Science.gov

Sample records for containment of biohazards

  1. The Use of Bioluminescence in Detecting Biohazardous Substances in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomulka, Kenneth William; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, reproducible alternative assay that requires minimal preparation and equipment for water testing. It provides students with a direct method of detecting potentially biohazardous material in water by observing the reduction in bacterial luminescence. (PR)

  2. Biohazardous waste management plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd W.

    2004-01-01

    This plan describes the process for managing non-medical biohazardous waste at Sandia National Laboratories California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of biohazardous waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to non-medical biohazardous waste.

  3. Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision2)

    SciTech Connect

    Waste Management Group

    2006-11-29

    These guidelines describe procedures to comply with all Federal and State laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) policy applicable to State-regulated medical and unregulated, but biohazardous, waste (medical/biohazardous waste). These guidelines apply to all LBNL personnel who: (1) generate and/or store medical/biohazardous waste, (2) supervise personnel who generate medical/biohazardous waste, or (3) manage a medical/biohazardous waste pickup location. Personnel generating biohazardous waste at the Joint Genome Institute/Production Genomics Facility (JGI/PGF) are referred to the guidelines contained in Section 9. Section 9 is the only part of these guidelines that apply to JGI/PGF. Medical/biohazardous waste referred to in this Web site includes biohazardous, sharps, pathological and liquid waste. Procedures for proper storage and disposal are summarized in the Solid Medical/Biohazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Chart. Contact the Waste Management Group at 486-7663 if you have any questions regarding medical/biohazardous waste management.

  4. Tell ';Em Early and Often: Communicating About Mars Sample Return Containment and Biohazard Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, J. D.; Race, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    The recent report of the Mars 2020 Science Definition Team recommended that the mission accomplish broad and rigorous in situ science, including seeking biosignatures and acquiring a diverse set of samples intended to be stored in a cache for potential return to Earth at a later time. In developing the Mars 2020 mission NASA and its partners are beginning at least the promise (uncertainty #1) of a later sample return and will need to address important uncertainties with implications not only for the integrity of science, but also for public communication about the mission and associated decision making. In particular, they will have to address the requirement, reaffirmed by multiple US National Research Council reports, to contain such a sample when it is returned (uncertainty #2) and not release it, unsterilized (uncertainty #3), until tests prove that it does not contain a biohazard (uncertainty #4). And of course we won't know what the samples are like until they are collected (uncertainty #5, et al.). In an ongoing process of scientific analysis and protocol development, NASA and its partners (such as the European Space Agency) have continued to discuss the requirements for containment and how it should be defined and implemented at a high (how high?) degree of certainty. How the protocol and requirements will be finalized, and how the decision process to approve them will be structured are all part of a communications picture that changes not only based on the technical aspects of the mission, but on other public events that may have little or nothing to do with the exploration of space. Now that the Mars 2020 mission has been moved forward as the first step in a sample-return train, NASA will face a robust communications challenge that will not only be complicated by the uncertainties numbered above, but by the uncertainties associated with any large-budget science program that depends on public funding, a situation fraught with its own uncertainties, to be

  5. Biohazard potential of putative Martian organisms during missions to Mars.

    PubMed

    Warmflash, David; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Jones, Jeffrey; Fox, George E; McKay, David S

    2007-04-01

    Exploration Class missions to Mars will require precautions against potential contamination by any native microorganisms that may be incidentally pathogenic to humans. While the results of NASA's Viking biology experiments of the 1970s have been generally interpreted as inconclusive for surface organisms, and attributed to active but nonbiological chemistries, the possibility of native surface life has never been ruled out completely. It is possible that, prior to the first human landing on Mars, robotic craft and sample return missions will provide enough data to know with certainty whether future human landing sites harbor extant life forms. If native life were found to exist, it would be problematic to determine whether any of its species might present a medical danger to astronauts. Therefore, it will become necessary to assess empirically the risk that the planet contains pathogens based on terrestrial examples of pathogenicity and to take a reasonably cautious approach to biohazard protection. A survey of terrestrial pathogens was conducted with special emphasis on those whose evolution has not depended on the presence of animal hosts. The history of the development and implementation of Apollo anti-contamination protocol and recommendations of the National Research Council's Space Studies Board regarding Mars were reviewed. Organisms can emerge in Nature in the absence of indigenous animal hosts and both infectious and non-infectious human pathogens are therefore theoretically possible on Mars. Although remote, the prospect of Martian surface life, together with the existence of a diversity of routes by which pathogenicity has emerged on Earth, suggests that the probability of human pathogens on Mars, while low, is not zero. Still, since the discovery and study of Martian life can have long-term benefits for humanity, the risk that Martian life might include pathogens should not be an obstacle to human exploration. As a precaution, it is recommended that EVA

  6. Biohazard potential of putative Martian organisms during missions to Mars.

    PubMed

    Warmflash, David; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Jones, Jeffrey; Fox, George E; McKay, David S

    2007-04-01

    Exploration Class missions to Mars will require precautions against potential contamination by any native microorganisms that may be incidentally pathogenic to humans. While the results of NASA's Viking biology experiments of the 1970s have been generally interpreted as inconclusive for surface organisms, and attributed to active but nonbiological chemistries, the possibility of native surface life has never been ruled out completely. It is possible that, prior to the first human landing on Mars, robotic craft and sample return missions will provide enough data to know with certainty whether future human landing sites harbor extant life forms. If native life were found to exist, it would be problematic to determine whether any of its species might present a medical danger to astronauts. Therefore, it will become necessary to assess empirically the risk that the planet contains pathogens based on terrestrial examples of pathogenicity and to take a reasonably cautious approach to biohazard protection. A survey of terrestrial pathogens was conducted with special emphasis on those whose evolution has not depended on the presence of animal hosts. The history of the development and implementation of Apollo anti-contamination protocol and recommendations of the National Research Council's Space Studies Board regarding Mars were reviewed. Organisms can emerge in Nature in the absence of indigenous animal hosts and both infectious and non-infectious human pathogens are therefore theoretically possible on Mars. Although remote, the prospect of Martian surface life, together with the existence of a diversity of routes by which pathogenicity has emerged on Earth, suggests that the probability of human pathogens on Mars, while low, is not zero. Still, since the discovery and study of Martian life can have long-term benefits for humanity, the risk that Martian life might include pathogens should not be an obstacle to human exploration. As a precaution, it is recommended that EVA

  7. A study of biohazard protection for farming modules of lunar base CELSS.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Midorikawa, Y; Shiba, M; Terai, M; Omasa, K; Nitta, K

    1992-01-01

    For the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) of a manned lunar base which is planned to be built on the moon early in the 21st century, several proposed programs exist to grow vegetables inside a farming module. At the 40th IAF (Malaga, 1989) the author et al presented a proposal for supplying food and nutrients to a crew of eight members, a basic concept which is based on growing four kinds of vegetables. This paper describes measures for biohazard protection in farming modules. In this study, biohazard protection means prevention of the dispersion of plant diseases to other plant species or other portions of farming beds.

  8. Evaluation of biohazards in dehydrated biofilms on foodstuff packaging.

    PubMed

    Le Magrex-Debar, E; Lemoine, J; Gellé, M P; Jacquelin, L F; Choisy, C

    2000-04-10

    Plastic materials used for food packaging are clean but not sterile when the food is just packaged. Accidental wet contamination may occur at every moment between packaging and opening by the consumer: on polyethylene (PET), bacteria may adhere strongly and constitute a biofilm in less than 24 h. By rolling on themselves, PET sheets may contaminate food. We tried to show that contact with salted foodstuffs favoured microbial recovery. Four strains were chosen to perform biofilms on PET: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Biofilms were dried up 24 h. Biofilm bacteria were stressed by adhesion, by starvation and by dehydration. However, they were capable of recovery in salted solutions or media, probably because one (or more) stress protected them against another stress. Stress was demonstrated by stress protein production, by mean of electrophoresis, and membrane lesions by mean of flow cytometry. Stress recovery was performed in aqueous salted solutions or salted brain-heart infusion with NaCl 9, 15, 20 and 30 g/l. Staphylococci were more sensitive to these stresses and recovery was a function of salt concentration. Gram-negative bacteria were little affected by stresses; salt effects were less important. If all these biofilms were capable of recovery from stresses in salted media, flexible PET could possibly lead to a health hazard when it is used for wet salt meats, e.g.

  9. Evaluation of biohazards in dehydrated biofilms on foodstuff packaging.

    PubMed

    Le Magrex-Debar, E; Lemoine, J; Gellé, M P; Jacquelin, L F; Choisy, C

    2000-04-10

    Plastic materials used for food packaging are clean but not sterile when the food is just packaged. Accidental wet contamination may occur at every moment between packaging and opening by the consumer: on polyethylene (PET), bacteria may adhere strongly and constitute a biofilm in less than 24 h. By rolling on themselves, PET sheets may contaminate food. We tried to show that contact with salted foodstuffs favoured microbial recovery. Four strains were chosen to perform biofilms on PET: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Biofilms were dried up 24 h. Biofilm bacteria were stressed by adhesion, by starvation and by dehydration. However, they were capable of recovery in salted solutions or media, probably because one (or more) stress protected them against another stress. Stress was demonstrated by stress protein production, by mean of electrophoresis, and membrane lesions by mean of flow cytometry. Stress recovery was performed in aqueous salted solutions or salted brain-heart infusion with NaCl 9, 15, 20 and 30 g/l. Staphylococci were more sensitive to these stresses and recovery was a function of salt concentration. Gram-negative bacteria were little affected by stresses; salt effects were less important. If all these biofilms were capable of recovery from stresses in salted media, flexible PET could possibly lead to a health hazard when it is used for wet salt meats, e.g. PMID:10791750

  10. Assessing the Biohazard Potential of Putative Martian Organisms for Exploration Class Human Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmflash, David; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Jones, Jeffrey; Fox, George E.; McKay, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Exploration Class missions to Mars will require precautions against potential contamination by any native microorganisms that may be incidentally pathogenic to humans. While the results of NASA's Viking biology experiments of 1976 have been generally interpreted as inconclusive for surface organisms, the possibility of native surface life has never been ruled out and more recent studies suggest that the case for biological interpretation of the Viking Labeled Release data may now be stronger than it was when the experiments were originally conducted. It is possible that, prior to the first human landing on Mars, robotic craft and sample return missions will provide enough data to know with certainty whether or not future human landing sites harbor extant life forms. However, if native life is confirmed, it will be problematic to determine whether any of its species may present a medical risk to astronauts. Therefore, it will become necessary to assess empirically the risk that the planet contains pathogens based on terrestrial examples of pathogenicity and to take a reasonably cautious approach to bio-hazard protection. A survey of terrestrial pathogens was conducted with special emphasis on those pathogens whose evolution has not depended on the presence of animal hosts. The history of the development and implementation of Apollo anticontamination protocol and recent recommendations of the NRC Space Studies Board regarding Mars were reviewed. Organisms can emerge in nature in the absence of indigenous animal hosts and both infectious and non-infectious human pathogens are theoretically possible on Mars. The prospect of Martian surface life, together with the existence of a diversity of routes by which pathogenicity has emerged on Earth, suggests that the possibility of human pathogens on Mars, while low, is not zero. Since the discovery and study of Martian life can have long-term benefits for humanity, the risk that Martian life might include pathogens should not

  11. Nanoparticles eyed as biohazard treatment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Chemical Engineering

    2003-11-10

    Nanoparticles may someday come to the rescue of people exposed to chemical, biological or radiological hazards. Argonne researchers are in the early testing stages of a system that would cleanse the blood of contaminants using tiny magnetic particles and a portable, external magnetic separator. Current methods of cleaning the blood of radioactive and other hazardous materials are mainly limited to dialysis and filtration techniques. Unfortunately, current medical procedures to detoxify human blood are restricted to only a few types of toxins, drastically limiting treatment options for exposed victims. Also, several important shortcomings exist with the currently available technology. Treatments can take several hours to complete, require the turnover and filtration of large volumes of blood, are rather inefficient at removing toxins and can be risky for the patient. For these reasons, current methods are mostly restricted to patients with kidney failure and certain types of drug overdoses. Alternative treatments exist, such antibodies and chelators, substances that combine with and neutralize toxins. These treatments can be used for specific kinds of toxins, but are not efficient. In addition, they can cause serious side effects, such as allergic reactions and organ failure. 'The best that doctors can do for most biohazard exposure is supportive treatment,' Kaminski said. 'This new system will be designed to directly remove the toxic agents from the bloodstream, quickly and efficiently.' The biohazard detoxification system will use biodegradable nanoparticles between 100 and 5,000 nanometers (one nanometer is one ten-millionth of a centimeter) in size, small enough to pass through tiny blood vessels and yet large enough to avoid being filtered from the bloodstream by the kidneys.

  12. Potential for laboratory exposures to biohazardous agents found in blood.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M R; Henderson, D K; Bennett, J E

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude of risk for occupational exposures to biohazardous agents found in blood was assessed by 800 environmental samples taken from a total of 10 clinical and research laboratories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Thirty-one samples from 11 work stations in three laboratories contained hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg). Observations of workers indicated that environmental contamination arose from several sources. Among the 11 work stations with HBsAg environmental samples, eight had high work loads, seven had inappropriate behaviors, and nine had flawed laboratory techniques. This information suggests that a multifactorial approach is needed to minimize the risk of laboratory-associated infections. PMID:2316762

  13. Protection against biohazards in animal laboratories.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, J; Yamanouchi, T

    1975-01-01

    An outline of the animal facilities known as the "Quarters for Experimentally Infected Animals" of the Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, is presented as one example of the approaches used for protecting against biohazards in animal laboratories. The quarters are contained in a 2-story building which is in the form of small cubicles for housing the experimentally infected animals. Each cubicle is equipped with specially designed cabinet compartments in which the animal cages are placed. The anterior surface of the compartments consists of an outward inclining door. Vigorous air-mixing between compartments and the interiors of the cubicles can be avoided by this arrangement. The air for ventilation is sucked through a gap between the edge of the door and the wall of each compartment and the collected air is finally filtered through Cambridge "Aerosolve" and "Absolute" filters before being exhausted into the atmosphere. In the central corridor connecting each cubicle the air pressure is maintained at a higher level than that in the cubicle but lower than that outdoors. Thus, the air stream is always kept flowing from the outside to the inside of the cubicle and from the inside of the cubicle to the compartments but never vice versa. Each cubicle is equipped with an individual, pass-through autoclave. All soiled materials are sterilized before being removed from the cubicle. The drained water from each cubicle is chlorinated in a tank by chloride of lime. In these facilities experimentally infected animals can be handled with little danger of accidental contamination of personnel, other animals, or the external environment. The authors emphasize the importance of complete adherence to the rules in such animal facilities.

  14. Medical and biohazardous waste generator`s guide: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Guide describes the procedures required to comply with all federal and state laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) policy applicable to medical and biohazardous waste. The members of the LBL Biological Safety Subcommittee participated in writing these policies and procedures. The procedures and policies in this Guide apply to LBL personnel who work with infectious agents or potentially infectious agents, publicly perceived infectious items or materials (e.g., medical gloves, culture dishes), and sharps (e.g., needles, syringes, razor blades). If medical or biohazardous waste is contaminated or mixed with a hazardous chemical or material, with a radioactive material, or with both, the waste will be handled in accordance with the applicable federal and State of California laws and regulations for hazardous, radioactive, or mixed waste.

  15. Protein radioiodination in a radioassay laboratory: evaluation of commercial Na/sup 125/I reagents and related biohazards

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.G.; Button, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    Three commercial Na/sup 125/I solutions (Amersham, New England Nuclear, and Union Carbide) have been examined with respect to multiple parameters affecting their use in the radioiodination of three representative peptides (insulin, growth hormone, and gastrin): % of radioiodine incorporation in protein; immunoreactivity and non-specific binding properties of the radiolabeled proteins; pH, volatility, and radionuclidic purity of radioiodine solutions; and vial construction with respect to multidose use. All three commercial Na/sup 125/I produced radioiodinated proteins of good quality for use in radioligand assays. The radioiodines differed with respect to the amount of iodine released during initial vial opening as a consequence of different pH levels. Two of the three products were shipped in vials with poor construction with respect to multidose use. Selection of a radioiodine was therefore reduced to the secondary considerations of iodine volatility and vial construction. The volatilized radioiodine observed during the spill of millicuries quantities of unbuffered pH 7.5 Na/sup 125/I was 14 microcuries per millicurie within the first 30 minutes. One thickness of rubber gloves reduced potential skin contamination from an accidental spill to insignificant levels: 20-30 picocuries per microcurie. Common good housekeeping procedures: i.e. rubber gloves, laboratory coat and a fume hood were found to be sufficient protection to eliminate most radioiodine volatility and contamination hazards associated with protein radiolabeling procedures.

  16. Biohazards in pharmaceutical freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Hermanský, M; Graichman, T

    1990-01-01

    Among freeze-dried drugs there are many which may imperil manufacturing personnel, e.g. cytostatic drugs possessing carcinogenic effects. Production zones must be specially adapted for handling such drugs. There are many risks endangering a freeze-drying operation--power or water supply failure, but also improperly established freeze-drying cycle. A production batch of a rare, expensive and sensitive product represents a big value; modern equipment therefore features sophisticated automation, overriding possible human error. Problem of particulate contamination is less severe with vials stoppered inside the vacuum chamber, but rubber closures still may become a source of haze. Back-migration of oil from vacuum pumps may be another source. Economy of industrial freeze-drying may be much improved if freezing sequence, drying rate, adjustment of vacuum by "bleeding" nitrogen are tailored specially for each particular product.

  17. Facility Safety Plan B360 Complex Biohazardous Operations CMLS-412r0

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G

    2007-01-08

    This Addendum to the Facility Safety Plan (FSP) 360 Complex describes the safety requirements for the safe conduct of all biohazardous research operations in all buildings within the 360 complex program areas. These requirements include all the responsibilities and authorities of building personnel, operational hazards, and environmental concerns and their controls. In addition, this Addendum prescribes facility-specific training requirements and emergency controls, as well as maintenance and quality assurance requirements for ES&H-related building systems.

  18. A Draft Test Protocol for Detecting Possible Biohazards in Martian Samples Returned to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.; Race, Margaret S.; DeVinenzi, Donald L.; Schad, P. Jackson; Stabekis, Pericles D.; Viso, Michel; Acevedo, Sara E.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the first complete draft of a protocol for detecting possible biohazards in Mars samples returned to Earth; it is the final product of the Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series, convened in 2000-2001 by NASA's Planetary Protection Officer. The goal of the five-workshop Series vas to develop a comprehensive protocol by which returned martian sample materials could be assessed for the presence of any biological hazard(s) while safeguarding the purity of the samples from possible terrestrial contamination The reference numbers for the proceedings from the five individual Workshops.

  19. Biohazards for human activities on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kminek, G.; Schmitt, D.

    system malfunction. In addition, contingency operations (decontamination of the whole habitat) can be carried out on the Moon under realistic conditions, but again, without the real danger of introducing any biohazard. Thus, using the Moon as test-bed for developing technologies and procedures for crew-safety and planetary protection has to be seriously considered.

  20. Energy-related pollutants in the environment: Use of short-term tests for mutagenicity in the isolation and identification of biohazards

    PubMed Central

    Epler, J. L.; Larimer, F. W.; Rao, T. K.; Nix, C. E.; Ho, T.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to gather information on the potential genetic hazards of existing or proposed energy-generating or -conversion systems, we have begun a correlated analytical and genetic analysis of a number of technologies. The work is divided into two phases: one deals with known compounds expected to occur in the environment through energy production, conversion, or use; the other deals with actual samples from existing or experimental processes. To approach the problems of coping with and testing large numbers of compounds, we set up a form of the “tier system.” Operating units utilizing Salmonella, Escherichia coli, yeast, human leukocytes, mammalian cells, and Drosophila have been initiated. Various liquid-liquid extraction methods and column chromatographic separations have been applied to crude products and effluents from oil-shale, coal-liquefaction, and coal-gasification processes. Mutagenicity of the various fractions is assayed by means of reversion of histidine-requiring auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium; comparative studies are carried out with the other genetic systems. In order to incorporate metabolic activation of these fractions and compounds, rat liver homogenates (S-9) are used in the various assays. Results implicate chemicals occurring in the basic (ether-soluble) and the neutral fractions as potential genetic hazards. Chemical constituents of these fractions (identified or predicted) were tested individually for their mutagenic activity. PMID:367762

  1. Increasing the biosafety of analytical systems in the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Schnipelsky, P.; Pardue, H. L.; Place, J.; Ozawa, K.

    1994-01-01

    Biosafety is an important part of the know-how of all clinical laboratory professionals. Biosafely must have high priority in the design and use of analytical systems. Attention should be focused on reducing the handling of biological specimens, reducing biohazards to laboratory personnel, and on improving the labelling and containment of biohazardous materials. In this paper, biosafety issues are discussed in relation to the design of analytical systems, their use and maintenance. PMID:18924687

  2. Disposable Membrane Sensors for Biohazardous Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Alexander G.

    The concept of bilayer lipid membrane sensing is elaborated. Disposable bilayer lipid membrane sensors permit both stochastic and deterministic sensing regimes. Technology for membrane sensor preparation is described in details. Stochastic membrane sensing using ion channels is described. Detection of cyano-bacterial toxins in waters by means of a stochastic sensing (ion channel induction) reveals a signature for a particular toxin type. This signature is especially well revealed by using the method of current-voltage surfaces, which establishes a bridge between stochastic and deterministic sensing by applying a time-averaging procedure. Flexoelectricity of membranes provides another way of deterministic sensing, of a stimulus-response type. The flexoelectric response is modulated by adsorption of the analyte over the membrane surface. Detection of environmental pollution of waters by heavy metal ions (Cd++ and Hg++) is thereby rendered possible. This approach is confronted with a stochastic sensing of the same metal ions by alteration of the channel open/closed probability and average channel current of two familiar channels, gramicidin and alamethicin.

  3. Multiphoton tomography to detect chemo- and biohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution multiphoton/CARS tomography provides optical biopsies with 300 nm lateral resolution with chemical fingerprints. Thousands of volunteers and patients have been investigated for early cancer diagnosis, evaluation of anti-ageing cosmetic products, and changes of cellular metabolism by UV exposure and decreased oxygen supply. The skin as the outermost and largest organ is also the major target of CB agents. Current UV-based sensors are useful for bio-aerosol sensing but not for evaluating exposed in vivo skin. Here we evaluate the use of 4D multiphoton/CARS tomographs based on near infrared femtosecond laser radiation, time-correlated single photon counting (FLIM) and white light generation by photonic crystal fibers to detect bio- and chemohazards in human in vivo skin using twophoton fluorescence, SHG, and Raman signals.

  4. A two-hypothesis approach to establishing a life detection/biohazard protocol for planetary samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Catharine; Steele, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    The COSPAR policy on performing a biohazard assessment on samples brought from Mars to Earth is framed in the context of a concern for false-positive results. However, as noted during the 2012 Workshop for Life Detection in Samples from Mars (ref. Kminek et al., 2014), a more significant concern for planetary samples brought to Earth is false-negative results, because an undetected biohazard could increase risk to the Earth. This is the reason that stringent contamination control must be a high priority for all Category V Restricted Earth Return missions. A useful conceptual framework for addressing these concerns involves two complementary 'null' hypotheses: testing both of them, together, would allow statistical and community confidence to be developed regarding one or the other conclusion. As noted above, false negatives are of primary concern for safety of the Earth, so the 'Earth Safety null hypothesis' -- that must be disproved to assure low risk to the Earth from samples introduced by Category V Restricted Earth Return missions -- is 'There is native life in these samples.' False positives are of primary concern for Astrobiology, so the 'Astrobiology null hypothesis' -- that must be disproved in order to demonstrate the existence of extraterrestrial life is 'There is no life in these samples.' The presence of Earth contamination would render both of these hypotheses more difficult to disprove. Both these hypotheses can be tested following a strict science protocol; analyse, interprete, test the hypotheses and repeat. The science measurements undertaken are then done in an iterative fashion that responds to discovery with both hypotheses testable from interpretation of the scientific data. This is a robust, community involved activity that ensures maximum science return with minimal sample use.

  5. Evaluation of a cubicle containment system in preventing gaseous and particulate airborne cross-contamination

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.J.; Hughes, H.C.; Singh, S.B.; Lang, C.M.

    1983-12-01

    The effectiveness of a cubicle containment system in preventing gaseous and particulate cross-contamination in animal facilities was evaluated using several techniques. Using a nitrous oxide dilution technique, no airborne cross-contamination was found between cubicles as long as all cubicle doors were kept closed. If the doors to the cubicle in which the gas was released were partially or completely opened, low concentrations of nitrous oxide could be detected in adjacent cubicles. These concentrations increased when the air exchange rates in the cubicle were decreased. Similar results were obtained when particulate transfer was measured using aerosolized Staphlococcus epidermidis and a slit to agar sampling technique. Air flows and point air velocities within the cubicle and the animal room were also studied. A trial of Sendai virus transmission between cubicles revealed no intercubicle transmission after 3 weeks of exposure. Overall, the cubicle containment system appeared to be an effective means of achieving limited biohazard containment, applicable to many research housing needs.

  6. Evaluation of a cubicle containment system in preventing gaseous and particulate airborne cross-contamination.

    PubMed

    White, W J; Hughes, H C; Singh, S B; Lang, C M

    1983-12-01

    The effectiveness of a cubicle containment system in preventing gaseous and particulate cross-contamination in animal facilities was evaluated using several techniques. Using a nitrous oxide dilution technique, no airborne cross-contamination was found between cubicles as long as all cubicle doors were kept closed. If the doors to the cubicle in which the gas was released were partially or completely opened, low concentrations of nitrous oxide could be detected in adjacent cubicles. These concentrations increased when the air exchange rates in the cubicle were decreased. Similar results were obtained when particulate transfer was measured using aerosolized Staphlococcus epidermidis and a slit to agar sampling technique. Air flows and point air velocities within the cubicle and the animal room were also studied. A trial of Sendai virus transmission between cubicles revealed no intercubicle transmission after 3 weeks of exposure. Overall, the cubicle containment system appeared to be an effective means of achieving limited biohazard containment, applicable to many research housing needs.

  7. Containment canister for capturing hazardous waste debris during piping modifications

    DOEpatents

    Dozier, Stanley B.

    2001-07-24

    The present invention relates to a capture and containment canister which reduces the risk of radiation and other biohazard exposure to workers, the need for a costly containment hut and the need for the extra manpower associated with the hut. The present invention includes the design of a canister having a specially designed magnetic ring that attracts and holds the top of the canister in place during modifications to gloveboxes and other types of radiological and biochemical hoods. The present invention also provides an improved hole saw that eliminates the need for a pilot bit.

  8. UV-Enhanced IR Raman System for Identifying Biohazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirbl, Robert; Moynihan, Philip; Lane, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    An instrumentation system that would include an ultraviolet (UV) laser or light-emitting diode, an infrared (IR) laser, and the equivalent of an IR Raman spectrometer has been proposed to enable noncontact identification of hazardous biological agents and chemicals. In prior research, IR Raman scattering had shown promise as a means of such identification, except that the Raman-scattered light was often found to be too weak to be detected or to enable unambiguous identification in practical applications. The proposed system would utilize UV illumination as part of a two-level optical-pumping scheme to intensify the Raman signal sufficiently to enable positive identification.

  9. Using an international workshop to develop functional requirements and a Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) with which to develop a preferred concept for a Mars Sample Return (MSR) Sample Receiving Facility (SRF).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskis, John; Guest, Michael; Bennett, Allan; Walker, James; Smith, Caroline; Baker, Robert; Grant, Colin

    COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy places very stringent requirements on Sample Return missions and `breaking the chain of contact' between Earth and the celestial body from which the sample is returned. This must be continued after return to Earth and -at the same time-any contamination or damage to the sample must be avoided until such time as it can be confirmed as not presenting a biohazard and available for subsequent curation and scientific investigation. Such a facility has never before been built and an investigation has been made to determine the requirements for a Mars Sample Return (MSR) Sample Receiving Facility (SRF) from first principles based on a Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) rather than the modification of an existing BSL-4 facility. This approach fully takes in to account cleanliness requirements to avoid sample contamination. This paper will present the results from the first part of an ESA funded study, which derived the top level functional requirements by reviewing published scientific literature from all expert domains i.e.; biocontainment, science curation, space technology, infrastructure and equipment. These functional requirements were then examined by invited attendees from all expert domains in a 2 day international workshop. From the results of the international workshop an existing Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) was modified and a trade off was conducted to derive a preferred concept which allowed early indications of future technological direction of study. The results of the MSR SRF study by SEA (as well as the results of another parallel study) will be taken into account by ESA to define the requirements for a follow-on procurement action in the future. There will be a review of the results from both studies and an agreement on the requirements based on these parallel studies. Therefore, the views expressed herein should not be taken to reflect the official opinion of the European Space Agency.

  10. Prenatal Experiences of Containment in the Light of Bion's Model of Container/Contained

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiello, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the idea of possible proto-experiences of the prenatal child in the context of Bion's model of container/contained. The physical configuration of the embryo/foetus contained in the maternal uterus represents the starting point for an enquiry into the unborn child's possible experiences of its state of being contained in a…

  11. CONTAIN code analyses of direct containment heating (DCH) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Tadios, E.L.; Washington, K.E.

    1995-06-01

    In some nuclear reactor core melt accidents, a potential exists for molten core debris to be dispersed into the containment under high pressure. Resulting energy transfer to the containment atmosphere can pressurize the containment. This process, known as direct containment heating (DCH), has been the subject of extensive experimental and analytical programs sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). DCH modeling has been a major focus for the development of the CONTAIN code. In support of the peer review, extensive analyses of DCH experiments were performed in order to assess the CONTAIN code`s DCH models and improve understanding of DCH phenomenology. The present paper summarizes this assessment effort.

  12. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  13. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  14. Containment of composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L.; Coppa, A. P.

    1979-01-01

    A lightweight containment was developed for turbofan engine fan blades. Subscale ballistic-type tests were first run on a number of concepts. The most promising configuration was selected and further evaluated by larger scale tests in a rotating test rig. Weight savings made possible by the use of this new containment system were determined and extrapolated to a CF6-size engine. An analytical technique was also developed to predict the released blades motion when involved in the blade/casing interaction process. Initial checkout of this procedure was accomplished using several of the tests run during the program.

  15. Characterization of aerosols containing microcystin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Irvin, C Mitch; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C

    2007-01-01

    Toxic blooms of cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in both freshwater and brackish water sources throughout the world. One class of cyanobacterial toxins, called microcystins, is cyclic peptides. In addition to ingestion and dermal, inhalation is a likely route of human exposure. A significant increase in reporting of minor symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria during recreational activities. Algae cells, bacteria, and waterborne toxins can be aerosolized by a bubble-bursting process with a wind-driven white-capped wave mechanism. The purposes of this study were to: evaluate sampling and analysis techniques for microcystin aerosol, produce aerosol droplets containing microcystin in the laboratory, and deploy the sampling instruments in field studies. A high-volume impactor and an IOM filter sampler were tried first in the laboratory to collect droplets containing microcystins. Samples were extracted and analyzed for microcystin using an ELISA method. The laboratory study showed that cyanotoxins in water could be transferred to air via a bubble-bursting process. The droplets containing microcystins showed a bimodal size distribution with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 1.4 and 27.8 mum. The sampling and analysis methods were successfully used in a pilot field study to measure microcystin aerosol in situ. PMID:18463733

  16. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Melamed, Dan; Patel, Bhavesh R; Fuhrmann, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  17. Physiological and biochemical defense reactions of Vicia faba L.-Rhizobium symbiosis face to chronic exposure to cyanobacterial bloom extract containing microcystins.

    PubMed

    Lahrouni, Majida; Oufdou, Khalid; El Khalloufi, Fatima; Baz, Mohamed; Lafuente, Alejandro; Dary, Mohammed; Pajuelo, Eloisa; Oudra, Brahim

    2013-08-01

    The presence of cyanotoxins, mainly microcystins (MCs), in surface freshwater represents a serious health risk to aquatic organisms living in the water body, as well as terrestrial animals and plants that are in contact with contaminated water. Consequently, the use of MCs contaminated water for irrigation represents a hazard for cultivated plants and could induce severe economical losses due to crops' yield reduction. The experimental approach undertaken in this work was exposing Vicia faba seedlings (inoculated with a Rhizobium strain resistant to MCs), to water supplemented with cyanobacterial crude extract containing total microcystins at a concentration of 50 and 100 μg/L (environmental relevant concentrations of MCs dissolved in the raw irrigation water from Lalla Takerkoust Lake-Marrakesh region). After chronic MCs exposure (2 months), biological and physiological parameters (plant growth, nitrogen uptake, mineral assimilation, and oxidative defense mechanisms) were evaluated. The results obtained showed evidence that chronic exposure to cyanobacterial bloom extract containing MCs strongly affected the physiological and biological plants activities; reduction of dry matter, photosynthetic activity, nodule number, and nitrogen assimilation. At the same time, an increase of oxidative stress was observed, as deduced from a significant increase of the activities of peroxidase, catalase, polyphenoloxidase, and phenylalanine ammonia lyase in leaves, roots, and nodules of faba bean plants exposed to cyanotoxins, especially at 100 μg/L of MCs. This experimentation constitutes a simulation of the situation related to cyanotoxins chronic exposure of seedlings-plants via the contaminated irrigation water. For this reason, once should take into consideration the possibility of contamination of agricultural crops and the quality of irrigation water should be by the way monitored for cyanotoxins biohazard.

  18. IP-1 Certification of Cargo Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, Lisle

    2010-10-05

    The purpose and scope of this engineering note is to demonstrate that the structural design of the cargo container complies with the IP-1 container requirements of 49 CFR 173.410 as required by CFR 173.411.

  19. Container Prevents Oxidation Of Metal Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Power, Christopher A.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Burns, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Sealed high-vacuum container holds metal powder required free of contamination by oxygen from point of manufacture to point of use at vacuum-plasma-spraying machine. Container protects powder from air during filling, storage, and loading of spraying machine. Eliminates unnecessary handling and transfer of powder from one container to another. Stainless-steel container sits on powder feeder of vacuum-plasma-spraying machine.

  20. Rinsing and management of pesticides' containers.

    PubMed

    Huyghebaert, B; Mostade, O; Pigeon, O; Galoux, M; Oger, R

    2002-01-01

    In order to reduce the effects on the environment, it is necessary to improve the management of pesticides' containers. Usually, users burn or bury empty containers. These methods, even though decreasing must be avoided or even forbidden. Since 1996, empty containers are systematically collected in Belgium and are specifically removed by the firm Phytofar Recover created by the Belgian Federation of pesticides' manufacturers. Since the beginning, the recovery rate (percentage of containers recovered compared with the containers sold) goes on increasing to exceed 85% in 2001. These action and results are a world first (more than 500 tons of empty containers are collected yearly). Once collected, empty containers are subjected to the European Policy about toxic wastes since they contained dangerous products. Their removal must follow a specific removal process by incineration at very high temperature (> 1200 degrees C) with a specific filtration of the smoke. The treatment cost is high and reaches 2 Euros per kg of container. If the container is rinsed and the residue does not exceed 1000, 10,000 or 30,000 mg per kg of container (depending on the dangerousness of product: very toxic, corrosive or toxic), it will be considered as domestic waste and will therefore follow a much more economical energy production process. The study aims at determining the quantities of residue contained in empty containers and the parameters reducing the rinsing efficiency: the formulation (EC, WP, WG), the container's size, packaging's type (plastic container or paper bag), the rinsing technique. Almost 150 tests and analyses of residue have been carried out. A manual rinsing procedure has been set up in order to meet the standards about residue. Rinsing three times with an average volume of water (20 to 30%) allows to reach the lowest residue level. As bags containing powder (WG or WP) container not be rinsed, it is necessary to empty them completely. It is however difficult to reach

  1. Residual Stress Testing of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.

    2004-02-12

    A Gas Tungsten Arc Welded (GTAW) outer 3013 container and a laser welded outer 3013 container have been tested for residual stresses according to the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard G-36-94 [1]. This ASTM standard describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in boiling magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution. Container sections in both the as-fabricated condition as well as the closure welded condition were evaluated. Significantly large residual stresses were observed in the bottom half of the as-fabricated container, a result of the base to can fabrication weld because through wall cracks were observed perpendicular to the weld. This observation indicates that regardless of the closure weld technique, sufficient residual stresses exist in the as-fabricated container to provide the stress necessary for stress corrosion cracking of the container, at the base fabrication weld. Additionally, sufficiently high residual stresses were observed in both the lid and the body of the GTAW as well as the laser closure welded containers. The stresses are oriented perpendicular to the closure weld in both the container lid and the container body. Although the boiling MgCl2 test is not a quantitative test, a comparison of the test results from the closure welds shows that there are noticeably more through wall cracks in the laser closure welded container than in the GTAW closure welded container.

  2. Performance of Sequoyah Containment Anchorage System

    SciTech Connect

    Fanous, F.; Greimann, L.; Wassef, W.; Bluhm, D.

