.; Simón, Layla; Vicenti, Amanda E.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2013-01-01

    Fat increment (0.05% cholesterol, chol) in standard diet promoted a significant increase in serum and sperm membrane chol, which ultimately altered membrane-coupled sperm specific functions: osmotic resistance, acrosomal reaction, and sperm capacitation in White New Zealand rabbits. These changes were also associated with a reduction in motility percentage and appearance of abnormal sperm morphology. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of dietary olive oil (OO, 7% v/w) administration to several male hypercholesterolemic rabbits (hypercholesterolemic rabbits, HCR) with altered fertility parameters. These HCR males were achieved by feeding normal rabbits with a high-fat diet (0.05% chol). HCR were associated with a modest non-significant increase in body weight (standard diet, 4.08±0.17 Kg, versus high-fat diet, 4.37±0.24 Kg). Hypercholesterolemic rabbits presented a marked decrease in semen volume, sperm cell count, and percentage of sperm motility, associated with a significant increase in sperm cell abnormalities. Moreover, sperm capacitation measured by the characteristic phosphorylated protein pattern in and induced acrosomal reaction were also altered suggesting sperm dysfunction. However, the administration of OO (for 16 weeks) to rabbits that were fed with 50% of the high-fat diet normalized serum chol. Curiously, OO supply succeeded to attenuate the seminal and sperm alterations observed in HCR group. Administration of OO alone did not cause any significant changes in above mentioned parameters. These data suggest that OO administration to HCR male rabbits recovers the loss of semen quality and sperm functionality. PMID:23326331

  3. Microbiological quality of terrestrial gastropods prepared for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Serrano, S; Medina, L M; Jurado, M; Jodral, M

    2004-08-01

    Hygienic quality was investigated in 60 samples of ready-to-eat snails (Helix lactea, Helix nemoralis, and Helix hortensis) obtained from 30 in-season street stalls and 30 catering establishments (bars) in Córdoba. In accordance with Spanish legislation regarding hygiene in the preparation, distribution, and sale of prepared foods, counts were obtained for total mesophilic aerobic bacteria, coliforms, total Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus. The results obtained showed that 33.3, 20.0, and 13.3% of the samples from stalls and 73.3, 53.3, and 6.7% of the samples from bars did not comply with the regulations with respect to the control of total mesophilic aerobic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. Coliforms were found in 53.3% of the samples from the bars (mean, 2.1 CFU/g) and in 33.3% of the stalls (mean, 1.1 CFU/g). Salmonella was not detected.

  4. Tooth loss and its association with dietary intake and diet quality in American adults.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong; Hollis, James H

    2014-11-01

    To investigate associations between the number of natural teeth and energy intake, nutrient intake, and diet quality in adults. Eligible adults who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2005-2008 were included in the present study (n=9140). Participants were classified into three groups depending on the total number of natural teeth (excluding third molars): full dentition (28 teeth), moderate dentition (21-27 teeth), and poor dentition (20 teeth or less). Dietary intake and diet quality were estimated from the first 24-h dietary recall data. Participants in the poor dentition group had significantly lower energy intake than those with moderate dentition (P<0.05), however, both groups did not significantly differ from those who had full dentition. Adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, physical activity, smoking status, and energy intake, the intake of protein as well as most vitamins and minerals were positively associated with the total number of natural teeth (P<0.05); an inverse association was observed for carbohydrate intake (P<0.001). Diet quality, as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2005, was inversely associated with tooth loss (P<0.001). Tooth loss in adults is associated with lower diet quality and reduced intake of most nutrients; this may partly explain for the higher risk of chronic diseases in this population. People with missing teeth are recommended to monitor their dietary intake to avoid nutrient deficiency and to improve their diet quality for better health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic consumption of a low-fat diet improves cardiometabolic risk factors according to the CLOCK gene in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Alcala-Diaz, Juan Francisco; Rangel-Zuñiga, Oriol; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; Lopez-Moreno, Javier; Tinahones, Francisco Jose; Ordovas, Jose M; Garaulet, Marta; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Martinez, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) gene have been associated with cardiometabolic conditions such as obesity and dyslipidemia. Our aim was to examine whether the chronic consumption of two healthy diets interacts with SNPs of the CLOCK gene in order to improve lipid metabolism and inflammation status in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). The diets were low-fat (LF) diet and Mediterranean diet (MedDiet). CLOCK SNPs (rs1801260, rs3749474, rs4580704) and the study procedures were performed in 897 patients from the CORDIOPREV clinical trial. After 12 months of intervention, we found significant gene-diet interactions between rs4580704 SNP and the LF diet. Specifically, major allele carriers C/C displayed a greater decrease in high sensitivity C-reactive protein (p < 0.001) and a significant increase in HDL/apolipoprotein A1 ratio (p = 0.029) than minor G allele carriers (G/G + C/G). No other gene-diet interactions were observed in this research. These results suggest that rs4580704 SNP interacts with the LF diet improving inflammation status and dyslipidemia related with CHD. The shift toward "personalized nutrition" based on gene-nutrient interactions may be suitable for promoting cardiovascular health in patients with CHD. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. High consumption of fructose rather than glucose promotes a diet-induced obese phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rovenko, Bohdana M; Perkhulyn, Natalia V; Gospodaryov, Dmytro V; Sanz, Alberto; Lushchak, Oleh V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2015-02-01

