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Sample records for containment atmosphere conditions-an

  1. MINOS atmospheric neutrino contained events

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, A.; /Minnesota U.

    2007-10-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment has continued to collect atmospheric neutrino events while doing a precision measurement of NuMI beam {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance oscillations. The 5.4 kton iron calorimeter is magnetized to provide the unique capability of discriminating between {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} interactions on an event-by-event basis and has been collecting atmospheric neutrino data since July 2003. An analysis of the neutrino events with interaction vertices contained inside the detector will be presented.

  2. Containment atmosphere response to external sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.; Almenas, K.

    1995-09-01

    The application of external sprays to a containment steel shell can be an effective energy removal method and has been proposed in the passive AP-600 design. Reduction of the steel shell temperature in contact with the containment atmosphere enhances both heat and mass transfer driving forces. Large scale experimental data in this area is scarce, therefore the measurements obtained from the E series tests conducted at the German HDR facility deserve special attention. These long term tests simulated various severe accident conditions, including external spraying of the hemispherical steel shell. This investigation focuses upon the integral response of the HDR containment atmosphere during spray periods and upon methods by which lumped parameter system codes, like CONTAIN, model the underlying condensation phenomena. Increases in spray water flowrates above a minimum value were ineffective at improving containment pressure reduction since the limiting resistance for energy transfer lies in the noncondensable-vapor boundary layer at the inner condensing surface. The spray created an unstable condition by cooling the upper layers of a heated atmosphere and thus inducing global natural circulation flows in the facility and subsequently, abrupt changes in lighter-than-air noncondensable (J{sub 2}/He) concentrations. Modeling results using the CONTAIN code are outlined and code limitations are delineated.

  3. OCEANET-Atmosphere - The Autonomous Measurement Container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisch, John; Macke, Andreas; Althausen, Dietrich; Bumke, Karl; Engelmann, Ronny; Kanitz, Thomas; Kleta, Henry; Zoll, Yann

    2010-05-01

    OCEANET-Atmosphere is a joint venture project of IFM-GEOMAR and IFT to study the mass and energy transfer of ocean and atmosphere by introducing a special measurement container, which is suitable to perform a large spectrum of atmospheric underway measurements on offshore research vessels and cargo ships. The container combines state-of-the-art measurement devices and connect them to its own computer network to realize a comprehensive system for remote sensing. A Raman-lidar measures marine and anthropogenic optical aerosol properities by analyzing the elastic signal and the vibration-rotation Raman signal of nitrogen. Our passive microwave radiometer determines the integrated water vapor and the liquid water path of the atmospheric column, as well as vertical temperature and humidity profiles. Carbon dioxide is measured high-frequent. Turbulence measurements are performed by means of a sonic anemometer. In combination with fast humidity sensors the fluxes of momentum, latent and sensible heat are derived. An automatic full sky imager monitors the state of the cloudy sky. A selection of standard meteorological devices measure air temperature, humidity, wind velocity, wind speed and downward shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes. The GPS sensors register navigational data. For an almost real time monitoring of a data subset our telemetry system is sending short hourly data reports via satellite. OCEANET-Atmosphere is set up to improve the quantity and the quality of atmospheric data sets on intercontinental oceanic transects, where the previous data base is still weak. A first research mission has been performed onboard RV Polarstern at ANT XXVI/1.

  4. Mercury - Does its atmosphere contain water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mercury, like that of the moon, is maintained in an extremely tenuous minimum state by weak solar wind accretion and radioactive decay processes, and depleted by strong removal mechanisms. Unlike the moon, it has a high daytime surface temperature that promotes the production of water vapor, which may be the dominant atmospheric constituent derived from solar wind protons.

  5. Synthetic spectra of simulated terrestrial atmospheres containing possible biomarker gases.

    PubMed

    Schindler, T L; Kasting, J F

    2000-05-01

    NASA's proposed Terrestrial Planet Finder, a space-based interferometer, will eventually allow spectroscopic analyses of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Such analyses would provide information about the existence of life on these planets. One strategy in the search for life is to look for evidence of O3 (and hence O2) in a planet's atmosphere; another is to look for gases that might be present in an atmosphere analogous to that of the inhabited early Earth. In order to investigate these possibilities, we have calculated synthetic spectra for several hypothetical terrestrial-type atmospheres. The model atmospheres represent four different scenarios. The first two, representing inhabited terrestrial planets, are an Earth-like atmosphere containing variable amounts of oxygen and an early Earth-type atmosphere containing methane. In addition, two cases representing Mars-like and early Venus-like atmospheres were evaluated, to provide possible "false positive" spectra. The calculated spectra suggest that ozone could be detected by an instrument like Terrestrial Planet Finder if the O2 concentration in the planet's atmosphere is > or = 200 ppm, or 10(-3) times the present atmospheric level. Methane should be observable on an early-Earth type planet if it is present in concentrations of 100 ppm or more. Methane has both biogenic and abiogenic sources, but concentrations exceeding 1000 ppm, or 0.1% by volume, would be difficult to produce from abiogenic sources alone. High methane concentrations in a planet's atmosphere are therefore another potential indicator for extraterrestrial life. PMID:11543302

  6. Synthetic spectra of simulated terrestrial atmospheres containing possible biomarker gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, T. L.; Kasting, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's proposed Terrestrial Planet Finder, a space-based interferometer, will eventually allow spectroscopic analyses of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Such analyses would provide information about the existence of life on these planets. One strategy in the search for life is to look for evidence of O3 (and hence O2) in a planet's atmosphere; another is to look for gases that might be present in an atmosphere analogous to that of the inhabited early Earth. In order to investigate these possibilities, we have calculated synthetic spectra for several hypothetical terrestrial-type atmospheres. The model atmospheres represent four different scenarios. The first two, representing inhabited terrestrial planets, are an Earth-like atmosphere containing variable amounts of oxygen and an early Earth-type atmosphere containing methane. In addition, two cases representing Mars-like and early Venus-like atmospheres were evaluated, to provide possible "false positive" spectra. The calculated spectra suggest that ozone could be detected by an instrument like Terrestrial Planet Finder if the O2 concentration in the planet's atmosphere is > or = 200 ppm, or 10(-3) times the present atmospheric level. Methane should be observable on an early-Earth type planet if it is present in concentrations of 100 ppm or more. Methane has both biogenic and abiogenic sources, but concentrations exceeding 1000 ppm, or 0.1% by volume, would be difficult to produce from abiogenic sources alone. High methane concentrations in a planet's atmosphere are therefore another potential indicator for extraterrestrial life.

  7. Synthetic Spectra of Simulated Terrestrial Atmospheres Containing Possible Biomarker Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Trent L.; Kasting, James F.

    2000-05-01

    NASA's proposed Terrestrial Planet Finder, a space-based interferometer, will eventually allow spectroscopic analyses of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Such analyses would provide information about the existence of life on these planets. One strategy in the search for life is to look for evidence of O 3 (and hence O 2) in a planet's atmosphere; another is to look for gases that might be present in an atmosphere analogous to that of the inhabited early Earth. In order to investigate these possibilities, we have calculated synthetic spectra for several hypothetical terrestrial-type atmospheres. The model atmospheres represent four different scenarios. The first two, representing inhabited terrestrial planets, are an Earth-like atmosphere containing variable amounts of oxygen and an early Earth-type atmosphere containing methane. In addition, two cases representing Mars-like and early Venus-like atmospheres were evaluated, to provide possible "false positive" spectra. The calculated spectra suggest that ozone could be detected by an instrument like Terrestrial Planet Finder if the O 2 concentration in the planet's atmosphere is ≥200 ppm, or 10 -3 times the present atmospheric level. Methane should be observable on an early-Earth type planet if it is present in concentrations of 100 ppm or more. Methane has both biogenic and abiogenic sources, but concentrations exceeding 1000 ppm, or 0.1% by volume, would be difficult to produce from abiogenic sources alone. High methane concentrations in a planet's atmosphere are therefore another potential indicator for extraterrestrial life.

  8. Atmospheric cloud water contains a diverse bacterial community

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtev, P. S.; Hill, Kimberly A.; Shepson, Paul B.; Konopka, Allan

    2011-06-15

    Atmospheric cloud water contains an active microbial community which can impact climate, human health and ecosystem processes in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Most studies on the composition of microbial communities in clouds have been performed with orographic clouds that are typically in direct contact with the ground. We collected water samples from cumulus clouds above the upper U.S. Midwest. The cloud water was analyzed for the diversity of bacterial phylotypes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. DGGE analyses of bacterial communities detected 17e21 bands per sample. Sequencing confirmed the presence of a diverse bacterial community; sequences from seven bacterial phyla were retrieved. Cloud water bacterial communities appeared to be dominated by members of the cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, actinobacteria and firmicutes.

  9. Algal refossilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide. [Contains bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Neushul, M. )

    1991-07-01

    The atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is steadily increasing. With our increasing awareness of the economic and environmental impacts of the greenhouse effects'' of CO{sub 2}, methane and other gases, there is interest in finding new methods to reduce the amounts of these gases in the atmosphere. This study evaluates the possibility that large-scale oceanic cultures of macroalgae (macroscopic seaweeds'') could be used to capture atmospheric CO{sub 2}. It is a design for a marine farm system in which a crop'' of calcareous macroalgae grows attached to, and supported by, floating macroalgae that comprise the farm structure.'' The least complicated, yet feasible, macroalgal farm system appears to be one in which laboratory-propagated calcareous algal epiphytes'' and floating algal basiphytes'' are dispersed together in natural ocean upwelling regions. From there, the plants drift with surface currents to the open ocean and then sink to the sea floor, where the buried carbon is refossilized.'' An important caveat regarding the use of calcareous algae is that the process of calcification may release CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. There is some evidence that CO{sub 2} is not released by calcification in red calcareous algae, but in contrast many geochemists feel that all biologically -- as well as chemically --mediated calcification processes release CO{sub 2}. A substantial amount of research will be necessary to answer basic questions about algal carbon fixation and biomineralization on one hand, while on the other hand to devise strategies for farming the open ocean. 76 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Iron-containing atmospheric aerosols in the Chernobyl fallout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, V.; Gushterov, V.; Winkler, H.; Trautwein, A. X.

    2005-11-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy was applied to determine the composition and the iron concentration in the atmospheric aerosols contaminated in Sofia, Bulgaria after the Chernobyl accident. The results confirm the major conclusion of the Kopcewiczs for Poland, i.e. that in the initial filters, collected during the contaminating fallout (30.04 05.05.1986), the iron concentration was highest, 3.69 μg/m3 and that magnetite Fe3O4 was present. For the following days a change in the chemical composition including the presence of α-Fe2O3, α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH as well as the absence of magnetite, was detected. Input of industrial iron contamination was negligible since the nearby steel plant had worked at minimum power due to official holidays. Unfortunately, Mössbauer spectroscopy studies only, do not allow a definite conclusion about an increase of the isotope abundance of 57Fe in the Chernobyl fallout.

  11. Estimation of the atmospheric corrosion on metal containers in industrial waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Baklouti, M; Midoux, N; Mazaudier, F; Feron, D

    2001-08-17

    Solid industrial waste are often stored in metal containers filled with concrete, and placed in well-aerated warehouses. Depending on meteorological conditions, atmospheric corrosion can induce severe material damages to the metal casing, and this damage has to be predicted to achieve safe storage. This work provides a first estimation of the corrosivity of the local atmosphere adjacent to the walls of the container through a realistic modeling of heat transfer phenomena which was developed for this purpose. Subsequent simulations of condensation/evaporation of the water vapor in the atmosphere were carried out. Atmospheric corrosion rates and material losses are easily deduced. For handling realistic data and comparison, two different meteorological contexts were chosen: (1) an oceanic and damp atmosphere and (2) a drier storage location. Some conclusions were also made for the storage configuration in order to reduce the extent of corrosion phenomena.

  12. Understanding the formation and composition of hazes in planetary atmospheres that contain carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörst, S. M.; Yoon, Y. H.; Hicks, R. K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Measurements from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) have revealed the presence of molecules in Titan's ionosphere with masses in excess of hundreds of amu. Negative ions with mass/charge (m/z) up to 10,000 amu/q [1] and positive ions with m/z up to 400 amu/q [2] have been detected. CAPS has also observed O+ flowing into Titan's upper atmosphere [3], which appears to originate from Enceladus and is likely the source of oxygen bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere [4]. The observed O+ is deposited in the region now known to contain large organic molecules. A recent Titan atmosphere simulation experiment has shown that incorporation of oxygen into Titan aerosol analogues results in the formation of all five nucleotide bases and the two smallest amino acids, glycine and alanine [5]. Similar chemical processes may have occurred in the atmosphere of the early Earth, or in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets; atmospheric aerosols may be an important source of the building blocks of life. Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in determining the radiation budget of an atmosphere and can also provide a wealth of organic material to the surface. The presence of atmospheric aerosols has been invoked to explain the relatively featureless spectrum of HD 189773b, including the lack of predicted atmospheric Na and K spectral lines [9]. The majority of the O+ precipitating into Titan's atmosphere forms CO (O(3P)+CH3 -> CO+H2+H) [4]. CO has also been detected in the atmospheres of a number of exoplanets including HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-12b [6-8]. It is therefore important to understand the role CO plays in the formation and composition of hazes in planetary atmospheres. Using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) (see e.g. [10]) we have obtained in situ composition measurements of aerosol particles (so-called "tholins") produced in N2/CH4/CO gas mixtures subjected to either FUV radiation (deuterium lamp, 115-400 nm) or a

  13. Testing of refractories in co-containing coal gasification atmospheres. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, T.; Heystek, H.

    1983-03-01

    Based on test data obtained on refractory samples exposed for 1000 hours to three steam-containing high-Btu atmospheres of different compositions at 500/sup 0/ C and 1000 psig it would appear that for the conditions tested commercial intermediate alumina insulating or dense refractory concretes would perform adequately as linings for dry-ash coal gasifiers. CO disintegration was not observed in commercial refractories reported to contain Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ exposed to a high-Btu gas composition containing CO whether or not NH/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S were present. In the 90 pct alumina dense concrete with a 0.1 pct iron (as Fe) powder addition it was found that the strength and abrasion resistance were adversely affected by the presence of CO, but only when NH/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S were not present. The presence of H/sub 2/S in a gas composition appear to retard or prevent CO disintegration of refractories containing additions of iron or iron oxide. Strength and abrasion resistance increases were noted for intermediate alumina castables exposed to the high-Btu atmospheres when compared to air exposures. Decreases in strength values occurred for the high alumina materials. This is characteristic of the results obtained in earlier studies of refractories following similar exposures at temperatures of 730/sup 0/ to 1100/sup 0/ C. 6 figures.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical stability of ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing atmospheres at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical stability of several ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing environments was analyzed with thermodynamic considerations in mind. Equilibrium calculations were made as a function of temperature, moisture content, and total system pressure. The following ceramic materials were considered in this study: SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, mullite, ZrO2, Y2O3, CaO, MgO, BeO, TiB2, TiC, HfC, and ZrC. On the basis of purely thermodynamic arguments, upper temperature limits are suggested for each material for long-term use in H2-containing atmospheres.

  15. Testing of refractories in CO-containing coal-gasification atmospheres. Final report. [Alumina concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, T.; Heystek, H.

    1983-03-01

    In this experiment a series of alumina concretes were exposed to gas environments B and C. Test temperature and pressure were maintained at 500/sup 0/C and 1000 psig. Conclusion are as follows: (1) based on test data obtained on refractory samples exposed for 1000 hours to three steam-containing high-Btu atmospheres of different compositions at 500/sup 0/C and 1000 psig it would appear that for the conditions tested commercial intermediate alumina insulating or dense refractory concretes would perform adequately as linings for dry-ash coal gasifiers; (2) CO disintegration was not observed in commercial refractories reported to contain Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ exposed to a high-Btu gas composition containing CO whether or not NH/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S were present. In the 90 pct alumina dense concrete with a 0.1 pct iron (as Fe) powder addition it was found that the strength and abrasion resistance were adversely affected by the presence of CO, but only when NH/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/S were not present; (3) the presence of H/sub 2/S in a gas composition appear to retard or prevent CO disintegration of refractories containing additions of iron or iron oxide; and (4) strength and abrasion resistance increases were noted for intermediate alumina castables exposed to the high-Btu atmospheres when compared to air exposures. Decreases in strength values occurred for the high alumina materials. This is characteristic of the results obtained in earlier studies for refractories following similar exposures at temperatures of 730/sup 0/-1100/sup 0/C. 6 figures, 1 table.

  16. High-temperature corrosion of metallic alloys in an oxidizing atmosphere containing NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.

    1989-02-01

    A particular heat-exchanger application involved metallic alloys exposed to flue gases of an aluminum remelt furnace. Because the flue gases might contain NaCl and other halides, the corrosion behavior of the alloys was to be investigated. Planned direct exposure of candidate alloys to the flue gases, however, was not conducted because of premature termination of the project. Complementary laboratory testing was conducted on seven commercially available alloys and two nickel aluminides. These materials were exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere containing 0.06 wt % NaCl for 1100 h at 1000/degree/C. Most of the alloy exhibited grain-boundary attack, which resulted in complete oxidation of enveloped grains. The alloys Incoloy MA-956, Incoloy 800, Inconel 625, Inconel 601, Hastelloy X, Haynes 188, and nickel aluminide IC-50 were substantially more corroded than Alloy 214 and nickel aluminide IC-221. The latter two alloys, therefore, would probably be superior to the others in application involving flue gases containing NaCl. Strength fabricability, and weldability, which are briefly discussed, would also affect selection of materials. 8 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Molecular halogen elimination from halogen-containing compounds in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lin, King-Chuen; Tsai, Po-Yu

    2014-04-28

    Atmospheric halogen chemistry has drawn much attention, because the halogen atom (X) playing a catalytic role may cause severe stratospheric ozone depletion. Atomic X elimination from X-containing hydrocarbons is recognized as the major primary dissociation process upon UV-light irradiation, whereas direct elimination of the X2 product has been seldom discussed or remained a controversial issue. This account is intended to review the detection of X2 primary products using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy in the photolysis at 248 nm of a variety of X-containing compounds, focusing on bromomethanes (CH2Br2, CF2Br2, CHBr2Cl, and CHBr3), dibromoethanes (1,1-C2H4Br2 and 1,2-C2H4Br2) and dibromoethylenes (1,1-C2H2Br2 and 1,2-C2H2Br2), diiodomethane (CH2I2), thionyl chloride (SOCl2), and sulfuryl chloride (SO2Cl2), along with a brief discussion on acyl bromides (BrCOCOBr and CH2BrCOBr). The optical spectra, quantum yields, and vibrational population distributions of the X2 fragments have been characterized, especially for Br2 and I2. With the aid of ab initio calculations of potential energies and rate constants, the detailed photodissociation mechanisms may be comprehended. Such studies are fundamentally important to gain insight into the dissociation dynamics and may also practically help to assess the halogen-related environmental variation. PMID:24622955

  18. Sulfur-containing particles emitted by concealed sulfide ore deposits: an unknown source of sulfur-containing particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. J.; Li, Y. K.; Jiang, T.; Hu, G.

    2015-06-01

    Sources of sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and organic sulfur compounds, such as fossil fuels, volcanic eruptions, and animal feeding operations, have attracted considerable attention. In this study, we collected particles carried by geogas flows ascending through soil, geogas flows above the soil that had passed through the soil, and geogas flows ascending through deep faults of concealed sulfide ore deposits, and analysed them using transmission electron microscopy. Numerous crystalline and amorphous sulfur-containing particles or particle aggregations were found in the ascending geogas flows. In addition to S, the particles contained O, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Na, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, As, Ti, Sr, Ba, Si, etc. Such particles are usually a few to several hundred nanometres in diameter with either regular or irregular morphology. The sulfur-containing particles originated from deep-seated weathering or faulting products of concealed sulfide ore deposits. The particles suspended in the ascending geogas flow migrated through faults from deep-seated sources to the atmosphere. This is a previously unknown source of the atmospheric particles. This paper reports, for the first time, the emission of sulfur-containing particles into the atmosphere from concealed sulfide ore deposits. The climatic and ecological influences of these sulfur-containing particles and particle aggregations should be assessed.

  19. Sulfur-containing particles emitted by concealed sulfide ore deposits: an unknown source of sulfur-containing particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Li, Y.; Jiang, T.; Hu, G.

    2014-11-01

    Sources of sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and organic sulfur compounds, such as fossil fuels, volcanic eruptions, and animal feeding operations, have attracted considerable attention. In this study, we collected particles carried by geogas flows ascending through soil, geogas flows above the soil that had passed through the soil, and geogas flows ascending through deep faults of concealed sulfide ore deposits and analyzed them using transmission electron microscopy. Numerous crystalline and amorphous sulfur-containing particles or particle aggregations were found in the ascending geogas flows. In addition to S, the particles contained O, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Na, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, As, Ti, Sr, Ba, Si, etc. Such particles are usually a few to several hundred nanometers in diameter with either regular or irregular morphology. The sulfur-containing particles originated from deep-seated weathering or faulting products of concealed sulfide ore deposits. The particles suspended in the ascending geogas flow migrated through faults from deep-seated sources to the atmosphere. This is a previously unknown source of the atmospheric particles. This paper reports, for the first time, the emission of sulfur-containing particles into the atmosphere from concealed sulfide ore deposits. The climatic and ecological influences of these sulfur-containing particles and particle aggregations should to be assessed.

  20. Thermodynamics of Silicon-Hydroxide Formation in H2O Containing Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan; Myers, Dwight; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of volatile silicon-hydroxide species from SiO2 in water containing atmospheres has been identified as a potentially important mode of degradation of Si-based ceramics. Availability of thermodynamic data for these species is a major problem. This study is part of an ongoing effort to obtain reliable, experimentally determined thermodynamic data for these species. The transpiration method was used to measure the pressure of Si-containing vapor in equilibrium with SiO2 (cristobalite) and Ar + H2O(g) with various mole fractions of water vapor, X(sub H2O), at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1780 K. Enthalpies and entropies for the reaction, SiO2(s) + 2H2O(g) = Si(OH)4(g), were obtained, at X(sub H2O) = 0.15 and 0.37, from the variation of lnK with 1/T according to the 'second law method'. The following data were obtained: delta(H)deg = 52.9 +/- 3.7 kJ/mole and delta(S)deg = -68.6 +/- 2.5 J/mole K at an average temperature of 1550 K, and delta(H)deg = 52.5+/-2.0 kJ/mole and delta(S)deg= -69.7 +/- 1.5 J/moleK at an average temperature of 1384 K, for X(sub H2O)= 0.15 and 0.37, respectively. These data agree with results from the literature obtained at an average temperature of 1600 K, and strongly suggest Si(OH)4(g) is the dominant vapor species. Contradictory results were obtained with the determination of the dependence of Si-containing vapor pressure on the partial pressure of water vapor at 1187 and 1722 K. These results suggested the Si-containing vapor could be a mixture of Si(OH)4 + SiO(OH)2. Further pressure dependent studies are in progress to resolve these issues.

  1. Atmospheric degradation mechanisms of hydrogen containing chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) and fluorocarbons (HFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, Reinhard

    1990-01-01

    The current knowledge of atmospheric degradation of hydrogen containing chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC 22 (CHClF2), HCFC 123 (CHCl2CF3), HCFC 124 (CHClFCF3), HCFC 141b (CFCl2CH3), HCFC 142b (CF2ClCH3)) and fluorocarbons (HFC 125 (CHF2CF3), HFC 134a (CH2FCF3), HFC 152a (CHF2CH3)) is assessed. Except for the initiation reaction by OH radicals, there are virtually no experimental data available concerning the subsequent oxidative breakdown of these molecules. However, from an analogy to the degradation mechanisms of simple alkanes, some useful guidelines as to the expected intermediates and final products can be derived. A noteable exception from this analogy, however, appears for the oxi-radicals. Here, halogen substitution induces new reaction types (C-Cl and C-C bond ruptures) which are unknown to the unsubstituted analogues and which modify the nature of the expected carbonyl products. Based on an evaluation of these processes using estimated bond strength data, the following simplified rules with regards to the chlorine content of the HCFC's may be deduced: (1) HCFC's containing one chlorine atom such as 22 and 142b seem to release their chlorine content essentially instantaneous with the initial attack on the parent by OH radicals, and for HCFC 124, such release is apparently prevented; (2) HCFC's such as 123 and 141b with two chlorine atoms are expected to release only one of these instantaneously; and the second chlorine atom may be stored in potentially long-lived carbonyl compounds such as CF3CClO or CClFO.

  2. Formation of phosgene during welding activities in an atmosphere containing chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, M S; Groeneveld, F R

    2000-01-01

    The formation of phosgene During welding activities in an atmosphere containing chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated. Four different chlorinated hydrocarbons were studied under laboratory conditions. Results are presented as time-averaged phosgene concentration in a total volume of 250 L of air being purged through a 52-L reaction vessel during 20 min. It was found that the formation of phosgene was in the order dichloromethane < Freon-22 < carbon tetrachloride < trichoroethylene. Local concentrations may be higher depending on dispersion phenomena. The interpretation in terms of occupational health was rather difficult because of the interaction with smoke particles and because of possible nonhomogeneous dispersion of phosgene around the workers. In the case of dichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride the short-term maximum allowable concentration (MAC) of phosgene was not attained at the respective MAC values of the chlorinated hydrocarbons themselves. In the case of trichloroethylene and Freon-22, however, the short-term MAC-value of phosgene was attained even when the concentration was still much below the respective MAC-values.

  3. Effect of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on the foodborne pathogens attached to commercial food containers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jayasena, Dinesh D; Yong, Hae In; Alahakoon, Amali U; Park, Sanghoo; Park, Jooyoung; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with numerous infections and problems in the health care and food industries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal effect of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet on Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium biofilm formation on collagen casing (CC), polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which are widely used food container materials. The samples were treated separately with the APP jet at a 50-W input power for 5 and 10 min, and nitrogen (6 l per minute) gas combined with oxygen (10 standard cubic centimeters per minute) was used to produce the APP. The APP jet reduced the number of bacterial cells in a time-dependent manner. All pathogens attached to CC, PP, and PET were reduced by 3-4 log CFU/cm(2) by the 10-min APP treatment. The developed APP jet was effectively reduced biofilms on CC, PP, and PET.

  4. Effect of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on the foodborne pathogens attached to commercial food containers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jayasena, Dinesh D; Yong, Hae In; Alahakoon, Amali U; Park, Sanghoo; Park, Jooyoung; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with numerous infections and problems in the health care and food industries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal effect of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet on Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium biofilm formation on collagen casing (CC), polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which are widely used food container materials. The samples were treated separately with the APP jet at a 50-W input power for 5 and 10 min, and nitrogen (6 l per minute) gas combined with oxygen (10 standard cubic centimeters per minute) was used to produce the APP. The APP jet reduced the number of bacterial cells in a time-dependent manner. All pathogens attached to CC, PP, and PET were reduced by 3-4 log CFU/cm(2) by the 10-min APP treatment. The developed APP jet was effectively reduced biofilms on CC, PP, and PET. PMID:26604423

  5. Mechanism of Na2SO4-induced corrosion of molybdenum containing nickel-base superalloys at high temperatures. I - Corrosion in atmospheres containing O2 only. II - Corrosion in O2 + SO2 atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetics of the Na2SO4-induced corrosion of the molybdenum-containing nickel-base superalloys, B-1900 and Udimet 700, coated with Na2MoO4, has been studied in oxygen atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 750 to 950 C. Because the gas turbine atmosphere always contains some SO2 and SO3, the effect of atmospheric SO2 content on corrosion of Udimet-700 has also been studied. It was found that in the O2 atmosphere the melt in the catastrophic corrosion phase consists of Na2MoO4 plus MoO3, with the onset of the catastrophic corrosion coinciding with the appearance of MoO3. In the presence of low levels of atmospheric SO2 (below 0.24 percent), the melt during catastrophic corrosion contains, in addition to Na2MoO4 and MoO3, some quantities of Na2SO4. At the levels of SO2 above 1 percent, no catastrophic corrosion was observed. At these SO2 levels, internal sulfidation appears to be the primary mode of degradation.

  6. Atmospheric Processing of Iron-Containing Mineral Dust Aerosol: A Major Source of Bioavailable Iron to Ocean Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubasinghege, G. R. S.; Hurub, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the present day, it has become more apparent that redox reactions involving mineral dust are of great interest, especially for Fe-containing mineral dust, as they transported and deposited into certain regions of the ocean that dissolved iron is often a limiting nutrient for ocean life. Given that heterogeneous reactions of Fe-containing mineral dust with acidic gases and their precursors, i.e. HNO3, dimethyl sulfide( DMS), lead to lower pH environments, the amount of bioavailable iron can increase as they are transported through the atmosphere. The current work focuses on chemical and photochemical processing of Fe-containing mineral dust particles in the presence of HNO3, SO2 and DMS under atmospherically relevant conditions. Here, various spectroscopic methods are combined with dissolution measurements to investigate atmospheric processing of iron containing aerosol dust, with a specific focus on mineralogy and environmental conditions, i.e. pH, relative humidity, temperature and solar flux. Ilmenite (FeTiO3) is used as one of the proxies for Fe-containing minerals that have enough complexity to mimic the mineral dust, yet simple enough to know the details of the reaction pathways. During these studies, above factors are found to play significant roles in the dissolution of iron from mineral dust aerosol. More importantly, data suggest that presence of titanium in the lattice structure of ilmenite enhances iron dissolution, at least by 3-fold in a comparison with hematite. Further, growth and activity of ocean diatoms (Cyclotella meneghiniana) are monitored in the presence of Fe-containing mineral dust under the same conditions. Here, diatoms are added to the reactors containing pre-dissolved iron from a prior 48hr reaction. Results show a high correlation between the growth of diatoms and the amount of bioavailable from iron containing minerals. The current study thus highlights these important, yet unconsidered, factors in the atmospheric processing of iron-containing

  7. An atmospheric air gas-liquid diffuse discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container used for water sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tang, Kai; Song, Ying

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we report that the air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container with different bottom structures at atmospheric pressure. Optical diagnostic measurements show that bountiful chemically and biologically active species, which are beneficial for effective sterilization in some areas, are produced. Such diffuse plasmas are then used to treat drinking water containing the common microorganisms (Candida albicans and Escherichia coli). It is found that these plasmas can sterilize the microorganisms efficiently.

  8. A Model for the Spectral Albedo of Snow. II: Snow Containing Atmospheric Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen G.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    1980-12-01

    Small highly absorbing particles, present in concentrations of only 1 part per million by weight (ppmw) or less, can lower snow albedo in the visible by 5-15% from the high values (96-99%) predicted for pure snow in Part I. These particles have, however, no effect on snow albedo beyond 0.9 m wavelength where ice itself becomes a strong absorber. Thus we have an attractive explanation for the discrepancy between theory and observation described in Part I, a discrepancy which seemingly cannot be resolved on the basis of near-field scattering and nonsphericity effects.Desert dust and carbon soot are the most likely contaminants. But careful measurements of spectral snow albedo in the Arctic and Antarctic paint to a `grey' absorber, one whose imaginary refractive index is nearly constant across the visible spectrum. Thus carbon soot, rather than the red iron oxide normally present in desert dust, is strongly indicated at these sites. Soot particles of radius 0.1 m, in concentrations of only 0.3 ppmw, can explain the albedo measurements of Grenfell and Maykut on Arctic Ice Island T-3. This amount is consistent with some observations of soot in Arctic air masses. 1.5 ppmw of soot is required to explain the Antarctic observations of Kuhn and Siogas, which seemed an unrealistically large amount for the earth's most unpolluted continent until we learned that burning of camp heating fuel and aircraft exhaust indeed had contaminated the measurement site with soot.Midlatitude snowfields are likely to contain larger absolute amounts of soot and dust than their polar counterparts, but the snowfall is also much larger, so that the ppmw contamination does not differ drastically until melting begins. Nevertheless, the variations in absorbing particle concentration which will exist can help to explain the wide range of visible snow albedos reported in the literature.Longwave emissivity of snow is unaltered by its soot and dust content. Thus the depression of snow albedo in the

  9. Mossbauer study of iron-containing atmospheric aerosol in relation to the air pollution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopcewicz, B.; Kopcewicz, M.

    2003-04-01

    Observation and monitoring of the aerosol background in the troposphere is very important for atmospheric physics. It is the first step in studying antropogenic components and their impact on the climate. Iron (both Fe(II) and Fe(III)) plays an important role in the multiphase atmospheric chemistry of S(IV) as a catalyst as well as an oxidant, and a photolytic source of OH radical. In order to assess the extent in which the iron content in the troposphere may change and to which extent that change may be attributed to human activity, it is necessary to have a complete picture of the distribution of iron concentration and its variation. For these purposes the Mössbauer spectroscopy was applied to analyze the iron compounds present in atmospheric aerosol. In this presentation we show results of measurements performed on the atmospheric aerosol collected in Poznan and Lodz (industrial cites in central Poland), Mikolajki (lake district, North-East Poland) and Kasprowy Wierch (mountain observatory, 1985 m a.s.l.). Depending to the sampling period and sampling site the significant changes in the iron concentration and chemical properties of the collected aerosol were observed. As a significant part of air pollution, especially in winter months, iron appeared in the form of iron sulfides, which were products of coal combustion. Also, iron oxyhydroxides and iron oxides, mostly hematite (bulk) and in the form of ultra fine particles in superparamagnetic state were observed. Results obtained from Mössbauer measurements were discussed in relation to the concentration of general air pollution.

  10. Need for desiccant in containers exposed to atmospheric conditions for long periods of time

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, K.E.

    1981-11-01

    Current component and system designs are required to perform satisfactorily up to 25 years. A maximum leak rate of 1 x 10/sup -6/ cc(STP) helium/sec-atm is a frequent requirement for component containers. Calculations show that undesiccated component containers continuously exposed to 50% relative humidity at 20/sup 0/C and having an internal free volume of less than 300 cc and the above leak rate will allow the internal dew point to rise enough for potential liquid condensation in less than four years. For the same vapor pressure differential, the moisture permeation rate through one linear inch of silicone o-ring is 750 times as fast as moisture enters a welded container whose leak rate is 1 x 10/sup -6/ cc(STP) helium/sec-atm. For ethylene propylene o-ring material this ratio is about 13. These values correspond to the ratios of the quantities of desiccant required to maintain an acceptable dew point temperature when the moisture capacity of the free volume is not included. Charts are provided for estimating the amount of desiccant required for helium leak tested containers and for containers sealed with elastomeric o-rings.

  11. LIF diagnostics of hydroxyl radical in a methanol containing atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Mu-Yang; Liu, San-Qiu; Pei, Xue-Kai; Lu, Xin-Pei; Zhang, Jia-Liang; Wang, De-Zhen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a pulsed-dc CH3OH/Ar plasma jet generated at atmospheric pressure is studied by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). A gas-liquid bubbler system is proposed to introduce the methanol vapor into the argon gas, and the CH3OH/Ar volume ratio is kept constant at about 0.1%. Discharge occurs in a 6-mm needle-to-ring gap in an atmospheric-pressure CH3OH/Ar mixture. The space-resolved distributions of OH LIF inside and outside the nozzle exhibit distinctly different behaviors. And, different production mechanisms of OH radicals in the needle-to-ring discharge gap and afterglow of plasma jet are discussed. Besides, the optical emission lines of carbonaceous species, such as CH, CN, and C2 radicals, are identified in the CH3OH/Ar plasma jet. Finally, the influences of operating parameters (applied voltage magnitude, pulse frequency, pulsewidth) on the OH radical density are also presented and analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11465013 and 11375041), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20151BAB212012 and 20161BAB201013), and the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61800).

  12. MEP and planetary climates: insights from a two-box climate model containing atmospheric dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jupp, Tim E.; Cox, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    A two-box model for equator-to-pole planetary heat transport is extended to include simple atmospheric dynamics. The surface drag coefficient CD is treated as a free parameter and solutions are calculated analytically in terms of the dimensionless planetary parameters η (atmospheric thickness), ω (rotation rate) and ξ (advective capability). Solutions corresponding to maximum entropy production (MEP) are compared with solutions previously obtained from dynamically unconstrained two-box models. As long as the advective capability ξ is sufficiently large, dynamically constrained MEP solutions are identical to dynamically unconstrained MEP solutions. Consequently, the addition of a dynamical constraint does not alter the previously obtained MEP results for Earth, Mars and Titan, and an analogous result is presented here for Venus. The rate of entropy production in an MEP state is shown to be independent of rotation rate if the advective capability ξ is sufficiently large (as for the four examples in the solar system), or if the rotation rate ω is sufficiently small. The model indicates, however, that the dynamical constraint does influence the MEP state when ξ is small, which might be the case for some extrasolar planets. Finally, results from the model developed here are compared with previous numerical simulations in which the effect of varying surface drag coefficient on entropy production was calculated. PMID:20368254

  13. MEP and planetary climates: insights from a two-box climate model containing atmospheric dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jupp, Tim E; Cox, Peter M

    2010-05-12

    A two-box model for equator-to-pole planetary heat transport is extended to include simple atmospheric dynamics. The surface drag coefficient CD is treated as a free parameter and solutions are calculated analytically in terms of the dimensionless planetary parameters eta (atmospheric thickness), omega (rotation rate) and xi (advective capability). Solutions corresponding to maximum entropy production (MEP) are compared with solutions previously obtained from dynamically unconstrained two-box models. As long as the advective capability xi is sufficiently large, dynamically constrained MEP solutions are identical to dynamically unconstrained MEP solutions. Consequently, the addition of a dynamical constraint does not alter the previously obtained MEP results for Earth, Mars and Titan, and an analogous result is presented here for Venus. The rate of entropy production in an MEP state is shown to be independent of rotation rate if the advective capability xi is sufficiently large (as for the four examples in the solar system), or if the rotation rate omega is sufficiently small. The model indicates, however, that the dynamical constraint does influence the MEP state when xi is small, which might be the case for some extrasolar planets. Finally, results from the model developed here are compared with previous numerical simulations in which the effect of varying surface drag coefficient on entropy production was calculated. PMID:20368254

  14. MEP and planetary climates: insights from a two-box climate model containing atmospheric dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jupp, Tim E; Cox, Peter M

    2010-05-12

    A two-box model for equator-to-pole planetary heat transport is extended to include simple atmospheric dynamics. The surface drag coefficient CD is treated as a free parameter and solutions are calculated analytically in terms of the dimensionless planetary parameters eta (atmospheric thickness), omega (rotation rate) and xi (advective capability). Solutions corresponding to maximum entropy production (MEP) are compared with solutions previously obtained from dynamically unconstrained two-box models. As long as the advective capability xi is sufficiently large, dynamically constrained MEP solutions are identical to dynamically unconstrained MEP solutions. Consequently, the addition of a dynamical constraint does not alter the previously obtained MEP results for Earth, Mars and Titan, and an analogous result is presented here for Venus. The rate of entropy production in an MEP state is shown to be independent of rotation rate if the advective capability xi is sufficiently large (as for the four examples in the solar system), or if the rotation rate omega is sufficiently small. The model indicates, however, that the dynamical constraint does influence the MEP state when xi is small, which might be the case for some extrasolar planets. Finally, results from the model developed here are compared with previous numerical simulations in which the effect of varying surface drag coefficient on entropy production was calculated.

  15. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass.

  16. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass. PMID:25497054

  17. Stability of chromium (III) sulfate in atmospheres containing oxygen and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, K. T.; Rao, B. D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    The stability of chromium sulfate in the temperature range from 880 K to 1040 K was determined by employing a dynamic gas-solid equilibration technique. The solid chromium sulfate was equilibrated in a gas stream of controlled SO3 potential. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses were used to follow the decomposition of chromium sulfate. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the decomposition product was crystalline Cr2O3 and that the mutual solubility between Cr2(SO4)3 and Cr2O3 was negligible. Over the temperature range investigated, the decomposition pressure were significantly high so that chromium sulfate is not expected to form on commercial alloys containing chromium when exposed to gaseous environments containing oxygen and sulfur (such as those encountered in coal gasification).

  18. Sputtering deposition of P-type SnO films with SnO₂ target in hydrogen-containing atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Ching; Hsu, Chao-Jui; Chang, Ching-Hsiang; Tsai, Shiao-Po; Chen, Wei-Chung; Hsieh, Hsing-Hung; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2014-08-27

    In this work, we had investigated sputtering deposition of p-type SnO using the widely used and robust SnO2 target in a hydrogen-containing reducing atmosphere. The effects of the hydrogen-containing sputtering gas on structures, compositions, optical, and electrical properties of deposited SnOx films were studied. Results show that polycrystalline and SnO-dominant films could be readily obtained by carefully controlling the hydrogen gas ratio in the sputtering gas and the extent of reduction reaction. P-type conductivity was unambiguously observed for SnO-dominant films with traceable Sn components, exhibiting a p-type Hall mobility of up to ∼3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). P-type SnO thin-film transistors using such SnO-dominant films were also demonstrated.

  19. Geometric correction of atmospheric turbulence-degraded video containing moving objects.

    PubMed

    Halder, Kalyan Kumar; Tahtali, Murat; Anavatti, Sreenatha G

    2015-02-23

    Long-distance surveillance is a challenging task because of atmospheric turbulence that causes time-varying image shifts and blurs in images. These distortions become more significant as the imaging distance increases. This paper presents a new method for compensating image shifting in a video sequence while keeping real moving objects in the video unharmed. In this approach, firstly, a highly accurate and fast optical flow technique is applied to estimate the motion vector maps of the input frames and a centroid algorithm is employed to generate a geometrically correct frame in which there is no moving object. The second step involves applying an algorithm for detecting real moving objects in the video sequence and then restoring it with those objects unaffected. The performance of the proposed method is verified by comparing it with that of a state-of-the-art approach. Simulation experiments using both synthetic and real-life surveillance videos demonstrate that this method significantly improves the accuracy of image restoration while preserving moving objects.

  20. High-pressure ignition of oil sands samples in oxygen atmospheres containing various concentrations of diluents

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, S.A.; Karim, G.A. )

    1990-12-01

    In-situ recovery of oil from oil sands deposits by combustion requires the injection of vast quantities of oxygen into the bed of deposits. Accordingly, there is a need to establish the ignition characteristics of high-grade Athabasca oil sands in environments containing pure oxygen at high-pressure and including the role of the presence of various diluents with the oxygen. A high-pressure constant volume bomb with a water calorimeter was employed as the test apparatus over the pressure range of 0.1 MPa to 4.0 MPa at ambient temperature. The paper presents the results of an experimental program that examined the effects of changes in the pressure, amounts of diluents and ignition energy on the ignition limits and subsequent combustion processes at ambient initial temperature. Moreover, the morphological changes to the samples at various stages of the process were also examined and discussed.