    1993-01-01

    Deformation of a steel containment anchorage system during a severe accident may result in a leakage path at the containment boundaries. Current design criteria are based on either ductile or brittle failure modes of headed bolts that do not account for factors such as cracking of the containment basemat or deformation of the anchor bolt that may affect the behavior of the containment anchorage system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of a typical ice condenser containment`s anchorage system. This was accomplished by analyzing the Sequoyah Containment Anchorage System. Based on a strength of materials approach and assuming that the anchor bolts are resisting the uplift caused by the internal pressure, one can estimate that the failure of the anchor bolts would occur at a containment pressure of 79 psig. To verify these results and to calibrate the strength of materials equation, the Sequoyah containment anchorage system was analyzed with the ABAQUS program using a three-dimensional, finite-element model. The model included portions of the steel containment building, shield building, anchor bolt assembly, reinforced concrete mat and soil foundation material.

  3. Baseline Microstructural Characterization of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, Phillip E.; Dunn, Kerry A

    2005-07-31

    Three DOE Standard 3013 outer storage containers were examined to characterize the microstructure of the type 316L stainless steel material of construction. Two of the containers were closure-welded yielding production-quality outer 3013 containers; the third examined container was not closed. Optical metallography and Knoop microhardness measurements were performed to establish a baseline characterization that will support future destructive examinations of 3013 outer containers in the storage inventory. Metallography revealed the microstructural features typical of this austenitic stainless steel as it is formed and welded. The grains were equiaxed with evident annealing twins. Flow lines were prominent in the forming directions of the cylindrical body and flat lids and bottom caps. No adverse indications were seen. Microhardness values, although widely varying, were consistent with annealed austenitic stainless steel. The data gathered as part of this characterization will be used as a baseline for the destructive examination of 3013 containers removed from the storage inventory.

  4. Geologic containment of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we present results of our work and outline our thoughts on resolving the uncertainties associated with the nature of the solubilities and speciation of actinides, the formation of radiocolloids, the sorption behavior of fission products and actinides and the transport mechanisms of advection, diffusion, and dispersion for radionuclides under environmental conditions though to exist at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. 27 refs.

  5. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, Stephen

    2011-08-16

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  6. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  7. Corrosion assessment of dry fuel storage containers

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    The structural stability as a function of expected corrosion degradation of 75 dry fuel storage containers located in the 200 Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds was evaluated. These containers include 22 concrete burial containers, 13 55-gal (208-l) drums, and 40 Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) transport/storage casks. All containers are buried beneath at least 48 in. of soil and a heavy plastic tarp with the exception of 35 of the EBR-II casks which are exposed to atmosphere. A literature review revealed that little general corrosion is expected and pitting corrosion of the carbon steel used as the exterior shell for all containers (with the exception of the concrete containers) will occur at a maximum rate of 3.5 mil/yr. Penetration from pitting of the exterior shell of the 208-l drums and EBR-II casks is calculated to occur after 18 and 71 years of burial, respectively. The internal construction beneath the shell would be expected to preclude containment breach, however, for the drums and casks. The estimates for structural failure of the external shells, large-scale shell deterioration due to corrosion, are considerably longer, 39 and 150 years respectively for the drums and casks. The concrete burial containers are expected to withstand a service life of 50 years.

  8. Reliability analysis of containment isolation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pelto, P.J.; Ames, K.R.; Gallucci, R.H.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Reliability Analysis of Containment Isolation System Project. Work was performed in five basic areas: design review, operating experience review, related research review, generic analysis and plant specific analysis. Licensee Event Reports (LERs) and Integrated Leak Rate Test (ILRT) reports provided the major sources of containment performance information used in this study. Data extracted from LERs were assembled into a computer data base. Qualitative and quantitative information developed for containment performance under normal operating conditions and design basis accidents indicate that there is room for improvement. A rough estimate of overall containment unavailability for relatively small leaks which violate plant technical specifications is 0.3. An estimate of containment unavailability due to large leakage events is in the range of 0.001 to 0.01. These estimates are dependent on several assumptions (particularly on event duration times) which are documented in the report.

  9. Development of characterization of plutonium storage containers

    SciTech Connect

    James, D.; Stevkovski, S.

    1999-02-01

    As a result of the end of the Cold War, at least 11,000 (possibly 20,000 or more) plutonium pits are projected to be stored at Pantex for up to fifty years. The current pit container, the ALR8 was not designed for this length of storage duration. As a result, Pantex officials have searched for alternative container options. The objective of this research is to develop and validate a model to predict the temperature distribution within the stored components and the internal structure of the proposed ALR8(SI) container, and to consider and analyze the safety features of the ALR8(SI) container as seen from the thermal performance view. Due to the time scale involved with the current simulations, the radioactive decay of the plutonium may be assumed to provide a uniform rate of heat generation. This heat is conducted to the surroundings through the solid structures of the assembly. In addition to conduction, the inert gas that fills the volume within the steel container convects a fraction of the generated heat from the plutonium to the colder steel surfaces. Radiation must also be accounted for as natural convection and limited conduction paths are present within the container. The research efforts in this project have been directed into two paths, numerical and experimental. First, the temperature distribution within the stored components are being determined experimentally as a function of fill gases, energy generation rate, and boundary conditions. Second, a finite element model of the ALR8 container has been developed so that the temperature distribution can be predicted as a function of the same experimental parameters. This paper presents the experimental method and data that have been obtained thus far, as well as the finite element model created using SDRC I-DEAS.

  10. Simplified dynamic buckling assessment of steel containments

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.; Renick, D.H.

    1993-02-01

    A simplified, three-degree-of-freedom analytical procedure for performing a response spectrum buckling analysis of a thin containment shell is developed. Two numerical examples with R/t values which bound many existing steel containments are used to illustrate the procedure. The role of damping on incipient buckling acceleration level is evaluated for a regulatory seismic spectrum using the two numerical examples. The zero-period acceleration level that causes incipient buckling in either of the two containments increases 31% when damping is increased from 1% to 4% of critical. Comparisons with finite element results on incipient buckling levels are favorable.

  11. Design and development of diborane shipping container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, development, and tests of a 200 pound container for the shipment of liquid diborane are reported. A record of the correspondence with the DOT to obtain a permit for liquid diborane shipment is presented.

  12. Predicting the Lifetimes of Nuclear Waste Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Fraser

    2014-03-01

    As for many aspects of the disposal of nuclear waste, the greatest challenge we have in the study of container materials is the prediction of the long-term performance over periods of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. Various methods have been used for predicting the lifetime of containers for the disposal of high-level waste or spent fuel in deep geological repositories. Both mechanical and corrosion-related failure mechanisms need to be considered, although until recently the interactions of mechanical and corrosion degradation modes have not been considered in detail. Failure from mechanical degradation modes has tended to be treated through suitable container design. In comparison, the inevitable loss of container integrity due to corrosion has been treated by developing specific corrosion models. The most important aspect, however, is to be able to justify the long-term predictions by demonstrating a mechanistic understanding of the various degradation modes.

  13. Testing of a steel containment vessel model

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Costello, J.F.

    1997-04-01

    A mixed-scale containment vessel model, with 1:10 in containment geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness, was fabricated to represent an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment vessel. A contact structure, installed over the model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. This paper describes the pretest preparations and the conduct of the high pressure test of the model performed on December 11-12, 1996. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Development of advanced lightweight containment systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C.

    1981-01-01

    Parametric type data were obtained on advanced lightweight containment systems. These data were used to generate design methods and procedures necessary for the successful development of such systems. The methods were then demonstrated through the design of a lightweight containment system for a CF6 size engine. The containment concept evaluated consisted basically of a lightweight structural sandwich shell wrapped with dry Kevlar cloth. The initial testing was directed towards the determination of the amount of Kevlar required to result in threshold containment for a specific set of test conditions. A relationship was then developed between the thickness required and the energy of the released blade so that the data could be used to design for conditions other than those tested.

  15. Anticancer Mechanism of Sulfur-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    De Gianni, Elena; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and vegetables have traditionally represented a main source for the discovery of many biologically active substances with therapeutic values. Among the many bioactive compounds identified over the years, sulfur-containing compounds, which are present especially in the genera Allium and Brassica, have been showing a protective effect against different types of cancer. Many in vitro and in vivo studies reported that apoptosis is crucial for the anticancer effects of sulfur-containing compounds. Garlic and onion compounds and isothiocyanates contained in Brassica vegetables are able to modulate apoptosis by a wide range of mechanisms. This chapter will give an overview on the induction of apoptosis by sulfur-containing compounds in cancer cells and their different molecular mechanisms. Finally, the potential clinical implications of their proapoptotic effects will be discussed. PMID:26298460

  16. Feasibility of Magnetostrictive Sensor Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun, H.

    1999-03-01

    This report describes the results of a study on the feasibility of using guided waves for long-range global inspection of containment metallic pressure boundaries (i.e., steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments) in nuclear power plants. Of particular concern in this study was the potential of the guided-wave approach for remotely inspecting the regions that are inaccessible; for example, regions where the metallic pressure boundary is backed by concrete on one or both sides. The study includes a literature review on long-range guided-wave inspection techniques, a modeling study of the behavior of guided waves in plates with different boundary conditions (e.g., freestanding and backed by concrete on one or both sides), and an experimental investigation of the feasibility of a guided-wave technique called ''magnetostrictive sensor (MsS)'' for (1) generating and detecting guided waves in plates and (2) detecting a defect over a long range. Results of the study showed (1) that it is feasible to achieve long-range global inspection of plates, including regions that are inaccessible, using low-frequency guided waves and (2) that the MsS technique is well suited for this application. Recommendations are made to further test and develop the MsS technique for practical implementation for containment inspection in nuclear power plants.

  17. The containment of cost of health care.

    PubMed

    Gordts, B

    1996-04-01

    The cost of health care services has become increasingly important to society. Although hospital physicians are traditionally not involved in cost calculation and cost containment, they bear the consequences of budget restrictions. Since 1987, the reimbursement for clinical laboratories in Belgian hospitals has changed towards an envelope based system. Clinical biologists became aware that new resources can only be obtained mainly through cost reductions. But to contain cost, one must understand how it is generated. Activity based costing (ABC) is a new technique developed for strategic management in the industry. By analyzing the cost of all activities involved in the production process, this technique is very well suited to calculate cost in service organizations like medical departments. Using the principles of ABC, we performed a detailed analysis of the cost of a microbiology laboratory, determining the full cost as well as the proportion of each cost sorts (materials, labor, ...) for each laboratory test. This analysis illustrates that cost can effectively be calculated in a hospital department and guide doctors in the evaluation of alternative medical techniques, investments in automation, and the decision on medical priorities. In our opinion, cost containment of hospital care must start from within each medical department. Responsibility and participation of physicians in the discussion on budget allocation are essential in the process of cost containment of the hospital health care.

  18. The containment of cost of health care.

    PubMed

    Gordts, B

    1996-04-01

    The cost of health care services has become increasingly important to society. Although hospital physicians are traditionally not involved in cost calculation and cost containment, they bear the consequences of budget restrictions. Since 1987, the reimbursement for clinical laboratories in Belgian hospitals has changed towards an envelope based system. Clinical biologists became aware that new resources can only be obtained mainly through cost reductions. But to contain cost, one must understand how it is generated. Activity based costing (ABC) is a new technique developed for strategic management in the industry. By analyzing the cost of all activities involved in the production process, this technique is very well suited to calculate cost in service organizations like medical departments. Using the principles of ABC, we performed a detailed analysis of the cost of a microbiology laboratory, determining the full cost as well as the proportion of each cost sorts (materials, labor, ...) for each laboratory test. This analysis illustrates that cost can effectively be calculated in a hospital department and guide doctors in the evaluation of alternative medical techniques, investments in automation, and the decision on medical priorities. In our opinion, cost containment of hospital care must start from within each medical department. Responsibility and participation of physicians in the discussion on budget allocation are essential in the process of cost containment of the hospital health care. PMID:8686402

  19. Resolution of the direct containment heating issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry containments or subatmospheric containments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1996-03-01

    This report uses the methodology and scenarios described in NUREG/CR-6075 and NUREG/CR-6075, Supplement 1, to address the direct containment heating (DCH) issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry or subatmospheric containments. DCH is considered resolved if the conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) is less than 0.1. The methodology calls for an initial screening phase in which the CCFP for each plant is calculated based on loads versus strength evaluations using plant-specific information. The DCH issue is considered resolved for a plant if the CCFP calculated in the screening phase is less than 0.01. This value is more stringent than the overall success criterion of 0.1. The CCFPs for all of the Westinghouse plants with dry containments were less than 0.01 in the screening phase calculations, and thus, the DCH issue is resolved for these plants based on containment loads alone. No additional analyses are required.

  20. Optical properties of coumarins containing copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowronski, L.; Krupka, O.; Smokal, V.; Grabowski, A.; Naparty, M.; Derkowska-Zielinska, B.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the optical properties such as absorption coefficient, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of dielectric function and energy band gap of coumarin-containing copolymers thin films by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) combined with transmittance measurements (T) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found that the optical properties of coumarin-containing copolymers strongly depend from length of alkyl spacer as well as the type of substitution in coumarin moiety. In our case the refractive index as well as the energy band gap of coumarin-containing copolymer decrease with increase the length of alkyl spacer. Additionally, the lengthening of the alkyl spacer brings the bathochromic shifts of the absorption spectra towards longer wavelengths.

  1. JUNIOR JADE - containment phenomenology of decoupled events

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.W.

    1995-02-01

    With five 8 pound high-explosive experiments, the author has investigated aspects of the containment phenomenology of partially decoupled events. In three experiments he observed multiple fractures and little cavity growth. In the final two experiments there were no fractures and cavity volumes grew by factors of approximately two and three. With the five experiments a spectrum of results ranging from hydraulic fracture - like crack propagation through multiple fracture propagation to the no fracture, or fully contained, case, was observed. For the multiple fracture experiments a partial residual stress field may have controlled the release of the cavity pressure. Measurements of cavity pressure versus time provided containment diagnostics; post event mining allowed visual observation of the cavities and fractures.

  2. Blends of cysteine-containing proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Justin

    2005-03-01

    Many agricultural wastes are made of proteins such as keratin, lactalbumin, gluten, and albumin. These proteins contain the amino acid cysteine. Cysteine allows for the formation of inter-and intra-molecular sulfur-sulfur bonds. Correlations are made between the properties of films made from the proteins and the amino acid sequence. Blends of cysteine-containing proteins show possible synergies in physical properties at intermediate concentrations. FT-IR spectroscopy shows increased hydrogen bonding at intermediate concentrations suggesting that this contributes to increased physical properties. DSC shows limited miscibility and the formation of new crystalline phases in the blends suggesting that this too contributes.

  3. Inspection of cargo containers using gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Esam M. A.; Gokhale, Prasad; Arendtsz, Nina V.; Lawrence, Andre H.

    1997-02-01

    This paper investigate, with the aid of Monte Carlo simulations and laboratory experiments, a technique for the detection of narcotics in large cargo containers using gamma-radiation. The transmission and back-scattering of photons, at different energies, is used to provide information useful for identifying the presence of bulk quantities of commonly encountered narcotics.

  4. Democratic Pedagogy and the Discourse of Containment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popen, Shari

    2002-01-01

    Discusses application of a discourse of containment in pedagogical practice, asserting that this discourse limits democratic possibilities in the classroom. Analyzes the stakes in political struggles over control of the production of meaning within the classroom, examining the mythologized version of Rosa Parks' story and the current agenda of…

  5. Resolution of the direct containment heating issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry containments or subatmospheric containments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1996-02-01

    This report uses the scenarios described in NUREG/CR-6075 and NUREG/CR-6075, Supplement 1, to address the direct containment heating (DCH) issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry or subatmospheric containments. DCH is considered resolved if the conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) is less than 0.1. Loads versus strength evaluations of the CCFP were performed for each plant using plant-specific information. The DCH issue is considered resolved for a plant if a screening phase results in a CCFP less than 0.01, which is more stringent than the overall success criterion. If the screening phase CCFP for a plant is greater than 0.01, then refined containment loads evaluations must be performed and/or the probability of high pressure at vessel breach must be analyzed. These analyses could be used separately or could be integrated together to recalculate the CCFP for an individual plant to reduce the CCFP to meet the overall success criterion of less than 0.1. The CCFPs for all of the Westinghouse plants with dry containments were less than 0.01 at the screening phase, and thus, the DCH issue is resolved for these plants based on containment loads alone. No additional analyses are required.

  6. Development of a Whole Container Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Michael J; Pickett, Chris A; Stinson, Brad J; Rowe, Nathan C

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines a technique for utilizing electrically conductive textiles as a whole container seal. This method has the potential to provide more robustness for ensuring that the container has not been breached versus conventional sealing methods that only provide tamper indication at the area used for normal access. The conductive textile is used as a distributed sensor for detecting and localizing container tamper or breach. For sealing purposes, the conductive fabric represents a bounded, near-infinite grid of resistors. The well-known infinite resistance grid problem was used to model and confirm the expected accuracy and validity of this approach. An experimental setup was built that uses a multiplexed Wheatstone bridge measurement to determine the resistances of a coarse electrode grid across the conductive fabric. Non-uniform resistance values of the grid infer the presence of damage or tears in the fabric. Results suggest accuracy proportional to the electrode spacing in determining the presence and location of disturbances in conductive fabric samples. Current work is focused on constructing experimental prototypes for field and environmental testing to gauge the performance of these whole container seals in real world conditions. We are also developing software and hardware to interface with the whole container seals. The latest prototypes are expected to provide more accuracy in detecting and localizing events, although detection of a penetration should be adequate for most sealing applications. We are also developing smart sensing nodes that integrate digital hardware and additional sensors (e.g., motion, humidity) into the electrode nodes within the whole container seal.

  7. Photodynamics of nonlinear fullerene-containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousova, Inna M.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Danilov, Oleg B.; Grigor'ev, Vladimir A.; Kalintsev, Alexander G.; Zgonnik, V. N.; Kamanina, Natalia V.; Zhevlakov, Aleksandr P.; Kris'ko, A. V.; Mironova, N. G.; Sosnov, Eugene N.; Gavronskaya, E. A.; Smirnov, V. A.; Yur'ev, Michail S.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Yashin, Vladimir E.

    2001-03-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies on photodynamics and mechanism of nonlinear optical processes, responsible for optical limiting of power radiation in the wavelength range from 0.3 to 1.3 microns, are presented. Peculiarities in the mechanisms of optical limiting for different fullerene-containing matrices, including solutions, solid-state and polymer systems, are shown.

  8. Cartilage-containing tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Eric M.

    1967-01-01

    An unusual case is reported of a woman aged 27 years who presented with four intrapulmonary cartilage-containing tumours which were resected from the left lung. The appearance of two new shadows in the chest several years later suggested that two of the resected tumours had recurred. Three of the four resected tumours consisted entirely of cartilage and bone and other connective tissues. The fourth tumour, although consisting almost entirely of cartilage and connective tissue, also contained epithelial tissue in the form of two small clefts, one in the periphery and the other in a connective tissue septum between the lobules of cartilage of the tumour. These tumours are regarded as a variation of the more typical cartilage-containing tumour of the lung which contains many spaces lined by respiratory epithelium and is regarded as a neoplasm arising in the connective tissue beneath the mucosa of a small bronchus with subsequent expansion into its lumen and enclosing spaces lined by the mucosal epithelium during its eccentric growth. The tumours consisting almost entirely of cartilage without spaces lined by epithelial cells are thought to expand into the adjacent lung tissue and not into the bronchial lumen. Therefore there is no inclusion of respiratory epithelium from the mucosa of the bronchus of origin. Images PMID:6033393

  9. Fire containment tests of aircraft interior panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Leon, H. A.; Williamson, R. B.; Hasegawa, H.; Fisher, F.; Draemel, R.; Marcussen, W. H.; Hilado, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an experimental program carried out to evaluate a possible method for testing the fire-containment qualities of aircraft interior panels. The experimental apparatus consisted of a burner that simulates various fire loads under different ventilation conditions in an enclosure of approximately the same size as an aircraft lavatory module. Two fire-containment tests are discussed in which two adjoining walls of the enclosure were made from state-of-the-art composite panels; rats were exposed to the combustion products in order to evaluate the toxic threat posed by those products. The results show that the burner can be employed to represent various fire-load conditions and that the methodology developed for fire containment can be useful in evaluating the fire resistance of composite panels before conducting large-scale tests. It is concluded that elements of the fire-containment criteria include the temperature rise on the backface of the panels as a function of time, the flame burn-through by either decomposition or severe distortion of the material, and the toxicity of the combustion gases evolved.

  10. Microbial production of lactate-containing polyesters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Eun; Choi, So Young; Shin, Jae Ho; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-01-01

    Due to our increasing concerns on environmental problems and limited fossil resources, biobased production of chemicals and materials through biorefinery has been attracting much attention. Optimization of the metabolic performance of microorganisms, the key biocatalysts for the efficient production of the desired target bioproducts, has been achieved by metabolic engineering. Metabolic engineering allowed more efficient production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, a family of microbial polyesters. More recently, non-natural polyesters containing lactate as a monomer have also been produced by one-step fermentation of engineered bacteria. Systems metabolic engineering integrating traditional metabolic engineering with systems biology, synthetic biology, protein/enzyme engineering through directed evolution and structural design, and evolutionary engineering, enabled microorganisms to efficiently produce natural and non-natural products. Here, we review the strategies for the metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the in vivo biosynthesis of lactate-containing polyesters and for the optimization of whole cell metabolism to efficiently produce lactate-containing polyesters. Also, major problems to be solved to further enhance the production of lactate-containing polyesters are discussed. PMID:23718266

  11. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion damage that has been found in a number of nuclear power plant containment structures can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. This has prompted concerns regarding the capacity of corroded containments to withstand accident loadings. To address these concerns, finite element analyses have been performed for a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment structure. Using ABAQUS, the pressure capacity was calculated for a typical vessel with no corrosion damage. Multiple analyses were then performed with the location of the corrosion and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis. Using a strain-based failure criterion, a {open_quotes}lower bound{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes}, and {open_quotes}upper bound{close_quotes} failure level was predicted for each case. These limits were established by: determining the amount of variability that exists in material properties of typical containments, estimating the amount of uncertainty associated with the level of modeling detail and modeling assumptions, and estimating the effect of corrosion on the material properties.

  12. Valuation effects of health cost containment measures.

    PubMed

    Strange, M L; Ezzell, J R

    2000-01-01

    This study reports the findings of research into the valuation effects of health cost containment activities by publicly traded corporations. The motivation for this study was employers' increasing cost of providing health care insurance to their employees and employers' efforts to contain those costs. A 1990 survey of corporate health benefits indicated that these costs represented 25 percent of employers' net earnings and this would rise by the year 2000 if no actions were taken to reduce cost. Health cost containment programs that are implemented by firms should be seen by shareholders as a wealth maximizing effort. As such, this should be reflected in share price. This study employed standard event study methodology where the event is a media announcement or report regarding an attempt by a firm to contain the costs of providing health insurance and other health related benefits to employees. It examined abnormal returns on a number of event days and for a number of event intervals. Of the daily and interval returns that are least significant at the 10 percent level, virtually all are negative. Cross-sectional analysis shows that the abnormal returns are related negatively to a unionization variable. PMID:10961833

  13. Valuation effects of health cost containment measures.

    PubMed

    Strange, M L; Ezzell, J R

    2000-01-01

    This study reports the findings of research into the valuation effects of health cost containment activities by publicly traded corporations. The motivation for this study was employers' increasing cost of providing health care insurance to their employees and employers' efforts to contain those costs. A 1990 survey of corporate health benefits indicated that these costs represented 25 percent of employers' net earnings and this would rise by the year 2000 if no actions were taken to reduce cost. Health cost containment programs that are implemented by firms should be seen by shareholders as a wealth maximizing effort. As such, this should be reflected in share price. This study employed standard event study methodology where the event is a media announcement or report regarding an attempt by a firm to contain the costs of providing health insurance and other health related benefits to employees. It examined abnormal returns on a number of event days and for a number of event intervals. Of the daily and interval returns that are least significant at the 10 percent level, virtually all are negative. Cross-sectional analysis shows that the abnormal returns are related negatively to a unionization variable.

  14. Preservation of Mercury in Polyethylene Containers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccolino, Samuel Paul

    1983-01-01

    Reports results of experiments favoring use of 0.5 percent nitric acid with an oxidant (potassium dichromate or potassium permanganate) to preserve samples in polyethylene containers for mercury analysis. Includes procedures used and statistical data obtained from the experiments. (JN)

  15. Response analysis of an automobile shipping container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, L.; Lee, S. H.; Johnstone, B.

    1973-01-01

    The design and development of automobile shipping containers to reduce enroute damage are discussed. Vibration tests were conducted to determine the system structural integrity. A dynamic analysis was made using NASTRAN and the results of the test and the analysis are compared.

  16. Container Security - part of the CORE system

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    A data integration system to support the US Customs and Border Protection Officers to supervise and make decisions for container inspections. CORE is designed to act as a framework to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization.

  17. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Horn, F.L.

    1961-12-12

    Uranium is recovered from spent uranium fuel elements containing or clad with zirconium. These fuel elements are placed in an anhydrous solution of hydrogen fluoride and nitrogen dioxide. Within this system uranium forms a soluble complex and zirconium forms an insoluble complex. The uranium can then be separated, treated, and removed from solution as uranium hexafluoride. (AEC)

  18. Synthesis of polycarbonates containing nonlinear optical chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.G.; Brittain, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    A new nonlinear (NLO) chromophore has been prepared. The chromophore is similar in structure to DANS (N,N-dimethylamino-4-nitrostilbene), but includes bisphenol moities. The bisphenol structure makes this system an excellent candidate for cyclic polycarbonate chemistry. The ring-opening polymerization of cyclic precursors containing NLO chromophore provides a novel processing pathway to NLO polymers.

  19. Phosphorous-containing analogues of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Nelson, V; Mastalerz, P

    1984-12-01

    Four analogues of aspartame (aspartylphenylalanine methyl ester) were prepared in which one of the carboxylate groups was replaced by a phosphonate group. None of the peptides so obtained was sweet, in contrast with the parent compound which is over 100 times sweeter than sucrose. These results contrast with several published reports of phosphonate analogues of amino acids and peptides which are potent inhibitors of enzymes containing acceptor sites for the parent compound.

  20. 40 CFR 265.171 - Condition of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Condition of containers. 265.171... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 265.171 Condition of containers. If a container... transfer the hazardous waste from this container to a container that is in good condition, or manage...

  1. 40 CFR 264.171 - Condition of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Condition of containers. 264.171... Use and Management of Containers § 264.171 Condition of containers. If a container holding hazardous... leak, the owner or operator must transfer the hazardous waste from this container to a container...

  2. PRODUCTION OF FLUORINE-CONTAINING HYDROCARBON

    DOEpatents

    Sarsfield, N.F.

    1949-08-01

    This patent relates to improvements in the production of fluorine- containing hydrocarbon derivatives. The process for increasing the degree of fluorination of a fluorochlorohydrocarbon comprises subjecting a highly fluorinated fluorochlorohydrocarbon to the action of a dehydrochlorinating agent, and treating the resulting unsaturated body with fluorine, cobalt trifluoride, or silver difluoride. A number of reagents are known as dehydrochlorinaling agents, including, for example, the caustic alkalies, either in an anhydrous condition or dissolved in water or a lower aliphatic alcohol.

  3. Dynamics of solid-containing tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Making use of a relatively simple, approximate but reliable method of analysis, a study is made of the responses to horizontal base shaking of vertical, circular cylindrical tanks that are filled with a uniform viscoelastic material. The method of analysis is described, and comprehensive numerical data are presented that elucidate the underlying response mechanisms and the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. In addition to the characteristics of the ground motion and a dimensionless measure of the tank wall flexibility relative to the contained medium, the parameters examined include the ratio of tank-height to tank-radius and the physical properties of the contained material. Both harmonic and earthquake-induced ground motions are considered. The response quantities investigated are the dynamic wall pressures, the critical forces in the tank wall, and the forces exerted on the foundation. Part A of the report deals with rigid tanks while the effects of tank wall flexibility are examined in Part B. A brief account is also given in the latter part of the interrelationship of the critical responses of solid-containing tanks and those induced in tanks storing a liquid of the same mass density.

  4. CONTAIN assessment of the NUPEC mixing experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stamps, D.W.

    1995-08-01

    The ability of the CONTAIN code to predict the thermal hydraulics of five experiments performed in the NUPEC 1/4-scale model containment was assessed. These experiments simulated severe accident conditions in a nuclear power plant in which helium (as a nonflammable substitute for hydrogen) and steam were coinjected at different locations in the facility with and without the concurrent injection of water sprays in the dome. Helium concentrations, gas temperatures and pressures, and wall temperatures were predicted and compared with the data. The use of different flow solvers, nodalization schemes, and analysis methods for the treatment of water sprays was emphasized. As a result, a general procedure was suggested for lumped-parameter code analyses of problems in which the thermal hydraulics are dominated by water sprays.

  5. Development of Mullite Substrates and Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibold, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The mullite-molten silicon interaction was evaluated through fabrication of a series of bodies made with variations in density, alumina-silica ratio, and glass-crystalline ratio. The materials were tested in a sessile drop technique. None of the variations stood up to extended exposure to molten silicon sufficiently to be recommended as a container material. However, directional solidification experiments suggest that, under proper conditions, contamination of the silicon by mullite containers can be minimized. To improve an already good thermal expansion match between mullite and silicon, compositional variations were studied. Altering of the alumina-silica ratio was determined to give a continuously varying thermal expansion. A standard mullite composition was selected and substrates 40 x 4 x .040 inches were fabricated. Slotted substrates of various configurations and various compositions were also fabricated.

  6. SULPHUR DIOXIDE LEACHING OF URANIUM CONTAINING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Rabbits, F.T.; Hester, K.D.; Smith, H.W.

    1958-12-01

    A process is described for extracting uranlum from uranium containing material, such as a low grade pitchblende ore, or mill taillngs, where at least part of the uraniunn is in the +4 oxidation state. After comminuting and magnetically removing any entrained lron particles the general material is made up as an aqueous slurry containing added ferric and manganese salts and treated with sulfur dioxide and aeration to an extent sufficient to form a proportion of oxysulfur acids to give a pH of about 1 to 2 but insufficient to cause excessive removal of the sulfur dioxide gas. After separating from the solids, the leach solution is adjusted to a pH of about 1.25, then treated with metallic iron in the presence of a precipitant such as a soluble phosphate, arsonate, or fluoride.

  7. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents.

  8. Energy implications of glass-container recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L L; Mintz, M M

    1994-03-01

    This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

  9. Mineralogical conversion of asbestos containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsford, S.K.; Foltz, A.D.; Ek, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    The principal objective of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) is to demonstrate a thermal-chemical mineralogical asbestos conversion unit at the Hanford Site, which converts non-radiological asbestos containing materials (ACMs) into an asbestos-free material. The permanent thermal-chemical mineralogical conversion of ACMs to a non-toxic, non-hazardous, potentially marketable end product should not only significantly reduce the waste stream volumes but terminate the {open_quotes}cradle to grave{close_quotes} ownership liabilities.

  10. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1995-01-01

    This grant deals with several topics related to the dynamics of systems containing a compact object. Most of our research in 1994 dealt with systems containing Neutron Stars (NS's), but we also addressed systems containing a Black Hole (BH) or a White Dwarf (WD) in situations relevant to NS systems. Among the systems were isolated regular pulsars, Millisecond Pulsars (MSP's) that are either Single (SMP's) or in a binary (BMP's) Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMX's) and Cataclysmic Variables (CV's). We also dealt with one aspect of NS structure, namely NS superfluidity. A large fraction of our research dealt with irradiation-driven winds from companions. These winds turned out to be of some importance in the evolution of LMXB's and MSP's, be they SMP's or BMP's. While their role during LMXB evolution (i.e. during the accretion phase) is not yet clear, they may play an important role in turning BMP's into SMP's and also in bringing about the formation of planets around MSP's.

  11. Metal dusting of nickel-containing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1998-12-31

    Metal dusting is a catastrophic form of carburization which leads to pitting and grooves as the affected metal disintegrates into a mixture of powdery carbon, metallic particles, and possibly oxides and carbides. This high temperature carburization mode is not yet well understood and while relatively infrequent, can be economically disastrous when it does occur in large and complex chemical and petrochemical process streams. References in the literature show that all classes of heat resistant alloys are prone to metal dusting, given the necessary and specific environmental conditions. These same references describe the environments that plague nickel-containing alloys and are used as the basis for postulation on the probable corrosion mechanisms responsible for metal dusting. Using alloy 800 and other nickel-containing alloys and metal dusting atmospheres, an effort is made to examine the steps in the metal dusting process and the temperature ranges over which metal dusting occurs.

  12. Dehydration resistance of liposomes containing trehalose glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyberg, Kendra; Goulding, Morgan; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2010-03-01

    The pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has an unusual outer membrane containing trehalose glycolipids that may contribute to its ability to survive freezing and dehydration. Based on our recent discovery that trehalose glycolipids confer dehydration resistance to supported lipid monolayers (Biophys. J. 94: 4718-4724 (2008); Langmuir 25: 5193-5198, (2009)), we hypothesized that liposomes containing synthetic trehalose glycolipids may be dehydration-resistant as well. To test this, we measured the leakage of encapsulated fluorophores and larger macromolecular cargo from such liposomes subject to freeze drying. Both leakage assays and size measurements show that the liposomes are dehydration-resistant. In addition to demonstrating a possibly technologically useful encapsulation platform, our results corroborate the view that encapsulation in a trehalose-glycolipid-rich membrane is a biophysically viable route to protection of mycobacteria from environmental stresses.

  13. Design study status of compact containment BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Kuroki, M.; Kojima, Y.; Arai, K.; Tahara, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a relatively mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Japan Atomic Power Company has been taking initiative in developing the concept of the Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR). The CCR., which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's relatively mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The upper entry CRDs enable a simplified safety system followed by in-vessel retention (IVR) capability with the compact primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration of RPV below the top of the core height, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC). The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. Further core design study has been carried out taking into account compact reactor size and reduction of fuel

  14. Pioneer fauna of nepheline-containing tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkova, I. V.; Kalmykova, V. V.; Liskovaya, A. A.

    2009-08-01

    The zoological analysis of nepheline-containing sands deposited in tailings 10-40 years ago showed that the pioneer colonists of this technogenic substrate are collembolan and mites, whose proportions depend on the succession of the bacterial and fungal components of the microbiota. The pioneer groups of mesofauna on 10- to 30-year-old tailings include carnivorous herpetobiontic arthropods and phytophagous insects. An impoverished version of the fauna of northern-taiga podzols is developed in the sands rehabilitated more than 40 years ago.

  15. Planning for future containmenht, handling and testing of returned martian samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Race, M.

    According to the Draft Test Protocol for Detecting Possible Biohazards in Martian Samples Returned to Earth, a rigorous battery of physical/chemical tests, life detection analyses, and biohazard tests will be done under strict containment prior to any distribution of unsterilized materials to the scientific community. While the design and construction of an appropriate sample receiving facility (SRF) will be dependent on future mission plans, discussions have already begun about the types of technical developments and advance research that will likely be needed to meet planetary protection requirements. The main challenges ahead center around the integration of maximum biocontainment and strict cleanliness conditions to ensure both biosafety and the preservation of the samples' scientific integrity, while handling the small amounts of pristine materials expected to be returned. Because details about facility designs and operational plans are sure to be scrutinized by the public, from the earliest phases it will be important to communicate openly about those plans, any potential risks, and mitigation options in order to develop understanding and support for the facility. Based on experiences at other maximum biocontainment facilities, public risk communication will be an important undertaking in the overall process of designing, constructing and operating the ultimate sample receiving facility, wherever it may be located.

  16. Containment performance of prototypical reactor containments subjected to severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Bohn, M.P.; Wesley, D.A.; Krishnaswamy, C.N.

    1996-12-01

    In SECY-90-016, the NTRC proposed a safety goal of a conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) of 0.1 and the alternative acceptance criteria allowed for steel containments, which specifies that the stresses should not exceed ASNE Level C allowables for severe accident pressures and temperatures. In this work, the need for an equivalent criterion for concrete containments was studied. Six surrogate containments were designed and analyzed in order to compare the margins between design pressure, pressure resulting in exceedance of Level C (or yield) stress limits, and ultimate pressure. For comparability, each containment has an identical internal volume and design pressure. Results from the analysis showed margins to yield are comparable and display a similar margin for both steel and concrete containments. In addition, the margin to failure, although slightly higher in the steel containments, were also comparable. Finally, a CCFP for code design was determined based on general membrane behavior and imposing an upper bound severe accident curve developed in the DCH studies. The resulting CCFP`s were less then 0.02 (or 2%) for all the surrogate containments studied, showing that these containment designs all achieved the NRC safety goal.