    During the last 20 years, there has been a considerable scientific debate about the possible mechanisms of induction of metabolic disorders by reducing monosaccharides such as glucose or fructose. In this study, we report the metabolic rearrangement in response to consumption of these monosaccharides at concentrations ranging from 0.25% to 20% in a Drosophila model. Flies raised on high-glucose diet displayed delay in pupation and increased developmental mortality compared with fructose consumers. Both monosaccharides at high concentrations promoted an obese-like phenotype indicated by increased fly body mass, levels of uric acid, and circulating and stored carbohydrates and lipids; and decreased percentage of water in the body. However, flies raised on fructose showed lower levels of circulating glucose and higher concentrations of stored carbohydrates, lipids, and uric acid. The preferential induction of obesity caused by fructose in Drosophila was associated with increased food consumption and reduced mRNA levels of DILP2 and DILP5 in the brain of adult flies. Our data show that glucose and fructose differently affect carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in Drosophila in part by modulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling. Some reported similarities with effects observed in mammals make Drosophila as a useful model to study carbohydrate influence on metabolism and development of metabolic disorders.

  7. Acute High Fat Diet Consumption Activates the Mesolimbic Circuit and Requires Orexin Signaling in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Spring; Patrone, Anabela; Reynaldo, Mirta; Perello, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Overconsumption of palatable energy-dense foods has negative health implications and it is associated with obesity and several eating disorders. Currently, little is known about the neuronal circuitries activated by the acute ingestion of a rewarding stimulus. Here, we used a combination of immunohistochemistry, pharmacology and neuronal tracing analyses to examine the role of the mesolimbic system in general, and the orexin neurons in particular, in a simple experimental test in which naïve mice are allowed to spontaneously eat a pellet of a high fat diet (HFD) for 2 h. We found that acute HFD activates c-Fos expression in several reward-related brain areas, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens, central amygdala and lateral hypothalamic area. We also found that: i- HFD-mediated orosensory stimulation was required for the mesolimbic pathway activation, ii- acute HFD differentially activates dopamine neurons of the paranigral, parabrachial pigmented and interfascicular sub-regions of the VTA, and iii- orexin neurons of the lateral hypothalamic area are responsive to acute HFD. Moreover, orexin signaling blockade, with the orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB-334867, reduces acute HFD consumption and c-Fos induction in the VTA but not in the other mesolimbic nuclei under study. Finally, we found that most orexin neurons responsive to acute HFD innervate the VTA. Our results show that acute HFD consumption recruits the mesolimbic system and that the full manifestation of this eating behavior requires the activation of orexin signaling. PMID:24466352

  8. Food costs, diet quality and energy balance in the United States.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Andrea; Frazão, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    The high obesity rates and poor diet quality in the United States, particularly among low income populations, are often attributed to low income, low food access, and high food prices of healthy foods. This paper discusses these associations and questions some of the metrics used to measure food prices. The paper argues that 1. On average, Americans consume diets that need improvement and there is only a very limited relationship between income and diet quality; 2. The way the food price is measured makes a difference in the perception of how expensive healthy and less healthy food is; 3. The way Americans allocate their food budgets between healthy and less healthy foods is not in line with healthy diets; and 4. At any food spending level there are households that purchase healthy (and unhealthy) diets, including budgets at or below the maximum allotment for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) which provides a means for low-income households to purchase food. Our key finding is that healthy foods and diets are affordable, but policy makers, nutrition educators, researchers and the media need to focus on promoting this message, and providing additional guidance on making the changes for Americans to switch to a healthy and affordable diet. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The Attitudes to Chocolate Questionnaire. Psychometric properties and relationship with consumption, dieting, disinhibition and thought suppression.