  1. Desizing of Starch Containing Cotton Fabrics Using Near Atmospheric Pressure, Cold DC Plasma Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasath, A.; Sivaram, S. S.; Vijay Anand, V. D.; Dhandapani, Saravanan

    2013-03-01

    An attempt has been made to desize the starch containing grey cotton fabrics using the DC plasma with oxygen as the gaseous medium. Process conditions of the plasma reactor were optimized in terms of distance between the plates (3.2 cm), applied voltage (600 V) and applied pressure (0.01 bar) to obtain maximum desizing efficiency. No discolouration was observed in the hot water extracts of the desized sample in presence of iodine though relatively higher solvent extractable impurities (4.53 %) were observed in the plasma desized samples compared to acid desized samples (3.38 %). Also, significant weight loss, improvements in plasma desized samples were observed than that of grey fabrics in terms of drop absorbency.

  2. Determination of the Composition of the Atmospheres in the Enclosures Containing the Charters of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, George F.

    2002-12-01

    In the early 1950s, the United States Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence, collectively known as the "Charters of Freedom," were encased in specially designed enclosures. As a protective measure the enclosures were filled with moist helium and sealed. Currently a project is underway to remove the Charters from these encasements and re-encase them in modem enclosures. Before these cases are opened, conservationists at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) wish to know if air has leaked into the cases and what the relative humidity is. In 1998 NARA contacted NASA to request assistance with this problem. By adapting the NASA Diode Laser Hygrometer (DLH), an airborne sensor based on the absorption of infrared radiation at 1.4 microns by water vapor, the cases containing the second and third pages of the Constitution were non-invasively analyzed in 1999. Approximate relative humidity values were obtained. In addition, because the width of the absorption line is dependent on the other gases present it was possible to determine that the seals had not leaked. During the summer of 2001, the remaining documents were removed from public display and were made available for analysis. To increase the sensitivity of the DLH to the presence of air, for the 2001 measurements a stronger water vapor absorption line was chosen, however this required locating a laser that operated at the wavelength of this stronger line. In this work a number of diode lasers were characterized and a suitable one was identified and installed in the DLH. A series of laboratory measurements of the chosen absorption line were performed to determine spectroscopic parameters including line strength, and helium broadening, air broadening, and self-broadening coefficients. The DLH was then reconfigured from its normal aircraft configuration to one more suitable for the Charters measurements. This involved installing it in a different housing, one specifically

  3. Powder containing 2H-type silicon carbide produced by reacting silicon dioxide and carbon powder in nitrogen atmosphere in the presence of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuramoto, N.; Takiguchi, H.

    1984-01-01

    The production of powder which contains silicon carbide consisting of 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide, beta type silicon carbide and less than 3% of nitrogen is discussed. The reaction temperature to produce the powder containing 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide is set at above 1550 degrees C in an atmosphere of aluminum or aluminum compounds and nitrogen gas or an antioxidation atmosphere containing nitrogen gas. The mixture ratio of silicon dioxide and carbon powder is 0.55 - 1:2.0 and the contents of aluminum or aluminum compounds within silicon dioxide is less than 3% in weight.

  4. Densities and excess molar volumes of binary mixtures containing propylene carbonate + chlorohydrocarbons at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, F.; Francesconi, R.

    1995-11-01

    Densities and excess molar volumes, V{sub m}{sup E}, for binary mixtures containing propylene carbonate + 10 chlorohydrocarbons (dichloromethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,4-dichlorobuthane, 1,6-dichlorohexane, 1,10-dichlorodecane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, trans-1,2-dichloroethene, and trichloroethene) have been measured at 298.15 K and at atmospheric pressure using an Anton Paar digital vibrating tube density meter. The results are fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. The values of V{sub m}{sup E} for the mixtures containing dichloroalkanes show an increasing trend with the increase of the chain length and vary from a minimum of {minus}0.24 cm{sup 3}/mol for dichloromethane up to a maximum of +0.31 cm{sup 3}/mol for 1,10-dichlorodecane. The excess molar volumes for the other mixtures are negative over the entire range of composition. Results are qualitatively discussed in terms of molecular interactions.

  5. Inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and aerobic microorganisms in Romaine lettuce packaged in a commercial polyethylene terephthalate container using atmospheric cold plasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (DACP) treatment on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and aerobic microorganisms in Romaine lettuce packaged in a conventional commercial plastic container were evaluated during storage at 4 degrees C for 7 days. Effects ...

  6. Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in Titan's Atmosphere, the Interstellar Medium and Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landera, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Several different mechanisms leading to the formation of (substituted) naphthalene and azanaphthalenes were examined using theoretical quantum chemical calculations. As a result, a series of novel synthetic routes to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (N-PACs) have been proposed. On Earth, these aromatic compounds originate from incomplete combustion and are released into our environment, where they are known to be major pollutants, often with carcinogenic properties. In the atmosphere of a Saturn's moon Titan, these PAH and N-PACs are believed to play a critical role in organic haze formation, as well as acting as chemical precursors to biologically relevant molecules. The theoretical calculations were performed by employing the ab initio G3(MP2,CC)/B3LYP/6-311G** method to effectively probe the Potential Energy Surfaces (PES) relevant to the PAH and N-PAC formation. Following the construction of the PES, Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Markus (RRKM) theory was used to evaluate all unimolecular rate constants as a function of collision energy under single-collision conditions. Branching ratios were then evaluated by solving phenomenological rate expressions for the various product concentrations. The most viable pathways to PAH and N-PAC formation were found to be those where the initial attack by the ethynyl (C2H) or cyano (CN) radical toward a unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule led to the formation of an intermediate which could not effectively lose a hydrogen atom. It is not until ring cyclization has occurred, that hydrogen elimination leads to a closed shell product. By quenching the possibility of the initial hydrogen atom elimination, one of the most competitive processes preventing the PAH or N-PAC formation was avoided, and the PAH or N-PAC formation was allowed to proceed. It is concluded that these considerations should be taken into account when attempting to explore any other potential routes towards

  7. Optimization and application of atmospheric pressure chemical and photoionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for speciation of oxygen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Acter, Thamina; Kim, Donghwi; Ahmed, Arif; Jin, Jang Mi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the feasibility of optimized positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) for structural assignment of diverse oxygen-containing compounds. The important parameters for optimization of HDX MS were characterized. The optimized techniques employed in the positive and negative modes showed satisfactory HDX product ions for the model compounds when dichloromethane and toluene were employed as a co-solvent in APCI- and APPI-HDX, respectively. The evaluation of the mass spectra obtained from 38 oxygen-containing compounds demonstrated that the extent of the HDX of the ions was structure-dependent. The combination of information provided by different ionization techniques could be used for better speciation of oxygen-containing compounds. For example, (+) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with alcohol, ketone, or aldehyde substituents, while (-) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with carboxylic functional groups. In addition, the compounds with alcohol can be distinguished from other compounds by the presence of exchanged peaks. The combined information was applied to study chemical compositions of degraded oils. The HDX pattern, double bond equivalent (DBE) distribution, and previously reported oxidation products were combined to predict structures of the compounds produced from oxidation of oil. Overall, this study shows that APCI- and APPI-HDX MS are useful experimental techniques that can be applied for the structural analysis of oxygen-containing compounds.

  8. Optimization and application of atmospheric pressure chemical and photoionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for speciation of oxygen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Acter, Thamina; Kim, Donghwi; Ahmed, Arif; Jin, Jang Mi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the feasibility of optimized positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) for structural assignment of diverse oxygen-containing compounds. The important parameters for optimization of HDX MS were characterized. The optimized techniques employed in the positive and negative modes showed satisfactory HDX product ions for the model compounds when dichloromethane and toluene were employed as a co-solvent in APCI- and APPI-HDX, respectively. The evaluation of the mass spectra obtained from 38 oxygen-containing compounds demonstrated that the extent of the HDX of the ions was structure-dependent. The combination of information provided by different ionization techniques could be used for better speciation of oxygen-containing compounds. For example, (+) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with alcohol, ketone, or aldehyde substituents, while (-) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with carboxylic functional groups. In addition, the compounds with alcohol can be distinguished from other compounds by the presence of exchanged peaks. The combined information was applied to study chemical compositions of degraded oils. The HDX pattern, double bond equivalent (DBE) distribution, and previously reported oxidation products were combined to predict structures of the compounds produced from oxidation of oil. Overall, this study shows that APCI- and APPI-HDX MS are useful experimental techniques that can be applied for the structural analysis of oxygen-containing compounds. PMID:26898203

  9. Real time analysis of lead-containing atmospheric particles in Beijing during springtime by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Li, Lei; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Zou, Lilin; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS), the chemical composition and size distributions of lead (Pb)-containing particles with diameter from 0.1 μm to 2.0 μm in Beijing were analyzed in the spring of 2011 during clear, hazy, and dusty days. Based on mass spectral features of particles, cluster analysis was applied to Pb-containing particles, and six major classes were acquired consisting of K-rich, carboneous, Fe-rich, dust, Pb-rich, and Cl-rich particles. Pb-containing particles accounted for 4.2-5.3%, 21.8-22.7%, and 3.2% of total particle number during clear, hazy and dusty days, respectively. K-rich particles are a major contribution to Pb-containing particles, varying from 30.8% to 82.1% of total number of Pb-containing particles, lowest during dusty days and highest during hazy days. The results reflect that the chemical composition and amount of Pb-containing particles has been affected by meteorological conditions as well as the emissions of natural and anthropogenic sources. K-rich particles and carbonaceous particles could be mainly assigned to the emissions of coal combustion. Other classes of Pb-containing particles may be associated with metallurgical processes, coal combustion, dust, and waste incineration etc. In addition, Pb-containing particles during dusty days were first time studied by SPAMS. This method could provide a powerful tool for monitoring and controlling of Pb pollution in real time.

  10. Corrosion-electrochemical behavior of nickel in an alkali metal carbonate melt under a chlorine-containing atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, E. V.; Kudyakov, V. Ya.; Malkov, V. B.; Plaksin, S. V.

    2013-08-01

    The corrosion-electrochemical behavior of a nickel electrode is studied in the melt of lithium, sodium, and potassium (40: 30: 30 mol %) carbonates in the temperature range 500-600°C under an oxidizing atmosphere CO2 + 0.5O2 (2: 1), which is partly replaced by gaseous chlorine (30, 50, 70%) in some experiments. In other experiments, up to 5 wt % chloride of sodium peroxide is introduced in a salt melt. A change in the gas-phase composition is shown to affect the mechanism of nickel corrosion.

  11. The Relative Humidity of the Atmosphere in the Encasements Containing the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution (Pages 1 and 4), and the Bill of Rights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, James W.; Burkett, Cecil G.; Levine, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    In 1951, the four pages of the US Constitution, the Letter of Transmittal, the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence, collectively called the 'Charters of Freedom,' were hermetically sealed individually in glass encasements. The atmosphere in the encasements consisted of a mixture of helium with water vapor at a relative humidity between 25 and 35% at room temperature. In 1998, Margaret Kelly of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), contacted Dr. Joel S. Levine at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to request assistance in determining the chemical composition of the atmosphere inside the encasements. Several different Langley learns were assembled to address that request. each using a different measurement technique. This report describes the method and results of one team's relative humidity measurements on encasements containing pages 1 and 4 of the US Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence performed at NARA, College Park. Maryland, on July 23, 2001.

  12. Ab Initio Investigation of the Structure, Stability and Atmospheric Distribution of Molecular Clusters Containing H2O, CO2 and N2O.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, K. H.; Seward, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from ab initio calculations for the structures, energetics and atmospheric abundances of neutral clusters containing water, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide up to 45km altitude using the complete basis set CBS-Q and G3 multi-level procedures. Gas phase hydration energies, enthalpies and entropies for the stepwise attachment of water onto clusters according to X(H2O)n + H2O = X(H2O)n+1 (where X = H2O, CO2 and N2O) are reported for up to n=5. In particular, our results demonstrate that values for the incremental hydration enthalpies and entropies of all three gases H2O, CO2 and N2O asymptotically approach values characteristic of bulk liquid water (i.e. -44.0 kJ/mol for the enthalpy and -118.8 J/Kmol for the entropy of condensation) following attachment of around 3-4 water molecules. Interestingly, our calculated number densities for the water dimer at 292Kelvin are in excellent agreement with recent values obtained from IR measurements of atmospheric media (Pfeilsticker et al., 2003, Science). Our quantum chemical calculations indicate that water attachment onto H2O, CO2 and N2O is a thermodynamically favorable process, such that hydrated clusters would form a significant atmospheric repository of these species.

  13. The influence of atmosphere conditions on Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi radiosensitization in irradiated ground beef containing carvacrol and tetrasodium pyrophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, M.; Borsa, J.; Chiasson, F.; Ouattara, B.

    2004-09-01

    The radiosensitization of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in presence of carvacrol (1.0%) and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (0.1%) in ground beef packed under four different atmospheres (air; 100% CO 2; MAP : 60% O 2-30% CO 2-10% N 2 and vacuum) was determined. Medium fat ground beef containing carvacrol and tetrasodium pyrophosphate was inoculated with E. coli or S. typhi. Samples were packed under different atmospheres as described before and irradiated at doses from 0.1 to 0.6 kGy in presence of E. coli and from 0.50 to 2.0 kGy for S. typhi. Results indicated that the best increase in radiosensitization was observed in samples packed under MAP. The D10 values were 0.046 kGy for E. coli and 0.053 kGy for S. typhi. Both bacteria were more resistant to irradiation under air, in the absence of active compound. A D10 values of 0.126 kGy for E. coli and 0.526 kGy for S. typhi was observed.

  14. Ab initio investigation of the structure, stability, and atmospheric distribution of molecular clusters containing H2O, CO2, and N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Kono H.; Seward, Terry M.

    2008-10-01

    We present results from ab initio calculations for the structures and energetic properties of neutral clusters containing water, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide using the complete basis set CBS-Q multilevel procedure. Gas phase hydration energies ΔG0, enthalpies ΔH0, and entropies ΔS0 for the stepwise attachment of water onto clusters according to X·(H2O)n + H2O ↔ X·(H2O)n+1 (X = CO2, N2O, and H2O) are reported for n ≤ 4. In particular, our results demonstrate that values for the incremental hydration enthalpies and entropies of all three gases CO2, N2O, and H2O asymptotically approach values characteristic of bulk water (i.e., -44.0 kJ mol-1 for the enthalpy and -118.8 J K-1 mol-1 for the entropy of condensation) following attachment of around three to four water molecules. Our ab initio calculations indicate that water attachment onto CO2, N2O, and H2O is a thermodynamically favorable process, such that hydrated CO2·(H2O)n, N2O·(H2O)n, and H2O·(H2O)n clusters would form a significant atmospheric repository of these species.

  15. Experimental studies of the formation of cluster ions formed by corona discharge in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, J. O.; Hvelplund, P.; Støchkel, K.; Enghoff, M. B.; Kurten, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on studies of ion induced nucleation in a corona discharge taking place in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O at standard temperature and pressure. Positive ions such as H3O+(H2O)n, NH4+(H2O)n, and H+(H2SO4)(H2O)n and negative ions such as HSO5-(H2O)n, SO4-(H2O)n, HSO4-(H2O)n and NO3-(H2O)n have been recorded. Large values of n (> 100) were observed and the experiment indicates the existence of even larger water clusters. In contrast, only clusters with a maximum of 2 sulfuric acid molecules were observed. Fragmentation studies also revealed that the negative ion HSO5-, which has been observed in many studies, in our experiments is contaminated by O2-(HNO3)(H2O) ions, and this may also have been the case in other experiments. Finally an ion with m/z = 232 (where m is the cluster mass in amu and z the charge state), capable of attaching H2O-molecules was observed and studied by fragmentation. Positive ion m/z (mass/charge) spectrum

  16. Collapsing Containers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  17. Atmospheric cold plasma inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and aerobic microorganisms in cold-stored romaine lettuce packaged in a commerical polyethylene terephthalate container

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafy greens continue to be a significant vector for foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7. Dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) treatment is a promising method for microbial decontamination of produce. An important aspect of this technology is the potential f...

  18. The atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars is essentially a pure carbon dioxide atmosphere that contains a small and seasonably varying amount of water vapor. A number of minor constituents which arise from the interactions of solar radiation with water vapor and carbon dioxide include carbon monoxide, atomic oxygen, molecular oxygen, ozone, and atomic hydrogen. At the surface of Mars the atmospheric pressure is less than one hundredth of the pressure at the surface of the earth. Extensive cloud systems appear on Mars. The structure of the lower Martian atmosphere is discussed together with variations in the lower atmosphere and the characteristics of the upper atmosphere. Reactions of photochemistry are considered along with the atmospheric escape and interactions between the atmosphere and the polar caps.

  19. Bending and turbulent enhancement phenomena of neutral gas flow containing an atmospheric pressure plasma by applying external electric fields measured by schlieren optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Sakakita, Hajime; Tsunoda, Syuichiro; Kasahara, Jiro; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kato, Susumu; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of turbulent enhancement phenomena of a neutral gas flow containing plasma ejected from the nozzle of plasma equipment, the schlieren optical method was performed to visualize the neutral gas behavior. It was confirmed that the turbulent starting point became closer to the nozzle exit, as the amplitude of discharge voltage (electric field) increased. To study the effect of electric field on turbulent enhancement, two sets of external electrodes were arranged in parallel, and the gas from the nozzle was allowed to flow between the upper and lower electrodes. It was found that the neutral gas flow was bent, and the bending angle increased as the amplitude of the external electric field increased. The results obtained using a simple model analysis roughly coincide with experimental data. These results indicate that momentum transport from drifted ions induced by the electric field to neutral particles is an important factor that enhances turbulence.

  20. Community Atmosphere Model

    2004-10-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is an atmospheric general circulation model that solves equations for atmospheric dynamics and physics. CAM is an outgrowth of the Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and was developed as a joint collaborative effort between NCAR and several DOE laboratories, including LLNL. CAM contains several alternative approaches for advancing the atmospheric dynamics. One of these approaches uses a finite-volume method originally developed by personnel atmore » NASNGSFC, We have developed a scalable version of the finite-volume solver for massively parallel computing systems. FV-CAM is meant to be used in conjunction with the Community Atmosphere Model. It is not stand-alone.« less

  1. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  2. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  3. Atmospheric electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In the last three years the focus was on the information contained in the lightning measurement, which is independent of other meteorological measurements that can be made from space. The characteristics of lightning activity in mesoscale convective systems were quantified. A strong relationship was found between lightning activity and surface rainfall. It is shown that lightning provides a precursor signature for wet microbursts (the strong downdrafts that produce windshears hazardous to aircraft) and that the lightning signature is a direct consequence of storm evolution. The Universities Space Research Association (USRA) collaborated with NASA scientists in the preliminary analysis and scientific justification for the design and deployment of an optical instrument which can detect lightning from geostationary orbit. Science proposals for the NASA mesoscale science program and for the Tethered Satellite System were reviewed. The weather forecasting research and unmanned space vehicles. Software was written to ingest and analyze the lightning ground strike data on the MSFC McIDAS system. The capabilities which were developed have a wide application to a number of problems associated with the operational impacts of electrical discharge within the atmosphere.

  4. The Upper Atmosphere; Threshold of Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, John

    This booklet contains illustrations of the upper atmosphere, describes some recent discoveries, and suggests future research questions. It contains many color photographs. Sections include: (1) "Where Does Space Begin?"; (2) "Importance of the Upper Atmosphere" (including neutral atmosphere, ionized regions, and balloon and investigations); (3)…

  5. Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Strobel, D. F.; Moses, J. I.; Waite, J. H.; Crovisier, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Bougher, S. W.; Roble, R. G.

    This paper summarizes the understanding of aeronomy of neutral atmospheres in the solar system, discussing most planets as well as Saturn's moon Titan and comets. The thermal structure and energy balance is compared, highlighting the principal reasons for discrepancies amongst the atmospheres, a combination of atmospheric composition, heliocentric distance and other external energy sources not common to all. The composition of atmospheres is discussed in terms of vertical structure, chemistry and evolution. The final section compares dynamics in the upper atmospheres of most planets and highlights the importance of vertical dynamical coupling as well as magnetospheric forcing in auroral regions, where present. It is shown that a first order understanding of neutral atmospheres has emerged over the past decades, thanks to the combined effects of spacecraft and Earth-based observations as well as advances in theoretical modeling capabilities. Key gaps in our understanding are highlighted which ultimately call for a more comprehensive programme of observation and laboratory measurements.

  6. Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Strobel, D. F.; Moses, J. I.; Waite, J. H.; Crovisier, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Bougher, S. W.; Roble, R. G.

    2008-08-01

    This paper summarizes the understanding of aeronomy of neutral atmospheres in the solar system, discussing most planets as well as Saturn’s moon Titan and comets. The thermal structure and energy balance is compared, highlighting the principal reasons for discrepancies amongst the atmospheres, a combination of atmospheric composition, heliocentric distance and other external energy sources not common to all. The composition of atmospheres is discussed in terms of vertical structure, chemistry and evolution. The final section compares dynamics in the upper atmospheres of most planets and highlights the importance of vertical dynamical coupling as well as magnetospheric forcing in auroral regions, where present. It is shown that a first order understanding of neutral atmospheres has emerged over the past decades, thanks to the combined effects of spacecraft and Earth-based observations as well as advances in theoretical modeling capabilities. Key gaps in our understanding are highlighted which ultimately call for a more comprehensive programme of observation and laboratory measurements.

  7. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  8. Atmospheric Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of extending the atmospheric observation from space is discussed. Observations of the earth's limb from GEO at microwave frequencies, global mapping of ozone, charged particle precipitation, photochemical reactions, spectral emissions from the atmosphere, microwave measurements, and radio probing of the atmosphere and ionosphere, which were not feasible prior to the availability of the shuttle because of the antenna limitations, may be readily carried out from the space stations.

  9. Atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sloane, C.S. ); Tesche, T.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the predictive strength of atmospheric models. The book covers all of the major important atmospheric areas, including large scale models for ozone depletion and global warming, regional scale models for urban smog (ozone and visibility impairment) and acid rain, as well as accompanying models of cloud processes and biofeedbacks.

  10. The Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1983-01-01

    The composition and dynamics of the earth's atmosphere are discussed, considering the atmosphere's role in distributing the energy of solar radiation received by the earth. Models of this activity which help to explain climates of the past and predict those of the future are also considered. (JN)

  11. CONTAIN code analyses of direct containment heating (DCH) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Tadios, E.L.; Washington, K.E.

    1995-06-01

    In some nuclear reactor core melt accidents, a potential exists for molten core debris to be dispersed into the containment under high pressure. Resulting energy transfer to the containment atmosphere can pressurize the containment. This process, known as direct containment heating (DCH), has been the subject of extensive experimental and analytical programs sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). DCH modeling has been a major focus for the development of the CONTAIN code. In support of the peer review, extensive analyses of DCH experiments were performed in order to assess the CONTAIN code`s DCH models and improve understanding of DCH phenomenology. The present paper summarizes this assessment effort.

  12. Atmospheric and wind modeling for ATC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The section on atmospheric modeling covers the following topics: the standard atmosphere, atmospheric variations, atmosphere requirements for ATC, and implementation of a software model for Center/Tracon Advisory System (CTAS). The section on wind modeling covers the following topics: wind data -- NOAA profiler system; wind profile estimation; incorporation of various data types into filtering scheme; spatial and temporal variation; and software implementation into CTAS. The appendices contain Matlab codes for atmospheric routines and for wind estimation.

  13. Atmospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  14. Atmospheric pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution (AP), its causes, and measures to prevent or reduce it are examined in reviews and reports presented at a workshop held in Damascus, Syria in August 1985. Topics discussed include AP and planning studies, emission sources, pollutant formation and transformation, AP effects on man and vegetation, AP control, atmospheric dispersion mechanisms and modeling, sampling and analysis techniques, air-quality monitoring, and applications. Diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  15. Convective adjustment in baroclinic atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1986-01-01

    Local convection in planetary atmospheres is generally considered to result from the action of gravity on small regions of anomalous density. That in rotating baroclinic fluids the total potential energy for small scale convection contains a centrifugal as well as a gravitational contribution is shown. Convective adjustment in such an atmosphere results in the establishment of near adiabatic lapse rates of temperature along suitably defined surfaces of constant angular momentum, rather than in the vertical. This leads in general to sub-adiabatic vertical lapse rates. That such an adjustment actually occurs in the earth's atmosphere is shown by example and the magnitude of the effect for several other planetary atmospheres is estimated.

  16. Sharps container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Angelene M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for use in disposing of potentially hazardous items and more particularly a Sharps receptacle for used hypodermic needles and the like. A Sharps container is constructed from lightweight alodined nonmagnetic metal material with a cup member having an elongated tapered shape and length greater than its transverse dimensions. A magnet in the cup member provides for metal retention in the container. A nonmagnetic lid member has an opening and spring biased closure flap member. The flap member is constructed from stainless steel. A Velcro patch on the container permits selective attachment at desired locations.

  17. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  18. Atmospheric engineering of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Averner, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of creating a breathable atmosphere on Mars was studied. Assuming that indigenous life is absent, and that human habitation will prove economically justifiable, several methods of introducing oxygen were considered. On the basis of energy requirements, photosynthetic oxygen production appears to be reasonable, assuming that the amounts of water, carbon dioxide, and mineral nutrients available on the Martian surface would be adequate for the growth of photosynthetic microorganisms. However, optimum rates of O2 formation could occur only after a significant increase in average temperature and in atmospheric mass. The generation of a runaway greenhouse/advective effect was considered. However, neither the energy requirement nor the time constant for initiation could be calculated. There appear to be no insuperable obstacles to the conversion of the Martian atmosphere to one containing oxygen, but the conversion would require many thousands of years.

  19. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect). PMID:16201423

  20. 40 CFR 61.345 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the container is maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric pressure, the owner or operator may... that the pressure in the container remains below atmospheric pressure. (b) Each cover and all openings... Permanent or Temporary Total Enclosure” in 40 CFR 52.741, appendix B. The enclosure may have permanent...

  1. 40 CFR 61.345 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the container is maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric pressure, the owner or operator may... that the pressure in the container remains below atmospheric pressure. (b) Each cover and all openings... Permanent or Temporary Total Enclosure” in 40 CFR 52.741, appendix B. The enclosure may have permanent...

  2. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  3. Direct containment heating models in the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, K.E.; Williams, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    The potential exists in a nuclear reactor core melt severe accident for molten core debris to be dispersed under high pressure into the containment building. If this occurs, the set of phenomena that result in the transfer of energy to the containment atmosphere and its surroundings is referred to as direct containment heating (DCH). Because of the potential for DCH to lead to early containment failure, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has sponsored an extensive research program consisting of experimental, analytical, and risk integration components. An important element of the analytical research has been the development and assessment of direct containment heating models in the CONTAIN code. This report documents the DCH models in the CONTAIN code. DCH models in CONTAIN for representing debris transport, trapping, chemical reactions, and heat transfer from debris to the containment atmosphere and surroundings are described. The descriptions include the governing equations and input instructions in CONTAIN unique to performing DCH calculations. Modifications made to the combustion models in CONTAIN for representing the combustion of DCH-produced and pre-existing hydrogen under DCH conditions are also described. Input table options for representing the discharge of debris from the RPV and the entrainment phase of the DCH process are also described. A sample calculation is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the models. The results show that reasonable behavior is obtained when the models are used to predict the sixth Zion geometry integral effects test at 1/10th scale.

  4. The middle Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jaquin, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of scattered light above the planetary limb from 116 Viking Orbiter images are used to constrain the temporal and spatial behavior of aerosols suspended in the Martian atmosphere. The data cover a wide range of seasons, locations, and viewing geometry, providing information about the aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution. The typical atmospheric column contains one or more discrete, optically thin, ice-like haze layers between 30 and 90 km elevation whose composition is inferred to be water ice. Below the detached hazes, a continuous haze, interpreted to have a large dust component, extends from as much as 50 km to the surface. The haze distribution exhibits an annual variation that reflects a seasonally driven circulation in the middle atmosphere. The potential role of stationary gravity waves in modifying the middle atmosphere circulation is explored using a linear theory applied to a realistic Martian environment. Martian topography derived from radar observations is decomposed into Fourier harmonics and used to linearly superpose gravity waves arising from each component. The larger amplitude topography on Mars combined with the absence of extended regions of smooth topography like oceans generates larger wave amplitudes than on the Earth. The circulation of the middle atmosphere is examined using a two-dimensional, linearized, axisymmetric model successfully employed in the study of the terrestrial mesosphere. Illustrations of temperature and wind speeds are presented for the southern summer solstice and southern spring equinox.

  5. Applications of atmospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Christopher John

    Surface modification techniques using plasmas have historically been completed in a low pressure environment due to Pd (pressure x gap distance) considerations influencing the behavior of plasma generation. Generally, plasmas produced in a low pressure environment are of a non-thermal or cold nature. The basic feature of non-thermal plasmas is the majority of electrical energy used to generate the plasma is primarily used to produce energetic electrons for generating chemical species. Low pressure plasmas serve many purposes for materials processing. Since the plasma environment is contained within a closed vessel, the plasma can be controlled very easily. Low pressure plasmas have been used in many industries but the complexity associated with the large pumping stations and limitation to batch processing has motivated new work in the area of atmospheric plasmas. Atmospheric plasmas offer both economic and technical justification for use over low pressure plasmas. Since atmospheric plasmas can be operated at ambient conditions, lower costs associated with continuous processing and a decrease in the complexity of equipment validate atmospheric plasma processing as a next generation plasma-aided manufacturing process. In an effort to advance acceptance of atmospheric plasma processing into industry, a process was developed, the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), in order to generate a homogeneous and non-thermal plasma discharge at ambient conditions. The discharge was applied to the reduction of known food borne pathogens, deposition of thin film materials, and modification of lignocellulosic biomass.

  6. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  7. Atmospheric humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water vapor plays a critical role in earth's atmosphere. It helps to maintain a habitable surface temperature through absorption of outgoing longwave radiation, and it transfers trmendous amounts of energy from the tropics toward the poles by absorbing latent heat during evaporation and subsequently...

  8. CONTAINMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous waste containment's primary objective is to isolate wastes deemed as hazardous from man and environmental systems of air, soil, and water. Hazardous wastes differ from other waste classifications due to their increased potential to cause human health effects or environ...

  9. Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, John

    2004-12-01

    In his book, John Green presents a unique personal insight into the fundamentals of fluid mechanics and atmospheric dynamics. Generations of students have benefited from his lectures, and this book, many years in the making, is the result of his wide teaching and research experience. The theory of fluid flow has developed to such an extent that very complex mathematics and models are currently used to describe it, but many of the fundamental results follow from relatively simple considerations: these classic principles are derived here in a novel, distinctive, and at times even idiosyncratic, way. The book is an introduction to fluid mechanics in the atmosphere for students and researchers that are already familiar with the subject, but who wish to extend their knowledge and philosophy beyond the currently popular development of conventional undergraduate instruction.

  10. SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, H.D.; Biggs, B.B.; Tariello, P.J.; George, K.O.

    1963-01-15

    A shipping container is described for transponting a large number of radioactive nuclear fuel element modules which produce a substantial amount of heat. The container comprises a primary pressure vessel and shield, and a rotatable head having an access port that can be indexed with module holders in the container. In order to remove heat generated in the fuel eleme nts, a heat exchanger is arranged within the container and in contact with a heat exchange fluid therein. The heat exchanger communicates with additional external heat exchangers, which dissipate heat to the atmosphere. (AEC)

  11. Astronomy and Atmospheric Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Les; Gaina, Alex

    2011-12-01

    The authors discusse the insuccess of the observation of the Total Eclipse of the Moon from 10 december 2011 in Romania and relate them with meteoconditions. Only a very short part of the last penumbral phase was observed, while the inital part and the totality was not observed due to very dense clouds. The change in color and brightness during this phase was signaled. Meanwhile, there is an area of science where clouds are of great use and interest. This area is Atmospheric optics, while the science which study clouds is meteorology. Clouds in combination with Solar and Moon light could give rise to a variety of strange, rare and unobvious phenomena in the atmosphere (sky), sometimes confused with Unidentified Flying Objects (UFO). The importance of meteorology for astronomy and atmospheric optics is underlined and an invitation to astronomers to use unfavourable days for athmospheric observations was sent. The web address of the site by Les Cowley, designed for atmospheric optics phenomena is contained in the text of the entry.

  12. Experimental results of an integral effects test in a zion-like geometry to investigate the effect of a classically inert atmosphere on direct containment heating: The IET-5 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1992-11-01

    The fifth experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-5) series was conducted to investigate the effects of high pressure melt ejection on direct containment heating. Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limiter plate with a 4-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The cavity contained 3.48 kg of water, and the basement floor inside the crane wall contained 71 kg of water, which corresponded to condensate levels in the Zion plant. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminium/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten them-lite was ejected by 6.0 MPa of steam into the reactor cavity.

  13. Atmospheric science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Ackerman, Thomas; Clarke, Antony; Goodman, Jindra; Levin, Zev; Tomasko, Martin; Toon, O. Brian; Whitten, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The following types of experiments for a proposed Space Station Microgravity Particle Research Facility are described: (1) growth of liquid water drop populations; (2) coalescence; (3) drop breakup; (4) breakup of freezing drops; (5) ice nucleation for large aerosols or bacteria; (6) scavenging of gases, for example, SO2 oxidation; (7) phoretic forces, i.e., thermophoresis versus diffusiophoresis; (8) Rayleigh bursting of drops; (9) charge separation due to collisions of rimed and unrimed ice; (10) charged drop dynamics; (11) growth of particles in other planetary atmospheres; and (12) freezing and liquid-liquid evaporation. The required capabilities and desired hardware for the facility are detailed.

  14. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP, volume 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sechrist, C. F., Jr. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    An overview is presented of the research activities and objectives of the middle atmosphere program (MAP). Status reports are presented of projects underway in the area of middle atmosphere climatology and atmospheric chemistry condensed minutes of MAP steering committee meetings are contained in this volume. Research recommendations for increased U.S. participation in the middle atmosphere program are given.

  15. Atmospheric Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embleton, Tony F. W.; Daigle, Gilles A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviewed here is the current state of knowledge with respect to each basic mechanism of sound propagation in the atmosphere and how each mechanism changes the spectral or temporal characteristics of the sound received at a distance from the source. Some of the basic processes affecting sound wave propagation which are present in any situation are discussed. They are geometrical spreading, molecular absorption, and turbulent scattering. In geometrical spreading, sound levels decrease with increasing distance from the source; there is no frequency dependence. In molecular absorption, sound energy is converted into heat as the sound wave propagates through the air; there is a strong dependence on frequency. In turbulent scattering, local variations in wind velocity and temperature induce fluctuations in phase and amplitude of the sound waves as they propagate through an inhomogeneous medium; there is a moderate dependence on frequency.

  16. Deposition of Atmospheric Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, L. M.

    Deposition of Atmospheric Pollutants, containing the proceedings of a colloquium held at Oberursel/Taunus, FRG, November 9-11, 1981, is divided into three main parts: dry deposition; wet deposition; and deposition on plants and vegetation.The 20 articles in the volume permit a fair survey of present-day knowledge and will be a useful tool to all working on the topic. Pollution by deposition of either the dry or wet sort is very insidious; its importance only appears in the long range, when its effects are or are almost irreversible. That is why concern was so long in emerging from decision makers.

  17. Does Pluto have a substantial atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of CH4 ice on Pluto implies that Pluto may have a substantial atmosphere consisting of heavy gases. Without such an atmosphere, sublimation of the CH4 ice would be so rapid on a cosmogonic time scale that either such an atmosphere would soon develop through the exposure of gases trapped in the CH4 ice or else the surface CH4 ice would soon be all sublimated away as other, more stable, ices became exposed. If such stable ices were present from the beginning, the existence of CH4 frosts would also imply that Pluto's present atmosphere contains a remnant of its primordial atmosphere.

  18. Quantum chemical calculations on a selection of iodine-containing species (IO, OIO, INO3, (IO)2, I2O3, I2O4 and I2O5) of importance in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Plane, John M C

    2008-04-01

    The electronic and geometric structures of the title complexes are studied quantum chemically using ab initio and density functional approaches. Coupled cluster calculations at the scalar relativistic (basis set) level are performed, and the results are corrected for spin-orbit coupling using data from relativistic density functional theory studies. The heats of formation (kJ mol(-1)) at 298 K are found to be: IO3 147.8, INO3 33.1, OIO 110.1, I2O3 64.0, I2O4 111.3, I2O5 33.0, IOIO 141.3, IOOI 179.9 and OI(I)O 157.9. These data are used to draw a number of conclusions regarding three important aspects of iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer. (i) Although the IO self reaction produces the asymmetric dimer, IOIO, it is unlikely that this species plays a further role in the atmosphere as it is short-lived. (ii) INO3 is sufficiently stable to explain the kinetics of the recombination reaction between IO and NO2, and the reaction between I2 and NO3 to produce I + INO3 is almost certainly the major source of iodine oxides at night. (iii) The higher iodine oxides I2O3 and I2O5 are very stable molecules, by contrast to the OIO dimer, I2O4, which is much less stable but which should still survive long enough in the marine boundary layer to provide a building block for iodine oxide particle formation.

  19. Integrated atmospheric characterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David W.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Stewart, John M.; Whiteman, David N.; Eaton, Frank D.

    2009-05-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing a transportable multi-lidar instrument known as the Integrated Atmospheric Characterization System (IACS). The system will be housed in standard shipping containers that will be transported to remote sites by tractor-trailer. IACS will comprise three lidars: a 355 nm imaging lidar for profiling refractive turbulence, a 355 nm Raman lidar for profiling water vapor, and an aerosol lidar operating at both 1.06 and 1.625 microns. All of the lidar transmit/receive optics will be co-aligned on a common mount, pointable at any elevation angle from horizontal to vertical. The entire system will be computer controlled to facilitate pointing and automatic data acquisition. The purpose of IACS is to characterize optical propagation paths during outdoor tests of electro-optical systems. The tests are anticipated to include ground-to-ground, air-to-ground, and ground-to-air scenarios, so the system must accommodate arbitrary slant paths through the atmosphere with maximum measurement ranges of 5-10 km. Elevation angle scans will be used to determine atmospheric extinction profiles at the infrared wavelengths, and data from the three wavelengths will be used to determine the aerosol Angstrom coefficient, enabling interpolation of results to other wavelengths in the 355 nm to 1.6 micron region. The imaging lidar for profiling refractive turbulence is based on a previously-reported project known as Range Profiles of Turbulence.

  20. The Role of Watershed Characteristics in Estuarine Condition: An Empirical Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine condition is a function of the nature of the estuary, ocean, and atmospheric systems, and the upstream watershed. To fully understand and predict how an estuary will respond to drivers and pressures, each compartment must be characterized. For example, eutrophication ef...

  1. Cometary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Rosa, N.

    Comets are icy leftovers from the formation of the solar system about 4.5 billion years ago. Because they have been stored at cold temperatures and their interiors have been protected by an overburden of insulating layers, comets contain the most unaltered remnants from the birth of our solar system. For this reason, determining their chemical composition and physical proper-ties as well as how the composition and structure of the nucleus changes with time are fundamental problems in planetary science. This information provides clues as to how material in our solar system formed and evolved.

  2. Scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, John P.; Chance, Kelly V.

    1991-01-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY is an instrument which measures backscattered, reflected, and transmitted light from the earth's atmosphere and surface. SCIAMACHY has eight spectral channels which observe simultaneously the spectral region between 240 and 1700 nm and selected windows between 1940 and 2400 nm. Each spectral channel contains a grating and linear diode array detector. SCIAMACHY observes the atmosphere in nadir, limb, and solar and lunar occultation viewing geometries.

  3. Modeling direct containment heating phenomena with CONTAIN 1. 12

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.O.; Russell, N.A.; Washington, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    CONTAIN is a detailed mechanistic computer code developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the integrated analysis of light water reactor severe accident containment phenomena. The most recent version of the code, CONTAIN 1.12, incorporates models for the phenomena of high pressure melt ejection (HPME) and the subsequent processes collectively known as Direct Containment Heating (DCH). CONTAIN 1.12 was used to model the Limited Flight Path 8A (LFP8A) experiment conducted at the Surtsey test facility at Sandia National Laboratories. In the experiment, 50 kg of molten thermite was injected into a scale model of the Surry cavity and then blown into the Surtsey vessel by high pressure steam. A seven-cell best-estimate CONTAIN model, using only a minimum of measured data, was used to simulate the LFP8A experiment. A comparison of the experimental and calculated results indicated that CONTAIN 1.12 was accurately modeling the physical processes involved in DCH phenomena, but the method of injecting the molten debris into the cavity in the CONTAIN model was causing the code to overpredict the chemical reaction and heat transfer rates between the molten debris and the system atmosphere. CONTAIN 1.12 predicted the peak vessel pressure to within less than 2% of the experimental value, but missed the timing on the pressure peak by approximately 1.75 s over the course of a 10 s calculation. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  4. The Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Michael (Editor); Travis, Larry D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A conference on the atmosphere of Jupiter produced papers in the areas of thermal and ortho-para hydrogen structure, clouds and chemistry, atmospheric structure, global dynamics, synoptic features and processes, atmospheric dynamics, and future spaceflight opportunities. A session on the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune was included, and the atmosphere of Saturn was discussed in several papers.

  5. SWiFT site atmospheric characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Christopher Lee; Ennis, Brandon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Historical meteorological tall tower data are analyzed from the Texas Tech University 200 m tower to characterize the atmospheric trends of the Scaled Wind Farm Technologies (SWiFT) site. In this report the data are analyzed to reveal bulk atmospheric trends, temporal trends and correlations of atmospheric variables. Through this analysis for the SWiFT turbines the site International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) classification is determined to be class III-C. Averages and distributions of atmospheric variables are shown, revealing large fluctuations and the importance of understanding the actual site trends as opposed to simply using averages. The site is significantly directional with the average wind speed from the south, and particularly so in summer and fall. Site temporal trends are analyzed from both seasonal (time of the year) to daily (hour of the day) perspectives. Atmospheric stability is seen to vary most with time of day and less with time of year. Turbulence intensity is highly correlated with stability, and typical daytime unstable conditions see double the level of turbulence intensity versus that experienced during the average stable night. Shear, veer and atmospheric stability correlations are shown, where shear and veer are both highest for stable atmospheric conditions. An analysis of the Texas Tech University tower anemometer measurements is performed which reveals the extent of the tower shadow effects and sonic tilt misalignment.

  6. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  7. Dynamics of the Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, Guy

    In recent years, much effort has been put in the study of chemical, dynamical, and radiative processes in the middle atmosphere. A great deal of activity has been stimulated by the necessity of estimating the potential effects of several anthropogenic perturbations on the ozone layer and on the earth's climate. For example, the atmospheric response to the emission of chlorofluorocarbons or nitrogen oxides is among the problems to be elucidated. Questions such as this cannot be properly answered without an understanding of the various processes involved in the transport of chemical constituents. The publication of a book. that contains original contributions on a variety of topics, such as internal gravity waves, tides, planetary waves, and stratospheric warmings, and that presents overview articles on the transport of trace species and on general circulation models is particularly useful for both research scientists and graduate students involved in atmospheric science.