  17. Reliability evaluation of prestressed concrete containment structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, J.; Hwang, H.; Reich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The probabilistic safety evaluation of a realistic unbonded prestressed concrete containment building subjected to combinations of static and dynamic loads is presented. Loads considered include dead load, prestressing, accidental internal pressure, tornado and earthquake loads. Pertinent load parameters are the occurrence rate, duration and intensity. These parameters are treated as random variables for most of the loads. Limit state probabilities conditional on a specific load combination are calculated using the analytical procedure developed at BNL, which makes use of the finite element method and random vibration theory. Lifetime limit state probabilities are calculated using a load coincidence formulation. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Activation of calcineurin by phosphotidylserine containing vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Politino, M.; King, M.M.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin (CaN) is a Ca/sup 2 +/- and calmodulin-regulated phosphatase. Recent findings suggested an association of CaN with biological membranes and prompted the present investigation into the interactions of the phosphatase with phospholipids in vitro. In the absence of calmodulin, sonicated preparations of phosphatidylserine (PS) provided a five-fold activation of the Ni- and Mn-supported activities of CaN towards (/sup 32/P) histone Hl; activation in the presence of calmodulin was much less pronounced. Half-maximal activation in the absence of calmodulin required approximately 0.1 mg/ml of PS. Activation of CaN was also observed with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC) containing 20% PS but not with PC alone, or with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Molecular sieve chromatography on Ultrogel AcA 34 provided further evidence that CaN associates with phospholipid vesicles composed of PS, or PC containing 20% PS, but not with vesicles of PC or PE. Complete association with medium sized vesicles of PS and PC/PS required Ca/sup 2 +/ ions; in the absence of the metal ion at least 60% of the enzyme failed to interact with the lipids while the remainder preferentially migrated with larger vesicles. These results suggest a role for Ca/sup 2 +/ in regulating CaN's interaction with phospholipids.

  19. Closeup view of lunar rocks contained in first Apollo 11 sample container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A closeup view of the lunar rocks contained in the first Apollo 11 sample return container. The rock box was opened for the first time in the Vacuum Laboratory of the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, at 3:55 p.m., July 26, 1969. The gloved hand gives an indication of size.

  20. Repair and cell cycle response in cells exposed to environmental biohazards. Progress report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, D.; Hadden, C.T.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) DNA repair in Bacillus subtilis; (2) postreplication repair in Rec/sup -/ mutants of B. subtilis; (3) photobiology of halogenated DNA; (4) effects of caffeine on pyrimidine dimer excision and postreplication repair in B. subtilis; and (5) DNA repair in toluene-treated Escherichia coli. (ACR)

  1. Comparison of Students Classified ED in Self-Contained Classrooms and a Self-Contained School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Middle school students classified with Emotional Disturbance in two levels of least restrictive environments (LRE)--self-contained classes (SCC) and a self-contained school (SCS)--were compared at the beginning and the end of a school year, using demographics, IQ and achievement testing, a teacher checklist for DSM-IV psychopathology, and standard…

  2. View of lunar rocks contained on second Apollo 11 sample return container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A close-up view of the lunar rocks contained in the second Apollo 11 sample return container. The rock box was opened for the first time in the Vacuum Laboratory of the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, on August 5, 1969.

  3. Performance of Particulate Containment at Nanotechnology Workplaces

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Li-Ming; Tsai, Candace S.-J.; Dunn, Kevin H.; Hammond, Duane; Marlow, David; Topmiller, Jennifer; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of engineering controls for the production or use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was investigated at two facilities. These controls assessments are necessary to evaluate the current status of control performance and to develop proper control strategies for these workplaces. The control systems evaluated in these studies included ventilated enclosures, exterior hoods, and exhaust filtration systems. Activity-based monitoring with direct-reading instruments and filter sampling for microscopy analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of control measures at study sites. Our study results showed that weighing CNTs inside the biological safety cabinet can have a 37% reduction on the particle concentration in the worker’s breathing zone, and produce a 42% lower area concentration outside the enclosure. The ventilated enclosures used to reduce fugitive emissions from the production furnaces exhibited good containment characteristics when closed, but they failed to contain emissions effectively when opened during product removal/harvesting. The exhaust filtration systems employed for exhausting these ventilated enclosures did not provide promised collection efficiencies for removing engineered nanomaterials from furnace exhaust. The exterior hoods were found to be a challenge for controlling emissions from machining nanocomposites: the downdraft hood effectively contained and removed particles released from the manual cutting process, but using the canopy hood for powered cutting of nanocomposites created 15%–20% higher ultrafine (<500 nm) particle concentrations at the source and at the worker’s breathing zone. The microscopy analysis showed that CNTs can only be found at production sources but not at the worker breathing zones during the tasks monitored. PMID:26705393

  4. Anaerobic pond treatment of wastewater containing sulphate.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, B K; Annachhatre, A P

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic ponds are usually used for treatment of industrial and agricultural wastes which contain high organic matter and sulphate. Competition for substrate between sulphate reducing bacteria and methane producing archaea, and the inhibitory effects of sulphide produced from microbial sulphate reduction reported in the literature varied considerably. In this research, a laboratory scale column-in-series anaerobic pond reactor, consisting of five cylindrical columns of acrylic tubes, was operated to evaluate the effect of COD and sulphate ratio on pond performance treating wastewater containing high organic matter and sulphate from a tapioca starch industry. The result depicted that no adverse effect of COD:SO4 ratios between 5 and 20 on overall COD removal performance of anaerobic pond operated with organic loading rate (OLR) of 150 to 600 g COD/m3d. Sulphate reducing bacteria could out-compete methane producing archaea for the same substrate at COD:SO4 ratio equal to or lower than 5 and OLR greater than 300 g COD/m3d. Sulphide inhibition was not observed on overall performance of pond up to an influent sulphate concentration of 650 mg/L.

  5. 40 CFR 265.173 - Management of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management of containers. 265.173... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 265.173 Management of containers. (a) A container... waste. (b) A container holding hazardous waste must not be opened, handled, or stored in a manner...

  6. 40 CFR 264.173 - Management of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management of containers. 264.173... Use and Management of Containers § 264.173 Management of containers. (a) A container holding hazardous... container holding hazardous waste must not be opened, handled, or stored in a manner which may rupture...

  7. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1996-01-01

    This grant dealt with several topics related to the dynamics of systems containing a compact object. Most of the research dealt with systems containing Neutron Stars (NS's), but a Black Hole (BH) or a White Dwarf (WD) in situations relevant to NS systems were also addressed. Among the systems were isolated regular pulsars, Millisecond Pulsars (MSP's) that are either Single (SMP's) or in a binary (BMP's), Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXB's) and Cataclysmic Variables (CV's). Also dealt with was one aspect of NS structure, namely NS superfluidity. A large fraction of the research dealt with irradiation-driven winds from companions which turned out to be of importance in the evolution of LMXB's and MSP's, be they SMP's or BMP's. While their role during LMXB evolution (i.e. during the accretion phase) is not yet clear, they may play an important role in turning BMP's into SMP's and also in bringing about the formation of planets around MSP's. Work was concentrated on the following four problems: The Windy Pulsar B197+20 and its Evolution; Wind 'Echoes' in Tight Binaries; Post Nova X-ray Emission in CV's; and Dynamics of Pinned Superfluids in Neutron Stars.

  8. Amine-containing cells of the lung.

    PubMed

    Pack, R J; Widdicombe, J G

    1984-11-01

    In many vertebrates, including mammals, there are amine-containing cells in the walls of the airways and the lungs. Despite a plethora of names for these cells, there is a general agreement about their structure. They occur singly or in groups (NEBs), but the functional distinction between the two types of distribution is uncertain. In spite of ultrastructural similarities, the cells may be physiologically heterogenous. The cells are characterised by their staining characteristics and content of electron-dense-core vesicles, which are believed to contain a biogenic amine. They also have additional cytoplasmic features common to other sensory paraganglia. They may be more numerous in certain species and also in the neonate. The NEBs may be innervated with afferent and/or efferent nerves, though physiological evidence of their innervation is scanty. The most popular hypothesis is that they can be stimulated by hypoxia to release mediators or to induce reflex activity. In the healthy animal, the amine-cells may control local ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) ratios via an action on the pulmonary vasculature. In disease, they may cause pulmonary hypertension. They can also give rise to three forms of tumour. Their full significance has yet to be established. PMID:6083878

  9. Antioxidant capacity of lycopene-containing foods.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Z; Powell, L C

    2001-03-01

    Increased consumption of tomatoes and tomato products has been associated with decreased cancer risks. One fat-soluble compound identified in tomatoes which may be responsible for this association is lycopene. There may, however, be other antioxidants present in tomato-based foods, and total antioxidant capacity may be another way to rate the health benefits of these foods. In this work, we examined the Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of aqueous and organic extracts of lycopene-containing foods: ketchup, fresh tomatoes, tomato paste, tomato sauce, tomato soup, tomato juice, vegetable juice, canned tomatoes and watermelon. Antioxidant activity in these food extracts was greater in the aqueous versus organic fractions, except for watermelon and tomato sauce where the levels were similar in the two fractions. Lycopene levels in the food samples tested, however, were relatively greater in the organic fractions, with the exception of the two juices, which had similar levels in the two fractions, and two highly concentrated tomato products, tomato paste and ketchup, which had relatively higher lycopene levels in the aqueous fractions. The foods with the highest antioxidant capacity per serving overall (tomato soup was highest) did not have the highest lycopene levels. This indicates that it may be important to consume a variety of tomato-containing products in order to obtain the largest variety of dietary antioxidants possible. PMID:11303462

  10. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  11. Generation of DNA nanocircles containing mismatched bases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu; Jung, Caroline; Marx, Andreas D; Winkler, Ines; Wyman, Claire; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Friedhoff, Peter; Cristovao, Michele

    2011-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system recognizes and repairs errors that escaped the proofreading function of DNA polymerases. To study molecular details of the MMR mechanism, in vitro biochemical assays require specific DNA substrates carrying mismatches and strand discrimination signals. Current approaches used to generate MMR substrates are time-consuming and/or not very flexible with respect to sequence context. Here we report an approach to generate small circular DNA containing a mismatch (nanocircles). Our method is based on the nicking of PCR products resulting in single-stranded 3' overhangs, which form DNA circles after annealing and ligation. Depending on the DNA template, one can generate mismatched circles containing a single hemimethylated GATC site (for use with the bacterial system) and/or nicking sites to generate DNA circles nicked in the top or bottom strand (for assays with the bacterial or eukaryotic MMR system). The size of the circles varied (323 to 1100 bp), their sequence was determined by the template DNA, and purification of the circles was achieved by ExoI/ExoIII digestion and/or gel extraction. The quality of the nanocircles was assessed by scanning-force microscopy and their suitability for in vitro repair initiation was examined using recombinant Escherichia coli MMR proteins.

  12. Properties of polypropylene nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myung Wook; Kim, Ju-Young; Ihn, Kyo Jin

    2007-11-01

    Silver/polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm were prepared using a new synthetic method. AgNO3 crystals were dissolved into hydrophilic domain of polyoxyethylene maleate-based surfactant (PEOM), which gives self-assembly nano-structures. The AgNO3 in the nano-domains of PEOM was reduced by NaBH4 to form nanoparticles. The colloidal solutions with silver nanoparticles were diluted with ethanol and were mixed with PP pellets. Silver nanocomposites were prepared by extrusion compounding process after drying the pellets. Contents of silver nanoparticles dispersed within PP resin were changed from 100 to 1000 ppm. Formation of silver nanoparticles within PP was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM. Size and distribution of dispersed silver nanoparticles were also measured by TEM. Silver/PP nanocomposites films showed not only improved thermal stability but also increased mechanical properties compared to neat PP film. Tensile properties of PP nanocomposites were largely improved compared with neat PP resin, and elongation increased also by 175% for the nanocomposites containing 1000 ppm silver nanoparticles.

  13. Free surface electrospinning of fibers containing microparticles.

    PubMed

    Brettmann, Blair K; Tsang, Shirley; Forward, Keith M; Rutledge, Gregory C; Myerson, Allan S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2012-06-26

    Many materials have been fabricated using electrospinning, including pharmaceutical formulations, superhydrophobic surfaces, catalysis supports, filters, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Often these materials can benefit from microparticles included within the electrospun fibers. In this work, we evaluate a high-throughput free surface electrospinning technique to prepare fibers containing microparticles. We investigate the spinnability of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solutions containing suspended polystyrene (PS) beads of 1, 3, 5, and 10 μm diameter in order to better understand free surface electrospinning of particle suspensions. PS bead suspensions with both 55 kDa PVP and 1.3 MDa PVP were spinnable at 1:10, 1:5, and 1:2 PS:PVP mass loadings for all particle sizes studied. The final average fiber diameters ranged from 0.47 to 1.2 μm and were independent of the particle size and particle loading, indicating that the fiber diameter can be smaller than the particles entrained and can furthermore be adjusted based on solution properties and electrospinning parameters, as is the case for electrospinning of solutions without particles.

  14. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about one quadrillon atoms cu cm of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200 C to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon mateial.

  15. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    DOEpatents

    Frosch, Robert A. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space; Salama, Amal M.

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about 10.sup.15 atoms/cm.sup.3 of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200.degree. C. to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon material.

  16. Method of determining a content of a nuclear waste container

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Richard T.; Entwistle, David

    2003-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for identifying contents of a nuclear waste container. The method includes the steps of forming an image of the contents of the container using digital radiography, visually comparing contents of the image with expected contents of the container and performing computer tomography on the container when the visual inspection reveals an inconsistency between the contents of the image and the expected contents of the container.

  17. Gasification of ash-containing solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, G.

    1983-03-01

    Ash-contaminated solid or semi-solid fuel is passed into the bottom zone of a fluidized bed gasifier, preferably containing cao to fix labile sulfur moieties, and gasified at a temperature below the ash-softening point. The resulting char and ash of relatively low size and/or weight pass to a top zone of the bed wherein the char is gasified at a temperature above the ash-softening point whereby a substantial proportion of the ash sticks to and agglomerates with solids in the top zone until the particle size and/or weight of the resulting agglomerates causes them to sink to the bottom of the gasifier from where they can be recovered. The hot gases leaving the top of the gasifying bed have a reduced burden of entrained ash, and may be cooled to prevent any entrained ash adhering to downstream equipment through which the gases pass.

  18. Electrical conductivity of concrete containing silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Abo El-Enein, S.A.; Kotkata, M.F.; Hanna, G.B.; Saad, M.; Abd El Razek, M.M.

    1995-12-01

    The influence of silica fume on concrete properties represents an important technical research. In general, silica fume tends to improve both mechanical characteristics and durability of concrete. Thus the electrical properties of concrete containing silica fume can be studied to clarify its physical performance during hydration. The electrical conductivity of neat cement, mortar and concrete pastes was measured during setting and hardening. The ordinary Portland cement was partially replaced by different amounts of silica fume by weight. The changes in the electrical conductivity were reported during setting and hardening after gauging with water. The results of this study showed that the electrical conductivity can be used as an indication for the setting characteristics as well as the structural changes of the hardened pastes made with and without silica fume.

  19. Ground freezing for containment of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Sayles, F.N.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1998-07-01

    The freezing of ground for the containment of subsurface hazardous waste is a promising method that is environmentally friendly and offers a safe alternative to other methods of waste retention in many cases. The frozen soil method offers two concepts for retaining waste. One concept is to freeze the entire waste area into a solid block of frozen soil thus locking the waste in situ. For small areas where the contaminated soil does not include vessels that would rupture from frost action, this concept may be simpler to install. A second concept, of course, is to create a frozen soil barrier to confine the waste within prescribed unfrozen soil boundaries; initial research in this area was funded by EPA, Cincinnati, OH, and the Army Corps of Engineers. The paper discusses advantages and limitations, a case study from Oak Ridge, TN, and a mesh generation program that simulates the cryogenic technology.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  1. Reuse of Material Containing Natural Radionuclides - 12444

    SciTech Connect

    Metlyaev, E.G.; Novikova, N.J.

    2012-07-01

    Disposal of and use of wastes containing natural radioactive material (NORM) or technologically enhanced natural radioactive material (TENORM) with excessive natural background as a building material is very important in the supervision body activity. At the present time, the residents of Octyabrsky village are under resettlement. This village is located just near the Priargunsky mining and chemical combine (Ltd. 'PPGHO'), one of the oldest uranium mines in our country. The vacated wooden houses in the village are demolished and partly used as a building material. To address the issue of potential radiation hazard of the wooden beams originating from demolition of houses in Octyabrsky village, the contents of the natural radionuclides (K-40, Th-232, Ra-226, U- 238) are being determined in samples of the wooden beams of houses. The NORM contents in the wooden house samples are higher, on average, than their content in the reference sample of the fresh wood shavings, but the range of values is rather large. According to the classification of waste containing the natural radionuclides, its evaluation is based on the effective specific activity. At the effective specific activity lower 1.5 kBq/kg and gamma dose rate lower 70 μR/h, the material is not considered as waste and can be used in building by 1 - 3 classes depending upon A{sub eff} value. At 1.5 kBq/kg < A{sub eff} ≤ 4 kBq/kg (4 class), the wooden beams might be used for the purpose of the industrial building, if sum of ratios between the radionuclide specific activity and its specific activity of minimum significance is lower than unit. The material classified as the waste containing the natural radionuclides has A{sub eff} higher 1.5 kBq /kg, and its usage for the purpose of house-building and road construction is forbidden. As for the ash classification and its future usage, such usage is unreasonable, because, according to the provided material, more than 50% of ash samples are considered as radioactive

  2. Studies of phthalocyanine-containing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pui Sze Priscilla

    This thesis reports the synthesis, spectroscopic and photophysical properties, and in vitro photodynamic activities of several series of phthalocyanine-containing polymers including poly(norbornene), poly(anhydride), and poly(epsilon-caprolactone). Chapter 1 gives a general overview of phthalocyanines including their synthesis and applications. Special emphasis has been placed on hydrophilic and non-aggregated phthalocyanines and their use in photodynamic therapy. In addition, different classes of phthalocyanine-containing polymers will also be mentioned. Chapter 2 discusses the synthesis, characterization, and photophysical properties of a series of poly(norbornene)s with zinc(II) phthalocyanine and amino acid moieties. The copolymers were prepared by copolymerization of 2-(2-norbornenylmethoxy)phthalocyaninatozinc(II) with 5-norbornenes substituted with phenylalanine and tyrosine. As shown by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, phthalocyanines in this series of polymer exhibit a rather strong aggregation tendency. Chapter 3 presents the synthesis, characterization, photophysical properties, and in vitro photodynamic activities of a related series of amino acid- and sugar-containing poly(norbornene)s connected axially to a silicon(IV) phthalocyanine core. These polymers exhibit a good solubility in common organic solvents. Due to the axial polymeric substituents, these compounds are free from aggregation and give a high singlet oxygen quantum yield. These polymers in Cremophor EL emulsions also show a high photodynamic activity against HepG2 cells, in particular the polymer with protected galactose moieties. Chapter 4 reports a series of silicon(IV) phthalocyanines substituted with two poly(sebacic anhydride) chains as the axial ligands. The polymers form nanoparticles in water in the presence of surfactants cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS). The degradation of the nanoparticles was carried out in alkaline media and was

  3. Random graphs containing arbitrary distributions of subgraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrer, Brian; Newman, M. E. J.

    2010-12-01

    Traditional random graph models of networks generate networks that are locally treelike, meaning that all local neighborhoods take the form of trees. In this respect such models are highly unrealistic, most real networks having strongly nontreelike neighborhoods that contain short loops, cliques, or other biconnected subgraphs. In this paper we propose and analyze a class of random graph models that incorporates general subgraphs, allowing for nontreelike neighborhoods while still remaining solvable for many fundamental network properties. Among other things we give solutions for the size of the giant component, the position of the phase transition at which the giant component appears, and percolation properties for both site and bond percolation on networks generated by the model.

  4. Adhesive Properties of Cured Phenylethynyl containing Imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a program to develop structural adhesives for high performance aerospace applications, several phenylethynyl containing oligomer blends of Larc(TM) MPEI and a reactive plasticizer designated LaRC LV-1 21 were prepared and evaluated. The fully imidized blends exhibited minimum melt viscosity as low as 1000 poise at 371 C. Ti/Ti lap shear specimens fabricated at 316 C under 15 psi gave RT strength of approx. 4300 psi and no change in strength was observed at 177 C. The chemistry and properties of this new MPEI as well as some blends of MPEI with LV-121 are presented and compared to the linear version, LARC(TM)-PETI-5.

  5. Proof testing of an explosion containment vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Esparza, E.D.; Stacy, H.; Wackerle, J.

    1996-10-01

    A steel containment vessel was fabricated and proof tested for use by the Los Alamos National Laboratory at their M-9 facility. The HY-100 steel vessel was designed to provide total containment for high explosives tests up to 22 lb (10 kg) of TNT equivalent. The vessel was fabricated from an 11.5-ft diameter cylindrical shell, 1.5 in thick, and 2:1 elliptical ends, 2 in thick. Prior to delivery and acceptance, three types of tests were required for proof testing the vessel: a hydrostatic pressure test, air leak tests, and two full design charge explosion tests. The hydrostatic pressure test provided an initial static check on the capacity of the vessel and functioning of the strain instrumentation. The pneumatic air leak tests were performed before, in between, and after the explosion tests. After three smaller preliminary charge tests, the full design charge weight explosion tests demonstrated that no yielding occurred in the vessel at its rated capacity. The blast pressures generated by the explosions and the dynamic response of the vessel were measured and recorded with 33 strain channels, 4 blast pressure channels, 2 gas pressure channels, and 3 displacement channels. This paper presents an overview of the test program, a short summary of the methodology used to predict the design blast loads, a brief description of the transducer locations and measurement systems, some of the hydrostatic test strain and stress results, examples of the explosion pressure and dynamic strain data, and some comparisons of the measured data with the design loads and stresses on the vessel.

  6. Self-assembly of azide containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Yuran, Sivan; Razvag, Yair; Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2014-07-01

    Functional structures and materials are formed spontaneously in nature through the process of self-assembly. Mimicking this process in vitro will lead to the formation of new substances that would impact many areas including energy production and storage, biomaterials and implants, and drug delivery. The considerable structural diversity of peptides makes them appealing building blocks for self-assembly in vitro. This paper describes the self-assembly of three aromatic dipeptides containing an azide moiety: H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH, H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe-OH, and H-Phe-Phe(4-azido)-OH. The peptide H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH self-assembled into porous spherical structures, whereas the peptides H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe-OH and H-Phe-Phe(4-azido)-OH did not form any ordered structures under the examined experimental conditions. The azido group of the peptide can serve as a photo cross-linking agent upon irradiation with UV light. To examine the effect of this group and its activity on the self-assembled structures, we irradiated the assemblies in solution for different time periods. Using electron microscopy, we determined that the porous spherical assemblies formed by the peptide H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH underwent a structural change upon irradiation. In addition, using FT-IR, we detected the chemical change of the peptide azido group. Moreover, using indentation experiments with atomic force microscopy, we showed that the Young's modulus of the spherical assemblies increased after 20 min of irradiation with UV light. Overall, irradiating the solution of the peptide assemblies containing the azido group resulted in a change both in the morphology and mechanical properties of the peptide-based structures. These ordered assemblies or their peptide monomer building blocks can potentially be incorporated into other peptide assemblies to generate stiffer and more stable materials. PMID:24889029

  7. Evaluation of static eliminators containing polonium-210

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Six static eliminators containing radioactive polonium-210 microspheres were examined subsequent to a contamination incident at a commercial facility. It was found that cracked and broken microspheres were being produced and incorporated into new devices and even as received devices were potential sources of contamination. It is shown that rough handling of the devices may initiate polonium-210 leakage during or prior to service. The epoxy binder used in the devices appears to suffer significant environmental and material damage even under ambient conditions. The effects of solvents, heat, moisture, or vibration during service may accelerate this damage. The breakdown of the epoxy binder appears to be a significant contributor to the contamination by loose microspheres or microsphere fragments.

  8. Local magnitudes of small contained explosions.

    SciTech Connect

    Chael, Eric Paul

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between explosive yield and seismic magnitude has been extensively studied for underground nuclear tests larger than about 1 kt. For monitoring smaller tests over local ranges (within 200 km), we need to know whether the available formulas can be extrapolated to much lower yields. Here, we review published information on amplitude decay with distance, and on the seismic magnitudes of industrial blasts and refraction explosions in the western U. S. Next we measure the magnitudes of some similar shots in the northeast. We find that local magnitudes ML of small, contained explosions are reasonably consistent with the magnitude-yield formulas developed for nuclear tests. These results are useful for estimating the detection performance of proposed local seismic networks.

  9. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  10. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1999-04-27

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

  11. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1999-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

  12. Advanced Construction of Compact Containment BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, M.; Maruyama, T.; Mori, H.; Hoshino, K.; Hijioka, Y.; Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. Compact Containment BWR (CCR) is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. CCR's specific self-standing steel high pressure resistible PCV is designed to contain minimum piping and valves inside with reactor pressure vessel (RPV), only 13 m in diameter and 24 m in height. This compact PCV makes it possible to

  13. DISSOLUTION OF FISSILE MATERIALS CONTAINING TANTALUM METAL

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

    2007-05-29

    The dissolution of composite materials containing plutonium (Pu) and tantalum (Ta) metals is currently performed in Phase I of the HB-Line facility. The conditions for the present flowsheet are the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal in the 15 L dissolver using a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) at 95 C for 4-6 h.[1] The Ta metal, which is essentially insoluble in HNO{sub 3}/fluoride solutions, is rinsed with process water to remove residual acid, and then burned to destroy classified information. During the initial dissolution campaign, the total mass of Pu and Ta in the dissolver charge was limited to nominally 300 g. The reduced amount of Pu in the dissolver charge coupled with significant evaporation of solution during processing of several dissolver charges resulted in the precipitation of a fluoride salt contain Pu. Dissolution of the salt required the addition of aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) and a subsequent undesired 4 h heating cycle. As a result of this issue, HB-Line Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to optimize the dissolution flowsheet to reduce the cycle time, reduce the risk of precipitating solids, and obtain hydrogen (H{sub 2}) generation data at lower fluoride concentrations.[2] Using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material, we performed three experiments to demonstrate the dissolution of the Pu metal using HNO{sub 3} solutions containing 0.15 and 0.175 M KF. When 0.15 M KF was used in the dissolving solution, 95.5% of the Pu in the sample dissolved in approximately 6 h. The undissolved material included a small amount of Pu metal and plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) solids. Complete dissolution of the metal would have likely occurred if the dissolution time had been extended. This assumption is based on the steady increase in the Pu concentration observed during the last several hours of the experiment. We attribute the formation of PuO{sub 2} to the complexation

  14. Contain analysis of hydrogen distribution and combustion in PWR dry containments

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.W.; Nimnual, S.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen transport and combustion in a PWR dry containment are analyzed using the CONTAIN code for a multi-compartment model of the Zion plant. The analysis includes consideration of both degraded core and full core meltdown accidents initiated by a small break LOCA. The importance of intercell flow mixing on distributions of gas composition and temperature in various compartments are evaluated. Thermal stratification and combustion behavior are discussed. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Feasibility evaluation of the universal container system: A multipurpose standardized spent-fuel container system

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, N.B.; Jones, D.C. Associates, Inc., Fairfax, VA )

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a preliminary evaluation of the Universal Container System (UC system), and to identify issues that must be addressed by the utility industry, the Department of Energy, and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to permit a decision to be made regarding the universal container as a spent fuel storage and transfer, transport, and disposal alternative to the current spent fuel management and disposal system.

  16. The probability of containment failure by direct containment heating in Zion

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Yan, H.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1994-12-01

    This report is the first step in the resolution of the Direct Containment Heating (DCH) issue for the Zion Nuclear Power Plant using the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). This report includes the definition of a probabilistic framework that decomposes the DCH problem into three probability density functions that reflect the most uncertain initial conditions (UO{sub 2} mass, zirconium oxidation fraction, and steel mass). Uncertainties in the initial conditions are significant, but our quantification approach is based on establishing reasonable bounds that are not unnecessarily conservative. To this end, we also make use of the ROAAM ideas of enveloping scenarios and ``splintering.`` Two causal relations (CRs) are used in this framework: CR1 is a model that calculates the peak pressure in the containment as a function of the initial conditions, and CR2 is a model that returns the frequency of containment failure as a function of pressure within the containment. Uncertainty in CR1 is accounted for by the use of two independently developed phenomenological models, the Convection Limited Containment Heating (CLCH) model and the Two-Cell Equilibrium (TCE) model, and by probabilistically distributing the key parameter in both, which is the ratio of the melt entrainment time to the system blowdown time constant. The two phenomenological models have been compared with an extensive database including recent integral simulations at two different physical scales. The containment load distributions do not intersect the containment strength (fragility) curve in any significant way, resulting in containment failure probabilities less than 10{sup {minus}3} for all scenarios considered. Sensitivity analyses did not show any areas of large sensitivity.

  17. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Reszka, Alfred A; Rodan, Gideon A

    2004-09-01

    The current paradigm for drug discovery requires the identification of a target involved in the disease process (e.g. enzyme or receptor) and the development of an appropriate ligand (activator, inhibitor or selective modulator). Selection of ligands for clinical development is based on the therapeutic window between efficacy vs. safety and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) considerations. For bisphosphonates (BPs) the process has not followed that paradigm. BPs have very low absorption and are retained in bone, their target tissue. A few have been used on a limited basis for over 20 years in diseases of rapid bone destruction (e.g. post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease, bone metastases, etc.), without understanding their molecular mechanism of action. The nitrogen-containing BPs (N-BPs) are the latest and most potent addition to this family of compounds and have the widest use. They have high potency, are specifically targeted to the osteoclast on bone and are used at very low doses (5-10 mg clinically). Over the last four years, there was significant progress in elucidating the mechanism of action of BPs, both lacking and containing nitrogen. This review will focus on the mechanism of action of the N-BPs, specifically alendronate (ALN) and risedronate (RIS), the two agents most widely used. For these and all other N-BPs, the molecular target is the isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Although inhibition of this enzyme by N-BPs results in the suppression of sterol biosynthesis, it is actually disruption of a branch pathway, isoprenylation, that is responsible for N-BP pharmacological activity. Isoprenylation involves covalent linkage of the 15 or 20 carbon isoprene moiety farnesyl diphosphate or geranylgeranyl diphosphate, respectively, to the carboxy-terminus of regulatory proteins, including the small GTPases Ras, Rac, Rho and Cdc42. The latter three, as well as

  18. Temperature variations in eyebank containers: comparative study of corneal transport containers and packing methods.

    PubMed

    York, K K; Ward, D E; Smith, R E

    Two containers ("Iowa" and "Virginia") commonly used for transporting donor corneas, and various packing methods were evaluated for constancy of temperature maintenance. The larger Iowa container was found to be superior for extended storage. Packing methods that allowed the vials (containing McCarey-Kaufman medium) to be in direct contact with wet ice or with ice water resulted in the best cooling. Direct contact with supercooled ice may cause freezing of the medium. Separating the vials from the ice water slush by dry foam rubber or Styrofoam did not allow adequate cooling. Heat sealing the vials in a plastic bag containing minimal air permitted proper cooling and may reduce the risk of contamination from the ice water.

  19. Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, D.F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

  20. Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Dennis F.

    1997-01-01

    A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

  1. Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, D.F.

    1997-09-02

    A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig.

  2. 27 CFR 26.106 - Marking containers of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marking containers of beer... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Beer § 26.106 Marking containers of beer. Containers of beer of Puerto... brewer; the serial number, capacity, and size of the container; the kind of beer; and the serial...

  3. 27 CFR 26.106 - Marking containers of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marking containers of beer... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Beer § 26.106 Marking containers of beer. Containers of beer of Puerto... brewer; the serial number, capacity, and size of the container; the kind of beer; and the serial...

  4. 27 CFR 26.106 - Marking containers of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Marking containers of beer... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Beer § 26.106 Marking containers of beer. Containers of beer of Puerto... brewer; the serial number, capacity, and size of the container; the kind of beer; and the serial...

  5. 27 CFR 26.106 - Marking containers of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Marking containers of beer... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Beer § 26.106 Marking containers of beer. Containers of beer of Puerto... brewer; the serial number, capacity, and size of the container; the kind of beer; and the serial...

  6. 27 CFR 26.106 - Marking containers of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marking containers of beer... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Beer § 26.106 Marking containers of beer. Containers of beer of Puerto... brewer; the serial number, capacity, and size of the container; the kind of beer; and the serial...

  7. 27 CFR 26.97 - Marking containers of wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marking containers of wine... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Wine § 26.97 Marking containers of wine. Containers of wine of Puerto... winemaker, the serial number of the container, the kind and taxable grade of the wine, the gallon...

  8. UASB treatment of wastewater containing concentrated benzoate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.Y.; Fang, H.H.P.; Chen, T.; Chui, H.K.

    1995-10-01

    The upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process removed 97--99% of soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) from wastewater containing concentrated benzoate at 37 C, pH 7.5, a hydraulic retention time of 9.8 h, and loading rates up to 30.6 g-COD/(L {center_dot} day) based on the reactor volume. About 95.2% of the total COD removed was converted to methane; 0.034 g of volatile suspended solids (VSS) was yielded for each gram of COD removed. The highly settleable granules were 1--3 mm in size with a layered microstructure and were composed in abundance of bacteria resembling the benzoate-degrading Syntrophus buswellii. Two interesting observations have led to the postulation that the degradation of benzoate into acetate was probably conducted completely inside the cell of Syntrophus buswellii-like bacteria: (1) no fatty acids except acetate were found in the effluent; and (2) the granules showed very limited butyrate-degrading capability and could not degrade propionate. This study demonstrated the feasibility of removing aromatic pollutants in wastewater by anaerobic processes.

  9. Ultrafiltration of micellar solutions containing phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczak, H.; Materna, K.; Urbanski, R.; Szymanowski, J.

    1999-10-15

    Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration represents a potentially attractive tool for the removal of different contaminants from wastewaters. The ultrafiltration of micellar solutions containing phenol or 4-nitrophenol was studied. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), hexadecylrimethyl ammonium sulfate, alkyl polyglucoside Glucopon 215 SC UP, and oxyethylated methyl dodecanoates with the average degree of oxyethylation equal to 5 and 9 were used as surfactants and NaHCO{sub 3} as an electrolyte and alkalizing agent. Filtration and phenol rejection depends on the presence of NaHCO{sub 3} and the type of surfactant. NaHCO{sub 3} depresses to the filtration rate, especially in the case of SDS and hydrophobic oxyethylated methyl dodecanoate. The highest filtration rates are obtained for hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and alkyl polyglucoside micellar solutions. The best separations, both of phenol and 4-nitrophenol (almost 100% rejection), are obtained for CTAB micellar solutions at the pH range from 3 to 11. Nonionic surfactants are not effective enough for the separation of phenol and 4-nitrophenol. SDS solutions permit only the separation of phenol.

  10. Adhesive Properties of Cured Phenylethynyl Containing Imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Chang, Alice C.

    1997-01-01

    Considerable attention has been directed towards acetylene terminated oligomers over the last 20 years' and recent work has focused on phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) oligomers. These reactive oligomers possess several features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives. The phenylethynyl group can be readily incorporated into many different functionalized oligomers. The reactive oligomers possess relatively low melt viscosities and thermally cure without the evolution of volatile by-products. Once cured, they typically display high glass transition temperatures (Tgs), excellent solvent resistance and high mechanical properties. new modified phenylethynyl-terminated imide (LaRC MPEI) oligomers were synthesized at various molecular weights utilizing a small amount of trifunctional amine. As long as the amount of triamine is relatively small, this approach produces a mixture of linear, star-shaped and branched polymer chains that has lower melt and solution viscosity than an equivalent molecular weight linear phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers. The work reported herein involves the synthesis and characterization of a copolymer using this approach and the preparation of blends utilizing a phenylethynyl containing reactive plasticizer of lower molecular weight called LaRC LV-121. The chemistry and properties of this new MPEI as well as some blends of MPEI with LV-121, are presented and compared to the linear version, LARC-PETI-5.

  11. An interpretation of passive containment cooling phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Bum-Jin; Kang, Chang-Sun,

    1995-09-01

    A simplified interpretation model for the cooling capability of the Westinghouse type PCCS is proposed in this paper. The PCCS domain was phenomenologically divided into 3 regions; water entrance effect region, asymptotic region, and air entrance effect region. The phenomena in the asymptotic region is focused in this paper. Due to the very large height to thickness ratio of the water film, the length of the asymptotic region is estimated to be over 90% of the whole domain. Using the analogy between heat and mass transfer phenomena in a turbulent situation, a new dependent variable combining temperature and vapor mass fraction was defined. The similarity between the PCCS phenomena, which contains the sensible and latent heat transfer, and the buoyant air flow on a vertical heated plate is derived. The modified buoyant coefficient and thermal conductivity were defined. Using these newly defined variable and coefficients, the modified correlation for the interfacial heat fluxes and the ratios of latent heat transfer to sensible heat transfer is established. To verify the accuracy of the correlation, the results of this study were compared with the results of other numerical analyses performed for the same configuration and they are well within the range of 15% difference.