    PubMed

    Van Gucht, Dinska; Soetens, Barbara; Raes, Filip; Griffith, James W

    2014-05-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Attitudes to Chocolate Questionnaire (ACQ), comparing the original three-factor model to a later-suggested two-factor model. We evaluated the construct validity of the ACQ by investigating the associations between the resulting factors and other eating-related questionnaires such as the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire and the Food Thought Suppression Inventory. Finally, we compared the scores on several scales regarding eating behavior between different groups (men versus women, dieters versus non-dieters and cravers versus non-cravers). A confirmatory factor analysis of the Dutch ACQ indicated the best global fit indices for the two-factor model, with the resulting factors being "Negative consequences and Guilt" and "Craving and emotional eating". Both factors were associated with other eating-related dimensions. However, craving seemed to be uniquely associated with the amount of chocolate consumed per week, whereas guilt correlated strongly with restraint. Finally, women scored higher on nearly all scales, but there was no significant gender difference with regard to chocolate consumption. Dieters reported more disinhibition, restraint, food-thought suppression and guilt, but they did not significantly differ from non-dieters with regards to their levels of craving, hunger nor consumption.

  10. Sugar-sweetened beverage and diet soda consumption and the 7-year risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus in middle-aged Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, M; Nakamura, K; Miura, K; Takamura, T; Yoshita, K; Nagasawa, S Y; Morikawa, Y; Ishizaki, M; Kido, T; Naruse, Y; Suwazono, Y; Sasaki, S; Nakagawa, H

    2014-02-01

    This cohort study investigated the association between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) and diet soda consumption and the incidence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men. The participants were 2,037 employees of a factory in Japan. We measured consumption of SSB and diet soda using a self-administered diet history questionnaire. The incidence of diabetes was determined in annual medical examinations over a 7-year period. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for diabetes were estimated after adjusting for age, body mass index, family history, and dietary and other lifestyle factors. During the study, 170 participants developed diabetes. The crude incidence rates (/1,000 person-years) across participants who were rare/never SSB consumers, <1 serving/week, ≥ 1 serving/week and <1 serving/day, and ≥ 1 serving/day were 15.5, 12.7, 14.9, and 17.4, respectively. The multivariate-adjusted HR compared to rare/never SSB consumers was 1.35 (95 % CI 0.80-2.27) for participants who consumed ≥ 1 serving/day SSB. Diet soda consumption was significantly associated with the incident risk of diabetes (P for trend = 0.013), and multivariate-adjusted HRs compared to rare/never diet soda consumers were 1.05 (0.62-1.78) and 1.70 (1.13-2.55), respectively, for participants who consumed <1 serving/week and ≥ 1 serving/week. Consumption of diet soda was significantly associated with an increased risk for diabetes in Japanese men. Diet soda is not always effective at preventing type 2 diabetes even though it is a zero-calorie drink.

  11. White tea consumption restores sperm quality in prediabetic rats preventing testicular oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro F; Tomás, Gonçalo D; Dias, Tânia R; Martins, Ana D; Rato, Luís; Alves, Marco G; Silva, Branca M

    2015-10-01

    Prediabetes represents a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It encompasses some, but not all, T2DM diagnostic criteria. Prediabetes has been recently associated with altered testicular function and increased testicular oxidative stress (OS). Tea is widely consumed and its anti-hyperglycaemic/antioxidant properties are known. This study aimed to evaluate whether white tea (WTEA) consumption by prediabetic rats could prevent testicular OS, preserving sperm quality. For that purpose, WTEA (presenting a high catechin content) was given to 30-day-old streptozotocin-induced prediabetic rats for 2 months. Testicular antioxidant potential and OS were evaluated, as well as sperm parameters, by standard techniques. WTEA consumption improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in prediabetic rats. Testicular antioxidant potential was increased by WTEA consumption, restoring protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, although glutathione content and redox state were not altered. WTEA consumption improved sperm concentration and sperm quality (motility, viability and abnormality) was restored. Overall, WTEA consumption improved reproductive health of male prediabetic rats. Based on the study results, WTEA consumption appears to be a natural, economical and effective strategy to counteract the deleterious effects of prediabetes on male reproductive health, but further studies will be needed before a definitive recommendation is made. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healt