  8. CALCIUM OXIDE SINTERING IN ATMOSPHERES CONTAINING WATER AND CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measurements of the effects of water vapor and CO2 on the sintering rate of nascent CaO, as a function of partial pressure and temperature using CaO prepared by rapid decomposition of CaCO3 and CA(OH)2. Each gas strongly catalyzed the sintering process ...

  9. The earth's atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W. (Editor); Devries, L. L.

    1972-01-01

    Topics discussed include the effects of solar radiation on the heat balance of the earth and its atmosphere, the physicomathematical models of the atmosphere and the computational schemes used in numerical investigations of the general circulation of the atmosphere, the effects of atmospheric turbulence on aeronautical systems, te chemistry of different regions of the atmosphere, the use of hot-filament and cold-cathode vacuum gauges to measure upper-atmosphere densities, methods of determining the air density at heights near a satellite's perigee by analyzing changes in its orbit, and an evaluation of various atmospheric models in the 100- to 1000-km altitude range.

  10. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    DOEpatents

    Stein, L.

    1973-12-11

    A method for purifying an atmosphere of radon and radon daughter elements which may be contained therein by contacting the atmosphere with a fluorinating solution, whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. The fluorides dissolve in the fluorinating solutlon and are removed from the atmosphere, which may then be recirculated. (Official Gazette)

  11. Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container

    DOEpatents

    Sparks, Michael H.

    2001-06-12

    The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

  12. Do pyrotechnics contain radium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Musilek, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    Many pyrotechnic devices contain barium nitrate which is used as an oxidizer and colouring agent primarily for green-coloured fireworks. Similarly, strontium nitrate is used for red-coloured pyrotechnic effects. Due to their chemical similarities to radium, barium and strontium ores can accumulate radium, causing a remarkable activity in these minerals. Radium in such contaminated raw materials can be processed together with the barium or strontium, unless extensive purification of the ores was undertaken. For example, the utilization of 'radiobarite' for the production of pyrotechnic ingredients can therefore cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols when the firework is displayed, resulting in negative health effects upon inhalation of these aerosols. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of gamma-photon-emitting radionuclides in several pyrotechnic devices. The highest specific activities were due to K-40 (up to 20 Bq g-1, average value 14 Bq g-1). Radium-226 activities were in the range of 16-260 mBq g-1 (average value 81 mBq g-1). Since no uranium was found in any of the samples, indeed, a slight enrichment of Ra-226 in coloured pyrotechnics can be observed. Radioactive impurities stemming from the Th-232 decay chain were found in many samples as well. In the course of novel developments aiming at the 'greening' of pyrotechnics, the potential radioactive hazard should be considered as well.

  13. Seasonal Variability of Saturn's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Simon, Amy; Delcroix, Marc; Orton, Glenn S.; Trinh, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal variability of Saturn's clouds and weather layer, currently displaying a variety of phenomena (convective storms, planetary waves, giant storms and lightning-induced events, etc.) is not yet fully understood. Variations of Saturn's radiance at 5.2 microns, a spectral region dominated by thermal emission in an atmospheric window containing weak gaseous absorption, contain a strong axisymmetric component as well as large discrete features at low and mid-latitudes that are several degrees colder than the planetary average and uncorrelated with features at shorter wavelengths that are dominated by reflected sunlight (Yanamandra-Fisher et al., 2001. Icarus, Vol. 150). The characterization of several fundamental atmospheric properties and processes, however, remains incomplete, namely: How do seasons affect (a) the global distribution of gaseous constituents and aerosols; and (b) temperatures and the stability against convection and large scale-atmospheric transport? Do 5-micron clouds have counterparts at other altitude levels? What changes occur during the emergence of Great White Storms? Data acquired at the NASA/IRTF and NAOJ/Subaru from 1995 - 2011; since 2004, high-resolution multi-spectral and high-spatial imaging data acquired by the NASA/ESA Cassini mission, represents half a Saturnian year or two seasons. With the addition of detailed multi-spectral data sets acquired by amateur observers, we study these dramatic phenomena to better understand the timeline of the evolution of these events. Seasonal (or temporal) trends in the observables such as albedo of the clouds, thermal fields of the atmosphere as function of altitude, development of clouds, hazes and global abundances of various hydrocarbons in the atmosphere can now be modeled. We will present results of our ongoing investigation for the search and characterization of periodicities over half a Saturnian year, based on a non-biased a priori approach and time series techniques (such as

  14. Gold and iron oxide associations under supergene conditions: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffié, Catherine; Benedetti, Marc F.; Parron, Claude; Amouric, Marc

    1996-05-01

    Abstract-The interaction of gold hydroxo-chloro complexes with iron oxides (ferrihydrites, goethites) during coprecipitation experiments is investigated. Chemical analyses of solids and solutions are coupled with a detailed characterization of the iron oxides with various methods, including X-ray diffraction, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. HCl solutions containing varying amounts of AuCl 4- and ferric nitrate were titrated to neutral or alkaline pH, resulting in the coprecipitation of gold and iron oxide phases (ferrihydrite or goethite). Reference titrations were performed in the absence of iron. Most of the gold was removed from solution in the presence of iron oxides whereas gold remained dissolved in the reference samples. In association with iron oxides two forms of gold have been identified by HRTEM and 197Au Mössbauer spectroscopy: metallic gold as well as chloro and/or hydroxo combined gold. This combined gold is in a trivalent state as the primary product which means that a reduction process is not a necessary step for the adsorption of gold species on iron oxides. Metallic gold characterized in these products by means of HRTEM consists mainly of colloids ranging from 3-60 nm in diameter embedded in the ferrihydrite matrix, as isolated particles or as particles associated with goethite laths. The smallest metallic gold particles detected would be almost invisible to classical observation techniques used for solid phases. In our experiments, oxidation-reduction reactions between Fe 2+ and Au 3+ are responsible for the presence of metallic gold observed on the iron phases. Photochemical reactions may also take part in the reduction process. Colloidal gold and gold complexes could be associated to the iron oxides by strong electrostatic interactions. Our results suggest that poorly ordered iron oxides are highly efficient in trapping gold from solutions thanks to their high surface area, and favor gold

  15. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  16. Our shared atmosphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our atmosphere is a precious and fascinating resource, providing air to breath, shielding us from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV), and maintaining a comfortable climate. Since the industrial revolution, people have significantly altered the composition of the atmosphere throu...

  17. The Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. E. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Topics considered at the conference included the dynamics, structure, chemistry, and evolution of the Venus atmosphere, as well as cloud physics and motion. Infrared, ultraviolet, and radio occultation methods of analysis are discussed, and atmospheric models are described.

  18. Laboratory for Atmospheres: 2004 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The report describes our role in NASA's mission, gives a broad description of our research, and summarizes our scientists' major accomplishments in 2004. The report also contains useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, outreach activities, and the transformation our laboratory has undergone. This report is published in two versions: 1) an abbreviated print version, and 2) an unabridged electronic version at our Laboratory for Atmospheres Web site: http://atmospheres.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

  19. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  20. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Melamed, Dan; Patel, Bhavesh R; Fuhrmann, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  1. Final Report - Phase II - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Brent; Sani, Rajesh

    2006-09-28

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Past research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. The project reported on here was an extension ($20,575) of the prior (much larger) project. This report is focused only on the work completed during the extension period. Further information on the larger impacts of our research, including 28 publications, can be found in the final report for the following projects: 1) Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study Grant # DE-FG03-01ER63270, and 2) Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions Grant # DE-FG03-98ER62630/A001 In this Phase II project, the toxic effects of uranium(VI) were studied using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in a medium containing bicarbonate or 1, 4-piperazinediethane sulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (PIPES) buffer (each at 30 mM, pH 7). The toxicity of uranium(VI) was dependent on the medium buffer and was observed in terms of longer lag times and in some cases, no measurable growth. The minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) was 140 M U(VI) in PIPES buffered medium. This is 36 times lower than previously reported for D. desulfuricans. These results suggest that U(VI) toxicity and the detoxification mechanisms of G20 depend greatly on the

  2. 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, H. J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity (ICAE 99), held June 7-11, 1999. This conference was attended by scientists and researchers from around the world. The subjects covered included natural and artificially initiated lightning, lightning in the middle and upper atmosphere (sprites and jets), lightning protection and safety, lightning detection techniques (ground, airborne, and space-based), storm physics, electric fields near and within thunderstorms, storm electrification, atmospheric ions and chemistry, shumann resonances, satellite observations of lightning, global electrical processes, fair weather electricity, and instrumentation.

  3. THAI Multi-Compartment Containment Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzleiter, T.; Poss, G.; Funke, F.; Allelein, H.J.

    2006-07-01

    The THAI experimental programme includes combined-effect investigations on thermal hydraulics, hydrogen, and fission product (iodine and aerosols) behaviour in LWR containments under severe accident conditions. An overview on the experiments performed up to now and on the future test program is presented, in combination with a selection of typical results to illustrate the versatility of the test facility and the broad variety of topics investigated. (authors)

  4. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I. )

    1990-03-01

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs.

  5. 40 CFR 265.1087 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-fill method to load liquids into the container; a vapor-balancing system or a vapor-recovery system to... defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b) may be open to the atmosphere at any time (i.e., covers and closure devices are... the conditions to be an empty container as defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b), the owner or operator...

  6. Containment loads due to direct containment heating and associated hydrogen behavior: Analysis and calculations with the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D C; Bergeron, K D; Carroll, D E; Gasser, R D; Tills, J L; Washington, K E

    1987-05-01

    One of the most important unresolved issues governing risk in many nuclear power plants involves the phenomenon called direct containment heating (DCH), in which it is postulated that molten corium ejected under high pressure from the reactor vessel is dispersed into the containment atmosphere, thereby causing sufficient heating and pressurization to threaten containment integrity. Models for the calculation of potential DCH loads have been developed and incorporated into the CONTAIN code for severe accident analysis. Using CONTAIN, DCH scenarios in PWR plants having three different representative containment types have been analyzed: Surry (subatmospheric large dry containment), Sequoyah (ice condenser containment), and Bellefonte (atmospheric large dry containment). A large number of parameter variation and phenomenological uncertainty studies were performed. Response of DCH loads to these variations was found to be quite complex; often the results differ substantially from what has been previously assumed concerning DCH. Containment compartmentalization offers the potential of greatly mitigating DCH loads relative to what might be calculated using single-cell representations of containments, but the actual degree of mitigation to be expected is sensitive to many uncertainties. Dominant uncertainties include hydrogen combustion phenomena in the extreme environments produced by DCH scenarios, and factors which affect the rate of transport of DCH energy to the upper containment. In addition, DCH loads can be aggravated by rapid blowdown of the primary system, co-dispersal of moderate quantities of water with the debris, and quenching of de-entrained debris in water; these factors act by increasing steam flows which, in turn, accelerates energy transport. It may be noted that containment-threatening loads were calculated for a substantial portion of the scenarios treated for some of the plants considered.

  7. Atmospheric suspensions of Russky Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golokhvast, Kirill S.; Nikiforov, P. A.; Chaika, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the first in the history of observations the results of studying of atmospheric suspensions contained in snowpacks of Russian Island (Vladivostok) , including the territory of campus of the Far Eastern Federal University (seasons 2011/2012-2013/2014 years). The distribution of airborne particles of different sizes and different genesis in differ by anthropogenic load districts of the island is revealed: the Far Eastern Federal University campus , the bridge over the Eastern Bosphorus Strait and the village Kanal. It is shown that in connection with the increase of anthropogenic load on the Russian island , its ecological condition deteriorates due to the rise in the atmosphere fractions of nano-and micro-sized particles.

  8. Electrochemical Measurement of Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeArmond, Anna H.; Davis, Dennis D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion of Shuttle thruster components in atmospheres containing high concentrations of nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and water is an important issue in ground operations of bipropellant systems in humid locations. Measurements of the corrosivities of NTO-containing atmospheres and the responses of different materials to these atmospheres have been accomplished using an electrochemical sensor. The sensor is composed of alternating aluminum/titanium strips separated by thin insulating layers. Under high humidity conditions a thin film of water covers the surface of the sensor. Added NTO vapor reacts with the water film to form a conductive medium and establishes a galvanic cell. The current from this cell can be integrated with respect to time and related to the corrosion activity. The surface layer formed from humid air/NTO reacts in the same way as an aqueous solution of nitric acid. Nitric acid is generally considered an important agent in NTO corrosion situations. The aluminum/titanium sensor is unresponsive to dry air, responds slightly to humid air (> 75% RH), and responds strongly to the combination of humid air and NTO. The sensor response is a power function (n = 2) of the NTO concentration. The sensor does not respond to NTO in dry air. The response of other materials in this type of sensor is related to position of the material in a galvanic series in aqueous nitric acid. The concept and operation of this electrochemical corrosion measurement is being applied to other corrosive atmospheric contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, sulfur dioxide, and acidic aerosols.

  9. Evolution of fracture permeability of ultramafic rocks at hydrothermal conditions: An experimental study on serpentinization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Moore, D. E.; Lockner, D. A.; Lowell, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks, during which olivine and pyroxene minerals are replaced by serpentine, magnetite, brucite and talc, is associated with hydrothermal activity at slow and ultraslow mid-ocean ridges. Serpentinization reactions affect hydrothermal fluid circulation by changing permeability of the oceanic crust. To advance our understanding of the evolution of permeability accompanying serpentinization reactions, we performed a series of flow-through experiments at a temperature of 260˚C, a confining pressure of 50 MPa, and a pore pressure of 20±2 MPa on cylindrical cores of ultramafic rocks (18 mm in diameter and 23 mm length) containing a single through-going tensile fracture. Pore fluid flow was in one direction and was collected routinely for chemical analysis. A 7.5 mm thick layer of the same rock, crushed and sieved (0.18-1.0 mm) was placed on the inlet end of the sample to produce a reactive heated reservoir for the pore fluid before entering the fracture. Multiple peridotite samples were tested, to investigate the effect of mineral assemblage on fluid-rock interaction and permeability. The initial effective permeability of the samples varied between 10-(15-18)m2, and it decreased by about 2 orders of magnitude in 7-10 days, showing that serpentinization reactions result in an initially rapid decrease in permeability. The best fit equation for the observed rate of change in permeability (k) is in the form of dk/dt=Ae-0.01t, where A is a constant and t is time. This result suggests that the rate of serpentine formation is largely controlled by the initial permeability rather than the properties of the reacting rock. Assuming flow between parallel plates, we find the effective crack width decreases by approximately 2 orders of magnitude during the experiments. The fluid chemistry and mineralogy data support the occurrence of serpentinization reactions. The early peak and monotonic decrease in the concentration of Mg, and Si in pore fluid

  10. 40 CFR 265.1087 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b) may be open to the atmosphere at any time (i.e., covers and closure devices are... the conditions to be an empty container as defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b), the owner or operator shall..., standard engineering codes and practices, or other requirements for the safe handling of...

  11. 40 CFR 265.1087 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b) may be open to the atmosphere at any time (i.e., covers and closure devices are... the conditions to be an empty container as defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b), the owner or operator shall..., standard engineering codes and practices, or other requirements for the safe handling of...

  12. Improved Mars Upper Atmosphere Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.

    2004-01-01

    The detailed characterization of the Mars upper atmosphere is important for future Mars aerobraking activities. Solar cycle, seasonal, and dust trends (climate) as well as planetary wave activity (weather) are crucial to quantify in order to improve our ability to reasonably depict the state of the Mars upper atmosphere over time. To date, our best information is found in the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Accelerometer (ACC) database collected during Phase 1 (Ls = 184 - 300; F10.7 = 70 - 90) and Phase 2 (Ls = 30 - 90; F10.7 = 90 - 150) of aerobraking. This database (100 - 170 km) consists of thermospheric densities, temperatures, and scale heights, providing our best constraints for exercising the coupled Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) and the Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM). The Planetary Data System (PDS) contains level 0 and 2 MGS Accelerometer data, corresponding to atmospheric densities along the orbit track. Level 3 products (densities, temperatures, and scale heights at constant altitudes) are also available in the PDS. These datasets provide the primary model constraints for the new MGCM-MTGCM simulations summarized in this report. Our strategy for improving the characterization of the Mars upper atmospheres using these models has been three-fold : (a) to conduct data-model comparisons using the latest MGS data covering limited climatic and weather conditions at Mars, (b) to upgrade the 15-micron cooling and near-IR heating rates in the MGCM and MTGCM codes for ad- dressing climatic variations (solar cycle and seasonal) important in linking the lower and upper atmospheres (including migrating tides), and (c) to exercise the detailed coupled MGCM and MTGCM codes to capture and diagnose the planetary wave (migrating plus non-migrating tidal) features throughout the Mars year. Products from this new suite of MGCM-MTGCM coupled simulations are being used to improve our predictions of the structure of the Mars upper atmosphere for the

  13. Atmospheric Electricity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delory, G.; Farrell, W.

    2011-10-01

    The atmosphere of Mars is one compelling example in our solar system that should possess active electrical processes, where dust storms are known to occur on local, regional, and global scales. Laboratory experiments and simulations all indicate that these events are expected to generate substantial quasi-static electric fields via triboelectric (i.e., frictional) charging, perhaps up to the breakdown potential of the Martian atmosphere. However current observations of potential electrical activity on Mars from both ground-based and orbital platforms have yielded conflicting results. If present, significant atmospheric electricity could be an important source of atmospheric chemistry on Mars, and thus impact our understanding of the evolution of the atmosphere and its past or present astrobiological potential. Here we review the current state of understanding regarding atmospheric electricity on Mars, and discuss its implications pending the results of future measurements.

  14. Pluto's atmosphere near perihelion

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A recent stellar occultation has confirmed predictions that Pluto has an atmosphere which is sufficiently thick to uniformly envelope the planet and to extend far above the surface. Pluto's atmosphere consists of methane and perhaps other volatile gases at temperatures below their freezing points; it should regulate the surface temperature of its volatile ices to a globally uniform value. As Pluto approaches and passes through perihelion, a seasonal maximum in the atmospheric bulk and a corresponding minimum in the exposed volatile ice abundance is expected to occur. The lag in maximum atmospheric bulk relative to perihelion will be diagnostic of the surface thermal properties. An estimate of Pluto's atmospheric bulk may result if a global darkening (resulting from the disappearance of the seasonally deposited frosts) occurs before the time of maximum atmospheric bulk. The ice deposited shortly after perihelion may be diagnostic of the composition of Pluto's volatile reservoir.

  15. Direct containment heating: Surtsey test results and models

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Nichols, R.T.; Pilch, M.; Brockmann, J.E.; Powers, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    Direct containment heating is one of the processes that can lead to containment rupture early in a severe reactor accident. The origins and the current understanding of this process are surveyed. Three issues arise in connection with direct containment heating -- threats to containment integrity posed by transfer of energy to the containment atmosphere from dispersed core debris or the generation of hydrogen by reactions of core debris with steam, and the formation of radioactive aerosols available for release from the plant should containment integrity be lost. The two threats to containment integrity have different characteristics. Energy exchange between core debris and the atmosphere depends on the long range dispersal of the debris and the atmosphere depends on the long range dispersal of the debris and can be affected by interactions of the debris with structures and co-dispersed water. Hydrogen generation is dependent on the detailed flows of debris and steam within and near the reactor cavity. Results of four experiments in the Surtsey test facility to explore energy exchange with the atmosphere are presented. These experiments suggest ''single particle'' models of direct heating over-predict the threat to containment integrity and that debris/structure interactions can enhance heating of the containment atmosphere. Results of test to establish the low pressure cut-off to direct heating are reported. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  17. Sources of atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Michaels, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The information available on factors that influence emissions from the principal societal sources of ammonia to the atmosphere, namely combustion processes, volatilization of farm animal wastes, and volatilization of fertilizers, is reviewed. Emission factors are established for each major source of atmospheric ammonia. The factors are then multiplied by appropriate source characterization descriptors to obtain calculated fluxes of ammonia to the atmosphere on a state-by-state basis for the United States.

  18. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  19. Atmospheres from Within

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Thomas; Abshire, James; Clancy, Todd; Fry, Ghee; Gustafson, Bo; Hecht, Michael; Kostiuk, Theodor; Rall, Jonathan; Reuter, Dennis; Sheldon, Robert

    1996-01-01

    In this review of atmospheric investigations from planetary surfaces, a wide variety of measurement and instrument techniques relevant to atmospheric studies from future planetary lander missions are discussed. The diversity of planetary surface environments within the solar system precludes complete or highly specific coverage, but lander investigations for Mars and cometary missions are presented as specific cases that represent the broad range of atmospheric-surface boundaries and that also correspond to high priority goals for future national and international lander missions.

  20. Corona method and apparatus for altering carbon containing compounds

    DOEpatents

    Sharma, Amit K.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Josephson, Gary B.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for altering a carbon containing compound in an aqueous mixture. According to a first aspect of the present invention, it has been discovered that for an aqueous mixture having a carbon containing compound with an ozone reaction rate less than the ozone reaction rate of pentachlorophenol, use of corona discharge in a low or non-oxidizing atmosphere increases the rate of destruction of the carbon containing compound compared to corona discharge an oxidizing atmosphere. For an aqueous mixture containing pentachlorphenol, there was essentially no difference in destruction between atmospheres. According to a second aspect of the present invention, it has been further discovered that an aqueous mixture having a carbon containing compound in the presence of a catalyst and oxygen resulted in an increased destruction rate of the carbon containing compound compared to no catalyst.

  1. Corona Method And Apparatus For Altering Carbon Containing Compounds

    DOEpatents

    Sharma, Amit K.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Josephson; Gary B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for altering a carbon-containing compound in an aqueous mixture. According to a first aspect of the present invention, it has been discovered that for an aqueous mixture having a carbon containing compound with an ozone reaction rate less than the ozone reaction rate of pentachlorophenol, use of corona discharge in a low or non-oxidizing atmosphere increases the rate of destruction of the carbon containing compound compared to corona discharge an oxidizing atmosphere. For an aqueous mixture containing pentachlorphenol, there was essentially no difference in destruction between atmospheres. According to a second aspect of the present invention, it has been further discovered that an aqueous mixture having a carbon-containing compound in the presence of a catalyst and oxygen resulted in an increased destruction rate of the carbon containing compound compared to no catalyst.

  2. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, Donald G.; Davis, Mary S.

    1990-01-01

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  3. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

    1984-08-30

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  4. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  5. Chemical kinetics and modeling of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    A unified overview is presented for chemical kinetics and chemical modeling in planetary atmospheres. The recent major advances in the understanding of the chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere make the study of planets more interesting and relevant. A deeper understanding suggests that the important chemical cycles have a universal character that connects the different planets and ultimately link together the origin and evolution of the solar system. The completeness (or incompleteness) of the data base for chemical kinetics in planetary atmospheres will always be judged by comparison with that for the terrestrial atmosphere. In the latter case, the chemistry of H, O, N, and Cl species is well understood. S chemistry is poorly understood. In the atmospheres of Jovian planets and Titan, the C-H chemistry of simple species (containing 2 or less C atoms) is fairly well understood. The chemistry of higher hydrocarbons and the C-N, P-N chemistry is much less understood. In the atmosphere of Venus, the dominant chemistry is that of chlorine and sulfur, and very little is known about C1-S coupled chemistry. A new frontier for chemical kinetics both in the Earth and planetary atmospheres is the study of heterogeneous reactions. The formation of the ozone hole on Earth, the ubiquitous photochemical haze on Venus and in the Jovian planets and Titan all testify to the importance of heterogeneous reactions. It remains a challenge to connect the gas phase chemistry to the production of aerosols.

  6. Heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Clancy, R Todd; Encrenaz, Thérèse; Fast, Kelly; Forget, François; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Montmessin, Franck; Perrier, Séverine

    2008-08-21

    Hydrogen radicals are produced in the martian atmosphere by the photolysis of water vapour and subsequently initiate catalytic cycles that recycle carbon dioxide from its photolysis product carbon monoxide. These processes provide a qualitative explanation for the stability of the atmosphere of Mars, which contains 95 per cent carbon dioxide. Balancing carbon dioxide production and loss based on our current understanding of the gas-phase chemistry in the martian atmosphere has, however, proven to be difficult. Interactions between gaseous chemical species and ice cloud particles have been shown to be key factors in the loss of polar ozone observed in the Earth's stratosphere, and may significantly perturb the chemistry of the Earth's upper troposphere. Water-ice clouds are also commonly observed in the atmosphere of Mars and it has been suggested previously that heterogeneous chemistry could have an important impact on the composition of the martian atmosphere. Here we use a state-of-the-art general circulation model together with new observations of the martian ozone layer to show that model simulations that include chemical reactions occurring on ice clouds lead to much improved quantitative agreement with observed martian ozone levels in comparison with model simulations based on gas-phase chemistry alone. Ozone is readily destroyed by hydrogen radicals and is therefore a sensitive tracer of the chemistry that regulates the atmosphere of Mars. Our results suggest that heterogeneous chemistry on ice clouds plays an important role in controlling the stability and composition of the martian atmosphere.

  7. Atmospheric Effects on the Combustion of Detonating Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, Joel

    2005-07-01

    The detonation and subsequent combustion of aluminized explosive formulations depend heavily on the reactions of aluminum and oxygen. Fuel-rich formulations require oxygen from an external source (nominally an oxygen-containing atmosphere) to burn the fuel to completion. Dynamic spectroscopic measurements were made for two different aluminized explosives (PBXIH-135 and PBXN-111) to investigate the effect of changing atmospheres on the combustion properties of aluminum. Both explosive formulations were tested under normal atmospheric conditions and in an atmosphere of nitrogen. Light emission (from 350-550 nm) from the explosive events was collected in a spectrometer and dispersed temporally in a streak camera. New, nitrogen-containing species (near 387 and 416 nm) arise in the nitrogen atmosphere experiments for both formulations that seem to replace aluminum monoxide as a primary intermediate product for the fuel. The peak assignments and global kinetics of each species will be presented and the implications of these results on atmospheric effects will be discussed.

  8. Clouds in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the terrestrial atmosphere clouds are familiar as vast collections of small water drops or ice cyrstals suspended in the air. The study of clouds touches on many facets of armospheric science. The chemistry of clouds is tied to the chemistry of the surrounding atmosphere.

  9. Evolution of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Theories on the origin of the Earth atmosphere and chemical composition are presented. The role of oxygenic photosynthesis on the determination of the Earth's origin is discussed. The research suggests that further analysis of the geologic record is needed to more accurately estimate the history of atmospheric oxygen.

  10. MODIS Atmospheric Data Handler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantharaj, Valentine; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Atmosphere Data Handler software converts the HDF data to ASCII format, and outputs: (1) atmospheric profiles of temperature and dew point and (2) total precipitable water. Quality-control data are also considered in the export procedure.

  11. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kimberly A.; Hatch, Courtney D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-07-01

    Aerosols represent an important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Because aerosols are composed of solid and liquid particles of varying chemical complexity, size, and phase, large challenges exist in understanding how they impact climate, health, and the chemistry of the atmosphere. Only through the integration of field, laboratory, and modeling analysis can we begin to unravel the roles atmospheric aerosols play in these global processes. In this article, we provide a brief review of the current state of the science in the analysis of atmospheric aerosols and some important challenges that need to be overcome before they can become fully integrated. It is clear that only when these areas are effectively bridged can we fully understand the impact that atmospheric aerosols have on our environment and the Earth's system at the level of scientific certainty necessary to design and implement sound environmental policies.

  12. The atmosphere below. (Videotape)

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    In this educational `Liftoff to Learning` video series, astronauts from the STS-45 Space Shuttle Mission (Kathy Sullivan, Byron Lichtenberg, Brian Duffy, Mike Foale, David Leestma, Charlie Bolden, and Dirk Frimont) explain and discuss the Earths atmosphere, its needs, the changes occurring within it, the importance of ozone, and some of the reasons behind the ozone depletion in the Earths atmosphere. The questions of: (1) what is ozone; (2) what has happened to the ozone layer in the atmosphere; and (3) what exactly does ozone do in the atmosphere, are answered. Different chemicals and their reactions with ozone are discussed. Computer animation and graphics show how these chemical reactions affect the atmosphere and how the ozone hole looks and develops at the south pole during its winter season appearance.

  13. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  14. The atmosphere below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-05-01

    In this educational 'Liftoff to Learning' video series, astronauts from the STS-45 Space Shuttle Mission (Kathy Sullivan, Byron Lichtenberg, Brian Duffy, Mike Foale, David Leestma, Charlie Bolden, and Dirk Frimont) explain and discuss the Earths atmosphere, its needs, the changes occurring within it, the importance of ozone, and some of the reasons behind the ozone depletion in the Earths atmosphere. The questions of: (1) what is ozone; (2) what has happened to the ozone layer in the atmosphere; and (3) what exactly does ozone do in the atmosphere, are answered. Different chemicals and their reactions with ozone are discussed. Computer animation and graphics show how these chemical reactions affect the atmosphere and how the ozone hole looks and develops at the south pole during its winter season appearance.

  15. The PHOCUS Project: Atmospheric Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, J.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.

    2012-12-01

    On the morning of July 21, 2011, the PHOCUS sounding rocket was launched from Esrange, Sweden, into strong noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The aim of the PHOCUS project (Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer mesosphere) is to study mesospheric particles (ice and meteoric smoke) and their interaction with their neutral and charged environment. Interactions of interest comprise the charging and nucleation of particles, the relationship between meteoric smoke and ice, and the influence of these particles on gas-phase chemistry. Here we will describe the optical measurements of the atmospheric composition and present first results including comparison to the other simultaneous measurements. The atmospheric composition was probed by a set of optical instruments from Stockholm University. The idea behind the instrument setup was to combine the advantages of the sensitive resonance fluorescence with well-calibrated airglow photometry. The set of instruments consisted of two resonance fluorescence probes (each containing a lamp and a detector), one for atomic oxygen and one for atomic hydrogen, and two IR photometers for O2 and OH dayglow emissions in the near IR. The O2 IR Atmospheric system at 1.27 μm is related to the photolysis of O3, which during the day is in steady state with O and a retrieval of O is possible. The OH Meinel emission is produced by the reaction between mesospheric O3 and H, and H concentrations can be deduced by combining information from both photometers. Unfortunately, some of these measurements were corrupted by instrument problems or payload glow. O3 and O profiles will be presented and compared to the simultaneous measurements of ice and meteoric smoke particles, water vapour and the state of the background neutral and charged atmosphere.

  16. Geochemical cycles of atmospheric gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Drever, J. I.

    1988-01-01

    The processes that control the atmosphere and atmospheric changes are reviewed. The geochemical cycles of water vapor, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and minor atmospheric constituents are examined. Changes in atmospheric chemistry with time are discussed using evidence from the rock record and analysis of the present atmosphere. The role of biological evolution in the history of the atmosphere and projected changes in the future atmosphere are considered.

  17. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    DOEpatents

    Stein, L.

    1974-01-01

    A method of removing radon and radon daughter elements from an atmosphere containing these elements by passing the atmosphere through a bed of fluorinating compound whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. These fluorides adhere to the fluorinating compound and are thus removed from the atmosphere which may then be recirculated. A method for recovering radon and separating radon from its daughter elements is also described. (Official Gazette)

  18. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  19. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  20. Sealed container sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Sampling device, by means of a tapered needle, pierces a sealed container while maintaining the seal and either evacuates or pressurizes the container. This device has many applications in the chemical, preservative and battery-manufacturing industries.

  1. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  2. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  3. Personal Container Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the study of personal containers and their uses in art creation for children. States that children are fascinated by boxes and containers. Provides examples of personal containers, such as lunch boxes, pencil cases, purses and valets, and school bags. (CMK)

  4. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

  5. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  6. Method and apparatus for container leakage testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-02-14

    An apparatus is described for use in one-hundred percent leak testing of food containers used in conjunction with a tracer gas. The apparatus includes a shell with entrance and exit air locks to create a controlled atmosphere through which a series of containers is conveyed by a conveyor belt. The pressure in the shell is kept lower than the pressure in the containers and the atmosphere is made to flow with the containers so that a tracer gas placed in the packages before sealing them will leak more readily, but the leaked tracer gas will remain associated with the leaking package as it moves through the shell. The leaks are detected with a sniffer probe in fluid communication with a gas chromatograph. The gas chromatograph issues a signal when it detects a leak to an ejector that will eject the leaking container from the conveyor. The system is timed so that the series of containers can move continuously into and out of the shell, past the probe and the ejector, without stopping, yet each package is tested for leaks and removed if leaking. 3 figs.

  7. Method and apparatus for container leakage testing

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for use in one-hundred percent leak testing of food containers used in conjunction with a tracer gas. The apparatus includes a shell with entrance and exit air locks to create a controlled atmosphere through which a series of containers is conveyed by a conveyor belt. The pressure in the shell is kept lower than the pressure in the containers and the atmosphere is made to flow with the containers so that a tracer gas placed in the packages before sealing them will leak more readily, but the leaked tracer gas will remain associated with the leaking package as it moves through the shell. The leaks are detected with a sniffer probe in fluid communication with a gas chromatograph. The gas chromatograph issues a signal when it detects a leak to an ejector that will eject the leaking container from the conveyor. The system is timed so that the series of containers can move continuously into and out of the shell, past the probe and the ejector, without stopping, yet each package is tested for leaks and removed if leaking.

  8. Triton's distorted atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Elliot, J L; Stansberry, J A; Olkin, C B; Agner, M A; Davies, M E

    1997-10-17

    A stellar-occultation light curve for Triton shows asymmetry that can be understood if Triton's middle atmosphere is distorted from spherical symmetry. Although a globally oblate model can explain the data, the inferred atmospheric flattening is so large that it could be caused only by an unrealistic internal mass distribution or highly supersonic zonal winds. Cyclostrophic winds confined to a jet near Triton's northern or southern limbs (or both) could also be responsible for the details of the light curve, but such winds are required to be slightly supersonic. Hazes and clouds in the atmosphere are unlikely to have caused the asymmetry in the light curve.

  9. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  10. Evolution of Atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, B.

    1993-02-12

    An atmosphere is the dynamic gaseous boundary layer between a planet and space. Many complex interactions affect the composition and time evolution of an atmosphere and control the environment - or climate - at a planet's surface. These include both reactions within the atmosphere as well as exchange of energy, gases, and dust with the planet below and the solar system above; for Earth today, interactions with the biosphere and oceans are paramount. In view of the large changes in inputs of energy and gases that have occurred since planets began to form and the complexity of the chemistry, it is not surprising that planetary climates have changed greatly and are continuing to change.

  11. Triton's Distorted Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Stansberry, J. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Agner, M. A.; Davies, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    A stellar-occultation light curve for Triton shows asymmetry that can be understood if Triton's middle atmosphere is distorted from spherical symmetry. Although a globally oblate model can explain the data, the inferred atmospheric flattening is so large that it could be caused only by an unrealistic internal mass distribution or highly supersonic zonal winds. Cyclostrophic winds confined to a jet near Triton's northern or southern limbs (or both) could also be responsible for the details of the light curve, but such winds are required to be slightly supersonic. Hazes and clouds in the atmosphere are unlikely to have caused the asymmetry in the light curve.

  12. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1999-04-27

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

  13. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1999-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

  14. Students 'Weigh' Atmospheric Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporaloni, Marina

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure developed by students that measures the mass concentration of particles in a polluted urban atmosphere. Uses a portable fan and filters of various materials. Compares students' data with official data. (DDR)

  15. Endothermic atmosphere economics

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of atmospheres for hardening of steel was presented in the March 1995 edition of Heat Treating Progress. This article expands on the information presented there by focusing on key current and future issues that impact the economics of endothermic atmospheres for heat treating. Many companies have developed their own methods of cost analysis. However, these schemes often do not account for ``intangible`` and market factors that impact the total cost of an endothermic atmosphere system. Many of these factors are discussed. A ``Cost Analysis Worksheet`` also is included for readers who want to perform a more detailed comparison. Changing technology, and environmental, energy, and market issues must also be considered when comparing the total costs of conventional generators and nitrogen/methanol-based heat treating atmospheres.

  16. Condensates in Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium theory which starts with temperature/pressure profiles, compositional information and thermodynamic data for condensable species in the jovian planet atmospheres predicts layers of condensate clouds in the upper troposphere.

  17. Thermal atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis Ralph

    1987-01-01

    The static thermal atmosphere is described and its predictions are compared to observations both to test the validity of the classic assumptions and to distinguish and describe those spectral features with diagnostic value.

  18. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  19. The invention of atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Martin, Craig

    2015-08-01

    The word "atmosphere" was a neologism Willebrord Snellius created for his Latin translation of Simon Stevin's cosmographical writings. Astronomers and mathematical practitioners, such as Snellius and Christoph Scheiner, applying the techniques of Ibn Mu'ādh and Witelo, were the first to use the term in their calculations of the height of vapors that cause twilight. Their understandings of the atmosphere diverged from Aristotelian divisions of the aerial region. From the early years of the seventeenth century, the term was often associated with atomism or corpuscular matter theory. The concept of the atmosphere changed dramatically with the advent of pneumatic experiments in the middle of the seventeenth century. Pierre Gassendi, Walter Charleton, and Robert Boyle transformed the atmosphere of the mathematicians giving it the characteristics of weight, specific gravity, and fluidity, while disputes about its extent and border remained unresolved. PMID:26193787

  20. Our Changing Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes what is known about two major variables involved in certain types of chemical pollution that seem to be changing the structure of the Earth's atmosphere. Discusses the greenhouse effect and the ozone layer. (TW)

  1. SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group

    ScienceCinema

    Viner, Brian; Parker, Matthew J.

    2016-07-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory, Atmospheric Technologies Group, conducts a best-in class Applied Meteorology Program to ensure the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site is operated safely and complies with stringent environmental regulations.

  2. The invention of atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Martin, Craig

    2015-08-01

    The word "atmosphere" was a neologism Willebrord Snellius created for his Latin translation of Simon Stevin's cosmographical writings. Astronomers and mathematical practitioners, such as Snellius and Christoph Scheiner, applying the techniques of Ibn Mu'ādh and Witelo, were the first to use the term in their calculations of the height of vapors that cause twilight. Their understandings of the atmosphere diverged from Aristotelian divisions of the aerial region. From the early years of the seventeenth century, the term was often associated with atomism or corpuscular matter theory. The concept of the atmosphere changed dramatically with the advent of pneumatic experiments in the middle of the seventeenth century. Pierre Gassendi, Walter Charleton, and Robert Boyle transformed the atmosphere of the mathematicians giving it the characteristics of weight, specific gravity, and fluidity, while disputes about its extent and border remained unresolved.

  3. Middle atmospheric electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of the advances made during the last few years with respect to the study of the electrodynamics in the earth's middle atmosphere. In a report of the experimental work conducted, attention is given to large middle atmospheric electric fields, the downward coupling of high altitude processes into the middle atmosphere, and upward coupling of tropospheric processes into the middle atmosphere. It is pointed out that new developments in tethered balloons and superpressure balloons should greatly increase the measurement duration of earth-ionospheric potential measurements and of stratospheric electric field measurements in the next few years. Theoretical work considered provides an excellent starting point for study of upward coupling of transient and dc electric fields. Hays and Roble (1979) were the first to construct a model which included orographic features as well as the classical thunderstorm generator.

  4. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  5. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  6. Atmospheric Excitation of Planetary Normal Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) understand the phenomenon of continuous free oscillations of the Earth and (2) examine the idea of using this phenomenon for planetary seismology. We first describe the results on (1) and present our evaluations of the idea (2) in the final section. In 1997, after almost forty years since the initial attempt by Benioff et al, continuous free oscillations of the Earth were discovered. Spheroidal fundamental modes between 2 and 7 millihertz are excited continuously with acceleration amplitudes of about 0.3-0.5 nanogals. The signal is now commonly found in virtually all data recorded by STS-1 type broadband seismometers at quiet sites. Seasonal variation in amplitude and the existence of two coupled modes between the atmosphere and the solid Earth support that these oscillations are excited by the atmosphere. Stochastic excitation due to atmospheric turbulence is a favored mechanism, providing a good match between theory and data. The atmosphere has ample energy to support this theory because excitation of these modes require only 500-10000 W whereas the atmosphere contains about 117 W of kinetic energy. An application of this phenomenon includes planetary seismology, because other planets may be oscillating due to atmospheric excitation. The interior structure of planets could be learned by determining the eigenfrequencies in the continuous free oscillations. It is especially attractive to pursue this idea for tectonically quiet planets, since quakes may be too infrequent to be recorded by seismic instruments.

  7. Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Howcroft, Caius Leo Frederick

    2004-12-01

    The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

  8. Atmospheric Chemistry Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This presentation poster covers data products from the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) of the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC). Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer products (TOMS) introduced in the presentation include TOMS Version 8 as well as Aura, which provides 25 years of TOMS and Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) data. The presentation lists a number of atmospheric chemistry and dynamics data sets at DAAC.

  9. Atmospheric Circulation and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.; Rengel, Miriam

    The deep atmosphere of Venus ( ˜ 180 km including the thermosphere) presents both observational and modeling challenges. Its thick, nearly uniform global cloud cover makes it difficult to fathom the vertical structure of the global circulation through available techniques that are applied to Earth's atmosphere. Further, the slow rotation of the planet and the consequential prevailing cyclostrophic balance restricts easy inferences about the meridional flow and circulation (Gierasch et al. 1997, Read 1986, Schubert et al. 2007).

  10. Mars Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Martian atmosphere is dynamically similar to the Earth's. Its spin-axis rotation rate is only minutes longer than Earth's so the Coriolois force is nearly identical to Earth's. The inclination of its spin axis is also similar to Earth's giving it similarity in seasonal change. And the Martian atmosphere is nearly transparent to solar radiation (except during dust periods) such that it is heated primarily by upwelling infrared radiation from the surface. These characteristics make Mars an ideal laboratory for studying the dynamics of rapidly rotating differentially heated atmospheres. This talk reviews what we have learned about Mars atmospheric dynamics and how if compares with Earth. The source of information to make such a comparison comes from observations and models. The former are sparse and that the latter have played a major role in shaping our thinking about the general circulation on Mars. However, the models need validation. Fortunately, the first two orbiters in NASA's Mars Surveyor Program have instrumentation to address many of the issues related to the general circulation and climate of Mars. The first, Mars Global Surveyor, is already at Mars gathering data. The second, the Mars 98 Orbiter to be launched later this year, carries a dedicated atmospheric sounder. Thus, much will be learned about Mars' atmosphere in the next few years.

  11. Venus upper atmosphere structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Nicholson, J. Y.; Lake, L. R.

    1980-12-01

    Atmospheric densities of Venus were measured from the orbital decay of the Pioneer Venus from Dec. 9, 1978 to Aug. 7, 1979 near the 16 deg latitude between 140 and 190 km during the entire day. Comparative atmospheric densities on earth at 150 km are higher by a factor of 3.5 with only a 1% diurnal variation; an atmospheric composition, temperature, and density model based on the orbiter atmospheric drag (OAD) vertical structure is presented. The model shows that atomic oxygen is the major component in the Venus atmosphere above 145 km at night and above 160 km during the day with mixing ratios over 0.1 near 140 km; drag measurements indicate O concentrations from 1 x 10 to the 9th/cu cm in daytime to 3 x 10 to the 7th/cu cm at night. It is concluded that the neutral upper atmosphere of Venus is surprisingly insensitive to solar extreme UV variations and changes in the solar wind.