  12. 49 CFR 451.7 - Alternative approval of existing containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternative approval of existing containers. 451.7 Section 451.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY SAFETY APPROVAL OF CARGO CONTAINERS TESTING AND APPROVAL OF CONTAINERS Approval of Existing Containers §...

  13. Properties of liposomal membranes containing lysolecithin.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, T; Inoue, K; Nojima, S

    1976-06-01

    Liposomes have been prepared with lysolecithin (1-acyl-sn-3-glycerylphosphorylcholine), egg lecithin (3-sn-phosphatidylcholine), dicetyl phosphate, and cholesterol. The ability to function as a barrier to the diffusion of glucose marker and the sensitivities of the liposomes to hypotonic treatment and other reagents which modified the permeability were examined. Generally, lysolecithin incorporation decreased the effectiveness of the membranes as a barrier to glucose and made the membranes more "osmotically fragile." Cholesterol incorporation counteracted the effect of incorporated lysolecithin. The more cholesterol incorporated into liposomes, the more lysolecthin could be incorporated into the membrane without loss of function as a barrier. With more than 50 mole% of colesterol, lysolecithin alone could form membranes which were practically impermeable to glucose. The hemolytic activity of lysolecithin was affected by mixing with various lecithins or cholesterol. Liposomes containing lysolecithin, which have the ability to trap glucose marker, showed poor hemolytic activity, while lipid micelles with lysolecithin (which could trap little glucose) showed almost the same hemolytic activity as lysolecithin itself. There seems to be a close correlation between hemolytic activity and barrier function of lipid micelles. PMID:986392

  14. Properties of liposomal membranes containing lysolecithin.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, T; Inoue, K; Nojima, S

    1976-06-01

    Liposomes have been prepared with lysolecithin (1-acyl-sn-3-glycerylphosphorylcholine), egg lecithin (3-sn-phosphatidylcholine), dicetyl phosphate, and cholesterol. The ability to function as a barrier to the diffusion of glucose marker and the sensitivities of the liposomes to hypotonic treatment and other reagents which modified the permeability were examined. Generally, lysolecithin incorporation decreased the effectiveness of the membranes as a barrier to glucose and made the membranes more "osmotically fragile." Cholesterol incorporation counteracted the effect of incorporated lysolecithin. The more cholesterol incorporated into liposomes, the more lysolecthin could be incorporated into the membrane without loss of function as a barrier. With more than 50 mole% of colesterol, lysolecithin alone could form membranes which were practically impermeable to glucose. The hemolytic activity of lysolecithin was affected by mixing with various lecithins or cholesterol. Liposomes containing lysolecithin, which have the ability to trap glucose marker, showed poor hemolytic activity, while lipid micelles with lysolecithin (which could trap little glucose) showed almost the same hemolytic activity as lysolecithin itself. There seems to be a close correlation between hemolytic activity and barrier function of lipid micelles.

  15. Methods for impact analysis of shipping containers

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.A.; Chun, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    This report reviews methods for performing impact stress analyses of shipping containers used to transport spent fuel. The three methods discussed are quasi-static, dynamic lumped parameter; and dynamic finite element. These methods are used by industry for performing impact analyses for Safety Analysis Reports. The approach for each method is described including assumptions and limitations and modeling considerations. The effects of uncertainties in the modeling and analyzing of casks are identified. Each of the methods uses linear elastic structural analysis principles. Methods for interfacing impact stresses with the design and load combinations criteria specified in Regulatory Guides 7.6 and 7.8 are outlined. The quasi-static method is based on D'Alembert's principle to substitute equivalent static forces for inertial forces created by the impact. The lumped parameter method is based on using a discrete number of stiffness elements and masses to represent the cask during impact. The dynamic finite element method uses finite element techniques combined with time integration to analyze the cask impact. Each of these methods can provide an acceptable means, within certain limitations, for analyzing cask impact on unyielding surfaces. 25 refs., 23 figs.

  16. Synthesis of microcapsules containing different extractant agents.

    PubMed

    Alcázar, Ángela; Carmona, Manuel; Borreguero, Ana M; de Lucas, Antonio; Rodríguez, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most toxic pollutants, with high capacity of accumulation in living organism, causing important human health problems. Therefore, the mercury removal from water is an important research goal. In a previous work, an extractant agent [di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid] was microencapsulated in poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) by means of suspension polymerisation using toluene as diluent. In this study, this recipe has been modified changing the toluene by heptane and extended to four additional extractants (trioctylamine, trioctylmethylammonium chloride [TOMAC], tributyl phosphate and trioctylphosphine oxide). The polluting potential of the waste liquid from the process was measured by total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand analyses. The morphology, particle size and distribution were studied by scanning electron microscopy and low angle laser light scattering. The amount of extractant agent into the microcapsules and the microencapsulation efficiency were determined by thermogravimetric analysis and the mercury removal capacity by equilibrium studies. Microcapsules containing TOMAC demonstrated to be the best material for the mercury removal and retention. PMID:26299426

  17. Characterization of Oversized Crates containing Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Randal K.; Haggard, Daniel L.; Hilliard, Jim; Mozhayev, Andrey V.

    2007-11-01

    The 212-N Building at the Hanford Site held fifteen large crates containing glove boxes and process equipment associated with the development and fabrication of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The gloveboxes and associated equipment originated from the 308 Building of the Hanford Site and had been placed in the crates after a process upset in the 1960s. The crates were transported to the 212-N Building and had been in storage since 1972. In an effort to reduce the hazard categorization of 212-N the crates were removed from the building and Nondestructive Assay (NDA) was performed to characterize the crate contents meeting both Safeguards and Waste Management interests. A measurement system consisting of four configurable neutron slab detectors and high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors was deployed. Since no viable information regarding the waste matrix and configuration was available it was essential to correct for attenuation with a series of transmission measurements using californium and europium sources for both neutron and gamma applications. The gamma and neutron results obtained during this measurement campaign are compared and discussed in the paper.

  18. Validation of CONTAIN-LMR code for accident analysis of sodium-cooled fast reactor containments

    SciTech Connect

    Gordeev, S.; Hering, W.; Schikorr, M.; Stieglitz, R.

    2012-07-01

    CONTAIN-LMR 1 is an analytical tool for the containment performance of sodium cooled fast reactors. In this code, the modelling for the sodium fire is included: the oxygen diffusion model for the sodium pool fire, and the liquid droplet model for the sodium spray fire. CONTAIN-LMR is also able to model the interaction of liquid sodium with concrete structure. It may be applicable to different concrete compositions. Testing and validation of these models will help to qualify the simulation results. Three experiments with sodium performed in the FAUNA facility at FZK have been used for the validation of CONTAIN-LMR. For pool fire tests, calculations have been performed with two models. The first model consists of one gas cell representing the volume of the burn compartment. The volume of the second model is subdivided into 32 coupled gas cells. The agreement between calculations and experimental data is acceptable. The detailed pool fire model shows less deviation from experiments. In the spray fire, the direct heating from the sodium burning in the media is dominant. Therefore, single cell modeling is enough to describe the phenomena. Calculation results have reasonable agreement with experimental data. Limitations of the implemented spray model can cause the overestimation of predicted pressure and temperature in the cell atmosphere. The ability of the CONTAIN-LMR to simulate the sodium pool fire accompanied by sodium-concrete reactions was tested using the experimental study of sodium-concrete interactions for construction concrete as well as for shielding concrete. The model provides a reasonably good representation of chemical processes during sodium-concrete interaction. The comparison of time-temperature profiles of sodium and concrete shows, that the model requires modifications for predictions of the test results. (authors)

  19. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-12-01

    Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

  20. 9 CFR 316.13 - Marking of outside containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marking of outside containers. 316.13... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION MARKING PRODUCTS AND THEIR CONTAINERS § 316.13 Marking of outside containers. (a... domestic commerce is moved from an official establishment, the outside container shall bear an...

  1. CONTAIN code analyses of direct containment heating (DCH) experiments: Model assessment and phenomenological interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Tadios, E.L.; Washington, K.E.

    1995-05-12

    Models for direct containment heating (DCH) in the CONTAIN code for severe accident analysis have been reviewed and a standard input prescription for their use has been defined. The code has been exercised against a large subset of the available DCH data base. Generally good agreement with the experimental results for containment pressurization ({Delta}P) and hydrogen generation has been obtained. Extensive sensitivity studies have been performed which permit assessment of many of the strengths and weaknesses of specific model features. These include models for debris transport and trapping, DCH heat transfer and chemistry, atmosphere-structure heat transfer, interactions between nonairborne debris and blowdown steam, potential effects of debris-water interactions, and hydrogen combustion under DCH conditions. Containment compartmentalization is an important DCH mitigator in the calculations, in agreement with experimental results. The CONTAIN model includes partially parametric treatments for some processes that are not well understood. The importance of the associated uncertainties depends upon the details of the DCH scenario being analyzed. Recommended sensitivity studies are summarized that allow the user to obtain a reasonable estimate of the uncertainties in the calculated results.

  2. The probability of containment failure by direct containment heating in surry

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Bergeron, K.D.; Tadios, E.L.; Stamps, D.W.; Spencer, B.W.; Quick, K.S.; Knudson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    In a light-water reactor core melt accident, if the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fails while the reactor coolant system (RCS) at high pressure, the expulsion of molten core debris may pressurize the reactor containment building (RCB) beyond its failure pressure. A failure in the bottom head of the RPV, followed by melt expulsion and blowdown of the RCS, will entrain molten core debris in the high-velocity steam blowdown gas. This chain of events is called a high-pressure melt ejection (HPME). Four mechanisms may cause a rapid increase in pressure and temperature in the reactor containment: (1) blowdown of the RCS, (2) efficient debris-to-gas heat transfer, (3) exothermic metal-steam and metal-oxygen reactions, and (4) hydrogen combustion. These processes, which lead to increased loads on the containment building, are collectively referred to as direct containment heating (DCH). It is necessary to understand factors that enhance or mitigate DCH because the pressure load imposed on the RCB may lead to early failure of the containment.

  3. Management of hazardous waste containers and container storage areas under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    DOE`s Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division, has prepared this guidance document to assist waste management personnel in complying with the numerous and complex regulatory requirements associated with RCRA hazardous waste and radioactive mixed waste containers and container management areas. This document is designed using a systematic graphic approach that features detailed, step-by-step guidance and extensive references to additional relevant guidance materials. Diagrams, flowcharts, reference, and overview graphics accompany the narrative descriptions to illustrate and highlight the topics being discussed. Step-by-step narrative is accompanied by flowchart graphics in an easy-to-follow, ``roadmap`` format.

  4. [Forensic chemical investigation of alcohol-containing liquids contained polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride and diethylphthalate].

    PubMed

    Tsisanova, E S; Salomatin, E M

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholism remains one of the main causes of premature death in the population of Russia. Hence, the importance of the problem of uncontrolled distribution and consumption of surrogate alcoholic products, such as alcohol-containing liquids of uncertain origin. The objective of the present study was to detect ethyl alcohol, polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride, and diethylphthalate in disinfectant liquids, biological fluids and human tissues and to analyse qualitative and quantitative composition of these materials. PMID:20821990

  5. The probability of containment failure by direct containment heating in Zion. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Stamps, D.W.; Tadios, E.L.; Knudson, D.L.

    1994-12-01

    Supplement 1 of NUREG/CR-6075 brings to closure the DCH issue for the Zion plant. It includes the documentation of the peer review process for NUREG/CR-6075, the assessments of four new splinter scenarios defined in working group meetings, and modeling enhancements recommended by the working groups. In the four new scenarios, consistency of the initial conditions has been implemented by using insights from systems-level codes. SCDAP/RELAP5 was used to analyze three short-term station blackout cases with Different lead rates. In all three case, the hot leg or surge line failed well before the lower head and thus the primary system depressurized to a point where DCH was no longer considered a threat. However, these calculations were continued to lower head failure in order to gain insights that were useful in establishing the initial and boundary conditions. The most useful insights are that the RCS pressure is-low at vessel breach metallic blockages in the core region do not melt and relocate into the lower plenum, and melting of upper plenum steel is correlated with hot leg failure. THE SCDAP/RELAP output was used as input to CONTAIN to assess the containment conditions at vessel breach. The containment-side conditions predicted by CONTAIN are similar to those originally specified in NUREG/CR-6075.

  6. Design and testing of wood containers for radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.S.; Barry, P.E.

    1981-03-25

    A wood container for shipping and storing radioactive waste was designed to eliminate the problems caused by the weight, cost, and shape of the steel containers previously used. Tests specified by federal regulations (compression, free-drop, penetration, and vibration) were conducted on two of the containers, one loaded to 2500 lb and one loaded to 5000 lb. The 5000-lb container failed the free-drop test, but the 2500-lb container easily passed the tests and therefore qualifies as a Type A container. Its simplicity of design, low weight, and ease in handling have proved to be time-saving and cost-effective.

  7. Commercial disposal of High Integrity Containers (HICs) containing EPICOR-II prefilters from Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Jr, J W; Lynch, R J; Tyacke, M J

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and commercially disposing of 45 High Integrity Containers (HICs), each containing an EPICOR-II prefilter. Also described are the improvements that were applied in the disposition of the 45 commercial EPICOR-II prefilters at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), versus those used for the demonstration unit. The significance of this effort was that the commercial disposal campaign involved the first-of-a-kind production use of a reinforced concrete HIC at the US Ecology, Inc. facility in the State of Washington. This allowed for safe disposal of high-specific-activity ion exchange material in EPICOR-II prefilters generated during the cleanup of the Unit-2 Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Building of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station. 26 figs.

  8. 7 CFR 52.774 - Fill of container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Fill of Container § 52.774 Fill of container. (a) FDA requirements. Canned red tart pitted cherries shall meet the fill of container requirements as set forth in the regulations of the Food and Drug Administration (21 CFR 145.125(c))....

  9. 7 CFR 52.774 - Fill of container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Fill of Container § 52.774 Fill of container. (a) FDA requirements. Canned red tart pitted cherries shall meet the fill of container requirements as set forth in the regulations of the Food and Drug Administration (21 CFR 145.125(c))....

  10. 40 CFR 264.172 - Compatibility of waste with containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with containers... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 264.172 Compatibility of waste with containers. The owner...

  11. 40 CFR 264.172 - Compatibility of waste with containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with containers. 264.172 Section 264.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 264.172 Compatibility of waste with containers. The owner...

  12. 40 CFR 264.172 - Compatibility of waste with containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with containers. 264.172 Section 264.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 264.172 Compatibility of waste with containers. The owner...

  13. 40 CFR 264.172 - Compatibility of waste with containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with containers. 264.172 Section 264.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 264.172 Compatibility of waste with containers. The owner...

  14. 40 CFR 264.172 - Compatibility of waste with containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with containers... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 264.172 Compatibility of waste with containers. The owner...

  15. STABILIZATION AND TESTING OF MERCURY CONTAINING WASTES: BORDEN SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details the stability assessment of a mercury containing sulfide treatment sludge. Information contained in this report will consist of background data submitted by the geneerator, landfill data supplied by EPA and characterization and leaching studies conducted by UC...

  16. 21 CFR 1230.48 - Relabeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.48 Relabeling of containers. (a) If containers are to be... requirements of the Federal Caustic Poison Act and all regulations and instructions issued thereunder....

  17. 21 CFR 1230.48 - Relabeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.48 Relabeling of containers. (a) If containers are to be... requirements of the Federal Caustic Poison Act and all regulations and instructions issued thereunder....

  18. 21 CFR 1230.48 - Relabeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.48 Relabeling of containers. (a) If containers are to be... requirements of the Federal Caustic Poison Act and all regulations and instructions issued thereunder....

  19. 21 CFR 1230.48 - Relabeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.48 Relabeling of containers. (a) If containers are to be... requirements of the Federal Caustic Poison Act and all regulations and instructions issued thereunder....

  20. 21 CFR 1230.48 - Relabeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.48 Relabeling of containers. (a) If containers are to be... requirements of the Federal Caustic Poison Act and all regulations and instructions issued thereunder....

  1. Separation and Sealing of a Sample Container Using Brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; Wincentsen, James E.; Gershman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A special double-wall container and a process for utilizing the container are being developed to enable (1) acquisition of a sample of material in a dirty environment that may include a biological and/or chemical hazard; (2) sealing a lid onto the inner part of the container to hermetically enclose the sample; (3) separating the resulting hermetic container from the dirty environment; and (4) bringing that hermetic container, without any biological or chemical contamination of its outer surface, into a clean environment. The process is denoted S(exp 3)B (separation, seaming, and sealing using brazing) because sealing of the sample into the hermetic container, separating the container from the dirty environment, and bringing the container with a clean outer surface into the clean environment are all accomplished simultaneously with a brazing operation.

  2. 36 CFR 4.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open container of alcoholic... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a... an open container. The operator of a motor vehicle is the person responsible for complying with...

  3. EVALUATION OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEMS USING HYDRAULIC HEAD DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subsurface vertical barriers have been used as components of containment systems to prevent or reduce the impact of containment sources on ground-water resources. Many containment systems also include a low permeability cover to prevent the infiltration-/recharge of precipitatio...

  4. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  5. 30 CFR 57.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 57.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 57.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  6. 30 CFR 56.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 56.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 56.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  7. 30 CFR 57.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 57.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 57.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  8. 30 CFR 56.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 56.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 56.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  9. 30 CFR 56.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 56.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 56.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  10. 30 CFR 57.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 57.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 57.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  11. 30 CFR 57.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 57.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 57.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  12. 30 CFR 57.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 57.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 57.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  13. 30 CFR 56.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 56.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 56.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  14. 30 CFR 56.4604 - Preparation of pipelines or containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preparation of pipelines or containers. 56.4604... Prevention and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 56.4604 Preparation of pipelines or containers. Before welding, cutting, or applying heat with an open flame to pipelines or containers that...

  15. 7 CFR 160.46 - Identification of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of containers. 160.46 Section 160.46... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Request Inspection by Licensed Inspectors § 160.46 Identification of containers. Containers packed with naval stores which have been inspected, classified, graded, and certified by...

  16. Shade periodicity affects growth of container grown dogwoods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Container-grown dogwoods rank third in the US in nursery sales of ornamental trees. However, Dogwoods are a challenging crop to produce in container culture, especially when bare root liners are used as the initial transplant into containers due unacceptable levels of mortality and poor growth. This...

  17. 36 CFR 1004.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SAFETY § 1004.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a motor vehicle is... receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose seal is broken or the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Open container of...

  18. 36 CFR 4.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a..., can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Open container of...

  19. 36 CFR 4.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a..., can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Open container of...

  20. 36 CFR 1004.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SAFETY § 1004.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a motor vehicle is... receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose seal is broken or the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Open container of...

  1. 36 CFR 1004.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SAFETY § 1004.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a motor vehicle is... receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose seal is broken or the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Open container of...

  2. 36 CFR 4.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a..., can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or has been opened, or whose... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Open container of...

  3. Process for the production of superconductor containing filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Tuominen, Olli P.; Hoyt, Matthew B.; Mitchell, David F.; Morgan, Carol W.; Roberts, Clyde Gordon; Tyler, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Superconductor containing filaments having embedments of superconducting material surrounded by a rayon matrix are formed by preparing a liquid suspension which contains at least 10 weight percent superconducting material; forming a multicomponent filament having a core of the suspension and a viscose sheath which contains cellulose xanthate; and thereafter, regenerating cellulose from the cellulose xanthate to form a rayon matrix.

  4. Strippable containment and decontamination coating composition and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Tucker, Mark D.; Jones, Joseph A.

    2009-04-07

    A method for containing at least a portion of radioisotopes, radionuclides, heavy metal or combination thereof contaminating a substrate wherein a containment composition is applied to the substrate. The ingredients within the containment composition interact with the contaminants on the surface of the substrate until the containment composition has polymerized to a water insoluble form containing at least a portion of the contaminates enmeshed therein. The dried composition is removed from the contaminated surface removing with the composition at least a portion of the contaminate.

  5. Process for the preparation of metal-containing nanostructured films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yunfeng (Inventor); Wang, Donghai (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Metal-containing nanostructured films are prepared by electrodepositing a metal-containing composition within the pores of a mesoporous silica template to form a metal-containing silica nanocomposite. The nanocomposite is annealed to strengthen the deposited metal-containing composition. The silica is then removed from the nanocomposite, e.g., by dissolving the silica in an etching solution to provide a self-supporting metal-containing nanostructured film. The nanostructured films have a nanowire or nanomesh architecture depending on the pore structure of the mesoporous silica template used to prepare the films.

  6. Analysis of hair after contamination with blood containing cocaine and blood containing benzoylecgonine.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Sue; Lee, Sooyeun; Cordero, Rosa

    2010-01-30

    In post-mortem work, blood is a potential source of external contamination of hair. The present study was carried out to investigate the amount of drug absorbed into hair which has been contaminated with blood containing either cocaine or BE. Solutions were prepared containing 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 3.0 microg/mL of either cocaine or BE in human blood. Samples of approximately 3.2g of drug-free hair were contaminated by soaking in the blood solutions for 5 min. They were then removed and left at room temperature. Approximately 0.5 g of hair was collected from each of the blood soaked hair samples at 6h, 1, 2, 4 and 7 days after contamination. As each hair sample was collected it was shampoo-washed to prevent further drug absorption. Hair samples were analysed in triplicate using a fully validated method described previously. EME and cocaethylene were also measured in order to find out if cocaine or BE was breaking down to these compounds. Both cocaine and BE were absorbed into hair in significant concentrations when the concentration in the blood was 0.5 microg/mL or greater; cocaine was more readily absorbed than BE. Cocaine broke down to EME (LOQ) and BE (of cocaine was 0.5 microg/mL or less, there was no evidence of it breaking down to form BE. From the samples soaked in blood containing BE, there was no evidence of the BE breaking down. The absorption of drug into hair did not increase as the contamination period increased from 6h to 7 days. PMID:19926234

  7. NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIAL CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yerger, L.; Mcclard, J.; Traver, L.; Grim, T.

    2010-02-01

    The first nondestructive examination (NDE) of 3013-type containers as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) was performed in February, 2005. Since that date 280 NDE surveillances on 255 containers have been conducted. These containers were packaged with plutonium-bearing materials at multiple DOE sites. The NDE surveillances were conducted at Hanford, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Savannah River Site (SRS). These NDEs consisted of visual inspection, mass verification, radiological surveys, prompt gamma analysis, and radiography. The primary purpose of performing NDE surveillances is to determine if there has been a significant pressure buildup inside the inner 3013 container. This is done by measuring the lid deflection of the inner 3013 container using radiography images. These lid deflection measurements are converted to pressure measurements to determine if a container has a pressure of a 100 psig or greater. Making this determination is required by Surveillance and Monitoring Plan (S&MP). All 3013 containers are designed to withstand at least 699 psig as specified by DOE-STD-3013. To date, all containers evaluated have pressures under 50 psig. In addition, the radiography is useful in evaluating the contents of the 3013 container as well as determining the condition of the walls of the inner 3013 container and the convenience containers. The radiography has shown no signs of degradation of any container, but has revealed two packaging anomalies. Quantitative pressure measurements based on lid deflections, which give more information than the 'less than or greater than 100 psig' (pass/fail) data are also available for many containers. Statistical analyses of the pass/fail data combined with analysis of the quantitative data show that it is extremely unlikely that any container in the population of 3013 containers considered in this study (e.g., containers packaged according to the DOE-STD-3013 by

  8. Managing breaches of containment and eradication of invasive plant populations

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Cameron S; Westcott, David A; Murphy, Helen T; Grice, Anthony C; Clarkson, John R

    2015-01-01

    Containment can be a viable strategy for managing invasive plants, but it is not always cheaper than eradication. In many cases, converting a failed eradication programme to a containment programme is not economically justified. Despite this, many contemporary invasive plant management strategies invoke containment as a fallback for failed eradication, often without detailing how containment would be implemented. We demonstrate a generalized analysis of the costs of eradication and containment, applicable to any plant invasion for which infestation size, dispersal distance, seed bank lifetime and the economic discount rate are specified. We estimate the costs of adapting eradication and containment in response to six types of breach and calculate under what conditions containment may provide a valid fallback to a breached eradication programme. We provide simple, general formulae and plots that can be applied to any invasion and show that containment will be cheaper than eradication only when the size of the occupied zone exceeds a multiple of the dispersal distance determined by seed bank longevity and the discount rate. Containment becomes proportionally cheaper than eradication for invaders with smaller dispersal distances, longer lived seed banks, or for larger discount rates. Both containment and eradication programmes are at risk of breach. Containment is less exposed to risk from reproduction in the ‘occupied zone’ and three types of breach that lead to a larger ‘occupied zone’, but more exposed to one type of breach that leads to a larger ‘buffer zone’. For a well-specified eradication programme, only the three types of breach leading to reproduction in or just outside the buffer zone can justify falling back to containment, and only if the expected costs of eradication and containment were comparable before the breach. Synthesis and applications. Weed management plans must apply a consistent definition of containment and provide sufficient

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Species of Chlamydomonas Containing Phosphatidylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Takashi; Tajima, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is one of the essential phospholipids for most eukaryotes. Although the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks PC, four species containing PC were found in the genus Chlamydomonas. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of the four species of Chlamydomonas containing PC. PMID:27688324

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Species of Chlamydomonas Containing Phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Takashi; Tajima, Naoyuki; Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is one of the essential phospholipids for most eukaryotes. Although the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks PC, four species containing PC were found in the genus Chlamydomonas Here, we report the draft genome sequences of the four species of Chlamydomonas containing PC. PMID:27688324

  11. Aging of steel containments and liners in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light water reactor plants is being addressed to understand the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion efficacy of inspection and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments. and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of containment related degradation experience is presented. Current and emerging nondestructive examination techniques and a degradation assessment methodology for characterizing and quantifying the amount of damage present are described. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures using time dependent structural reliability analysis methods are summarized. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process. Results of this research provide a means for establishing current and estimating future structural capacity margins of containments, and to address the significance of incidences of reported containment degradation.

  12. [Investigation of the influence of temperature on polyelectrolyte microcapsules containing and not containing proteins].

    PubMed

    Guzhvina, D V; Dubrovskiĭ, A V; Shabarchina, L I; Sukhorukov, B I

    2010-01-01

    Using the methods of light scattering and optical microscopy, data on the thermosensitivity of hollow microcapsules generated by alternative layers of poly(allylamine) and poly(sterenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte and microcapsules with included polyelectrolyte complexes and proteins have been obtained. It has been shown that all three types of capsules shrink with increasing temperature and the time interval of thermal influence, and their diameter decreases. The thermosensitivity has been estimated by means of the temperature factor of shell shrinkage (Ec). For all three types of the microcapsules containing from 6 to 10 layers in the shell, the phenomenon of the thermosensitivity alternation depending on the number of shell layers was revealed. With an odd number of the shell layers, the shrinkage is stronger than with an even number. Using the transport proteins of blood hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin as an example, the dependence of the thermosensitivity of microcapsules on the quantity, the degree of ionization, and the conformational state of the incapsulating protein was investigated. PMID:20184141

  13. An overview of BWR Mark-1 containment venting risk implications: An evaluation of potential Mark-1 containment improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, K.C.; Dallman, R.J.; Galyean, W.J.

    1989-06-01

    This report supplements containment venting risk evaluations performed for the Mark-I Containment Performance Improvement (CPI) Program. Quantitative evaluations using simplified containment event trees for station blackout sequences were performed to evaluate potential risk reduction offered by containment venting, and improved automatic depressurization system with a dedicated power source, and an additional supply of water to either the containment sprays or the vessel with a dedicated power source. The risk calculations were based on the Draft NUREG-1150 results for Peach Bottom with selected enhancements. Several sensitivity studies were performed to investigate phenomenological, operational, and equipment performance uncertainties. Qualitative risk evaluations were provided for loss of long-term containment heat removal and anticipated transients without scram for the same set of improvements. A limited discussion is provided on the generic applicability of these results to other plants with Mark-I containments. 23 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Instrumentation and testing of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    SciTech Connect

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Pace, D.W.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1997-04-01

    Static overpressurization tests of two scale models of nuclear containment structures - a steel containment vessel (SCV) representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR) - are being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper discusses plans for instrumentation and testing of the PCCV model. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. PERFORMANCE OF A CONTAINMENT VESSEL CLOSURE FOR RADIOACTIVE GAS CONTENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents a summary of the design and testing of the containment vessel closure for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This package is a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The containment vessel closure incorporates features specifically designed for the containment of tritium when subjected to the normal and hypothetical conditions required of Type B radioactive material shipping Packages. The paper discusses functional performance of the containment vessel closure of the BTSP prototype packages and separate testing that evaluated the performance of the metallic C-Rings used in a mock BTSP closure.

  16. Characterization of Settler Tank, KW Container and KE Container Sludge Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Carolyn A.; Luna, Maria L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-04-01

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has specified base formulations for non-radioactive sludge simulants for use in the development and testing of equipment for sludge sampling, retrieval, transport, and processing. In general, the simulant formulations are based on the average or design-basis physical and chemical properties obtained by characterizing sludge samples. The simulants include surrogates for uranium metal, uranium oxides (agglomerates and fine particulate), and the predominant chemical phases (iron and aluminum hydroxides, sand). Specific surrogate components were selected to match the nominal particle-size distribution and particle-density data obtained from sludge sample analysis. Under contract to CHPRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed physical and rheological characterization of simulants, and the results are reported here. Two base simulant types (dry) were prepared by STP staff at the Maintenance and Storage Facility and received by PNNL in February 2009: Settler Tank Simulant and KW Container Sludge Simulant. A third simulant, KE Container Sludge Simulant was received by PNNL in December 2010. The objectives of this simulant characterization effort were to provide baseline characterization data on simulants being used by STP for process development and equipment testing and provide a high-level comparison of the simulant characteristics to the targets used to formulate the simulants.

  17. Coaxial cavity for measuring level of liquid in a container

    DOEpatents

    Booman, Glenn L.; Phelps, Frank R.

    1979-01-01

    A method and means for measuring the level of a liquid in a container. A coaxial cavity having a perforated outer conductor is partially submerged in the liquid in the container wherein the liquid enters and terminates the annular region of the coaxial cavity. The fundamental resonant frequency of the portion of the coaxial cavity which does not contain liquid is determined experimentally and is used to calculate the length of the liquid-free portion of the coaxial cavity and thereby the level of liquid in the container.

  18. Six-Month-Old Infants’ Categorization of Containment Spatial Relations

    PubMed Central

    Casasola, Marianella; Cohen, Leslie B.; Chiarello, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Six-month-old infants’ ability to form an abstract category of containment was examined using a standard infant categorization task. Infants were habituated to 4 pairs of objects in a containment relation. Following habituation, infants were tested with a novel example of the familiar containment relation and an example of an unfamiliar relation. Results indicate that infants look reliably longer at the unfamiliar versus familiar relation, indicating that they can form a categorical representation of containment. A second experiment demonstrated that infants do not rely on object occlusion to discriminate containment from a support or a behind spatial relation. Together, the results indicate that by 6 months, infants can recognize a containment relation from different angles and across different pairs of objects. PMID:12795384

  19. Axially perpendicular offset Raman scheme for reproducible measurement of housed samples in a noncircular container under variation of container orientation.

    PubMed

    Duy, Pham K; Chang, Kyeol; Sriphong, Lawan; Chung, Hoeil

    2015-03-17

    An axially perpendicular offset (APO) scheme that is able to directly acquire reproducible Raman spectra of samples contained in an oval container under variation of container orientation has been demonstrated. This scheme utilized an axially perpendicular geometry between the laser illumination and the Raman photon detection, namely, irradiation through a sidewall of the container and gathering of the Raman photon just beneath the container. In the case of either backscattering or transmission measurements, Raman sampling volumes for an internal sample vary when the orientation of an oval container changes; therefore, the Raman intensities of acquired spectra are inconsistent. The generated Raman photons traverse the same bottom of the container in the APO scheme; the Raman sampling volumes can be relatively more consistent under the same situation. For evaluation, the backscattering, transmission, and APO schemes were simultaneously employed to measure alcohol gel samples contained in an oval polypropylene container at five different orientations and then the accuracies of the determination of the alcohol concentrations were compared. The APO scheme provided the most reproducible spectra, yielding the best accuracy when the axial offset distance was 10 mm. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study the characteristics of photon propagation in the APO scheme and to explain the origin of the optimal offset distance that was observed. In addition, the utility of the APO scheme was further demonstrated by analyzing samples in a circular glass container.

  20. Aqueous solutions of transition metal containing micelles.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Peter C; Fallis, Ian A; Tatchell, Thomas; Bushby, Lisa; Beeby, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Incorporation of d- or f-block metals into ligand systems that renders a metal complex surface-active or drives its partitioning into surfactant phases enables the localisation of chemical functionality at interfaces. This article discusses a number of fundamental aspects of these interesting materials and examines potential applications. PMID:18812239

  1. Fuel compositions containing terpene derivatives of

    SciTech Connect

    Karol, T.J.

    1989-01-03

    A diesel fuel composition is described characterized by improved wear properties and comprising a major portion of middle distillates boiling in the range of about 163/sup 0/C to 400/sup 0/C and a minor wear improving amount of a reaction product of a terpene and 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole.

  2. Conductive Circuit Containing a Polymer Composition Containing Thermally Exfoliated Graphite Oxide and Method of Making the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A conductive circuit containing a polymer composite, which contains at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide having a surface area of from about 300 m(sup.2)/g to 2600 m(sup.2)/g, and a method of making the same.

  3. Fluorescence of carbonyl-containing intraionic polymethines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulinich, Andrii V.

    2016-09-01

    Electronic structure and spectral-fluorescent properties of four related indole-based intraionic polymethines are discussed. They all comprise at least one carbonyl group in the acceptor part of their molecule but the effects of the carbonyls upon their UV/Vis and fluorescence spectra depend substantially on its position within the polymethine chromophore. At that, solvation of the carbonyls with highly electrophilic protic solvents can, as a function of dye structure, cause both a rise and decrease of fluorescence quantum yield of a dye or have no tangible effect at all. To get insight into the regularities of such behaviour, the dyes were examined closely using both their absorption and fluorescence spectral data and the (TD) DFT quantum chemical simulation.

  4. Enzymatic synthesis of polymers containing nicotinamide mononucleotide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Rihe

    1995-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-diphosphate in its reduced form is an excellent substrate for polynucleotide phosphorylase from Micrococcus luteus both in de novo polymerization reactions and in primer extension reactions. The oxidized form of the diphosphate is a much less efficient substrate; it can be used to extend primers but does not oligomerize in the absence of a primer. The cyanide adduct of the oxidized substrate, like the reduced substrate, polymerizes efficiently. Loss of cyanide yields high molecular weight polymers of the oxidized form. Terminal transferase from calf thymus accepts nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-triphosphate as a substrate and efficiently adds one residue to the 3'-end of an oligodeoxynucleotide. T4 polynucleotide kinase accepts oligomers of nicotinamide mononucleotide as substrates. However, RNA polymerases do not incorporate nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-triphosphate into products on any of the templates that we used.

  5. Enzymatic Synthesis of Polymers Containing Nicotinamide Mononucleotide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Rihe; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1995-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-diphosphate in its reduced form is an excellent substrate for polynucleotide phosphorylase from Micrococcus luteus both in de novo polymerization reactions and in primer extension reactions. The oxidized form of the diphosphate is a much less efficient substrate; it can be used to extend primers but does not oligomerize in the absence of a primer. The cyanide adduct of the oxidized substrate, like the reduced substrate, polymerizes efficiently. Loss of cyanide yields high molecular weight polymers of the oxidized form. Terminal transferase from calf thymus accepts nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-triphosphate as a substrate and efficiently adds one residue to the 3'-end of an oligodeoxynucleotide. T4 polynucleotide kinase accepts oligomers of nicotinamide mononucleotide as substrates. However, RNA polymerases do not incorporate nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-triphosphate into products on any of the templates that we used.

  6. Containing the Costs of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Clark L.; Beaven, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The current cost structure of higher education, comprised of multiple controllable and uncontrollable costs, is analyzed and promising opportunities to reduce costs are explored. Some innovative strategies that have saved substantial sums for the institutions implementing them are highlighted. (MSE)

  7. Physics of systems containing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1989-01-01

    The following is a summary of work done during the period of Mar. to Oct. 1989. Three major topics were extensively looked into during this time: the reported 2,000 Hz optical signal from the direction of SNR1987A, the possibility that neutron stellar surface magnetic fields do not decay except when the star is accreting, and the 6 Hz QPOs of LMXBs.