  12. Atmospheric Models for Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta L.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    There are eight destinations in the solar System with sufficient atmosphere for aerocapture to be a viable aeroassist option - Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and its moon Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. Engineering-level atmospheric models for four of these targets (Earth, Mars, Titan, and Neptune) have been developed for NASA to support systems analysis studies of potential future aerocapture missions. Development of a similar atmospheric model for Venus has recently commenced. An important capability of all of these models is their ability to simulate quasi-random density perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithm, and for thermal systems design. Similarities and differences among these atmospheric models are presented, with emphasis on the recently developed Neptune model and on planned characteristics of the Venus model. Example applications for aerocapture are also presented and illustrated. Recent updates to the Titan atmospheric model are discussed, in anticipation of applications for trajectory and atmospheric reconstruct of Huygens Probe entry at Titan.

  13. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  14. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  15. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  16. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  17. The photochemistry of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent theoretical and observational investigations of photochemical processes in the atmospheres of the planets and their satellites are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the CO2-dominated atmospheres of Mars and Venus, the hydrogen-dominated atmospheres of the Jovian planets, the SO2 atmosphere of Io, and the massive atmospheres of Titan and Triton. The principal reaction paths involved are listed and briefly characterized, and numerical data on atmospheric compositions are given in tables.

  18. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  19. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  20. CONTAIN independent peer review

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Corradini, M.L.; Denning, R.S.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Loyalka, S.K.; Smith, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    The CONTAIN code was developed by Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide integrated analyses of containment phenomena. It is used to predict nuclear reactor containment loads, radiological source terms, and associated physical phenomena for a range of accident conditions encompassing both design-basis and severe accidents. The code`s targeted applications include support for containment-related experimental programs, light water and advanced light water reactor plant analysis, and analytical support for resolution of specific technical issues such as direct containment heating. The NRC decided that a broad technical review of the code should be performed by technical experts to determine its overall technical adequacy. For this purpose, a six-member CONTAIN Peer Review Committee was organized and a peer review as conducted. While the review was in progress, the NRC issued a draft ``Revised Severe Accident Code Strategy`` that incorporated revised design objectives and targeted applications for the CONTAIN code. The committee continued its effort to develop findings relative to the original NRC statement of design objectives and targeted applications. However, the revised CONTAIN design objectives and targeted applications. However, the revised CONTAIN design objectives and targeted applications were considered by the Committee in assigning priorities to the Committee`s recommendations. The Committee determined some improvements are warranted and provided recommendations in five code-related areas: (1) documentation, (2) user guidance, (3) modeling capability, (4) code assessment, and (5) technical assessment.

  1. 40 CFR 265.1087 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 265.71. If a defect is detected, the owner or operator shall repair the defect in accordance... defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b) may be open to the atmosphere at any time (i.e., covers and closure devices are... the conditions to be an empty container as defined in 40 CFR 261.7(b), the owner or operator...

  2. Improving containment strategies in biopharming.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Denis J

    2007-09-01

    This review examines the challenges of segregating biopharmed crops expressing pharmaceutical or veterinary agents from mainstream crops, particularly those destined for food or feed use. The strategy of using major food crops as production vehicles for the expression of pharmaceutical or veterinary agents is critically analysed in the light of several recent episodes of contamination of the human food chain by non-approved crop varieties. Commercially viable strategies to limit or avoid biopharming intrusion into the human food chain require the more rigorous segregation of food and non-food varieties of the same crop species via a range of either physical or biological methods. Even more secure segregation is possible by the use of non-food crops, non-crop plants or in vitro plant cultures as production platforms for biopharming. Such platforms already under development range from outdoor-grown Nicotiana spp. to glasshouse-grown Arabidopsis, lotus and moss. Amongst the more effective methods for biocontainment are the plastid expression of transgenes, inducible and transient expression systems, and physical containment of plants or cell cultures. In the current atmosphere of heightened concerns over food safety and biosecurity, the future of biopharming may be largely determined by the extent to which the sector is able to maintain public confidence via a more considered approach to containment and security of its plant production systems.

  3. Corrosion assessment of dry fuel storage containers

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    The structural stability as a function of expected corrosion degradation of 75 dry fuel storage containers located in the 200 Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds was evaluated. These containers include 22 concrete burial containers, 13 55-gal (208-l) drums, and 40 Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) transport/storage casks. All containers are buried beneath at least 48 in. of soil and a heavy plastic tarp with the exception of 35 of the EBR-II casks which are exposed to atmosphere. A literature review revealed that little general corrosion is expected and pitting corrosion of the carbon steel used as the exterior shell for all containers (with the exception of the concrete containers) will occur at a maximum rate of 3.5 mil/yr. Penetration from pitting of the exterior shell of the 208-l drums and EBR-II casks is calculated to occur after 18 and 71 years of burial, respectively. The internal construction beneath the shell would be expected to preclude containment breach, however, for the drums and casks. The estimates for structural failure of the external shells, large-scale shell deterioration due to corrosion, are considerably longer, 39 and 150 years respectively for the drums and casks. The concrete burial containers are expected to withstand a service life of 50 years.

  4. Atmospheric anthropic impacts tracked by the French atmospheric mobile observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, J.; Chazette, P.; Flamant, P. H.

    2009-04-01

    A new ATmospheric Mobile ObServatory, so called "ATMOS", has been developed by the LiMAG "Lidar, Meteorology and Geophysics" team of the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) in France, in order to contribute to international field campaigns for studying atmospheric physico-chemistry, air quality and climate (i.e. aerosols, clouds, trace gazes, atmospheric dynamics and energy budget) and the ground-based validation of satellite observations. ATMOS has been deployed in the framework of i) LISAIR, for monitoring air quality in Paris in 2005, ii) AMMA "African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis", in Tamanrasset and in Niamey for observing the aerosols and the atmospheric boundary layer in the Sahara and in the Sahel in 2006, iii) COPS "Convectively and Orographycally driven Precipitation Study" in the Rhin Valley in 2007 and iv) the validation of the spatial mission CALIPSO, launched in April 2006. In the coming years, ATMOS will be deployed i) in the Paris Megacity, in the framework of MEGAPOLI (2009-2010), ii) in southern France (near Marseille) for the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment CHARMEX (2011-2012) and iii) the validation of ADM-Aeolus in 2010-2011 and Earth-Care in 2012. ATMOS payload is modular, accounting for the different platforms, instruments and measuring techniques. The deployment of ATMOS is an essential contribution to field campaigns, complementing the fixed sites, and a potential alternative of airborne platforms, heavier and more expensive. ATMOS mobile payload comprises both the remote sensing platform MOBILIS ("Moyens mOBIles de téLédetection de l'IPSL") and the in-situ physico-chemical station SAMMO ("Station Aérosols et chiMie MObile"). MOBILIS is an autonomous and high-performance system constituted by a full set of active and passive remote sensing instrumentation (i.e. Lidars and radiometers), whose payload may be adapted for either i) long term fixed monitoring in a maritime container or a shelter, ii) ground-based transect

  5. Atmospheric Laser Communication.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer(, Kenneth W.; Witiw, Michael R.; Baars+, Jeffrey A.; Oke, T. R.

    2004-05-01

    Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly through the atmosphere via laser beams over paths from a few meters to 4 km or longer. FSL uses lasers in the near-infrared spectrum, typically at wavelengths of 850 or 1550 nm. Given these wavelengths, atmospheric attenuation must be considered, and an adequate margin of optical power (dB) must exist to support high system availability (the percentage of time that an FSL link is in operation, typically 99.9%). A visual range of 100 m can attenuate a laser beam at a rate of nearly 130 dB km-1. For short links (< 1200 m), fog and low clouds are the primary concerns. For longer links, scintillation, heavy rain, and snow frequently become issues. To address these issues, long-term climate data are analyzed to determine the frequency of occurrence of low visibilities and low-cloud ceilings. To estimate availability at a site of interest, adjustments to airport climate data are made to accommodate differences in altitude, geography, and the effects of the urban heat island. In sum, communication via FSL is a feasible alternative to fiber optic cable when atmospheric conditions are considered and properly analyzed.(Current affiliation: The Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington+Current affiliation: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

  6. LIMITS ON QUAOAR'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Gwyn, Stephen; Kavelaars, J. J.; Trujillo, Chad; Stephens, Andrew W.; Gimeno, German

    2013-09-10

    Here we present high cadence photometry taken by the Acquisition Camera on Gemini South, of a close passage by the {approx}540 km radius Kuiper belt object, (50000) Quaoar, of a r' = 20.2 background star. Observations before and after the event show that the apparent impact parameter of the event was 0.''019 {+-} 0.''004, corresponding to a close approach of 580 {+-} 120 km to the center of Quaoar. No signatures of occultation by either Quaoar's limb or its potential atmosphere are detectable in the relative photometry of Quaoar and the target star, which were unresolved during closest approach. From this photometry we are able to put constraints on any potential atmosphere Quaoar might have. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo and likelihood approach, we place pressure upper limits on sublimation supported, isothermal atmospheres of pure N{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4}. For N{sub 2} and CO, the upper limit surface pressures are 1 and 0.7 {mu}bar, respectively. The surface temperature required for such low sublimation pressures is {approx}33 K, much lower than Quaoar's mean temperature of {approx}44 K measured by others. We conclude that Quaoar cannot have an isothermal N{sub 2} or CO atmosphere. We cannot eliminate the possibility of a CH{sub 4} atmosphere, but place upper surface pressure and mean temperature limits of {approx}138 nbar and {approx}44 K, respectively.

  7. THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert E.

    2010-06-20

    Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

  8. Fundamentals of Atmospheric Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-02-01

    This textbook fills a gap in the literature for teaching material suitable for students of atmospheric science and courses on atmospheric radiation. It covers the fundamentals of emission, absorption, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation from ultraviolet to infrared and beyond. Much of the book applies to planetary atmosphere. The authors are physicists and teach at the largest meteorology department of the US at Penn State. Craig T. Bohren has taught the atmospheric radiation course there for the past 20 years with no book. Eugene Clothiaux has taken over and added to the course notes. Problems given in the text come from students, colleagues, and correspondents. The design of the figures especially for this book is meant to ease comprehension. Discussions have a graded approach with a thorough treatment of subjects, such as single scattering by particles, at different levels of complexity. The discussion of the multiple scattering theory begins with piles of plates. This simple theory introduces concepts in more advanced theories, i.e. optical thickness, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter. The more complicated theory, the two-stream theory, then takes the reader beyond the pile-of-plates theory. Ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of atmospheric science.

  9. Atmospheric planetary wave response to external forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, D. E.; Reiter, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The tools of observational analysis, complex general circulation modeling, and simpler modeling approaches were combined in order to attack problems on the largest spatial scales of the earth's atmosphere. Two different models were developed and applied. The first is a two level, global spectral model which was designed primarily to test the effects of north-south sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) gradients between the equatorial and midlatitude north Pacific. The model is nonlinear, contains both radiation and a moisture budget with associated precipitation and surface evaporation, and utilizes a linear balance dynamical framework. Supporting observational analysis of atmospheric planetary waves is briefly summarized. More extensive general circulation models have also been used to consider the problem of the atmosphere's response, especially in the horizontal propagation of planetary scale waves, to SSTA.

  10. Evolution of the atmosphere and oceans.

    PubMed

    Holland, H D; Lazar, B; McCaffrey, M

    1986-03-01

    The residence times of most constituents of the atmosphere and oceans are small fractions of the age of the Earth and, in general, their rate of output has been nearly equal to their rate of input. We are disturbing a number of these dynamic equilibria quite severely. The mineralogy of marine evaporites rules out drastic changes in the composition of sea water during the last 900 Myr. The chemistry of soils formed more than 1,000 Myr ago suggests that the atmosphere then contained significantly more CO2 and less O2 than at present. Hydrogen peroxide may well have been the principal oxidant and formaldehyde the main reductant in rain water between 3,000 and 1,000 Myr ago. Major changes in atmospheric chemistry since that time are almost certainly related to the evolution of the biosphere.

  11. Evolution of the atmosphere and oceans.

    PubMed

    Holland, H D; Lazar, B; McCaffrey, M

    1986-03-01

    The residence times of most constituents of the atmosphere and oceans are small fractions of the age of the Earth and, in general, their rate of output has been nearly equal to their rate of input. We are disturbing a number of these dynamic equilibria quite severely. The mineralogy of marine evaporites rules out drastic changes in the composition of sea water during the last 900 Myr. The chemistry of soils formed more than 1,000 Myr ago suggests that the atmosphere then contained significantly more CO2 and less O2 than at present. Hydrogen peroxide may well have been the principal oxidant and formaldehyde the main reductant in rain water between 3,000 and 1,000 Myr ago. Major changes in atmospheric chemistry since that time are almost certainly related to the evolution of the biosphere. PMID:11540871

  12. A reduced atmosphere for early Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    One-dimensional, radiative-convective climate calculations indicate that the old model of a warm, dense, CO2 atmosphere on early Mars is no longer viable. The magnitude of the greenhouse effect in a CO2/H2O atmosphere is limited by condensation of CO2 clouds; this phenomenon is not important for Mars today, but has a pronounced cooling effect at the low solar luminosities thought to apply during early solar system history. The failure of this model indicates one of four things: (1) the new climate calculations are incorrect; (2) current solar evolution models are incorrect; (3) the idea that early Mars was warm and wet is incorrect; or (4) the atmosphere of early Mars contained other greenhouse gases (or particles) in addition to CO2 and H2O. Of these explanations, the most plausible is number (4) and the rest of the investigation is a further explanation of number (4).

  13. Experimental evaluation of atmospheric aerosol turbidity in different Atlantic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Plakhina, I.N.; Pyrogov, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The statistical estimation of the experimental values of atmospheric turbidity are considered over the different Atlantic regions: from clean atmospheric conditions to very turbid conditions influenced by air masses from Africa containing continental Sahara aerosol. The factors influencing the variability of atmospheric turbidity are also analyzed. The contribution of aerosol to atmospheric attenuation of the direct solar radiation is estimated. It is shown that aerosol is the main factor determining the values of the optical thickness and its variability. The single scattering albedo is evaluated. The influence of the Sahara dust on the total solar radiation over the ocean surface is estimated. Based on the found relationship between aerosol optical thickness, total atmosphere, and aerosol turbidity in the surface layer, the height of the homogeneous atmosphere has been estimated. In addition, the aerosol generation by ocean surface in storm conditions has been considered.

  14. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.

    2015-10-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics and circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress, while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  15. Atmospheric Pseudohalogen Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, David John

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is not usually considered in atmospheric chemical models. The paper presents three reasons why hydrogen cyanide is likely to be significant for atmospheric chemistry. Firstly, HCN is a product and marker of biomass burning. Secondly, it is also likely that lightning is producing HCN, and as HCN is sparingly soluble it could be a useful long-lived "smoking gun" marker of lightning activity. Thirdly, the chemical decomposition of HCN leads to the production of small amounts of the cyanide (CN) and NCO radicals. The NCO radical can be photolyzed in the visible portion of the spectrum yielding nitrogen atoms (N). The production of nitrogen atoms is significant as it leads to the titration of total nitrogen from the atmosphere via N+N->N2, where N2 is molecular nitrogen.

  16. Portable containment sleever apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rea, Michael J.; Brown, Roger A.

    2000-01-01

    A sleever apparatus includes an inner member with a central passage through which an item to be sleeved is passed. An outer member surrounds the inner member and defines a space between the members for holding a supply of containment material, which is preferably plastic sleeving. The apparatus has a handle which allows a user to hold the apparatus and walk the apparatus along the length of the item to be sleeved. As the user passes the item through the sleever apparatus, the containment material exits through a slit at one end of the apparatus in order to contain the item. The sleever apparatus may be formed of disposable materials, such as cardboard, and may be intended for a single use application. Alternatively, the sleever apparatus may be comprised of more permanent materials such as PVC or fiberglass. The sleever apparatus may include a serrated end for cutting the containment material and may include appropriate tubing and valves for either directing an inert gas into the containment material around the item or for withdrawing air from within the containment material in order to create a vacuum. In one embodiment, the sleever apparatus has a cartridge that can be replaced with another cartridge once the supply of the containment material has been depleted.

  17. Dreaming of Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Radiative transfer retrievals have become the standard in modelling of exoplanetary transmission and emission spectra. Analysing currently available observations of exoplanetary atmospheres often invoke large and correlated parameter spaces that can be difficult to map or constrain.To address these issues, we have developed the Tau-REx (tau-retrieval of exoplanets) retrieval and the RobERt spectral recognition algorithms. Tau-REx is a bayesian atmospheric retrieval framework using Nested Sampling and cluster computing to fully map these large correlated parameter spaces. Nonetheless, data volumes can become prohibitively large and we must often select a subset of potential molecular/atomic absorbers in an atmosphere.In the era of open-source, automated and self-sufficient retrieval algorithms, such manual input should be avoided. User dependent input could, in worst case scenarios, lead to incomplete models and biases in the retrieval. The RobERt algorithm is build to address these issues. RobERt is a deep belief neural (DBN) networks trained to accurately recognise molecular signatures for a wide range of planets, atmospheric thermal profiles and compositions. Using these deep neural networks, we work towards retrieval algorithms that themselves understand the nature of the observed spectra, are able to learn from current and past data and make sensible qualitative preselections of atmospheric opacities to be used for the quantitative stage of the retrieval process.In this talk I will discuss how neural networks and Bayesian Nested Sampling can be used to solve highly degenerate spectral retrieval problems and what 'dreaming' neural networks can tell us about atmospheric characteristics.

  18. Photochemistry of Pluto's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    1999-01-01

    This work include studies of two problems: (1) Modeling thermal balance, structure. and escape processes in Pluto's upper atmosphere. This study has been completed in full. A new method, of analytic solution for the equation of hydrodynamic flow from in atmosphere been developed. It was found that the ultraviolet absorption by methane which was previously ignored is even more important in Pluto's thermal balance than the extreme ultraviolet absorption by nitrogen. Two basic models of the lower atmosphere have been suggested, with a tropopause and a planetary surface at the bottom of the stellar occultation lightcurve, respectively, Vertical profiles, of temperature, density, gas velocity, and the CH4 mixing ratio have been calculated for these two models at low, mean, and high solar activity (six models). We prove that Pluto' " s atmosphere is restricted to 3060-4500 km, which makes possible a close flyby of future spacecraft. Implication for Pluto's evolution have also been discussed. and (2) Modeling of Pluto's photochemistry. Based on the results of (1), we have made some changes in the basic continuity equation and in the boundary conditions which reflect a unique can of hydrodynamic escape and therefore have not been used in modeling of other planetary atmospheres. We model photochemistry of 44 neutral and 23 ion species. This work required solution of a set of 67 second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Two models have been developed. Each model consists of the vertical profiles for 67 species, their escape and precipitation rates. These models predict the chemical structure and basic chemical processes in the current atmosphere and possible implication of these processes for evolution. This study has also been completed in full.

  19. Atmospheric correction of satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmirko, Konstantin; Bobrikov, Alexey; Pavlov, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    Atmosphere responses for more than 90% of all radiation measured by satellite. Due to this, atmospheric correction plays an important role in separating water leaving radiance from the signal, evaluating concentration of various water pigments (chlorophyll-A, DOM, CDOM, etc). The elimination of atmospheric intrinsic radiance from remote sensing signal referred to as atmospheric correction.

  20. Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrum, A. W.

    1989-01-01

    GRAM series of four-dimensional atmospheric model validated by years of data. GRAM program, still available. More current are Gram 86, which includes atmospheric data from 1986 and runs on DEC VAX, and GRAM 88, which runs on IBM 3084. Program generates altitude profiles of atmospheric parameters along any simulated trajectory through atmosphere, and also useful for global circulation and diffusion studies.

  1. OBOE containment prospectus

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, N R

    1999-11-19

    The OBOE series of experiments presents a new fielding concept for LLNL subcritical experiments. An experimental alcove will be reused for many different experiments. Each individual experiment will be conducted within a steel experimental vessel. After each experiment, the vessel will be moved to the back of the alcove and entombed in grout. The alcove is designed with sufficient space to entomb 12 experiment vessels. Each experiment in the OBOE series of experiments is composed of one experimental package. Each experimental package will have high explosive (HE) and special nuclear material (SNM) in a subcritical assembly. Each experimental package will be placed in a steel experimental vessel within the OBOE zero-room. Each experiment will be detonated inside its experimental vessel in the OBOE zero-room that is formed by a steel and concrete barrier at the entrance to the U1a.102C drift. The containment plan for the OBOE series of experiments utilizes a two containment vessel concept. The first containment vessel is formed by the primary containment barrier that seals the U1a.102C drift. The second containment vessel is formed by the secondary containment barrier in the U1a.100 drift. While it is likely that the experiment vessel will contain the SNM from an experiment, the containment plan for the OBOE series only assumes that the steel experiment vessel provides shock mitigation and is a heat sink for the heat produced by the detonation of the HE. It is possible that one or more of the experimental vessels may seep SNM in the zero-room from a failure of a seal on the vessel. We are presenting a containment plan for the entire series of OBOE experiments. At this time, we do not know exactly how many experiments will actually be conducted in the OBOE series. However, we do know that the maximum number of experiments in the OBOE series is 12. After the final experiment in the OBOE series, a larger experiment will be conducted in the U1a.102C alcove. This

  2. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  3. Comets, meteorites and atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Owen, T; Bar-Nun, A

    1996-01-01

    The relatively low value of Xe/Kr in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars seems to rule out meteorites as the major carriers of noble gases to the inner planets. Laboratory experiments on the trapping of gases in ice forming at low temperatures suggest that comets may be a better choice. It is then possible to develop a model for the origin of inner planet atmospheres based on volatiles delivered by comets added to volatiles originally trapped in planetary rocks. The model will be tested by results from the Galileo Entry Probe.

  4. Global atmospheric changes.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1991-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the processes that are responsible for the greenhouse effect, air pollution, acid deposition, and increased exposure to UV radiation. PMID:1820255

  5. Global atmospheric changes.

    PubMed

    Piver, W T

    1991-12-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the processes that are responsible for the greenhouse effect, air pollution, acid deposition, and increased exposure to UV radiation.

  6. Searching for Charon's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, J.; Stern, A.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Gladstone, R.; Parker, J. W.; Steffl, A.; Schindhelm, E.; Greathouse, T. K.; Retherford, K. D.; Versteeg, M. H.; Summers, M. E.; Strobel, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    There has been no compelling evidence to date for an atmosphere around Charon. However, New Horizons' successful flyby of the Pluto-Charon system provides orders of magnitude more sensitivity to detection of even a very tenuous Charon atmosphere. In particular, the Alice ultraviolet spectrograph acquired measurements of both reflected sunlight from Charon on approach of the system, as well as observing an occultation of the sun during departure through Charon's shadow. We will present the results from Alice and our analysis of these Charon observations.

  7. Comets, meteorites and atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Bar-Nun, A.

    1996-01-01

    The relatively low value of Xe/Kr in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars seems to rule out meteorites as the major carriers of noble gases to the inner planets. Laboratory experiments on the trapping of gases in ice forming at low temperatures suggest that comets may be a better choice. It is then possible to develop a model for the origin of inner planet atmospheres based on volatiles delivered by comets added to volatiles originally trapped in planetary rocks. The model will be tested by results from the Galileo Entry Probe.

  8. Jupiter's outer atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    The current state of the theory of Jupiter's outer atmosphere is briefly reviewed. The similarities and dissimilarities between the terrestrial and Jovian upper atmospheres are discussed, including the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary magnetic fields. Estimates of Jovian parameters are given, including magnetosphere and auroral zone sizes, ionospheric conductivity, energy inputs, and solar wind parameters at Jupiter. The influence of the large centrifugal force on the cold plasma distribution is considered. The Jovian Van Allen belt is attributed to solar wind particles diffused in toward the planet by dynamo electric fields from ionospheric neutral winds, and the consequences of this theory are indicated.

  9. Evolution of the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    Evolution of Mars' noble gases through two stages of hydrodynamic escape early in planetary history has been proposed previously by the author. In the first evolutionary stage of this earlier model, beginning at a solar age of approximately 50 m.y., fractionating escape of a H2-rich primordial atmosphere containing CO2, N2, and the noble gases in roughly the proportions found in primitive carbonaceous (CI) chondrites is driven by intense extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) leads to a long (approximately 80 m.y.) period of quiescence, followed by an abrupt degassing of remnant H2, CO2, and N2 from the mantle and of solar-composition noble gases lighter than Xe from the planet's volatile-rich accretional core. Degassed H refuels hydrodynamic loss in a waning but still potent solar EUV flux. Atmospheric Xe, Kr, and Ar remaining at the end of this second escape stage, approximately 4.2 G.y. ago, have evolved to their present-day abundances and compositions. Residual Ne continues to be modified by accretion of solar wind gases throughout the later history of the planet. This model does not address a number of processes that now appear germane to Martian atmospheric history. One, gas loss and fractionation by sputtering, has recently been shown to be relevant. Another, atmospheric erosion, appears increasingly important. In the absence then of a plausible mechanism, the model did not consider the possibility of isotopic evolution of noble gases heavier than Ne after the termination of hydrodynamic escape. Subsequent non-thermal loss of N was assumed, in an unspecified way, to account for the elevation of N from the model value of approximately 250 percent at the end of the second escape stage to approximately 620 percent today. Only qualitative attention was paid to the eroding effects of impact on abundances of all atmophilic species prior to the end of heavy bombardment approximately 3.8 G.y. ago. No attempt was made to include precipitation and recycling of carbonates in

  10. Therapeutic potential of atmospheric neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Tatje, Jennifer; Biffi, Katia; Leschi, Delphine; Briançon, Jérome; Marcovici, Céline Lantieri

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive type of primary brain tumour in humans. It has a very poor prognosis despite multi-modality treatments consisting of open craniotomy with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recently, a new treatment has been proposed – Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) – which exploits the interaction between Boron-10 atoms (introduced by vector molecules) and low energy neutrons produced by giant accelerators or nuclear reactors. Methods The objective of the present study is to compute the deposited dose using a natural source of neutrons (atmospheric neutrons). For this purpose, Monte Carlo computer simulations were carried out to estimate the dosimetric effects of a natural source of neutrons in the matter, to establish if atmospheric neutrons interact with vector molecules containing Boron-10. Results The doses produced (an average of 1 μGy in a 1 g tumour) are not sufficient for therapeutic treatment of in situ tumours. However, the non-localised yet specific dosimetric properties of 10B vector molecules could prove interesting for the treatment of micro-metastases or as (neo)adjuvant treatment. On a cellular scale, the deposited dose is approximately 0.5 Gy/neutron impact. Conclusion It has been shown that BNCT may be used with a natural source of neutrons, and may potentially be useful for the treatment of micro-metastases. The atmospheric neutron flux is much lower than that utilized during standard NBCT. However the purpose of the proposed study is not to replace the ordinary NBCT but to test if naturally occurring atmospheric neutrons, considered to be an ionizing pollution at the Earth's surface, can be used in the treatment of a disease such as cancer. To finalize this study, it is necessary to quantify the biological effects of the physically deposited dose, taking into account the characteristics of the incident particles (alpha particle and Lithium

  11. Reference and Standard Atmosphere Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Roberts, Barry C.; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of standard and reference atmosphere models along with the history of their origin and use since the mid 19th century. The first "Standard Atmospheres" were established by international agreement in the 1920's. Later some countries, notably the United States, also developed and published "Standard Atmospheres". The term "Reference Atmospheres" is used to identify atmosphere models for specific geographical locations. Range Reference Atmosphere Models developed first during the 1960's are examples of these descriptions of the atmosphere. This paper discusses the various models, scopes, applications and limitations relative to use in aerospace industry activities.

  12. 46 CFR 154.901 - Atmospheric control within cargo tanks and cargo piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atmospheric control within cargo tanks and cargo piping... BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.901 Atmospheric...

  13. Atmospheric effects on laser beams. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-08-01

    The compilation cites recent research on laser beam transmission through the atmosphere. Studies on molecular attenuation turbulence, thermal blooming atmospheric window flows, atmospheric composition, aerosols, infrared lasers, computerized simulation, and water vapor are included. The effects of attenuation on optical radar, optical communications, and infrared detection are covered. This updated bibliography contains 260 citations, 14 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  14. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  15. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James R.

    2004-06-29

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  16. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    SciTech Connect

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  17. Artificial cloud formation in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Jayaweera, K O; Ohtake, T

    1972-11-01

    An artificial cloud in the cloudless atmosphere at a temperature below 0 degrees C was formed by introducing pellets of Dry Ice into air containing more water vapor than would be present at the saturation point with respect to ice. Such clouds could be utilized to establish radiative equilibrium between ground and air so as to inhibit the cooling of selective arctic surface regions under clear skies.

  18. The relative humidity of Mars' atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    As a general rule, Mars' atmosphere contains as much water vapor as it can hold on a daily basis; it reaches saturation at night, and the vapor appears to be distributed throughout the lowest several kilometers. Interesting exceptions to this occur when there are temperature inversions in the arctic springtime and during dust-storm activity. As contrasted to the northern hemisphere there appears to be no local source of water in the southern temperate and arctic areas.

  19. Atmospheric circulation in a Permian climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Steven; Tost, Holger

    2015-04-01

    At the beginning of the Permian (299-251 mya) the formation of the supercontinent Pangaea that comprised all of the present-day continents was completed. This configuration with a single landmass stretching from North to South Pole provides a special case of land-sea distribution for analysing its effect on climate and atmospheric circulation. This work uses a coupled system to represent Permian climate, including an explicit formulation for meridional heat transport in both atmosphere and ocean. The simulations are done with a topography of the early Late Permian (approx. 262 mya). During the Permian the Earth turned from an icehouse world with preindustrial carbon dioxide concentration to a hothouse world with an atmosphere containing up to ten times as much of carbon dioxide as before. Therefore centurial time-slice experiments with different carbon dioxide concentrations are performed, allowing for adjusted equilibrium climate states. Our simulation results are compared to alternative modelling studies, but also to sedimental and phytogeographic data. Analysing the Permian atmosphere, special interest is given on convectional processes to study atmospheric circulation in comparison with the present-day situation.

  20. Underground nuclear waste containments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1995-11-01

    In the United States, about a hundred million gallons of high-level nuclear waste are stored in underground containments. Basically, these containments are of two different designs: single-shell and double-shell structures. The single-shell structures consist of reinforced concrete cylindrical walls seated on circular mats and enclosed on top with torispherical domes or circular flat roofs. The walls and the basemats are lined with carbon steel. The double-shell structures provide another layer of protection and constitute a completely enclosed steel containment within the single-shell structure leaving an annular space between the two walls. Single-shell containments are of earlier vintage and were built in the period 1945-1965. Double-shell structures were built through the 1960s and 1970s. Experience gained in building and operating the single-shell containments was used in enhancing the design and construction of the double-shell structures. Currently, there are about 250 underground single-shell and double-shell structures containing the high-level waste with an inventory of about 800 million curies. During their service lives, especially in early stages, these structures were subjected to thermal excursions of varying extents; also, they have aged in the chemical environment. Furthermore, in their remaining service lives, the structures may be subjected to loads for which they were not designed, such as larger earthquakes or chemical explosions. As a result, the demonstration of safety of these underground nuclear containments poses a challenge to structural engineers, which increases with time. Regardless of current plans for gradual retrieval of the waste and subsequent solidification for disposal, many of these structures are expected to continue to contain the waste through the next 20-40 years. In order to verify their structural capabilities in fulfilling this mission, several studies were recently performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  1. Container cover closure apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Griesau, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to handling and/or storing hazardous waste materials, such as radioactive materials, and is more specifically directed to loading and/or unloading radioactive material into or out of a container, such as a drum, by remote operation, and more particularly the present invention relates to the remote opening and/or closing of a container secured by a compression ring.

  2. Interpretation and containment.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, L

    2000-02-01

    The author explores two aspects of the analyst's effort to imagine the inner world of his patient and the way that they are manifest in the clinical moment. The first of these is the analyst's recognition and interpretation of his patient's elaborated fantasies. This current of the analyst's imagination is most often evoked by the patient's communication of whole-object transferences, which occurs largely in his verbal associations. The second is the analyst's reception and transformation of his patient's primitive emotional experience, a process that Bion has called containment. This second imaginative current is most often evoked by the patient's communication of part-object transferences, which occurs largely in affect and action. Interpretation and containment both go on at once in clinical work, although one or the other is usually dominant. Attention to the interplay of interpretation and containment in the clinical moment enables us to identify the articulation of whole- and part-object transferences and to integrate ego-psychological and Kleinian frames of reference in clinical work. In addition, the concept of mutual containment opens Kleinian theory to the possibility of a two-person psychology in which the roles of analyst and patient are more symmetrical than they are usually conceived to be within this frame of reference. The author presents two clinical examples to demonstrate the interplay of interpretation and containment. In the first, these processes operate smoothly. In the second, the process of containment is strained but ultimately successful.

  3. Echo 1 container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Echo 1 container: The design of this container was one of the most difficult technical tasks. Hansen writes: 'After several weeks of examining potential solutions to this problem, the Langley engineers narrowed the field of ideas to five. They then built working models of these five container designs, and 12-foot-diameter models of the satellite for simulation studies. With help from Langley's Engineering Service and Mechanical Service divisions, the Echo group built a special 41-foot-diameter spherical vacuum chamber equipped with pressure-proof windows. There the dynamics of opening the container and inflating the satelloon could be studies as the satelloon fell to the bottom of the tank.' 'The container-opening mechanism that eventually resulted from these vacuum tests was surely one of the oddest explosive devices ever contrived. The container was a sphere that opened at its equator into top and bottom hemispheres. the top half fit on the bottom half much like a lid fits snugly atop a kitchen pot. The joint between the two hemispheres, therefore, formed a sliding valve. The halves had to move apart an inch or two before the canister was actually open. It was in this joint between the hemispheres that the charge was placed.' The whole whole system was laced together with fishing line which resulted in many disdainful comments from visiting scientists and engineers but the system worked. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 180.

  4. Overview of atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rote, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Effluents from the transportation system are the major cause of Satellite Power System related atmospheric effects. These effects are discussed and include inadvertent weather modification, air quality degradation, compositional changes in the stratosphere and mesosphere, formation of noctilucent clouds, plasma density changes, airglow enhancements, and changes in composition and dynamics of the plasmasphere and magnetosphere.

  5. Does the Atmosphere Precess?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, R. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The study considers a north-south pair of mid-latitude rings of atmospheric mass, symmetric with respect to the equator, and rotating with respect to the distant stars. The mass and angular velocity are assigned similar to the annual and zonal mean upper level westerlies. Their relatively rapid rotation is assumed to allow a rigid body approximation on long time and space scales. The rings are constrained to move as if rigidly connected to a common axis of rotation. The pair thus constitutes a symmetric top with a fixed pivot point at the center of mass. Analysis of the dynamics follows the classical mechanics approach used for precession of the equinoxes. The theoretical rate of precession for this highly idealized system yields a period on the order of decades. The predicted dynamics appears consistent with three prior studies of observational data: latitudinal movements of atmospheric circulation above far Southern Australia, latitudinal movements of ocean circulation in the Kuroshio Extension, and changes in global Atmospheric Angular Momentum before and after 1976. Each of these observational records indicates correlation with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The theoretical dynamics in combination with the observations suggests the axis of rotation of the atmospheric westerlies is offset from the Earth axis by a few degrees, and further, that this axis precesses around a mean axis on a time scale of a few decades.

  6. Solar Atmosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution honoring Kees de Jager's 80th birthday is a review of "one-dimensional" solar atmosphere modeling that followed on the initial "Utrecht Reference Photosphere" of Heintze, Hubenet & de Jager (1964). My starting point is the Bilderberg conference, convened by de Jager in 1967 at the time when NLTE radiative transfer theory became mature. The resulting Bilderberg model was quickly superseded by the HSRA and later by the VAL-FAL sequence of increasingly sophisticated NLTE continuum-fitting models from Harvard. They became the "standard models" of solar atmosphere physics, but Holweger's relatively simple LTE line-fitting model still persists as a favorite of solar abundance determiners. After a brief model inventory I discuss subsequent work on the major modeling issues (coherency, NLTE, dynamics) listed as to-do items by de Jager in 1968. The present conclusion is that one-dimensional modeling recovers Schwarzschild's (1906) finding that the lower solar atmosphere is grosso modo in radiative equilibrium. This is a boon for applications regarding the solar atmosphere as one-dimensional stellar example - but the real sun, including all the intricate phenomena that now constitute the mainstay of solar physics, is vastly more interesting.

  7. Modeling of Atmosphere Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, James; Kittredge, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    NASA's AES is pioneering new approaches for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. All spacecraft systems must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Here, we show work related to improving system efficiency and reliability for water separation systems on crewed vehicles and the initial development of COMSOL simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project

  8. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  9. Lunar atmospheric composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Apollo 17 carried a miniature mass spectrometer, called the Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment (LACE), to the moon as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) to study the composition and variations in the lunar atmosphere. The instrument was successfully deployed in the Taurus-Littrow Valley with its entrance aperture oriented upward to intercept and measure the downward flux of gases at the lunar surface. During the ten lunations that the LACE operated, it produced a large base of data on the lunar atmosphere, mainly collected at night time. It was found that thermal escape is the most rapid loss mechanism for hydrogen and helium. For heavier gases, photoionization followed by acceleration through the solar wind electric field accounted for most of the loss. The dominant gases on the moosn were argon and helium, and models formed for their distribution are described in detail. It is concluded that most of the helium in the lunar atmosphere is of solar wind origin, and that there also exist very small amounts of methane, ammonia, and carbon dioxide.

  10. Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    2004-01-01

    The NASA supported project 'Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres' has been quite successful in broadening our understanding of the cometary environment. We list peer reviewed publications and conference presentation that have been made as a result of studies performed under this project. Following the list we present details of a selection of the results.

  11. Global Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Carl C.

    1975-01-01

    The global atmospheric monitoring plans of the World Meteorological Organization are detailed. Single and multipurpose basic monitoring systems and the monitoring of chemical properties are discussed. The relationship of the World Meteorological Organization with the United Nations environment program is discussed. A map of the World…

  12. Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Darrach, Muray

    2007-01-01

    Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) identifies gases that are present in minute quantities in the International Space Station (ISS) breathing air that could harm the crew s health. If successful, instruments like VCAM could accompany crewmembers during long-duration exploration missions to the Moon or traveling to Mars.

  13. Electricity in the Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampath, S.; Kumar, V. Sasi

    1991-01-01

    The theory of the atmospheric electric circuit and a discussion of the fair-weather electrical are presented. The ion concentration, mobility, conductivity, and electric field altitudinal profiles are explained. An outline of the electrical processes inside thunderstorms along with a description of the lightning strike are included. (Author)

  14. Atmospheric neutrinos observed in underground detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced when the primary cosmic ray beam hits the atmosphere and initiates atmospheric cascades. Secondary mesons decay and give rise to neutrinos. The neutrino production was calculated and compared with the neutrino fluxes detected in underground detectors. Contained neutrino events are characterized by observation of an interaction within the fiducial volume of the detector when the incoming particle is not observed. Both the neutrino flux and the containment requirement restrict the energy of the neutrinos observed in contained interactions to less than several GeV. Neutrinos interact with the rock surrounding the detector but only muon neutrino interactions can be observed, as the electron energy is dissipated too fast in the rock. The direction of the neutrino is preserved in the interaction and at energies above 1 TeV the angular resolution is restricted by the scattering of the muon in the rock. The muon rate reflects the neutrino spectrum above some threshold energy, determined by the detector efficiency for muons.

  15. Atmospheric pollution in Lisbon urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C.

    2009-04-01

    Lisbon is the capital city of Portugal with about 565,000 residents in 2008 and a population density of 6,600 inhabitants per square kilometre. Like several other major metropolis, the town is surrounded by satellite cities, forming together a region known as "Lisbon Metropolitan Area" with about 3 million inhabitants, a quarter of the overall Portuguese population. Besides their local residents, it is estimated that more than one million citizens come into the Lisbon area every day from the outskirts, leading to elevated traffic densities and intense traffic jams, with important consequences on air pollution levels and obvious negative impacts on human health. Airborne particulate matter limit values are frequently exceeded, making urgent the existence of consistent programs to monitor and help taking measures to control them. Within the Portuguese project PAHLIS (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Contamination in Lisbon Urban Atmosphere) financed by the Portuguese Science Foundation ("Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia"), an aerosol and vapour phase sampling program is being implemented in the city of Lisbon at two selected contrasting zones, namely a typically busy area with intense road traffic and frequent exceedences of the particulate matter standard for the maximum allowable concentration, and a residential quieter area, thus with a cleaner atmosphere characterised as an urban background site. An one month-long sampling campaign was performed during the summer of 2008, where particulate matter was collected in two fractions (coarse 2.5µm

  16. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  17. Comets, impacts, and atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias; Bar-Nun, Akiva

    1994-01-01

    Studies of element abundances and values of D/H in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Titan have emphasized the important role of icy planetesimals in the formation of these bodies. In these atmospheres, C/H and D/H increase as the relative masses of the 'cores' of the planets increase. N/H appears to deviate from this trend in an interesting way. In the inner solar system, the traditional approach of using carbonaceous chondrites as the source of planetary volatiles is in serious trouble because of the depletion of xenon and the unusual pattern of xenon isotopes found in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars, and because of the solar-type abundance ratios of argon, krypton and xenon and the large amounts of neon and argon on Venus. Recent studies of elemental abundances in comets, especially P/Halley, coupled with laboratory studies of the trapping of gas in ice formed at low temperatures by A. Bar-Nun et al. provide a consistent interpretation of all of these results. This interpretation emphasizes the fundamental importance of icy planetesimals (comets) and the randomness of early impacts in the formation of planetary systems. Cometary delivery by itself will not explain the noble gas abundances on the inner planets. There is good evidence for at least one additional source, which presumably consists of the rocky material making up the bulk of the planets. The existence of this rocky reservoir is manifested in the nucleogenic isotopes and in the neon which is found in all these atmospheres and is also present in the Earth's mantle. This neon may well be a relic of the planets' earliest, accretional atmospheres.

  18. A survey of kinetic data of compounds containing flourine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Chlorofluoromethanes may have a significant effect on the level of ozone in the atmosphere. However, the role of fluroine-containing compounds has not been examined fully. A tabulation of a search of the chemical kinetic literature published between 1953 and July 1975, is presented. The data are then evaluated with respect to acceptability and importance to the overall reaction balance in the atmosphere. Possible future research to elucidate important reaction processes is discussed.

  19. Effects of pollutant atmospheres on surface receptors of pulmonary macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.B.; Rao, V.S.; Mannix, R.C.; Phalen, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of two multicomponent pollutant atmospheres on the surface receptors (FcR) and phagocytic activity of rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages have been studied. FcR are crucial for the macrophages to become cytotoxic against target cells. The atmospheres were composed of pollutants that are prevalent in the South Coast Air Basin of southern California. Rats were exposed nose-only to a 7-component oxidant-and sulfate-containing atmosphere for 4 h/d for either 7 or 21 consecutive days. In another experiment rats were exposed 5 h/d for 5 consecutive days to another pollutant combination--acid droplets plus carbon-containing dilute diesel engine exhaust. In both experiments matched rats were exposed nose-only to purified air to be used as controls. Each of the atmospheres studied significantly reduced FcR activity for at least 3 d following the exposure, with the group of rats exposed to the 7-component atmosphere for 21 d exhibiting the most pronounced effect. Macrophages from rats exposed to the diesel exhaust plus acid atmosphere and the 7-component atmosphere for 7 d had significantly reduced phagocytic activity for at least 3 d postexposure, while the macrophages from rats exposed to the latter atmosphere for 21 d had phagocytic activity near control values. The decrease in phagocytosis and inhibition of FcR of macrophages suggests an impairment of macrophage function that probably renders the host vulnerable to bacterial and/or viral infections.

  20. Explosion containment device

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, William B.; Daniel, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an explosives storage container for absorbing and containing the blast, fragments and detonation products from a possible detonation of a contained explosive. The container comprises a layer of distended material having sufficient thickness to convert a portion of the kinetic energy of the explosion into thermal energy therein. A continuous wall of steel sufficiently thick to absorb most of the remaining kinetic energy by stretching and expanding, thereby reducing the momentum of detonation products and high velocity fragments, surrounds the layer of distended material. A crushable layer surrounds the continuous steel wall and accommodates the stretching and expanding thereof, transmitting a moderate load to the outer enclosure. These layers reduce the forces of the explosion and the momentum of the products thereof to zero. The outer enclosure comprises a continuous pressure wall enclosing all of the layers. In one embodiment, detonation of the contained explosive causes the outer enclosure to expand which indicates to a visual observer that a detonation has occurred.

  1. Neutron-Capture Kr-80 and Ar-36 in the Martian Atmosphere and Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L.; McKay, D. S.; Masarik, J.

    2001-01-01

    We calculate that approximately 10% of martian atmospheric Kr-80 formed by neutron capture on Mars in approx. 0.5 Ga. The regolith contains even larger amounts of n-capture Kr-80 and Ar-36, which may provide clues to the evolution of the martian regolith and atmosphere. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. On Detecting Biospheres from Chemical Thermodynamic Disequilibrium in Planetary Atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Bergsman, David S; Catling, David C

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in Solar System atmospheres, in which we quantify the available Gibbs energy: the Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosphere minus that of atmospheric gases reacted to equilibrium. The purely gas phase disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere is mostly attributable to O2 and CH4. The available Gibbs energy is not unusual compared to other Solar System atmospheres and smaller than that of Mars. However, Earth's fluid envelope contains an ocean, allowing gases to react with water and requiring a multiphase calculation with aqueous species. The disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere-ocean system (in joules per mole of atmosphere) ranges from ∼20 to 2 × 10(6) times larger than the disequilibria of other atmospheres in the Solar System, where Mars is second to Earth. Only on Earth is the chemical disequilibrium energy comparable to the thermal energy per mole of atmosphere (excluding comparison to Titan with lakes, where quantification is precluded because the mean lake composition is unknown). Earth's disequilibrium is biogenic, mainly caused by the coexistence of N2, O2, and liquid water instead of more stable nitrate. In comparison, the O2-CH4 disequilibrium is minor, although kinetics requires a large CH4 flux into the atmosphere. We identify abiotic processes that cause disequilibrium in the other atmospheres. Our metric requires minimal assumptions and could potentially be calculated from observations of exoplanet atmospheres. However, further work is needed to establish whether thermodynamic disequilibrium is a practical exoplanet biosignature, requiring an assessment of false positives, noisy

  3. Composition and Detection of Europa's Sputter-Induced Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.; Marconi, M. L.; Smyth, W. H.

    2007-12-01

    Europa has an extremely tenuous atmosphere that appears to be marginally collisional, so that species ejected from the surface with sufficient energy have a high probability of escape. Such an atmosphere is often referred to as a surface boundary-layer atmosphere. That is, as at Mercury, the Moon and Ganymede, the interaction of the ambient gas with the surface determines the composition, local column density, and morphology of the atmosphere. Since gas phase species are often more readily identified both in situ and by remote sensing, Europa's atmosphere is of interest as an extension of Europa's surface. Since Europa is imbedded in the Jovian magnetosphere and is not protected from the solar EUV flux, radiolytic, photolytic and stimulated desorption processes populate the atmosphere with atoms and molecules ejected from Europa's surface. These processes are often lumped together using the words 'sputter-produced' atmosphere. Early laboratory sputtering data by Brown, Lanzerotti and co-workers were used to predict the principal atmospheric component, O2, and its average column density. Since H2 loss accompanies the formation and ejection of O2 from ice and H2 escapes readily, the atmospheric formation process also efficiently populates the Jovian magnetosphere. In fact the extension of Europa's atmosphere as a gas torus gravitationally bound to Jupiter and only perturbed by Europa contains more of Europa's ejected surface material than the gravitationally bound atmosphere. In addition to O2, Na and K have been identified. Here we review the modeling of Europa's sputter produced atmosphere and ionosphere. Our principal interest is in the morphology of the atmosphere and the relationship between the composition and Europa's local surface composition. The possibility of detection by an orbiting spacecraft is considered as is the relevance of such detections to Europa's putative subsurface ocean.

  4. On Detecting Biospheres from Chemical Thermodynamic Disequilibrium in Planetary Atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Bergsman, David S; Catling, David C

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in Solar System atmospheres, in which we quantify the available Gibbs energy: the Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosphere minus that of atmospheric gases reacted to equilibrium. The purely gas phase disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere is mostly attributable to O2 and CH4. The available Gibbs energy is not unusual compared to other Solar System atmospheres and smaller than that of Mars. However, Earth's fluid envelope contains an ocean, allowing gases to react with water and requiring a multiphase calculation with aqueous species. The disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere-ocean system (in joules per mole of atmosphere) ranges from ∼20 to 2 × 10(6) times larger than the disequilibria of other atmospheres in the Solar System, where Mars is second to Earth. Only on Earth is the chemical disequilibrium energy comparable to the thermal energy per mole of atmosphere (excluding comparison to Titan with lakes, where quantification is precluded because the mean lake composition is unknown). Earth's disequilibrium is biogenic, mainly caused by the coexistence of N2, O2, and liquid water instead of more stable nitrate. In comparison, the O2-CH4 disequilibrium is minor, although kinetics requires a large CH4 flux into the atmosphere. We identify abiotic processes that cause disequilibrium in the other atmospheres. Our metric requires minimal assumptions and could potentially be calculated from observations of exoplanet atmospheres. However, further work is needed to establish whether thermodynamic disequilibrium is a practical exoplanet biosignature, requiring an assessment of false positives, noisy

  5. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A container for the storage, shipping and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same which has compactness, which is safe against fracture or accident, and which is reusable. The container consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example, of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and will be retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  6. Silicone-containing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  7. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2004-10-12

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  8. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2005-05-24

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  9. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  10. Primitive Terrestrial Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, Kevin John

    1985-12-01

    A 23.3 year periodicity preserved in a 2500 million year old banded iron-formation is interpreted as reflecting the climatic influence of the lunar nodal tide, the signature of which has been detected in the modern climate. The lunar distance is deduced to have been 52 Earth radii. The influence of the lunar nodal tide is also detected in varves dating to 680 million years B.P. The implied history of Precambrian tidal friction is in excellent agreement with both more recent paleontological evidence and the long -term stability of the lunar orbit. The solar semidiurnal thermal tide was resonant with the natural period of the atmosphere when the day was (TURN)21.3 hours. This took place at the end of the Precambrian. The resonant atmospheric tide would have been large enough (.01 bar at the surface) to have influenced the weather. In contrast to lunar oceanic tides, the gravitational torque on the thermal tide accelerates the Earth's rotation rate; near resonance the opposing torques were comparable, so that the day may have been stabilized near 21.3 hours for much of the Precambrian. A sustained resonance does not conflict with the available evidence. Methane photochemistry in the primitive terrestrial atmosphere is studied using a detailed numerical model. Methane is oxidized cleanly and efficiently provided CO(,2) is more abundant than CH(,4). If CH(,4) and CO(,2) abundances are comparable, a large fraction of the methane present is polymerized, forming alkanes in the troposphere and polyacetylenes and nitriles in the upper atmosphere. Production of HCN from CH(,4) and N(,2) in the anaerobic atmosphere and its subsequent removal in rainwater could have been efficient; net production varying from .01% to 10% of the methane consumed. In the absence of a magnetic field, high ancient solar EUV and X-ray fluxes would have permitted an ocean of hydrogen to escape as a transsonic wind from a primordial accretionary greenhouse atmosphere in as little as 25 million years

  11. Volcanic eruptions: Atmospheric effects. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning gaseous and particulate contributions to the Earth's atmosphere from volcanoes, and the effects these substances have on the climate and the environment. Citations cover case studies of specific volcanic eruptions, detection and measurement of volcanic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, environmental effects on the biota, long and short term climatological effects, paleoclimatology and volcanoes, atmospheric and transport modeling, and solar radiation inhibition. (Contains a minimum of 214 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Papers Presented to the Workshop on the Evolution of the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains papers that have been accepted for the Workshop on the Evolution of the Martian Atmosphere. The abstracts presented in the paper cover such topics as: modeling of the mars atmosphere from early development to present including specific conditions affecting development; studies of various atmospheric gases such as O2, SO2, CO2, NH3, and nitrogen; meteorite impacts and their effects on the atmosphere; and water inventories and cycles.

  13. Material containment enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David O.

    1993-01-01

    An isolation enclosure and a group of isolation enclosures useful when a relatively large containment area is required. The enclosure is in the form of a ring having a section removed so that a technician may enter the center area of the ring. In a preferred embodiment, an access zone is located in the transparent wall of the enclosure and extends around the inner perimeter of the ring so that a technician can insert his hands into the enclosure to reach any point within. The inventive enclosures provide more containment area per unit area of floor space than conventional material isolation enclosures.

  14. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  15. STUDYING ATMOSPHERE-DOMINATED HOT JUPITER KEPLER PHASE CURVES: EVIDENCE THAT INHOMOGENEOUS ATMOSPHERIC REFLECTION IS COMMON

    SciTech Connect

    Shporer, Avi; Hu, Renyu

    2015-10-15

    We identify three Kepler transiting planets, Kepler-7b, Kepler-12b, and Kepler-41b, whose orbital phase-folded light curves are dominated by planetary atmospheric processes including thermal emission and reflected light, while the impact of non-atmospheric (i.e., gravitational) processes, including beaming (Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, is negligible. Therefore, those systems allow a direct view of their atmospheres without being hampered by the approximations used in the inclusion of both atmospheric and non-atmospheric processes when modeling the phase-curve shape. We present here the analysis of Kepler-12b and Kepler-41b atmosphere based on their Kepler phase curve, while the analysis of Kepler-7b was already presented elsewhere. The model we used efficiently computes reflection and thermal emission contributions to the phase curve, including inhomogeneous atmospheric reflection due to longitudinally varying cloud coverage. We confirm Kepler-12b and Kepler-41b show a westward phase shift between the brightest region on the planetary surface and the substellar point, similar to Kepler-7b. We find that reflective clouds located on the west side of the substellar point can explain the phase shift. The existence of inhomogeneous atmospheric reflection in all three of our targets, selected due to their atmosphere-dominated Kepler phase curve, suggests this phenomenon is common. Therefore, it is also likely to be present in planetary phase curves that do not allow a direct view of the planetary atmosphere as they contain additional orbital processes. We discuss the implications of a bright-spot shift on the analysis of phase curves where both atmospheric and gravitational processes appear, including the mass discrepancy seen in some cases between the companion’s mass derived from the beaming and ellipsoidal photometric amplitudes. Finally, we discuss the potential detection of non-transiting but otherwise similar planets, whose mass is too

  16. Monitoring Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, the Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) System is now available commercially from Science and Engineering Services, Inc through a technology transfer license. The MPL System is built to characterize numerous details of the composition and dynamics of the atmosphere, such as atmospheric cloud and aerosol concentration and is suitable for environmental monitoring studies that require full-time, unattended measurements of cloud and aerosol height structure. It is eye safe at all ranges and because of the modest dimensions, can be used where space is limited. The system can also be equipped with a protective climate-controlled enclosure, permitting placement of the system in field operations where adequate shelter may not exist. Studies of climate dynamics, meteorological research, and environmental monitoring are a few of the possible applications.

  17. Atmospheric rendezvous feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaezler, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the feasibility of using atmospheric rendezvous to increase the efficiency of space transportation and to determine the most effective implementation. It is concluded that atmospheric rendezvous is feasible and can be utilized in a space transportation system to reduce size of the orbiter vehicle, provide a powered landing with go-around capability for every mission, and achieve lateral range performance that exceeds requirements. A significantly lighter booster and reduced launch fuel requirements are additional benefits that can be realized with a system that includes a large subsonic airplane for recovery of the orbiter. Additional reduction in booster size is possible if the airplane is designed for recovery of the booster by towing. An airplane about the size of the C-5A is required.

  18. Global atmospheric sampling program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lezberg, E. A.; Perkins, P. J.; Englund, D. R.; Gauntner, D. J.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Automated instruments were installed on a commercial B-747 aircraft, during the program, to obtain baseline data and to monitor key atmospheric constituents associated with emissions of aircraft engines in order to determine if aircraft are contributing to pollution of the upper atmosphere. Data thus acquired on a global basis over the commercial air routes for 5 to 10 years will be analyzed. Ozone measurements in the 29,000 to 45,000 foot altitude were expanded over what has been available from ozonesondes. Limited aerosol composition measurements from filter samples show low levels of sulfates and nitrates in the upper troposphere. Recently installed instruments for measurement of carbon monoxide and condensation nuclei are beginning to return data.

  19. The atmosphere of Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, P. G. J.; Calcutt, S. B.; Taylor, F. W.; McCleese, D. J.

    Mars, one of the most Earth-like of the planets, is today a cold, dry and barren world. However, there is good evidence that it may have been much warmer and wetter in the past and perhaps even supported life. The public interest aroused by these findings and by recent studies of `SNC' meteorites, believed to have come from Mars, with their claims of the evidence of ancient Martian life, has focused attention on the ambitious programme of Mars Exploration currently being undertaken by NASA and ESA and has provided additional impetus. Improved measurements of the conditions on Mars' surface and in its atmosphere are central to both agencies' plans, and current atmospheric missions are reviewed in this paper together with possible future designs.

  20. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOEpatents

    Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

    1987-10-02

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  1. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

  2. Outer atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    The region above the earth from about 90 km to 150 km is a major part of the upper or outer atmosphere. It is relatively unexplored, being too high for balloons or aircraft and too low for persistent orbiting spacecraft. However, the concept of a tethered subsatellite, deployed downward from an orbiting, more massive craft such as the Space Shuttle, opens the possibility of a research capability that could provide global mapping of this region. The need for research in this thick spherical shell above the earth falls into two major categories: (1) scientific data for understanding and modeling the global atmosphere and thereby determining its role in the earth system, and (2) engineering data for the design of future aerospace vehicles that will operate there. This paper presents an overview and synthesis of the currently perceived research needs and the state-of-the-art of the proposed tethered research capability.

  3. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOEpatents

    Griesbach, Otto A.; Stencel, Joseph R.

    1990-01-01

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  4. Atmospheric emission photometric imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1981-01-01

    A dual-channel video system mounted on a stabilized two-axis gimbal system (mounted on the pallet) with associated optics and data handling electronics described the low light flux observations are required for: (1) investigating ionospheric transport processes by observing Mg+ ions; (2) supporting magnetospheric electron bounce experiments; (3) measuring electron cross sections for selected atmospheric species; (4) detecting small particle contamination; and (5) studying natural auroras.

  5. Atmospheres around Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Benz, Willy

    1994-12-01

    Interest in the behavior of atmospheres around neutron stars has grown astronomically in the past few years. Some of this interest arrived in the wake of the explosion of Supernova 1987A and its elusive remnant; spawning renewed interest in a method to insure material ``fall-back'' onto the adolescent neutron star in an effort to transform it into a silent black hole. However, the bulk of the activity with atmospheres around neutron stars is concentrated in stellar models with neutron star, rather than white dwarf, cores; otherwise known as Thorne-Zytkow objects. First a mere seed in the imagination of theorists, Thorne-Zytkow objects have grown into an observational reality with an ever-increasing list of formation scenarios and observational prospects. Unfortunately, the analytic work of Chevalier on supernova fall-back implies that, except for a few cases, the stellar simulations of Thorne-Zytkow objects are missing an important aspect of physics: neutrinos. Neutrino cooling removes the pressure support of these atmospheres, allowing accretion beyond the canonical Eddington rate for these objects. We present here the results of detailed hydrodynamical simulations in one and two dimensions with the additional physical effects of neutrinos, advanced equations of state, and relativity over a range of parameters for our atmosphere including entropy and chemical composition as well as a range in the neutron star size. In agreement with Chevalier, we find, under the current list of formation scenarios, that the creature envisioned by Thorne and Zytkow will not survive the enormous appetite of a neutron star. However, neutrino heating (a physical effect not considered in Chevalier's analysis) can play an important role in creating instabilities in some formation schemes, leading to an expulsion of matter rather than rapid accretion. By placing scrutiny upon the formation methods, we can determine the observational prospects for each.

  6. Earth's earliest atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, Kevin; Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce

    2010-10-01

    Earth is the one known example of an inhabited planet and to current knowledge the likeliest site of the one known origin of life. Here we discuss the origin of Earth's atmosphere and ocean and some of the environmental conditions of the early Earth as they may relate to the origin of life. A key punctuating event in the narrative is the Moon-forming impact, partly because it made Earth for a short time absolutely uninhabitable, and partly because it sets the boundary conditions for Earth's subsequent evolution. If life began on Earth, as opposed to having migrated here, it would have done so after the Moon-forming impact. What took place before the Moon formed determined the bulk properties of the Earth and probably determined the overall compositions and sizes of its atmospheres and oceans. What took place afterward animated these materials. One interesting consequence of the Moon-forming impact is that the mantle is devolatized, so that the volatiles subsequently fell out in a kind of condensation sequence. This ensures that the volatiles were concentrated toward the surface so that, for example, the oceans were likely salty from the start. We also point out that an atmosphere generated by impact degassing would tend to have a composition reflective of the impacting bodies (rather than the mantle), and these are almost without exception strongly reducing and volatile-rich. A consequence is that, although CO- or methane-rich atmospheres are not necessarily stable as steady states, they are quite likely to have existed as long-lived transients, many times. With CO comes abundant chemical energy in a metastable package, and with methane comes hydrogen cyanide and ammonia as important albeit less abundant gases.

  7. Atmospheric optics in art.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, S D

    1991-08-20

    A brief historical overview of the atmospheric optical phenomena that appear in works of fine art is presented. It is shown that artists have recorded many features of the color and brightness of the sky and clouds, aerial perspective and visibility effects, and phenomena, including crepuscular rays, rainbows, halos, and coronas. Artistic biases resulting from prevailing styles and societal influences are noted. Attention is drawn to a number of phenomena recorded by artists that have not yet been explained or modeled.

  8. Shuttle derived atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findlay, John

    1987-01-01

    The shuttle descends along a rather shallow path, thus providing some information on the horizontal structure of the atmosphere. Small scale structures were suggested (shears, potholes). The best estimates of the shuttle drag coefficient and projected areas are used to go from accelerometer data to density through the use of BET's (Best Estimated Trajectories). Data are from the IMU's (Inertial Measurement Unit) and the HiRAP (High Resolution Accelerometer Package).

  9. Atmospheric Science Without Borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Arnico; Praveen, Ps; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Bhave, Prakash; Surapipith, Vanisa; Pradhan, Bidya; Karki, Anita; Ghimire, Shreta; Thapa, Alpha; Shrestha, Sujan

    2016-04-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) in northern South Asia are among the most polluted and most densely populated places in the world, and they are upwind of vulnerable ecosystems in the Himalaya mountains. They are also fragmented across 5 countries between which movement of people, data, instruments and scientific understanding have been very limited. ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative has for the past three years been working on filling data gaps in the region, while facilitating collaborations across borders. It has established several atmospheric observatories at low and mid elevations in Bhutan and Nepal that provide new data on the inflow of pollutants from the IGP towards the mountains, as well as quantify the effects of local emissions on air quality in mountain cities. EGU will be the first international conference where these data will be presented. ICIMOD is in the process of setting up data servers through which data from the region will be shared with scientists and the general public across borders. Meanwhile, to promote cross-border collaboration among scientists in the region, while addressing an atmospheric phenomenon that affects the lives of the several hundred million people, ICIMOD' Atmosphere Initiative has been coordinating an interdisciplinary multi-year study of persistent winter fog over the Indo-Gangetic Plains, with participation by researchers from Pakistan, India, China, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. Using a combination of in-situ measurements and sample collection, remote sensing, modeling and community based research, the researchers are studying how changing moisture availability and air pollution have led to increases in fog frequency and duration, as well as the fog's impacts on local communities and energy demand that may affect air pollution emissions. Preliminary results of the Winter 2015-2016 field campaign will be shown.

  10. Atmospheric prediction model survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellck, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the SEASAT Satellite program of NASA, a survey of representative primitive equation atmospheric prediction models that exist in the world today was written for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Seventeen models developed by eleven different operational and research centers throughout the world are included in the survey. The surveys are tutorial in nature describing the features of the various models in a systematic manner.

  11. Discovering Pluto's atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, J.K.; Killian, A.

    1988-12-01

    Observations of the occultation of an obscure 12th-magnitude star in eastern Virgo by Pluto on June 9, 1988 are discussed. The occultation was observed by astronomers aboard NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory flying over the Pacific. The prediction of the occultation and the results of the observations are examined. The study demonstrated that Pluto has a thin atmosphere and that its diameter is about two-thirds that of the moon.

  12. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Harold N.

    1987-01-01

    Various types of atmospheric turbulence measurements are addressed for the purpose of stimulating discussion relative to available data. An outline of these various types of measurements are discussed. Some specific results of detailed characterization studies made at NASA Langley are emphasized. The most recent reports on statistics of turbulence encounters for various types of aircraft operations are summarized. Special severe encounter studies and reference to remote sensing are also included. Wind shear is considered to be a special topic and is not covered.

  13. SMEAT atmosphere trace contaminants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schornick, J. L.; Heinrich, C. T.; Garcia, G. S., Jr.; Verostko, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The atmosphere trace contaminant analysis support provided for the Skylab Medical Experiments Altitude Test (SMEAT) which was conducted from July 26 through September 20, 1972, at the JSC Crew Systems Division facility is discussed. Sample acquisition techniques and analytical instrumentation methodology utilized for identification and quantification of the trace contaminants are described. Emphasis is placed on the contaminants found, their occurrence patterns, and possible sources.

  14. Atmospheric Disturbance Environment Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tank, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, the application of atmospheric disturbance data to airplane design problems has been the domain of the structures engineer. The primary concern in this case is the design of structural components sufficient to handle transient loads induced by the most severe atmospheric "gusts" that might be encountered. The concern has resulted in a considerable body of high altitude gust acceleration data obtained with VGH recorders (airplane velocity, V, vertical acceleration, G, altitude, H) on high-flying airplanes like the U-2 (Ehernberger and Love, 1975). However, the propulsion system designer is less concerned with the accelerations of the airplane than he is with the airflow entering the system's inlet. When the airplane encounters atmospheric turbulence it responds with transient fluctuations in pitch, yaw, and roll angles. These transients, together with fluctuations in the free-stream temperature and pressure will disrupt the total pressure, temperature, Mach number and angularity of the inlet flow. For the mixed compression inlet, the result is a disturbed throat Mach number and/or shock position, and in extreme cases an inlet unstart can occur (cf. Section 2.1). Interest in the effects of inlet unstart on the vehicle dynamics of large, supersonic airplanes is not new. Results published by NASA in 1962 of wind tunnel studies of the problem were used in support of the United States Supersonic Transport program (SST) (White, at aI, 1963). Such studies continued into the late 1970's. However, in spite of such interest, there never was developed an atmospheric disturbance database for inlet unstart analysis to compare with that available for the structures load analysis. Missing were data for the free-stream temperature and pressure disturbances that also contribute to the unStart problem.

  15. Atmospheric emission photometric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mende, S.B.

    1981-11-01

    A dual-channel video system mounted on a stabilized two-axis gimbal system (mounted on the pallet) with associated optics and data handling electronics is described. Low light flux observations are required for: (1) investigating ionospheric transport processes by observing Mg+ ions (2) supporting magnetospheric electron bounce experiments (3) measuring electron cross sections for selected atmospheric species (4) detecting small particle contamination and (5) studying natural auroras.

  16. Atmospheric optics in art.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, S D

    1991-08-20

    A brief historical overview of the atmospheric optical phenomena that appear in works of fine art is presented. It is shown that artists have recorded many features of the color and brightness of the sky and clouds, aerial perspective and visibility effects, and phenomena, including crepuscular rays, rainbows, halos, and coronas. Artistic biases resulting from prevailing styles and societal influences are noted. Attention is drawn to a number of phenomena recorded by artists that have not yet been explained or modeled. PMID:20706420

  17. Crash resistant container

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Jim D.

    1994-01-01

    A container for hazardous materials capable of protecting the enclosed materials from high speed impact. Energy absorption is provided by a multiplicity of crushable layers of either wire mesh or perforated metal sheets which thin and flow together under impact loading. Layers of a higher tensile strength material are interspersed within the crushable layers to confine them and increase performance.

  18. Crash resistant container

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, J.D.

    1994-08-16

    A container for hazardous materials capable of protecting the enclosed materials from high speed impact is disclosed. Energy absorption is provided by a multiplicity of crushable layers of either wire mesh or perforated metal sheets which thin and flow together under impact loading. Layers of a higher tensile strength material are interspersed within the crushable layers to confine them and increase performance. 1 fig.

  19. WASTE CONTAINMENT OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    BSE waste is derived from diseased animals such as BSE (bovine spongiform encepilopothy, also known as Mad Cow) in cattle and CWD (chronic wasting disease) in deer and elk. Landfilling is examined as a disposal option and this presentation introduces waste containment technology...

  20. Silicone containing solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small amount, for example 1% by weight, of a liquid silicone oil to a metal containing solid rocket propellant provides a significant reduction in heat transfer to the inert nozzle walls. Metal oxide slag collection and blockage of the nozzle are eliminated and the burning rate is increased by about 5% to 10% thus improving ballistic performance.

  1. Polyazomethines containing trifluoromethylbenzene units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Soluble, amorphous, aromatic polyazomethine polymers and copolymers were prepared by reacting a dialdehyde monomer with a diamine monomer containing trifluoromethylbenzene and various combinations thereof in a solvent, such as N,N-dimethylacetamide. The reaction was heated to reflux yielding a polyazomethine which, after cooling to room temperature, was precipitated. These polymers and copolymers may be used to make films, coatings, composites and adhesives.

  2. Polyazomethines containing trifluoromethylbenzene units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Soluble, amorphous, aromatic polyazomethine polymers and copolymers were prepared by reacting a dialdehyde monomer with a diamine monomer containing trifluoromethylbenzene and various combinations thereof in a solvent, such as N,N-dimethylacetamide. The reaction was heated to reflux yielding a polyazomethine which, after cooling to room temperature, was precipitated. These polymers and copolymers may be used to make films, coatings, composites and adhesives.

  3. Herbs Indoors. Container Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Duane

    This package consists of two bilingual instructional booklets for use in helping Indochinese refugees learn basic gardening skills. Included in the package are Cambodian, Vietnamese, and English translations of instructions for raising herbs indoors and Cambodian and English translations of guidelines for container gardening. The herb booklet…

  4. NORBO containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-11-01

    The NORBO event was detonated in hole U8c of Nevada Test Site. A low level radiation was detected in the emplacement hole below the top stemming plug after subsurface collapse. The NORBO containment was considered successful. Maps, measuring methods and emplacement are described.

  5. CEBRERO containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The CEBRERO event was detonated in hole U9cw of the Nevada Test Site. Detonation time was 1:00 PM PST on August 14, 1985. No subsidence was observed. Radiation arrivals were detected to a depth of 145 m in the emplacement hole; however, no radiation was detected at any elevation above that. The CEBRERO event containment was satisfactory.

  6. Dynamics of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1989-01-01

    The overall goal is to illuminate the mechanisms that control weather and climate on the Earth and other planets. Each planet presents its own puzzling behavior - the stability of jets and vortices in Jupiter's otherwise turbulent atmosphere, the superrotation of the Venus atmosphere, the interplay of dust, polar volatiles, and climate change in Mars, the supersonic meteorology of Io, and the counterintuitive equator-to-pole temperature gradients on the outer planets. The data sets are generally those obtained from spacecraft - cloud-tracked winds, radiometrically inferred temperatures, and the results of in situ observations where appropriate. The approach includes both data analysis and modeling, ranging from analytic modeling to time-dependent numerical modeling of atmospheric dynamics. The latter approach involves the use of supercomputers such as the San Diego Cray. Progress is generally made when a model with a small number of free parameters either fits a data set that has a large number of independent observations or applies to several planets at once.

  7. Dreaming of Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, I. P.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we introduce the RobERt (Robotic Exoplanet Recognition) algorithm for the classification of exoplanetary emission spectra. Spectral retrieval of exoplanetary atmospheres frequently requires the preselection of molecular/atomic opacities to be defined by the user. In the era of open-source, automated, and self-sufficient retrieval algorithms, manual input should be avoided. User dependent input could, in worst-case scenarios, lead to incomplete models and biases in the retrieval. The RobERt algorithm is based on deep-belief neural (DBN) networks trained to accurately recognize molecular signatures for a wide range of planets, atmospheric thermal profiles, and compositions. Reconstructions of the learned features, also referred to as the “dreams” of the network, indicate good convergence and an accurate representation of molecular features in the DBN. Using these deep neural networks, we work toward retrieval algorithms that themselves understand the nature of the observed spectra, are able to learn from current and past data, and make sensible qualitative preselections of atmospheric opacities to be used for the quantitative stage of the retrieval process.

  8. NASA CONNECT: Atmospheric Detectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'The Measurement of All Things: Atmospheric Detectives' is the second of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'The Measurement of All Things: Atmospheric Detectives' students will learn how scientists use satellites, lasers, optical detectors, and wavelengths of light to measure the presence of certain gaseous elements, compounds, and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere.

  9. Titan's surface and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2016-05-01

    Since its arrival in late 2004, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn has revealed Titan to be a world that is both strange and familiar. Titan is the only extraterrestrial body known to support standing bodies of stable liquid on its surface and, along with Earth and early Mars, is one of three places in the Solar System known to have had an active hydrologic cycle. With atmospheric pressures of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90-95 K at the surface, methane and ethane condense out of Titan's nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and flow as liquids on the surface. Despite vast differences in environmental conditions and materials from Earth, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle drives climatic and geologic processes which generate landforms that are strikingly similar to their terrestrial counterparts, including vast equatorial dunes, well-organized channel networks that route material through erosional and depositional landscapes, and lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons. These similarities make Titan a natural laboratory for studying the processes that shape terrestrial landscapes and drive climates, probing extreme conditions impossible to recreate in earthbound laboratories. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of atmospheric/surface interactions, such as wind-wave generation or aeolian dune development, provide valuable data to anchor physical models.

  10. Atmospheric Ball Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurden, C. J. V.; Wurden, G. A.

    2008-11-01

    Free-floating atmospheric pressure copper hydroxyl ball plasmas have been studied in air and helium atmospheres, using still and high speed photography (up to 20,000 fps), collimated photodiodes, and spectroscopy. A fine boundary layer between the greenish Cu-OH cloud, and the air, is orange in color. However, when the discharge is initiated into a helium atmosphere, the boundary layer is no longer visible, suggesting that the visible boundary was caused by interactions with oxygen. We have studied scaling of the 10-cm diameter ball plasmas with both the size of the water bucket, and the applied discharge voltage, over the range of 500-5000 volts. When looking at the initial spider-leg breakdown above the water surface, the ratio of H-alpha to H-beta lines suggests a temperature of ˜0.3 eV. This is also consistent with the presence of molecular lines of OH, and perhaps CuOH2 in the rising cloud. The cloud is affected by, but can penetrate through an aluminum window screen mesh.

  11. Does toxicity of aromatic pollutants increase under remote atmospheric conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Kroflič, Ana; Grilc, Miha; Grgić, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds contribute significantly to the budget of atmospheric pollutants and represent considerable hazard to living organisms. However, they are only rarely included into atmospheric models which deviate substantially from field measurements. A powerful experimental-simulation tool for the assessment of the impact of low- and semi-volatile aromatic pollutants on the environment due to their atmospheric aqueous phase aging has been developed and introduced for the first time. The case study herein reveals that remote biotopes might be the most damaged by wet urban guaiacol-containing biomass burning aerosols. It is shown that only after the primary pollutant guaiacol has been consumed, its probably most toxic nitroaromatic product is largely formed. Revising the recent understanding of atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry, which is mostly concerned with the radical nitration mechanisms, the observed phenomenon is mainly attributed to the electrophilic nitrogen-containing reactive species. Here, their intriguing role is closely inspected and discussed from the ecological perspective. PMID:25748923

  12. Electron microscopy of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Fu

    Electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EM/EDS) is a powerful tool for single particle analysis. However, the accuracy with which atmospheric particle compositions can be quantitatively determined by EDS is often hampered by substrate-particle interactions, volatilization losses in the low pressure microscope chamber, electron beam irradiation and use of inaccurate quantitation factors. A pseudo-analytical solution was derived to calculate the temperature rise due to the dissipation of the electron energy on a particle-substrate system. Evaporative mass loss for a spherical cap-shaped sulfuric acid particle resting on a thin film supported by a TEM grid during electron beam impingement has been studied. Measured volatilization rates were found to be in very good agreement with theoretical predictions. The method proposed can also be used to estimate the vapor pressure of a species by measuring the decay of X-ray intensities. Several types of substrates were studied. We found that silver-coated silicon monoxide substrates give carbon detection limits comparable to commercially available substrates. An advantage of these substrates is that the high thermal conductivity of the silver reduces heating due to electron beam impingement. In addition, exposure of sulfuric acid samples to ammonia overnight substantially reduces sulfur loss in the electron beam. Use of size-dependent k-factors determined from particles of known compositions shows promise for improving the accuracy of atmospheric particle compositions measured by EM/EDS. Knowledge accumulated during the course of this thesis has been used to analyze atmospheric particles (Minneapolis, MN) selected by the TDMA and collected by an aerodynamic focusing impactor. 'Less' hygroscopic particles, which do not grow to any measurable extent when humidified to ~90% relative humidity, included chain agglomerates, spheres, flakes, and irregular shapes. Carbon was the predominant element detected in

  13. Self contained, independent, in-vacuum spinner motor

    DOEpatents

    Ayers, Marion J.

    2002-01-01

    An independent, self contained apparatus for operation within a vacuum chamber. A sealed enclosure is located in the chamber. The enclosure contains its own atmosphere independent of the vacuum in the chamber. A motor, power unit, and controls are located entirely within the enclosure. They do not have a direct structural connection outside of the enclosure in any way that would effect the atmosphere within the enclosure. The motor, power unit, and controls drive a spinner plate located outside the enclosure but within the vacuum chamber.

  14. The chemistry of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Present knowledge concerning the chemistry of planetary atmospheres is reviewed along with the theories which attempt to explain observational data. The known gross atmospheric compositions of the terrestrial and giant planets are listed, differences between the atmospheres of earth and Venus are discussed, and the atmospheres of the giant planets are described. The origin and evolution of the atmospheres of earth, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus are outlined, and chemical processes in the atmospheres are examined, particularly cloud formation. The question of organic synthesis and evolution in the reducing atmospheres of the giant planets is considered. It is noted that laboratory work on the individual chemical processes and reactions involved in the evolution of organic compounds in planetary atmospheres, comets, and interstellar space points to the inevitability of organic-compound synthesis in all these situations and to the pervasiveness of organic chemistry throughout the universe.

  15. Upper atmosphere pollution measurements (GASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The environmental effects are discussed of engine effluents of future large fleets of aircraft operating in the stratosphere. Topics discussed include: atmospheric properties, aircraft engine effluents, upper atmospheric measurements, global air sampling, and data reduction and analysis

  16. Atmospheric Visibility Monitoring (AVM) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Tong, Loretta

    1996-01-01

    The program objective is to obtain atmospheric transmission statistics data to support optical communications through: (1) Atmospheric loss in optical communication channel; (2) Joint PDFs for multiple site reception; (3) Statistical modeling; and (4) extrapolate PDFs for other sites.

  17. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  18. Spectroscopic Techniques for Atmospheric Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bililign, Solomon

    2009-07-06

    Several analytical and optical techniques for atmospheric analysis are discussed. Environmental constraints for real world applications are mentioned. Special emphasis is given to the cavity ring Down Spectroscopy as a very sensitive method for atmospheric trace gas detection is described.

  19. First International Conference on Laboratory Research for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Kenneth (Editor); Allen, John E., Jr. (Editor); Stief, Louis J. (Editor); Quillen, Diana T. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Proceedings of the First International Conference on Laboratory Research for Planetary Atmospheres are presented. The covered areas of research include: photon spectroscopy, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, and charged particle interactions. This report contains the 12 invited papers, 27 contributed poster papers, and 5 plenary review papers presented at the conference. A list of attendees and a reprint of the Report of the Subgroup on Strategies for Planetary Atmospheres Exploration (SPASE) are provided in two appendices.

  20. Atmospheric microwave refractivity and refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, E.; Hodge, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric refractivity can be expressed as a function of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, and operating frequency. Based on twenty-year meteorological data, statistics of the atmospheric refractivity were obtained. These statistics were used to estimate the variation of dispersion, attenuation, and refraction effects on microwave and millimeter wave signals propagating along atmospheric paths. Bending angle, elevation angle error, and range error were also developed for an exponentially tapered, spherical atmosphere.

  1. A spectral climatology for atmospheric compensation of hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, John H.; Resmini, Ronald G.

    2016-05-01

    Most Earth observation hyperspectral imagery (HSI) detection and identification algorithms depend critically upon a robust atmospheric compensation capability to correct for the effects of the atmosphere on the radiance signal. Atmospheric compensation methods typically perform optimally when ancillary ground truth data are available, e.g., high fidelity in situ radiometric observations or atmospheric profile measurements. When ground truth is incomplete or not available, additional assumptions must be made to perform the compensation. Meteorological climatologies are available to provide climatological norms for input into the radiative transfer models; however no such climatologies exist for empirical methods. The success of atmospheric compensation methods such as the empirical line method suggests that remotely sensed HSI scenes contain comprehensive sets of atmospheric state information within the spectral data itself. It is argued that large collections of empirically-derived atmospheric coefficients collected over a range of climatic and atmospheric conditions comprise a resource that can be applied to prospective atmospheric compensation problems. A previous study introduced a new climatological approach to atmospheric compensation in which empirically derived spectral information, rather than sensible atmospheric state variables, is the fundamental datum. The current work expands the approach across an experimental archive of 127 airborne HSI datasets spanning nine physical sites to represent varying climatological conditions. The representative atmospheric compensation coefficients are assembled in a scientific database of spectral observations and modeled data. Improvements to the modeling methods used to standardize the coefficients across varying collection and illumination geometries and the resulting comparisons of adjusted coefficients are presented. The climatological database is analyzed to show that common spectral similarity metrics can be used

  2. Infrared spectra of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townes, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The development of high spectral resolution and highly sensitive long infrared wavelength instruments is reported. This instrumentation is used to examine molecular lines in planetary atmospheres in enough detail to obtain new information about these atmospheres. Such information includes (1) pressure and temperature relations in planetary atmospheres, and (2) molecular and isotopic composition.

  3. Venus Atmospheric Maneuverable Platform (VAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidan, R.; Lee, G.; Sokol, D.; Griffin, K.; Bolisay, L.

    2014-05-01

    VAMP is a long lived, semi-buoyant, atmospheric “rover” that deploys in orbit, enters the Venus atmosphere and flies in the Venus atmosphere between 55 and 70 km for up to one year as a platform to address VEXAG goals I.A, I.B, and I.C.

  4. On-Orbit Measurements of the ISS Atmosphere by the Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrach, M. R.; Chutjian, A.; Bornstein, B. J.; Croonquist, A. P.; Garkanian, V.; Haemmerle, V. R.; Hofman, J.; Heinrichs, W. M.; Karmon, D.; Kenny, J.; Kidd, R. D.; Lee, S.; MacAskill, J. A.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Mandrake, L.; Rust, T. M.; Schaefer, R. T.; Thomas, J. L.; Toomarian, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report on trace gas and major atmospheric constituents results obtained by the Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) during operations aboard the International Space Station (ISS). VCAM is an autonomous environmental monitor based on a miniature gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. It was flown to the ISS on shuttle mission STS-131 and commenced operations on 6/10/10. VCAM provides measurements of ppb-to-ppm levels of volatile trace-gas constituents, and of the atmospheric major constituents (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide) in a space vehicle or station. It is designed to operate autonomously and maintenance-free, approximately once per day, with a self-contained gas supply sufficient for a one-year lifetime. VCAM is designed to detect and identify 90% of the target compounds at their 180-day Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration levels.

  5. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  6. Radionuclide Behavior in Containments.

    2000-02-14

    MATADOR analyzes the transport and deposition of radionuclides as vapor or aerosol through Light Water Reactor (LWR) containments during severe accidents and calculates environmental release fractions of radionuclides as a function of time. It is intended for use in system risk studies. The principal output is information on the timing and magnitude of radionuclide releases to the environment as a result of severely degraded core accidents. MATADOR considers the transport of radionuclides through the containmentmore » and their removal by natural deposition and the operation of engineered safety systems such as sprays. Input data on the source term from the primary system, the containment geometry, and thermal-hydraulic conditions are required.« less

  7. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  8. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  9. Fractionated martian atmosphere in the nakhlites?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Michael J.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Owen, Tobias; Musselwhite, Donald S.