  8. Development and Performance Evaluation of an Ozone-Contained Ice Making Machine Employing Pressurized Air Tight Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Akiyama, Tomoaki; Hirofuji, Yushi; Koyama, Shigeru

    Ozone has the capability of sterilization and deodorization due to high oxidation power. It is also effective for the conservation of perishable foods and purification of water. However, ozone has a disadvantage, that is, conservation of ozone is difficult because it reacts to oxygen. Recently, ozone-contained ice is taken attention for the purpose of its conservation. The use of ozone-contained ice seems to keep food fresher when we conserve and transport perishable foods due to the effects of cooling and sterilization of ozone-contained ice. In the present study, we have developed an ozone-contained ice making machine employing pressurized air tight containers with commercially available size. And the performance evaluation of the system is also carried out. Furthermore, we investigated the sterilization effect of ozone-contained ice on conservation of fish. It was seen that ozone-contained ice is effective for sterilization of surface of fish.

  9. Analyses of a Reinforced Concrete Containment with Liner Corrosion Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.; Smith, J.A.

    1998-11-19

    Incidents of liner corrosion in nuclear power containment structures have been recorded. These incidents and concerns of other possible liner corrosion in containment have prompted an interest in determining g the capacity of a degraded containment. Finite element analyses of a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) reinforced concrete containment with liner corrosion were conducted using the A13AQUS finite element code with the ANACAP-U nonlinear concrete constitutive model. The effect of liner corrosion on containment capacity was investigated. A loss of coolant accident was simulated by applying pressure and temperature changes to the structure without corrosion to determine baseline failure limits, followed by multiple analyses of the containment with corrosion at different locations and varying degrees of liner degradation. The corrosion locations were chosen at the base of the containment wall, near the equipment hatch, and at the midheight of the containment wall. Using a strain-based failure criterion the different scenarios were evaluated to prioritize their effect on containment capacity

  10. Geometric simulation of structures containing rigid units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    Much insight into the behaviour of the framework silicates can be obtained from the Rigid Unit model. I review results from geometric analyses [1] of framework structures, quantifying the significance of rigid unit motion in thermal disorder and in defect accomodation, and from a method of simulation [2,3] based on a whole-body `geometric potential' rather than on interatomic potentials. I show the application of the geometric potential to the symmetry-constrained generation of hypothetical zeolite frameworks [4], and to the rapid generation of protein conformations using insights from rigid cluster decomposition [5]. 1. Wells, Dove and Tucker, Journal of Applied Crystallography, 37:536--544 (2004). 2. G.D. Gatta and S.A. Wells, Phys. Chem. Min. 31:1--10 (2004). 3. A. Sartbaeva, S. A. Wells, S. A. T. Redfern, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, 8173 (2004) 4. M. M. J. Treacy, I. Rivin, E. Balkovsky, K. H. Randall and M. D. Foster, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 74, 121-132 (2004). 5. M.F. Thorpe, Ming Lei, A.J. Rader, Donald J. Jacobs, and Leslie A. Kuhn, Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 19, 1:60 - 69, (2001).

  11. Treatment of flue gas containing noxious gases

    SciTech Connect

    Dvirka, M.; Psihos, G.J.; Cosulich, J.J.

    1987-07-21

    A method is described of reducing the noxious gases such as chlorides including hydrogen chloride and chlorine from the flue gases derived from the incineration of solid waste materials in a furnace with a combustion chamber and a combustion zone to substantially reduce the formation of dioxins for a cleaner effluent gas to the atmosphere, comprising: introducing sodium bicarbonate into the flue gas of a furnace incinerating the waste materials, positioning introduction of sodium bicarbonate for at least one location along the path of the flue gas at a temperature below about 1564/sup 0/F but not below about 518/sup 0/F, heating the sodium bicarbonate in the flue gas for a time sufficient to drive off the water and carbon dioxide from the sodium bicarbonate, forming sodium carbonate particle during the heating of the sodium bicarbonate, the sodium carbonate having a higher porosity to produce a greater reaction area on the surface of the particles, contacting the porous sodium carbonate with chlorides in the flue gases for a sufficient time and temperature to react and produce sodium chloride and prevent their formation of dioxins; and separating the sodium chloride from the flue gas to produce a cleaner gas for exit to the atmosphere.

  12. Evaluation of containers as a virtualisation alternative for HEP workloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Gareth; Washbrook, Andrew; Crooks, David; Qin, Gang; Cadellin Skipsey, Samuel; Stewart, Gordon; Britton, David

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the emerging technology of Linux containers is examined and evaluated for use in the High Energy Physics (HEP) community. Key technologies required to enable containerisation will be discussed along with emerging technologies used to manage container images. An evaluation of the requirements for containers within HEP will be made and benchmarking will be carried out to asses performance over a range of HEP workflows. The use of containers will be placed in a broader context and recommendations on future work will be given.

  13. Bumblebee Pupae Contain High Levels of Aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer’s disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline. PMID:26042788

  14. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  15. Evaluation of concrete containing photocatalytic titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Shannon

    The air pollution inversions in the mountain west are a societal problem that require a large-scale solution. With the more stringent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations established in 2010, and the recent discovery of the photocatalytic pollution reduction capabilities of titanium dioxide (TiO2), interest has developed to create pollution-reducing construction materials. Over the last decade, a number of laboratory studies have been performed and a few field studies have occurred around the world. There are commercially available photocatalytic materials that can be used in concrete construction; however, the materials are often cost prohibitive. This study investigated both practical application techniques and the effects of the climatic environment around the specimens. When concrete specimens were exposed to the weather for 120-days, the specimen's photocatalytic efficiency decreased significantly. Rejuvenation methods were investigated; however, no methods tested were able to increase the photocatalytic efficiency of the specimens to preweathered condition. The final element of this study focused on identifying practical and cost-effective methods of adding TiO2 to current production methods by working with a local precast manufacturer. This research is a stepping stone to develop methodologies to minimize the decline of photocatalytic efficiency due to the exposure to the environment. This element is critical in understanding this complex technology and identifying problems that need to be addressed before products are ready for widespread use.

  16. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline. PMID:26042788

  17. Surface modifications of some nanocomposites containing starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, M.-C.; Popescu, M.-C.; Vasile, C.

    2008-09-01

    Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites have attracted strong interest in today's materials research, due to the possible impressive enhancements of material properties, comparatively with those of pure polymers. Several starch/poly(vinylalcohol)/montmorillonite nanocomposites have been subjected to surface modification by physical treatments such as dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) exposure and coating with proteins (albumin) or polysaccharides (chitosan), for improving their biocompatibility. Untreated and treated surfaces have been comparatively studied by contact angle measurements, FT-IR and 2D-FT-IR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. It has been established that enhancement of the surface characteristics depends on the type and number of incorporated nanoparticles as well as on the treatment applied. Coupling of DBD exposure and coating techniques appears to be highly efficient.

  18. Design for containment of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C. ); McDonald, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Department of Energy, (DOE), facilities across the United States, use wind and tornado design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. In addition, other programs such as Advanced Light Water Reactors, New Production Reactors, and Individual Plant Examinations for External Events for commercial nuclear power plants utilize design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. The use of probabilistic performance goals is a departure from design practice for commercial nuclear power plants which have traditionally been designed utilizing a conservative specification of wind and tornado loading combined with deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits. Approaches which utilize probabilistic wind and tornado hazard curves for specification of loading and deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits are discussed in this paper. Through the use of such design/evaluation approaches, it may be demonstrated that there is high likelihood that probabilistic performance goals can be achieved. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. Final Report Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J; Ellingwood, B R; Oland, C Barry

    2005-09-01

    The Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program had primary objectives of (1) understanding the significant factors relating corrosion occurrence, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments; (2) providing the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins or estimating future residual structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; (3) providing recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by USNRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation; and (4) providing technical assistance to the USNRC (as requested) related to concrete technology. Primary program accomplishments have included development of a degradation assessment methodology; reviews of techniques and methods for inspection and repair of containment metallic pressure boundaries; evaluation of high-frequency acoustic imaging, magnetostrictive sensor, electromagnetic acoustic transducer, and multimode guided plate wave technologies for inspection of inaccessible regions of containment metallic pressure boundaries; development of a continuum damage mechanics-based approach for structural deterioration; establishment of a methodology for reliability-based condition assessments of steel containments and liners; and fragility assessments of steel containments with localized corrosion. In addition, data and information assembled under this program has been transferred to the technical community through review meetings and briefings, national and international conference participation, technical committee involvement, and publications of reports and journal articles. Appendix A provides a listing of program reports, papers, and publications; and Appendix B contains a listing of

  20. Structural aspects of ganglioside-containing membranes.

    PubMed

    Cantu', Laura; Corti, Mario; Brocca, Paola; Del Favero, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The demand for understanding the physical role of gangliosides in membranes is pressing, due to the high number of diverse and crucial biological functions in which they are involved, needing a unifying thread. To this purpose, model systems including gangliosides have been subject of extensive structural studies. Although showing different levels of complication, all models share the need for simplicity, in order to allow for physico-chemical clarity, so they keep far from the extreme complexity of the true biological systems. Nonetheless, as widely agreed, they provide a basic hint on the structural contribution specific molecules can pay to the complex aggregate. This topic we address in the present review. Gangliosides are likely to play their physical role through metamorphism, cooperativity and demixing, that is, they tend to segregate and identify regions where they can dictate and modulate the geometry and the topology of the structure, and its mechanical properties. Strong three-dimensional organisation and cooperativity are exploited to scale up the local arrangement hierarchically from the nano- to the mesoscale, influencing the overall morphology of the structure. PMID:19063860

  1. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  2. Method of preparing nitrogen containing semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Barber, Greg D.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2004-09-07

    A method of combining group III elements with group V elements that incorporates at least nitrogen from a nitrogen halide for use in semiconductors and in particular semiconductors in photovoltaic cells.

  3. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  4. [Characterization of resin-containing glass ionomers].

    PubMed

    Gladys, S; Van Meerbeek, B; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1996-01-01

    Recently, several new resin-modified glassionomers have been introduced on the dental market. At the moment a real confusion exists over the right terminology of the products and its limits in use. Therefore, an in vitro and in vivo study with simultaneously a comparison with conventional glassionomers and composite resins was really necessary. This study revealed that resin-modified glassionomers have physico-mechanical properties that are situated between those of conventional glassionomers and composite resins. The manufacturers have a different approach concerning the particle size distribution. The new materials give a rough surface. They are not indicated for posterior restorations, because their surface hardness is too low compared to that of enamel, and their fatigue resistance is insufficient. The elasticity decreases during setting and maturation. Consequently, they are mainly indicated in situations that require a moderate strength and esthetics, for patients with a high caries activity and when ease in use is requested.

  5. Decontamination of matrices containing actinide oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Villarreal, Robert

    1997-12-01

    There is provided a method for removing actinides and actinide oxides, particularly fired actinides, from soil and other contaminated matrices, comprising: (a) contacting a contaminated material with a solution of at least one inhibited fluoride and an acid to form a mixture; (b) heating the mixture of contaminated material and solution to a temperature in the range from about 30 C to about 90 C while stirring; (c) separating the solution from any undissolved matrix material in the mixture; (d) washing the undissolved matrix material to remove any residual materials; and (e) drying and returning the treated matrix material to the environment.

  6. Hydration of Cuphea seeds containing crystallized triacylglycerols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds that exhibit intermediate storage behavior do not appear to survive under conventional -18C storage conditions. Cuphea wrightii, C. laminuligera, C. carthagenensis, and C. aequipetala are considered sensitive to low temperature storage. The seeds of these species have triacylglycerols (TAG) ...

  7. Container size influences snack food intake independently of portion size.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, David; Corneille, Olivier; Klein, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    While larger containers have been found to increase food intake, it is unclear whether this effect is driven by container size, portion size, or their combination, as these variables are usually confounded. The study was advertised as examining the effects of snack food consumption on information processing and participants were served M&M's for free consumption in individual cubicles while watching a TV show. Participants were served (1) a medium portion of M&M's in a small (n=30) or (2) in a large container (n=29), or (3) a large portion in a large container (n=29). The larger container increased intake by 129% (199 kcal) despite holding portion size constant, while controlling for different confounding variables. This research suggests that larger containers stimulate food intake over and above their impact on portion size. PMID:22306436

  8. Method for primary containment of cesium wastes

    DOEpatents

    Angelini, Peter; Lackey, Walter J.; Stinton, David P.; Blanco, Raymond E.; Bond, Walter D.; Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.

    1983-01-01

    A method for producing a cesium-retentive waste form, characterized by a high degree of compositional stability and mechanical integrity, is provided by subjecting a cesium-loaded zeolite to heat under conditions suitable for stabilizing the zeolite and immobilizing the cesium, and coating said zeolite for sufficient duration within a suitable environment with at least one dense layer of pyrolytic carbon to seal therein said cesium to produce a final, cesium-bearing waste form. Typically, the zeolite is stabilized and the cesium immobilized in less than four hours by confinement within an air environment maintained at about 600.degree. C. Coatings are thereafter applied by confining the calcined zeolite within a coating environment comprising inert fluidizing and carbon donor gases maintained at 1,000.degree. C. for a suitable duration.

  9. 40 CFR 265.172 - Compatibility of waste with container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with container. 265.172 Section 265.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 265.172 Compatibility of waste...

  10. 40 CFR 265.172 - Compatibility of waste with container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with container. 265.172 Section 265.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 265.172 Compatibility of waste...

  11. 40 CFR 265.172 - Compatibility of waste with container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with container. 265.172 Section 265.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 265.172 Compatibility of waste...

  12. 40 CFR 265.172 - Compatibility of waste with container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with container. 265.172 Section 265.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 265.172 Compatibility of waste...

  13. 40 CFR 265.172 - Compatibility of waste with container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compatibility of waste with container... WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 265.172 Compatibility of waste...

  14. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  15. New Aspects of Zirconium Containing Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, Ilan

    Metal carbene complexes have made their way from organometallic curiosities to valuable reagents and catalysts. They offer novel synthetic opportunities in carbon-carbon bond formation based on either carbene-centered reactions or on metal-templated processes which makes them indispensable in modern synthetic methodology. The most prominent metal carbenes are now either commercially available or easy to synthesize and handle with modern laboratory techniques. This volume organized in eight chapters written by the leading scientists in the field illustrates the theoretical background, non-classical nucleophilic and cycloaddition patterns, chromium-templated benzannulation and photo-induced reactions, rhodium-catalyzed carbene transfer as well as the principles and applications of olefin metathesis which has coined the progress in synthetic methodology over the past decade.

  16. Detail view of oil container designed as part of lubricating ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of oil container designed as part of lubricating system for unit 43. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  17. DETAIL VIEW OF OIL CONTAINER DESIGNED AS PART OF LUBRICATING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OIL CONTAINER DESIGNED AS PART OF LUBRICATING SYSTEM FOR UNIT #3. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  18. 27 CFR 25.155 - Types of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Types of containers. 25.155 Section 25.155 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.155 Types of containers....

  19. 27 CFR 25.155 - Types of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Types of containers. 25.155 Section 25.155 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.155 Types of containers....

  20. 27 CFR 25.155 - Types of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Types of containers. 25.155 Section 25.155 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.155 Types of containers....

  1. 27 CFR 25.155 - Types of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Types of containers. 25.155 Section 25.155 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.155 Types of containers....

  2. 27 CFR 25.155 - Types of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Types of containers. 25.155 Section 25.155 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.155 Types of containers....

  3. Determining the Coefficient of Discharge for a Draining Container

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Ashley; Slaton, William

    2014-01-01

    The flow of fluids through open containers is a topic studied frequently in introductory physics classes. A fluid mechanics class delves deeper into the topic of fluid flow through open containers with holes or barriers. The flow of a fluid jet out of a sharp-edged orifice rarely has the same area as the orifice due to a fluid flow phenomenon…

  4. LCA comparison of container systems in municipal solid waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Rives, Jesus; Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2010-06-15

    The planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems requires accurate environmental impact evaluation of the systems and their components. This research assessed, quantified and compared the environmental impact of the first stage of the most used MSW container systems. The comparison was based on factors such as the volume of the containers, from small bins of 60-80 l to containers of 2400 l, and on the manufactured materials, steel and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Also, some parameters such as frequency of collections, waste generation, filling percentage and waste container contents, were established to obtain comparable systems. The methodological framework of the analysis was the life cycle assessment (LCA), and the impact assessment method was based on CML 2 baseline 2000. Results indicated that, for the same volume, the collection systems that use HDPE waste containers had more of an impact than those using steel waste containers, in terms of abiotic depletion, global warming, ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation, human toxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity. Besides, the collection systems using small HDPE bins (60 l or 80 l) had most impact while systems using big steel containers (2400 l) had less impact. Subsequent sensitivity analysis about the parameters established demonstrated that they could change the ultimate environmental impact of each waste container collection system, but that the comparative relationship between systems was similar.

  5. Methods for improving the gas barrier properties of polymeric containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, G.J.

    1984-10-23

    Methods are disclosed for the treatment of food, beverage, and medicine containers and the like, which are made of organic polymeric resins, to greatly increase the gas barrier properties thereof. The containers are ion-plated with a very thin flexible layer of an inorganic oxide.

  6. 7 CFR 52.774 - Fill of container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CERTAIN OTHER PROCESSED FOOD PRODUCTS 1 United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Fill of Container § 52.774 Fill of container. (a) FDA requirements. Canned red tart pitted... Administration (21 CFR 145.125(c)). (b) Recommended minimum drained weights—(1) General. The minimum...

  7. 7 CFR 52.774 - Fill of container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CERTAIN OTHER PROCESSED FOOD PRODUCTS 1 United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Fill of Container § 52.774 Fill of container. (a) FDA requirements. Canned red tart pitted... Administration (21 CFR 145.125(c)). (b) Recommended minimum drained weights—(1) General. The minimum...

  8. LCA comparison of container systems in municipal solid waste management.

    PubMed

    Rives, Jesús; Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2010-06-01

    The planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems requires accurate environmental impact evaluation of the systems and their components. This research assessed, quantified and compared the environmental impact of the first stage of the most used MSW container systems. The comparison was based on factors such as the volume of the containers, from small bins of 60-80l to containers of 2400l, and on the manufactured materials, steel and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Also, some parameters such as frequency of collections, waste generation, filling percentage and waste container contents, were established to obtain comparable systems. The methodological framework of the analysis was the life cycle assessment (LCA), and the impact assessment method was based on CML 2 baseline 2000. Results indicated that, for the same volume, the collection systems that use HDPE waste containers had more of an impact than those using steel waste containers, in terms of abiotic depletion, global warming, ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation, human toxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity. Besides, the collection systems using small HDPE bins (60l or 80l) had most impact while systems using big steel containers (2400l) had less impact. Subsequent sensitivity analysis about the parameters established demonstrated that they could change the ultimate environmental impact of each waste container collection system, but that the comparative relationship between systems was similar.

  9. Evaluating performance of container terminal operation using simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Jamil, Fadhilah Che; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2015-05-01

    A container terminal is a facility where containers are transshipped from one mode of transport to another. Congestion problem leads to the decreasing of the customer's level of satisfaction. This study presents the application of simulation technique with the main objective of this study is to develop the current model and evaluate the performance of the container terminal. The suitable performance measure used in this study to evaluate the container terminal model are the average waiting time in queue, average of process time at berth, number of vessels enter the berth and resource utilization. Simulation technique was found to be a suitable technique to conduct in this study. The results from the simulation model had proved to solve the problem occurred in the container terminal.

  10. HAZARDS OF THERMAL EXPANSION FOR RADIOLOGICAL CONTAINER ENGULFED IN FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-05-01

    Fire accidents pose a serious threat to nuclear facilities. It is imperative that transport casks or shielded containers designed to transport/contain radiological materials have the ability to withstand a hypothetical fire. A numerical simulation was performed for a shielded container constructed of stainless steel and lead engulfed in a hypothetical fire as outlined by 10 CFR §71.73. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the thermal response of the container during and after the fire. The thermal model shows that after 30 minutes of fire, the stainless steel will maintain its integrity and not melt. However, the lead shielding will melt since its temperature exceeds the melting point. Due to the method of construction of the container under consideration, ample void space must be provided to allow for thermal expansion of the lead upon heating and melting, so as to not overstress the weldment.

  11. 36 CFR 1004.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open container of alcoholic beverage. 1004.14 Section 1004.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a motor vehicle...

  12. 24 CFR 35.135 - Use of paint containing lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of paint containing lead. 35... Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and Definitions for All Programs. § 35.135 Use of paint containing lead....

  13. 24 CFR 35.135 - Use of paint containing lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of paint containing lead. 35... Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and Definitions for All Programs. § 35.135 Use of paint containing lead....

  14. 24 CFR 35.135 - Use of paint containing lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Use of paint containing lead. 35... Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and Definitions for All Programs. § 35.135 Use of paint containing lead....

  15. 24 CFR 35.135 - Use of paint containing lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of paint containing lead. 35... Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and Definitions for All Programs. § 35.135 Use of paint containing lead....

  16. 24 CFR 35.135 - Use of paint containing lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of paint containing lead. 35... Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and Definitions for All Programs. § 35.135 Use of paint containing lead....

  17. Determining prestressing forces for inspection of prestressed concrete containments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    General Design Criterion 53, Provisions for Containment Testing and Inspection,'' of Appendix A, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,'' to 10 CFR Part 50, Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,'' requires, in part, that the reactor containment be designed to permit (1) periodic inspection of all important areas and (2) an appropriate surveillance program. Regulatory Guide 1.35, Inservice Inspection of Ungrouted Tendons in Prestressed Concrete Containment Structures,'' describes a basis acceptable to the NRC staff for developing an appropriate inservice inspection and surveillance program for ungrouted tendons in prestressed concrete containment structures of light-water-cooled reactors. This guide expands and clarifies the NRC staff position on determining prestressing forces to be used for inservice inspections of prestressed concrete containment structures.

  18. Forced transport of deformable containers through narrow constrictions.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Remy; van der Heijden, Thijs; Kaoui, Badr; Harting, Jens; Storm, Cornelis

    2014-09-01

    We study, numerically and analytically, the forced transport of deformable containers through a narrow constriction. Our central aim is to quantify the competition between the constriction geometry and the active forcing, regulating whether and at which speed a container may pass through the constriction and under what conditions it gets stuck. We focus, in particular, on the interrelation between the force that propels the container and the radius of the channel, as these are the external variables that may be directly controlled in both artificial and physiological settings. We present lattice Boltzmann simulations that elucidate in detail the various phases of translocation and present simplified analytical models that treat two limiting types of these membrane containers: deformational energy dominated by the bending or stretching contribution. In either case we find excellent agreement with the full simulations, and our results reveal that not only the radius but also the length of the constriction determines whether or not the container will pass.

  19. Design integration of favorable geometry, structural support and containment

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, J.A.; McGehee, G.A.

    1991-07-01

    In designs for fissile processes at Savannah River site, different approaches have been used to provide engineered margins of safety for criticality with containment and seismic resistance as additional requirements. These requirements are frequently at odds in engineered systems. This paper proposes a plan to take advantage of vessels with favorable geometry to provide seismic resistance and to support a glovebox for containment. Thin slab tanks, small diameter pencil tanks, annular tanks, and other novel designs have been used for criticality safety. The requirement for DBE seismic resistance and rigid control of dimensions leads the designer to consider annular tanks for meeting these requirements. The high strength of annular tanks may logically be used to support secondary containment. Hands-on access to all instruments, piping etc. within containment can be provided through gloveports, thus a specialized glovebox. This paper examines the advantages of using an annular tank design to provide favorable geometry, structural support and containment.

  20. Accident response group (ARG) containers for recovery of damaged warheads

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Hoffman, J.P.

    1993-09-01

    This report provides an overview of the containers that are currently stored at Pantex and available for use in response to an accident or for use in any other application where a sealed containment vessel and accident resistant overpack may be needed.

  1. 9 CFR 316.13 - Marking of outside containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... domestic commerce is moved from an official establishment, the outside container shall bear an official... establishment for domestic commerce has been inspected and passed and is enclosed in a cloth or other wrapping... inspection legend shall be destroyed. (e) The outside containers of any product which has been inspected...

  2. 40 CFR 156.140 - Identification of container types.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... statement such as “See container for recycling information.” must be placed on the label under the heading... allow a different (concentrated) product to be diluted in the container.” (3) Recycling or reconditioning statement. One of the following statements is required: (i) “Offer for recycling if...

  3. 40 CFR 156.140 - Identification of container types.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... statement such as “See container for recycling information.” must be placed on the label under the heading... allow a different (concentrated) product to be diluted in the container.” (3) Recycling or reconditioning statement. One of the following statements is required: (i) “Offer for recycling if...

  4. 40 CFR 156.140 - Identification of container types.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... statement such as “See container for recycling information.” must be placed on the label under the heading... allow a different (concentrated) product to be diluted in the container.” (3) Recycling or reconditioning statement. One of the following statements is required: (i) “Offer for recycling if...

  5. 40 CFR 156.140 - Identification of container types.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... statement such as “See container for recycling information.” must be placed on the label under the heading... allow a different (concentrated) product to be diluted in the container.” (3) Recycling or reconditioning statement. One of the following statements is required: (i) “Offer for recycling if...

  6. 40 CFR 156.140 - Identification of container types.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... statement such as “See container for recycling information.” must be placed on the label under the heading... allow a different (concentrated) product to be diluted in the container.” (3) Recycling or reconditioning statement. One of the following statements is required: (i) “Offer for recycling if...

  7. Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Falkenstein, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

  8. Observations of some oxygen-containing and sulfur-containing organic molecules in cold dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Friberg, P; Kaifu, N; Kawaguchi, K; Kitamura, Y; Matthews, H E; Minh, Y; Saito, S; Ukita, N; Yamamoto, S

    1989-07-15

    Observations of nine oxygen- and sulfur-containing organic molecules have been made toward the cold dark clouds TMC-1 and L134N. We have confirmed the presence of para-ketene (H2C2O) in TMC-1, have for the first time observed ortho-ketene, and find a total ketene column density approximately 1 x 10(13) cm-2. Thioformaldehyde (H2CS) is easily detectable in both TMC-1 and L134N, with a column density about 5 times larger in the former source (approximately 3 x 10(13) cm-2). The fractional abundance of ketene is comparable to the predictions of ion-molecule chemistry, while that of thioformaldehyde in TMC-1 is one to two orders of magnitude greater than that expected from such models at steady state. Interstellar sulfur chemistry thus continues to be poorly understood. We set upper limits for the column densities of formic acid (HCOOH), vinyl alcohol (CH2CHOH), methyl formate (HCO2CH3), formamide (NH2CHO), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), isothiocyanic acid (HNCS), and thioketene (H2C2S) in both sources.

  9. 7 CFR 981.43 - Marking or labeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS... or label their containers that are used in packaging or handling of bulk almonds. For purposes of... packaging or handling of bulk almonds. Volume Regulation...

  10. 7 CFR 981.43 - Marking or labeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS... or label their containers that are used in packaging or handling of bulk almonds. For purposes of... packaging or handling of bulk almonds. Volume Regulation...

  11. 7 CFR 981.43 - Marking or labeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS... or label their containers that are used in packaging or handling of bulk almonds. For purposes of... packaging or handling of bulk almonds. Volume Regulation...

  12. 7 CFR 981.43 - Marking or labeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS... or label their containers that are used in packaging or handling of bulk almonds. For purposes of... packaging or handling of bulk almonds. Volume Regulation...

  13. 7 CFR 981.43 - Marking or labeling of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS... or label their containers that are used in packaging or handling of bulk almonds. For purposes of... packaging or handling of bulk almonds. Volume Regulation...

  14. Use of outdoor containments at Westinghouse Hanford Company

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.; Sparks, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This discussion describes the development and application of outdoor containments at Hanford Site Tank Farm facilities. Tank Farms is a huge facility, spread over the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site. Westinghouse Hanford Company operates the Tank Farms for the US Department of Energy. The operation and maintenance of this facility require routine access to underground storage tanks and above ground support structures. In the past, workers often accessed tanks and structures in the open, without containment. In general this approach worked; however, it relied on the skill of our crafts and calm weather conditions. The current regulatory environment and our increased focus on safety demand use of more stringent and reliable containment techniques. Historically, the use of containments has been limited mostly to indoor activities which support radiological maintenance at facilities such as reactors and process facilities. Expanding the use of these containments to support work at the Tank Farms and other outdoor activities presents many challenges. Westinghouse Hanford is actively pursuing innovative solutions to issues of outdoor containments. The process of evaluating new containment solutions, and our lessons learned are described below.

  15. Container and closure means for storage of radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Bienek, H.; Finkbeiner, R.; Wick, W.

    1984-03-20

    In the final storage of radioactive substances in containers, these containers must be sealed so as to be gas-tight by means of a cover, before they are taken to the final storage place. In order to avoid thermal stress, which has up till now been customary, of the radioactive substances on the one hand and of the container and cover on the other hand, it is proposed that the container and the sealing cover should be suitably ground on their seating areas which cooperate with each other, and when the container is closed the cover is held by prestressing on the seating area of the container. In a preferred method, after grinding, a thin equalizing layer of a highly corrosion-resistant, deformable material is applied to at least one of the seating surfaces of the container and cover, in order to achieve a compensation for any roughness which may be present, which will improve the sealing, depending on the technically and/or economically possible extent of the grinding. It is also possible, however, to form the prestressing by means of a lapped contact.

  16. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  17. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  18. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  19. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  20. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  1. Analysis of concrete containment structures under severe accident loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, V.L.

    1993-12-31

    One of the areas of current interest in the nuclear power industry is the response of containment buildings to internal pressures that may exceed design pressure levels. Evaluating the response of structures under these conditions requires computing beyond design load to the ultimate load of the containment. For concrete containments, this requirement means computing through severe concrete cracking and into the regime of wide-spread plastic rebar and/or tendon response. In this regime of material response, an implicit code can have trouble converging. This paper describes some of the author`s experiences with Version 5.2 of ABAQUS Standard and the ABAQUS concrete model in computing the axisymmetric response of a prestressed concrete containment to ultimate global structural failure under high internal pressures. The effects of varying the tension stiffening parameter in the concrete material model and variations of the parameters for the CONTROLS option are discussed.

  2. Inservice inspection of ungrouted tendons in prestressed concrete containments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    General Design Criterion 53, Provisions for Containment Testing and Inspection,'' of Appendix A, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,'' to 10 CFR Part 50, Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,'' requires, in part, that the reactor containment be designed to permit (1) periodic inspection of all important areas and (2) an appropriate surveillance program. This guide describes a basis acceptable to the NRC staff for developing an appropriate inservice inspection and surveillance program for ungrouted tendons in prestressed concrete containment structures of light-water-cooled reactors. The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards has been consulted concerning this guide and has concurred in the regulatory position.

  3. Impact analysis of the DC-1 shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Aramayo, G.A.

    1994-06-01

    Containers used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for the transport of radioactive material components, including components and special assemblies, are required to meet certain impact requirements that are demonstrated by experimental testing, analytical modeling, or the combination of both. The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 49 Section 173.7(d) stipulates that, packages (containers) made by or under direction of the USDOE may be used for the transportation of radioactive materials when evaluated, approved, and certified by the DOE against packaging standards equivalent to those specified in 10 CFR Part 71.1 This paper gives an example of computer analysis of the impact simulation for a typical container in support of experimental testing performed to assure compliance of the container design with Federal Regulations. The paper includes details of the analysis performed and lists the advantages and disadvantages compared with experimental testing.

  4. Crystallinity and solubility behavior of iron-containing fluoridated hydroxyapatites.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Takahashi, J; Kimura, H

    1986-09-01

    Iron-containing fluoridated hydroxyapatites with various fluoride contents were synthesized at 80 degrees C and pH 7.4 using FeCl2 X nH2O as a source of iron. The Fe2+ uptake of fluoridated apatites was independent of fluoride concentration in the solution. a-Axis dimensions of Fe-containing apatites decreased with the degree of fluoridation in addition to the decrease related to the substitution of Fe2+ ions. All Fe-containing fluoridated apatites were less well crystallized than Fe-free fluoridated apatites previously reported, although with increasing degree of fluoridation, the crystallinity behavior of the former apatites appeared analogous to that of the latter apatites. In contrast to this inhibited crystallinity behavior, the apparent solubility of Fe-containing fluoridated apatites decreased more than that of Fe-free fluoridated apatites at low fluoride content.

  5. EVALUATION OF HDPE CONTAINERS FOR MACROENCAPSULATION OF MIXED WASTE DEBRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, David; Carlson, Tim; Gardner, Brad; Bushmaker, Robert; Battleson, Dan; Shaw, Mark; Bierce, Lawrence

    2003-02-27

    Macroencapsulation is currently available at facilities permitted by the U.S. Environmental Protection agency for the treatment of radioactively contaminated hazardous waste. The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the use of high-density polyethylene containers to provide a simpler means of meeting macroencapsulation requirements. Macroencapsulation is used for the purpose of isolating waste from the disposal environment in order to meet the Land Disposal Restriction treatment standards for debris-like waste. The containers being evaluated have the potential of providing a long-term reduction in the leachability and subsequent mobility of both the hazardous and radioactive contaminants in this waste while at the same allowing treatment by the generator as the waste is being generated. While the testing discussed in this paper shows that further developmental work is necessary, these tests also indicate that these containers have the potential to reduce the cost, schedule, and complexity of meeting the treatment standard for mixed waste debris.

  6. Sealing and External Sterilization of a Sample Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Olorunsola, Ayoola

    2008-01-01

    A method of (1) sealing a sample of material acquired in a possibly b iologically contaminated ("dirty") environment into a hermetic conta iner, (2) sterilizing the outer surface of the container, then (3) d elivering the sealed container to a clean environment has been propos ed. The method now proposed was originally intended to be used to ret urn samples from Mars to Earth, but could also be used on Earth to t ransport material samples acquired in environments that contain biol ogical hazards and/or, in some cases, chemical hazards.

  7. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in spherical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audelott, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter spherical containers in weightlessness. Complete liquid circulation flow patterns were easily established in containers that were less than half full of liquid, while for higher liquid fill conditions, vapor was drawn into the inlet of the simulated mixer unit. Increasing the liquid-jet or lowering the position at which the liquid jet entered the container caused increasing turbulence and bubble formation.

  8. An apparatus for the electrodynamic containment of charged macroparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Melbourne, R.; Maleki, L.; Janik, G.; Prestage, J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic moition of the ions contained in the trapped (199)Hg+ frequency standard contributes to the stability of the standard. In order to study these dynamics, a macroscopic analog of the (199)Hg+ trap is constructed. Containment of micron-sized particles in this trap allows direct visual observation of the particles' motion. Influenced by the confining fields and their own Coulomb repulsion, the particles can form stable arrays.

  9. 1. EXTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING UNITEDTOD TWINTANDEM ENGINE, FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING UNITED-TOD TWIN-TANDEM ENGINE, FOR 40" BLOOMING MILL - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  10. 2. EXTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING MESTACORLISS CROSSCOMPOUND ENGINE, FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EXTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING MESTA-CORLISS CROSS-COMPOUND ENGINE, FOR 40" BLOOMING MILL - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  11. Holographic imaging of natural-fiber-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Kyle J [Richland, WA; Tucker, Brian J [Pasco, WA; Severtsen, Ronald H [Richland, WA; Hall, Thomas E [Kennewick, WA; McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA; Lechelt, Wayne M [West Richland, WA; Griffin, Jeffrey W [Kennewick, WA; Sheen, David M [Richland, WA

    2010-12-21

    The present invention includes methods and apparatuses for imaging material properties in natural-fiber-containing materials. In particular, the images can provide quantified measures of localized moisture content. Embodiments of the invention utilize an array of antennas and at least one transceiver to collect amplitude and phase data from radiation interacting with the natural-fiber-containing materials. The antennas and the transceivers are configured to transmit and receive electromagnetic radiation at one or more frequencies, which are between 50 MHz and 1 THz. A conveyance system passes the natural-fiber-containing materials through a field of view of the array of antennas. A computing device is configured to apply a synthetic imaging algorithm to construct a three-dimensional image of the natural-fiber-containing materials that provides a quantified measure of localized moisture content. The image and the quantified measure are both based on the amplitude data, the phase data, or both.

  12. SIMULATIONS FOR ACTIVE INTERROGATION OF HEU IN CARGO CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    LEE, SANG Y.; BEDDINGFIELD, DAVID H.; PARK, JAEYOUNG

    2007-01-22

    We describe the results of a Monte Carlo simulation 10 investigate the feasibility of using a pulsed deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron technique for active interrogation of special nuclear material in cargo containers. Time distributions of fission neutrons from highly enriched uranium induced by a pulsed D-T neutron source were calculated for cargo containers with different hydrogen contents. A simple detector system with polyethylene and cadmium was modeled to calculate the two-group neutron flux at the detector.

  13. Nontraditional methods of synthesising metal-containing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomogailo, Anatolii D.; Savost'yanov, V. S.

    1991-07-01

    Complexes of metals with (meth)acrylates and acrylamides are used as examples for examining the application of nontraditional methods for initiating polymerisation of metal-containing monomers: graft, low-temperature, electrochemical, matrix, solid-state (under high pressure with shear deformation), frontal and spontaneous. Such approaches are demonstrated to be very effective for preparing metal-containing polymers with a wide spectrum of relative molecular masses and with different solubility and stereotacticity. The bibliography includes 39 references.