    1994-01-01

    Considerable evidence points to a martian origin of the shergottite-nakhlite-chassignite (SNC) meteorites. Noble gas isotopic compositions have been measured in most SNC meteorites. The Xe-129/Xe-132 vs. Kr-84/Xe-132 ratios in Chassigny, most shergottites, and lithology C of EETA 79001 define a linear array. This array is thought to be a mixing line between martian mantle and martian atmosphere. One of the SNC meteorites, Nakhla, contains a leachable component that has an elevated Xe-129/Xe-132 ratio relative to its Kr-84/Xe-132 ratio when compared to this approximately linear array. The leachable component probably consists in part of iddingsite, an alteration product produced by interaction of olivine with aqueous fluid at temperatures lower than 150 C. The elevated Xe isotopic ratio may represent a distinct reservoir in the martian crust or mantle. More plausibly, it is elementally fractionated martian atmosphere. Formation of sediments fractionates the noble gases in the correct direction. The range of sediment/atmosphere fractionation factors is consistent with the elevated Xe-129/Xe-132 component in Nakhla being contained in iddingsite, a low temperature weathering product. The crystallization age of Nakhla is 1.3 Ga. Its low-shock state suggests that it was ejected from near the surface of Mars. As liquid water is required for the formation of iddingsite, these observations provide further evidence for the near surface existence of aqueous fluids on Mars more recently than 1.3 Ga.

  10. Atmospheric rare gases in lunar rock 60015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Leich, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Aliquots of lunar rock 60015 were subjected to various types of exposure and handling designed to produce terrestrial contamination, in order to test the possibility of a terrestrial origin for the terrestrial-like trapped Xe reported for lunar rock samples. Crushing the rock produced up to order-of-magnitude increases in the abundances of Ar, Kr, and Xe relative to the millimeter-sized chips of 60015 previously analyzed. Contrary to expectations for atmospheric contamination, high temperatures (above 1000 C) were necessary to remove about 75% of the trapped Kr and Xe, and the rare-gas elemental abundance ratios differed from those in terrestrial samples believed to have occluded atmospheric gases. It is concluded, on the basis of similar temperature-release profiles and elemental-fractionation patterns, that the trapped Xe observed in all these 60015 analyses is atmospheric contamination. Such a conclusion cannot unequivocally be drawn for other lunar rocks containing terrestrial-like Xe, but the present results demonstrate that arguments based on high extraction temperatures and elemental abundance ratios cannot be useful to rule out rare-gas atmospheric contamination in such samples.

  11. Satellite observation of atmospheric nuclear gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Letaw, J R; Share, G H; Kinzer, R L; Silberberg, R; Chupp, E L; Forrest, D J; Rieger, E

    1989-02-01

    We present a satellite observation of the spectrum of gamma radiation from the Earth's atmosphere in the energy interval from 300 keV to 8.5 MeV. The data were accumulated by the gamma ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission over 3 1/2 years, from 1980 to 1983. The excellent statistical accuracy of the data allows 20 atmospheric line features to be identified. The features are superimposed on a continuum background which is modeled using a power law with index -1.16. Many of these features contain a blend of more than one nuclear line. All of these lines (with the exception of the 511-keV annihilation line) are Doppler broadened. Line energies and intensities are consistent with production by secondary neutrons interacting with atmospheric 14N and 16O. Although we find no evidence for other production mechanisms, we cannot rule out significant contributions from direct excitation or spallation by primary cosmic ray protons. The relative intensities of the observed line features are in fair agreement with theoretical models; however, existing models are limited by the availability of neutron cross sections, especially at high energies. The intensity and spectrum of photons at energies below the 511-keV line, in excess of a power law continuum, can be explained by Compton scattering of the annihilation line photons in traversing an average of approximately 21 g cm-2 of atmosphere.

  12. CORNUCOPIA containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-03-01

    The CORNUCOPIA event was detonated on July 24, 1986. A crater resulted from the event that was 137.5 m in diameter and a maximum depth of 16.9 m. No radiation was detected above the ground surface and containment was satisfactory. This report describes measuring methods utilized, maps indicating the location of the event, and a discussion, with data, concerning the collapse progression.

  13. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOEpatents

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  14. Concrete containment aging study

    SciTech Connect

    Pachner, J.; Tai, T.M.; Naus, D.

    1994-04-01

    In 1989, IAEA initiated a pilot study on the management of aging of nuclear power plant components. The Phase I and II studies of concrete containment are discussed. With the data base, plant owners will be able to review and enhance their existing programs. IAEA will analyze data provided by participating plants and the report is scheduled to be released by late 1994 (final report release mid-1995).

  15. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 Version: Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) presents the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 (Mars-GRAM 2010) and its new features. Mars-GRAM is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Additionally, this TM includes instructions on obtaining the Mars-GRAM source code and data files as well as running Mars-GRAM. It also contains sample Mars-GRAM input and output files and an example of how to incorporate Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  16. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution ( MAVEN) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Lin, R. P.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Mitchell, D. F.; Beutelschies, G.; Priser, T.; Acuna, M.; Andersson, L.; Baird, D.; Baker, D.; Bartlett, R.; Benna, M.; Bougher, S.; Brain, D.; Carson, D.; Cauffman, S.; Chamberlin, P.; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Cheatom, O.; Clarke, J.; Connerney, J.; Cravens, T.; Curtis, D.; Delory, G.; Demcak, S.; DeWolfe, A.; Eparvier, F.; Ergun, R.; Eriksson, A.; Espley, J.; Fang, X.; Folta, D.; Fox, J.; Gomez-Rosa, C.; Habenicht, S.; Halekas, J.; Holsclaw, G.; Houghton, M.; Howard, R.; Jarosz, M.; Jedrich, N.; Johnson, M.; Kasprzak, W.; Kelley, M.; King, T.; Lankton, M.; Larson, D.; Leblanc, F.; Lefevre, F.; Lillis, R.; Mahaffy, P.; Mazelle, C.; McClintock, W.; McFadden, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Montmessin, F.; Morrissey, J.; Peterson, W.; Possel, W.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Schneider, N.; Sidney, W.; Sparacino, S.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Tolson, R.; Toublanc, D.; Waters, C.; Woods, T.; Yelle, R.; Zurek, R.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN spacecraft launched in November 2013, arrived at Mars in September 2014, and completed commissioning and began its one-Earth-year primary science mission in November 2014. The orbiter's science objectives are to explore the interactions of the Sun and the solar wind with the Mars magnetosphere and upper atmosphere, to determine the structure of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere and the processes controlling it, to determine the escape rates from the upper atmosphere to space at the present epoch, and to measure properties that allow us to extrapolate these escape rates into the past to determine the total loss of atmospheric gas to space through time. These results will allow us to determine the importance of loss to space in changing the Mars climate and atmosphere through time, thereby providing important boundary conditions on the history of the habitability of Mars. The MAVEN spacecraft contains eight science instruments (with nine sensors) that measure the energy and particle input from the Sun into the Mars upper atmosphere, the response of the upper atmosphere to that input, and the resulting escape of gas to space. In addition, it contains an Electra relay that will allow it to relay commands and data between spacecraft on the surface and Earth.

  17. Stars with Extended Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2002-12-01

    This Workshop consisted of a full-day meeting of the Working Group "Sterren met Uitgebreide Atmosferen" (SUA, Working Group Stars with Extended Atmospheres), a discussion group founded in 1979 by Kees de Jager, Karel van der Hucht and Pik Sin The. This loose association of astronomers and astronomy students working in the Dutch-speaking part of the Low Countries (The Netherlands and Flanders) organised at regular intervals one-day meetings at the Universities of Utrecht, Leiden, Amsterdam and Brussels. These meetings consisted of the presentation of scientific results by junior as well as senior members of the group, and by discussions between the participants. As such, the SUA meetings became a forum for the exchange of ideas, and for asking questions and advice in an informal atmosphere. Kees de Jager has been chairman of the WG SUA from the beginning in 1979 till today, as the leading source of inspiration. At the occasion of Prof. Kees de Jager's 80th birthday, we decided to collect the presented talks in written form as a Festschrift in honour of this well-respected and much beloved scientist, teacher and friend. The first three papers deal with the personality of Kees de Jager, more specifically with his role as a supervisor and mentor of young researchers and as a catalyst in the research work of his colleagues. And also about his remarkable role in the establishment of astronomy education and research at the University of Brussels. The next presentation is a very detailed review of solar research, a field in which Cees was prominently active for many years. Then follow several papers dealing with stars about which Kees is a true expert: massive stars and extended atmospheres.

  18. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this three year proposal are: (1) to calculate the likely diffusive flux of Ar and He from the interior of Mercury for representative crustal compositions; (2) compute a reasonable estimate of the fractional escape flux of photoions for the likely range of field conditions; and (3) to calculate the capture rate of solar wind ions into the atmosphere. The morphology of the magnetosphere in response to the solar wind and the IMF is the crucial boundary condition for the flux of ions to the surface. We have tackled problem (1) using a multipath diffusion code, and problems (2) and (3) using a combination of MHD and kinetic plasma dynamics.

  19. Variation of workplace atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    The assessment of exposure to airborne contaminants in the workplace requires recognition of the variability of workplace atmospheres. Measurements made to estimate inhalation exposure should be as near to the worker's nose or mouth as feasible. The measurements may be affected by factors such as resuspension of dust from work clothing and other surfaces and steep concentration gradients. The variability introduced by these fluctuating sources will add to the variability associated with the sampling system. It is important to understand the factors which may result in artifacts in exposure assessments and to exercise professional judgement when interpreting measurements of the concentration of airborne contaminants to which a worker is exposed.

  20. Uranus deep atmosphere revealed

    SciTech Connect

    De Pater, I.; Romani, P.N.; Atreya, S.K. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor )

    1989-12-01

    The present examination of the radio spectrum and latitudinal radio brightness temperature variation of Uranus leads to a ejection of thermochemical equilibrium models and the adoption of an atmospheric model characterized by a low ammonia volume-mixing ratio that is uniformly distributed over a wide altitude range. The elemental ratios derivable from this model support the planetary accretion theory of Pollack and Bodenheimer (1989). It is noted that while the equatorial and midlatitude values of Uranian radio brightness temperature are explainable by condensation theories, the polar value can only be accounted for through the invocation of strong, dry air downdrafts. 43 refs.

  1. Atmospheric transformation of diesel emissions.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Barbara; Samy, Shar; McDonald, Jacob D; Seagrave, JeanClare

    2010-04-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that exposing diesel exhaust (DE*) to the atmosphere transforms its composition and toxicity. Our specific aims were (1) to characterize the gas- and particle-phase products of atmospheric transformations of DE under the influence of daylight, ozone (O3), hydroxyl (OH) radicals, and nitrate (NO3) radicals; and (2) to explore the biologic activity of DE before and after the transformations took place. The study was executed with the aid of the EUPHORE (European Photoreactor) outdoor simulation chamber facility in Valencia, Spain. EUPHORE is one of the largest and best-equipped facilities of its kind in the world, allowing investigation of atmospheric transformation processes under realistic ambient conditions (with dilutions in the range of 1:300). DE was generated on-site using a modern light-duty diesel engine and a dynamometer system equipped with a continuous emission-gas analyzer. The engine (a turbocharged, intercooled model with common-rail direct injection) was obtained from the Ford Motor Company. A first series of experiments was carried out in January 2005 (the winter 2005 campaign), a second in May 2005 (the summer 2005 campaign), and a third in May and June 2006 (the summer 2006 campaign). The diesel fuel that was used closely matched the one currently in use in most of the United States (containing 47 ppm sulfur and 15% aromatic compounds). Our experiments examined the effects on the composition of DE aged in the dark with added NO3 radicals and of DE aged in daylight with added OH radicals both with and without added volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to remove excess nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), a NO(x) denuder was devised and used to conduct experiments in realistic low-NO(x) conditions in both summer campaigns. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to determine the particle size and the number and volume concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in the DE. O3, NO(x), and reactive nitrogen oxides (NO

  2. Atmospheric transformation of diesel emissions.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Barbara; Samy, Shar; McDonald, Jacob D; Seagrave, JeanClare

    2010-04-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that exposing diesel exhaust (DE*) to the atmosphere transforms its composition and toxicity. Our specific aims were (1) to characterize the gas- and particle-phase products of atmospheric transformations of DE under the influence of daylight, ozone (O3), hydroxyl (OH) radicals, and nitrate (NO3) radicals; and (2) to explore the biologic activity of DE before and after the transformations took place. The study was executed with the aid of the EUPHORE (European Photoreactor) outdoor simulation chamber facility in Valencia, Spain. EUPHORE is one of the largest and best-equipped facilities of its kind in the world, allowing investigation of atmospheric transformation processes under realistic ambient conditions (with dilutions in the range of 1:300). DE was generated on-site using a modern light-duty diesel engine and a dynamometer system equipped with a continuous emission-gas analyzer. The engine (a turbocharged, intercooled model with common-rail direct injection) was obtained from the Ford Motor Company. A first series of experiments was carried out in January 2005 (the winter 2005 campaign), a second in May 2005 (the summer 2005 campaign), and a third in May and June 2006 (the summer 2006 campaign). The diesel fuel that was used closely matched the one currently in use in most of the United States (containing 47 ppm sulfur and 15% aromatic compounds). Our experiments examined the effects on the composition of DE aged in the dark with added NO3 radicals and of DE aged in daylight with added OH radicals both with and without added volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to remove excess nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), a NO(x) denuder was devised and used to conduct experiments in realistic low-NO(x) conditions in both summer campaigns. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to determine the particle size and the number and volume concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in the DE. O3, NO(x), and reactive nitrogen oxides (NO

  3. Atmospheric mercury—An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, William H.; Munthe, John

    This paper presents a broad overview and synthesis of current knowledge and understanding pertaining to all major aspects of mercury in the atmosphere. The significant physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of this element and its environmentally relebant species encountered in the atmosphere are examined. Atmospheric pathways and processes considered herein include anthropogenic as well as natural sources of Hg emissions to the atmosphere, aerial transport and dispersion (including spatial and temporal variability), atmospheric transformations (both physical and chemical types), wet and dry removal/deposition processes to Earth's surface. In addition, inter-compartmental (air-water/soil/vegetation) transfer and biogeochemical cycling of mercury are considered and discussed. The section on numerical modelling deals with atmospheric transport models as well as process-oriented models. Important gaps in our current knowledge of mercury in the atmospheric environment are identified, and suggestions for future areas of research are offered.

  4. Ocean color determination through a scattering atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements made of the surface level albedo for ocean water containing various concentrations of phytoplankton indicate a strong correlation between wavelength dependent albedo ratios and phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration. To sense surface level albedo ratios from space platforms it is necessary to correct for the scattering and absorption properties of the atmosphere for the wavelengths in question. Atmospheric scattering models were constructed to calculate corrections at two wavelengths, 0.46 and 0.54 millimicrons. Assuming a natural background uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth of 0.1, it is found that the chlorophyll concentration may be determined to within one standard deviation of from 0.5 to 2.5 milligrams per cubic meter. By remotely sensing the aerosol optical depth to a greater accuracy it appears feasible to detect chlorophyll concentrations to uncertainty approaching 0.1 milligram per cubic meter.

  5. Atmospheric aerosols as prebiotic chemical reactors

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Christopher M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Tuck, Adrian F.; Vaida, Veronica

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have recently been found to contain a large number of chemical elements and a high content of organic material. The latter property is explicable by an inverted micelle model. The aerosol sizes with significant atmospheric lifetimes are the same as those of single-celled organisms, and they are predicted by the interplay of aerodynamic drag, surface tension, and gravity. We propose that large populations of such aerosols could have afforded an environment, by means of their ability to concentrate molecules in a wide variety of physical conditions, for key chemical transformations in the prebiotic world. We also suggest that aerosols could have been precursors to life, since it is generally agreed that the common ancestor of terrestrial life was a single-celled organism. The early steps in some of these initial transformations should be accessible to experimental investigation. PMID:11035775

  6. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in an atmosphere with a specific form of temperature profile has been investigated by analytical means. The temperature profile used is representative of an actual atmospheric profile and contains three free parameters. Both lapse and inversion cases have been considered. Although ray solution have been considered the primary emphasis has been on solutions of the acoustic wave equation with point force where the sound speed varies with height above the ground corresponding to the assumed temperature profile. The method used to obtain the solution of the wave equation is based on Hankel transformation of the wave equation, approximate solution of the transformed equation for wavelength small compared to the scale of the temperature (or sound speed) profile, and approximate or numerical inversion of the Hankel transformed solution. The solution displays the characteristics found in experimental data but extensive comparison between the models and experimental data has not been carried out.

  7. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in an atmosphere with a specific form of a temperature profile has been investigated by analytical means. The temperature profile used is representative of an actual atmospheric profile and contains three free parameters. Both lapse and inversion cases have been considered. Although ray solutions have been considered, the primary emphasis has been on solutions of the acoustic wave equation with point source where the sound speed varies with height above the ground corresponding to the assumed temperature profile. The method used to obtain the solution of the wave equation is based on Hankel transformation of the wave equation, approximate solution of the transformed equation for wavelength small compared to the scale of the temperature (or sound speed) profile, and approximate or numerical inversion of the Hankel transformed solution. The solution displays the characteristics found in experimental data but extensive comparison between the models and experimental data has not been carried out.

  8. Atmospheric aerosols as prebiotic chemical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Christopher M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Tuck, Adrian F.; Vaida, Veronica

    2000-10-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have recently been found to contain a large number of chemical elements and a high content of organic material. The latter property is explicable by an inverted micelle model. The aerosol sizes with significant atmospheric lifetimes are the same as those of single-celled organisms, and they are predicted by the interplay of aerodynamic drag, surface tension, and gravity. We propose that large populations of such aerosols could have afforded an environment, by means of their ability to concentrate molecules in a wide variety of physical conditions, for key chemical transformations in the prebiotic world. We also suggest that aerosols could have been precursors to life, since it is generally agreed that the common ancestor of terrestrial life was a single-celled organism. The early steps in some of these initial transformations should be accessible to experimental investigation.

  9. Polar nephelometer for atmospheric particulate studies.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M Z; Evans, W H

    1980-10-01

    A unique polar nephelometer was designed and constructed for the measurement of atmospheric particulate characteristics. The nephelometer produces visible light from a self-contained laser to irradiate an air sample drawn into the instrument. The light scattered from the particulates and molecules in the sample is detected as a function of scattering angle for each of four different incident light polarizations. These measurements are used to determine the particulate scattering matrix which is a function of the size, shape, and index of refraction of the particles. The region of sensitivity for the measurements corresponds to the size range of particles that strongly affects visible radiative transfer in the atmosphere, which is the primary application for the derived information. PMID:20234624

  10. U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Part 1 gives the basis for computation of the main tables of atmospheric properties, including values of physical constants, conversion factors, and definitions of derived properties, including values of physical constants, conversion factors, and definitions of derived properties. Part 2 describes the model and data used up to 85 km, in the first section; and the model and data used above 85 km in the second section. The theoretical basis of the high altitude model is given in an appendix. Part 3 contains information on minor constituents in the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. The main tables of atmospheric properties to 1000 km are given in Part 4. The international system of metric units is used.

  11. Deposited atmospheric chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, W.R.

    1986-09-01

    A mountaintop bog in western Pennsylvania serves as a reservoir for materials deposited from the atmosphere. Biological activity in the bog decomposes plant matter, which becomes humified and mineralized at increasing depths. Little or no mixing of elements occurs below the active root zone. Radionuclides produced by natural means and by nuclear weapons have been used to measure the ages of the layers deposited during the growing season of each year. The upper layers of the bog indicate that the deposition of total sulfur is at least 20 times and that of nitrogen is 45 times the value estimated prior to cutting the forest, with a doubling time for each of 25-35 yr. Bromine deposition also doubles every 35 yr. The pattern of mass and element deposition illustrates the changes in land use and industrial effluents that were sources for the material deposited on the bog. The decrease in atmospheric particle removal shows up in the 1960 and later layers. Compared with terrestrial abundances, the relative enrichments over time for chlorine, nitrogen, sulfur, and bromine are more than 100 times those calculated for 1817; lead, calcium, and antimony are 10 to 40 times greater.

  12. The Durban atmospheric LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorgawa, A.; Bencherif, H.; Michaelis, M. M.; Porteneuve, J.; Malinga, S.

    2007-03-01

    A brief description of the Durban atmospheric LIDAR (acronym for light detection and ranging) system for the measurement of vertical temperature profiles is presented. In its original configuration, a 10 Hz-laser was used as the transmitter for the LIDAR. The 10 Hz-laser has now been replaced by a 30 Hz-laser delivering five times more power. Both lasers have been used separately to sample the atmosphere above Durban. A comparative analysis of the backscattered signals obtained separately from each laser shows that the 30 Hz-laser has a much greater stratospheric range. The wavelength emitted for both lasers is 532 nm. A comparison of the average monthly LIDAR temperature profiles has been computed between 20 and 60 km. The LIDAR temperature profiles have been compared with the South African Weather Service (SAWS) radiosonde temperature measurement for the lower stratosphere, between 20 and 27 km. The agreement between the two measurements is good in the lower stratosphere where SAWS radiosondes overlap with LIDAR. A comparison of the LIDAR and SAGE II (stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment) aerosol measurements has also been carried out.

  13. Atmospheric infrared sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkranz, Philip, W.; Staelin, David, H.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of two Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) team members during the first half of 1995. Changes to the microwave first-guess algorithm have separated processing of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) from AMSU-B data so that the different spatial resolutions of the two instruments may eventually be considered. Two-layer cloud simulation data was processed with this algorithm. The retrieved water vapor column densities and liquid water are compared. The information content of AIRS data was applied to AMSU temperature profile retrievals in clear and cloudy atmospheres. The significance of this study for AIRS/AMSU processing lies in the improvement attributable to spatial averaging and in the good results obtained with a very simple algorithm when all of the channels are used. Uncertainty about the availability of either a Microwave Humidity Sensor (MHS) or AMSU-B for EOS has motivated consideration of possible low-cost alternative designs for a microwave humidity sensor. One possible configuration would have two local oscillators (compared to three for MHS) at 118.75 and 183.31 GHz. Retrieval performances of the two instruments were compared in a memorandum titled 'Comparative Analysis of Alternative MHS Configurations', which is attached.

  14. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  15. Cost Containment in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Culyer, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Health care cost containment is not in itself a sensible policy objective, because any assessment of the appropriateness of health care expenditure in aggregate, as of that on specific programs, requires a balancing of costs and benefits at the margin. International data on expenditures can, however, provide indications of the likely impact on costs and expenditures of structural features of health care systems. Data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for both European countries and a wider set are reviewed, and some current policies in Europe that are directed at controlling health care costs are outlined. PMID:10313433

  16. ARMADA containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1996-04-01

    ARMADA was detonated in hole U9cs of Nevada Test Site. Depth of burial was 265 m in the Paintbrush Tuff of area 9, about 400 m above the Paleozoic formation and 310 m above the standing water level. Detonation time was 05:53 PDT on April 22, 1983, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 0.4 hour after detonation. Resulting crater had a mean radius of 72.9 m and a max depth of 7.7 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the ARMADA containment was considered successful.

  17. Metal dusting of nickel-containing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1998-12-31

    Metal dusting is a catastrophic form of carburization which leads to pitting and grooves as the affected metal disintegrates into a mixture of powdery carbon, metallic particles, and possibly oxides and carbides. This high temperature carburization mode is not yet well understood and while relatively infrequent, can be economically disastrous when it does occur in large and complex chemical and petrochemical process streams. References in the literature show that all classes of heat resistant alloys are prone to metal dusting, given the necessary and specific environmental conditions. These same references describe the environments that plague nickel-containing alloys and are used as the basis for postulation on the probable corrosion mechanisms responsible for metal dusting. Using alloy 800 and other nickel-containing alloys and metal dusting atmospheres, an effort is made to examine the steps in the metal dusting process and the temperature ranges over which metal dusting occurs.

  18. Rayleigh scattering in the atmospheres of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišák, J.; Krtička, J.; Munzar, D.; Kubát, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Rayleigh scattering is a result of an interaction of photons with bound electrons. Rayleigh scattering is mostly neglected in calculations of hot star model atmospheres because most of the hydrogen atoms are ionized and the heavier elements have a lower abundance than hydrogen. In atmospheres of some chemically peculiar stars, helium overabundant regions containing singly ionized helium are present and Rayleigh scattering can be a significant opacity source. Aims: We evaluate the contribution of Rayleigh scattering by neutral hydrogen and singly ionized helium in the atmospheres of hot stars with solar composition and in the atmospheres of helium overabundant stars. Methods: We computed several series of model atmospheres using the TLUSTY code and emergent fluxes using the SYNSPEC code. These models describe atmospheres of main sequence B-type stars with different helium abundance. We used an existing grid of models for atmospheres with solar chemical composition and we calculated an additional grid for helium-rich stars with N(He)/N(H) = 10. Results: Rayleigh scattering by neutral hydrogen can be neglected in atmospheres of hot stars, while Rayleigh scattering by singly ionized helium can be a non-negligible opacity source in some hot stars, especially in helium-rich stars.

  19. AP600 containment purge radiological analysis

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, M.; Schulz, J.; Tan, C.

    1995-02-01

    The AP600 Project is a passive pressurized water reactor power plant which is part of the Design Certification and First-of-a-Kind Engineering effort under the Advanced Light Water Reactor program. Included in this process is the design of the containment air filtration system which will be the subject of this paper. We will compare the practice used by previous plants with the AP600 approach to meet the goals of industry standards in sizing the containment air filtration system. The radiological aspects of design are of primary significance and will be the focus of this paper. The AP600 Project optimized the design to combine the functions of the high volumetric flow rate, low volumetric flow rate, and containment cleanup and other filtration systems into one multi-functional system. This achieves a more simplified, standardized, and lower cost design. Studies were performed to determine the possible concentrations of radioactive material in the containment atmosphere and the effectiveness of the purge system to keep concentrations within 10CFR20 limits and within offsite dose objectives. The concentrations were determined for various reactor coolant system leakage rates and containment purge modes of operation. The resultant concentrations were used to determine the containment accessibility during various stages of normal plant operation including refueling. The results of the parametric studies indicate that a dual train purge system with a capacity of 4,000 cfm per train is more than adequate to control the airborne radioactivity levels inside containment during normal plant operation and refueling, and satisfies the goals of ANSI/ANS-56.6-1986 and limits the amount of radioactive material released to the environment per ANSI/ANS 59.2-1985 to provide a safe environment for plant personnel and offsite residents.

  20. Containment materials: Status and summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen containment materials are studied. The safe, reliable, and economic containment of hydrogen is essential to the success of virtually any hydrogen energy transport and storage scheme. The potential problems associated with hydrogen containment are presented.

  1. Three-dimensional random earth atmospheres for Monte Carlo trajectory analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A set of four computer tapes containing random three dimensional Earth atmospheres is available for Monte Carlo trajectory analyses. The tapes contain sufficient atmospheric tables to allow replications of any trajectory below an altitude of 99 km. The atmospheres were provided by an empirical model designed to generate random atmospheres whose distributions match those in a data base of sounding rocket measurements. A readily implementable means of linking the tapes to any existing trajectory simulation computer program is described involving the addition of three subroutines which are listed in an appendix.

  2. Greenhouse effect in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-04-01

    Average optical atmospheric parameters for the infrared spectrum range are evaluated on the basis of the Earth energetic balance and parameters of the standard atmosphere. The average optical thickness of the atmosphere is u ≈ 2.5 and this atmospheric emission is originated at altitudes below 10 km. Variations of atmospheric radiative fluxes towards the Earth and outward are calculated as a function of the concentration of \\text{CO}2 molecules for the regular model of molecular spectrum. As a result of doubling of the \\text{CO}2 concentration the change of the global Earth temperature is (0.4 +/- 0.2) \\text{K} if other atmospheric parameters are conserved compared to the value (3.0 +/- 1.5) \\text{K} under real atmospheric conditions with the variation of the amount of atmospheric water. An observed variation of the global Earth temperature during the last century (0.8 ^\\circ \\text{C}) follows from an increase of the mass of atmospheric water by 7% or by conversion of 1% of atmospheric water in aerosols.

  3. Convective storms in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2013-05-01

    The atmospheres of the planets in the Solar System have different physical properties that in some cases can be considered as extreme when compared with our own planet's more familiar atmosphere. From the tenuous and cold atmosphere of Mars to the dense and warm atmosphere of Venus in the case of the terrestrial planets, to the gigantic atmospheres of the outer planets, or the nitrogen and methane atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan, we can find a large variety of physical environments. The comparative study of these atmospheres provides a better understanding of the physics of a geophysical fluid. In many of these worlds convective storms of different intensity appear. They are analogous to terrestrial atmospheres fed by the release of latent heat when one of the gases in the atmosphere condenses and they are therefore called moist convective storms. In many of these planets they can produce severe meteorological phenomena and by studying them in a comparative way we can aspire to get a further insight in the dynamics of these atmospheres even beyond the scope of moist convection. A classical example is the structure of the complex systems of winds in the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. These winds are zonal and alternate in latitude but their deep structure is not accessible to direct observation. However the behaviour of large--scale convective storms vertically extending over the "weather layer" allows to study the buried roots of these winds. Another interesting atmosphere with a rather different structure of convection is Titan, a world where methane is close to its triple point in the atmosphere and can condense in bright clouds with large precipitation fluxes that may model part of the orography of the surface making Titan a world with a methane cycle similar to the hydrological cycle of Earth's atmosphere.

  4. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  5. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  6. Organometalic carbosilane polymers containing vanadium and their preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Okamura, K.; Shishido, T.; Fukuda, K.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention concerns a new organometallic polymer material containing in part a vanadium-siloxane linkage (V-0-Si), which has excellent resistance to heat and oxidation and a high residue ratio after high temperature treatment in a non-oxidizing atmosphere, for example, nitrogen, argon, helium, ammonia, or hydrogen.

  7. VLA Shows "Boiling" in Atmosphere of Betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    A team of astronomers says that observations with the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope show that a neighboring bloated star has giant convective plumes propelling gas from its surface (photosphere) up into the star's atmosphere. This new information contradicts long-held ideas that such stellar atmospheres are more uniform, and may resolve questions about how the star's atmosphere attains its enormous size as well as how dust and gas is driven away from the star. Jeremy Lim of the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics in Taiwan; Chris Carilli, Anthony Beasley, and Ralph Marson of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM; and Stephen White of the University of Maryland studied the red-supergiant star Betelgeuse, about 430 light-years away in the constellation Orion. They reported their findings in the April 9 issue of the scientific journal Nature. "These radio-telescope images confirm that Betelgeuse -- already more than 600 times larger than our Sun -- has a dense atmosphere that extends to many times larger still than the star itself," said Lim. "The highest-resolution image shows the star's atmosphere to have a remarkably complex structure." "To our surprise," added White, "the images also show that most of the gas in the atmosphere is only about as hot as that on the surface. Previously, all of it was thought to be very much hotter." The astronomers used the VLA to make images of Betelgeuse at a variety of radio frequencies. The series of radio observations measured the temperature of the star's atmosphere at different heights. Previous observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at ultraviolet wavelengths showed that the star's atmosphere contains very hot gas at about twice the surface temperature. The VLA images showed that there also is lower-temperature gas throughout the atmosphere. This gas is near the surface temperature at low heights and decreases in temperature

  8. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is {approx} 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was put initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status.

  9. Lifetimes and fates of toxic air contaminants in California's atmosphere, June 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, R.; Arey, J.

    1993-06-01

    The report presents information concerning the nature and rate of removal of toxic air pollutants (TAPs) from the atmosphere and any products formed; it also addresses the formation of possible TAPs in the atmosphere. It contains a comprehensive review of the atmospheric chemistry of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, N-nitrosomorpholine, and dialkylnitrosamines. It also outlines the atmospheric lifetimes of 23 possible TAPs, including: hexachlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, dimethyl sulfate, propylene oxide, chlorobenzene, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, benxyl chloride, acrylonitrile, toluene diisocyanates, and 1,4-dioxane. It also reviews possible atmospheric formation of TAPs. Acrolein, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and PAHs are shown to be present in the atmosphere largely due to atmospheric reactions. Another section describes an investigation of the mutagenicity of products of simulated atmospheric reactions of gasoline and terpenes (emitted from vegetation). These may not be major sources of ambient mutagenicity in California.

  10. Double Helical Fluid Containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Brian

    2003-11-01

    In the absence of gravity or at micro-scales, helical wires can support cylindrical volumes of fluid of infinite length, making them convenient as conduits. However, fixed contact line double helical fluid volumes have the additional property that they can be drained to zero volume without loss of stability to constant pressure disturbances. Thus the two-wire support is a convenient microgravity or micro-scale container as well as conduit. For evenly spaced wires, continuous draining of a cylindrical volume to zero is possible for double helices ranging from moderate pitch to the parallel wire case. Double helices of steeper pitch are stable as cylinders and at zero volume, but are unstable for some range of intermediate volumes. This unstable zone is very strongly dependent on the offset between the helical wires, varying rapidly for offsets other than 180 degrees. Preliminary experimental results validate the theoretical predictions.

  11. FUEL CONTAINER CLOSURE

    DOEpatents

    Stone, C.C.; Noland, R.A.

    1962-07-17

    A method of producing a spherical closed end on a small thin-walled tube forming a container for reactor fuel is described. An end cap inserted in the tube has a long slender external projection extending axially of the tube. A heavy electrical current is applied to the projection, and simultaneously a portion of the tube very near the end cap is chilled. A part of the projection is vaporized, and the balance is melted, along with portions of the end cap and the tube. As a result, the end cap is welded to the tube, and the projection in melting is spread out to form a spherical surface on the end cap. (AEC)

  12. SALUT: Containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The SALUT event was detonated in hole U20ak of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in Fig. 1.1. The device had a depth-of-burial of 607 m in the Scrugham Peak rhyolite of Area 20, about 15 m above the standing water level (SWL), as shown in Figures 1.2 and 1.3. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in Fig. 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 08:15 PDT on June 12, 1985 and about 10 hours, 17 minutes later a sub-surface collapse progressed upwards to a depth between 200 and 270 m. No radiation arrivals were detected in the emplacement hole and the SALUT containment was considered successful.

  13. LABAN containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The LABAN event was detonated in hole U2ff of the Nevada Test Site. The device had a depth-of-burial of 326 m in the alluvium of Area 4, about 240 m above the standing water level (SWL). Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes and Narver. Detonation time was 06:33 PDT on August 3, 1983. About 75 minutes later the chimney began collapsing to the surface. A major collapse event occurred 5 minutes later with episodes continuing for the next 20 minutes. No radiation arrivals were detected in the emplacement hole at depths less than 106 m and the LABAN containment was considered successful.

  14. TARKO containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1997-06-01

    The TARKO event was detonated in hole U2fd of the Nevada Test Site. The TARKO device had a depth-of-burial of 369 m in the alluvium area 2, about 280 m above the Paleozoic formation and 200 m above the standing water level. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole is described. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 07:00 PST on February 27,1980, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 4 hours after the detonation resulting in a crater having a mean radius of 45.7 m and a maximum depth of 13.6 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the TARKO containment was considered successful.

  15. CABOC containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1996-04-01

    The CABOC event was detonated in hole U2cp of the Nevada Test Site as indicated. The CABOC device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 335 m in the Paintbrush Tuffs of area 2, about 200 m above the Paleozoic formation and 260 m above the standing water level, as shown. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 13:05 PST on December l, 1981, and subsurface collapse progressed to a depth of between 37 and 77 m at about 57 minutes after the detonation. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the CABOC containment was considered successful.

  16. DAUPHIN containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Hienle, R.

    1997-06-01

    The DAUPHIN event was detonated in hole U9cq of the Nevada Test Site. The DAUPHIN device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 319 m in the Tunnel Beds Tuffs of area 9, about 200 m above the Paleozoic formation and about 300 m above the standing water level. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement is described. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 08:50 PST on November 14, 1980, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 27. 5 minutes after the detonation resulting in an asymmetric crater having a mean radius of 71.9 m and a maximum depth of 13.0 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the DAUPHIN containment was considered successful.

  17. AKAVI containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-08-01

    The AKAVI event was detonated in hole U2es of the Nevada Test Site as indicated. The device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 494 m in the Paintbrush Tuff of area 2, about 90 m above the standing water level and 300 m above the Paleozoic formation. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 07:00 PST on December 3, 1981 and 103 minutes later a surface collapse occurred leaving a crater with mean radius of 90.5 m and maximum depth of 19.5 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the AKAVI containment was considered successful.

  18. CHEEDAM containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1996-04-01

    The CHEEDAM event was detonated in hole U2et of the Nevada Test Site. The CHEEDAM device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 342 m in the Tunnel Beds Tuffs of area 2, about 85 m above the Paleozoic formation, and 240 m above the standing water level. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 09:00 PST on February 17,1983, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 1.1 hour after detonation. The resulting crater had a mean radius of 57.9 m and a maximum depth of 10.0 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the CHEEDAM containment was considered successful.

  19. Containment data report - KARAB

    SciTech Connect

    Heinle, R

    1998-07-01

    The KARAB event was detonated in hole U4ah of the Nevada Test Site. The KARAB device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 331 m in the Tunnel Beds tuff of area 4, about 200 m above the Paleozoic formation and the standing water level. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 07:51 PST on March 16, 1978 and collapse progressed to the surface about 53 minutes after detonation. The resulting surface crater had an average radius of 60.3 m and a maximum depth of 7.6 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and containment of the KARAB event was considered successful. This paper describes the site of the event and reports on stemming performance and collapse phenomena

  20. VIDE containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1996-03-01

    The VIDE event was detonated in hole U8k of the Nevada Test Site as indicated. The device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 327 m in the bedded tuffs of area 9, about 200 m above the Paleozoic and the standing water level. Stemming of the 1.83 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 07:35 PDT on April 30, 1981 and 53.5 minutes later a subsurface collapse or stemming fall to a depth of about 180 m occurred. No radiation arrivals were detected in the emplacement hole above the bottom stemming plug and the VIDE containment was considered successful.

  1. HAVARTI containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1997-06-01

    The HAVARTI event was detonated in hole U10bg of the Nevada Test Site. The HAVARTI device had a depth-of-burial of 200 m in the Tunnel Bed tuffs of area 10, about 280 m above the Paleozoic formation and 330 m above the standing water level. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole is described. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver). Detonation time was 06:41 PDT on August 5 1981. At a depth of 149 m there was an indication of subsurface collapse occurring 1780 s after detonation. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the HAVARTI containment was considered successful.

  2. Ocean-atmospheric linkages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle on the time scale of decades to centuries. The input rate of CO2 to the atmosphere due to fossil fuel burning and deforestation has continued to increase over the last century. To balance the global carbon budget, a sink is required whose magnitude is changing on similar time scales. We have sought to identify aspects of the ocean system that are capable of responding on decadal time scales, to examine our present ability to model such changes, and to pinpoint ways in which this ability could be improved. Many other important aspects of the ocean's role in global change are not addressed, including the importance of oceanic heat transport and thermal inertia to the climate system, biogeochemical cycling of elements other than carbon, and the importance of the ocean as a source or sink of trace gases.

  3. Atmospheric chemistry research

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Global environmental changes are occurring all around us, and the energy industry is a major player in the changes that are taking place. Wise energy policy can only be generated from a position of informed enlightenment and understanding about the environmental consequences of energy production and utilization. The atmospheric chemistry research being conducted at the University of Kentucky's Center for Applied Energy Research is geared toward providing the knowledge necessary to allow industrial and legislative officials to make responsible energy decisions in the 1990's and beyond. Three programs are described: the Kentucky Acid Deposition Program Precipitation chemistry network; modeling of regional and urban photochemistry and acid deposition; and modeling of global tropospheric chemistry.

  4. Soot in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.

    1980-10-01

    The principal goal of the research described is to assess quantitatively the relative amounts of primary and secondary carbonaceous material in atmospheric aerosols and to differentiate between secondary carbonaceous species produced by photochemical and nonphotochemical reactions. The approach used most extensively involves the use of an optical attenuation technique, combined with total particulate carbon determination. The black component of soot, which is an unambiguous tracer for primary emissions, can be conveniently monitored because of its large and uniform optical absorptivity. The black carbon content of the particles can easily be determined by an optical attenuation method. Determination of total particulate carbon mass enables the study of the relations between the black and the total carbon content.

  5. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  6. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  7. Surviving Atmospheric Spacecraft Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    In essence, to survival a spacecraft breakup an animal must not experience a lethal event. Much as with surviving aircraft breakup, dissipation of lethal forces via breakup of the craft around the organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. As spacecraft can travel higher and faster than aircraft, it is often assumed that spacecraft breakup is not a survivable event. Similarly, the belief that aircraft breakup or crashes are not survivable events is still prevalent in the general population. As those of us involved in search and rescue know, it is possible to survive both aircraft breakup and crashes. Here we make the first report of an animal, C. elegans, surviving atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications implied for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  8. Halogens in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicerone, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric halogen measurement data are presented for: (1) inorganic and organic gaseous compounds of chlorine, fluorine, bromine and iodine; and (2) chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodine in particulate form and in precipitation. The roles that these data and other, unavailable data play in the determination of the global cycles of the halogens are discussed. It is found that the speciation of the halogen gases in the troposphere is uncertain, with the only inorganic species detected by species-specific methods being HC1 and SF6. It is shown that heterogeneous reactions, both gas-to-particle and particle-to-gas processes, precipitation removal, and sea-salt aerosol generation and fractionation processes, need quantitative investigation to allow progress in estimating halogen sources and sinks. Where practical, quantitative comparisons are made between measured and predicted concentrations.

  9. Phanerozoic Atmospheric Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, Robert A.

    Theoretical calculations, based on both the chemical and isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, indicate that atmospheric O2 has varied appreciably over Phanerozoic time, with a notable excursion during the Permo-Carboniferous reaching levels as high as 35% O2. This agrees with measurements of the carbon isotopic composition of fossil plants together with experiments and calculations on the effect of O2 on photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation. The principal cause of the excursion was the rise of large vascular land plants and the consequent increased global burial of organic matter. Higher levels of O2 are consistent with the presence of Permo-Carboniferous giant insects, and preliminary experiments indicate that insect body size can increase with elevated O2. Higher O2 also may have caused more extensive, possibly catastrophic, wildfires. To check this, realistic burning experiments are needed to examine the effects of elevated O2 on fire behavior.

  10. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2008 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    out in collaboration with other laboratories and research groups within the Earth Sciences Division, across the Sciences and Exploration Directorate, and with partners in universities and other Government agencies. The Laboratory for Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA s research agenda. Our Laboratory often has relatively large programs, sizable satellite missions, and observational campaigns that require the cooperative and collaborative efforts of many scientists. We ensure an appropriate balance between our scientists responsibility for these large collaborative projects and their need for an active individual research agenda. This balance allows members of the Laboratory to continuously improve their scientific credentials. Members of the Laboratory interact with the general public to support a wide range of interests in the atmospheric sciences. Among other activities, the Laboratory raises the public s awareness of atmospheric science by presenting public lectures and demonstrations, by making scientific data available to wide audiences, by teaching, and by mentoring students and teachers. The Laboratory makes substantial efforts to attract new scientists to the various areas of atmospheric research. We strongly encourage the establishment of partnerships with Federal and state agencies that have operational responsibilities to promote the societal application of our science products. This report describes our role in NASA s mission, gives a broad description of our research, and summarizes our scientists major accomplishments during calendar year 2008. The report also contains useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities.