  14. Corrosion resistance of nickel-containing alloys in petrochemical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.D.

    1997-09-01

    Numerous nickel-containing alloys possess a desirable combination of properties vital to long term dependability within petrochemical and refinery plants. Critical to many operations is the requirement for elevated temperature sulfidation resistance under either reducing or oxidizing environments. This paper surveys the role of materials, environmental factors, alloying elements and the formation of protective scales on the performance of selected nickel-containing alloys.

  15. PRESSURIZATION OF CONTAINMENT VESSELS FROM PLUTONIUM OXIDE CONTENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    Transportation and storage of plutonium oxide is typically done using a convenience container to hold the oxide powder which is then placed inside a containment vessel. Intermediate containers which act as uncredited confinement barriers may also be used. The containment vessel is subject to an internal pressure due to several sources including; (1) plutonium oxide provides a heat source which raises the temperature of the gas space, (2) helium generation due to alpha decay of the plutonium, (3) hydrogen generation due to radiolysis of the water which has been adsorbed onto the plutonium oxide, and (4) degradation of plastic bags which may be used to bag out the convenience can from a glove box. The contributions of these sources are evaluated in a reasonably conservative manner.

  16. Chemistry and mass transport of iodine in containment

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Kress, T.S.; Shockley, W.E.; Daish, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    TRENDS is a computer code for modeling behavior of iodine in containment. It tracks both chemical and physical changes and features such as calculation of radiation dose rates in water pools , radiolysis effects, hydrolysis, and deposition/revaporization on aerosols and structural surfaces. Every attempt has been made to account for all significant processes. Reaction rate constants for iodine hydrolysis and radiolysis were obtained by a variable algorithm that gives values closely modeling experimental data. TRENDS output provides the distribution of iodine in containment and release from containment as a function of time during a severe accident sequence. Initial calculations with TRENDS have shown that the amount of volatile iodine released from containment is sensitive to the value of the liquid-gas (evaporation) mass transport coefficient for I/sub 2/. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. APPLICATION OF NONSPHERICAL FISSILE CONFIGURATION IN WASTE CONTAINERS AT SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

    2007-01-03

    Transuranic (TRU) solid waste that has been generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been stored in more than 30,000 55-gallon drums and carbon steel boxes since 1953. Nearly two thirds of those containers have been processed and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Among the containers assayed so far, the results indicate several drums with fissile inventories significantly higher (600-1000 fissile grams equivalent (FGE) {sup 239}Pu) than their original assigned values. While part of this discrepancy can be attributed to the past limited assay capabilities, human errors are believed to be the primary contributor. This paper summarizes the application of nonspherical fissile material configuration in waste containers, resulting in less restrictive mass and spacing limits, increased storage capacity, and several administrative controls for handling and storage of waste containers being modified without compromising safety.

  18. 6. VIEW OF INSIDE OF RAIL CAR CONTAINING GRAPHITE DELIVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF INSIDE OF RAIL CAR CONTAINING GRAPHITE DELIVERED TO BUILDING 444. THE GRAPHITE WAS FORMED INTO MOLDS AND CRUCIBLE FOR USE IN THE FOUNDRY. (1/12/54) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Use of penetration monitoring in safeguards systems. [Containment and surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, S.; Bleck, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the performance assessment of penetration monitoring systems has been developed within the Containment and Surveillance Subgroup of the International Working Group on Reprocessing Plant Safeguards. The paper examines the use of this method and concludes that the technique is extremely useful in containment and surveillance system design and could also be valuable in operational safeguards systems providing the information generated was used with the care appropriate to the inherent assumptions.

  20. Synthesis and properties of oligodeoxynucleotides containing biaryl units.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshihito; Komatsuzaki, Shinji; Takasu, Keiji; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kitade, Yukio

    2009-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and properties of oligonucleotides (ONs) containing biaryl units, which are composed of a bis(hydroxymethyl)benzene residue and a naphthalene or pyrene moiety. We found that by introducing the biaryl units into the ONs, the aromatic chromophores are suitably arrayed in the DNAs. Further, we succeeded in the detection of a single-base mismatch in RNA by using the ON containing the biaryl unit as a molecular beacon.

  1. Methods for ultimate load analysis of concrete containments

    SciTech Connect

    Dameron, R.A.; Dunham, R.S.; Rashid, Y.R.; Sullaway, M.F. )

    1989-08-01

    This report describes the most recent concrete containment analyses that have been conducted in support of the EPRI-sponsored development of a concrete containment response and leakage prediction methodology. In this third phase of a six-year concrete containment research program, the effort consisted of: (1) compilation of strain concentration factors from Phases 1 and 2 for use with a newly developed leakage prediction criteria, and (2) continuation of analytical support which has involved the most complex concrete analyses used in the research program to date. This report presents the results of several concrete analyses, namely the pre-test and post-test analyses of a reinforced concrete containment specimen with penetration tested at Construction Technology Laboratories, as well as other 3D continuum analyses related to the development of the concrete containment analysis methodology. The analytical methods consist of ABAQUS-EPGEN, a general purpose nonlinear finite element code, combined with recently developed reinforced concrete modeling capabilities. The other analysis that is described is a 3D study of potential prestressed containment penetration punch shear force. 11 refs., 33 figs.

  2. Development and characterization of an orodispersible film containing drug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bao-de; Shen, Cheng-ying; Yuan, Xu-dong; Bai, Jin-xia; Lv, Qing-yuan; Xu, He; Dai, Ling; Yu, Chao; Han, Jin; Yuan, Hai-long

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a novel orodispersible film (ODF) containing drug nanoparticles was developed with the goal of transforming drug nanosuspensions into a solid dosage form and enhancing oral bioavailability of drugs with poor water solubility. Nanosuspensions were prepared by high pressure homogenization and then transformed into ODF containing drug nanoparticles by mixing with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution containing microcrystalline cellulose, low substituted hydroxypropylcellulose and PEG-400 followed by film casting and drying. Herpetrione, a novel and potent antiviral agent with poor water solubility that extracted from Herpetospermum caudigerum, was chosen as a model drug and studied systematically. The uniformity of dosage units of the preparation was acceptable according to the criteria of Japanese Pharmacopoeia 15. The ODF was disintegrated in water within 30s with reconstituted nanosuspensions particle size of 280 ± 11 nm, which was similar to that of drug nanosuspensions, indicating a good redispersibility of the fast dissolving film. Result of X-ray diffraction showed that HPE in the ODF was in the amorphous state. In the in vitro dissolution test, the ODF containing HPE nanoparticles showed an increased dissolution velocity markedly. In the pharmacokinetics study in rats, compared to HPE coarse suspensions, the ODF containing HPE nanoparticles exhibited significant increase in AUC0-24h, Cmax and decrease in Tmax, MRT. The result revealed that the ODF containing drug nanoparticles may provide a potential opportunity in transforming drug nanosuspensions into a solid dosage form as well as enhancing the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:24103635

  3. 12. Detail view, north wall of porch containing the exterior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail view, north wall of porch containing the exterior pantry door (note the lintel stone with the abstracted wave motif). - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  5. Preparation of polypropylene thermoplastic container via thermoforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruqiyah Nik Hassan, Nik; Amira Mohd Ghazali, Farah; Aziz Jaafar, Abdul; Mazni Ismail, Noor

    2016-02-01

    In this study, plastic containers made of polypropylene (PP) sheets were fabricated via vacuum thermoforming. Thermoforming is a process used in fabricating plastic parts by changing flat thermoplastic sheet to three dimensional shapes. In preparing these thermoplastic containers, the design and fabrication of mould were first done by using Catia V5 software and CNC milling machine, respectively. The thermoforming process was then performed at various temperatures ranging from 160°C until 200°C on the PP sheet to form the container. From the experiment, it can be suggested that the outcomes of final thermoplastic containers are significantly depends on temperature control during thermoforming process and also the vent holes design of the mould.

  6. OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE AND RUN OUT WITH TRAVELING TORCH. MACHINE IS CASTING IN TWIN MOLD. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  7. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PIT IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PITS CENTER, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Absorbent pads for Containment, Neutralization, and Clean-Up of Environmental Spills Containing Chemically-Reactive Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A pad for cleaning up liquid spills is described which contains a porous surface covering, and an absorbent interior containing chemically reactive reagents for neutralizing noxious chemicals within the spilled liquid. The porous surface and the absorbent component would normally consist of chemically resistant materials allowing tentative spill to pass. The absorbent interior which contains the neutralizing reagents can but is not required to be chemically resilient and conducts the liquid chemical spill towards the absorbent interior containing the chemically reactive reagents where the dangerous and undesirable chemicals within the chemical spill are then neutralized as well as removed from the premises.

  10. 10. Photocopy of drawing of missile shipping container from Procedures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of drawing of missile shipping container from Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System, Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA 1956. - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  11. A case of accidental ingestion of ant bait containing fipronil.

    PubMed

    Fung, Hin Tat; Chan, Kar Ki; Ching, Wei Ming; Kam, Chak Wah

    2003-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman accidentally ingested a commercial ant bait containing fipronil without development of obvious toxicity, supporting the safety of this new insecticide as demonstrated in animal studies. However, concentrated agricultural products may be more toxic, and the potential for seizures should not be overlooked. The pharmacological action, mechanism of selective insect toxicity, and clinical effects of fipronil are discussed.

  12. Methods for ultimate load analysis of concrete containments

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, R.S.; Rashid, Y.R.; Yuan, K.A.; Lu, Y.M.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of the research project described in this interim report is to develop a qualified methodology for the ultimate load analysis of concrete containment structures. The EPRI-sponsored nonlinear finite element code ABAQUS-EPGEN, which has recently been modified to incorporate a constitutive model for plain concrete and modeling capabilities for reinforced and prestressed concrete containments, is utilized as the structural analysis tool in this development. The ABAQUS-EPGEN concrete modeling and analysis capabilities are first evaluated by comparing measured data with code predictions for full-scale reinforced concrete slab specimens tested under uniaxial and biaxial tension. These specimen tests simulate the behavior of the cylindrical wall of a typical concrete containment structure under internal pressure. The calculated and measured strain comparisons are used to improve the constitutive model and to qualify the code for concrete containment analysis. The second part of this effort deals with the ultimate load analysis of reinforced and prestressed containments to determine bounds on the global overpressure capacities of typical concrete containment structures. The third part of this effort further examines such local effects through a substructural analysis of the liner-concrete interaction at major concrete cracks.

  13. Design and characterization of sulfobetaine-containing terpolymer biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Heath, Daniel E; Cooper, Stuart L

    2012-08-01

    A methacrylic terpolymer system with non-fouling interfacial properties was synthesized by the random copolymerization of hexyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate and sulfobetaine methacrylate (a monomer bearing a zwitterionic pendant group). Polymers were synthesized from feeds containing 0-15 mol.% of the zwitterion-containing methacrylate. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance verified the incorporation of sulfobetaine methacrylate into the polymer structure. Water absorption studies illustrate that the hydrophilicity of the material increases with increasing zwitterion concentration. The biological properties of the polymer were probed by fibrinogen adsorption, human umbilical vein endothelial cell adhesion and growth, and platelet adhesion. Strong resistance to protein adsorption and cell and platelet attachment was observed on materials synthesized from 15 mol.% sulfobetaine methacrylate. Results were compared to the non-fouling behavior of a PEGylated terpolymer formulation and it was observed that the poly(ethylene glycol)-containing materials were slightly more effective at resisting human umbilical vein endothelial cell adhesion and growth over a 7 day incubation period, but the zwitterion-containing materials were equally effective at resisting fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion. The zwitterion-containing materials were electrospun into three-dimensional random fiber scaffolds. Materials synthesized from 15 mol.% of the zwitterion-containing monomer retained their non-fouling character after fabrication into scaffolds. PMID:22503950

  14. Photoreaction of indole-containing mycotoxins to fluorescent products.

    PubMed

    Maragos, C M

    2009-06-01

    Photochemical reaction of the non-fluorescent mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to fluorescent products was recently reported. Because CPA contains an indole moiety, believed to contribute to the fluorescence, it was of interest to determine whether the effect might be more generally applicable to indole-containing mycotoxins. Three indole-containing tremorgens (penitrem A, paxilline, verruculogen) that have not previously been reported to be fluorescent were rendered fluorescent by exposure to ultraviolet light in a photoreactor. Naturally fluorescent ergot alkaloids, which also contain an indole-moiety, exhibited a diminished response after exposure. This suggests that the phenomenon may be most useful for detection of indole-containing tremorgens that are non-fluorescent, rather than for the enhancement of materials that are already fluorescent, such as the ergot alkaloids. The extent to which fluorescence enhancement was seen was strongly influenced by the reaction environment, in particular the solvent used and whether cyclodextrins were present. In an HPLC format, placement of the photoreactor post-column allowed for the fluorescence detection of penitrem A, paxilline, and verruculogen. The ability to photoreact indole-containing tremorgens and detect them by fluorescence may open up new avenues for detection of these mycotoxins alone or in combination. PMID:23604981

  15. Contained Entity of an Educational Innovation: The Realities of Micropolitics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raksit, Mandira

    2006-01-01

    This study was about a single case of educational innovation and excellence in educational technology in a secondary school in Ontario. The researcher explored the question of how the innovation resulted from an individual effort and attainment remained a "contained entity" after its decade-long existence. From the lenses of multiple realities,…

  16. Method for treatment of water containing low concentrations of mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.; Kraynik, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    A process employing magnetic filtering techniques has been devised for treating water containing concentrations on the order of 1 microgram/cubic centimeter of atomic or ionic mercury. A laboratory-scale system has been operated and can reduce the mercury content of test solutions by as much as 90 percent.

  17. GAS ANALYSES FROM HEADSPACE OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.; Livingston, R.; Traver, L.; Arnold, M.; Bridges, N.; Kessinger, G.; Duffey, J.

    2010-02-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) 3013 destructive examination program performs surveillances on 3013 containers originating from multiple sites across the DOE complex. The bases for the packaging, storage, and surveillance activities are derived from the Department of Energy's 3013 Standard (DOE-STD-3013-2004). During destructive examination, headspace gas samples are obtained from the 3013 inner container and the annulus between the outer and inner containers. To characterize gas species, the samples are analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), direct-inlet mass spectrometry (DIMS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The GC results, as well as other parameters, are utilized as input into the gas evaluation software tool (GEST) program for computation of pre-puncture gas compositions and pressures. Over 30 containers from the Hanford Site and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) have been examined in the first three years of the surveillance program. Several containers were shown to have appreciable hydrogen content (some greater than 30 mol %), yet little or no oxygen was detected in any of the containers, including those exhibiting high hydrogen concentrations. Characteristics including moisture content, surface area, and material composition, along with the headspace gas composition, are utilized in an attempt to explain the chemical behavior of the packaged materials.

  18. Complex-wide representation of material packaged in 3013 containers

    SciTech Connect

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Peppers, Larry G.; Friday, Gary P.

    2009-06-01

    The DOE sites packaging plutonium oxide materials packaged according to Department of Energy 3013 Standard (DOE-STD-3013) are responsible for ensuring that the materials are represented by one or more samples in the Materials Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program. The sites categorized most of the materials into process groups, and the remaining materials were characterized, based on the prompt gamma analysis results. The sites issued documents to identify the relationships between the materials packaged in 3013 containers and representative materials in the MIS program. These “Represented” documents were then reviewed and concurred with by the MIS Working Group. However, these documents were developed uniquely at each site and were issued before completion of sample characterization, small-scale experiments, and prompt gamma analysis, which provided more detailed information about the chemical impurities and the behavior of the material in storage. Therefore, based on the most recent data, relationships between the materials packaged in 3013 containers and representative materials in the MIS program been revised. With the prompt gamma analysis completed for Hanford, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River Site 3013 containers, MIS items have been assigned to the 3013 containers for which representation is based on the prompt gamma analysis results. With the revised relationships and the prompt gamma analysis results, a Master “Represented” table has been compiled to document the linkages between each 3013 container packaged to date and its representative MIS items. This table provides an important link between the Integrated Surveillance Program database, which contains information about each 3013 container to the MIS items database, which contains the characterization, prompt gamma data, and storage behavior data from shelf-life experiments for the representative MIS items.

  19. Certification testing of Quality Secondary Storage (QSS) containers

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeault, M. L.

    2008-07-15

    LANL undertook a program to design, test, and procure a new set of secondary tritium containment vessels to replace older containment vessels. This program was driven by new requirements to meet all metal seal and higher temperature ratings. The testing involved ASME pressure tests, additional pneumatic tests at room and elevated temperature, and drop tests. Testing revealed a fabrication issue with the metal seal and a need to provide a crash bar for drop protection. (authors)

  20. Reassessing the extent of the Q classification for containment paint

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, G.

    1995-12-31

    A mounting number of site-specific paint debris transport and screen clogging analyses submitted to justify substandard containment paint work have been deemed persuasive by virtue of favorable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission safety evaluation report (SER) findings. These lay a strong foundation for a standardized approach to redefining the extent to which paint in containment needs to be considered {open_quotes}Q.{close_quotes} This information justifies an initiative by licensees to roll back paint work quality commitments made at the design phase. This paper questions the validity of the basic premise that all primary containment paint can significantly compromise core and containment cooling [emergency core cooling system/engineered safeguard feature (ECCS/ESF)]. It is posited that the physical extent of painted containment surfaces for which extant material qualification and quality control (QC) structures need apply can be limited to zones relatively proximate to ECCS/ESF suction points. For other painted containment surfaces, simplified criteria should be allowed.

  1. HEADSPACE GAS EVALUATION OF WELDED PLUTONIUM STORAGE CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B; Stephen Harris, S; Matthew Arnold, M; Steve Hensel, S

    2008-04-01

    The Can Puncture Device (CPD) serves as a containment vessel during the puncture of nested 3013 containers as part of surveillance operations in K-Area. The purpose of the CPD sampling process is to determine the original pressure and composition of gases within the inner 3013 container. The relation between the composition of the gas sample drawn from the CPD and that originally in the inner 3013 container depends on the degree of mixing that occurs over the interval of time from the puncture to drawing the sample. Gas mixing is bounded by the extremes of no mixing of gases in the inner container and that of complete mixing, in which case the entire CPD system is of uniform composition. Models relating the sample composition and pressure to the initial (pre-puncture) inner can composition and pressure for each of these extremes were developed. Predictions from both models were compared to data from characterization experiments. In the comparison, it was found that the model that assumed complete gas mixing after puncture, the Uniform Mixing Model, showed significantly better agreement with the data than the model that assumed no change in the composition of the inner container, referred to as the Non-Uniform Mixing Model. Both models were implemented as Microsoft{reg_sign} Excel spreadsheet calculations, which utilize macros, to include the effects of uncertainties and biases in the measurements of process parameters and in the models. Potential inleakage of gas from the glovebox is also addressed. The spreadsheet utilizing the Uniform Mixing Model, which was validated by data from the characterization tests, is used to evaluate the pre-puncture composition and pressure within the inner 3013 container. This spreadsheet model is called the Gas Evaluation Software Tool (GEST).

  2. Growth of Microorganisms in Total Parenteral Nutrition Solutions Containing Lipid

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Shimono, Kazuyuki; Kaneda, Shinya; Tamura, Takumi; Ichihara, Masao; Nakashima, Yoshifumi

    2010-01-01

    Background: To identify the microorganisms that can grow rapidly in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions, we investigated the growth of the major causes of catheter-related blood stream infection (Staphylococcus aureus, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus cereus, and Candida albicans) in TPN solutions containing lipid. Methods: The pH value of a TPN solution containing lipid (pH 6.0, containing 20 ppm of NaHSO3) was adjusted by the addition of HCl to 5.7, 5.4, or 4.9. The pH value of another TPN solution (pH5.5, containing 400 ppm of NaHSO3) was adjusted by the addition of NaOH to 5.9, 6.3, or 6.8. A specific number of each microorganism was added to 10 mL of each test solution and incubated at room temperature. The number of microorganisms was counted as colony forming units at 0, 24, and 48 hrs later. Results: C albicans increased similarly at any pH values in the TPN solution. The bacterial species also increased rapidly at pH6.0 in the solution containing 20 ppm of NaHSO3, but growth was suppressed as the pH value was reduced, with growth halted at pH4.9. However, these bacterial species did not increase, even at pH5.9, in the other solution containing 400 ppm of NaHSO3. Conclusions: These results suggest that Candida species can grow rapidly in almost all TPN solutions regardless of the acidity, lipid, and NaHSO3; also, some bacterial species may grow in TPN solutions containing lipid unless the pH value is 5.0 or less. Therefore, each TPN solution should be examined whether or not the bacterial species can proliferate. PMID:20567610

  3. Capacity of Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels with Prestressing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,JEFFREY A.

    2001-09-01

    Reduced prestressing and degradation of prestressing tendons in concrete containment vessels were investigated using finite element analysis of a typical prestressed containment vessel. The containment was analyzed during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) with varying levels of prestress loss and with reduced tendon area. It was found that when selected hoop prestressing tendons were completely removed (as if broken) or when the area of selected hoop tendons was reduced, there was a significant impact on the ultimate capacity of the containment vessel. However, when selected hoop prestressing tendons remained, but with complete loss of prestressing, the predicted ultimate capacity was not significantly affected for this specific loss of coolant accident. Concrete cracking occurred at much lower levels for all cases. For cases where selected vertical tendons were analyzed with reduced prestressing or degradation of the tendons, there also was not a significant impact on the ultimate load carrying capacity for the specific accident analyzed. For other loading scenarios (such as seismic loading) the loss of hoop prestressing with the tendons remaining could be more significant on the ultimate capacity of the containment vessel than found for the accident analyzed. A combination of loss of prestressing and degradation of the vertical tendons could also be more critical during other loading scenarios.

  4. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  5. PHARMACODYNAMICAL EVALUATION OF MATRIX TYPE TRANSDERMAL THERAPEUTIC SYSTEMS CONTAINING CAPTOPRIL.

    PubMed

    Kerımoğlu, Oya; Şahbaz, Sevınç; Şehırlı, Özer; Ozdemır, Zarıfe Nıgar; Çetınel, Şule; Dortunç, Betül; Şener, Göksel

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate pharmacodynamical properties of transdermal therapeutic systems (TTS) containing captopril together with synthetic and pH independent polymers, Eudragit RL 100 and RS 100. Optimum formulation was chosen according to the results of our previous study regarding in vitro dissolution and ex vivo diffusion rate studies through excised human skin by using Franz Diffusion Cell. Control group, hypertension group (HT) and TTS containing captopril hypertension group (HT-CAP) were assessed for the pharmacodynamic activity of the study. Pharmacodynamic activity of transdermal patches containing captopril was evaluated in rats by the measurement of systolic blood pressure for 24 h with the use of the tail cuff method. Blood pressure, heart rate, body and heart weight, heart and body weight ratio were determined. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Na+, K(+)-ATPase were measured in the serum of rats. Histopathological evaluation of the heart tissue was conducted in order to determine any tissue damage. Blood pressure values of the TTS containing captopril hypertension group were decreased significantly and became almost similar with the blood pressure values of the control group. These results indicated that matrix type transdermal patches prepared with Eudragit RL 100 and RS 100 polymers containing captopril can be considered as transdermal therapeutic systems for chronical treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure. However, further in vivo pharmacokinetic studies should be performed in order to determine the blood level of the drug.

  6. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment

  7. Emerging Roles of JmjC Domain-Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Accari, Sandra L; Fisher, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins are a diverse superfamily of proteins containing a characteristic, evolutionarily conserved β-barrel structure that normally contains binding sites for Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate. In the best studied JmjC-domain proteins, the JmjC barrel has a histone demethylase catalytic activity. Histones are evolutionarily conserved proteins intimately involved in the packaging of DNA within the nucleus of eukaryotic organisms. The N-termini ("tails") of the histone proteins are subject to a diverse array of posttranslational modifications including methylation. Unlike many of the other histone modifications which are transient, methylation was thought to be permanent, until the relatively recent identification of the first demethylases. Jumonji C domain-containing proteins were first identified with a role in the modulation of histone methylation marks. This family of proteins is broken up into seven distinct subgroups based on domain architecture and their ability to antagonize specific histone methylation marks. Their biological functions derive from their ability to regulate gene expression and include roles in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation, and stress responses. However, one subgroup remains, the largest, in which the JmjC domain has no known biochemical function. These proteins belong to the JmjC-domain-only subgroup and as their name suggests, the only bioinformatically recognizable domain they contain is the highly conserved JmjC domain. PMID:26404469

  8. [Hygienic evaluation of experimental samples of antimicrobial underwear containing hexachlorophene].

    PubMed

    Borshchenko, V V; Savinich, F K; Gorshkov, V P; Rogatovskaia, A P

    1976-01-01

    The hygienic examination of 12 samples of knitted underwear which contained hexachlorophene added during fiber formation allowed the selection of four types that can be used under poor sanitation conditions. Taking into consideration possible changes in the proportion of various micoorganisms during prolonged space flights, it is recommended to carry out a complex investigation in order to allow the use of the antimicrobial underwear by specific crewmembers during a certain period of time. PMID:13247

  9. Method for determining processability of a hydrocarbon containing feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2013-09-10

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

  10. Synthesis and thermal properties of new bionanofluids containing gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Pérez, J. L.; López Gamboa, G.; Gutiérrez Fuentes, R.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.; Correa Pacheco, Z. N.; López-y-López, V. E.; Tepech-Carrillo, L.

    2016-10-01

    New bionanofluids containing Au nanoparticles with different concentrations were prepared by chemical reduction method. The nanoparticles were mixed with biodiesel from soybean prepared using alkaline catalysts. Thermal properties of biodiesel containing Au nanoparticles with different volume percentage concentrations were measured by mismatched dual-beam mode thermal lens technique in order to measure the effect of the presence of nanoparticles ( φ = 13.3 nm) on the bionanofluids thermal diffusivity. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was estimated by fitting the experimental data to the theoretical expression for transient thermal lens. The thermal diffusivity of the bionanofluids (biodiesel containing Au nanoparticles) seems to be strongly dependent on the presence of nanoparticles. It was observed an increase in the thermal diffusivity when volume percentage of nanoparticles increased. A possible explanation for such high thermal diffusivity of the biodiesel with Au nanoparticles is given. UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques were used to characterize the bionanofluids.

  11. Posttest Analyses of the Steel Containment Vessel Model

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of a scale model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. This testis part of a program to investigate the response of representative models of nuclear containment structures to pressure loads beyond the design basis accident. The posttest analyses of this test focused on three areas where the pretest analysis effort did not adequately predict the model behavior during the test. These areas are the onset of global yielding, the strain concentrations around the equipment hatch and the strain concentrations that led to a small tear near a weld relief opening that was not modeled in the pretest analysis.

  12. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1997-01-01

    A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

  13. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1997-03-18

    A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

  14. Characterization of cyclodextrin containing nanofilters for removal of pharmaceutical residues.

    PubMed

    Jurecska, Laura; Dobosy, Péter; Barkács, Katalin; Fenyvesi, Éva; Záray, Gyula

    2014-09-01

    Due to the increasing amount of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in general and pharmaceutical residues in particular in municipal wastewater, the efficiency of water treatment technologies should be improved. Following the biological treatment of wastewater nanofiltration offers a possible way for the removal of POPs. In this study β-cyclodextrin containing nanofilters having different chemical composition and thickness (1.5-3.5mm) were investigated. For their characterization, their adsorption capacity was determined applying ibuprofen containing model solution and total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer. It could be established that the regeneration of nanofilters with ethanol and the application of inorganic additives (NaCl, NaHCO3, NH4HCO3) increased the adsorption capacity of nanofilters. The best results were achieved with chemical composition of 30m/m% β-cyclodextrin polymer beads and 70m/m% ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in the presence of 12mmol ammonium hydrogen carbonate/nanofilter.

  15. Emissions from open burning of used agricultural pesticide containers.

    PubMed

    Gullett, Brian K; Tabor, Dennis; Touati, Abderrahmane; Kasai, Jeanne; Fitz, Nancy

    2012-06-30

    Emissions from simulated open burning of used agricultural pesticide containers were sampled for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs), and particle matter (PM(10) and PM(2.5)). Clean high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers, containers with trace pesticide, and triple-rinsed containers were burned separately in an open combustion facility and their emissions compared. Two common chlorinated pesticides were used: 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 1-chloro-3-ethylamino-5-isopropylamino-2,4,6-triazine (atrazine). PCDD/PCDF emission factors ranged from 0.1 to 24ng toxic equivalents (TEQ)/kg C burned with a mean and median of 4.9 and 1.9ng TEQ/kgC burned, respectively. In a limited number of trials, the trace 2,4-D in the HDPE container led to a statistically significant increase in PCDD/PCDF formation compare to all other conditions. Residual atrazine did not lead to more PCDD/PCDF than the unrinsed 2,4-D container. Total (16 compounds) PAH emission factors varied from 1.5 to 6.7mg/kgC burned. These limited data suggest that rinsing the 2,4-D container prior to burning reduces both PCDD/PCDF and PAH emissions. Nine PM(2.5) emission factors ranged from 9 to 35mg/gC burned and ten PM(10) values ranged from 6 to 43mg/gC burned. Neither pesticide appeared to have any effect on PM concentration.

  16. Verification of knowledge bases based on containment checking

    SciTech Connect

    Levy. A.Y.; Rousset, M.C.

    1996-12-31

    Building complex knowledge based applications requires encoding large amounts of domain knowledge. After acquiring knowledge from domain experts, much of the effort in building a knowledge base goes into verifying that the knowledge is encoded correctly. We consider the problem of verifying hybrid knowledge bases that contain both Horn rules and a terminology in a description logic. Our approach to the verification problem is based on showing a close relationship to the problem of query containment. Our first contribution, based on this relationship, is presenting a thorough analysis of the decidability and complexity of the verification problem, for knowledge bases containing recursive rules and the interpreted predicates =, {le}, < and {ne}. Second, we show that important new classes of constraints on correct inputs and outputs can be expressed in a hybrid setting, in which a description logic class hierarchy is also considered, and we present the first complete algorithm for verifying such hybrid knowledge bases.

  17. Moving atoms and small molecules out of open containers.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael L

    2013-03-21

    Density functional theory with the M05-2X exchange/correlation functional is used to study the barriers for expulsion of atoms and small molecules (N2, CO, H2, Ar, Kr, Xe, H2O) out of open fullerenes (I20) and related molecular containers (C40H20, [5]beltene, cucurbit[5]uril). The reactions are examples where dispersion plays a critical role in determining the barrier heights. Calculations are compared with experimental kinetic data for N2@I20, CO@I20, and Xe@cucurbit[5]uril (Xe@CB[5]). Comparing the four molecular containers, the activation barriers for escape of an atom or small molecule correlate with the binding energies. A new open-fullerene model container C40H20 (C40) was constructed from C60 with a constriction at both ends formed by five methylene groups around the rim. The activation barriers for escape of N2 and CO from the model container are similar to those from the I20 open-cage fullerene. In the case of H2O@C40, charge analysis reveals an interesting charge transfer at the transition state as the escaping guest is "squeezed" out of the host container.

  18. Evaluation of an air drilling cuttings containment system

    SciTech Connect

    Westmoreland, J.

    1994-04-01

    Drilling at hazardous waste sites for environmental remediation or monitoring requires containment of all drilling fluids and cuttings to protect personnel and the environment. At many sites, air drilling techniques have advantages over other drilling methods, requiring effective filtering and containment of the return air/cuttings stream. A study of. current containment methods indicated improvements could be made in the filtering of radionuclides and volatile organic compounds, and in equipment like alarms, instrumentation or pressure safety features. Sandia National Laboratories, Dept. 61 11 Environmental Drilling Projects Group, initiated this work to address these concerns. A look at the industry showed that asbestos abatement equipment could be adapted for containment and filtration of air drilling returns. An industry manufacturer was selected to build a prototype machine. The machine was leased and put through a six-month testing and evaluation period at Sandia National Laboratories. Various materials were vacuumed and filtered with the machine during this time. In addition, it was used in an actual air drive drilling operation. Results of these tests indicate that the vacuum/filter unit will meet or exceed our drilling requirements. This vacuum/filter unit could be employed at a hazardous waste site or any site where drilling operations require cuttings and air containment.

  19. Aging management of nuclear power plant containments for license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.C.; Kuo, P.T.; Lee, S.S.

    1997-09-01

    In 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), now the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), submitted for NRC review, the industry reports (IRs), NUMARC Report 90-01 and NUMARC Report 90-10, addressing aging management issues associated with PWR containments and BWR containments for license renewal, respectively. In 1996, the Commission amended 10 CFR 50.55a to promulgate requirements for inservice inspection of containment structures. This rule amendment incorporates by reference the 1992 Edition with the 1992 Addenda of Subsections IWE and IWL of the ASME Code addressing the inservice inspection of metal containments/liners and concrete containments, respectively. The purpose of this report is to reconcile the technical information and agreements resulting from the NUMARC IR reviews which are generally described in NUREG-1557 and the inservice inspection requirements of subsections IWE and IWL as promulgated in {section}50.55a for license renewal consideration. This report concludes that Subsections IWE and IWL as endorsed in {section}50.55a are generally consistent with the technical agreements reached during the IR reviews. Specific exceptions are identified and additional evaluations and augmented inspections for renewal are recommended.

  20. Growth and development of maize that contains mutant tubulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Wick

    2004-07-23

    Mutant maize plants containing a Mu transposon disrupting one of the five beta tubulin genes of interest were followed for several generations and hybridized with each other to produce plants containing disruptions in both copies of a single gene or disruption of more than one tubulin gene. Seedlings of some of these plants were grown under chilling conditions for a few weeks. After DOE funding ended, plants have been assessed to see whether mutant are more or less tolerant to chilling. Other mutant plants will be assessed for their male and female fertility relative to non-mutant siblings or other close relatives.

  1. SOP--Determining the Volume of a Container

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, John G.; Martz, Harry E.

    2010-10-26

    The purpose of this Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) is to give guidelines on how to measure the volume of a container for use in radiography studies. This SOP gives details on a recommended method of how exactly to measure the volume of containers used for specimens for Micro CT and EDS measurements. This volume is important in determining accurate densities of the specimens. This SOP is referred to in TP 48 - Preparation of Hydrogen Peroxide/Icing Sugar Specimens for X-ray Measurements by J.G. Reynolds and H.E. Martz

  2. Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

  3. A survey of kinetic data of compounds containing flourine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Chlorofluoromethanes may have a significant effect on the level of ozone in the atmosphere. However, the role of fluroine-containing compounds has not been examined fully. A tabulation of a search of the chemical kinetic literature published between 1953 and July 1975, is presented. The data are then evaluated with respect to acceptability and importance to the overall reaction balance in the atmosphere. Possible future research to elucidate important reaction processes is discussed.

  4. [Health risks of residual fumigants in international transport containers].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Budnik, L T; Preisser, A M

    2010-03-01

    The increasing transport of goods worldwide is mainly carried in standard containers. These containers are frequently fumigated in order to protect freight from pests and to follow regulations of importing countries. Fumigants as well as toxic industrial chemicals can adsorb to goods and be emitted from them over various periods of time. This review is based on a literature search, analyses of air samples from a randomized selection of import containers at the port of Hamburg and clinical investigations of intoxicated subject. These data indicate that about 70% of imported containers exceed national or international threshold levels, about one sixth exceeding occupational exposure limits of fumigants and/or toxic industrial chemical, 0.5% had concentrations immediately dangerous to life or health. Intoxications by inhalation mainly occur in workers in the logistics area. No information exists on possible fumigation in small and medium-sized companies where the container units are unloaded. Neurological and respiratory ailments dominated in patients from our outpatient clinic and those reported in the literature: symptoms were often misdiagnosed. Our results confirm findings of other investigators that subjects who unload containers or have otherwise intensive contact with imported goods are frequently exposed to toxic or very toxic volatile chemicals. It can be assumed that there are many unrecognized cases and also health risks to the ultimate consumers of transported goods. History taking targeted on potential exposure is of great diagnostic importance in elucidating typical temporal relationship between exposure by inhalation and symptoms such as headache, skin irritation, cough, dyspnea, diarrhoea and neurological deficits. Detailed investigations by medical specialists is necessary to confirm suspected diagnoses. This should be combined with immediate special analyses of air samples and laboratory tests (biological monitoring).

  5. Assessment of current criteria for dynamic stability of container vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanca, C.; Ancuta, C.; Acomi, N.; Andrei, C.