  11. Sources and transformations of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Eben Spencer

    transported towards Europe. In this study, particles were highly processed prior to sampling, with residence times of a few days in the atmosphere. The MILAGRO campaign focused on the evolution of the Mexico City plume as it was transported north. During this study, regional and locally emitted particles were measured with residence times varying from minutes to days in the atmosphere. In both studies, the light scattering - AMS system provided detailed information about the density and composition of single particles, leading to important insights into how atmospheric processing transforms the particle properties. In Mexico City, the light scattering-AMS system was used for the first time as a true single particle mass spectrometer and revealed specific details about the atmospheric processing of primary particles from combustion sources. To quantify the radiative effects of the particles on climate, the processing and ultimate fate of primary emissions (often containing black carbon or soot) must be understood. To provide a solid basis for the interpretation of the data obtained during the field studies, experiments were conducted with a well characterized soot generation-sampling system developed by the Boston College research group. The laboratory soot source was combined with the light scattering - AMS system and a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC) to measure the change in cloud-forming activity of soot particles as they are processed in the atmosphere. Because of the importance of black carbon in the atmosphere, several instruments have been developed to measure black carbon. In July of 2008, an intercomparison study of 18 instruments was conducted in the Boston College laboratory, with soot particles produced and processed to mimic a wide range of atmospherically-relevant conditions. Transformations in the physical, chemical, and optical properties of soot particles were monitored with the combined suite of aerosol instrumentation. Results from the

  12. Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

    2005-11-01

    In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

  13. Models of Mars' atmosphere (1974)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric models for support of design and mission planning of space vehicles that are to orbit the planet Mars, enter its atmosphere, or land on the surface are presented. Quantitative data for the Martian atmosphere were obtained from Earth-base observations and from spacecraft that have orbited Mars or passed within several planetary radii. These data were used in conjunction with existing theories of planetary atmospheres to predict other characteristics of the Martian atmosphere. Earth-based observations provided information on the composition, temperature, and optical properties of Mars with rather coarse spatial resolution, whereas spacecraft measurements yielded data on composition, temperature, pressure, density, and atmospheric structure with moderately good spatial resolution. The models provide the temperature, pressure, and density profiles required to perform basic aerodynamic analyses. The profiles are supplemented by computed values of viscosity, specific heat, and speed of sound.

  14. Reference atmospheres: VIRA II -Venus International Reference Atmosphere update.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasova, Ludmila

    2012-07-01

    VIRA I was started in 1982 (30 years ago) and published in1985 (ASR,v5,n11, 1985) by G. Keating, A. Kliore, and V. Moroz. The purpose was to produce a concise, descriptive model summarizing the physical properties of the atmosphere of Venus, which by then had been extensively observed by instruments on board the Venera and Pioneer space probes. VIRA was used by many scientists and engineers in their studies as referent standard of atmospheric data. Afterwards several missions have obtained new data. In particular the experiments on late Veneras and Venus Express. Experiments on board of VEX, working on the orbit for 6 years, provide new high quality data on atmospheric structure, clouds properties, dynamics, composition of the atmosphere, thermal balance, ionosphere. These new data will be used for VIRA update. Original data consists of 7 Chapters.(1 ) Models of the structure of the atmosphere of Venus from the surface to 100 km altitude, (2) Circulation of the atmosphere from surface to 100 km, (3) Particulate matter in the Venus atmosphere, (4) Models of Venus neutral upper atmosphere: structure and composition, (5) Composition of the atmosphere below 100 km altitude, (6) Solar and thermal radiation in the Venus atmosphere, (7) The Venus ionosphere. By 2002 Gerry Keating collected materials to update VIRA. But only two chapter were published: (1 ) Models of the structure of the atmosphere of Venus from the surface to 100 km altitude (Zasova et al, 2006, Cosmic Research, 44, N4), (5) Composition of the atmosphere below 100 km altitude (De Bergh et al. 2006, PSS). Both these chapters were based on the data, obtained before VEX. At the moment the structure of the original VIRA looks acceptable for VIRA II also, however, new Chapters may be added. At COSPAR 2014 in Moscow the session on Reference atmospheres (RAPS), may be proposed to continue discussion on VIRA, and start working on MIRA, and complete VIRA and publish (including CD) after COSPAR 2016 (or may be even

  15. Exploring the atmosphere using smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Vogt, Patrik; Stari, Cecilia; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C.

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of the inner layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, are determinant for Earth's life. In this experience we explore the first hundreds of meters using a smartphone mounted on a quadcopter. Both the altitude and the pressure are obtained using the smartphone's sensors. We complement these measures with data collected from the flight information system of an aircraft. The experimental results are compared with the International Standard Atmosphere and other simple approximations: isothermal and constant density atmospheres.

  16. Atmosphere Explorer set for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer-D (Explorer-54) is described which will explore in detail an area of the earth's outer atmosphere where important energy transfer, atomic and molecular processes, and chemical reactions occur that are critical to the heat balance of the atmosphere. Data are presented on the mission facts, launch vehicle operations, AE-D/Delta flight events, spacecraft description, scientific instruments, tracking, and data acquisition.

  17. Stochastic background of atmospheric cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, G. ); Wlodarczyk, Z. )

    1993-06-15

    Fluctuations in the atmospheric cascades developing during the propagation of very high energy cosmic rays through the atmosphere are investigated using stochastic branching model of pure birth process with immigration. In particular, we show that the multiplicity distributions of secondaries emerging from gamma families are much narrower than those resulting from hadronic families. We argue that the strong intermittent like behaviour found recently in atmospheric families results from the fluctuations in the cascades themselves and are insensitive to the details of elementary interactions.

  18. Efficient vector radiative transfer calculations in vertically inhomogeneous cloudy atmospheres.

    PubMed

    van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2006-08-10

    Accurate radiative transfer calculations in cloudy atmospheres are generally time consuming, limiting their practical use in satellite remote sensing applications. We present a model to efficiently calculate the radiative transfer of polarized light in atmospheres that contain homogeneous cloud layers. This model combines the Gauss-Seidel method, which is efficient for inhomogeneous cloudless atmospheres, with the doubling method, which is efficient for homogeneous cloud layers. Additionally to reduce the computational effort for radiative transfer calculations in absorption bands, the cloud reflection and transmission matrices are interpolated over the absorption and scattering optical thicknesses within the cloud layer. We demonstrate that the proposed radiative transfer model in combination with this interpolation technique is efficient for the simulation of satellite measurements for inhomogeneous atmospheres containing one homogeneous cloud layer. For example, the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) measurements in the oxygen A band (758-773 nm) and the Hartley-Huggins ozone band (295-335 nm) with a spectral resolution of 0.4 nm can be simulated for these atmospheres within 1 min on a 2.8 GHz PC with an accuracy better than 0.1%.

  19. Superrotation observed in Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshihisa; Takagi, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    Venus has a dense and high-temperature atmosphere with 92 atm and 730K at the surface. The high temperature near the surface is maintained by the greenhouse effect due to a huge amount of carbon dioxide, which is a main constituent of the atmosphere. It is observed that the Venus atmosphere rotates in the same direction with the solid part (its rotation period is 243 Earth days) and at 70 km altitude this atmospheric rotation is 60 times faster than the solid part. This superrotation is introduced in detail.

  20. Atmospheric waves and the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, T.

    1972-01-01

    A review of evidence supporting the existence of atmospheric waves is presented, and a simple, theoretical approach for describing them is shown. Suggestions for gravity wave sources include equatorial and auroral electrojet, auroral and polar substorm heating, atmospheric jet streams, and large oceanic tides. There are reviewed previous studies dealing with the interaction between ionization and atmospheric waves believed to exist at ionospheric heights. These waves include acoustic waves, evanescent waves, and internal atmospheric gravity waves. It is explained that mode analysis, often employed when an increased number of layers is used for a more complete profile, is inapplicable for waves very close to a source.

  1. Commissioning of self-management support for people with long-term conditions: an exploration of commissioning aspirations and processes

    PubMed Central

    Reidy, Claire; Kennedy, Anne; Pope, Catherine; Vassilev, Ivo; Rogers, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore how self-management support (SMS) is considered and conceptualised by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and whether this is reflected in strategic planning and commissioning. SMS is an essential element of long-term condition (LTC) management and CCGs are responsible for commissioning services that are coordinated, integrated and link into patient's everyday lives. This focus provides a good test and exemplar for how commissioners communicate with their local population to find out what they need. Design A multisite, quasi-ethnographic exploration of 9 CCGs. Setting National Health Service (NHS) CCGs in southern England, representing varied socioeconomic status, practice sizes and rural and urban areas. Data collection/analysis Content analysis of CCG forward plans for mention of SMS. Semistructured interviews with commissioners (n=10) explored understanding of SMS and analysed thematically. The practice of commissioning explored through the observations of Service User Researchers (n=5) attending Governing Body meetings (n=10, 30 hours). Results Observations illuminate the relative absence of SMS and gateways to active engagement with patient and public voices. Content analysis of plans point to tensions between local aspirations and those identified by NHS England for empowering patients by enhancing SMS services (‘person-centred’, whole systems). Interview data highlight disparities in the process of translating the forward plans into practice. Commissioners reference SMS as a priority yet details of local initiatives are notably absent with austerity (cost-containment) and nationally measured biomedical outcomes taking precedence. Conclusions Commissioners conceptualise locally sensitive SMS as a means to improve health and reduce service use, but structural and financial constraints result in prioritisation of nationally driven outcome measures and payments relating to biomedical targets. Ultimately, there is little evidence of

  2. Code manual for CONTAIN 2.0: A computer code for nuclear reactor containment analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.K.; Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Gido, R.G.; Tadios, E.L.; Davis, F.J.; Martinez, G.M.; Washington, K.E.; Tills, J.

    1997-12-01

    The CONTAIN 2.0 computer code is an integrated analysis tool used for predicting the physical conditions, chemical compositions, and distributions of radiological materials inside a containment building following the release of material from the primary system in a light-water reactor accident. It can also predict the source term to the environment. CONTAIN 2.0 is intended to replace the earlier CONTAIN 1.12, which was released in 1991. The purpose of this Code Manual is to provide full documentation of the features and models in CONTAIN 2.0. Besides complete descriptions of the models, this Code Manual provides a complete description of the input and output from the code. CONTAIN 2.0 is a highly flexible and modular code that can run problems that are either quite simple or highly complex. An important aspect of CONTAIN is that the interactions among thermal-hydraulic phenomena, aerosol behavior, and fission product behavior are taken into account. The code includes atmospheric models for steam/air thermodynamics, intercell flows, condensation/evaporation on structures and aerosols, aerosol behavior, and gas combustion. It also includes models for reactor cavity phenomena such as core-concrete interactions and coolant pool boiling. Heat conduction in structures, fission product decay and transport, radioactive decay heating, and the thermal-hydraulic and fission product decontamination effects of engineered safety features are also modeled. To the extent possible, the best available models for severe accident phenomena have been incorporated into CONTAIN, but it is intrinsic to the nature of accident analysis that significant uncertainty exists regarding numerous phenomena. In those cases, sensitivity studies can be performed with CONTAIN by means of user-specified input parameters. Thus, the code can be viewed as a tool designed to assist the knowledge reactor safety analyst in evaluating the consequences of specific modeling assumptions.

  3. WEXFORD containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The WEXFORD event was detonated in hole U2cr of the Nevada Test Site. A plan view map of the local region of hole U2cr showing the surface projections of the faults and the local drill holes is given. The device had a depth-of-burial of 314 m in the Tunnel Beds tuff of Area 2, about 120 m above the standing water level (SWL). Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes and Narver. Detonation time was 07:45 PDT on August 30, 1984 and about 26 minutes later the chimney collapsed to the surface leaving a small, off-center crater which grew, over several days, until it took on a cookie cutter form encompassing the emplacement hole and having a mean diameter of about 35 m. An interior, highly asymmetric crater had a mean diameter of about 12 m. No functioning monitors detected radiation arrivals in the emplacement hole above a depth of 130 m and the WEXFORD containment was considered successful.

  4. CARNELIAN containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T

    1998-07-01

    The CARNELIAN event was detonated in hole U4af of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in figure 1 .l. The CARNELIAN device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 208 m in the alluvium of Area 4 , about 70 m above the Paleozoic formation and 330 m above the standing water level, as shown in the geologic cross-sections of figure 1.2(l) Figure 1 3 displays the local surface area showing nearby events Stemming of the 2 44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1 4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver(2) Detonation time was about 07 00 PDT on July 28,1977, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 19 minutes after the detonation resulting in a crater having a "cookie-cutter" geometry (steep walls with a relatively flat bottom) with a mean radius of 32 2 m and a maximum depth of 10 5 m No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the CARNELIAN containment was considered successful

  5. Organic containment separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  6. KRYDOST: Containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The KRYDOST event was detonated in hole U2co of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in figure 1.1. The device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 335 m in the Paintbrush tuff of Area 2, about 200 m above the Paleozoic and about 260 m above the standing water level, as shown in figures 1.2 and 1.3(l). Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1.4. An additional exploratory hole (Ue2co) was drilled 15-24 m to the south-south east of the emplacement hole. This hole was grouted from depth to the surface. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver(2). I During drilling, a deeply dipping fault was discovered to intersect both the emplacement and the satellite holes and an associated antithetic fault also found to intersect the emplacement hole as seen in figures 1.2 and 1.3. Detonation time was 13:00 PDT on May 6, 1982 and about 3 hours later a subsurface collapse to about half the DOB occurred. No radiation arrivals were detected above the ground surface and the KRYDOST containment was considered successful.

  7. CABRA containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, T.

    1996-03-01

    The CABRA event was detonated in hole U20aj of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in figure 1.1. The CABRA device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 542 m in the Tuffs and rhyolites of area 20, about 20 m above the standing water level, as shown in figure 1.2(l). Figure 1.3 is a plan map of the immediate Vicinity of hole U20aj showing the drill holes used in the construction of the cross section plot of figure 1.2. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 12:20 PST on March 26,1983, and a sub-surface collapse to a depth of 380 m was observed. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the CABRA containment was considered successful.

  8. Tellurium behavior in containment under light water reactor accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.

    1986-02-01

    Interactions of tellurium in containment can result in changes of physical form and therefore in its transport properties. This report discusses the most probable forms of tellurium in a containment environment under LWR accident conditions. The physical and chemical form of inorganic tellurium species will be determined by condensation, oxidation, and dissolution in water. Of the three volatile tellurium chemical forms, Te/sub 2/ (gas), H/sub 2/Te, and organic tellurides, only organic tellurides have the potential to remain in the gas phase in a containment atmosphere. There is a general lack of information on the formation and removal of organic tellurides under LWR accident conditions. 41 refs.

  9. Atmospheric electricity and aerosol-cloud interactions in earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Tammet, Hannes; Mäkelä, Antti; Haapalainen, Jussi; Mirme, Sander; Nieminen, Tuomo; Franchin, Alessandro; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Hõrrak, Urmas

    2013-05-01

    Firstly, atmospheric ions play an important role in the fair weather electricity in Earth's atmosphere. Small ions, or charged molecular clusters, carry electric currents in the atmosphere. These small ions are continuously present, and their lifetime in lower atmosphere is about one minute. It's essential to find out a connection between the production rate of cluster ions, ion-ion recombination, and ion-aerosol attachment, and their ambient concentrations, in order to understand electrical properties of air. Secondly, atmospheric ions are important for Earth's climate, due to their potential role in secondary aerosol formation, which can lead to increased number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), which in turn can change the cloud properties. Our aim is to quantify the connections between these two important roles of air ions based on field observations.

  10. Mechanisms for the atmospheric corrosion of carbonate stone

    SciTech Connect

    Graedel, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    The physical and chemical phenomena responsible for the atmospheric corrosion of carbonate stone are presented. Corrosion product formation, morphology, and chemical makeup are discussed in the context of calcium-containing minerals and other crystalline structures that thermodynamics and kinetics suggest are likely to be present. Formation pathways for the minerals most often reported to occur in carbonate corrosion layers are shown in schematic diagrams. The dominant corrosion products are sulfates and oxalates, the former resulting from interactions with atmospheric sulfur dioxide or sulfate ions, the latter from oxalate secretions from the biological organisms. present (and perhaps to some extent from oxalate deposited from the atmosphere). The degradation processes are enhanced by the catalytic action of transition metal ions present in the stone and of soot deposited from the atmosphere.

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy of Halogenated Species for Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorine- and chlorine-containing molecules in the atmosphere are very strong greenhouse gases, meaning that even small amounts of these gases contribute significantly to the radiative forcing of climate. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are regulated by the 1987 Montreal Protocol because they deplete the ozone layer. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which do not deplete the ozone layer and are not regulated by the Montreal Protocol, have been introduced as replacements for CFCs and HCFCs. HFCs have global-warming potentials many times greater than carbon dioxide, and are increasing in the atmosphere at a very fast rate. Various satellite instruments monitor many of these molecules by detecting infrared radiation that has passed through the Earth's atmosphere. However, the quantification of their atmospheric abundances crucially requires accurate quantitative infrared spectroscopy. This talk will focus on new and improved laboratory spectroscopic measurements for a number of important halogenated species.

  12. The young Sun and photochemistry of the primitive Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nair, H.; Gerstell, M. F.; Yung, Y. L.

    1993-01-01

    We will investigate the climatology of an atmosphere where CO2 is a minor constituent but still the key radiative species. The thermal structure of the dust-free atmosphere is estimated by employing a simple radiative-convective model similar to that used by Gierasch and Goody. Radiative heating rates are computed using the Caltech/JPL one-dimensional photochemical model. Thermal cooling rates for a Martian atmosphere containing O2, O3, H2O, N2O, CO, and CO2 are calculated using FASCODE and k-distribution methods. The effects due to pressure broadening of the infrared absorption lines of CO2 by CO and O2, as well as the radiative effects of increased ozone densities in the atmosphere, will be examined.

  13. Photochemistry of Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renyu; Seager, S.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres require photochemistry for their study. This is because the steady state composition depends critically on the component gas sources (surface emission) and sinks (chemical reactions initiated by UV photolysis). For my Ph.D. research I have developed a comprehensive photochemistry model for terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres from the ground up, which includes 111 molecules and aerosols made of C, H, O, N, S elements, and more than 800 chemical reactions linking them. With updated numerical algorithms, the photochemistry model has desirable features for exoplanet exploration, notably the capacity of treating both reduced and oxidized atmospheres, the elimination of the need of fine-tuned initial conditions, and the flexibility of choosing a subset of chemical species and chemical reactions for the computation. Using the photochemistry model, I provided benchmark atmospheric composition models for reducing, weakly oxidizing, and highly oxidizing atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets; I systemized the short-lived nature of sulfur gases on virtually all types of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres; I revisited O2 as the remote-sensing probe of biotic photosynthesis and found a potential false positive in high CO2 atmospheres without surface emission of reducing gases (e.g., H2 and CH4); and I provided atmosphere models to propose NH3 as a new biosignature gas in hydrogen-rich atmospheres. I have also extended the photochemistry model to the regime of thick atmospheres (at depths of which thermochemical equilibrium can be effectively achieved), and summarized a “zoo of super-Earths” including water planets, hydrocarbon planets, and even oxygen planets depending on the C-H-O elemental abundances of their atmospheres.

  14. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Babayan, Steve E.; Hicks, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  15. Atmospheric continuous-variable quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, B.; Peuntinger, C.; Killoran, N.; Khan, I.; Wittmann, C.; Marquardt, Ch; Leuchs, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present a quantum communication experiment conducted over a point-to-point free-space link of 1.6 km in urban conditions. We study atmospheric influences on the capability of the link to act as a continuous-variable (CV) quantum channel. Continuous polarization states (that contain the signal encoding as well as a local oscillator (LO) in the same spatial mode) are prepared and sent over the link in a polarization multiplexed setting. Both signal and LO undergo the same atmospheric fluctuations. These are intrinsically auto-compensated which removes detrimental influences on the interferometric visibility. At the receiver, we measure the Q-function and interpret the data using the framework of effective entanglement (EE). We compare different state amplitudes and alphabets (two-state and four-state) and determine their optimal working points with respect to the distributed EE. Based on the high entanglement transmission rates achieved, our system indicates the high potential of atmospheric links in the field of CV quantum key distribution.

  16. The integrated atmospheric characterization system (IACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. W.; Albers, K. R.; Brown, E. A.; Craney, T. A.; Hosain, M. M.; James, R. K.; Meraz, N. D.; Mercer, A. J.; Nielson, K. D.; Ortman, R. L.; Pool, T. W.; Wood, J. W.; Stewart, J. M.; Strike, T. M.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Whiteman, D. N.

    2014-06-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing a transportable multi-lidar instrument known as the Integrated Atmospheric Characterization System (IACS). The system will be housed in two shipping containers that will be transported to remote sites on a low-boy trailer. IACS will comprise three lidars: a 355 nm imaging lidar for profiling refractive turbulence, a 355 nm Raman lidar for profiling water vapor, and an aerosol lidar operating at 355 nm as well as 1.064 and 1.627 µm. All of the lidar transmit/receive optics will be on a common mount, pointable at any elevation angle from 10 degrees below horizontal to vertical. The entire system will be computer controlled to facilitate pointing and automatic data acquisition. The purpose of IACS is to characterize optical propagation paths during outdoor tests of electro-optical systems. The tests are anticipated to include ground-to-ground, air-to-ground, and ground-to-air scenarios, so the system must accommodate arbitrary slant paths through the atmosphere, with maximum measurement ranges of 5-10 km. Elevation angle scans will be used to determine atmospheric extinction profiles at the infrared wavelengths, and data from the three wavelengths will be used to determine the aerosol Angstrom coefficient, enabling interpolation of results to other wavelengths in the 355 nm to 1.627 µm region.

  17. Transient clouds in Titan's lower atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C A; Owen, T; Miller, G A; Geballe, T

    1998-10-01

    The 1980 encounter by the Voyager 1 spacecraft with Titan, Saturn's largest moon, revealed the presence of a thick atmosphere containing nitrogen and methane (1.4 and approximately 0.05 bar, respectively). Methane was found to be nearly saturated at Titan's tropopause, which, with other considerations, led to the hypothesis that Titan might experience a methane analogue of Earth's vigorous hydrological cycle, with clouds, rain and seas. Yet recent analyses of Voyager data indicate large areas of super-saturated methane, more indicative of dry and stagnant conditions. A resolution to this apparent contradiction requires observations of Titan's lower atmosphere, which was hidden from the Voyager cameras by the photochemical haze (or smog) in Titan's stratosphere. Here we report near-infrared spectroscopic observations of Titan within four narrow spectral windows where the moon's atmosphere is ostensibly transparent. We detect pronounced flux enhancements that indicate the presence of reflective methane condensation clouds in the troposphere. These clouds occur at a relatively low altitude (15+/-10 km), at low latitudes, and appear to cover approximately 9 per cent of Titan's disk.

  18. Volcanic Effects in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiti, A.; Zhang, S.; Holt, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions have a well observed impact on the lower atmosphere and climate. In the past forty years, two eruptions, El Chichon in 1982 and Pinatubo in 1991, released significant amounts of aerosols. The effects of these two volcanos have been studied in the stratosphere (10km - 50km), but not in the upper atmosphere. This project attempted to find traces of the two eruptions at altitudes of 250km to 500km through temperature trend studies of long-term observations of the upper atmosphere. An ion temperature trend model was refined and then used to subtract solar, geomagnetic, annual, semi-annual, and correlated effects from Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) data, which span more than 3 solar cycles starting in 1970s. After subtraction, the ion temperature residuals were studied around the years 1982 and 1991 for anomalous dips. This modeling technique was then applied to the Sondrestrom (1990-) and St. Santin (1966-1987) ISR sites to validate temperature trends and volcanic effects at different locations., Effects of the 1982 El Chichon eruption appeared to exist with a visible ion temperature drop in Millstone Hill and St. Santin measurements. The 1991 Pinatubo eruption was not immediately present until up to 2 years later over Millstone Hill and Sondrestrom, but this result contains large uncertainty due to solar and magnetic activities. Further study is needed to understand the theoretical effects of volcanic activity at those altitudes and gauge the significance of the observed temperature residuals.

  19. Organic synthesis in the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Ochiai, E.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1981-10-01

    Experimental simulations of organic chemistry taking place in the atmosphere of Titan are presented in light of the recent atmospheric composition data provided by the Voyager spacecraft. In the experiments, a gas mixture of N2 and CH4 in proportions from about 100:1 to 100:4 was irradiated by UV radiation, electric discharges, an electron beam, gamma radiation and a proton beam to assess the possible contributions of the various possible energy sources to atmospheric chemistry on Titan. Analysis of reaction products by GC/MS reveals UV light to produce saturated hydrocarbons such as C2H6 and C3H8 but no appreciable amounts of unsaturated hydrocarbons or nitrogen-containing compounds. Electric discharges and gamma, beta and proton radiation, however, are found to produce HCN and more unsaturated than saturated hydrocarbons. Acetylene is believed to be produced from ethane or ethylene in methanephotolysis, while HCN may be produced from CH2 radicals. The presence of HCN on Titan is interpreted as implying that the chemical processes postulated as involved in the formation of bases and amino acids on the primitive earth may be common in the solar system.

  20. Strain localization in brittle-ductile shear zones: fluid abundant vs fluid limited conditions (an example from Wyangala area, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruzeniece, L.; Piazolo, S.

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on physiochemical processes occurring in a brittle-ductile shear zone at both fluid-present and fluid-limited conditions. In the studied shear zone (Wyangala, SE Australia), a coarse-grained two feldspar-quartz-biotite granite is transformed into a medium grained orthogneiss at the shear zone margins and a fine-grained quartz-muscovite phyllonite in the central parts. The orthogneiss displays cataclasis of feldspar and crystal-plastic deformation of quartz. Quartz accommodates most of the deformation and is extensively recrystallized showing distinct crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Feldspar-to-muscovite, biotite-to-muscovite and albitization reactions occur locally at porphyroclasts' fracture surfaces and margins. However, the bulk rock composition shows very little change in respect to the wall rock composition. In contrast, in the shear zone centre quartz occurs as large, weakly deformed porphyroclasts, in sizes similar to that in the wall rock, suggesting that it has undergone little deformation. Feldspars and biotite are almost completely reacted to muscovite, which is arranged in a fine-grained interconnected matrix. Muscovite-rich layers contain significant amounts of fine-grained intermixed quartz with random CPO. These domains are interpreted to have accommodated most of the strain. Bulk rock chemistry data shows a significant increase in SiO2 and depletion in NaO content compared to the wall rock composition. We suggest that the high and low strain fabrics represent markedly different scenarios and cannot be interpreted as a simple sequential development with respect to strain. We suggest that the fabrics and mineralogical changes in the shear zone centre have formed due to fluid influx probably along an initially brittle fracture. Here, hydration reactions dramatically changed the rheological properties of the rock. In the newly produced muscovite-quartz layers creep cavitation associated with grain boundary sliding and

  1. A Regulation for the Control of Atmospheric Pollution, Amended Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board, San Juan.

    Nine articles, related to the preservation of the natural quality of the air, and to prevention, elimination and control of atmospheric pollution in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, are contained in this document. These articles were written and enacted by the Environmental Quality Board in accordance with Law No. 9, approved June 18, 1970 -…

  2. Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Part 23: Water; Atmospheric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA.

    Standards for water and atmospheric analysis are compiled in this segment, Part 23, of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) annual book of standards. It contains all current formally approved ASTM standard and tentative test methods, definitions, recommended practices, proposed methods, classifications, and specifications. One…

  3. Decrease of the Atmospheric Co-Rotation with Height

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Membrado, M.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Considering our atmosphere as a steady viscous gaseous envelope that co-rotates with the Earth, we obtain a solution for the form in which this induced rotational effect decreases as a function of the distances to the centre of the Earth and to the rotation axis. (Contains 1 figure.)

  4. The status of military specifications with regard to atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, David J.; Heffley, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    The features of atmospheric disturbances that are significant to aircraft flying qualities are discussed. Next follows a survey of proposed models. Lastly, there is a discussion of the content and application of the model contained in the current flying qualities specification and the forthcoming MIL-Standard.

  5. Nanoporous Materials in Atmosphere Revitalization. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, J.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Luna, Bernadette; Junaedi, Christian; Mulloth, Lila; Perry, Jay L.; Raptis, Raphael G.; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric Revitalization (AR) is the term the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) uses to encompass the engineered systems that maintain a safe, breathable gaseous atmosphere inside a habitable space cabin. An AR subsystem is a key part of the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system for habitable space cabins. The ultimate goal for AR subsystem designers is to 'close the loop', that is, to capture gaseous human metabolic products, specifically water vapor (H2O) and Carbon dioxide (CO2), for maximal Oxygen (o2) recovery and to make other useful resources from these products. The AR subsystem also removes trace chemical contaminants from the cabin atmosphere to preserve cabin atmospheric quality, provides O2 and may include instrumentation to monitor cabin atmospheric quality. Long duration crewed space exploration missions require advancements in AR process technologies in order to reduce power consumption and mass and to increase reliability compared to those used for shorter duration missions that are typically limited to Low Earth Orbit. For example, current AR subsystems include separate processors and process air flow loops for removing metabolic CO2 and volatile organic tract contaminants (TCs). Physical adsorbents contained in fixed, packed beds are employed in these processors. Still, isolated pockets of high carbon dioxide have been suggested as a trigger for crew headaches and concern persists about future cabin ammonia (NH3) levels as compared with historical flights. Developers are already focused on certain potential advancements. ECLS systems engineers envision improving the AR subsystem by combining the functions of TC control and CO2 removal into a single regenerable process and moving toward structured sorbents - monoliths - instead of granular material. Monoliths present a lower pressure drop and eliminate particle attrition problems that result from bed containment. New materials and configurations offer promise for

  6. Quality of Golden papaya stored under controlled atmosphere conditions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Derliane Ribeiro; de Resende, Eder Dutra

    2013-10-01

    This work evaluated physicochemical parameters of Golden papaya stored under refrigeration in controlled atmospheres. The fruits were kept at 13  in chambers containing either 3 or 6% O2 combined with 6%, 10% or 15% CO2. Moreover, a normal atmosphere was produced with 20.8% O2 and 0.03% CO2 with ethylene scrubbing, and a control treatment was used with ambient conditions. Evaluations were performed at the following times: before storage, after 30 days of storage in controlled atmosphere, and after removal from controlled atmosphere and storage for 7 days in the cold room. At the lower O2 levels and higher CO2 levels, the ripening rate was decreased. The drop in pulp acidity was avoided after 30 days of storage at 3% O2, but the fruits reached normal acidity after removal from controlled atmosphere and storage for 7 days in the cold room. The reducing sugars remained at a higher concentration after 30 days under 3% O2 and 15% CO2 even 7 days after removal from controlled atmosphere and storage in the cold room. This atmosphere also preserved the content of ascorbic acid at a higher level.

  7. Polyport atmospheric gas sampler

    DOEpatents

    Guggenheim, S. Frederic

    1995-01-01

    An atmospheric gas sampler with a multi-port valve which allows for multi, sequential sampling of air through a plurality of gas sampling tubes mounted in corresponding gas inlet ports. The gas sampler comprises a flow-through housing which defines a sampling chamber and includes a gas outlet port to accommodate a flow of gases through the housing. An apertured sample support plate defining the inlet ports extends across and encloses the sampling chamber and supports gas sampling tubes which depend into the sampling chamber and are secured across each of the inlet ports of the sample support plate in a flow-through relation to the flow of gases through the housing during sampling operations. A normally closed stopper means mounted on the sample support plate and operatively associated with each of the inlet ports blocks the flow of gases through the respective gas sampling tubes. A camming mechanism mounted on the sample support plate is adapted to rotate under and selectively lift open the stopper spring to accommodate a predetermined flow of gas through the respective gas sampling tubes when air is drawn from the housing through the outlet port.

  8. Jupiter Atmospheric Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Huge cyclonic storms, the Great Red Spot and the Little Red Spot, and wispy cloud patterns are seen in fascinating detail in this map of Jupiter's atmosphere obtained January 14-15, 2007, by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI).

    The map combines information from 11 different LORRI images that were taken every hour over a 10-hour period -- a full Jovian day -- from 17:42 UTC on January 14 to 03:42 UTC on January 15. The New Horizons spacecraft was approximately 72 million kilometers (45 million miles) from Jupiter at the time.

    The LORRI pixels on the 'globe' of Jupiter were projected onto a rectilinear grid, similar to the way flat maps of Earth are created. The LORRI pixel intensities were corrected so that every point on the map appears as if the sun were directly overhead; some image sharpening was also applied to enhance detail. The polar regions of Jupiter are not shown on the map because the LORRI images do not sample those latitudes very well and artifacts are produced during the map-projection process.

  9. Atmospheric breakup of meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dasher, Bassem; Swift, Damian; Remington, Bruce; Mulford, Roberta; Milathianaki, Despina; Chen, Laura; Eakins, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    When meteoroids enter a planetary atmosphere, breakup is governed by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, mitigated by the strength of the meteoritic material. Particle sizes in the breakup cascade depend on the perturbation length scales exhibiting growth. The physics of meteoroid entry is thus related closely to experiments where strength at high pressure is inferred from the Rayleigh-Taylor growth of perturbations. There are significant discrepancies between predicted and observed breakup altitudes of meteoroids, which in turn reduce the accuracy of assessments of the impact threat from asteroids. Simulations, validated by laboratory experiments of instability growth, can play a role in understanding the breakup of meteoroids and thus the threat from asteroids. Continuum dynamics simulations provide more rigorous stress distribution than are usually used in breakup analyses, and can be used to calibrate compact expressions describing the breakup conditions. We have measured the strength of samples from Fe-rich meteorites using indentation and shock-loading experiments, and found them to be significantly stronger than was previously realized. This, together with the more accurate stress analysis, removes the altitude discrepancy for Fe-rich meteorites. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. High altitude atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, Alan E.

    1988-01-01

    Five empirical models were compared with 13 data sets, including both atmospheric drag-based data and mass spectrometer data. The most recently published model, MSIS-86, was found to be the best model overall with an accuracy around 15 percent. The excellent overall agreement of the mass spectrometer-based MSIS models with the drag data, including both the older data from orbital decay and the newer accelerometer data, suggests that the absolute calibration of the (ensemble of) mass spectrometers and the assumed drag coefficient in the atomic oxygen regime are consistent to 5 percent. This study illustrates a number of reasons for the current accuracy limit such as calibration accuracy and unmodeled trends. Nevertheless, the largest variations in total density in the thermosphere are accounted for, to a very high degree, by existing models. The greatest potential for improvements is in areas where we still have insufficient data (like the lower thermosphere or exosphere), where there are disagreements in technique (such as the exosphere) which can be resolved, or wherever generally more accurate measurements become available.

  11. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1997-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, M. J.; DeCola, P. L.; Kaye, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology development, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the upper troposphere and stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our chemical and physical understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Research Division in the Office of Earth Science at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort have also been provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aero-Space Technology. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper troposphere and the stratosphere and their control on the distribution of atmospheric chemical species such as ozone; assess possible perturbations to the composition of the atmosphere caused by human activities and natural phenomena (with a specific emphasis on trace gas geographical distributions, sources, and sinks and the role of trace gases in defining the chemical composition of the upper atmosphere); understand the processes affecting the distributions of radiatively active species in the atmosphere, and the importance of chemical-radiative-dynamical feedbacks on the meteorology and climatology of the stratosphere and troposphere; and understand ozone production, loss, and recovery in an atmosphere with increasing abundances of greenhouse gases. The current report is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported

  12. Prenatal Experiences of Containment in the Light of Bion's Model of Container/Contained

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiello, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the idea of possible proto-experiences of the prenatal child in the context of Bion's model of container/contained. The physical configuration of the embryo/foetus contained in the maternal uterus represents the starting point for an enquiry into the unborn child's possible experiences of its state of being contained in a…

  13. Free from the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    An artificial, laser-fed star now shines regularly over the sky of Paranal, home of ESO's Very Large Telescope, one of the world's most advanced large ground-based telescopes. This system provides assistance for the adaptive optics instruments on the VLT and so allows astronomers to obtain images free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere, regardless of the brightness and the location on the sky of the observed target. Now that it is routinely offered by the observatory, the skies seem much sharper to astronomers. In order to counteract the blurring effect of Earth's atmosphere, astronomers use the adaptive optics technique. This requires, however, a nearby reference star that has to be relatively bright, thereby limiting the area of the sky that can be surveyed. To surmount this limitation, astronomers now use at Paranal a powerful laser that creates an artificial star, where and when they need it. Two of the Adaptive Optics (AO) science instruments at the Paranal observatory, NACO and SINFONI, have been upgraded to work with the recently installed Laser Guide Star (LGS; see ESO 07/06) and have delivered their first scientific results. This achievement opens astronomers' access to a wealth of new targets to be studied under the sharp eyes of AO. "These unique results underline the advantage of using a Laser Guide Star with Adaptive Optics instruments, since they could not be obtained with Natural Guide Stars," says Norbert Hubin, head of the Adaptive Optics group at ESO. "This is also a crucial milestone towards the multi-laser systems ESO is designing for the VLT and the future E-ELT" (see e.g. ESO 19/07). ESO PR Photo 27a/07 ESO PR Photo 27a/07 An Ultra Luminous Merger (NACO-LGS/VLT) The Laser Guide Star System installed at Paranal uses the PARSEC dye laser developed by MPE-Garching and MPIA-Heidelberg, while the launch telescope and the laser laboratory was developed by ESO. "It is great to see the whole system working so well together," emphasises Richard

  14. DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1995-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

  15. Organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory photochemical simulations and other types of chemical simulations are discussed. The chemistry of methane, which is the major known constituent of Titan's atmosphere was examined with stress on what can be learned from photochemistry and particle irradiation. The composition of dust that comprises the haze layer was determined. Isotope fractionation in planetary atmospheres is also discussed.

  16. Atmospheric Neutrinos: Background and Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Mocioiu, Irina

    2010-11-24

    We discuss a brief history of atmospheric neutrinos, from background to proton decay searches to proving neutrino oscillations. We then discuss how high statistics atmospheric neutrino measurements in the IceCube Deep Core Array can provide useful information about neutrino oscillation parameters and other neutrino properties.

  17. Planetary atmosphere modeling and predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The capability to generate spacecraft frequency predictions which include the refractive bending effects induced during signal passage through a planetary atmosphere is a pivotal element of the DSN Radio Science System. This article describes the current implementation effort to develop planetary atmosphere modeling and prediction capability.

  18. Atmospheric iodine abates smog ozone.

    PubMed

    HAMILTON, W F; LEVINE, M; SIMON, E

    1963-04-12

    Traces of iodine in test samples of irradiated photochemical smog atmospheres either inhibit ozone formation or lower its concentration. Eye and respiratory irritation are reduced qualitatively. Iodine is more effective in suppressing ozone in a photochemical smog atmosphere than it is in purified air.

  19. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  20. Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Blocker, Rhonda; Justus, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    4D model provides atmospheric parameter values either automatically at positions along linear path or along any set of connected positions specified by user. Based on actual data, GRAM provides thermal wind shear for monthly mean winds, percent deviation from standard atmosphere, mean vertical wind, and perturbation data for each position.

  1. Microwave Atmospheric-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes tests of microwave pressure sounder (MPS) for use in satellite measurements of atmospheric pressure. MPS is multifrequency radar operating between 25 and 80 GHz. Determines signal absorption over vertical path through atmosphere by measuring strength of echoes from ocean surface. MPS operates with cloud cover, and suitable for use on current meteorological satellites.

  2. On the Decadal Modes of Oscillation of an Idealized Ocean-atmosphere System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vikram M.

    1990-01-01

    Axially-symmetric, linear, free modes of global, primitive equation, ocean-atmosphere models are examined to see if they contain decadal (10 to 30 years) oscillation time scale modes. A two-layer ocean model and a two-level atmospheric model are linearized around axially-symmetric basic states containing mean meridional circulations in the ocean and the atmosphere. Uncoupled and coupled, axially-symmetric modes of oscillation of the ocean-atmosphere system are calculated. The main conclusion is that linearized, uncoupled and coupled, ocean-atmosphere systems can contain axially-symmetric, free modes of variability on decadal time scales. These results have important implications for externally-forced decadal climate variability.

  3. Atmospheric composition - Influence of biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    The variability of atmospheric constituents influenced by biological organisms over various time scales is examined, together with the human contribution to atmospheric sulfur. The biogeochemistry of nitrogen is discussed, with an emphasis on N2O, NO, and microbially mediated reactions in soil and water. Carbon species are bound up mainly in sediments and the deep ocean, but human activities involving combustion may cause a doubling of the atmospheric levels of CO2 in the near future, which could produce a general low-level atmospheric warming. Longer term measurements are required to assess the effects of CH4 augmentation in the atmosphere through fuel combustion. Coal burning effectively doubles the amount of SO2 produced by natural sources, and reduces the pH of rainwater, thus posing hazards to fish, plankton, and mollusc life.

  4. Atmospheric Research 2012 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K -M.

    2013-01-01

    This annual report, as before, is intended for a broad audience. Our readers include colleagues within NASA, scientists outside the Agency, science graduate students, and members of the general public. Inside are descriptions of atmospheric research science highlights and summaries of our education and outreach accomplishments for calendar year 2012.The report covers research activities from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office under the Office of Deputy Director for Atmospheres, Earth Sciences Division in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate of NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall mission of the office is advancing knowledge and understanding of the Earths atmosphere. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential to our continuing research.

  5. Io's volcanic and sublimation atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Miguel A.; Schubert, Gerald; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Paige, David A.; Baumgardner, John

    1991-01-01

    Fully 3D axisymmetric gasdynamic equations simulating SO2 and H2S frost sublimation and SO2 dayside and nightside volcanic atmospheres on Io are numerically solved, using a time-explicit finite-volume formulation. Both the sublimation and volcanic atmospheres generate horizontal supersonic winds away from the subsolar point or the volcanic vent. While the sublimation atmosphere is primarily driven by horizontal pressure gradients determined by surface temperatures, the volcanic atmosphere is driven by pressure gradients that are determined by the source rate. Sublimation and condensation produce patterns of surface deposits which are characteristic of the two types of atmospheres. The volcanic model is quantitatively consistent with Voyager observations of ring deposits.

  6. Chemistry Of Atmospheric Brown Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2015-05-27

    Organic carbon (OC) accounts for a large fraction of atmospheric aerosol and has profound effects on air quality, atmospheric chemistry and climate forcing. Molecular composition of the OC and its evolution during common processes of atmospheric aging have been a subject of extensive research over the last decade (see reviews of Ervens et al.,1 Hallquist et al.,2 Herckes et al.,3 Carlton et al.,4 Kroll and Seinfeld,5 Rudich et al.,6 and Kanakidou et al.7). Even though many fundamental advances have been reported in these studies, our understanding of the climate-related properties of atmospheric OC is still incomplete and the specific ways in which OC impacts atmospheric environment and climate forcing are just beginning to be understood. This review covers one topic of particular interest in this area –environmental chemistry of light-absorbing aerosol OC and its impact on radiative forcing.