    2016-08-01

    Container vessels sailing through heavy weather are exposed to a significant variation of stability due to specific shape of the hull combined with the action of the waves. Even if the weather forecast is transmitted to vessels, the way of acting it is a matter of officers’ experience. The Maritime Safety Committee, under the International Maritime Organization, has approved the Guidance to the master for avoiding dangerous situations in adverse weather and sea conditions. Adverse weather conditions include wind induced waves or heavy swell. The development of dangerous phenomena such as surf-riding and broaching to, syncronious and parametric rollings is a result of a these adverse conditions which has to be encountered by the vessels. Understanding the dynamic stability of the vessel in the waves and ship's behaviour based on mathematical and physical rules is a difficult task, any effort in order to assess these components are salutary. To avoid excessive acceleration and forces which can damage the hull of the vessel, lashing and integrity of containers, course and speed may need to be changed for the vessel's motion in heavy seas. Specific software have been developed as aids for evaluating the response of the vessel in heavy seas according to parameters variations. The paper aims at assessing of current criteria for dynamic stability of a container vessel model ship in order to determine the ways for avoiding dangerous conditions. The results should be regarded as a supporting tool during the decision making process.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of toothpastes containing natural extracts, chlorhexidine or triclosan.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Andiara; Ferreira, Danielly Cunha Araújo; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; da Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra; Nelson-Filho, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of toothpastes containing natural extracts, chlorhexidine or triclosan. The effectiveness of toothpastes containing natural extracts (Parodontax®), 0.12% chlorhexidine (Cariax®), 0.3% triclosan (Sanogil®) or fluoride (Sorriso®, control) was evaluated against yeasts, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using the disk diffusion method. Water was used as a control. Disks impregnated with the toothpastes were placed in Petri dishes containing culture media inoculated with 23 indicative microorganisms by the pour plate method. After incubation, the inhibition growth halos were measured and statistical analyses (α=0.05) were performed. The results indicated that all formulations, except for conventional toothpaste (Sorriso®), showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. The toothpaste containing natural extracts (Parodontax®) was the only product able to inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The toothpastes containing chlorhexidine, triclosan or natural extracts presented antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and yeasts.

  7. Method for the containment of oils and oil sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Edgar, A.C.; Smith, G.N.

    1983-06-07

    A method is claimed for the solidification and containment of sludge from an oil reclaiming process to permit environmentally safe storage disposal of the sludge and particularly electric transformer oil containing pcb's. In the process, the sludge or oil is mixed with fuller's earth in a weight ratio of at least 40:60 of fuller's earth to sludge or oil. The fuller's earth has a particle size not greater than -4 mesh to 0 mesh range and a moisture content of less than 12%. (The mixture is allowed to harden to a paste like solid material and conveyed to a conventional land fill storage disposal site).

  8. NESdb: a database of NES-containing CRM1 cargoes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Darui; Grishin, Nick V; Chook, Yuh Min

    2012-09-01

    The leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) is the only known class of targeting signal that directs macromolecules out of the cell nucleus. NESs are short stretches of 8-15 amino acids with regularly spaced hydrophobic residues that bind the export karyopherin CRM1. NES-containing proteins are involved in numerous cellular and disease processes. We compiled a database named NESdb that contains 221 NES-containing CRM1 cargoes that were manually curated from the published literature. Each NESdb entry is annotated with information about sequence and structure of both the NES and the cargo protein, as well as information about experimental evidence of NES-mapping and CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NESdb will be updated regularly and will serve as an important resource for nuclear export signals. NESdb is freely available to nonprofit organizations at http://prodata.swmed.edu/LRNes.

  9. NESdb: a database of NES-containing CRM1 cargoes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Darui; Grishin, Nick V; Chook, Yuh Min

    2012-09-01

    The leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) is the only known class of targeting signal that directs macromolecules out of the cell nucleus. NESs are short stretches of 8-15 amino acids with regularly spaced hydrophobic residues that bind the export karyopherin CRM1. NES-containing proteins are involved in numerous cellular and disease processes. We compiled a database named NESdb that contains 221 NES-containing CRM1 cargoes that were manually curated from the published literature. Each NESdb entry is annotated with information about sequence and structure of both the NES and the cargo protein, as well as information about experimental evidence of NES-mapping and CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NESdb will be updated regularly and will serve as an important resource for nuclear export signals. NESdb is freely available to nonprofit organizations at http://prodata.swmed.edu/LRNes. PMID:22833564

  10. NESdb: a database of NES-containing CRM1 cargoes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Darui; Grishin, Nick V.; Chook, Yuh Min

    2012-01-01

    The leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) is the only known class of targeting signal that directs macromolecules out of the cell nucleus. NESs are short stretches of 8–15 amino acids with regularly spaced hydrophobic residues that bind the export karyopherin CRM1. NES-containing proteins are involved in numerous cellular and disease processes. We compiled a database named NESdb that contains 221 NES-containing CRM1 cargoes that were manually curated from the published literature. Each NESdb entry is annotated with information about sequence and structure of both the NES and the cargo protein, as well as information about experimental evidence of NES-mapping and CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NESdb will be updated regularly and will serve as an important resource for nuclear export signals. NESdb is freely available to nonprofit organizations at http://prodata.swmed.edu/LRNes. PMID:22833564

  11. Syntheses and Reactions of Chalcogen-containing Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Sashida, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    The advances in my laboratory for the past 20-25 years concerning the chemistry of chalcogen-containing heterocycles are reviewed. The intramolecular cyclization of the chalcogenols (-TeH, -SeH, -SH) into a triple bond or appropriate leaving group produced various chalcogen-containing heterocycles. The reactions of the obtained products were examined: the reactions of 1-benzo- and 2-benzopyrylium salts containing a tellurium or selenium element with several nucleophiles, including alkoxides, amines, the cyanide ion, an active methyl compound (acetone), Grignard reagents, copper reagents, and tin reagents, along with hydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions, provided corresponding chromes or isochromes having various functional groups at the 2- or 1-C position. Isothiocyanate and isoselenocyanate were used as chalcogen sources for the preparation of five- or six-membered heterocycles. In addition, double intramolecular cyclization, ring-expansion reactions, electrophilic cyclization and iodocyclization were also carried out. PMID:27252064

  12. Analysis of EF-hand-containing proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Day, Irene S; Reddy, Vaka S; Shad Ali, Gul; Reddy, ASN

    2002-01-01

    Background In plants, calcium (Ca2+) has emerged as an important messenger mediating the action of many hormonal and environmental signals, including biotic and abiotic stresses. Many different signals raise cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), which in turn is thought to regulate cellular and developmental processes via Ca2+-binding proteins. Three out of the four classes of Ca2+-binding proteins in plants contain Ca2+-binding EF-hand motif(s). This motif is a conserved helix-loop-helix structure that can bind a single Ca2+ ion. To identify all EF-hand-containing proteins in Arabidopsis, we analyzed its completed genome sequence for genes encoding EF-hand-containing proteins. Results A maximum of 250 proteins possibly having EF-hands were identified. Diverse proteins, including enzymes, proteins involved in transcription and translation, protein- and nucleic-acid-binding proteins and a large number of unknown proteins, have one or more putative EF-hands. Phylogenetic analysis identified six major groups that contain some families of proteins. Conclusions The presence of EF-hand motif(s) in a diversity of proteins is consistent with the involvement of Ca2+ in regulating many cellular and developmental processes. Thus far, only 47 of the possible 250 EF-hand proteins have been reported in the literature. Various domains that we identified in many of the uncharacterized EF-hand-containing proteins should help in elucidating their cellular role(s). Our analyses suggest that the Ca2+ messenger system is widely used in plants and that EF-hand-containing proteins are likely to be the key transducers mediating Ca2+ action. PMID:12372144

  13. Process for disposal of aqueous solutions containing radioactive isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Colombo, Peter; Neilson, Jr., Robert M.; Becker, Walter W.

    1979-01-01

    A process for disposing of radioactive aqueous waste solutions whereby the waste solution is utilized as the water of hydration to hydrate densified powdered portland cement in a leakproof container; said waste solution being dispersed without mechanical inter-mixing in situ in said bulk cement, thereafter the hydrated cement body is impregnated with a mixture of a monomer and polymerization catalyst to form polymer throughout the cement body. The entire process being carried out while maintaining the temperature of the components during the process at a temperature below 99.degree. C. The container containing the solid polymer-impregnated body is thereafter stored at a radioactive waste storage dump such as an underground storage dump.

  14. In vivo evaluation of matrix pellets containing nanocrystalline ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Vergote, G J; Vervaet, C; Van Driessche, I; Hoste, S; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Jain, R A; Ruddy, S; Remon, J P

    2002-06-20

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vivo behaviour of matrix pellets formulated with nanocrystalline ketoprofen after oral administration to dogs. No significant differences in AUC-values were seen between pellet formulations containing nanocrystalline or microcrystalline ketoprofen and a commercial ketoprofen formulation (reference: Rofenid 200 Long Acting). C(max) of the formulations containing nano- or microcrystalline ketoprofen was significantly higher compared to reference, whereas t(max) was significantly lower. The in-vivo burst release observed for the spray dried nanocrystalline ketoprofen matrix pellets was reduced following compression of the pellets in combination with placebo wax/starch pellets. These matrix tablets sustained the ketoprofen plasma concentrations during 5.6 and 5.4 h for formulations containing nano- and microcrystalline ketoprofen, respectively.

  15. 27 CFR 25.182 - Kinds of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Transfer to Another Brewery of Same Ownership § 25.182 Kinds of containers. A brewer may transfer beer without payment of tax from one brewery to another brewery belonging to the same brewer (a) in the brewer's packages or (b) in...

  16. 27 CFR 25.182 - Kinds of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Transfer to Another Brewery of Same Ownership § 25.182 Kinds of containers. A brewer may transfer beer without payment of tax from one brewery to another brewery belonging to the same brewer (a) in the brewer's packages or (b) in...

  17. 27 CFR 25.182 - Kinds of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Transfer to Another Brewery of Same Ownership § 25.182 Kinds of containers. A brewer may transfer beer without payment of tax from one brewery to another brewery belonging to the same brewer (a) in the brewer's packages or (b) in...

  18. 27 CFR 25.182 - Kinds of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Transfer to Another Brewery of Same Ownership § 25.182 Kinds of containers. A brewer may transfer beer without payment of tax from one brewery to another brewery belonging to the same brewer (a) in the brewer's packages or (b) in...

  19. 27 CFR 25.182 - Kinds of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Transfer to Another Brewery of Same Ownership § 25.182 Kinds of containers. A brewer may transfer beer without payment of tax from one brewery to another brewery belonging to the same brewer (a) in the brewer's packages or (b) in...

  20. Recent progress in 3-D imaging of sea freight containers

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Theobald Schön, Tobias Sukowski, Frank; Dittmann, Jonas; Hanke, Randolf

    2015-03-31

    The inspection of very large objects like sea freight containers with X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is an emerging technology. A complete 3-D CT scan of a see-freight container takes several hours. Of course, this is too slow to apply it to a large number of containers. However, the benefits of a 3-D CT for sealed freight are obvious: detection of potential threats or illicit cargo without being confronted with legal complications or high time consumption and risks for the security personnel during a manual inspection. Recently distinct progress was made in the field of reconstruction of projections with only a relatively low number of angular positions. Instead of today’s 500 to 1000 rotational steps, as needed for conventional CT reconstruction techniques, this new class of algorithms provides the potential to reduce the number of projection angles approximately by a factor of 10. The main drawback of these advanced iterative methods is the high consumption for numerical processing. But as computational power is getting steadily cheaper, there will be practical applications of these complex algorithms in a foreseeable future. In this paper, we discuss the properties of iterative image reconstruction algorithms and show results of their application to CT of extremely large objects scanning a sea-freight container. A specific test specimen is used to quantitatively evaluate the image quality in terms of spatial and contrast resolution and depending on different number of projections.

  1. Recent progress in 3-D imaging of sea freight containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Theobald; Schön, Tobias; Dittmann, Jonas; Sukowski, Frank; Hanke, Randolf

    2015-03-01

    The inspection of very large objects like sea freight containers with X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is an emerging technology. A complete 3-D CT scan of a see-freight container takes several hours. Of course, this is too slow to apply it to a large number of containers. However, the benefits of a 3-D CT for sealed freight are obvious: detection of potential threats or illicit cargo without being confronted with legal complications or high time consumption and risks for the security personnel during a manual inspection. Recently distinct progress was made in the field of reconstruction of projections with only a relatively low number of angular positions. Instead of today's 500 to 1000 rotational steps, as needed for conventional CT reconstruction techniques, this new class of algorithms provides the potential to reduce the number of projection angles approximately by a factor of 10. The main drawback of these advanced iterative methods is the high consumption for numerical processing. But as computational power is getting steadily cheaper, there will be practical applications of these complex algorithms in a foreseeable future. In this paper, we discuss the properties of iterative image reconstruction algorithms and show results of their application to CT of extremely large objects scanning a sea-freight container. A specific test specimen is used to quantitatively evaluate the image quality in terms of spatial and contrast resolution and depending on different number of projections.

  2. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.; Costello, J.F.

    1998-04-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11--12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented.

  3. Conversion of synthesis gas with iron-containing catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Butter, S.A.; Chester, A.W.

    1981-03-10

    A method is disclosed for the conversion of synthesis gas to a liquid hydrocarbon product having a boiling range of less than 400* F. at a 90% overhead utilizing a novel catalyst prepared from a water-insoluble organic iron compound. The novel method involves contacting synthesis gas with a single particle catalyst containing iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica-to-alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 angstrom units, and a constraint index of about 1 to 12, and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters.

  4. Fabrication of Iron-Containing Carbon Materials From Graphite Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh

    1996-01-01

    Carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, iron oxide or iron halide were fabricated. Typical samples of these metals were estimated to contain 1 iron atom per 3.5 to 5 carbon atoms. Those carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, and/or Fe3O4 were magnetic. The kinetics of the fabrication process were studied by exposing graphite fluoride (CF(0.68)) to FeCl3 over a 280 to 420 C temperature range. Between 280 and 295 C, FeCl3 quickly entered the structure of CF(0.68), broke the carbon-fluorine bonds, and within 10 to 30 min, completely converted it to carbon made up of graphite planes between which particles of crystalline FeF3 and noncrystalline FeCl3 were located. Longer reaction times (e.g., 28 hr) or higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 420 C) produced materials containing graphite, a FeCl3-graphite intercalation compound, FeCl2(center dot)4H2O, and FeCl2(center dot)2H2O. These products were further heat treated to produce iron-containing carbon materials. When the heating temperature was kept in the 750 to 850 C range, and the oxygen supply was kept at the optimum level, the iron halides in the carbon structure were converted to iron oxides. Raising the heat to temperatures higher than 900 C reduced such iron oxides to iron metal. The kinetics of these reactions were used to suggest processes for fabricating carbon materials containing iron alloy. Such processes were then tested experimentally. In one of the successful trial runs, commercially purchased CF(0.7) powder was used as the reactant, and NiO was added during the final heating to 1200 C as a source of both nickel and oxygen. The product thus obtained was magnetic and was confirmed to be a nickel-iron alloy in carbon.

  5. COMPARATIVE CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF TWO PALLADIUM CONTAINING TITANIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lian, T. Yashiki, T. Nakayama, T. Nakanishi, R. B. Rebak

    2006-07-23

    The ASTM standard B 265 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of titanium (Ti) alloys. It is planned to use corrosion resistant and high strength titanium alloys to fabricate the drip shield at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Titanium grade (Gr) 7 (R52400) and other Ti alloys are currently being characterized for this application. Ti Gr 7 contains 0.15% Palladium (Pd) to increase its corrosion performance. In this article we report results on the comparative short term corrosion behavior of Ti Gr 7 and a Ruthenium (Ru) containing alloy (Ti Gr 33). Ti Gr 33 also contains a small amount of Pd. Limited electrochemical testing such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic curves showed that both alloys have a similar corrosion behavior in the tested environments.

  6. Comparative Corrosion Behavior of Two Palladium Containing Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Yashiki, T; Nakayama, T; Nakanishi, T; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    The ASTM standard B 265 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of titanium (Ti) alloys. It is planned to use corrosion resistant and high strength titanium alloys to fabricate the drip shield at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Titanium grade (Gr) 7 (R52400) and other Ti alloys are currently being characterized for this application. Ti Gr 7 contains 0.15% Palladium (Pd) to increase its corrosion performance. In this article we report results on the comparative short term corrosion behavior of Ti Gr 7 and a Ruthenium (Ru) containing alloy (Ti Gr 33). Ti Gr 33 also contains a small amount of Pd. Limited electrochemical testing such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic curves showed that both alloys have a similar corrosion behavior in the tested environments.

  7. In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Varvel, Mark Darrell

    2005-12-27

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  8. In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Varvel, Mark Darrell

    2005-12-27

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  9. A case of taurine-containing drink induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Lee, Suh-Young; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Young; Yang, Min-Suk; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Sae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Taurine is one of most abundant free amino acids in mammalian tissue. It has been used for various health functional foods as a main ingredient in food industry. A 33-year-old female patient repeatedly experienced generalized itching, urticaria, dyspnea and dizziness after drinking taurine-containing drinks. The patient showed positive response to oral challenge tests with taurine-containing drinks. The patient also showed positive response with synthetic taurine but not with natural taurine. Skin prick test and basophil activation test with the synthetic taurine were negative. To our knowledge, there has been no report of taurine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. We herein report the first case of taurine-containing drink induced anaphylaxis, especially by synthetic taurine.

  10. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  11. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  12. High-Resolution Fractionation of Signaling Endosomes Containing Different Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Gretchen; Welker, Jonathan; Scott, Jessica; van Der Salm, Louise; Grimes, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Receptor endocytosis is regulated by ligand binding, and receptors may signal after endocytosis in signaling endosomes. We hypothesized that signaling endosomes containing different types of receptors may be distinct from one another and have different physical characteristics. To test this hypothesis, we developed a high-resolution organelle fractionation method based on mass and density, optimized to resolve endosomes from other organelles. Three different types of receptors undergoing ligand-induced endocytosis were localized predominately in endosomes that were resolved from one another using this method. Endosomes containing activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), TrkA and EGFR, were similar to one another. Endosomes containing p75NTR (in the tumor necrosis receptor superfamily) and PAC1 (a G-protein-coupled receptor) were distinct from each other and from RTK endosomes. Receptor-specific endosomes may direct the intracellular location and duration of signal transduction pathways to dictate response to signals and determine cell fate. PMID:19416476

  13. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  14. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  15. A case of taurine-containing drink induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Lee, Suh-Young; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Young; Yang, Min-Suk; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Sae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Taurine is one of most abundant free amino acids in mammalian tissue. It has been used for various health functional foods as a main ingredient in food industry. A 33-year-old female patient repeatedly experienced generalized itching, urticaria, dyspnea and dizziness after drinking taurine-containing drinks. The patient showed positive response to oral challenge tests with taurine-containing drinks. The patient also showed positive response with synthetic taurine but not with natural taurine. Skin prick test and basophil activation test with the synthetic taurine were negative. To our knowledge, there has been no report of taurine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. We herein report the first case of taurine-containing drink induced anaphylaxis, especially by synthetic taurine. PMID:23404176

  16. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  17. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING OF LIQUID AEROSOLS CONTAINING DISSOLVED ORGANICS AND ELECTROLYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many tropospheric aerosols contain large fractions of soluble organic material, believed to derive from the oxidation of precursors such alpha-pinene. The chemical composition of aerosol organic matter is complex and not yet fully understood.

    The key properties of solu...

  18. Method of using a diatomaceous earth containing absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Wollrich, G.W.

    1993-05-25

    A method of adsorbing petroleum oil from a petroleum oil containing material is described which comprises contacting said material with an effective amount of an adsorbent composition consisting essentially of sugar, vinegar, and diatomaceous earth combined in relative amounts which result in a composition capable of effectively adsorbing petroleum oil.

  19. GENERAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF ATOMIC PHYSICS OBSERVATORY WHICH CONTAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF ATOMIC PHYSICS OBSERVATORY WHICH CONTAINS THE WHITE DOME STRUCTURE. THE SHED-LIKE STRUCTURE TO THE LEFT IS THE SEARCH-LIGHT BUILDING. - Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Atomic Physics Observatory, 5241 Broad Branch Drive Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. Chemistry and biology of arabinofuranosyl- and galactofuranosyl-containing polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Houseknecht, J B; Lowary, T L

    2001-12-01

    Polysaccharides containing galactofuranosyl and arabinofuranosyl residues are key components of many microorganisms. Recent investigations have provided a greater understanding of the biosynthetic pathways by which these glycans are assembled. Concomitant with these biochemical studies, an increasing number of chemical syntheses of oligofuranosides have been reported and new methods for their assembly have been developed.

  1. 40 CFR 265.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 302. (d) Secondary containment for tanks must include one or more of the following... potential for damage to wildlife, crops, vegetation, and physical structures caused by exposure to waste...: (A) The quantity and quality of ground water and the direction of ground-water flow, (B) The...

  2. 40 CFR 265.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 302. (d) Secondary containment for tanks must include one or more of the following... potential for damage to wildlife, crops, vegetation, and physical structures caused by exposure to waste...: (A) The quantity and quality of ground water and the direction of ground-water flow, (B) The...

  3. 40 CFR 265.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 302. (d) Secondary containment for tanks must include one or more of the following... potential for damage to wildlife, crops, vegetation, and physical structures caused by exposure to waste...: (A) The quantity and quality of ground water and the direction of ground-water flow, (B) The...

  4. 40 CFR 265.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 302. (d) Secondary containment for tanks must include one or more of the following... potential for damage to wildlife, crops, vegetation, and physical structures caused by exposure to waste...: (A) The quantity and quality of ground water and the direction of ground-water flow, (B) The...

  5. Detection of Shielded Nuclear Material in a Cargo Container

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Jones; D. R. Norman; K. J. Haskell; J. W. Sterbentz; W. Y. Yoon; S. M. Watson; J. T. Johnson; J. M. Zabriskie; B. D. Bennett; R. W. Watson; J. F. Hamon

    2005-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory, along with Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center, are developing electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technologies for the detection of shielded nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This paper describes a developing prototypical cargo container inspection system utilizing the Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) technology, incorporates interchangeable, well-defined, contraband shielding structures (i.e., "calibration" pallets) providing realistic detection data for induced radiation signatures from smuggled nuclear material, and provides various shielded nuclear material detection results. Using a 4.8-kg quantity of depleted uranium, neutron and gamma-ray detection responses are presented for well-defined shielded and unshielded configurations evaluated in a selected cargo container inspection configuration. © 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved

  6. Feasibility evaluation of the universal container system: A multipurpose standardized spent-fuel container system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, N.B.; Jones, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a preliminary evaluation of the Universal Container System (UC system), and to identify issues that must be addressed by the utility industry, the Department of Energy, and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to permit a decision to be made regarding the universal container as a spent fuel storage and transfer, transport, and disposal alternative to the current spent fuel management and disposal system.

  7. Absorbent Pads for Containment, neutralization, and clean-up of environmental spills containing chemically-reactive agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A pad for cleaning up liquid spills is described which contains a porous surface covering, and an absorbent interior containing chemically reactive reagents for neutralizing noxious chemicals within the spilled liquid. The porous surface and the absorbent component would normally consist of chemically resistant materials allowing tentative spill to pass. The absorbent interior which contains the neutralizing reagents can but is not required to be chemically resilient and conducts the liquid chemically reactive reagents where the dangerous and undesirable chemicals within the chemical spill are then neutralized as well as removed from the premises.

  8. Analysis of containerized cargo in the ship container terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obhodas, Jasmina; Sudac, Davorin; Valkovic, Vladivoj; Baricevic, Martina; Franulović, Andrej; Perot, Bertrand; Carasco, Cedric; Alain, Mariani; Anne-Cecile, Raoux; El Kanawati, Wassila

    2010-07-01

    The container scanning system based on the elemental analysis of suspect cargo by use of fast 14 MeV neutrons with detection of associated alpha particle has been recently developed under the EU-FP6 "EURITRACK" project. The system is currently set-up in port of Rijeka, Croatia, to be tested and upgraded under the EU-JLS ERITR@C project. Here we present results of analysis performed on 152 screened containers selected by the Croatian Custom and detail descriptive statistical analysis of their shipping manifests. Statistics such as distribution functions of container types, type of packages, type of cargos and average cargo densities were obtained in order to establish the properties of standard cargo traffic. The analyses by using multivariate statistical approach that included principal component analysis (PCA) and between group analysis (BGA) have shown that cargo matrices can be classified as metallic (Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Ni…), ceramic-glass (Si, O) and organic (C, O, N). In this paper the organic matrices have been analysed in more detail since they are identified as most difficult because of their potential interference with main elements contained in threat materials such as explosives or drugs. Density as a discriminating factor has been included for better recognition of different types of goods.

  9. Development and assessment of the CONTAIN hybrid flow solver

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.K.; Stamps, D.W.

    1997-06-20

    A new gravitational head formulation for the treatment of stratified flows has been developed for CONTAIN, a lumped-parameter code used primarily for the analysis of postulated accidents in nuclear power plants. This new hybrid formulation is discussed and compared in this paper with the old, average-density CONTAIN formulation. In addition, these formulations are assessed against experimental data from three large-scale experiments in which stratified conditions were observed. These are the NUPEC M-8-1, Surtsey ST-3, and the HDR E11.2 experiments.

  10. In vitro toxicological characterisation of three arsenic-containing hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Meyer, S; Matissek, M; Müller, S M; Taleshi, M S; Ebert, F; Francesconi, K A; Schwerdtle, T

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic-containing hydrocarbons are one group of fat-soluble organic arsenic compounds (arsenolipids) found in marine fish and other seafood. A risk assessment of arsenolipids is urgently needed, but has not been possible because of the total lack of toxicological data. In this study the cellular toxicity of three arsenic-containing hydrocarbons was investigated in cultured human bladder (UROtsa) and liver (HepG2) cells. Cytotoxicity of the arsenic-containing hydrocarbons was comparable to that of arsenite, which was applied as the toxic reference arsenical. A large cellular accumulation of arsenic, as measured by ICP-MS/MS, was observed after incubation of both cell lines with the arsenolipids. Moreover, the toxic mode of action shown by the three arsenic-containing hydrocarbons seemed to differ from that observed for arsenite. Evidence suggests that the high cytotoxic potential of the lipophilic arsenicals results from a decrease in the cellular energy level. This first in vitro based risk assessment cannot exclude a risk to human health related to the presence of arsenolipids in seafood, and indicates the urgent need for further toxicity studies in experimental animals to fully assess this possible risk.

  11. 40 CFR 264.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL... of hazardous waste or hazardous constituents to the environment, secondary containment that meets the...) For tank systems that store or treat materials that become hazardous wastes, within two years of...

  12. 21. INTERIOR DETAIL OF TON CONTAINER DEMILITARIZATION EQUIPMENT IN BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR DETAIL OF TON CONTAINER DEMILITARIZATION EQUIPMENT IN BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A VORTEX CONTAINMENT COMBUSTOR FOR COAL COMBUSTION SYTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a vortex containment combustor (VCC) for coal combustion systems, designed to solve major problems facing the conversion of oil- and gas-fired boilers to coal (e.g., derating, inorganic impurities in coal, and excessive formation of NOx and...

  14. 16. INTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING MESTACORLISS CROSSCOMPOUND ENGINE, FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING MESTA-CORLISS CROSS-COMPOUND ENGINE, FOR 40" BLOOMING MILL. THIS VIEW IS TAKEN FROM THE HIGH-PRESSURE SIDE OF THE ENGINE SHOWING THE SERVICE PLATFORM - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  15. PCM thermal energy storage in cylindrical containers of various configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Mujumdar, A.S.; Ali Ashraf, F.; Menon, A.S.; Weber, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental measurements are reported for the time variation of surface-averaged rate of heat storage during melting in single, thin-walled cylindrical containers of copper filled with a commercially available paraffin wax. For the wax used the enthalpy-temperature curve was obtained using a differential scanning calorimeter according to the ASTM method. 12 refs.

  16. Investigation of Drainage and Plant Growth from Nursery Container Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of water and major nutrients lost through drainage from a nursery container substrate treated with different amounts of nitrogen (N), phosphate (P), and potassium (K), and potted with butterfly bush plants were investigated. The substrate was mainly composed of aged pine bark and steamed...

  17. Development of fiber shields for engine containment. [mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, R. J.; Davidson, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were conducted in translational launchers and spin pits to generate empirical data used in the design of a Kevlar shield for containing engine burst debris. Methods are given for modeling the relationship of fragment characteristics to shielding requirements. The change in relative importance of shield mounting provisions as fragment energy is increased is discussed.

  18. Syntheses of Cyclic Guanidine-Containing Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuyong; De, Saptarshi; Chen, Chuo

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring guanidine derivatives frequently display medicinally useful properties. Among them, the higher order pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids, the dragmacidins, the crambescidins/batzelladines, and the saxitoxins/tetradotoxins have stimulated the development of many new synthetic methods over the past decades. We provide here an overview of the syntheses of these cyclic guanidine-containing natural products. PMID:25684829

  19. Redox chromophore compounds and electrodes of metal containing substituted bipyridines

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Cecil M.; Redepenning, Jody G.

    1986-01-01

    Chromophoric compounds, each having a wide range of distinct color changes in response to changes in the oxidation states thereof, are provided in the form of polymerizable monomers, and polymers thereof, of certain metal containing, and electron group substituted, 2,2'-bipyridine compounds.

  20. 40 CFR 264.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., it may be subject to the reporting requirements of 40 CFR part 302.] (d) Secondary containment for... damage to wildlife, crops, vegetation, and physical structures caused by exposure to waste constituents...: (A) The quantity and quality of ground water and the direction of ground-water flow, (B) The...

  1. 40 CFR 264.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., it may be subject to the reporting requirements of 40 CFR part 302.] (d) Secondary containment for... damage to wildlife, crops, vegetation, and physical structures caused by exposure to waste constituents...: (A) The quantity and quality of ground water and the direction of ground-water flow, (B) The...

  2. 40 CFR 264.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., it may be subject to the reporting requirements of 40 CFR part 302.] (d) Secondary containment for... damage to wildlife, crops, vegetation, and physical structures caused by exposure to waste constituents...: (A) The quantity and quality of ground water and the direction of ground-water flow, (B) The...

  3. 40 CFR 264.193 - Containment and detection of releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., it may be subject to the reporting requirements of 40 CFR part 302.] (d) Secondary containment for... damage to wildlife, crops, vegetation, and physical structures caused by exposure to waste constituents...: (A) The quantity and quality of ground water and the direction of ground-water flow, (B) The...

  4. Discriminability of tryptophan containing dipeptides using quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonina, S.; Nenadl, O.; Rondi, A.; Bonacina, L.; Extermann, J.; Kiselev, D.; Dolamic, I.; Burgi, T.; Wolf, J. P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that the coherent manipulation of molecular wavepackets in the excited states of trp-containing dipeptides allows efficient discrimination among them. Optimal dynamic discrimination fails, however, for some dipeptide couples. When considering the limited spectral resources at play (3 nm bandwidth at 266 nm), we discuss the concept of discriminability, which appears uncorrelated to both static spectra and relaxation lifetimes.

  5. 9 CFR 381.105 - Export certification; marking of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Export certification; marking of containers. 381.105 Section 381.105 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE..., except in case of error in the certificate or loss of the certificate originally issued. A request for...

  6. The leeway of shipping containers at different immersion levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Øyvind; Allen, Arthur A.; Maisondieu, Christophe; Roth, Jens-Christian; Forest, Bertrand

    2012-05-01

    The leeway of 20-ft containers in typical distress conditions is established through field experiments in a Norwegian fjord and in open-ocean conditions off the coast of France with a wind speed ranging from calm to 14 m s-1. The experimental setup is described in detail, and certain recommendations were given for experiments on objects of this size. The results are compared with the leeway of a scaled-down container before the full set of measured leeway characteristics are compared with a semianalytical model of immersed containers. Our results are broadly consistent with the semianalytical model, but the model is found to be sensitive to choice of drag coefficient and makes no estimate of the crosswind leeway of containers. We extend the results from the semianalytical immersion model by extrapolating the observed leeway divergence and estimates of the experimental uncertainty to various realistic immersion levels. The sensitivity of these leeway estimates at different immersion levels are tested using a stochastic trajectory model. Search areas are found to be sensitive to the exact immersion levels, the choice of drag coefficient, and somewhat less sensitive to the inclusion of leeway divergence. We further compare the search areas, thus, found with a range of trajectories estimated using the semianalytical model with only perturbations to the immersion level. We find that the search areas calculated without estimates of crosswind leeway and its uncertainty will grossly underestimate the rate of expansion of the search areas. We recommend that stochastic trajectory models of container drift should account for these uncertainties by generating search areas for different immersion levels and with the uncertainties in crosswind and downwind leeway reported from our field experiments.

  7. Rapid Identification and Verification of Indirubin-Containing Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhigang; Tu, Yuan; Xia, Ye; Cheng, Peipei; Sun, Wei; Shi, Yuhua; Guo, Licheng; He, Haibo; Xiong, Chao; Chen, Shilin; Zhang, Xiuqiao

    2015-01-01

    Indirubin, one of the key components of medicinal plants including Isatis tinctoria, Polygonum tinctorium, and Strobilanthes cusia, possesses great medicinal efficacy in the treatment of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML). Due to misidentification and similar name, materials containing indirubin and their close relatives frequently fall prey to adulteration. In this study, we selected an internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) for distinguishing these indirubin-containing species from five of their usual adulterants, after assessing identification efficiency of matK, rbcL, psbA-trnH, and ITS2 among these species. The results of genetic distances and neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree indicated that ITS2 region is a powerful DNA barcode to accurately identify these indirubin-containing species and discriminate them from their adulterants. Additionally, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to verify indirubin in different organs of the above species. The results showed that indirubin had been detected in the leaves of Is. tinctoria, P. tinctorium, S. cusia, and Indigo Naturalis (made from their mixture), but not in their roots, or in the leaves of their adulterants. Therefore, this study provides a novel and rapid method to identify and verify indirubin-containing medicinal plants for effective natural treatment of CML. PMID:26089942

  8. Development and assessment of the CONTAIN hybrid flow solver

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.K.; Stamps, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    A new gravitational head formulation for the treatment of stratified conditions has been developed for CONTAIN 1.2, a control volume code used primarily for the analyses of postulated accidents in nuclear power plants. The new CONTAIN formulation of gravitational heads, termed the hybrid formulation, is described. This method of calculating stratified conditions is compared with the old, average-density formulation used in code versions prior to CONTAIN 1.2. Both formulations are assessed in this report with experimental data from three large-scale experiments in which stratified conditions formed by injection of a buoyant gas were observed. In general, the hybrid formulation gives a substantially higher degree of stratification than the old formulation. For stable, fully developed stratifications, the hybrid formulation also gives much better agreement with the measured degree of stratification than the old formulation. In addition, the predicted degree of stratification is robust and not sensitive to nodalization, provided a set of nodalization guidelines are followed. However, for stratification behavior controlled by special physics not modeled in CONTAIN, such as momentum convection, plume entrainment, or bulk molecular diffusion, one should not expect good agreement with experiment unless special measures to accommodate the missing physics are taken.

  9. Thermographic inspection of pipes, tanks, and containment liners

    SciTech Connect

    Renshaw, Jeremy B. Muthu, Nathan; Lhota, James R.; Shepard, Steven M.

    2015-03-31

    Nuclear power plants are required to operate at a high level of safety. Recent industry and license renewal commitments aim to further increase safety by requiring the inspection of components that have not traditionally undergone detailed inspected in the past, such as tanks and liners. NEI 09-14 requires the inspection of buried pipes and tanks while containment liner inspections are required as a part of license renewal commitments. Containment liner inspections must inspect the carbon steel liner for defects - such as corrosion - that could threaten the pressure boundary and ideally, should be able to inspect the surrounding concrete for foreign material that could be in contact with the steel liner and potentially initiate corrosion. Such an inspection requires a simultaneous evaluation of two materials with very different material properties. Rapid, yet detailed, inspection results are required due to the massive size of the tanks and containment liners to be inspected. For this reason, thermal NDE methods were evaluated to inspect tank and containment liner mockups with simulated defects. Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) was utilized to enhance the images and provide detailed information on the sizes and shapes of the observed defects. The results show that thermographic inspection is highly sensitive to the defects of interest and is capable of rapidly inspecting large areas.

  10. Transcutol containing vesicles for topical delivery of minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Mura, Simona; Manconi, Maria; Valenti, Donatella; Sinico, Chiara; Vila, Amparo Ofelia; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of Transcutol (Trc) to produce elastic vesicles with soy lecithin (SL) and study the influence of the obtained vesicles on in vitro (trans)dermal delivery of minoxidil. To this purpose, so-called penetration enhancer-containing vesicles (PEVs) were prepared using Trc aqueous solutions (5-10-20-30% v/v) as hydrophilic phase. SL liposomes, without Trc, were used as control. Prepared formulations were characterized in terms of size distribution, morphology, zeta potential, deformability, and rheological behavior. The influence of the obtained PEVs on (trans)dermal delivery of minoxidil was studied by in vitro diffusion experiments through pig skin. Results showed that all prepared PEVs were able to give good entrapment efficiency (E%≈67) similar to that of conventional liposomes. Trc-containing PEVs showed to be more deformable than liposomes only when minoxidil was loaded in 5 and 10% Trc-containing vesicles. Rheological studies showed that PEVs have higher fluidity than conventional liposomes. All PEVs showed a higher stability than liposomes as shown by studying zeta potential and size distribution during three months. Results of in vitro diffusion experiments showed that Trc-containing PEVs are able to deliver minoxidil to deep skin layers without any transdermal permeation. PMID:20446805

  11. Thermographic inspection of pipes, tanks, and containment liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Lhota, James R.; Muthu, Nathan; Shepard, Steven M.