  7. Linkages between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretherton, Francis; Dickinson, Robert E.; Fung, Inez; Moore, Berrien, III; Prather, Michael; Running, Steven W.; Tiessen, Holm

    1992-01-01

    The primary research issue in understanding the role of terrestrial ecosystems in global change is analyzing the coupling between processes with vastly differing rates of change, from photosynthesis to community change. Representing this coupling in models is the central challenge to modeling the terrestrial biosphere as part of the earth system. Terrestrial ecosystems participate in climate and in the biogeochemical cycles on several temporal scales. Some of the carbon fixed by photosynthesis is incorporated into plant tissue and is delayed from returning to the atmosphere until it is oxidized by decomposition or fire. This slower (i.e., days to months) carbon loop through the terrestrial component of the carbon cycle, which is matched by cycles of nutrients required by plants and decomposers, affects the increasing trend in atmospheric CO2 concentration and imposes a seasonal cycle on that trend. Moreover, this cycle includes key controls over biogenic trace gas production. The structure of terrestrial ecosystems, which responds on even longer time scales (annual to century), is the integrated response to the biogeochemical and environmental constraints that develop over the intermediate time scale. The loop is closed back to the climate system since it is the structure of ecosystems, including species composition, that sets the terrestrial boundary condition in the climate system through modification of surface roughness, albedo, and, to a great extent, latent heat exchange. These separate temporal scales contain explicit feedback loops which may modify ecosystem dynamics and linkages between ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term change in climate, resulting from increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, and nitrous oxide (N2O)) will further modify the global environment and potentially induce further ecosystem change. Modeling these interactions requires coupling successional models to biogeochemical models to

  8. Methane venting to the atmosphere from sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhova, Natalia; Semiletov, Igor; Salyuk, Anatoly; Joussupov, Vladimir; Kosmach, Denis; Gustafsson, Orjan; Leifer, Ira

    2010-05-01

    Sustained release of methane to the atmosphere from thawing Arctic permafrost likely is a strong positive feedback to climate warming. A climate impact of Arctic methane releases is implied by past climate shifts and may play a role in the renewed growth of contemporary atmospheric methane. Observed Arctic warming in early 21st century is stronger than predicted by several degrees, which may accelerate thaw-release of methane. The East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS, encompassing the Laptev, East Siberian and Russian part of the Chuckchi Seas) occupies an area of 2.1×106 km2, three times as great as terrestrial Siberian wetlands. It is a shallow seaward extension of the Siberian tundra that was flooded during the Holocene transgression 7-15 kyr ago. The ESAS sub-sea permafrost, (frozen sediments inter-layered with the flooded peatland) contains not only comparable amounts of carbon as still land-fast permafrost in the Siberian tundra, but also sequesters permafrost-related seabed deposits of CH4. Remobilization to the atmosphere of only a small fraction of the methane trapped in ESAS sediments could trigger abrupt climate warming. Currently it is hypothesized that sub-sea permafrost acts as a lid retaining this shallow methane reservoir. However, estimates of ESAS methane emissions based on recent observations indicate the current atmospheric budget, which arises from gradual diffusion and ebullition, is on par with estimates of methane emissions from the entire World Ocean. Large transient emissions remain to be assessed; yet initial data suggest this component could increase significantly annual emissions. These study results show methane leakage from the shallow ESAS needs consideration in interactions between the biogeosphere and a warming Arctic climate.

  9. An atmospheric visual analysis and exploration system.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuyan; Ye, Jing; Svakhine, Nikolai; Lasher-Trapp, Sonia; Baldwin, Mike; Ebert, David S

    2006-01-01

    Meteorological research involves the analysis of multi-field, multi-scale, and multi-source data sets. In order to better understand these data sets, models and measurements at different resolutions must be analyzed. Unfortunately, traditional atmospheric visualization systems only provide tools to view a limited number of variables and small segments of the data. These tools are often restricted to two-dimensional contour or vector plots or three-dimensional isosurfaces. The meteorologist must mentally synthesize the data from multiple plots to glean the information needed to produce a coherent picture of the weather phenomenon of interest. In order to provide better tools to meteorologists and reduce system limitations, we have designed an integrated atmospheric visual analysis and exploration system for interactive analysis of weather data sets. Our system allows for the integrated visualization of 1D, 2D, and 3D atmospheric data sets in common meteorological grid structures and utilizes a variety of rendering techniques. These tools provide meteorologists with new abilities to analyze their data and answer questions on regions of interest, ranging from physics-based atmospheric rendering to illustrative rendering containing particles and glyphs. In this paper, we will discuss the use and performance of our visual analysis for two important meteorological applications. The first application is warm rain formation in small cumulus clouds. Here, our three-dimensional, interactive visualization of modeled drop trajectories within spatially correlated fields from a cloud simulation has provided researchers with new insight. Our second application is improving and validating severe storm models, specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. This is done through correlative visualization of WRF model and experimental Doppler storm data.

  10. Studies of Tenuous Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand the physical and chemical processes which produce the dust comae in comets and various tenuous planetary and planetary satellite (upper) atmospheres through interactions with their particle, field, and radiation environs, it is necessary analyze remotely observed and spacecraft data with physically meaningful models. With this in mind, we have undertaken a coupled program of theoretical modeling and complementary data analysis regarding the distribution of dust in comets, and the global distributions of neutral and ionized gases in, and escape from, tenuous planetary atmospheres. The nature of the atmospheres and ionospheres of Jupiter's natural satellites Io and Europa and their interactions with their surrounding radiation, and particles and fields environments is a very active and timely field of study. Various kinds of work, depending on different regime-dependent approaches have been adopted in recent years, with the hope of understanding the basic global structure of the atmospheres, and their interactions with solar radiation and with the Jovian plasma torus environment. Io's interaction with Jupiter's corotating plasma torus has been studied for over 25 years. Io has a neutral atmosphere which is probably locally thick but rather uneven across its surface. (See Lellouch 1996 for an excellent review of pre-1996 literature.) The ultimate source for atmospheric gases appears to be the numerous active volcanoes on the surface, moderated by condensation and sublimation from the surface. The energetic particle environment near Io is responsible for the balance of the plasma heating, Joule heating, ionization, and surface d responsible I an atmospheric sputtering, and in some form drives the escape of the neutral atmosphere. The tenuous atmosphere portion of our work involves developing and applying coupled three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and fully kinetic ion and neutral Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models to describe the upper

  11. Cyberinfrastructure for Atmospheric Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmson, R.; Moore, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    Each year across the United States, floods, tornadoes, hail, strong winds, lightning, hurricanes, and winter storms cause hundreds of deaths, routinely disrupt transportation and commerce, and result in billions of dollars in annual economic losses . MEAD and LEAD are two recent efforts aimed at developing the cyberinfrastructure for studying and forecasting these events through collection, integration, and analysis of observational data coupled with numerical simulation, data mining, and visualization. MEAD (Modeling Environment for Atmospheric Discovery) has been funded for two years as an NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) Alliance Expedition. The goal of this expedition has been the development/adaptation of cyberinfrastructure that will enable research simulations, datamining, machine learning and visualization of hurricanes and storms utilizing the high performance computing environments including the TeraGrid. Portal grid and web infrastructure are being tested that will enable launching of hundreds of individual WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) simulations. In a similar way, multiple Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) or WRF/ROMS simulations can be carried out. Metadata and the resulting large volumes of data will then be made available for further study and for educational purposes using analysis, mining, and visualization services. Initial coupling of the ROMS and WRF codes has been completed and parallel I/O is being implemented for these models. Management of these activities (services) are being enabled through Grid workflow technologies (e.g. OGCE). LEAD (Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery) is a recently funded 5-year, large NSF ITR grant that involves 9 institutions who are developing a comprehensive national cyberinfrastructure in mesoscale meteorology, particularly one that can interoperate with others being developed. LEAD is addressing the fundamental information technology (IT) research challenges needed

  12. Measuring the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz Rodriguez, Jaime

    2010-11-01

    The new CRISP filter at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope provides opportunities for observing the solar atmosphere with unprecedented spatial resolution and cadence. In order to benefit from the high quality of observational data from this instrument, we have developed methods for calibrating and restoring polarized Stokes images, obtained at optical and near infrared wavelengths, taking into account field-of-view variations of the filter properties. In order to facilitate velocity measurements, a time series from a 3D hydrodynamical granulation simulation is used to compute quiet Sun spectral line profiles at different heliocentric angles. The synthetic line profiles, with their convective blueshifts, can be used as absolute references for line-of-sight velocities. Observations of the Ca II 8542 Å line are used to study magnetic fields in chromospheric fibrils. The line wings show the granulation pattern at mid-photospheric heights whereas the overlying chromosphere is seen in the core of the line. Using full Stokes data, we have attempted to observationally verify the alignment of chromospheric fibrils with the magnetic field. Our results suggest that in most cases fibrils are aligned along the magnetic field direction, but we also find examples where this is not the case. Detailed interpretation of Stokes data from spectral lines formed in the chromospheric data can be made using non-LTE inversion codes. For the first time, we use a realistic 3D MHD chromospheric simulation of the quiet Sun to assess how well NLTE inversions recover physical quantities from spectropolarimetric observations of Ca II 8542 Å. We demonstrate that inversions provide realistic estimates of depth-averaged quantities in the chromosphere, although high spectral resolution and high sensitivity are needed to measure quiet Sun chromospheric magnetic fields.

  13. MARCS model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plez, B.

    2008-12-01

    In this review presented at the Symposium A Stellar Journey in Uppsala, June 2008, I give an account of the historical development of the MARCS code, and its premises from the first version published in 1975 to the 2008 grid. The primary driver for the development team who constantly strive to include the best possible physical data, is the science that can be done with the models. A few preliminary comparisons of M star model spectra to spectrophotometric observations are presented. Particular results related to opacity effects are discussed. The size of errors in spectral energy distribution (SED) and model thermal stratification is estimated for different densities of wavelength sampling. The number of points used in the MARCS 2008 grid (108 000) is large enough to ensure errors of only a few K in all models of the grid, except the optically very thin layers of metal-poor stars. Errors in SEDs may reach about 10% locally in the UV. The published sampled SEDs are thus adequate to compute synthetic broadband photometry, but higher resolution spectra will be computed in the near future and published as well on the MARCS site (marcs.astro.uu.se). Test model calculations with TiO line opacity accounted for in scattering show significant cooling of the upper atmospheric layers of red giants. Rough estimates of radiative and collisional time scales for electronic transitions of TiO indicate that scattering may well be the dominant mechanism in these lines. However, models constructed with this hypothesis are incompatible with optical observations of TiO (Arcturus) or IR observations of OH (Betelgeuse), although they may succeed in explaining H2O line observations. More work is needed in that direction.

  14. Droplet structure interactions in direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L. Jr.; Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    Direct containment heating (DCH) in light water reactors can occur during severe accidents that involve the meltout of the bottom of the reactor vessel while the vessel is at high pressure. The ejected core debris can heat and pressurize the atmosphere and challenge the integrity of containment. The results of recent large-scale direct containment heating tests in the Surtsey facility at the Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the importance of the interactions of core debris with structure. In the DCH-2, -3, and -4 tests, > 50% of the simulated core debris injected into the large vessel was found frozen to the ceiling or sidewalls. This finding led to questions concerning the detailed physics of debris/structure interactions. It was expected that vigorous splashing assisted by gravity would have limited the quantity of frozen debris to much smaller amounts. Accordingly, a search of the technical literature was undertaken in the areas of liquid drop interactions with surfaces and with other liquid drops to provide the bases for modeling. The available information was reviewed for applicability to the DCH process. The results of the search and review led to a correlation for the splashing process and a preliminary explanation of the DCH test results in the form of illustrative models.

  15. CONTAIN code analyses of direct containment heating (DCH) experiments: Model assessment and phenomenological interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Tadios, E.L.; Washington, K.E.

    1995-05-12

    Models for direct containment heating (DCH) in the CONTAIN code for severe accident analysis have been reviewed and a standard input prescription for their use has been defined. The code has been exercised against a large subset of the available DCH data base. Generally good agreement with the experimental results for containment pressurization ({Delta}P) and hydrogen generation has been obtained. Extensive sensitivity studies have been performed which permit assessment of many of the strengths and weaknesses of specific model features. These include models for debris transport and trapping, DCH heat transfer and chemistry, atmosphere-structure heat transfer, interactions between nonairborne debris and blowdown steam, potential effects of debris-water interactions, and hydrogen combustion under DCH conditions. Containment compartmentalization is an important DCH mitigator in the calculations, in agreement with experimental results. The CONTAIN model includes partially parametric treatments for some processes that are not well understood. The importance of the associated uncertainties depends upon the details of the DCH scenario being analyzed. Recommended sensitivity studies are summarized that allow the user to obtain a reasonable estimate of the uncertainties in the calculated results.

  16. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A summary final report of work accomplished is presented. Work was performed in the following areas: (1) Galileo Probe science analysis, (2) Galileo probe Atmosphere Structure Instrument, (3) Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Structure/Meteorology instrument, (4) Mars Pathfinder data analysis, (5) Science Definition for future Mars missions, (6) Viking Lander data analysis, (7) winds in Mars atmosphere Venus atmospheric dynamics, (8) Pioneer Venus Probe data analysis, (9) Pioneer Venus anomaly analysis, (10) Discovery Venus Probe Titan probe instrument design, and (11) laboratory studies of Titan probe impact phenomena. The work has resulted in more than 10 articles published in archive journals, 2 encyclopedia articles, and many working papers. This final report is organized around the four planets on which there was activity, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Titan, with a closing section on Miscellaneous Activities. A major objective was to complete the fabrication, test, and evaluation of the atmosphere structure experiment on the Galileo probe, and to receive, analyze and interpret data received from the spacecraft. The instrument was launched on April 14, 1989. Calibration data were taken for all experiment sensors. The data were analyzed, fitted with algorithms, and summarized in a calibration report for use in analyzing and interpreting data returned from Jupiter's atmosphere. The sensors included were the primary science pressure, temperature and acceleration sensors, and the supporting engineering temperature sensors. Computer programs were written to decode the Experiment Data Record and convert the digital numbers to physical quantities, i.e., temperatures, pressures, and accelerations. The project office agreed to obtain telemetry of checkout data from the probe. Work to extend programs written for use on the Pioneer Venus project included: (1) massive heat shield ablation leading to important mass loss during entry; and (2) rapid planet rotation, which introduced

  17. CONTAINER MATERIALS, FABRICATION AND ROBUSTNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Louthan, M.; Rawls, G.; Sindelar, R.; Zapp, P.; Mcclard, J.

    2009-11-10

    The multi-barrier 3013 container used to package plutonium-bearing materials is robust and thereby highly resistant to identified degradation modes that might cause failure. The only viable degradation mechanisms identified by a panel of technical experts were pressurization within and corrosion of the containers. Evaluations of the container materials and the fabrication processes and resulting residual stresses suggest that the multi-layered containers will mitigate the potential for degradation of the outer container and prevent the release of the container contents to the environment. Additionally, the ongoing surveillance programs and laboratory studies should detect any incipient degradation of containers in the 3013 storage inventory before an outer container is compromised.

  18. Atmospheric transport of persistent pollutants governs uptake by holarctic terrestrial biota

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, P.; Okla, L.; Woin, Per )

    1990-10-01

    The atmospheric deposition of PCBs, DDT, and lindane, governed uptake in terrestrial biota in the Scandinavian peninsula. Mammalian herbivores and predators as well as predatory insects contained higher levels of pollutants at locations where the fallout load was high than at stations where atmospheric deposition was lower, and the two variables were significantly correlated.

  19. AVC Helps Teachers View the Atmosphere and Play in the Sand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaus, Christopher; Andrew, Keith; McCollum, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Atmospheric Visualization Collection (AVC), part of the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) that contains an archive of weather images as well as a collection of educational material that uses the images to teach atmospheric science concepts. Discusses the potential use of this information for K-12 and undergraduate students.…

  20. Atmospheric Entry Heating of Micrometeorites Revisited: Higher Temperatures and Potential Biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, S.; Alexander, C. M. OD.

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric entry heating model of Love and Brownlee appears to have overestimated evaporation rates by as much as two orders of magnitude. Here we revisit the issue of atmospheric entry heating, using a revised prescription for evaporation rates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. The Measurement of Atmospheric Concentrations and Deposition of Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David S.; Nicholson, Ken W.

    1994-01-01

    Provides a physical description of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), both in terms of their characteristic nature in the atmosphere and the processes which control their deposition. Contains a summary of the requirements for a full assessment of atmospheric SVOCs and their deposition. (LZ)

  2. Wet atmospheric generation apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamner, Richard M. (Inventor); Allen, Janice K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention described relates to an apparatus for providing a selectively humidified gas to a camera canister containing cameras and film used in space. A source of pressurized gas (leak test gas or motive gas) is selected by a valve, regulated to a desired pressure by a regulator, and routed through an ejector (venturi device). A regulated source of water vapor in the form of steam from a heated reservoir is coupled to a low pressure region of the ejector which mixes with high velocity gas flow through the ejector. This mixture is sampled by a dew point sensor to obtain dew point thereof (ratio of water vapor to gas) and the apparatus adjusted by varying gas pressure or water vapor to provide a mixture at a connector having selected humidity content.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Simulations of hot gas planets atmospheres (Salz+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, M.; Czesla, S.; Schneider, P. C.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-11-01

    The following tables contain the simulation results from the publication. Each table contains a 1D spherically symmetric, hydrodynamically escaping thermosphere of a hot gas planet. The atmospheres contain hydrogen and helium, and no molecules. The simulations were performed with the PLUTO-CLOUDY interface (Salz et al., Cat. J/A+A/576/A21). Each table contains a header, which specifies the system parameters, that where used for the simulations. The simulation region extends to 12/15 planetary radii, but the atmospheres are only approximately valid up to the Roche-lobe height, above which the spherical approximation is invalid. The Roche-lobe height is also given in the header. In the cases of WASP-10 b and WASP-8 b the atmospheres are hydrodynamically stable and the atmospheres extend only up to the exobase defined for proton-proton scattering as given in the publication. (17 data files).

  4. Germination of fungal conidia after exposure to low concentration ozone atmospheres.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The germinability of conidia of Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium expansum, or Penicillium italicum was determined periodically during exposure for approximately 100 days to a humid atmosphere of air alone or air containing 150 ppb ozone ...

  5. Mechanism for production of secondary organic aerosols and their representation in atmospheric models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1999-06-07

    This document contains the following: organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons; gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to model inorganic, organic, and ambient smog aerosols; and representation of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models.

  6. Global distribution of Pluto's atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L.; Stern, S.A.

    1983-04-15

    Pluto's volatile atmosphere currently extends essentially uniformly around the globe and has nearly uniform thickness, discounting topographic elevation differences and tidal effects. Although in equilibrium with the surface ice, the atmosphere does not noticeably freeze out on the night side, during eclipses of the Sun by Charon, or at the poles during Pluto's present season near perihelion. The bulk thermal tide is negligible. The rotational and tidal deformations of the atmosphere affect the atmospheric thickness of 0.6--2% for a pure CH/sub 4/ atmosphere, depending on the unknown mass of Charon, and up to 15% for an atmosphere with high mean molecular weight. An important consequence of the global uniformity of Pluto's atmosphere and the observed CH/sub 4/ column abundance of 27 +- 7 m--Am is that Pluto's surface is close to 58 K over the entire globe. This compares with the value approx.43 K expected on the basis of insolation and blackbody radiation. We suggest that the explanation for Pluto's elevated surface temperature is the low thermal emissivity of solid CH/sub 4/, expected on the basis of the absence of a rotational spectrum in the gas. Solid CH/sub 4/, which covers an appreciable portion of Pluto's surface, can absorb sunlight in the visible and near-infrared bands but lacks opacity at thermal wavelengths to radiate the absorbed energy efficiently.

  7. Model simulations for Europa's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. C.; Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.

    2000-10-01

    Europa's tenuous atmosphere is thought to be produced from sputtering of surface species (predominantly H2O ice ) by heavy ions in the Jovian magnetosphere. Because of its low residence time at Europa's surface temperature, O2, a stable decomposition product of H2O, has been predicted to exist in a significant amount in Europa's atmosphere [Johnson et al. 1982, Eviatar et al. 1985, Johnson 1990]. Recent HST observations have confirmed that and suggested an O2 atmospheric column of 1015 cm-2 on Europa [Hall et al. 1995]. Recent theoretical studies applied to modeling of pure oxygen atmospheres on Europa [Ip et al. 1996, Saur et al. 1998, Shematovich and Johnson 2000] have produced results that are consistent with the above scenerio. In addition to water products, recent observations from Galileo NIMS instruments have suggested the existence of hydrated salt minerals and sulfuric acid on Europa's surface [McCord et al. 1999, Carlson et al. 1999]. Therefore, it is expected that decomposition of these materials by magnetospheric ions can produce volatile species such as H2S, SO2, CO2 and Na in Europa's atmosphere. In fact, Na has been identified in the extended atmosphere of Europa [Brown and Hill, 1996]. In this paper, we will use a kinetic model to study the fate and abundance of these volatile species in addition to simulating the formation of an oxygen atmosphere on Europa.

  8. Earth surface-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppmann, R.; Fiedler, F.

    2003-04-01

    The German Atmospheric Research Program (AFO2000) consists of 155 scientific contributions organised in 25 joint projects, 11 individual projects and 5 young scientist groups. The overall aim of AFO2000 is to improve the understanding of the atmospheric system, to develop and supply instruments for environmental policy, and to support young scientists in the field of atmospheric research. 10 of these projects investigate transport processes between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere. Biogenic emissions of trace gases and their influence on the chemistry in the lower atmosphere are studied in detail by field experiments at selected forest sites in Germany and by simulation experiments. Together with numerical simulations and elaborated emission inventories the results will be used to estimate changes in emissions due to land use changes and climatic changes. To understand the observed distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere chemical mechanisms are studied, which lead to the transformation of these compounds. It is necessary to integrate individual processes within complex models in order to detect unknown interactions and be able to make forecasts on future developments . Fluxes of aerosol and gases from the soil to the lower atmosphere are also investigated. Research activities address the different contributions to these fluxes from urban and rural areas by vertical soundings in the lower troposphere and by remote sensing. Complementary to these activities model simulations over differently sized areas are also performed. A further focus of these projects are quantitative descriptions of transport and turbulent diffusion of trace compounds, moisture, momentum, and energy in the atmosphere above different landscapes. Therefore additional flow structures induced by heterogeneous land use and terrain relief are studied in detail. To investigate these transport processes innovative measurement systems, ground based stations (anchor stations) and also modern

  9. Venus Atmospheric Maneuverable Platform (VAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro Griffin, Kristen L.; Sokol, D.; Dailey, D.; Lee, G.; Polidan, R.

    2013-10-01

    We have explored a possible new approach to Venus upper atmosphere exploration by applying Northrop Grumman (non-NASA) development programs to the challenges associated with Venus upper atmosphere science missions. Our concept is a low ballistic coefficient (<50 Pa), semi-buoyant aircraft that deploys prior to entering the Venus atmosphere, enters the atmosphere without an aeroshell, and provides a long-lived (months to years), maneuverable vehicle capable of carrying science payloads to explore the Venus upper atmosphere. In this presentation we report results from our ongoing study and plans for future analyses and prototyping. We discuss the overall mission architecture and concept of operations from launch through Venus arrival, orbit, entry, and atmospheric science operations. We present a strawman concept of VAMP, including ballistic coefficient, planform area, percent buoyancy, inflation gas, wing span, vehicle mass, power supply, propulsion, materials considerations, structural elements, subsystems, and packaging. The interaction between the VAMP vehicle and the supporting orbiter will also be discussed. In this context, we specifically focus upon four key factors impacting the design and performance of VAMP: 1. Feasibility of and options for the deployment of the vehicle in space 2. Entry into the Venus atmosphere, including descent profile, heat rate, total heat load, stagnation temperature, control, and entry into level flight 3. Characteristics of flight operations and performance in the Venus atmosphere: altitude range, latitude and longitude access, day/night performance, aircraft performance (aerodynamics, power required vs. power available, propulsion, speed, percent buoyancy), performance sensitivity to payload weight 4. Science payload accommodation, constraints, and opportunities We discuss interdependencies of the above factors and the manner in which the VAMP strawman’s characteristics affect the CONOPs and the science objectives. We show how

  10. Titan's Polar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Achterberg, R. K.; Schinder, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini CIRS and Radio-Occultation measurements obtained in 2004-2015 have tracked the evolution of temperatures and winds in Titan's polar atmosphere, as the winter season shifted from the northern hemisphere to the southern. The dissolution of the strong circumpolar vortex initially seen in the northern hemisphere has been gradual. There is no evidence of the rapid distortion and disruption forced by planetary waves that can occur on Earth. Indeed, neither Cassini experiment has identified any thermal signature attributable to planetary-scale waves. The south-polar region has turned wintry fairly abruptly: temperature and zonal wind maps from CIRS data show that the 1-mbar temperatures at high southern latitudes in late autumn are already much colder than those at the corresponding latitudes in the north in midwinter, when the first extensive polar measurements were obtained. The south-polar region now has a strong circumpolar vortex, with maximum stratospheric winds occurring near 60° S, in contrast to the northern hemisphere in winter, where the polar vortex was much broader, extending to 20°-30° N. Potential vorticity maps now indicate steep meridional gradients at high southern latitudes, implying a barrier to efficient mixing between the polar region and lower latitudes. Radio-occultations have higher vertical resolution than CIRS, and they have recently probed latitudes as high as 65° in both hemispheres (latitudes closer to the pole are precluded because of the geometry of Earth occultations and the season). Above 80 km at these latitudes, where the radiative damping times are small enough that temperatures have large seasonal variations, the stratosphere in the north has warmed, and it has become much colder in the south. The abrupt transition region with negative vertical temperature gradient between 80 and 100 km, which was seen at high northern latitudes in winter, has weakened, but it is still visible. In the south, one can see the early stage of

  11. Scientific investigations of atmospheric processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Research was performed in atmospheric, dynamical, and thermodynamical processes and in other disciplines necessary to accomplish the following tasks: develop procedures for combining generalized radiative transfer codes with dynamic atmospheric model codes; perform diagnostic analysis of atmospheric processes to gain a better understanding of the evolution and development of mesoscale circulation systems and their precipitation structures; and to develop algorithms and software necessary to graphically display diagnostic sets on the MSFC McIDAS and EADS to facilitate scientific study and sensor capability evaluation. Research activities during this reporting period are detailed.

  12. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere?

  13. New atmospheric sensor analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, K. G.

    1989-01-01

    The functional capabilities of the ESAD Research Computing Facility are discussed. The system is used in processing atmospheric measurements which are used in the evaluation of sensor performance, conducting design-concept simulation studies, and also in modeling the physical and dynamical nature of atmospheric processes. The results may then be evaluated to furnish inputs into the final design specifications for new space sensors intended for future Spacelab, Space Station, and free-flying missions. In addition, data gathered from these missions may subsequently be analyzed to provide better understanding of requirements for numerical modeling of atmospheric phenomena.

  14. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere? PMID:20299587

  15. Atmospheric transmission computer program CP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Barnett, T. L.; Korb, C. L.; Hanby, W.; Dillinger, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is described which allows for calculation of the effects of carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, ozone, carbon monoxide, and nitrous oxide on earth resources remote sensing techniques. A flow chart of the program and operating instructions are provided. Comparisons are made between the atmospheric transmission obtained from laboratory and spacecraft spectrometer data and that obtained from a computer prediction using a model atmosphere and radiosonde data. Limitations of the model atmosphere are discussed. The computer program listings, input card formats, and sample runs for both radiosonde data and laboratory data are included.

  16. Self-contained exothermic applicator and process

    DOEpatents

    Koehmstedt, Paul L.

    1984-01-01

    An adhesive resin application system which requires no external heating apparatus, and which is operative in the absence of a reactive atmosphere, is disclosed. The system provides its own heat by employing an adhesive material containing reactants which react exothermally when electrically ignited. After ignition of the reactants, sufficient heat energy is liberated by the exothermic reaction either to plasticize a thermoplastic resin or to cure a thermosetting resin and therby bond together two closely spaced objects. This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 489,006, filed Apr. 27, 1983, which is a continuation-in-part of application, Ser. No. 929,120, filed July 28, 1978, both now abandoned.

  17. Atmospheric neutrino flux calculation using the NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    2015-07-01

    We extend our calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes to polar and tropical regions. It is well known that the air density profiles in the polar and the tropical regions are different from the mid-latitude region. Also there are large seasonal variations in the polar region. In this extension, we use the NRLMSISE-00 global atmospheric model J. M. Picone, J. Geophys. Res. 107, SIA 15 (2002), replacing the U.S.-standard 1976 atmospheric model, which has no positional or seasonal variations. With the NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model, we study the atmospheric neutrino flux at the polar and tropical regions with seasonal variations. The geomagnetic model international geomagnetic reference field (IGRF) we have used in our calculations seems accurate enough in the polar regions also. However, the polar and the equatorial regions are the two extremes in the IGRF model, and the magnetic field configurations are largely different from one another. Note that the equatorial region is also the tropical region generally. We study the effect of the geomagnetic field on the atmospheric neutrino flux in these extreme regions.

  18. Cluster Ions and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    We investigate the properties and possible roles of naturally occurring ions under at- mospheric conditions. Among other things, the formation of stable charged molecular clusters represents the initial stages of aerosol nucleation [e.g., Keesee and Castle- man, 1982], while the conversion of vapor to aggregates is the first step in certain atmospheric phase transitions [e.g. Hamill and Turco, 2000]. We analyze the stability and size distributions of common ionic clusters by solving the differential equations describing their growth and loss. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are deter- mined using kinetic and thermodynamic data. The latter are derived from direct labo- ratory measurements of equilibrium constants, from the classical charged liquid drop model applied to large aggregates (i.e., the Thomson model [Thomson, 1906]), and from quantum mechanical calculations of the thermodynamic potentials associated with the cluster structures. This approach allows us to characterize molecular clusters across the entire size range from true molecular species to larger aggregates exhibiting macroscopic behavior [D'Auria, 2001]. Cluster systems discussed in this talk include the proton hydrates (PHs) and nitrate-water and nitrate-nitric acid series [D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. These ions have frequently been detected in the stratosphere and tropo- sphere [e.g., Arnold et al., 1977; Viggiano and Arnold, 1981]. We show how the pro- posed hybrid cluster model can be extended to a wide range of ion systems, including non-proton hydrates (NPHs), mixed-ligand clusters such as nitrate-water-nitric acid and sulfate-sulfuric acid-water, as well as more exotic species containing ammonia, pyridine and other organic compounds found on ions [e.g., Eisele, 1988; Tanner and Eisele, 1991]. References: Arnold, F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of posi- tive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. D'Auria, R., A study of ionic

  19. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Franklin R.

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  20. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  1. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1997-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition.

  2. (Chemistry of the global atmosphere)

    SciTech Connect

    Marland, G.

    1990-09-27

    The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

  3. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  4. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric research in the Earth Sciences Division (610) consists of research and technology development programs dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmosphere and its interaction with the climate of Earth. The Division's goals are to improve understanding of the dynamics and physical properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; atmospheric chemistry, including the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and radiative properties of Earth's atmosphere and the influence of solar variability on the Earth's climate. Major research activities are carried out in the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office. The overall scope of the research covers an end-to-end process, starting with the identification of scientific problems, leading to observation requirements for remote-sensing platforms, technology and retrieval algorithm development; followed by flight projects and satellite missions; and eventually, resulting in data processing, analyses of measurements, and dissemination from flight projects and missions. Instrument scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology to remotely sense the atmosphere. Members of the various Laboratories conduct field measurements for satellite sensor calibration and data validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud resolving models, and developing the next-generation Earth system models. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential at every stage of the research process to meeting our goals and maintaining leadership of the

  5. Atmospheres in a Test Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, R.; Erculiani, M. S.; Giro, E.; D'Alessandro, M.; Galletta, G.

    2013-09-01

    The "Atmosphere in a Test Tube" project is a laboratory experiment that will be able to reproduce condition of extreme environments by means of a simulator. These conditions span from those existing inside some parts of the human body to combinations of temperatures, pressures, irradiation and atmospheric gases present on other planets. In this latter case the experiments to be performed will be useful as preliminary tests for both simulation of atmosphere of exoplanets and Solar System planets and Astrobiology experiments that should be performed by planetary landers or by instruments to be launched in the next years. In particular at INAF Astronomical Observatory of Padova Laboratory we are approaching the characterization of extrasolar planet atmospheres taking advantage by innovative laboratory experiments with a particular focus on low mass Neptunes and Super earths and low mass M dwarfs primaries.

  6. Shuttle atmospheric lidar research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Shuttle atmospheric lidar program is discussed in relation to an understanding of the processes governing the Earth's atmosphere and in the capacity to evaluate the atmospheric susceptibility to manmade and natural perturbations. Applications of the lidar which are discussed are the determination of the global flow of water vapor and pollutants in the troposphere, improvement of chemical and transport models of the stratosphere and mesosphere, evaluation of radiative models of the atmosphere, investigation of chemistry and transport of thermospheric atomic species, and investigation of magnetospheric aspects of sun/weather relationships. The features of the lidar measurements discussed are the high spatial resolution, control of the source wavelength and intensity, and high measurement specificity.

  7. Southeast Atmosphere Studies Workshop 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of atmospheric trace species in the United States have changed dramatically over the past several decades in response to pollution control strategies, shifts in domestic energy policy, and economic development (and resulting emission changes) elsewhere in the world...

  8. Early Earth: Atmosphere's solar shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ramses

    2016-06-01

    Frequent storms on the young Sun would have ejected energetic particles and compressed Earth's magnetosphere. Simulations suggest that the particles penetrated the atmosphere and initiated reactions that warmed the planet and fertilized life.

  9. Uranus atmospheric dynamics and circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Michael; Beebe, Reta F.; Conrath, Barney J.; Hinson, David P.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1991-01-01

    The observations, models, and theories relevant to the atmospheric dynamics and meteorology of Uranus are discussed. The available models for the large-scale heat transport and atmospheric dynamics as well as diagnostic interpretations of the Voyager data are reviewed. Some pertinent ideas and questions regarding the global circulation balance are considered, partly in comparison with other planetary atmospheres. The available data indicate atmospheric rotation at midlatitudes nearly 200 m/s faster than that of the planetary magnetic field. Analysis of the dynamical deformation of the shape and size of isobaric surfaces measured by the Voyager radio-occultation experiment suggests a subrotating equator at comparable altitudes. Infrared temperature retrievals above the cloud deck indicate a smaller equator-to-pole contrast than expected for purely radiative-convective equilibrium, but show local variations implying a latitudinally correlated decrease with altitude in the cloud-tracked wind.

  10. Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code

    1991-11-20

    The Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) is a real-time emergency response modeling capability designed to advise Emergency Managers of the path, timing, and projected impacts from an atmospheric release. TRAC evaluates the effects of both radiological and non-radiological hazardous substances, gases and particulates. Using available surface and upper air meteorological information, TRAC realistically treats complex sources and atmospheric conditions, such as those found in mountainous terrain. TRAC calculates atmospheric concentration, deposition, and dose for more thanmore » 25,000 receptor locations within 80 km of the release point. Human-engineered output products support critical decisions on the type, location, and timing of protective actions for workers and the public during an emergency.« less

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  12. The bibliometrics of atmospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimblecombe, Peter; Grossi, Carlota M.

    Bibliometric analysis is an important tool in the management of a journal. SCOPUS output is used to assess the increase in the quantity of material in Atmospheric Environment and stylistic changes in the way authors choose words and punctuation in titles and assemble their reference lists. Citation analysis is used to consider the impact factor of the journal, but perhaps more importantly the way in which it reflects the importance authors give to papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The impact factor of Atmospheric Environment (2.549 for 2007) from the Journal Citation Reports suggests it performs well within the atmospheric sciences, but it conceals the long term value authors place on papers appearing in the journal. Reference lists show that a fifth come through citing papers more than a decade old.

  13. An emergency response mobile robot for operations in combustible atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W. (Inventor); Ohm, Timothy R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A mobile, self-powered, self-contained, and remote-controlled robot is presented. The robot is capable of safely operating in a combustible atmosphere and providing information about the atmosphere to the operator. The robot includes non-sparking and non-arcing electro-mechanical and electronic components designed to prevent the robot from igniting the combustible atmosphere. The robot also includes positively pressurized enclosures that house the electromechanical and electronic components of the robot and prevent intrusion of the combustible atmosphere into the enclosures. The enclosures are interconnected such that a pressurized gas injected into any one of the enclosures is routed to all the other enclosures through the interconnections. It is preferred that one or more sealed internal channels through structures intervening between the enclosures be employed. Pressure transducers for detecting if the pressure within the enclosures falls below a predetermined level are included. The robot also has a sensing device for determining the types of combustible substances in the surrounding atmosphere, as well as the concentrations of each type of substance relative to a pre-determined lower explosive limit (LEL). In addition, the sensing device can determine the percent level of oxygen present in the surrounding atmosphere.

  14. Emergency response mobile robot for operations in combustible atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W. (Inventor); Ohm, Timothy R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A mobile, self-powered, self-contained, and remote-controlled robot is presented. The robot is capable of safely operating in a combustible atmosphere and providing information about the atmosphere to the operator. The robot includes non-sparking and non-arcing electro-mechanical and electronic components designed to prevent the robot from igniting the combustible atmosphere. The robot also includes positively pressurized enclosures that house the electromechanical and electronic components of the robot and prevent intrusion of the combustible atmosphere into the enclosures. The enclosures are interconnected such that a pressurized gas injected into any one of the enclosures is routed to all the other enclosures through the interconnections. It is preferred that one or more sealed internal channels through structures intervening between the enclosures be employed. Pressure transducers for detecting if the pressure within the enclosures falls below a predetermined level are included. The robot also has a sensing device for determining the types of combustible substances in the surrounding atmosphere, as well as the concentrations of each type of substance relative to a pre-determined lower explosive limit (LEL). In addition, the sensing device can determine the percent level of oxygen present in the surrounding atmosphere.

  15. Climate and atmospheric modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The climate and atmosphere modeling research programs have concentrated on the development of appropriate atmospheric and upper ocean models, and preliminary applications of these models. Principal models are a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a three-dimensional global model, and an upper ocean model. Principal applications were the study of the impact of CO2, aerosols, and the solar 'constant' on climate.

  16. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect

    Randerson, D.

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  17. 2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, DL

    2011-05-04

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

  18. Retention of an atmosphere on early Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of valley networks and indications of high erosion rates in ancient terrains on Mars suggest that Mars was warm and wet during heavy bombardment. Various processes that could occur on early Mars were integrated into a self-consistent model to determine what circumstances might lead to warm temperatures during and at the end of heavy bombardment. Included were weathering and burial of CO2 as carbonates, impact erosion, sputtering, and recycling of CO2 back into the atmosphere by burial and heating. The models suggest that despite losses from the atmosphere by weathering and impact erosion, Mars could retain a 0.5 to 1 bar atmosphere at the end of heavy bombardment partly because weathering temporarily sequesters CO2 in the ground and protects it from impact erosion while the impact rate is declining and impact erosion is becoming less effective. Because of the low output of the early Sun, surface temperatures can be above freezing only for a very efficient greenhouse, such as that suggested by Forget and Pierrehumbert [1997]. With weak greenhouse models, temperatures are below freezing throughout heavy bombardment, and such a large amount of CO2 is left in the atmosphere at the end of heavy bombardment that it is difficult to eliminate subsequently to arrive at the present surface inventory. With strong greenhouse models, temperatures are well above freezing during heavy bombardment and drop to close to freezing at the end of heavy bombardment, at which time the atmosphere contains 0.5 to 1 bar of CO2. This can be largely eliminated subsequently by sputtering and low-temperature weathering. Such a model is consistent with the change in erosion rate and the declining rate of valley formation at the end of heavy bombardment. Conditions that favor warm temperatures at the end of heavy bombardment are an efficient greenhouse, low weathering rates, low impact erosion rates, and a smaller fraction of heat lost by conduction as opposed to transport of lava to

  19. Atmospheric Residence Times of Continental Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkanski, Yves Jacques

    The global atmospheric distributions of ^{222}Rn and ^{210 }Pb are simulated with a three-dimensional model of atmospheric transport based on the meteorology of the NASA GISS^1>=neral circulation model. The short-lived radioactive gas ^ {222}Rn (half-life = 3.8d) is emitted almost exclusively from land, at a relatively uniform rate; hence it is an excellent tracer of continental influences. Lead -210 is produced by decay of ^{222} Rn and immediately condenses to preexisting aerosol surfaces. It provides an excellent measure of aerosol residence times in the atmosphere because its source is accurately defined by the ^{222} Rn distribution. Results from the three-dimensional model are compared to measurements of ^ {222}Rn and ^{210 }Pb atmospheric concentrations to evaluate model's long-range transport over oceanic regions and to study the deposition mechanisms of atmospheric aerosols. Model results for ^{222} Rn are used to examine the long-range transport of continental air over two selected oceanic regions, the subantartic Indian Ocean and the North Pacific. It is shown that fast transport of air from southern Africa causes substantial continental pollution at southern mid-latitudes, a region usually regarded as pristine. Air over the North Pacific is heavily impacted by continental influences year round, but the altitude at which the transport occurs varies seasonally. Observations of aerosols at island sites, which are commonly used as diagnostics of continental influences, may be misleading because they do not account for influences at high altitude and because aerosols are efficiently scavenged by deposition during transport. The study of ^{210}Pb focuses on defining the residence times of submicron aerosols in the troposphere. Scavenging in wet convective updrafts is found to provide the dominant sink on a global scale. The globally averaged residence time for ^{210 }Pb-containing aerosols in the troposphere is 7 days. The average increase in residence time

  20. Atmospheric changes from solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Aplin, K L; Scott, C J; Gray, S L

    2016-09-28

    This article reviews atmospheric changes associated with 44 solar eclipses, beginning with the first quantitative results available, from 1834 (earlier qualitative accounts also exist). Eclipse meteorology attracted relatively few publications until the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980, with the 11 August 1999 eclipse producing the most papers. Eclipses passing over populated areas such as Europe, China and India now regularly attract scientific attention, whereas atmospheric measurements of eclipses at remote locations remain rare. Many measurements and models have been used to exploit the uniquely predictable solar forcing provided by an eclipse. In this paper, we compile the available publications and review a subset of them chosen on the basis of importance and novelty. Beyond the obvious reduction in incoming solar radiation, atmospheric cooling from eclipses can induce dynamical changes. Observations and meteorological modelling provide evidence for the generation of a local eclipse circulation that may be the origin of the 'eclipse wind'. Gravity waves set up by the eclipse can, in principle, be detected as atmospheric pressure fluctuations, though theoretical predictions are limited, and many of the data are inconclusive. Eclipse events providing important early insights into the ionization of the upper atmosphere are also briefly reviewed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550760