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear power plants are required to operate at a high level of safety. Recent industry and license renewal commitments aim to further increase safety by requiring the inspection of components that have not traditionally undergone detailed inspected in the past, such as tanks and liners. NEI 09-14 requires the inspection of buried pipes and tanks while containment liner inspections are required as a part of license renewal commitments. Containment liner inspections must inspect the carbon steel liner for defects - such as corrosion - that could threaten the pressure boundary and ideally, should be able to inspect the surrounding concrete for foreign material that could be in contact with the steel liner and potentially initiate corrosion. Such an inspection requires a simultaneous evaluation of two materials with very different material properties. Rapid, yet detailed, inspection results are required due to the massive size of the tanks and containment liners to be inspected. For this reason, thermal NDE methods were evaluated to inspect tank and containment liner mockups with simulated defects. Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) was utilized to enhance the images and provide detailed information on the sizes and shapes of the observed defects. The results show that thermographic inspection is highly sensitive to the defects of interest and is capable of rapidly inspecting large areas.

  12. 75 FR 20299 - Garnishment of Accounts Containing Federal Benefit Payments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ...Treasury, SSA, VA, RRB and OPM (Agencies) are publishing for comment a proposed rule to implement statutory restrictions on the garnishment of Federal benefit payments. The Agencies are taking this action in response to recent developments in technology and debt collection practices that have led to an increase in the freezing of accounts containing Federal benefit payments. The proposed rule......

  13. Nickel container of highly-enriched uranium bodies and sodium

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, Walter H.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel element comprises highly a enriched uranium bodies coated with a nonfissionable, corrosion resistant material. A plurality of these bodies are disposed in layers, with sodium filling the interstices therebetween. The entire assembly is enclosed in a fluid-tight container of nickel.

  14. Influence of shading on container-grown flowering dogwoods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bare root dogwoods can be successfully grown when transplanted into a container production system. Shade treatments regardless of color or density did have an effect on the plant growth of Cherokee Brave™ and Cherokee Princess dogwood. Plants grown under 50% black and 50% white shade had more heigh...

  15. 21 CFR 1230.41 - Delivery of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Delivery of containers. 1230.41 Section 1230.41 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER...

  16. 21 CFR 1230.41 - Delivery of containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Delivery of containers. 1230.41 Section 1230.41 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS UNDER...

  17. 13. INTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING MESTACORLISS CROSSCOMPOUND ENGINE, FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING MESTA-CORLISS CROSS-COMPOUND ENGINE, FOR 40" BLOOMING MILL. THIS VIEW HIGHLIGHTS THE CRANK AND 24' DIAMETER FLYWHEEL. - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  18. Photolysis of Indole-Containing Mycotoxins to Fluorescent Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photochemical reaction of the non-fluorescent mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to fluorescent products was recently reported. Because CPA contains an indole moiety, believed to contribute to the fluorescence, it was of interest to determine whether the effect might be more generally applicable to ...

  19. Composite Vessels for Containment of Extreme Blast Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J; Henning, C; Grundler, W; Switzer, V; Hollaway, R; Morrison, J; Hagler, L; Kokko, E; Deteresa, S; Hathcoat, B; Dalder, E

    2004-07-15

    A worldwide trend for explosives testing has been to replace open-air detonations with containment vessels, especially when any hazardous materials are involved. As part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) effort to ensure the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been developing a high performance filament wound composite firing vessel that is nearly radiographically transparent. It was intended to contain a limited number of detonations of metal cased explosive assemblies in radiographic facilities such as the Advanced Hydrodynamic Facility (AHF) being studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory. A 2-meter diameter pressure vessel was designed to contain up to 35 kg (80 lb) of TNT equivalent explosive without leakage. Over the past 5 years a total of three half-scale (1 meter diameter) vessels have been constructed, and two of them were tested to 150% load with 8.2 kg (18-pound) spheres of C4 explosive. The low density and high specific strength advantages used in this composite vessel design may have other additional applications such as transporting sensitive explosives that could otherwise be moved only in very small quantities. Also, it could be used for highly portable, explosive containment systems for law enforcement.

  20. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  1. A Characterization of Banach Spaces Containing l1

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Haskell P.

    1974-01-01

    It is proved that a Banach space contains a subspace isomorphic to l1 if (and only if) it has a bounded sequence with no weak-Cauchy subsequence. The proof yields that a sequence of subsets of a given set has a subsequence that is either convergent or Boolean independent. PMID:16592162

  2. Leaching of Silver from Silver-Impregnated Food Storage Containers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Niece, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of silver in commercial products has proliferated in recent years owing to its antibacterial properties. Food containers impregnated with micro-sized silver promise long food life, but there is some concern because silver can leach out of the plastic and into the stored food. This laboratory experiment gives students the opportunity to…

  3. 36 CFR 4.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a motor vehicle parked at an authorized campsite where the motor vehicle's occupant(s) are camping... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a motor vehicle is responsible for complying with the provisions of this section that pertain to...

  4. The genome of RNA tumor viruses contains polyadenylic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Cartas, M

    1972-04-01

    The 70S genome of two RNA tumor viruses, murine sarcoma virus and avian myeloblastosis virus, binds to Millipore filters in buffer with high salt concentration and to glass fiber filters containing poly(U). These observations suggest that 70S RNA contains adenylic acid-rich sequences. When digested by pancreatic RNase, 70S RNA of murine sarcoma virus yielded poly(A) sequences that contain 91% adenylic acid. These poly(A) sequences sedimented as a relatively homogenous peak in sucrose gradients with a sedimentation coefficient of 4-5 S, but had a mobility during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis that corresponds to molecules that sediment at 6-7 S. If we estimate a molecular weight for each sequence of 30,000-60,000 (100-200 nucleotides) and a molecular weight for viral 70S RNA of 3-12 million, each viral genome could contain 1-8 poly(A) sequences. Possible functions of poly(A) in the infecting viral RNA may include a role in the initiation of viral DNA or RNA synthesis, in protein maturation, or in the assembly of the viral genome.

  5. The Safety of Small Containers for Flammable Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Edward S.

    1988-01-01

    Highlights aspects of safety that are unfamiliar to most laypersons and to many chemists as well. Presents findings that may lend themselves to presentation in chemistry classes. Details flammability tests, vapor space hazards, and the special case of gasoline containers. Provides experimental data relating vent area and internal pressure. (CW)

  6. Transformation of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Parshikov, Igor A; Silva, Eliane O; Furtado, Niege A J C

    2014-02-01

    The saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds include many drugs and compounds that may be used as synthons for the synthesis of other pharmacologically active substances. The need for new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles for organic synthesis, biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry, including optically active derivatives, has increased interest in microbial synthesis. This review provides an overview of microbial technologies that can be valuable to produce new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles, including hydroxylated derivatives. The chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity of microbial processes can be indispensable for the synthesis of new compounds. Microbial processes carried out with fungi, including Beauveria bassiana, Cunninghamella verticillata, Penicillium simplicissimum, Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Rhodococcus erythropolis, biotransform many substrates efficiently. Among the biological activities of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds are antimicrobial, antitumor, antihypertensive and anti-HIV activities; some derivatives are effective for the treatment and prevention of malaria and trypanosomiasis, and others are potent glycosidase inhibitors.

  7. Influence of Container Mulches on Irrigation and Nutrient Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment was conducted in 2005 and repeated in 2006 to determine the influence of mulch products and controlled release fertilizer (CRF) placement on irrigation and nutrition requirements of container-grown crops. Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla 'Fasan' and 'Endless Summer') were grown in 2.7...

  8. 24. VIEW OF BOXES CONTAINING SOLENOIDS AND HYDRAULIC PUMP CONTRACTORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW OF BOXES CONTAINING SOLENOIDS AND HYDRAULIC PUMP CONTRACTORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DOORS AND BREAKERS FOR RECEPTACLES ON SEVERAL STATIONS. BOXES LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3W MST STATION 63. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. TESTING AND ANALYSES OF CHAT AND ASPHALT-CONTAINING CHAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular mine waste are generated from the extraction and beneficiation of lead/zinc minerals. The fine gravel waste, commonly known as chat, in the Tristate Mining District contains elevated levels of lead, zinc and cadmium which can result in potentially serious human health a...

  10. Improved Synthesis of a Dimethylfuran-Containing Macrolide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthetic pathway to the furan-containing macrolide pheromone of Galerucella beetles was shortened from 13 steps in the original synthesis to 10 steps, and the overall yield was increased greater than six fold. A concise Reformatsky-based sequence of reactions was utilized to construct the key ...

  11. Synthesis of a dimethylfuran-containing macrolide insect pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthetic pathway to the furan-containing macrolide pheromone of Galerucella beetles was shortened from 13 steps in the original synthesis to 10 steps, and the overall yield was increased greater than six fold. A concise Reformatsky-based sequence of reactions was utilized to construct the key ...

  12. Computer Simulation in Mass Emergency and Disaster Response: An Evaluation of Its Effectiveness as a Tool for Demonstrating Strategic Competency in Emergency Department Medical Responders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the capability of computer simulation as a tool for assessing the strategic competency of emergency department nurses as they responded to authentically computer simulated biohazard-exposed patient case studies. Thirty registered nurses from a large, urban hospital completed a series of computer-simulated case studies of…

  13. Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    Nondestructive detection of the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste is accomplished by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solifified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

  14. Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1985-01-01

    A method of nondestructively detecting the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solidified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

  15. External Corrosion Analysis of Model 9975 Packaging Container

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P.

    1999-02-23

    The Materials Consultation Group of SRTC has completed an external corrosion analysis of the Model 9975 packaging container for storage in K Reactor under ambient conditions for a period of 12 years. The 12-year storage period includes two years for shipping and ten years for storage. Based on review of existing literature and stated building storage conditions, corrosion degradation of the 304L Stainless Steel (SS) packaging container (drum and vessels) should be minimal during the 12 year time period. There may be visible corrosion on the galvanized carbon steel pallet due to initial drum handling. The visible corrosion will not be sufficient to cause significant degradation during the 12-year storage period. The Materials Consultation Group concludes that there are sufficient data to establish the technical basis for safe storage of the Model 9975 container in the 105-K building for up to 10 years following the 2-year shipping period. The data are sufficient to allow the 304L SS containers to be stored for a total period of 15 years.

  16. A stochastic killing system for biological containment of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, P; Jensen, L B; Molin, S

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria with a stochastic conditional lethal containment system have been constructed. The invertible switch promoter located upstream of the fimA gene from Escherichia coli was inserted as expression cassette in front of the lethal gef gene deleted of its own natural promoter. The resulting fusion was placed on a plasmid and transformed to E. coli. The phenotype connected with the presence of such a plasmid was to reduce the population growth rate with increasing significance as the cell growth rate was reduced. In very fast growing cells, there was no measurable effect on growth rate. When a culture of E. coli harboring the plasmid comprising the containment system is left as stationary cells in suspension without nutrients, viability drops exponentially over a period of several days, in contrast to the control cells, which maintain viability nearly unaffected during the same period of time. Similar results were obtained with a strain in which the killing cassette was inserted in the chromosome. In competition with noncontained cells during growth, the contained cells are always outcompeted. Stochastic killing obtained by the fim-gef fusion is at present relevant only as a containment approach for E. coli, but the model may be mimicked in other organisms by using species-specific stochastic expression systems. PMID:7574584

  17. Bactericidal behavior of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Ma, Yong; Lin, Naiming; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Stainless steels are one of the most common materials used in health care environments. However, the lack of antibacterial advantage has limited their use in practical application. In this paper, antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different Cu contents have been prepared by plasma surface alloying technology (PSAT). The steel surface with Cu content 90 wt.% (Cu-SS) exhibits strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) within 3 h. Although the Cu-containing surface with Cu content 2.5 wt.% (CuNi-SS) can also kill all tested bacteria, this process needs 12 h. SEM observation of the bacterial morphology and an agarose gel electrophoresis were performed to study the antibacterial mechanism of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces against E. coli. The results indicated that Cu ions are released when the Cu-containing surfaces are in contact with bacterial and disrupt the cell membranes, killing the bacteria. The toxicity of Cu-alloyed surfaces does not cause damage to the bacterial DNA. These results provide a scientific explanation for the antimicrobial applications of Cu-containing stainless steel. The surfaces with different antibacterial abilities could be used as hygienic surfaces in healthcare-associated settings according to the diverse requirement of bactericidal activities.

  18. Reliability-based condition assessment of steel containment and liners

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingwood, B.; Bhattacharya, B.; Zheng, R.

    1996-11-01

    Steel containments and liners in nuclear power plants may be exposed to aggressive environments that may cause their strength and stiffness to decrease during the plant service life. Among the factors recognized as having the potential to cause structural deterioration are uniform, pitting or crevice corrosion; fatigue, including crack initiation and propagation to fracture; elevated temperature; and irradiation. The evaluation of steel containments and liners for continued service must provide assurance that they are able to withstand future extreme loads during the service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. Rational methodologies to provide such assurances can be developed using modern structural reliability analysis principles that take uncertainties in loading, strength, and degradation resulting from environmental factors into account. The research described in this report is in support of the Steel Containments and Liners Program being conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The research demonstrates the feasibility of using reliability analysis as a tool for performing condition assessments and service life predictions of steel containments and liners. Mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors are identified, and statistical data supporting the use of these models in time-dependent reliability analysis are summarized. The analysis of steel containment fragility is described, and simple illustrations of the impact on reliability of structural degradation are provided. The role of nondestructive evaluation in time-dependent reliability analysis, both in terms of defect detection and sizing, is examined. A Markov model provides a tool for accounting for time-dependent changes in damage condition of a structural component or system. 151 refs.

  19. 76 FR 46805 - Notice of Utah Adoption by Reference of the Pesticide Container Containment Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... regulations. In accordance with State of Utah Agricultural Code, the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food... through E. The State did not request any modification to the federal PCC rules, and with this notice, the EPA Region 8, is formally announcing the adoption by reference with no modifications. FOR...

  20. 23. A SECTION OF THE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT WHICH CONTAINS BURBANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. A SECTION OF THE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT WHICH CONTAINS BURBANK ORIGINALS - QUINCES - ALONG ROAD. THE EUCALYPTUS TO THE RIGHT IS JUST OUTSIDE THE SOUTHEAST CORNER PROPERTY LINE AND WAS INDICATED ON THE 1912 BURBANK PLAN. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Avenue, Sebastopol, Sonoma County, CA

  1. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-12-01

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

  2. Synthesis and investigation of carbazoles and fluorenes containing tetrathiafulvalene core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, George G.; Shklyaeva, Elena V.; Syutkin, Roman V.; Lebedev, Konstantin Yu.; Osorgina, Irina V.; Romanova, Valentina A.; Bushueva, Anastasya Yu.

    2008-12-01

    For the first time carbazole- and fluorene-based monomers containing tetrathiafulvalene moieties were prepared. All the synthesized monomers were electrochemically polymerized in CH 3CN (CH 2Cl 2) media using (C 2H 5)N 4ClO 4 (1:1) as the supporting electrolyte. The properties of the resulting polymers were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV).

  3. View of Plum Street regulator in foreground, containing 18" vitrified ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Plum Street regulator in foreground, containing 18" vitrified clay pipe, in background are the Riverfront Park and the Route 51 Bridge. WPA retaining wall (Haer no. Pa-398) is right. - Plum Street Regulator, Plum Street at Monongahela River, Allegheny County, PA

  4. Method for inhibiting corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    Nickel-containing alloys are protected against corrosion by contacting the alloy with a molten alkali metal having dissolved therein aluminum, silicon or manganese to cause the formation of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic layer. Components can be protected by applying the coating after an apparatus is assembled.

  5. Facile synthesis of pyrazole- and benzotriazole-containing selenoethers.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Andrei S; Chernova, Nina P; Ogorodnikov, Vladimir D; Petrenko, Tatiana V; Khlebnikov, Andrei I

    2014-01-01

    Azole-containing selenoethers, 1,5-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-3-selena pentane and 1,3-bis(1,2,3-benzotriazol-1-yl)-2-selena propane were prepared by the reaction of corresponding tosylate or chloride with sodium selenide generated in situ from elemental selenium and sodium formaldehydesulfoxylate (rongalite).

  6. 36 CFR 1004.14 - Open container of alcoholic beverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or stored in a motor vehicle parked at an authorized campsite where the motor vehicle's occupant(s... beverage. 1004.14 Section 1004.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.14 Open container of alcoholic beverage. (a) Each person within a motor vehicle...

  7. 18. The west end of the dining room contains four ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. The west end of the dining room contains four windows that overlook Central Avenue. As other millwork in the restaurant, these windows were originally finished with stain and varnish. Transoms retain their original operators. Credit GADA/MRM. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. Emissions from Open burning of Used Agricultural Pesticide Containers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions from simulated open burning of used agricultural pesticide containers were sampled for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs), and particle matter (PM10 and PM2.5). Clean high density polyethyl...

  9. 18. CENTER OF SOUTH PLANT FROM TON CONTAINER RECONDITIONING BUILDING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. CENTER OF SOUTH PLANT FROM TON CONTAINER RECONDITIONING BUILDING, WITH FREE-STANDING SMOKESTACK AT LEFT FOREGROUND. VIEW TO WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. Ethanol production in fermentation of mixed sugars containing xylose

    DOEpatents

    Viitanen, Paul V.; Mc Cutchen, Carol M.; Li; Xu; Emptage, Mark; Caimi, Perry G.; Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; Franden, Mary Ann

    2009-12-08

    Xylose-utilizing Z. mobilis strains were found to have improved ethanol production when grown in medium containing mixed sugars including xylose if sorbitol or mannitol was included in the medium. The effect was seen in concentrations of mixed sugars where no growth lag period occurs, as well as in higher sugars concentrations.

  11. Irrigation timing and volume affects growth of container grown maples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Container nursery production requires large inputs of water and nutrients but frequently irrigation inputs exceed plant demand and lack application precision or are not applied at optimal times for plant production. The results from this research can assist producers in developing irrigation manage...

  12. PRESERVATION OF SULFIDIC WATERS CONTAINING DISSOLVED AS (III)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solutions containing variable concentrations of sulfide (p to31 ppm) and arsenite (0.35 to 10 ppm) were subjected to several different preservation treatments. As predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics, at near-neutral pH the experimental solutions were undersaturated with resp...

  13. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    PubMed Central

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  14. Assessment of respiration activity and ecotoxicity of composts containing biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Kopeć, Michał; Gondek, Krzysztof; Baran, Agnieszka

    2013-03-01

    The research was conducted to determine if introducing biodegradable polymer materials to the composting process would affect selected biological properties of mature compost. Determination of biological properties of composts composed of testing their respiration activity and toxicity. Respiration activity was measured in material from the composting process by means of OxiTop Control measuring system. The ecotoxicity of composts was estimated by means of a set of biotests composed of three microbiotests using five test organisms. Introduction of polymer materials caused a decrease in respiration activity of mature compost. Similar dependencies as in the case of mass loss were registered. Compost to which a biodegradable polymer with the highest content of starch was added revealed the smallest difference in comparison with organic material composted without polymers. Lower content of starch in a polymer caused lower respiration activity of composts, whereas microorganism vaccine might have accelerated maturing of composts, thus contributing to the smallest respiration of compost. In composts containing biopolymers the following were observed: an increase in germination inhibition--2.5 times, roots growth inhibition--1.8 times, growth inhibition of Heterocypris incongruens--four times and luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri--1.6 times in comparison with the control (compost K1). Composts containing biopolymers were classified as toxicity class III, whereas the compost without polymer addition as class II.

  15. Assessment of respiration activity and ecotoxicity of composts containing biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Kopeć, Michał; Gondek, Krzysztof; Baran, Agnieszka

    2013-03-01

    The research was conducted to determine if introducing biodegradable polymer materials to the composting process would affect selected biological properties of mature compost. Determination of biological properties of composts composed of testing their respiration activity and toxicity. Respiration activity was measured in material from the composting process by means of OxiTop Control measuring system. The ecotoxicity of composts was estimated by means of a set of biotests composed of three microbiotests using five test organisms. Introduction of polymer materials caused a decrease in respiration activity of mature compost. Similar dependencies as in the case of mass loss were registered. Compost to which a biodegradable polymer with the highest content of starch was added revealed the smallest difference in comparison with organic material composted without polymers. Lower content of starch in a polymer caused lower respiration activity of composts, whereas microorganism vaccine might have accelerated maturing of composts, thus contributing to the smallest respiration of compost. In composts containing biopolymers the following were observed: an increase in germination inhibition--2.5 times, roots growth inhibition--1.8 times, growth inhibition of Heterocypris incongruens--four times and luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri--1.6 times in comparison with the control (compost K1). Composts containing biopolymers were classified as toxicity class III, whereas the compost without polymer addition as class II. PMID:23290616

  16. Determination of optimal LWR containment design, excluding accidents more severe than Class 8

    SciTech Connect

    Cave, L.; Min, T.K.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning the restrictive effect of existing NRC requirements; definition of possible targets for containment; possible containment systems for LWR; optimization of containment design for class 3 through class 8 accidents (PWR); estimated costs of some possible containment arrangements for PWR relative to the standard dry containment system; estimated costs of BWR containment.

  17. Method of forming capsules containing a precise amount of material

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.; Maya, J.

    1986-06-24

    A method of forming a sealed capsule containing a submilligram quantity of mercury or the like, the capsule being constructed from a hollow glass tube, by placing a globule or droplet of the mercury in the tube. The tube is then evacuated and sealed and is subsequently heated so as to vaporize the mercury and fill the tube therewith. The tube is then separated into separate sealed capsules by heating spaced locations along the tube with a coiled heating wire means to cause collapse spaced locations there along and thus enable separation of the tube into said capsules. 7 figs.

  18. Method of forming capsules containing a precise amount of material

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.; Maya, Jakob

    1986-01-01

    A method of forming a sealed capsule containing a submilligram quantity of mercury or the like, the capsule being constructed from a hollow glass tube, by placing a globule or droplet of the mercury in the tube. The tube is then evacuated and sealed and is subsequently heated so as to vaporize the mercury and fill the tube therewith. The tube is then separated into separate sealed capsules by heating spaced locations along the tube with a coiled heating wire means to cause collapse spaced locations therealong and thus enable separation of the tube into said capsules.

  19. Memory operation mechanism of fullerene-containing polymer memory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Anri Fujii, Daiki

    2015-03-09

    The memory operation mechanism in fullerene-containing nanocomposite gate insulators was investigated while varying the kind of fullerene in a polymer gate insulator. It was cleared what kind of traps and which positions in the nanocomposite the injected electrons or holes are stored in. The reason for the difference in the easiness of programming was clarified taking the role of the charging energy of an injected electron into account. The dependence of the carrier dynamics on the kind of fullerene molecule was investigated. A nonuniform distribution of injected carriers occurred after application of a large magnitude programming voltage due to the width distribution of the polystyrene barrier between adjacent fullerene molecules. Through the investigations, we demonstrated a nanocomposite gate with fullerene molecules having excellent retention characteristics and a programming capability. This will lead to the realization of practical organic memories with fullerene-containing polymer nanocomposites.

  20. Bulging of cans containing plutonium residues. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Wood, D.H.; Condit, R.H.; Shikany, S.D.

    1996-03-01

    In 1994, two cans in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Plutonium Facility were found to be bulging as a result of the generation of gases form the plutonium ash residues contained in the cans. This report describes the chronology of this discovery, the response actions that revealed other pressurized cans, the analysis of the causes, the short-term remedial action, a followup inspection of the short-term storage packages, and a review of proposed long-term remedial options.

  1. Combing of Genomic DNA from Droplets Containing Picograms of Material

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of linear DNA molecules is a critical step in many single-molecule genomic approaches including DNA mapping, fiber-FISH, and several emerging sequencing technologies. In the ideal situation, the DNA that is deposited for these experiments is absolutely linear and uniformly stretched, thereby enabling accurate distance measurements. However, this is rarely the case, and furthermore, current approaches for the capture and linearization of DNA on a surface tend to require complex surface preparation and large amounts of starting material to achieve genomic-scale mapping. This makes them technically demanding and prevents their application in emerging fields of genomics, such as single-cell based analyses. Here we describe a simple and extremely efficient approach to the deposition and linearization of genomic DNA molecules. We employ droplets containing as little as tens of picograms of material and simply drag them, using a pipet tip, over a polymer-coated coverslip. In this report we highlight one particular polymer, Zeonex, which is remarkably efficient at capturing DNA. We characterize the method of DNA capture on the Zeonex surface and find that the use of droplets greatly facilitates the efficient deposition of DNA. This is the result of a circulating flow in the droplet that maintains a high DNA concentration at the interface of the surface/solution. Overall, our approach provides an accessible route to the study of genomic structural variation from samples containing no more than a handful of cells. PMID:25561163

  2. Modelling of radiation field around spent fuel container.

    PubMed

    Kryuchkov, E F; Opalovsky, V A; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Operation of nuclear reactors leads to the production of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). There are two basic strategies of SNF management: ultimate disposal of SNF in geological formations and recycle or repeated utilisation of reprocessed SNF. In both options, there is an urgent necessity to study radiation properties of SNF. Information about SNF radiation properties is required at all stages of SNF management. In order to reach more effective utilisation of nuclear materials, new fuel cycles are under development based on uranium-plutonium, uranium-thorium and some other types of nuclear fuel. These promising types of nuclear fuel are characterised by quite different radiation properties at all the stages of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) listed above. So, comparative analysis is required for radiation properties of different nuclear fuel types at different NFC stages. The results presented here were obtained from the numerical analysis of the radiation field around transport containers of different SNF types and in SNF storage. The calculations are carried out with the application of the computer code packages SCALE-4.3 and MCNP-4C. Comparison of the dose parameters obtained for different models of the transport container with experimental data allowed us to make certain conclusions about the errors of numerical results caused by the approximate geometrical description of the transport container. PMID:16604702

  3. Acoustic properties of a crack containing magmatic or hydrothermal fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    We estimate the acoustic properties of a crack containing maginatic or hydrothermal fluids to quantify the source properties of long-period (LP) events observed in volcanic areas assuming that a crack-like structure is the source of LP events. The tails of synthetic waveforms obtained from a model of a fluid-driven crack are analyzed by the Sompi method to determine the complex frequencies of one of the modes of crack resonance over a wide range of the model parameters ??/a and ??f/??s, where ?? is the P wave velocity of the rock matrix, a is the sound speed of the fluid, and ??f and ??s are the densities of the fluid and rock matrix, respectively. The quality factor due to radiation loss (Qr) for the selected mode almost monotonically increases with increasing ??/a, while the dimensionless frequency (??) of the mode decreases with increasing ??/a and ??f/??s. These results are used to estimate Q and ?? for a crack containing various types of fluids (gas-gas mixtures, liquid-gas mixtures, and dusty and misty gases) for values of a, ??f, and quality factor due to intrinsic losses (Qi) appropriate for these types of fluids, in which Q is given by Q-1 = Qr-1 + Qi-1. For a crack containing such fluids, we obtain Q ranging from almost unity to several hundred, which consistently explains the wide variety of quality factors measured in LP events observed at various volcanoes. We underscore the importance of dusty and misty gases containing small-size particles with radii around 1 ??m to explain long-lasting oscillations with Q significantly larger than 100. Our results may provide a basis for the interpretation of spatial and temporal variations in the observed complex frequencies of LP events in terms of fluid compositions beneath volcanoes. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Remediation of ground water containing volatile organic compounds and tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.N.; Folsom, E.N.

    1994-03-01

    The Trailer 5475 (T-5475) East Taxi Strip Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California was used as a taxi strip by the US Navy to taxi airplanes to the runway from 1942 to 1947. Solvents were used in some unpaved areas adjacent to the East Taxi Strip for cleaning airplanes. From 1953 through 1976, the area was used to store and treat liquid waste. From 1962 to 1976 ponds were constructed and used for evaporation of liquid waste. As a result, the ground water in this area contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and tritium. The ground water in this area is also known to contain hexavalent chromium that is probably naturally occurring. Therefore, LLNL has proposed ``pump-and-treat`` technology above grade in a completely closed loop system. The facility will be designed to remove the VOCs and hexavalent chromium, if any, from the ground water, and the treated ground water containing tritium will be reinjected where it will decay naturally in the subsurface. Ground water containing tritium will be reinjected into areas with equal or higher tritium concentrations to comply with California regulations.

  5. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-02-22

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

  6. Model suicide vector for containment of genetically engineered microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bej, A K; Perlin, M H; Atlas, R M

    1988-10-01

    A model suicide vector (pBAP19h), designed for the potential containment of genetically engineered microorganisms, was made by constructing a plasmid with the hok gene, which codes for a lethal polypeptide, under the control of the lac promoter. The vector plasmid also codes for carbenicillin resistance. In the absence of carbenicillin, induction of the hok gene in vitro caused elimination of all detectable cells containing the suicide vector; pBAP19h-free cells of the culture survived and grew exponentially. In the presence of carbenicillin, however, the number of cells containing pBAP19h initially declined after induction of hok but then multiplied exponentially. The surviving cells still had a fully functional hok gene and had apparently developed resistance to the action of the Hok polypeptide. Thus, high selective pressure against the loss of the suicide vector led to a failure of the system. Soil microcosm experiments confirmed the ability of a suicide vector to restrict the growth of a genetically engineered microorganism in the absence of selective pressure against the loss of the plasmid, with 90 to 99% elimination of hok-bearing cells within 24 h of hok induction. However, some pBAP19h-bearing cells survived in the soil microcosms after hok induction. The surviving cells contained an active hok gene but were not capable of normal growth even after elimination of the hok gene; it appears that a mutation that made them Hok resistant also reduced their capacity for membrane functions needed for energy generation and exponential cell growth. Thus, the model suicide vector was shown to be functional in soil as well as in vitro.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3060017

  7. Formulation of vaccines containing CpG oligonucleotides and alum

    PubMed Central

    Aebig, Joan A.; Mullen, Gregory E. D.; Dobrescu, Gelu; Rausch, Kelly; Lambert, Lynn; Ajose-Popoola, Olubunmi; Long, Carole A.; Saul, Allan; Miles, Aaron P.

    2007-01-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides are potent immunostimulants. For parenterally delivered alum based vaccines, the immunostimulatory effect of CpG depends on the association of the CpG and antigen to the alum. We describe effects of buffer components on the binding of CPG 7909 to aluminum hydroxide (Alhydrogel), assays for measuring binding of CPG 7909 to alum and CPG 7909 induced dissociation of antigen from the alum. Free CPG 7909 is a potent inducer of IP-10 in mice. However the lack of IP-10 production from formulations containing bound CPG 7909 suggested that CPG 7909 does not rapidly dissociate from the alum after injection. It also suggests that IP-10 assays are not a good basis for potency assays for alum based vaccines containing CPG 7909. PMID:17512533

  8. Characterization and antibacterial properties of porous fibers containing silver ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaoyang; Fan, Chenxu; Tang, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Jianghui; Song, Yanhua; Shao, Zhongbiao; Xu, Lan

    2016-11-01

    Materials prepared on the base of bioactive silver compounds have become more and more popular. In the present work, the surface morphology, structure and properties, of electrospun Polylactide Polylactic acid (PLA) porous fibers containing various ratios of silver ions were investigated by a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), universal testing machine, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and et al. The biological activities of the proposed porous fibers were discussed in view of the released silver ions concentration. Antibacterial properties of these porous fibers were studied using two bacterial strains: Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Results of the antibacterial testing suggested that PLA porous fibers containing silver ions could be used as potent antibacterial wound dressing materials in the biomedical field.

  9. Measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D.E.

    1986-06-01

    This thesis reports a measurement of the average lifetime of hadrons containing bottom quarks. It is based on data taken with the DELCO detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. The decays of hadrons containing bottom quarks are tagged in hadronic events by the presence of electrons with a large component of momentum transverse to the event axis. Such electrons are identified in the DELCO detector by an atmospheric pressure Cherenkov counter assisted by a lead/scintillator electromagnetic shower counter. The lifetime measured is 1.17 psec, consistent with previous measurements. This measurement, in conjunction with a limit on the non-charm branching ratio in b-decay obtained by other experiments, can be used to constrain the magnitude of the V/sub cb/ element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix to the range 0.042 (+0.005 or -0.004 (stat.), +0.004 or -0.002 (sys.)), where the errors reflect the uncertainty on tau/sub b/ only and not the uncertainties in the calculations which relate the b-lifetime and the element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix.

  10. The Rupture Behaviour Of Woven Fabrics Containing Kevlar Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, N.; Qu, J.; Darley, M.; Lingard, S.

    2012-07-01

    Woven fabrics containing high performance fibres are frequently used in spacecraft structures and the rupture behaviour of these fabrics heavily influences the performance of its final products. However, the initiation and propagation of a ruptured fracture in the woven fabrics is not clear and the interpretation of the results from different tear testing methods varies. Currently there is a lack of knowledge about both the characteristics of tear propagation woven fabrics containing high performance fibres such as Kevlar and the influence of the fabric structural parameters on the rupture behaviour of the fabrics; this knowledge gap creates difficulties for the engineering design and selection of suitable fabric materials to meet specific requirements in each application case involving such woven fabrics. In this paper, the tear propagations in a polyurethane-coated woven fabric containing Kevlar fibres based on two different tear testing standards are examined; the mechanism of tear propagation in woven fabrics and the influences of tear testing design on the interpretation of the results from different tear testing methods are discussed. It is expected that the results will guide both the engineering design of Kevlar woven fabric structures and the evaluation of the fabric performance.

  11. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  12. Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  13. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR NON-FUEL COMPONENTS DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) non-fuel components disposal container system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  14. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR CANISTERED SNF DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) canistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333PY ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  15. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR NAVAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) naval spent nuclear fuel disposal container system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMF 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  16. Decay constants of pseudoscalar mesons containing heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, V. S.; Yamawaki, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    The QCD sum-rules of Shifman et al. for n-th order moments are applied to the determination of the decay constants of pseudoscalar mesons containing a heavy quark (c or b). The general case when Q/sup 2/, the squared momentum transfer, is non-zero is considered. The stability of the sum-rules against variations in both Q/sup 2/ and n is discussed.

  17. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR DISPOSAL CONTAINER HANDLING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) disposal container handling system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-O333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  18. 68. VIEW OF CONSOLE CONTAINING OPERATIONS AND CHECKOUT, RANGE SAFETY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. VIEW OF CONSOLE CONTAINING OPERATIONS AND CHECKOUT, RANGE SAFETY, AND BATTERY CLOCK PANELS SHOWING INDEPENDENT POWER SUPPLY IN CABINETS BENEATH PANELS. FOOT PEDAL FOR CONTROLLING COMMUNICATIONS HEADSET VISIBLE IN FRONT OF LEFT CABINET. THIS CONSOLE LOCATED NEAR THE MIDDLE OF THE WEST WALL OF SLC-3E CONTROL ROOM. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. Endovascular Repair of Contained Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Robert; Loosemore, Tom; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of stent-grafts for the treatment of acute rupture of the thoracic aorta. Methods: Four patients with acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta were treated by insertion of stent-grafts. The underlying aortic lesions were aneurysm, acute aortic ulcer, acute type B dissection and giant cell aortitis. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia in three patients and local anesthesia in one patient. Results: All stent-grafts were successfully deployed. All patients survived the procedure and are now alive and well at follow-up (mean 6.3 months, range 44 days-16 months). One patient underwent a second stent procedure 10 days after the first procedure because of a proximal endoleak. All hemothoraces have resolved. There were no complications. Conclusion:Treatment of acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta by the insertion of stent-grafts is feasible. The technical success rates,complication rates and patient survival compare favorably with emergency surgery.

  20. Structure and Function of CW Domain Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Liu, Shasha; Zhang, Xinxin; Liang, Xiao; Zahid, Kashif Rafiq; Liu, Ke; Liu, Jinlin; Deng, Lingfu; Yang, Jihong; Qi, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The CW domain is a zinc binding domain, composed of approximately 50- 60 amino acid residues with four conserved cysteine (C) and two to four conserved tryptophan (W) residues. The members of the superfamily of CW domain containing proteins, comprised of 12 different eukaryotic nuclear protein families, are extensively expressed in vertebrates, vertebrate-infecting parasites and higher plants, where they are often involved in chromatin remodeling, methylation recognition, epigenetic regulation and early embryonic development. Since the first CW domain structure was determined 5 years ago, structures of five CW domains have been solved so far. In this review, we will discuss these recent advances in understanding the identification, definition, structure, and functions of the CW domain containing proteins. PMID:26806410